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Sample records for monoclonal b-cell proliferation

  1. [Single B cell monoclonal antibody technologies and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contribute a lot to the development of numerous fields in life science as a pivotal tool in modern biological research. Development of the PCR methods and maturation of antibody production have made it possible to generate mAbs from single human B cells by single cell RT-PCR with successional cloning and expression in vitro. Compared to traditional monoclonal antibody technologies, single B cell technologies require relatively fewer cells, which are highly efficient in obtaining specific mAbs in a rapid way with preservation of the natural heavy and light chain pairing. With so many advantages, single B cell technologies have been proved to be an attractive approach for retrieval of naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires generated in vivo, design of rationale structure-based vaccine, evaluation and development of basic B cell biology concepts in health and autoimmunity, and prevention of infectious diseases by passive immunization and therapy for disorders. Accordingly, this review introduced recent progresses in the single B cell technologies for generating monoclonal antibodies and applications.

  2. Monoclonal paraprotein influences baseline B-cell repertoire diversity and perturbates influenza vaccination-induced B-cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tete, Sarah M.; Kipling, David; Westra, Johanna; de Haan, Aalzen; Bijl, Marc; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Sahota, Surinder S.; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) arises from a clonal expansion of plasma cells in the bone marrow, secreting monoclonal (M) paraprotein. It is associated with increased susceptibility to infections, which may reflect altered B-cell repertoire. To investigate this, we examin

  3. Monoclonal paraprotein influences baseline B-cell repertoire diversity and perturbates influenza vaccination-induced B-cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tete, Sarah M.; Kipling, David; Westra, Johanna; de Haan, Aalzen; Bijl, Marc; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Sahota, Surinder S.; Bos, Nicolaas A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) arises from a clonal expansion of plasma cells in the bone marrow, secreting monoclonal (M) paraprotein. It is associated with increased susceptibility to infections, which may reflect altered B-cell repertoire. To investigate this, we examin

  4. Antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies isolated from B cells expressing constitutively active STAT5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenc A Scheeren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5. Active STAT5 inhibits the differentiation of B cells while increasing their replicative life span. We obtained cloned B cell lines, which produced antibodies in the presence of interleukin 21 after turning off STAT5. We used this method to obtain monoclonal antibodies against the model antigen tetanus toxin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we describe a novel and relatively simple method of immortalizing antigen-specific human B cells for isolation of human monoclonal antibodies. These results show that STAT5 overexpression can be employed to isolate antigen specific antibodies from human memory B cells.

  5. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Almeida, Julia; Nieto, Wendy G; Teodosio, Cristina; Rodriguez-Caballero, Arancha; Romero, Alfonso; López, Antonio; Fernandez-Navarro, Paulino; Vega, Tomas; Perez-Andres, Martin; Valent, Peter; Jäger, Ulrich; Orfao, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) with normal lymphocyte counts is associated with decreased numbers of normal circulating B-cell subsets.Little is known about the distribution of normal lymphoid cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood (PB) of subjects with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). In our study, we compared the absolute number of PB lymphoid cells and their subpopulations in 95 MBL cases with normal lymphocyte counts vs. 617 age-/sex-matched non-MBL healthy subjects (controls), using highly sensitive flow cytometry. MBL cases showed significantly reduced numbers of normal circulating B-cells, at the expense of immature and naive B-cells; in addition, CD4+CD8+ double-positive T-cells and CD8+ T-cells were significantly lower and higher vs. controls, respectively. Moreover, most normal B-cell subsets were significantly decreased in PB at >1% MBL-counts, vs. "low-count" MBL cases, and lower amounts of immature/naive B-cells were detected in biclonal (particularly in cases with coexisting CLL-like- and non-CLL-like B-cell clones) vs. monoclonal MBL subjects. In summary, our results show imbalanced (reduced) absolute numbers of recently produced normal circulating B-cells (e.g., immature and naıve B-cells) in MBL, which becomes more pronounced as the MBL cell count increases.

  6. Circulating clonotypic B cells in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Leandro S; Perez-Andres, Martin; Balanzategui, Ana; Sarasquete, Maria E; Paiva, Bruno; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Barcena, Paloma; Sanchez, Maria Luz; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garcia-Sanz, Ramón; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell compartment in which multiple myeloma stem cells reside remains unclear. We investigated the potential presence of mature, surface-membrane immunoglobulin-positive B lymphocytes clonally related to the tumor bone marrow plasma cells among different subsets of peripheral blood B cells from ten patients (7 with multiple myeloma and 3 with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance). The presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements was determined in multiple highly-purified fractions of peripheral blood B-lymphocytes including surface-membrane IgM(+) CD27(-) naïve B-lymphocytes, plus surface-membrane IgG(+), IgA(+) and IgM(+) memory CD27(+) B cells, and normal circulating plasma cells, in addition to (mono)clonal plasma cells, by a highly-specific and sensitive allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction directed to the CDR3 sequence of the rearranged IGH gene of tumor plasma cells from individual patients. Our results showed systematic absence of clonotypic rearrangements in all the different B-cell subsets analyzed, including M-component isotype-matched memory B-lymphocytes, at frequencies undetermined significance are usually devoid of clonotypic B cells while the presence of immunophenotypically aberrant myeloma plasma cells in peripheral blood of myeloma patients is a relatively frequent finding.

  7. Cutting Edge: Regulation of TLR4-driven B cell proliferation by RP105 is not B cell-autonomous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L.; Flick, Leah M.; Divanovic, Senad; Jackson, Shaun W.; Bram, Richard; Rawlings, David J.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Karp, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanistic understanding of RP105 has been confounded by the fact that this TLR homolog has appeared to have opposing, cell type-specific effects on TLR4 signaling. While RP105 inhibits TLR4-driven signaling in cell lines and myeloid cells, impaired LPS-driven proliferation by B cells from RP105−/− mice has suggested that RP105 facilitates TLR4 signaling in B cells. We show here that modulation of B cell proliferation by RP105 is not a function of B cell-intrinsic expression of RP105, and identify a mechanistic role for dysregulated BAFF expression in the proliferative abnormalities of B cells from RP105−/− mice: serum BAFF levels are elevated in RP105−/− mice, and partial BAFF neutralization rescues aberrant B cell proliferative responses in such mice. These data indicate that RP105 does not have dichotomous effects on TLR4 signaling, and emphasize the need for caution in interpreting the results of global genetic deletion. PMID:22291190

  8. Cutting edge: regulation of TLR4-driven B cell proliferation by RP105 is not B cell autonomous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L; Flick, Leah M; Divanovic, Senad; Jackson, Shaun W; Bram, Richard; Rawlings, David J; Finkelman, Fred D; Karp, Christopher L

    2012-03-01

    Mechanistic understanding of RP105 has been confounded by the fact that this TLR homolog has appeared to have opposing, cell type-specific effects on TLR4 signaling. Although RP105 inhibits TLR4-driven signaling in cell lines and myeloid cells, impaired LPS-driven proliferation by B cells from RP105(-/-) mice has suggested that RP105 facilitates TLR4 signaling in B cells. In this article, we show that modulation of B cell proliferation by RP105 is not a function of B cell-intrinsic expression of RP105, and identify a mechanistic role for dysregulated BAFF expression in the proliferative abnormalities of B cells from RP105(-/-) mice: serum BAFF levels are elevated in RP105(-/-) mice, and partial BAFF neutralization rescues aberrant B cell proliferative responses in such mice. These data indicate that RP105 does not have dichotomous effects on TLR4 signaling and emphasize the need for caution in interpreting the results of global genetic deletion.

  9. Non-CLL-like monoclonal B-Cell lymphocytosis in the general population: Prevalence and phenotypic/genetic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Nieto (Wendy); C. Teodosio (Cristina); A. López (Antonio); A. Rodríguez-Caballero (Arancha); A. Romero (Alfonso); P. Bárcena (Paloma); M.L. Gutierrez; A.W. Langerak (Anton); P. Fernandez-Navarro (Paulino); A. Orfao; J. Almeida (Julia); A.O.M.C.C.S. Santa Marta de Tormes; B.H.P.C.S. Garrido Sur; C.L.M.T.C.S. Ledesma; C.R.J.M.C.S. Alba de Tormes; C.L.R.C.S.F. Villalobos; D.V.P.J.C.S. Peñaranda; F.E.E.C.S. Pizarrales-Vidal; G.R.B.L.C.S. La Alberca; G.S.F.C.S. Periurbana Norte; G.M.J.C.S. Guijuelo; G.M.J.M.C.S. Vitigudino; J.R.M.J.C.S. Garrido Norte; J.C.T.B.C.S. Elena Ginel Diez; M.P.M.C.S. Fuentes de Oñoro; M.L.J.C.S. San Juan; M.D.M.P.C.S. Miguel Armijo; S.A.B.C.S. Aldeadavila de La Ribera; S.P.R.C.S. San Jose

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) indicates <5 × 109peripheral blood (PB) clonal B-cells/L in healthy individuals. In most cases, MBL cells show similar phenotypic/genetic features to chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells - CLL-like MBL - but little is known about

  10. Non-CLL-like monoclonal B-Cell lymphocytosis in the general population: Prevalence and phenotypic/genetic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.G. Nieto (Wendy); C. Teodosio (Cristina); A. López (Antonio); A. Rodríguez-Caballero (Arancha); A. Romero (Alfonso); P. Bárcena (Paloma); M.L. Gutierrez; A.W. Langerak (Ton); P. Fernandez-Navarro (Paulino); A. Orfao; J. Almeida (Julia); A.O.M.C.C.S. Santa Marta de Tormes; B.H.P.C.S. Garrido Sur; C.L.M.T.C.S. Ledesma; C.R.J.M.C.S. Alba de Tormes; C.L.R.C.S.F. Villalobos; D.V.P.J.C.S. Peñaranda; F.E.E.C.S. Pizarrales-Vidal; G.R.B.L.C.S. La Alberca; G.S.F.C.S. Periurbana Norte; G.M.J.C.S. Guijuelo; G.M.J.M.C.S. Vitigudino; J.R.M.J.C.S. Garrido Norte; J.C.T.B.C.S. Elena Ginel Diez; M.P.M.C.S. Fuentes de Oñoro; M.L.J.C.S. San Juan; M.D.M.P.C.S. Miguel Armijo; S.A.B.C.S. Aldeadavila de La Ribera; S.P.R.C.S. San Jose

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) indicates <5 × 109peripheral blood (PB) clonal B-cells/L in healthy individuals. In most cases, MBL cells show similar phenotypic/genetic features to chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells - CLL-like MBL - but little is known about non-CLL-li

  11. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  12. [MALT B cell lymphoma with kidney damage and monoclonal gammopathy: a case study and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, R; Vega-Cabrera, C; Peces, C; Pobes, A; Fresno, M F

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of low-grade B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) involving the left kidney and simultaneous onset of a monoclonal gammopathy IgM kappa. No predisposing local inflammatory condition was identified. Following left nephrectomy, the renal specimen showed the centrocyte like cells and lymphoid cells in the lymphoepithelial lesions were positive for CD20 and CD79α. The neoplastic cells expressed monotypic cytoplasmic IgM kappa. The demonstration of bone marrow cells of B-lineage expressing the same monoclonal protein as the tumor suggested bone marrow involvement, even in the absence of identical morphology. Despite chemotherapy and rituximab treatment, clinical follow-up showed right kidney extension with high-grade transformation, and finally systemic dissemination. This case illustrates that the kidney is among the sites that may be involved by MALT B-cell lymphomas in a primary or secondary fashion, and the need for expanded investigation of the possible dissemination. We review the literature on this unusual extranodal lymphoma.

  13. Differential Effects of Tacrolimus versus Sirolimus on the Proliferation, Activation and Differentiation of Human B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opas Traitanon

    Full Text Available The direct effect of immunosuppressive drugs calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus, TAC and mTOR inhibitor (Sirolimus, SRL on B cell activation, differentiation and proliferation is not well documented. Purified human B cells from healthy volunteers were stimulated through the B Cell Receptor with Anti-IgM + anti-CD40 + IL21 in the absence / presence of TAC or SRL. A variety of parameters of B cell activity including activation, differentiation, cytokine productions and proliferation were monitored by flow cytometry. SRL at clinically relevant concentrations (6 ng/ml profoundly inhibited CD19(+ B cell proliferation compared to controls whereas TAC at similar concentrations had a minimal effect. CD27(+ memory B cells were affected more by SRL than naïve CD27- B cells. SRL effectively blocked B cell differentiation into plasma cells (CD19(+CD138(+ and Blimp1(+/Pax5(low cells even at low dose (2 ng/ml, and totally eliminated them at 6 ng/ml. SRL decreased absolute B cell counts, but the residual responding cells acquired an activated phenotype (CD25(+/CD69(+ and increased the expression of HLA-DR. SRL-treated stimulated B cells on a per cell basis were able to enhance the proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+CD25(- T cells and induce a shift toward the Th1 phenotype. Thus, SRL and TAC have different effects on B lymphocytes. These data may provide insights into the clinical use of these two agents in recipients of solid organ transplants.

  14. Efficient Methods To Isolate Human Monoclonal Antibodies from Memory B Cells and Plasma Cells.

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    Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    In this article, we highlight the advantages of isolating human monoclonal antibodies from the human memory B cells and plasma cell repertoires by using high-throughput cellular screens. Memory B cells are immortalized with high efficiency using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in the presence of a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist, while plasma cells are maintained in single-cell cultures by using interleukin 6 (IL-6) or stromal cells. In both cases, multiple parallel assays, including functional assays, can be used to identify rare cells that produce antibodies with unique properties. Using these methods, we have isolated potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies against a variety of viruses, in particular, a pan-influenza-A-neutralizing antibody and an antibody that neutralizes four different paramyxoviruses. Given the high throughput and the possibility of directly screening for function (rather than just binding), these methods are instrumental to implement a target-agnostic approach to identify the most effective antibodies and, consequently, the most promising targets for vaccine design. This approach is exemplified by the identification of unusually potent cytomegalovirus-neutralizing antibodies that led to the identification of the target, a pentameric complex that we are developing as a candidate vaccine.

  15. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... peripheral blood lymphocytes caused by the low abundance of antigen-specific B cells in the circulation. The preselection of B cells is based on the specificity of the surface Ig receptor and is accomplished using the antigen of interest conjugated to magnetic beads. This method should significantly increase...

  16. The RP105/MD-1 complex is indispensable for TLR4/MD-2-dependent proliferation and IgM-secreting plasma cell differentiation of marginal zone B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yoshinori; Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Kariyone, Ai; Ohta, Shoichiro; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Kimoto, Masao; Miyake, Kensuke; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Marginal zone (MZ) B cells mount rapid T-cell-independent (T-I) immune responses against microbial components such as LPS. While Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is essential for LPS responses, MZ B cells uniquely express high levels of another LPS sensor Radioprotective 105 (RP105). However, little is known about how RP105 is used by MZ B cells. In this study, we investigated TLR4- or RP105-dependent MZ B cell responses by utilizing agonistic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to each receptor. Cross-linking TLR4 and RP105 at the same time with the mAbs induced robust IgM-secreting plasma cell generation as lipid A moiety of LPS. In contrast, stimulation with either mAb alone did not elicit such responses. RP105-deficient MZ B cells failed to produce IgM-secreting plasma cells in response to lipid A. TLR4 or lipid A stimulation of MZ B cells up-regulated their B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp-1) and X-box-binding protein 1 (Xbp-1) mRNA expression. RP105 stimulation alone did not give these responses and in fact decreased TLR4-mediated their expression. Compared with wild-type (WT) MZ B cells, RP105-deficient MZ B cells exhibited increased levels of Blimp-1 and Xbp-1 mRNA expression in response to lipid A. Lipid A or TLR4 plus RP105 stimulation induced massive proliferation and expression of Bcl-xL and c-Myc in WT but not RP105-deficient MZ B cells. These responses contributed to TLR4-mediated anti-apoptotic responses in MZ B cells. Thus, RP105 contributes in a unique way to the TLR4-dependent survival, proliferation and plasma cell generation of MZ B cells.

  17. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  18. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  19. APE/Ref-1 makes fine-tuning of CD40-induced B cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Sonia; Gri, Giorgia; Gattei, Valter; Pagano, Michele; Pucillo, Carlo

    2008-08-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease-1/Redox factor-1, a multifunctional DNA base excision repair and redox regulation enzyme, plays an important role in oxidative signalling, transcription factor regulation, and cell cycle control. Recently, we have demonstrated that following the triggering of CD40 on B cells, APE/Ref-1 translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and regulates the activity of B cell-specific transcription factors. In the present paper we investigate whether APE/Ref-1 plays a role in controlling CD40-mediated B cell proliferation too. We demonstrate a concurrent increase in proliferation and decrease in apoptosis of primary mouse B cells activated by CD40 cross-linking and transfected with functional APE/Ref-1 antisense oligonucleotide. Moreover, we provide evidence that a redox-mediated signalling mechanism is involved in this process and we propose that APE/Ref-1, controlling the intracellular redox state, may also affect the cell cycle by inducing nucleus-cytoplasm redistribution of p21. Together, these findings suggest that APE/Ref-1 could act as a negative regulator in an adaptive response to elevated ROS levels following CD40 cross-linking. Considering the important role of ROS and APE/Ref-1 in CD40-mediated B cell proliferation, our data will contribute to understand the mechanisms of tumor escape and suggest APE/Ref-1 as a novel target for tumor therapeutic approaches.

  20. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiura, Yoshihito [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kotani, Norihiro, E-mail: kotani@kochi-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Yamashita, Ryusuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamamoto, Harumi [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kozutsumi, Yasunori [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Honke, Koichi [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  1. Hospital population screening reveals overrepresentation of CD5(-) monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of IgM type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigtlaender, Minna; Vogler, Birthe; Trepel, Martin; Panse, Jens; Jung, Roman; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Bacher, Ulrike; Binder, Mascha

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) result from clonal expansions of mature B or plasma cells. Here, we set out to determine the immunophenotypic/monoclonal immunoglobulin (M protein) features and co-prevalence of MBL and MGUS in a hospital-based cohort of 1909 non-hematooncological patients. Of the evaluable cases, 3.8 % showed evidence for MBL by immunophenotyping, while 9.8 % were screened positive for M protein by immunofixation. With six concomitant cases (0.4 %), MBL and MGUS were not statistically associated. At least in two of these coincident cases, MBL and MGUS were of different clonal origin since both clones had divergent light chain restriction. CD5(-) MBL (57.1 %) and IgM+ MGUS (24.7 %) were strikingly overrepresented compared to population-based screenings and did not progress to overt lymphoma or myeloma during the observation period (mean follow-up of 117 weeks or 110 weeks, respectively). Prevalence and phenotypes suggest that a substantial proportion of incidental MBL and MGUS in hospitalized patients may be attributed to transiently expanded B-cell clones in the context of disease-related immune stimulation rather than reflecting veritable precursors of clonal B-cell malignancies.

  2. The MHV68 M2 protein drives IL-10 dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Andrea M; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Speck, Samuel H

    2008-04-01

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) establishes long-term latency in memory B cells similar to the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). EBV encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10) homolog and modulates cellular IL-10 expression; however, the role of IL-10 in the establishment and/or maintenance of chronic EBV infection remains unclear. Notably, MHV68 does not encode an IL-10 homolog, but virus infection has been shown to result in elevated serum IL-10 levels in wild-type mice, and IL-10 deficiency results in decreased establishment of virus latency. Here we show that a unique MHV68 latency-associated gene product, the M2 protein, is required for the elevated serum IL-10 levels observed at 2 weeks post-infection. Furthermore, M2 protein expression in primary murine B cells drives high level IL-10 expression along with increased secretion of IL-2, IL-6, and MIP-1alpha. M2 expression was also shown to significantly augment LPS driven survival and proliferation of primary murine B cells. The latter was dependent on IL-10 expression as demonstrated by the failure of IL10-/- B cells to proliferate in response to M2 protein expression and rescue of M2-associated proliferation by addition of recombinant murine IL-10. M2 protein expression in primary B cells also led to upregulated surface expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25) and the activation marker GL7, along with down-regulated surface expression of B220, MHC II, and sIgD. The cells retained CD19 and sIgG expression, suggesting differentiation to a pre-plasma memory B cell phenotype. These observations are consistent with previous analyses of M2-null MHV68 mutants that have suggested a role for the M2 protein in expansion and differentiation of MHV68 latently infected B cells-perhaps facilitating the establishment of virus latency in memory B cells. Thus, while the M2 protein is unique to MHV68, analysis of M2 function has revealed an important role for IL-10 in MHV68 pathogenesis-identifying a

  3. The MHV68 M2 protein drives IL-10 dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M Siegel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 establishes long-term latency in memory B cells similar to the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein Barr Virus (EBV. EBV encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10 homolog and modulates cellular IL-10 expression; however, the role of IL-10 in the establishment and/or maintenance of chronic EBV infection remains unclear. Notably, MHV68 does not encode an IL-10 homolog, but virus infection has been shown to result in elevated serum IL-10 levels in wild-type mice, and IL-10 deficiency results in decreased establishment of virus latency. Here we show that a unique MHV68 latency-associated gene product, the M2 protein, is required for the elevated serum IL-10 levels observed at 2 weeks post-infection. Furthermore, M2 protein expression in primary murine B cells drives high level IL-10 expression along with increased secretion of IL-2, IL-6, and MIP-1alpha. M2 expression was also shown to significantly augment LPS driven survival and proliferation of primary murine B cells. The latter was dependent on IL-10 expression as demonstrated by the failure of IL10-/- B cells to proliferate in response to M2 protein expression and rescue of M2-associated proliferation by addition of recombinant murine IL-10. M2 protein expression in primary B cells also led to upregulated surface expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25 and the activation marker GL7, along with down-regulated surface expression of B220, MHC II, and sIgD. The cells retained CD19 and sIgG expression, suggesting differentiation to a pre-plasma memory B cell phenotype. These observations are consistent with previous analyses of M2-null MHV68 mutants that have suggested a role for the M2 protein in expansion and differentiation of MHV68 latently infected B cells-perhaps facilitating the establishment of virus latency in memory B cells. Thus, while the M2 protein is unique to MHV68, analysis of M2 function has revealed an important role for IL-10 in MHV68 pathogenesis

  4. A robust high throughput platform to generate functional recombinant monoclonal antibodies using rabbit B cells from peripheral blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Seeber

    Full Text Available We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal.

  5. A robust high throughput platform to generate functional recombinant monoclonal antibodies using rabbit B cells from peripheral blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeber, Stefan; Ros, Francesca; Thorey, Irmgard; Tiefenthaler, Georg; Kaluza, Klaus; Lifke, Valeria; Fischer, Jens André Alexander; Klostermann, Stefan; Endl, Josef; Kopetzki, Erhard; Pashine, Achal; Siewe, Basile; Kaluza, Brigitte; Platzer, Josef; Offner, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a robust platform to generate and functionally characterize rabbit-derived antibodies using B cells from peripheral blood. The rapid high throughput procedure generates a diverse set of antibodies, yet requires only few animals to be immunized without the need to sacrifice them. The workflow includes (i) the identification and isolation of single B cells from rabbit blood expressing IgG antibodies, (ii) an elaborate short term B-cell cultivation to produce sufficient monoclonal antigen specific IgG for comprehensive phenotype screens, (iii) the isolation of VH and VL coding regions via PCR from B-cell clones producing antigen specific and functional antibodies followed by the sequence determination, and (iv) the recombinant expression and purification of IgG antibodies. The fully integrated and to a large degree automated platform (demonstrated in this paper using IL1RL1 immunized rabbits) yielded clonal and very diverse IL1RL1-specific and functional IL1RL1-inhibiting rabbit antibodies. These functional IgGs from individual animals were obtained at a short time range after immunization and could be identified already during primary screening, thus substantially lowering the workload for the subsequent B-cell PCR workflow. Early availability of sequence information permits one to select early-on function- and sequence-diverse antibodies for further characterization. In summary, this powerful technology platform has proven to be an efficient and robust method for the rapid generation of antigen specific and functional monoclonal rabbit antibodies without sacrificing the immunized animal.

  6. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3: different antigenic determinants from human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang, P; Chiang, B L; Hwang, L H; Chen, Y G; Yang, P M; Chi, W K; Chen, P J; Chen, D S

    1999-04-01

    The nonstructural (NS3) region protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) possesses major B-cell epitopes that induce antibodies after infection. To elucidate further the characteristics of these B cells and their role in the immune regulation of HCV infection, T9 (portion of NS3 region, amino acids [a.a.] 1188-1493)-specific monoclonal antibodies were derived and mapped for B-cell antigenic determinants with recombinant proteins. A total of 10 T9-specific hybridomas were generated and tested for B-cell antigenic determinants. To analyze the B-cell antigenic determinants, eight recombinant proteins including NS3-e (a.a. 1175-1334), NS3-a' (a.a. 1175-1250), NS3-a (a.a. 1251-1334), NS3-b (a.a. 1323-1412), NS3-c (a.a. 1407-1499), NS3-a/b (a.a. 1251-1412), NS3-bc (a.a. 1323-1499), and NS3-abc (a.a. 1251-1499) encoded by NS3-region internal clones were expressed and tested for immunoblotting. The data suggested IgG hybridomas recognized NS3-a, NS3-a', or NS3-b protein by immunoblotting. By contrast, the NS3-e protein bears the major antigenic determinant recognized by human sera. Half of the hybridomas were found to react with protein NS3-a', which is not a major B-cell antigenic determinant in humans. These data suggested that conformational epitopes in vivo may be important for B-cell recognition.

  7. Lenalidomide potentiates CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg-related suppression of lymphoma B-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Borycka, Ilona Sara; Nowak, Eliza; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Błachnio, Katarzyna; Biernacka, Marzena; Bujko, Mateusz; Walewski, Jan; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-03-10

    We have previously found that ex vivo expanded human CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg cells suppress proliferation of lymphoma B-cell lines. Here we demonstrate that the immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide potentiates suppression of lymphoma B-cell proliferation by freshly isolated CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs, as well as suppression by Tregs expanded polyclonally in the presence of rapamycin from CD4(+)CD25(+)T cells or CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo)T cells. The regulation of lymphoma cell proliferation by Tregs pre-expanded with "third-party" allogeneic MoDCs in the presence of rapamycin was also potentiated by lenalidomide. Lenalidomide contributed to the suppression exerted by Tregs despite concomitant downregulation of Treg proliferation. Lenalidomide did not reduce the suppression of conventional T cells by expanded Tregs. The exposure of polyclonally expanded Tregs to lenalidomide did not significantly alter their phenotype. There was no uniform pattern of lenalidomide effect on Treg-mediated regulation of lymphoma B cells freshly isolated from patients. Freshly isolated lymphoma cells activated with multimeric CD40L and IL-4 to support their survival in vitro varied in their sensitivity to lenalidomide, and the regulatory effect of Tregs on such lymphoma cells ranged from suppression to help in individual patients. Lenalidomide potentiated or attenuated Treg effects on the survival of freshly isolated lymphoma cells. A combination of lenalidomide treatment with adoptive transfer of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs or CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(lo)Tregs expanded ex vivo could be used to suppress proliferation of residual lymphoma in select patients with lymphoma responsive to the regulation by Tregs and sensitive to lenalidomide.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; RYU, CHUN JEIH

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assa...

  9. Phosphorothioate oligodeoxyribonucleotides induce in vitro proliferation of chicken B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattrang, Eva

    2009-10-15

    The study aimed to evaluate short synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODN) as inducers of proliferation of chicken peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to identify the proliferating cells. A panel of different ODN; with phosphodiester and/or phosphorothioate backbone, with and without CpG-motifs, was therefore assessed for in vitro induction of proliferation. Six complete phosphorothioate ODN induced proliferation of PBMC while the complete phosphodiester or chimeric phosphodiester/phosphorohiate ODN did not. Moreover, CpG-motifs were not essential for induction of proliferation as responses to CpG-ODN were similar to those of their GpC controls. Two stimulatory phosphorothioate ODN were also used in phosphodiester form. In this comparison, only the phosphorothioate ODN were active despite the identical nucleotide sequences of their phosphodiester counterparts. In order to deliver DNA to the cytoplasm and decrease degradation of ODN by nucleases, stimulating as well as inactive ODN were treated with lipofectin prior to induction. However, proliferative responses were not influenced by lipofectin treatment and in analogy, none of the inactive ODN induced proliferation after lipofectin treatment. Among PBMC, ODN-responding cells were identified as predominantly Bu-1, immunoglobulin and major histocompatibility complex class II expressing cells, while CD3 expressing cells were not responding. Using magnetic cell separation of Bu-1 expressing cells prior to culture it was found that Bu-1 depleted cells did not proliferate upon ODN stimulation while the Bu-1 enriched cells were able to proliferate upon this stimulus. Taken together, among ODN in the present panel, only phosphorothioate ODN induced proliferation of PBMC. Responses were induced regardless of the presence of CpG-motifs and were not influenced by addition of lipofectin. Amid the chicken PBMC, predominantly cells of a B-cell phenotype proliferated in response to ODN stimulation and they were able

  10. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Hem C.; Sun, Zhiguo; Upadhyay, Santosh K.; El-Naccache, Darine W.; Singh, Rajnish K.; Sahu, Sushil K.; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have suggested that Epithelial–Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein) is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA) encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition) during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas. PMID:27463802

  11. KSHV-Mediated Regulation of Par3 and SNAIL Contributes to B-Cell Proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hem C Jha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have suggested that Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT and transformation is an important step in progression to cancer. Par3 (partitioning-defective protein is a crucial factor in regulating epithelial cell polarity. However, the mechanism by which the latency associated nuclear antigen (LANA encoded by Kaposi's Sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV regulates Par3 and EMTs markers (Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition during viral-mediated B-cell oncogenesis has not been fully explored. Moreover, several studies have demonstrated a crucial role for EMT markers during B-cell malignancies. In this study, we demonstrate that Par3 is significantly up-regulated in KSHV-infected primary B-cells. Further, Par3 interacted with LANA in KSHV positive and LANA expressing cells which led to translocation of Par3 from the cell periphery to a predominantly nuclear signal. Par3 knockdown led to reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptotic induction. Levels of SNAIL was elevated, and E-cadherin was reduced in the presence of LANA or Par3. Interestingly, KSHV infection in primary B-cells led to enhancement of SNAIL and down-regulation of E-cadherin in a temporal manner. Importantly, knockdown of SNAIL, a major EMT regulator, in KSHV cells resulted in reduced expression of LANA, Par3, and enhanced E-cadherin. Also, SNAIL bound to the promoter region of p21 and can regulate its activity. Further a SNAIL inhibitor diminished NF-kB signaling through upregulation of Caspase3 in KSHV positive cells in vitro. This was also supported by upregulation of SNAIL and Par3 in BC-3 transplanted NOD-SCID mice which has potential as a therapeutic target for KSHV-associated B-cell lymphomas.

  12. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N;

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... apoptosis of mouse splenic B cells. This resulted from specific blockade of NF-kappa B induction, which normally inhibits apoptosis. LPS- or B cell receptor (BCR)-induced proliferation was not inhibited by these treatments, and mAb-induced association of CD40 with other B cell surface molecules did not have...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  13. Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with epstein-barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Jianjiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-driven B cell proliferation is critical to its subsequent persistence in the host and is a key event in the development of EBV-associated B cell diseases. Thus, inquiry into early cellular events that precede EBV-driven proliferation of B cells is essential for understanding the processes that can lead to EBV-associated B cell diseases. Methods Infection with high titers of EBV of mixed, primary B cells in different stages of differentiation occurs during primary EBV infection and in the setting of T cell-immunocompromise that predisposes to development of EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases. Using an ex vivo system that recapitulates these conditions of infection, we correlated expression of selected B cell-surface markers and intracellular cytokines with expression of EBV latency genes and cell proliferation. Results We identified CD23, CD58, and IL6, as molecules expressed at early times after EBV-infection. EBV differentially infected B cells into two distinct sub-populations of latently infected CD23+ cells: one fraction, marked as CD23hiCD58+IL6- by day 3, subsequently proliferated; another fraction, marked as CD23loCD58+, expressed IL6, a B cell growth factor, but failed to proliferate. High levels of LMP1, a critical viral oncoprotein, were expressed in individual CD23hiCD58+ and CD23loCD58+ cells, demonstrating that reduced levels of LMP1 did not explain the lack of proliferation of CD23loCD58+ cells. Differentiation stage of B cells did not appear to govern this dichotomy in outcome either. Memory or naïve B cells did not exclusively give rise to either CD23hi or IL6-expressing cells; rather memory B cells gave rise to both sub-populations of cells. Conclusions B cells are differentially susceptible to EBV-mediated proliferation despite expression of viral gene products known to be critical for continuous B cell growth. Cellular events, in addition to viral gene expression, likely play a

  14. Adaptation of pancreatic islet B-cells during the last third of pregnancy: regulation of B-cell function and proliferation by lactogenic hormones in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, M; Kishi, K

    1999-10-01

    In rodents, placental lactogen (PL)-I is considered to be the first trigger to enhance pancreatic islet B-cell function, and after its secretion is diminished at mid-pregnancy, PL-II takes over this role. However, little information is available on the regulation of islet B-cell function and proliferation by lactogenic hormones during the last third of pregnancy. This was the focus of the present study using rats in which pregnancy was forcibly prolonged. This rat possesses unique characteristics in that PL-I is re-secreted during the prolonged period of pregnancy and the peak concentrations in maternal circulation are comparable with those observed during mid-pregnancy in normal-pregnancy rats. Pregnancy was prolonged by successive administration of pregnant mare's serum gonadotropin (30IU/rat, s.c. on day 12) and human chorionic gonadotropin (10IU/rat, i.v. on day 14). When the insulin secretory responses to 10mmol/l glucose in islets obtained from normal-pregnancy and prolonged-pregnancy rats were tested, each insulin secretory response correlated well with the values of plasma lactogenic activity throughout the period of pregnancy and lactation. Examination of B-cell proliferation in normal-pregnancy rats showed that 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation into dividing B-cells reached a maximum on day 15 and then decreased markedly towards term. No increase in B-cell proliferation was observed on day 19 when plasma lactogenic activity reached the maximum. In prolonged-pregnancy rats, BrdU incorporation also continued to decrease as observed in normal-pregnancy rats after day 15, and then no enhancement in B-cell proliferation was observed even when the plasma lactogenic activity, including re-secreted PL-I, reached maximum. These results suggest that, in the last third of pregnancy, B-cell proliferation is no longer stimulated by lactogenic hormones in contrast to the insulin secretory response which is sustained.

  15. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine.

  16. Novel immunohistochemical monoclonal antibody against rat B cell receptor Associated Protein 31 (BAP31).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chaojun; Yan, Binyuan; Chen, Lihua; Li, Yongming; Wei, Yuying; Sun, Yuanjie; Yang, Angang; Yang, Kun; Jin, Boquan

    2009-10-01

    BAP31 is an evolutionarily conserved polytopic integral protein of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane implicated in regulating the export of selected membrane proteins from the ER to downstream compartments of the secretory pathway. BAP31 interacts with mIgD, cellubrevin, major histocompatibility complex class I, and BCL-2/BCL-X(L) and plays an important role in regulating the egress of these proteins and in apoptosis. Although BAP31 RNA is ubiquitous, the protein's anatomic localization in rat tissues has not been determined. This is partially because production of high affinity antibodies, especially monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) suitable for immunohistochemical staining, has lagged. To gain further insight into its possible functions, we generated a novel MAb specific for rat BAP31 in immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry and localized BAP31 in some rat tissues. Immunoreactivity of BAP31 was prominent in fundic glands, colon, pancreatic acinuses, and liver but not in skeleton muscle and lung. Thus, successful production of rat BAP31 monoclonal antibodies provides a new powerful tool for investigation of BAP31 function in the rat model.

  17. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  18. SPECIFIC UPTAKE OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY-CONJUGATED METHOTREXATE BY HUMAN LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIC B CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Zhenping; Yang Chunzheng; Tarunendu Ghose; Jaroslav Kralovec

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To analysis the uptake of free MTX and MTX conjugated to tumor specific monoclonal antibody by target and non-target cells. Methods: The folate antagonist methotrexate (MTX) was conjugated to two monoclonal antibodies (Mab) directed against human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), Dal B01 and Dal B02, by an active ester method. Both conjugates were more cytotoxic toward the target tumor cell line D10-1than to the non-target cell line MOLT-3, and Dal B02-MTX conjugate was more inhibitory to D10-1 cells than free MTX in a 6 h pulse exposure assay. Results: Drug uptake studies revealed that D10-1 cells took up much more Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX than free MTX. The amounts of drug taken up by D10-1 cells incubated with Dal B01 and Dal B02-conjugated MTX were always 3 to 5-fold higher than that taken up by MOLT-3 cells, although the latter took up more drug when incubated with free MTX. Furthermore, tumor cells incubated with Dal B01 or Dal B02-conjugated MTX retained much larger amounts of drug for a prolonged period of time than those incubated with free MTX.Conclusion: The enhanced specific cytotoxicity of Dal B01 and Dal B02-MTX conjugates toward target tumor cells is therefore likely due to (Ⅰ) delivery of larger amounts of MTX to target cells when the drug is conjugated to Mab;(ii) longer retention of Mab-conjugated MTX by target cells; and (iii) slow, prolonged release of MTX from the surface-bound or endocytosed conjugates, rendering them into a sustained release dosage form.

  19. Desmoids in familial adenomatous polyposis are monoclonal proliferations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, S B; Frayling, I M; Phillips, R K

    2000-02-01

    Desmoids are poorly-understood, locally aggressive, non-metastasizing fibromatoses that occur with disproportionate frequency in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Their nature is controversial with arguments for and against a neoplastic origin. Neoplastic proliferations are by definition monoclonal, whereas reactive processes originate from a polyclonal background. We examined clonality of 25 samples of desmoid tissue from 11 female FAP patients by assessing patterns of X-chromosome inactivation to calculate a clonality ratio. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a polymorphic CAG short tandem repeat (STR) sequence adjacent to a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme site within the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) gene using fluorescent-labelled primers enabled analysis of PCR products by Applied Biosystems Genescan II software. Twenty-one samples from nine patients were informative for the assay. Samples from all informative cases comprised a median of 66% (range 0-75%) clonal cells but from the six patients with a clonality ratio < or =0.5 comprised a median of 71% (65-75%) clonal cells. FAP-associated desmoid tumours are true neoplasms. This may have implications in the development of improved treatment protocols for patients with these aggressive tumours.

  20. A Pathway Switch Directs BAFF Signaling to Distinct NFκB Transcription Factors in Maturing and Proliferating B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan V. Almaden

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BAFF, an activator of the noncanonical NFκB pathway, provides critical survival signals during B cell maturation and contributes to B cell proliferation. We found that the NFκB family member RelB is required ex vivo for B cell maturation, but cRel is required for proliferation. Combined molecular network modeling and experimentation revealed Nfkb2 p100 as a pathway switch; at moderate p100 synthesis rates in maturing B cells, BAFF fully utilizes p100 to generate the RelB:p52 dimer, whereas at high synthesis rates, p100 assembles into multimeric IκBsome complexes, which BAFF neutralizes in order to potentiate cRel activity and B cell expansion. Indeed, moderation of p100 expression or disruption of IκBsome assembly circumvented the BAFF requirement for full B cell expansion. Our studies emphasize the importance of p100 in determining distinct NFκB network states during B cell biology, which causes BAFF to have context-dependent functional consequences.

  1. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma B cell-specific deficient mice have an impaired antibody response1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H.; Murant, Thomas I.; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M.; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J.; Phipps, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative functions and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring and atherosclerosis among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote antibody production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. Here, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development as well as the levels of circulating antigen-specific antibodies during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of antigen-specific antibodies and low numbers of antigen-experienced antibody-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within neither primary nor secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report to show under physiological conditions that PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and antibody production. PMID:23041568

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ B cell-specific-deficient mice have an impaired antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Thatcher, Thomas H; Murant, Thomas I; Moshkani, Safiehkhatoon; Sahler, Julie M; Bottaro, Andrea; Sime, Patricia J; Phipps, Richard P

    2012-11-15

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are members of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PPARγ, a ligand-activated transcription factor, has important anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative functions, and it has been associated with diseases including diabetes, scarring, and atherosclerosis, among others. PPARγ is expressed in most bone marrow-derived cells and influences their function. PPARγ ligands can stimulate human B cell differentiation and promote Ab production. A knowledge gap is that the role of PPARγ in B cells under physiological conditions is not known. We developed a new B cell-specific PPARγ (B-PPARγ) knockout mouse and explored the role of PPARγ during both the primary and secondary immune response. In this article, we show that PPARγ deficiency in B cells decreases germinal center B cells and plasma cell development, as well as the levels of circulating Ag-specific Abs during a primary challenge. Inability to generate germinal center B cells and plasma cells is correlated to decreased MHC class II expression and decreased Bcl-6 and Blimp-1 levels. Furthermore, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have an impaired memory response, characterized by low titers of Ag-specific Abs and low numbers of Ag-experienced, Ab-secreting cells. However, B-PPARγ-deficient mice have no differences in B cell population distribution within primary or secondary lymphoid organs during development. This is the first report, to our knowledge, to show that, under physiological conditions, PPARγ expression in B cells is required for an efficient B cell-mediated immune response as it regulates B cell differentiation and Ab production.

  3. Engagement of CD22 on B cells with the monoclonal antibody epratuzumab stimulates the phosphorylation of upstream inhibitory signals of the B cell receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, Simon; Fleischer, Sarah J; Wiedemann, Annika; Daridon, Capucine; Maloney, Alison; Shock, Anthony; Dörner, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    The binding of antigen to the B cell receptor (BCR) results in a cascade of signalling events that ultimately drive B cell activation. Uncontrolled B cell activation is regulated by negative feedback loops that involve inhibitory co-receptors such as CD22 and CD32B that exert their functions following phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs (ITIMs). The CD22-targeted antibody epratuzumab has previously been shown to inhibit BCR-driven signalling events, but its effects on ITIM phosphorylation of CD22 and CD32B have not been properly evaluated. The present study therefore employed both immunoprecipitation and flow cytometry approaches to elucidate the effects of epratuzumab on direct phosphorylation of key tyrosine (Tyr) residues on both these proteins, using both transformed B cell lines and primary human B cells. Epratuzumab induced the phosphorylation of Tyr(822) on CD22 and enhanced its co-localisation with SHP-1. Additionally, in spite of high basal phosphorylation of other key ITIMs on CD22, in primary human B cells epratuzumab also enhanced phosphorylation of Tyr(807), a residue involved in the recruitment of Grb2. Such initiation events could explain the effects of epratuzumab on downstream signalling in B cells. Finally, we were able to demonstrate that epratuzumab stimulated the phosphorylation of Tyr(292) on the low affinity inhibitory Fc receptor CD32B which would further attenuate BCR-induced signalling. Together, these data demonstrate that engagement of CD22 with epratuzumab leads to the direct phosphorylation of key upstream inhibitory receptors of BCR signalling and may help to explain how this antibody modulates B cell function.

  4. Renal small B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytic differentiation presenting with monoclonal gammopathy and disseminated intravascular coagulation syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula de Oliveira Pádua Prestes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal lymphomas are very rare. However, the kidney may be a site of metastasis, usually from a disseminated aggressive lymphoma. A 58-year-old woman was brought to the medical facility due to acute mental confusion, severe hypotension, septic shock, and signs of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Laboratory tests showed severe leukopenia, renal failure, altered liver function, and elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase levels. Protein electrophoresis revealed hypergammaglobulinemia with a monoclonal peak of IgG lambda. The clinical outcome was fulminant and the patient died less than 24 hours after admission. Autopsy revealed an indolent B-cell lymphoma with extensive plasmacytic differentiation infiltrating the right renal sinus and involving the submandibular and sublingual glands, cervical and peri-aortic lymph nodes, multiple microscopic foci in pituitary and adrenal glands, lung, breast, liver, thyroid, and bone marrow. Numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells were detected by immunohistochemistry although other histological features of IgG4-related disease were missing. There was also extensive hemorrhagic necrosis of the adrenal glands and purulent cystitis, which was probably responsible for the septic shock. The authors concluded that the kidney was most likely the primary site of the indolent lymphoma, as that was the site with the largest tumor mass. Infiltration of other organs was considered as dissemination of the disease. The differential diagnosis with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma is discussed.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Two Monoclonal Antibodies against the Same Epitope on B-Cell Receptor Associated Protein 31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Tae; Shin, Saemina; Hwang, Hyo Jeong; Kim, Min Kyu; Jung, Han-Sung; Park, Hwangseo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we showed that B-cell receptor associated protein 31 (BAP31), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane chaperone, is also expressed on the cell surface by two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) 297-D4 and 144-A8. Both MAbs recognize the same linear epitope on the C-terminal domain of BAP31, although they were independently established. Here, flow cytometric analysis showed that 144-A8 had additional binding properties to some cells, as compared to 297-D4. Quantitative antigen binding assays also showed that 144-A8 had higher antigen binding capacity than 297-D4. Affinity measurement revealed that 144-A8 had 1.54-fold higher binding affinity than 297-D4. Analysis of the heavy- and light-chain variable region sequences of two MAbs revealed that both MAbs belonged to the same heavy chain (Igh-V3660 VH3) and light chain subgroup (IGKV21) with just two amino acid differences in each framework region, indicating that both MAbs arise from the same germline origin. Seven amino acid differences were found between the complementarity determining regions (CDRs) of the two MAbs. Molecular modeling of the epitope-paratope complexes revealed that the epitope appeared to reside in closer proximity to the CDRs of 144-A8 than to those of 297-D4 with the stronger hydrogen bond interactions with the former than the latter. More interestingly, an additional hydrophobic interaction appeared to be established between the leucine residue of epitope and the paratope of 144-A8, due to the substitution of H-Tyr101 for H-Phe101 in 144-A8. Thus, the different binding specificity and affinity of 144-A8 appeared to be due to the different hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interaction induced by the alterations of amino acids in CDRs of 144-A8. The results provide molecular insights into how the binding specificities and affinities of antibodies evolve with the same epitope in different microenvironments.

  6. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale O Starkie

    Full Text Available Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive. These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking

  7. Synergy of interleukin 10 and toll-like receptor 9 signalling in B cell proliferation: Implications for lymphoma pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feist, Maren; Kemper, Judith; Taruttis, Franziska; Rehberg, Thorsten; Engelmann, Julia C; Gronwald, Wolfram; Hummel, Michael; Spang, Rainer; Kube, Dieter

    2017-03-01

    A network of autocrine and paracrine signals defines B cell homeostasis and is thought to be involved in transformation processes. Investigating interactions of these microenvironmental factors and their relation to proto-oncogenes as c-Myc (MYC) is fundamental to understand the biology of B cell lymphoma. Therefore, B cells with conditional MYC expression were stimulated with CD40L, insulin-like growth factor 1, α-IgM, Interleukin-10 (IL10) and CpG alone or in combination. The impact of forty different interventions on cell proliferation was investigated in MYC deprived cells and calculated by linear regression. Combination of CpG and IL10 led to a strong synergistic activation of cell proliferation (S-phase/doubling of total cell number) comparable to cells with high MYC expression. A synergistic up-regulation of CDK4, CDK6 and CCND3 expression by IL10 and CpG treatment was causal for this proliferative effect as shown by qRT-PCR analysis and inhibition of the CDK4/6 complex by PD0332991. Furthermore, treatment of stimulated MYC deprived cells with MLN120b, ACHP, Pyridone 6 or Ruxolitinib showed that IL10/CpG induced proliferation and CDK4 expression were JAK/STAT3 and IKK/NF-κB dependent. This was further supported by STAT3 and p65/RELA knockdown experiments, showing strongest effects on cell proliferation and CDK4 expression after double knockdown. Additionally, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed a dual binding of STAT3 and p65 to the proximal promotor of CDK4 after IL10/CpG treatment. Therefore, the observed synergism of IL10R and TLR9 signalling was able to induce proliferation in a comparable way as aberrant MYC and might play a role in B cell homeostasis or transformation. © 2016 UICC.

  8. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge.

  9. Prognostic value of miR-155 in individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and patients with B chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Shanafelt, Tait D; Ivan, Cristina; Shimizu, Masayoshi; Rabe, Kari G; Nouraee, Nazila; Ikuo, Mariko; Ghosh, Asish K; Lerner, Susan; Rassenti, Laura Z; Xiao, Lianchun; Hu, Jianhua; Reuben, James M; Calin, Steliana; You, M James; Manning, John T; Wierda, William G; Estrov, Zeev; O'Brien, Susan; Kipps, Thomas J; Keating, Michael J; Kay, Neil E; Calin, George A

    2013-09-12

    Noncoding RNAs play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). We hypothesized that microRNAs (miRs) are involved in the transition from monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) to CLL and tested miR-15a/16-1 cluster, miR-21, and miR-155 expression in purified B cells of normal individuals, individuals with MBL, and patients with CLL. When we analyzed 224 samples from 2 independent training and validation cohorts, we found that miR-155 was overexpressed in B cells from individuals with MBL, and even more so in B cells from patients with CLL, when compared with B cells from normal individuals. Furthermore, we were able to identify miR-155 in circulating microvesicles from both individuals with MBL and patients with CLL. Next, to examine the prognostic role of miR-155, we measured its expression level in plasma samples collected before treatment initiation in 228 patients with CLL. We found significantly higher miR-155 expression levels in patients who failed to achieve a complete response compared with those who experienced complete response. Our findings support the use of cellular and plasma levels of miR-155 as biomarkers for the risk of progression in individuals with MBL, as well as to identify patients with CLL who may not respond well to therapy.

  10. A novel, blocking, Fc-silent anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody prolongs nonhuman primate renal allograft survival in the absence of B cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordoba, F; Wieczorek, G; Audet, M; Roth, L; Schneider, M A; Kunkler, A; Stuber, N; Erard, M; Ceci, M; Baumgartner, R; Apolloni, R; Cattini, A; Robert, G; Ristig, D; Munz, J; Haeberli, L; Grau, R; Sickert, D; Heusser, C; Espie, P; Bruns, C; Patel, D; Rush, J S

    2015-11-01

    CD40-CD154 pathway blockade prolongs renal allograft survival in nonhuman primates (NHPs). However, antibodies targeting CD154 were associated with an increased incidence of thromboembolic complications. Antibodies targeting CD40 prolong renal allograft survival in NHPs without thromboembolic events but with accompanying B cell depletion, raising the question of the relative contribution of B cell depletion to the efficacy of anti-CD40 blockade. Here, we investigated whether fully silencing Fc effector functions of an anti-CD40 antibody can still promote graft survival. The parent anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody HCD122 prolonged allograft survival in MHC-mismatched cynomolgus monkey renal allograft transplantation (52, 22, and 24 days) with accompanying B cell depletion. Fc-silencing yielded CFZ533, an antibody incapable of B cell depletion but still able to potently inhibit CD40 pathway activation. CFZ533 prolonged allograft survival and function up to a defined protocol endpoint of 98-100 days (100, 100, 100, 98, and 76 days) in the absence of B cell depletion and preservation of good histological graft morphology. CFZ533 was well-tolerated, with no evidence of thromboembolic events or CD40 pathway activation and suppressed a gene signature associated with acute rejection. Thus, use of the Fc-silent anti-CD40 antibody CFZ533 appears to be an attractive approach for preventing solid organ transplant rejection.

  11. A Review of Obinutuzumab (GA101), a Novel Type II Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody, for the Treatment of Patients with B-Cell Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobinai, Kensei; Klein, Christian; Oya, Naoko; Fingerle-Rowson, Günter

    2017-02-01

    Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a novel, type II, glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been developed to address the need for new therapeutics with improved efficacy in patients with lymphocytic leukemia and lymphoma of B-cell origin. Obinutuzumab has a distinct mode of action relative to type I anti-CD20 antibodies, such as rituximab, working primarily by inducing direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Obinutuzumab is under investigation in a wide-ranging program of clinical trials in patients with B-cell malignancies. Efficacy as monotherapy has been reported in patients with relapsed/refractory indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) of B-cell origin. Improved outcomes have also been noted when obinutuzumab is added to chemotherapy in patients with B-cell NHL, and superiority over rituximab has been reported with combination therapy in patients with CLL. Ongoing research is focusing on developing options for chemotherapy-free treatment and on new combinations of obinutuzumab with novel targeted agents.

  12. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in a hospital-based UK population and a rural Ugandan population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, Andy C; Ssemaganda, Aloysius; de Tute, Ruth; Doughty, Chi; Newton, Darren; Vardi, Anna; Evans, Paul A S; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Owen, Roger G; Lightfoot, Tracy; Wakeham, Katie; Karabarinde, Alex; Asiki, Gershim; Newton, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Reported incidence of B-cell malignancies shows substantial geographical variation, being more common in the Americas and Europe than in Africa. This variation might reflect differences in diagnostic capability, inherited susceptibility, and infectious exposures. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a precursor lesion that can be screened for in apparently healthy people, allowing comparison of prevalence across different populations independently of health-care provision. We aimed to compare the prevalence and phenotypic characteristics of MBL in age-and-sex-matched populations from rural Uganda and the UK. In this cross-sectional study, we recruited volunteers aged at least 45 years who were seronegative for HIV-1 from the established Ugandan General Population Cohort and obtained their whole-blood samples. We also obtained blood samples from anonymised waste material of age-and-sex-matched individuals (aged >45 years, with a normal blood count and no history of cancer) in the UK. We used flow cytometry to determine the presence of MBL, defined according to standard diagnostic criteria, in the samples and compared differences in the proportion of cases with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL)-phenotype MBL and CD5-negative MBL, as well as differences in absolute monoclonal B-cell count between the two cohorts. Between Jan 15 and Dec 18, 2012, we obtained samples from 302 Ugandan volunteers and 302 UK individuals who were matched by age and sex to the Ugandan population. Overall MBL prevalence was higher in the Ugandan participants (42 [14%] individuals) than in the UK cohort (25 [8%]; p=0·038). CLL-phenotype MBL was detected in three (1%) Ugandan participants and 21 (7%) UK participants (p=0·00021); all three Ugandan participants had absolute monoclonal B-cell count below one cell per μL, whereas the 21 UK participants had a median absolute number of circulating neoplastic cells of 4·6 (IQR 2-12) cells per μL. The prevalence of CD5-negative MBL was

  13. Autoantigenic targets of B-cell receptors derived from chronic lymphocytic leukemias bind to and induce proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwick, Carsten; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Kemele, Maria; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Bühler, Andreas; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter

    2013-06-06

    Antigenic targets of the B-cell receptor (BCR) derived from malignant cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) might play a role in the pathogenesis of this neoplasm. We screened human tissue-derived protein macroarrays with antigen-binding fragments derived from 47 consecutive cases of CLL. An autoantigenic target was identified for 12/47 (25.5%) of the cases, with 3 autoantigens being the target of the BCRs from 2 patients each. Recombinantly expressed autoantigens bound specifically to the CLL cells from which the BCR used for the identification of the respective autoantigen was derived. Moreover, binding of the autoantigen to the respective leukemic cells induced a specific activation and proliferation of these cells. In conclusion, autoantigens are frequent targets of CLL-BCRs. Their specific binding to and induction of proliferation in the respective leukemic cells provide the most convincing evidence to date for the long-time hypothesized role of autoantigens in the pathogenesis of CLL.

  14. Synthesis of α-santonin derived acetyl santonous acid triazole derivatives and their bioevaluation for T and B-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangroo, Nisar A; Singh, Jasvinder; Dar, Alamgir A; Gupta, Nidhi; Chinthakindi, Praveen K; Kaul, Anpurna; Khuroo, Mohmmed A; Sangwan, Payare L

    2016-09-14

    A new series of α-santonin derived acetyl santonous acid 1,2,3-triazole derivatives were synthesised using Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cyclo-addition reaction (click chemistry approach) and evaluated for their in vitro inhibition activity on concanavalin A (ConA) induced T cell proliferation and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced B cell proliferation. Among the synthesised series, compounds 2-10 and 19 exhibited significant inhibition against ConA and LPS stimulated T-cell and B-cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner. More significantly compounds 4, 9-10 and 19 exhibited potent inhibition activity with remarkably lower cytotoxicity on the mitogen-induced T cell and B cell proliferation at 1 μM concentration. The compound 6 displayed potent immunosuppressive effects with ∼89% against LPS induced B-cell and ∼83% against ConA stimulated T-cell proliferation at 100 μM concentration without cytotoxicity. Compound 10 was more selective against B cell proliferation and exhibited 81% and 69% suppression at 100 and 1 μM concentration respectively. The present study led to the identification of several santonin analogs with reduced cytotoxicity and strong inhibition activity against the cell proliferation induced by the mitogens.

  15. A human CD5+ B cell clone that secretes an idiotype-specific high affinity IgM monoclonal antibody.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.J. van der Heijden (Roger); H. Bunschoten; A.C. Hoek (Aad); J. van Es (Johan); M. Punter; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractWe previously demonstrated the occurrence of a naturally arisen human anti-idiotypic B cell clone, that we transformed with EBV (EBV383). We show evidence that EBV383 not only expresses the CD5 surface Ag, but also contains the 2.7-kb mRNA transcript encoding this protein. In addition, w

  16. A noncognate interaction with anti-receptor antibody-activated helper T cells induces small resting murine B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    Culture of small resting allogeneic B cells (of an irrelevant haplotype) with two clones of T helper (Th) cells that were activated by the F23.1 anti-T cell receptor antibody led to the activation of B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody. Th cell supernatants by themselves had no effect...... on resting B cells (even in the presence of intact F23.1 antibody), but could induce antibody secretion by anti-Ig-preactivated B cells. Both F23.1+ clones (E9.D4 and 4.35F2) and one F23.1- clone (D2.2) could synergize with supernatants from activated E9.D4 T cells to induce B cell activation. F(ab')2...... to plastic resulted in weak T cell activation, and these T cells did not induce B cell responses. Haptenated B cell populations, although recognized by E9.D4, were not activated. Separation of T and B cells by a 0.4-micron membrane prevented T-dependent B cell activation, although Th cell-derived B cell...

  17. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong-Su, E-mail: seong-su-han@uiowa.edu [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Han, Sangwoo [Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  18. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...... of IgG and C3 fragments. Furthermore, the binding of Tg to B cells in preparations of normal blood cells was higher in HT serum than in serum from controls and correlated positively with the serum anti-Tg activity, as did the B and CD4+ T cell proliferation. Disruption of the three-dimensional structure...

  19. PI3Kδ inhibition augments the efficacy of rapamycin in suppressing proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)+ B cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, S; Wei, L; Krams, S M; Esquivel, C O; Martinez, O M

    2013-08-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) continues to be a devastating and potentially life-threatening complication in organ transplant recipients. PTLD is associated with EBV infection and can result in malignant B cell lymphomas. Here we demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway is highly activated in EBV+ B cell lymphoma lines derived from patients with PTLD. Treatment with the mTORC1 inhibitor Rapamycin (RAPA) partially inhibited the proliferation of EBV+ B cell lines. Resistance to RAPA treatment correlated with high levels of Akt phosphorylation. An mTORC1/2 inhibitor and a PI3K/mTOR dual inhibitor suppressed Akt phosphorylation and showed a greater anti-proliferative effect on EBV+ B lymphoma lines compared to RAPA. EBV+ B cell lymphoma lines expressed high levels of PI3Kδ. We demonstrate that PI3Kδ is responsible for Akt activation in EBV+ B cell lymphomas, and that selective inhibition of PI3Kδ by either siRNA, or a small molecule inhibitor, augmented the anti-proliferative effect of RAPA on EBV+ B cell lymphomas. These results suggest that PI3Kδ is a novel, potential therapeutic target for the treatment of EBV-associated PTLD and that combined blockade of PI3Kδ and mTOR provides increased efficacy in inhibiting proliferation of EBV+ B cell lymphomas.

  20. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  1. Identification of a linear B-cell epitope on the avian leukosis virus P27 protein using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofei; Qin, Liting; Zhu, Haibo; Sun, Yingjun; Cui, Xuezhi; Gao, Yadong; Qi, Xiaole; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Honglei; Gao, Yulong; Wang, Xiaomei

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an avian oncogenic retrovirus that can induce various clinical tumors. The capsid protein P27 is the group-specific antigen of ALV and has many viral antigen sites that are easy to detect. In this study, we produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb), 3A9, that is specific for the P27 protein. A series of partially overlapping peptides were screened to define (181)PPSAR(185) as the minimal linear epitope recognized by mAb 3A9. The identified epitope could be recognized by chicken anti-ALV and mouse anti-ALV P27 sera. The epitope was highly conserved among a number of ALV-A, ALV-B and ALV-J strains. MAb 3A9 might be a valuable tool for the development of new immunodiagnostic approaches for ALV, and the defined linear epitope might help further our understanding of the antigenic structure of the P27 protein.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin as probes for proliferating cells by immunofluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki, P; Ogata, K; Tan, E M

    1988-04-22

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)/cyclin is an intranuclear polypeptide antigen that is found in both normal and transformed proliferating cells. We have recently described two mouse monoclonal antibodies reacting with PCNA. In this report we describe the application of these antibodies to the study of proliferating human cells by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and by flow cytometry. A fixation/permeation procedure was developed in order to obtain satisfactory binding of monoclonal PCNA-specific antibodies to proliferating cells. This method involved fixation with 1% paraformaldehyde followed by methanol treatment. For the staining of cells in suspension with the IgM type monoclonal antibodies lysolecithin was added to the paraformaldehyde solution to achieve a better permeation by the antibody molecules. This procedure gave a good ratio of specific staining relative to the background staining. It also preserved the shape and normal architecture of the cells as judged by visual microscopic observation and by light scatter measurements using a flow cytometer. Furthermore, this fixation technique permits simultaneous labeling of DNA by propidium iodide and PCNA by monoclonal antibodies. PCNA was detected in various types of normal and transformed proliferating cells by indirect immunofluorescence. Quiescent peripheral blood mononuclear cells were PCNA-negative whereas a fraction of lectin-stimulated lymphocytes became PCNA-positive. Similarly, early passages of fetal skin fibroblasts were PCNA-positive but non-proliferating senescent fibroblasts of later passages were PCNA-negative. The association of PCNA-staining by monoclonal antibodies with cell proliferation was confirmed by flow cytometry. Simultaneous labeling of PCNA and DNA showed that the PCNA signal increased during the G1 phase of the cell cycle, reached its maximum in the S-phase, and declined during the G2/M phase. Using cell sorting we demonstrated that mitotic cells had a very low PCNA

  3. Invited article: inhibition of B cell functions: implications for neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-06-01

    B cells are involved in the pathophysiology of many neurologic diseases, either in a causative or contributory role, via production of autoantibodies, cytokine secretion, or by acting as antigen-presenting cells leading to T cell activation. B cells are clonally expanded in various CNS disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), paraneoplastic CNS disorders, or stiff-person syndrome, and are activated to produce pathogenic autoantibodies in demyelinating neuropathies and myasthenia. B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferating inducing ligand (APRIL), key cytokines for B cell survival, are strongly unregulated in MS brain and in muscles of inflammatory myopathies. Modulation of B cell functions using a series of monoclonal antibodies against CD20+ B cells or the molecules that increase B cell survival, such as BAFF/APRIL and their receptors BAFF-R, TACI, and BCMA, provide a rational approach to the treatment of the aforementioned neurologic disorders. In controlled studies, rituximab, a B cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, has been encouraging in MS and paraproteinemic anti-MAG demyelinating neuropathy, exerting long-lasting remissions. In uncontrolled series, benefit has been reported in several disorders. B cell depletion is a well-tolerated therapeutic option currently explored in the treatment of several autoimmune neurologic disorders.

  4. Lymphomagenic CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling drives malignant B-cell proliferation via cooperative NF-κB and JNK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knies, Nathalie; Alankus, Begüm; Weilemann, Andre; Tzankov, Alexandar; Brunner, Kristina; Ruff, Tanja; Kremer, Marcus; Keller, Ulrich B; Lenz, Georg; Ruland, Jürgen

    2015-12-29

    The aggressive activated B cell-like subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is characterized by aberrant B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and constitutive nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation, which is required for tumor cell survival. BCR-induced NF-κB activation requires caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 11 (CARD11), and CARD11 gain-of-function mutations are recurrently detected in human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). To investigate the consequences of dysregulated CARD11 signaling in vivo, we generated mice that conditionally express the human DLBCL-derived CARD11(L225LI) mutant. Surprisingly, CARD11(L225LI) was sufficient to trigger aggressive B-cell lymphoproliferation, leading to early postnatal lethality. CARD11(L225LI) constitutively associated with B-cell CLL/lymphoma 10 (BCL10) and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation gene 1 (MALT1) to simultaneously activate the NF-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling cascades. Genetic deficiencies of either BCL10 or MALT1 completely rescued the phenotype, and pharmacological inhibition of JNK was, similar to NF-κB blockage, toxic to autonomously proliferating CARD11(L225LI)-expressing B cells. Moreover, constitutive JNK activity was observed in primary human activated B cell-like (ABC)-DLBCL specimens, and human ABC-DLBCL cells were also sensitive to JNK inhibitors. Thus, our results demonstrate that enforced activation of CARD11/BCL10/MALT1 signaling is sufficient to drive transformed B-cell expansion in vivo and identify the JNK pathway as a therapeutic target for ABC-DLBCL.

  5. Single cell cloning and recombinant monoclonal antibodies generation from RA synovial B cells reveal frequent targeting of citrullinated histones of NETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsiero, Elisa; Bombardieri, Michele; Carlotti, Emanuela; Pratesi, Federico; Robinson, William; Migliorini, Paola; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards citrullinated antigens with generation of anti-citrullinated peptide/proteins antibodies (ACPA). Currently, the nature and source of citrullinated antigens driving the humoral autoimmune response within synovial ectopic lymphoid structures (ELS) is a crucial unknown aspect of RA pathogenesis. Here we characterised the autoreactive B-cell response of lesional B cells isolated from ELS+RA synovium. Methods Single synovial tissue CD19+cells were Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted and VH/VL Ig genes cloned to generate recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) from patients with ELS+/ACPA+RA. Results RA-rmAbs immunoreactivity analysis provided the following key findings: (1) in a chIP-based array containing 300 autoantigens and in a ‘citrullinome’ multiplex assay, a strong reactivity against citrullinated histones H2A/H2B (citH2A/H2B) was observed in ∼40% of RA-rmAbs, followed by cit-fibrinogen and cit-vimentin; (2) anti-citH2A/H2B-reactive RA-rmAbs (but not anti-citH2A/H2B negative) selectively recognised neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) from peripheral blood and/or RA joint neutrophils; (3) anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET immunobinding was dependent on affinity maturation and was completely abrogated following reversion of hypermutated IgVH/VL genes to germline sequences; (4) ELS+ (not ELS−) RA synovial tissues engrafted into Severe Combined ImmunoDeficiency (SCID) mice released human anti-citH2A/citH2B and anti-NET antibodies in association with the intra-graft expression of CXCL13 and lymphotoxin (LT)-β, two master regulators of ELS. Conclusion We provided novel evidence that B cells differentiated within synovial ELS in the RA joints frequent target deiminated proteins which could be generated during NETosis of RA synovial neutrophils including histones. Thus, NETs could represent a source of citrullinated antigens fuelling the ACPA autoimmune

  6. Toll-like receptor agonists synergize with CD40L to induce either proliferation or plasma cell differentiation of mouse B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Boeglin

    Full Text Available In a classical dogma, pathogens are sensed (via recognition of Pathogen Associated Molecular Patterns (PAMPs by innate immune cells that in turn activate adaptive immune cells. However, recent data showed that TLRs (Toll Like Receptors, the most characterized class of Pattern Recognition Receptors, are also expressed by adaptive immune B cells. B cells play an important role in protective immunity essentially by differentiating into antibody-secreting cells (ASC. This differentiation requires at least two signals: the recognition of an antigen by the B cell specific receptor (BCR and a T cell co-stimulatory signal provided mainly by CD154/CD40L acting on CD40. In order to better understand interactions of innate and adaptive B cell stimulatory signals, we evaluated the outcome of combinations of TLRs, BCR and/or CD40 stimulation. For this purpose, mouse spleen B cells were activated with synthetic TLR agonists, recombinant mouse CD40L and agonist anti-BCR antibodies. As expected, TLR agonists induced mouse B cell proliferation and activation or differentiation into ASC. Interestingly, addition of CD40 signal to TLR agonists stimulated either B cell proliferation and activation (TLR3, TLR4, and TLR9 or differentiation into ASC (TLR1/2, TLR2/6, TLR4 and TLR7. Addition of a BCR signal to CD40L and either TLR3 or TLR9 agonists did not induce differentiation into ASC, which could be interpreted as an entrance into the memory pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that PAMPs synergize with signals from adaptive immunity to regulate B lymphocyte fate during humoral immune response.

  7. Treatment of severe refractory autoimmune hemolytic anemia in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with alemtuzumab (humanized CD52 monoclonal antibody).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, C; Hansson, L; Celsing, F; Lundin, J

    2007-03-01

    Progressive B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is often complicated by autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), which in some cases may be refractory to conventional therapy such as corticosteroids, rituximab and splenectomy. We report here on 5 patients (median age 66 years, range 59-69) with advanced B-CLL, all of whom developed severe transfusion-dependent AIHA resistant to conventional therapy and received subcutaneous (SC) or intravenous (IV) alemtuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the CD52 antigen as salvage treatment for AIHA. Alemtuzumab was well tolerated with only minor 'first dose' reactions. All 5 patients responded with a >or=2.0 g/dl rise in hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, in the absence of further transfusions, after a median time of 5 weeks (range 4-7), and the mean Hb increased from 7.2 g/dl at baseline to 11.9 g/dl at end of treatment. All patients remained stable, without further AIHA episodes, after a median follow-up time of 12 months with a mean Hb of 12.5 g/dl (range 12.2-12.9). For patients with severe, refractory CLL-related AIHA, who have not previously responded to conventional therapy, alemtuzumab is an effective agent.

  8. A proliferation-inducing ligand sustains the proliferation of human naïve (CD27⁻) B cells and mediates their differentiation into long-lived plasma cells in vitro via transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor and B-cell mature antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yoshiko; Haneda, Masataka; Kadomatsu, Kenji; Kobayashi, Takaaki

    2015-06-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (PCs) contribute to humoral immunity through an undefined mechanism. Memory B cells, but not human naïve B cells, can be induced to differentiate into long-lived PCs in vitro. Because evidence links a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), a tumor necrosis factor family member, to the ability of bone marrow to mediate long-term PC survival, we reasoned that APRIL influences the proliferation and differentiation of naïve B cells. We describe here the development of a simple cell culture system that allowed us to show that APRIL sustained the proliferation of naïve human B cells and induced them to differentiate into long-lived PCs. Blocking the transmembrane activator and calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor or B-cell mature antigen shows they were required for the differentiation of naïve B cells into long-lived PCs in vitro. Our in vitro culture system will reveal new insights into the biology of long-lived PCs.

  9. Intravascular large B cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo García-Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B cell lymphoma (IVBCL is a rare type of extranodal large B cell lymphoma characterized by selective growth of lymphoma cells within the microvasculature. We present an illustrative case of intravascular B cell lymphoma suspected by the presence of a very small monoclonal B cell population identified by immunophenotype and polymerase chain reaction in bone marrow. The diagnosis was confirmed by skin biopsy.

  10. B cells as therapeutic targets in autoimmune neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2008-10-01

    B cells have a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune neurological disorders, not only as precursors of antibody-producing cells, but also as important regulators of the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation, cytokine production, and formation of ectopic germinal centers in the intermeningeal spaces. Two B-cell trophic factors-BAFF (B-cell-activating factor) and APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand)-and their receptors are strongly upregulated in many immunological disorders of the CNS and PNS, and these molecules contribute to clonal expansion of B cells in situ. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules and trophic factors provides a rational approach to the treatment of autoimmune neurological diseases. This article reviews the role of B cells in autoimmune neurological disorders and summarizes the experience to date with rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody against CD20, for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, autoimmune neuropathies, neuromyelitis optica, paraneoplastic neurological disorders, myasthenia gravis, and inflammatory myopathies. It is expected that ongoing controlled trials will establish the efficacy and long-term safety profile of anti-B-cell agents in several autoimmune neurological disorders, as well as exploring the possibility of a safe and synergistic effect with other immunosuppressants or immunomodulators.

  11. Induction of p16(INK4a) is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalska, Lenka; White, Robert E; Parker, Gillian A; Turro, Ernest; Sinclair, Alison J; Paschos, Kostas; Allday, Martin J

    2013-02-01

    To explore the role of p16(INK4a) as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a) and p14(ARF). Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT), we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) lacking active p16(INK4a) protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF)-fusion protein (p14/p16). The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a). Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a) and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a)-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a)-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a) expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a)-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  12. Induction of p16(INK4a is the major barrier to proliferation when Epstein-Barr virus (EBV transforms primary B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Skalska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available To explore the role of p16(INK4a as an intrinsic barrier to B cell transformation by EBV, we transformed primary B cells from an individual homozygous for a deletion in the CDKN2A locus encoding p16(INK4a and p14(ARF. Using recombinant EBV-BAC viruses expressing conditional EBNA3C (3CHT, we developed a system that allows inactivation of EBNA3C in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs lacking active p16(INK4a protein but expressing a functional 14(ARF-fusion protein (p14/p16. The INK4a locus is epigenetically repressed by EBNA3C--in cooperation with EBNA3A--despite the absence of functional p16(INK4a. Although inactivation of EBNA3C in LCLs from normal B cells leads to an increase in p16(INK4a and growth arrest, EBNA3C inactivation in the p16(INK4a-null LCLs has no impact on the rate of proliferation, establishing that the repression of INK4a is a major function of EBNA3C in EBV-driven LCL proliferation. This conditional LCL system allowed us to use microarray analysis to identify and confirm genes regulated specifically by EBNA3C, independently of proliferation changes modulated by the p16(INK4a-Rb-E2F axis. Infections of normal primary B cells with recombinant EBV-BAC virus from which EBNA3C is deleted or with 3CHT EBV in the absence of activating ligand 4-hydroxytamoxifen, revealed that EBNA3C is necessary to overcome an EBV-driven increase in p16(INK4a expression and concomitant block to proliferation 2-4 weeks post-infection. If cells are p16(INK4a-null, functional EBNA3C is dispensable for the outgrowth of LCLs.

  13. The effect of unlabelled monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the biodistribution of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype mAb in murine B cell lymphoma

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    Schiele, J. (Stanford University (United States). Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine); Knox, S.J. (Stanford University Medical Center (United States). Department of Radiation Oncology); Ruhl, W. (Stanford University (United States). Division of Laboratory Animal Medicine Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Goris, M.L. (Stanford University Medical Center (United States). Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    The 38C13 murine B cell lymphoma model was used to study the effect of the pre-injection of unlabelled anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the subsequent biodistribution of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype mAb. Mice with established tumors received 0-500 [mu]g of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb 24 h prior to the administration of [sup 131]I-anti-idiotype (specific), or both [sup 125]I-anti-idiotype and [sup 131]I-isotype-matched irrelevant control (non-specific) mAb. Mice were counted daily in a gamma counter and sacrificed at 2-144 h following injection. Mice were dissected and the weight and activity of the animals and organs were measured. Mice were bled periodically and circulating idiotype levels were measured using an ELISA assay. 500 [mu]g of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb increased the retention time of the specific but not the nonspecific mAb in all organs and tumor. Following pretreatment with unlabelled mAb, the cumulative tumor/whole body and tumor/normal organ ratios became similar to those of the nonspecific mAb, with concentration ratios (specific/nonspecific mAb) of approximately 1, which persisted until 96 h post injection when circulating idiotype reappears in antigen excess. In the absence of unlabelled mAb there was less retention in tumor and normal tissue. This is presumed to be due in part to decreased levels of circulating [sup 131]I-mAb secondary to rapid plasma clearance of antigen-body complexes and tumor cell mediated dehalogenation, which results when the specific mAb specifically binds the target antigen. Thus, the addition of unlabelled mAb increased the retention by decreasing the specific behavior of the anti-idiotype antibody. (author). 12 refs.; 1 fig.; 3 tabs.

  14. The truncate mutation of Notch2 enhances cell proliferation through activating the NF-κB signal pathway in the diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Zhang

    Full Text Available The Notch2 is a critical membrane receptor for B-cell functions, and also displays various biological roles in lymphoma pathogenesis. In this article, we reported that 3 of 69 (4.3% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs exhibited a truncate NOTCH2 mutation at the nucleotide 7605 (G/A in the cDNA sequence, which led to partial deletion of the C-terminal of PEST (proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain. The truncate Notch2 activated both the Notch2 and the NF-κB signals and promoted the proliferation of B-cell lymphoma cell lines, including DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Moreover, the ectopic proliferation was completely inhibited by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor. Simultaneously, PDTC also reduced the expression level of Notch2. Based on these results, we conclude that the Notch2 receptor with PEST domain truncation enhances cell proliferation which may be associated with the activation of the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling. Our results are expected to provide a possible target for new DLBCL therapies by suppressing the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling.

  15. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-28

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  16. Nfkb1 activation by the E26 transformation-specific transcription factors PU.1 and Spi-B promotes Toll-like receptor-mediated splenic B cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Stephen K H; Abbas, Ali K; Solomon, Lauren A; Groux, Gaëlle M N; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2015-05-01

    Generation of antibodies against T-independent and T-dependent antigens requires Toll-like receptor (TLR) engagement on B cells for efficient responses. However, the regulation of TLR expression and responses in B cells is not well understood. PU.1 and Spi-B (encoded by Sfpi1 and Spib, respectively) are transcription factors of the E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family and are important for B cell development and function. It was found that B cells from mice knocked out for Spi-B and heterozygous for PU.1 (Sfpi1(+/-) Spib(-/-) [PUB] mice) proliferated poorly in response to TLR ligands compared to wild-type (WT) B cells. The NF-κB family member p50 (encoded by Nfkb1) is required for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) responsiveness in mice. PUB B cells expressed reduced Nfkb1 mRNA transcripts and p50 protein. The Nfkb1 promoter was regulated directly by PU.1 and Spi-B, as shown by reporter assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Occupancy of the Nfkb1 promoter by PU.1 was reduced in PUB B cells compared to that in WT B cells. Finally, infection of PUB B cells with a retroviral vector encoding p50 substantially restored proliferation in response to LPS. We conclude that Nfkb1 transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B promotes TLR-mediated B cell proliferation.

  17. Chronic hepatitis C virus infection and lymphoproliferative disorders: mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome, monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Sciacca, Claudio; Abate, Maria Lorena; Olivero, Antonella; Rosso, Chiara; Touscoz, Giovanni Antonio; Ciancio, Alessia; Rizzetto, Mario; Smedile, Antonina

    2015-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) has been associated with lymphoproliferative disorders (LPD) such as mixed cryoglobulinemia syndrome (MCS), monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). The aim of the present study is to assess MCS, MGUS, and B-NHL prevalence in a cohort of CHC-infected patients and to evaluate the association of demographic, clinical, and virologic factors with the presence of LPDs. A total of 121 CHC patients with LPDs (50 M, 71 F; mean age 61.5 ± 11.8) and 130 CHC patients without extrahepatic manifestations (60 M, 70 F; mean age 60.4 ± 9.2) were retrospectively enrolled from a cohort of 1313 CHC patients between January 2006 and December 2013. Patients with LPDs included: 25 patients with MCS (9 M, 16 F; mean age 60.2 ± 1.4), 55 patients with MGUS (18 M, 37 F; mean age 61.3 ± 12.1), and 41 patients with B-NHL (23 M, 18F; mean age 62.5 ± 11.0) RESULTS: Patients with MCS (25/1313; 1.9%), MGUS (55/1313; 4.2%), and B-LNH (41/1313; 3.1%) did not differ in age, severity of liver disease, HCV genotype, and response to antiviral therapy. Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, a positive association was found between the presence of cirrhosis and MGUS (odds ratio [OR] = 2.8924, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2693-6.5909; P = 0.012) and between cirrhosis and B-NHL (OR = 3.9407, 95% CI 1.7226-9.0153; P = 0.001), whereas no association with MCS diagnosis emerged. Despite the pathogenetic mechanism of HCV-associated LPDs is still unclear, cirrhosis is an additional risk factor for the development of lymphoproliferative disorders in patients with chronic HCV infection. © 2014 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Distinction between Asymptomatic Monoclonal B-cell Lymphocytosis with Cyclin D1 Overexpression and Mantle Cell Lymphoma: From Molecular Profiling to Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Ana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Nonell, Lara; Salar, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Gimeno, Javier; Garcia-Garcia, Mar; Carmen Vela, Maria; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Navarro, José Tomás; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Abrisqueta, Pau; Arenillas, Leonor; Serrano, Cristina; Lloreta, Josep; Miñana, Belén; Cerutti, Andrea; Florensa, Lourdes; Orfao, Alberto; Sanz, Ferran; Solé, Francesc; Dominguez-Sola, David; Serrano, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Purpose According to current diagnostic criteria, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) encompasses the usual, aggressive variants and rare, nonnodal cases with monoclonal asymptomatic lymphocytosis, cyclin D1–positive (MALD1). We aimed to understand the biology behind this clinical heterogeneity and to identify markers for adequate identification of MALD1 cases. Experimental Design We compared 17 typical MCL cases with a homogeneous group of 13 untreated MALD1 cases (median follow-up, 71 months). We conducted gene expression profiling with functional analysis in five MCL and five MALD1. Results were validated in 12 MCL and 8 MALD1 additional cases by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in 24 MCL and 13 MALD1 cases by flow cytometry. Classification and regression trees strategy was used to generate an algorithm based on CD38 and CD200 expression by flow cytometry. Results We found 171 differentially expressed genes with enrichment of neoplastic behavior and cell proliferation signatures in MCL. Conversely, MALD1 was enriched in gene sets related to immune activation and inflammatory responses. CD38 and CD200 were differentially expressed between MCL and MALD1 and confirmed by flow cytometry (median CD38, 89% vs. 14%; median CD200, 0% vs. 24%, respectively). Assessment of both proteins allowed classifying 85% (11 of 13) of MALD1 cases whereas 15% remained unclassified. SOX11 expression by qRT-PCR was significantly different between MCL and MALD1 groups but did not improve the classification. Conclusion We show for the first time that MALD1, in contrast to MCL, is characterized by immune activation and driven by inflammatory cues. Assessment of CD38/CD200 by flow cytometry is useful to distinguish most cases of MALD1 from MCL in the clinical setting. MALD1 should be identified and segregated from the current MCL category to avoid overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. PMID:24352646

  19. Comparative in Vitro Analysis of Proliferation, Ig Secretion, and Ig Class Switching by Murine Marginal Zone and Follicular B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    FL). IgG2a, IgE, and IgA ) found in the culture supernatants. and sorted cells were immediately reanalyzed to confirm their stai oDetermination of...the Bnh ouL.EPA.Czae.nd.Snou190Ati isotspe switch of murine B cells.. J, Evp. Aed. 155:734. immunogilobulins induce death by apoptosis in WEHI -21S1 8...J. A. Boersma. and E. Claassen. 1992. Complement- Tcells in the development of an IgG and IgA antibody re- meiae folclrlclzto TidpnettPC- n sponse. J

  20. B cell helper assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Sergio; Tonti, Elena; Casorati, Giulia; Dellabona, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Activation, proliferation and differentiation of naïve B lymphocytes into memory B cells and plasma cells requires engagement of the B cell receptor (BCR) coupled to T-cell help (1, 2). T cells deliver help in cognate fashion when they are activated upon recognition of specific MHC-peptide complexes presented by B cells. T cells can also deliver help in a non-cognate or bystander fashion, when they do not find specific MHC-peptide complexes on B cells and are activated by alternative mechanisms. T-cell dependent activation of B cells can be studied in vitro by experimental models called "B cell helper assays" that are based on the co-culture of B cells with activated T cells. These assays allow to decipher the molecular bases for productive T-dependent B cell responses. We show here examples of B cell helper assays in vitro, which can be reproduced with any subset of T lymphocytes that displays the appropriate helper signals.

  1. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of direct rhenium-188-labeled anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

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    Decker, Mario de [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)], E-mail: mario.dedecker@health.wa.gov.au; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert [Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Slegers, Guido [Department of Medical Imaging of Domestic Animals, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Dierckx, Rudi A. [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University Medical Centre Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Vos, Filip de [Department of Radiopharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-15

    Alemtuzumab (Campath, Berlex) is a humanized IgG1 rat monoclonal antibody directed against the cell surface CD52 antigen, found on lymphocytes and monocytes. It is being developed for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), autoimmune disease and for the prevention of transplant rejection. This study focused on synthesis, quality control, in vitro evaluation and biodistrubution of {sup 188}Re-labeled alemtuzumab for radioimmunotherapy of B-cell CLL. {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab was synthesized using a direct radiolabeling method. Reduction of the intramolecular disulfide bonds of the antibody was performed with tris-(carboxyethyl)-phosphine (Pierce), using a 1:60 molar excess. Reaction took place at room temperature for 20 min. A PD-10 desalting column was used to purify the reduced antibody from excess phospine. Complexation and transchelation of {sup 188}ReO{sub 4}{sup -} was achieved using sodium gluconate as weak chelator and SnCl{sub 2} as reducing agent. Quality control was done using instant thin-layer chromatography. Binding assays were performed on a CD52-positive cell line (HuT-78). Female NMRI mice were injected intravenously with 20 {mu}g radiolabeled alemtuzumab and killed at preset time intervals for biodistribution studies. Tissues were dissected, weighed and counted for determination of radioactivity. Data were expressed as percentage injected activity per gram of tissue (% IA/g tissue) or as percentage injected activity (% IA). {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab was prepared achieving high radiochemical yields. Labeling efficiency of more than 95% can be obtained using optimal reaction conditions. {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab showed good in vitro stability, remaining intact at 24 h after radiolabeling. In mice, {sup 188}Re-alemtuzumab showed high uptake in the blood (25.10{+-}1.36% IA at 1 h p.i.), followed by a biexponential clearance (t{sub 1/2{alpha}}=4.790 h and t{sub 1/2{beta}}=55.45 h). Increased uptake was observed in kidneys and heart (9

  2. Interleukin 6 dependence of spontaneous in vitro differentiation of B cells from patients with IgM gammapathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, Y.; Fermand, J.P.; Schmitt, C.; Seligmann, M.; Brouet, J.C. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Paris (France)); Navarro, S.; Vainchenker, W. (Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Cretail (France))

    1990-05-01

    Blood B cells from eight patients with clonal lymphoid disorders characterized by monoclonal IgM secretion (four with malignant plasmacytic proliferation typical of Waldenstroem macroglobulinemia and four without overt lymphoid neoplasia) were found to spontaneously differentiate in vitro into plasma cells. In all instances, monoclonal plasma cells were generated from extensively purified B cells or T-cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells after a 7-day culture period, with a corresponding high rate of IgM secretion into the culture medium. This differentiation occurred in the absence of any cell proliferation process as measured by ({sup 3}H)thymidine uptake at day 2 or 4. Normal B cells did not differentiate under the same experimental conditions. Detection of interleukin 6 (IL-6) bioactivity in all patients' B-cell culture supernatants as well as of IL-6 mRNA in freshly prepared, uncultured B cells in the two cases studied by in situ hybridization suggested that IL-6 secretion by B cells may play a role in this process. Moreover, in the four patients without overt lymphoid proliferation, B-cell differentiation was significantly inhibited in the presence of anti-IL-6 antibodies. In contrast, anti-IL-6 antibodies did not preclude the differentiation into plasma cells of B cells from the four patients with bona fide Waldenstroem macroglobulinemia. These results suggest a two-step pathogenesis for such human lymphoplasmacytic clonal proliferations, the initial stage being characterized by an IL-6-dependent autocrine differentiation pathway.

  3. Clues to pathogenesis of Waldenström macroglobulinemia and immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance provided by analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement and clustering of B-cell receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varettoni, Marzia; Zibellini, Silvia; Capello, Daniela; Arcaini, Luca; Rossi, Davide; Pascutto, Cristiana; Rattotti, Sara; Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Pochintesta, Lara; Gotti, Manuel; Gaidano, Gianluca; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-11-01

    We characterized immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements and searched for clusters of stereotyped B-cell receptors in 123 patients with Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM; n = 59) or immunoglobulin M monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (IgM-MGUS) (n = 64). A productive monoclonal IGHV-D-J rearrangement was obtained in 99/123 patients (80%). Immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes were mutated in 94/99 patients (95%) with a median somatic hypermutation rate of 6.7% (2.1-14.5). Compared with the normal B-cell repertoire, patients with WM/IgM-MGUS showed an over-representation of the IGHV3 subgroup (83% vs. 55%, p < 0.0001) and an under-representation of IGHV1 (7% vs. 14%, p = 0.04) and IGHV4 (7% vs. 23%, p = 0.0001) subgroups. At the gene level, in WM/IgM-MGUS there was an over-representation of IGHV3-23 (24% vs. 12%, p = 0.0003), IGHV3-64 (3% vs. < 1%, p = 0.003), IGHV3-7 (12% vs. 4%, p = 0.0001) and IGHV3-74 (9% vs. 2%, p < 0.0001), while IGHV4-39 was never used (0 vs. 5%, p = 0.03). Intra-WM/IgM-MGUS search for HCDR3 similarity showed no association fulfilling criteria for stereotyped receptors. WM/IgM-MGUS sequences were unrelated to known chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) subsets. In conclusion, the IGHV gene usage in WM and IgM-MGUS is remarkably biased as compared to the normal B-cell repertoire. WM and IgM-MGUS-specific HCDR3 clusters do not occur with a frequency detectable with currently available databases, not supporting a B-cell receptor-driven pathogenesis in WM and IgM-MGUS.

  4. RNA-binding motif protein 5 inhibits the proliferation of cigarette smoke-transformed BEAS-2B cells through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xue-Jiao; Du, Yan-Wei; Hao, Yu-Qiu; Su, Zhen-Zhong; Zhang, Lin; Zhao, Li-Jing; Zhang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    Cigarette smoking has been shown to be the most significant risk factor for lung cancer. Recent studies have also indicated that RNA-binding motif protein 5 (RBM5) can modulate apoptosis and suppress tumor growth. The present study focused on the role of RBM5 in the regulation of cigarette smoke extract (CSE)-induced transformation of bronchial epithelial cells into the cancerous phenotype and its mechanism of action. Herein, we exposed normal BEAS-2B cells for 8 days to varying concentrations of CSE or dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), followed by a recovery period of 2 weeks. Next, the RBM5 protein was overexpressed in these transformed BEAS-2B cells though lentiviral infection. Later, the morphological changes, cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis, invasion and migration were assessed. In addition, we analyzed the role of RBM5 in xenograft growth. The expression of RBM5 along with the genes related to cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and invasion were also examined. Finally, our results revealed that BEAS-2B cells exposed to 100 µg/ml CSE acquired phenotypic changes and formed tumors in nude mice, indicative of their cancerous transformation and had reduced RBM5 expression. Subsequent overexpression of RBM5 in these cells significantly inhibited their proliferation, induced G1/S arrest, triggered apoptosis and inhibited their invasion and migration, including xenograft growth. Thus, we established an in vitro model of CSE-induced cancerous transformation and concluded that RBM5 overexpression inhibited the growth of these transformed cells through cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. Therefore, our study suggests the importance of RBM5 in the pathogenesis of smoking-related cancer.

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of direct rhenium-188-labeled anti-CD52 monoclonal antibody alemtuzumab for radio immunotherapy of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Decker, Mario; Bacher, Klaus; Thierens, Hubert; Slegers, Guido; Dierckx, Rudi A.; De Vos, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Alemtuzumab (Campath, Berlex) is a humanized IgG1 rat monoclonal antibody directed against the cell surface CD52 antigen, found on lymphocytes and monocytes. It is being developed for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), autoinumme disease and for the prevention of transplant rejecti

  6. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  7. ASCT2 (SLC1A5)-Deficient Mice Have Normal B-Cell Development, Proliferation, and Antibody Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masle-Farquhar, Etienne; Bröer, Angelika; Yabas, Mehmet; Enders, Anselm; Bröer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    SLC1A5 (solute carrier family 1, member 5) is a small neutral amino acid exchanger that is upregulated in rapidly proliferating lymphocytes but also in many primary human cancers. Furthermore, cancer cell lines have been shown to require SLC1A5 for their survival in vitro. One of SLC1A5’s primary substrates is the immunomodulatory amino acid glutamine, which plays an important role in multiple key processes, such as energy supply, macromolecular synthesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, and resistance against oxidative stress. These processes are also essential to immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, B and T lymphocytes. We show here that mice with a stop codon in Slc1a5 have reduced glutamine uptake in activated lymphocytes and primary fibroblasts. B and T cell populations and maturation in resting mice were not affected by absence of SLC1A5. Antibody production in resting and immunized mice and the germinal center response to immunization were also found to be normal. SLC1A5 has been recently described as a novel target for the treatment of a variety of cancers, and our results indicate that inhibition of SLC1A5 in cancer therapy may be tolerated well by the immune system of cancer patients. PMID:28553292

  8. ASCT2 (SLC1A5-Deficient Mice Have Normal B-Cell Development, Proliferation, and Antibody Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Masle-Farquhar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available SLC1A5 (solute carrier family 1, member 5 is a small neutral amino acid exchanger that is upregulated in rapidly proliferating lymphocytes but also in many primary human cancers. Furthermore, cancer cell lines have been shown to require SLC1A5 for their survival in vitro. One of SLC1A5’s primary substrates is the immunomodulatory amino acid glutamine, which plays an important role in multiple key processes, such as energy supply, macromolecular synthesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, and resistance against oxidative stress. These processes are also essential to immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, B and T lymphocytes. We show here that mice with a stop codon in Slc1a5 have reduced glutamine uptake in activated lymphocytes and primary fibroblasts. B and T cell populations and maturation in resting mice were not affected by absence of SLC1A5. Antibody production in resting and immunized mice and the germinal center response to immunization were also found to be normal. SLC1A5 has been recently described as a novel target for the treatment of a variety of cancers, and our results indicate that inhibition of SLC1A5 in cancer therapy may be tolerated well by the immune system of cancer patients.

  9. Detection of non-CLL-like monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis increases dramatically in the very elderly, while detection of CLL-like populations varies by race: findings in a multiethnic population-based cohort of elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlefsen, Kerstin L; Cherian, Sindhu; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Getaneh, Asqual; Lessin, Lawrence; Li, Wenjun; Wood, Brent L; Reiner, Alexander P

    2016-10-01

    Monoclonal B cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is both a marker of immune senescence and a potential precursor of B cell malignancy. Most MBL populations have a chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like (CLL-like) immunophenotype, but those that are CD5-negative (non-CLL-like) are also recognized and may represent a distinct diagnostic entity. To date, MBL studies have taken place in relatively homogenous populations, although risk of CLL varies across racial groups and geographic regions. We report flow cytometry data from 597 ethnically diverse 64-94-year-old women from across the USA who are participants in the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) Long-Life Study (LLS). Overall, MBL was detected in 26 % of the participants and included 20.9 % with a CLL-like immunophenotype, 5 % with a non-CLL-like immunophenotype, and 1.3 % with both. White and Hispanic women were more than twice as likely to have a CLL-like MBL population detected than African American women, corrected for age (P = 0.003). By contrast, detection of non-CLL-like MBL did not vary significantly by race, but did increase markedly with advancing age, being present in 12.7 % of those aged 85 and older. We provide new evidence that rates of detection of CLL-like MBL are lower in African Americans, and further suggest that non-CLL-like clonal expansions should be regarded as distinct from CLL-like MBL.

  10. Annexin A2 is a target of autoimmune T and B cell responses associated with synovial fibroblast proliferation in patients with antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianta, Annalisa; Drouin, Elise E; Crowley, Jameson T; Arvikar, Sheila; Strle, Klemen; Costello, Catherine E; Steere, Allen C

    2015-10-01

    In this study, autoantibody responses to annexin A2 were found in 11-15% of 278 patients with Lyme disease, including in those with erythema migrans (EM), an early sign of the illness, and in those with antibiotic-responsive or antibiotic-refractory Lyme arthritis (LA), a late disease manifestation. In contrast, robust T cell reactivity to annexin A2 peptides was found only in patients with responsive or refractory LA. In LA patients, annexin A2 protein levels, which were higher in the refractory group, correlated with annexin A2 antibody levels in sera and synovial fluid. In addition, in patients with antibiotic-refractory LA who had anti-annexin A2 antibodies, synovial tissue had intense staining for annexin A2 protein, greater synovial fibroblast proliferation and more tissue fibrosis. Thus, a subset of LA patients had T and B cell responses to annexin A2, and in the refractory group, annexin A2 autoantibodies were associated with specific pathologic findings.

  11. Activation of resting human B cells by helper T-cell clone supernatant: characterization of a human B-cell-activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Gougeon, M L; Moreau, J L; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1987-12-01

    The effects of helper T-cell clone supernatants on resting human B cells were investigated. Four different helper T-cell clones (two T4+ and two T8+) were stimulated by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies on Sepharose beads or anti-T11(2) plus anti-T11(3) monoclonal antibodies. The supernatants from these activated clones induced the proliferation of highly purified resting B lymphocytes from the peripheral blood. The B cells exhibited a cell size and a surface-antigen pattern (4F2 antigen and transferrin receptor) of phase G0 B cells, and they were functionally resting. In response to T-cell supernatants a large fraction of the B cells enlarged and expressed 4F2 antigens and transferrin receptors. In gel filtration, the corresponding activity migrated with an apparent Mr of 12,000-15,000. Our findings strongly support the existence of a human B-cell-activating factor acting on resting B cells and causing them to enter phase G1 of the cell cycle.

  12. Cloning non-transformed sheep B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, P J; Beskorwayne, T; Godson, D L; Popowych, Y; Hein, W

    2000-04-03

    The capacity to clone B cells and establish permanent B cell lines has greatly facilitated a wide variety of studies characterising the growth, differentiation, and gene expression of murine and human B cells. Similar investigations of B cell biology for other species have been severely restricted by an inability to culture or clone B cells. This is the first report of a method to clone non-transformed sheep B cells using a culture system based on murine CD154 and a combination of human gamma chain-common cytokines. Sheep Peyer's patch B cells were cultured for 120 days and then cloned by limiting dilution culture. The parental B cell culture contained both surface immunoglobulin (sIg)M(+) and sIgG1(+) B cells and both types of B cell were cloned. Clonality was confirmed by PCR analysis of Ig heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) expression and DNA sequencing of HC V genes. There was agreement between the PCR and flow cytometric analyses of HC isotype expression on the B cell clones but the available monoclonal antibodies specific for sheep lambda and kappa LC did not react with all clones. Soluble Ig was detected in the culture supernatant of sIgG1(+) clones but not sIgM(+) clones. The B cell clones remained dependent upon CD154 and gamma chain-common cytokine co-stimulation for sustained growth and maintained stable Ig expression. The cloning of non-transformed sheep B cells should provide a valuable tool for studying sheep B cell biology, establishing Ig HC- and LC-specific monoclonal antibodies, analysing the B cell Ig repertoire, and may be used to produce sheep monoclonal antibodies.

  13. Molecular programming of B cell memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Michael; Okitsu, Shinji; Wang, Nathaniel; McHeyzer-Williams, Louise

    2011-12-09

    The development of high-affinity B cell memory is regulated through three separable phases, each involving antigen recognition by specific B cells and cognate T helper cells. Initially, antigen-primed B cells require cognate T cell help to gain entry into the germinal centre pathway to memory. Once in the germinal centre, B cells with variant B cell receptors must access antigens and present them to germinal centre T helper cells to enter long-lived memory B cell compartments. Following antigen recall, memory B cells require T cell help to proliferate and differentiate into plasma cells. A recent surge of information - resulting from dynamic B cell imaging in vivo and the elucidation of T follicular helper cell programmes - has reshaped the conceptual landscape surrounding the generation of memory B cells. In this Review, we integrate this new information about each phase of antigen-specific B cell development to describe the newly unravelled molecular dynamics of memory B cell programming.

  14. Phase 1 study results of the type II glycoengineered humanized anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab (GA101) in B-cell lymphoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salles, Gilles; Morschhauser, Franck; Lamy, Thierry; Milpied, Noel; Thieblemont, Catherine; Tilly, Hervé; Bieska, Gabi; Asikanius, Elina; Carlile, David; Birkett, Joe; Pisa, Pavel; Cartron, Guillaume

    2012-05-31

    Whereas the chimeric type I anti-CD20 Ab rituximab has improved outcomes for patients with B-cell malignancies significantly, many patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) remain incurable. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized anti-CD20 type II Ab that has demonstrated superior activity against type I Abs in vitro and in preclinical studies. In the present study, we evaluated the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of GA101 in a phase 1 study of 21 patients with heavily pretreated, relapsed, or refractory CD20(+) indolent NHL. Patients received GA101 in a dose-escalating fashion (3 per cohort, range 50/100-1200/2000 mg) for 8 × 21-day cycles. The majority of adverse events (AEs) were grades 1 and 2 (114 of 132 total AEs). Seven patients reported a total of 18 grade 3 or 4 AEs. Infusion-related reactions were the most common AE, with most occurring during the first infusion and resolving with appropriate management. Three patients experienced grade 3 or 4 drug-related infusion-related reactions. The best overall response was 43%, with 5 complete responses and 4 partial responses. Data from this study suggest that GA101 was well tolerated and demonstrated encouraging activity in patients with previously treated NHL up to doses of 2000 mg. This trial is registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00517530.

  15. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...

  16. Characterization of a human platelet antigen-1a-specific monoclonal antibody derived from a B cell from a woman alloimmunized in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eksteen, Mariana; Tiller, Heidi; Averina, Maria; Heide, Gøril; Kjaer, Mette; Ghevaert, Cedric; Michaelsen, Terje E; Ihle, Øistein; Husebekk, Anne; Skogen, Bjørn; Stuge, Tor B

    2015-06-15

    Human platelet Ag (HPA)-1a, located on integrin β3, is the main target for alloantibodies responsible for fetal and neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (FNAIT) in the white population. There are ongoing efforts to develop an Ab prophylaxis and therapy to prevent or treat FNAIT. In this study, an mAb specific for HPA-1a, named 26.4, was derived from an immortalized B cell from an alloimmunized woman who had an infant affected by FNAIT. It is the only HPA-1a-specific human mAb with naturally paired H and L chains. Specific binding of mAb 26.4, both native and recombinant forms, to platelets and to purified integrins αIIbβ3 (from platelets) and αVβ3 (from trophoblasts) from HPA-1a(+) donors was demonstrated by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance technology, respectively. No binding to HPA-1a(-) platelets or integrins was detected. Moreover, the Ab binds with higher affinity to integrin αVβ3 compared with a second HPA-1a-specific human mAb, B2G1. Further in vitro experimentation demonstrated that mAb 26.4 can opsonize HPA-1a(+) platelets for enhanced phagocytosis by monocytes, inhibit binding of maternal polyclonal anti-HPA-1a Abs, and weakly inhibit aggregation of HPA-1a-heterozygous platelets, the latter with no predicted clinical relevance. Thus, mAb 26.4 is highly specific for HPA-1a and could potentially be explored for use as a prophylactic or therapeutic reagent for FNAIT intervention and as a phenotyping reagent to identify women at risk for immunization.

  17. Increased ability of peripheral blood B cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis to produce interleukin 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamura,Masahiro

    1990-12-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-four patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA and 20 normal controls were examined for the ability of their peripheral blood B cells to produce interleukin 1 (IL-1 with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS. B cells were purified from peripheral blood by negative selection methods (i.e., removal of adherent cells and sheep red blood cell rosette-forming cells, followed by treatment with monoclonal antibodies (OKT3 and OKM1 and complement. The amount of IL-1 in B cell culture supernatants (SN was measured by thymocyte and fibroblast proliferation assays and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for IL-1 alpha and beta. As a group, cultured B cells from patients with RA, both spontaneously and when stimulated with LPS, produced higher levels of IL-1 than those from normal controls. IL-1 production by RA B cells with LPS had a weak but positive correlation with disease activity. Moreover, RA B cell culture SN with elevated levels of IL-1 had a synergistic effect on the growth of anti-human IgM (anti-mu stimulated B cells. In separate experiments, the growth of RA B cells was significantly promoted by IL-1 beta both with and without anti-mu stimulation. These results suggest that B cell-derived IL-1 may be involved in the B cell clonal expansion of RA through its own activity as a B cell stimulatory factor.

  18. A theoretical investigation of the effect of proliferation and adhesion on monoclonal conversion in the colonic crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Mirams, Gary R.

    2012-11-01

    The surface epithelium lining the intestinal tract renews itself rapidly by a coordinated programme of cell proliferation, migration and differentiation events that is initiated in the crypts of Lieberkühn. It is generally believed that colorectal cancer arises due to mutations that disrupt the normal cellular dynamics of the crypts. Using a spatially structured cell-based model of a colonic crypt, we investigate the likelihood that the progeny of a mutated cell will dominate, or be sloughed out of, a crypt. Our approach is to perform multiple simulations, varying the spatial location of the initial mutation, and the proliferative and adhesive properties of the mutant cells, to obtain statistical distributions for the probability of their domination. Our simulations lead us to make a number of predictions. The process of monoclonal conversion always occurs, and does not require that the cell which initially gave rise to the population remains in the crypt. Mutations occurring more than one to two cells from the base of the crypt are unlikely to become the dominant clone. The probability of a mutant clone persisting in the crypt is sensitive to dysregulation of adhesion. By comparing simulation results with those from a simple one-dimensional stochastic model of population dynamics at the base of the crypt, we infer that this sensitivity is due to direct competition between wild-type and mutant cells at the base of the crypt. We also predict that increases in the extent of the spatial domain in which the mutant cells proliferate can give rise to counter-intuitive, non-linear changes to the probability of their fixation, due to effects that cannot be captured in simpler models. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. A novel role for junctional adhesion molecule-A in tumor proliferation: modulation by an anti-JAM-A monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Liliane; Haeuw, Jean-François; Beau-Larvor, Charlotte; Gonzalez, Alexandra; Zanna, Laurence; Malissard, Martine; Lepecquet, Anne-Marie; Robert, Alain; Bailly, Christian; Broussas, Matthieu; Corvaia, Nathalie

    2013-03-15

    To identify new potential targets in oncology, functional approaches were developed using tumor cells as immunogens to select monoclonal antibodies targeting membrane receptors involved in cell proliferation. For that purpose cancer cells were injected into mice and resulting hybridomas were screened for their ability to inhibit cell proliferation in vitro. Based on this functional approach coupled to proteomic analysis, a monoclonal antibody specifically recognizing the human junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) was defined. Interestingly, compared to both normal and tumor tissues, we observed that JAM-A was mainly overexpressed on breast, lung and kidney tumor tissues. In vivo experiments demonstrated that injections of anti-JAM-A antibody resulted in a significant tumor growth inhibition of xenograft human tumors. Treatment with monoclonal antibody induced a decrease of the Ki67 expression and downregulated JAM-A levels. All together, our results show for the first time that JAM-A can interfere with tumor proliferation and suggest that JAM-A is a potential novel target in oncology. The results also demonstrate that a functional approach coupled to a robust proteomic analysis can be successful to identify new antibody target molecules that lead to promising new antibody-based therapies against cancers.

  20. A new monoclonal antibody against DNA ligase I is a suitable marker of cell proliferation in cultured cell and tissue section samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Vitolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive characterization of the replicative human DNA ligase I (LigI undertaken in the last decade demonstrated that the level of this protein strongly correlates with the rate of cell proliferation. This may allow to expand the repertoire of clinical biomarkers for the analysis of cell proliferation.We have produced a new monoclonal antibody (5H5 against LigI and exploited it as cell proliferation marker in Western blotting and immunofluorescence as well as in immunohistochemistry on paraffin tissue sections. The Western blot analysis showed that the LigI level detected by 5H5 antibody is high in all proliferating cells. On the contrary the protein is down regulated in resting human fibroblast and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis on cultured HeLa cells showed that 5H5 antibody labels all proliferating cells and displays the same staining pattern of BrdU in S-phase nuclei. Finally the analysis of serial sections of inflamed tonsils and NHL lymph nodes (either frozen or paraffin embedded demonstrated that 5H5 marks the same population of cells as the Ki-67 antibody. Our results demonstrate that 5H5 antibody is a valuable tool for labeling proliferating cells that can be conveniently used in Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry.

  1. Inhibition of proliferation and survival of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells by a small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulvino, Mary; Liang, Yue; Oleksyn, David; DeRan, Michael; Van Pelt, Elise; Shapiro, Joel; Sanz, Ignacio; Chen, Luojing; Zhao, Jiyong

    2012-08-23

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), the most common type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, remains a partially curable disease. Genetic alterations affecting components of NF-κB signaling pathways occur frequently in DLBCL. Almost all activated B cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, which is the least curable group among the 3 major subtypes of this malignancy, and a substantial fraction of germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL exhibit constitutive NF-κB pathway activity. It has been demonstrated that ABC-DLBCL cells require such activity for proliferation and survival. Therefore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in DLBCL may provide an efficient and targeted therapy. In screening for small-molecule compounds that may inhibit NF-κB activation in DLBCL cells, we identified a compound, NSC697923, which inhibits the activity of the ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) enzyme Ubc13-Uev1A. NSC697923 impedes the formation of the Ubc13 and ubiquitin thioester conjugate and suppresses constitutive NF-κB activity in ABC-DLBCL cells. Importantly, NSC697923 inhibits the proliferation and survival of ABC-DLBCL cells and GCB-DLBCL cells, suggesting the Ubc13-Uev1A may be crucial for DLBCL growth. Consistently, knockdown of Ubc13 expression also inhibited DLBCL cell survival. The results of the present study indicate that Ubc13-Uev1A may represent a potential therapeutic target in DLBCL. In addition, compound NSC697923 may be exploited for the development of DLBCL therapeutic agents.

  2. Reprogramming human B cells into induced pluripotent stem cells and its enhancement by C/EBPα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, C; Sardina, J L; Di Stefano, B; Romero-Moya, D; Muñoz-López, A; Ariza, L; Chillón, M C; Balanzategui, A; Castaño, J; Herreros, A; Fraga, M F; Fernández, A; Granada, I; Quintana-Bustamante, O; Segovia, J C; Nishimura, K; Ohtaka, M; Nakanishi, M; Graf, T; Menendez, P

    2016-03-01

    B cells have been shown to be refractory to reprogramming and B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have only been generated from murine B cells engineered to carry doxycycline-inducible Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and Myc (OSKM) cassette in every tissue and from EBV/SV40LT-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines. Here, we show for the first time that freshly isolated non-cultured human cord blood (CB)- and peripheral blood (PB)-derived CD19+CD20+ B cells can be reprogrammed to iPSCs carrying complete VDJH immunoglobulin (Ig) gene monoclonal rearrangements using non-integrative tetracistronic, but not monocistronic, OSKM-expressing Sendai Virus. Co-expression of C/EBPα with OSKM facilitates iPSC generation from both CB- and PB-derived B cells. We also demonstrate that myeloid cells are much easier to reprogram than B and T lymphocytes. Differentiation potential back into the cell type of their origin of B-cell-, T-cell-, myeloid- and fibroblast-iPSCs is not skewed, suggesting that their differentiation does not seem influenced by 'epigenetic memory'. Our data reflect the actual cell-autonomous reprogramming capacity of human primary B cells because biased reprogramming was avoided by using freshly isolated primary cells, not exposed to cytokine cocktails favoring proliferation, differentiation or survival. The ability to reprogram CB/PB-derived primary human B cells offers an unprecedented opportunity for studying developmental B lymphopoiesis and modeling B-cell malignancies.

  3. [CXCR3 monoclonal antibody inhibits the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 cells and HepG2 cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuqiang; Wang, Zhiyao; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Jing; Cai, Lei; Shen, Hui; Kong, Yong; Qiu, Yuhua

    2015-11-01

    To study the effects of chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3) monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro. Ascites of CXCR3 mAb was prepared at first. MCF-7 and HepG2 cells with high expressions of CXCR3 were screened by flow cytometry. MTT assay was used to detect the effects of CXCR3 mAb on the proliferation of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro in the absence/presence of interferon-inducible T-cell alpha chemoattractant (I-TAC). Transwell™ assay was performed to investigate the effects of CXCR3 mAb on the migration of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro in the absence/presence of I-TAC. The expression rate of CXCR3 on MCF-7 and HepG2 cells were 83.5% and 96.2%, respectively. 50 mg/mL CXCR3 mAb significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells, and also inhibited the promoting effect of I-TAC on the proliferation and migration of MCF-7 and HepG2 cells in vitro. CXCR3 mAb can significantly inhibit the proliferation and migration of the tumor cells highly expressing CXCR3 in vitro.

  4. [IgG4-related disease and clonal B-cell lymphoid proliferation: Description of two clinical cases and a review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, E V; Vasilyev, V I; Kovrigina, A M; Safonova, T N; Nasonov, E L

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic immune-related disease that may involve the pancreas, liver, retroperitoneal space, biliary tract, salivary and lacrimal glands, eye socket, lung, and kidney. In term of pathomorphogenesis, it is a fibroinflammatory disease manifesting as a tumor-like lesion of organs, elevated serum IgG4 levels, and a morphofunctional substrate - the development of marked fibrosis and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the tissues with the high content of IgG4-positive plasma cells. The detection of a tumor-like nodule frequently leads to that the patients with IgG4-RD undergo major traumatic surgery for presumed cancer. At the same time, a number of investigations show the association of IgG4-RD with the development of cancer and lymphoproliferative diseases. The paper describes two clinical cases: Russia's first diagnosis of MALT lymphoma of the lacrimal gland, IgG4-positive and IgG4-RD with a rare onset with a destruction focus in the cervical vertebrae, multiple organ dysfunction, B-cell clonality in salivary gland tissue and PIgMκ secretion. It also reviews world literature on the development of lymphoproliferative diseases in the presence of IgG4-RD.

  5. Supernatant from a cloned helper T cell stimulates resting B cells to express transferrin and IL-2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Leclercq, L; Dautry-Varsat, A; Theze, J

    1987-07-01

    We describe the properties of the supernatant from a murine cloned helper T cell (clone 52.3) which is able to polyclonally activate most resting B cells in the absence of any additional stimulus. We hypothesize that an activity which we call BCAF (B-cell-activating factor(s] exists in our supernatant which can activate resting B cells alone or in conjunction with other lymphokines. In the present report, we investigate changes in the surface antigen pattern induced on resting B cells by BCAF-containing supernatant. Analysis of the cells by flow cytometry shows that transferrin receptor and IL-2 receptor expression increase on a large fraction of B cells after 2 days of activation by the T-helper-cell clone supernatant. Monoclonal anti-transferrin receptor antibody inhibits cell division but does not affect blastogenesis, while IL-2 has no effect in our experimental system. Our present results confirm that BCAF-containing supernatants can act on most resting B cells and replace helper T cells in inducing B-cell activation and proliferation.

  6. Mangiferin inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is correlated with downregulation of B-cell lymphoma-2 and upregulation of microRNA-182.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minglin; Ma, Huili; Yang, Lixin; Li, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Mangiferin, a flavonoid extracted from the mango tree, possesses anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, anti-herpes simplex and antitumor activity, and is able to affect immune function. The present study investigated the anticancer effects of mangiferin treatment on PC3 human prostate cancer cells, and the potential underlying mechanisms. In the present study, an MTT assay was used to analyze the proliferation of PC3 cells. Subsequently, flow cytometry and colorimetric assay kits were utilized to measure the PC3 cell apoptotic rate. The expression levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) and microRNA-182 (miR-182) were detected using western blot analysis and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, respectively. Finally, miR-182 and anti-miR-182 were transfected into PC3 cells, which were used to investigate the effects of mangiferin. Mangiferin treatment reduced the proliferation of PC3 human prostate cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, mangiferin was able to promote apoptosis and induce the caspase-3 activity of PC3 human prostate cancer cells. Mangiferin treatment was also able to significantly reduce Bcl-2 expression levels and enhance miR-182 expression in PC3 cells. Finally, it was observed that mangiferin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in PC3 human prostate cancer cells, and this effect was correlated with downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of miR-182.

  7. The immunomodulatory benzodiazepine Bz-423 inhibits B-cell proliferation by targeting c-myc protein for rapid and specific degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Thomas B; Ney, Gina M; Subramanian, Chitra; Opipari, Anthony W; Glick, Gary D

    2006-02-01

    Myc proteins regulate cell growth and are oncogenic in many cancers. Although these proteins are validated molecular anticancer targets, new therapies aimed at modulating myc have yet to emerge. A benzodiazepine (Bz-423) that was discovered in efforts to find new drugs for lupus was found recently to have antiproliferative effects on Burkitt's lymphoma cells. We now show that the basis for the antiproliferative effects of Bz-423 is the rapid and specific depletion of c-myc protein, which is coupled to growth-suppressing effects on key regulators of proliferation and cell cycle progression. c-Myc is depleted as a result of signals coupled to Bz-423 binding its molecular target, the oligomycin sensitivity-conferring protein subunit of the mitochondrial F(1)F(o)-ATPase. Bz-423 inhibits F(1)F(o)-ATPase activity, blocking respiratory chain function and generating superoxide, which at growth-inhibiting concentrations triggers proteasomal degradation of c-myc. Bz-423-induced c-myc degradation is independent of glycogen synthase kinase but is substantially blocked by mutation of the phosphosensitive residue threonine 58, which when phosphorylated targets c-myc for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. Collectively, this work describes a new lead compound, with drug-like properties, which regulates c-myc by a novel molecular mechanism that may be therapeutically useful.

  8. miR-320a regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in multiple myeloma by targeting pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yinghao [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Wu, Depei, E-mail: wudepei@medmail.com.cn [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Wang, Jishi, E-mail: lgylhlyh@aliyun.com [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China)

    2016-05-13

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is implicated in cancer development and progression. While miR-320a is reported to be deregulated in many malignancy types, its biological role in multiple myeloma (MM) remains unclear. Here, we observed reduced expression of miR-320a in MM samples and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-320a dramatically suppressed cell viability and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in vitro. Mechanistic investigation led to the identification of Pre-B-cellleukemia transcription factor 3 (PBX3) as a novel and direct downstream target of miR-320a. Interestingly, reintroduction of PBX3 abrogated miR-320a-induced MM cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. In a mouse xenograft model, miR-320a overexpression inhibited tumorigenicity and promoted apoptosis. Our findings collectively indicate that miR-320a inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in MM cells by directly targeting PBX3, supporting its utility as a novel and potential therapeutic agent for miRNA-based MM therapy. -- Highlights: •Expression of miR-320a in MM cell induces apoptosis in vitro. •miR-320a represses PBX3 via targeting specific sequences in the 3′UTR region. •Exogenous expression of PBX3 reverses the effects of miR-320a in inhibiting MM cell growth and promoting apoptosis. •Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits tumor growth and increases apoptosis in vivo.

  9. A Paradigm Shift on the Question of B Cells in Transplantation? Recent Insights on Regulating the Alloresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firl, Daniel J; Benichou, Gilles; Kim, James I; Yeh, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    B lymphocytes contribute to acute and chronic allograft rejection through their production of donor-specific antibodies (DSAs). In addition, B cells present allopeptides bound to self-MHC class II molecules and provide costimulation signals to T cells, which are essential to their activation and differentiation into memory T cells. On the other hand, both in laboratory rodents and patients, the concept of effector T cell regulation by B cells is gaining traction in the field of transplantation. Specifically, clinical trials using anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies to deplete B cells and reverse DSA had a deleterious effect on rates of acute cellular rejection; a peculiar finding that calls into question a central paradigm in transplantation. Additional work in humans has characterized IL-10-producing B cells (IgM memory and transitional B cells), which suppress the proliferation and inflammatory cytokine productions of effector T cells in vitro. Understanding the mechanisms of regulating the alloresponse is critical if we are to achieve operational tolerance across transplantation. This review will focus on recent evidence in murine and human transplantation with respect to non-traditional roles for B cells in determining clinical outcomes.

  10. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  11. EBNA3C-mediated regulation of aurora kinase B contributes to Epstein-Barr virus-induced B-cell proliferation through modulation of the activities of the retinoblastoma protein and apoptotic caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Hem Chandra; Lu, Jie; Saha, Abhik; Cai, Qiliang; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Prasad, Mahadesh A J; Robertson, Erle S

    2013-11-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic gammaherpesvirus that is implicated in several human malignancies, including Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), and AIDS-associated lymphomas. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C), one of the essential EBV latent antigens, can induce mammalian cell cycle progression through its interaction with cell cycle regulators. Aurora kinase B (AK-B) is important for cell division, and deregulation of AK-B is associated with aneuploidy, incomplete mitotic exit, and cell death. Our present study shows that EBNA3C contributes to upregulation of AK-B transcript levels by enhancing the activity of its promoter. Further, EBNA3C also increased the stability of the AK-B protein, and the presence of EBNA3C leads to reduced ubiquitination of AK-B. Importantly, EBNA3C in association with wild-type AK-B but not with its kinase-dead mutant led to enhanced cell proliferation, and AK-B knockdown can induce nuclear blebbing and cell death. This phenomenon was rescued in the presence of EBNA3C. Knockdown of AK-B resulted in activation of caspase 3 and caspase 9, along with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) cleavage, which is known to be an important contributor to apoptotic signaling. Importantly, EBNA3C failed to stabilize the kinase-dead mutant of AK-B compared to wild-type AK-B, which suggests a role for the kinase domain in AK-B stabilization and downstream phosphorylation of the cell cycle regulator retinoblastoma protein (Rb). This study demonstrates the functional relevance of AK-B kinase activity in EBNA3C-regulated B-cell proliferation and apoptosis.

  12. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  13. Identification of Env-specific Monoclonal Antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 Infected Person by B cell Activation and RT-PCR Cloning%利用B细胞培养和RT-PCR技术从我国HIV-1感染者中筛选膜蛋白特异性单克隆抗体的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪慧敏; 管永军; 曾毅; 徐柯; 余双庆; 丁林林; 罗海艳; Robin Flinko; George K lewis; 冯霞; 邵继荣

    2012-01-01

    To obtain protective human monoclonal antibody from HIV-1 infected person, we adapted a technology for isolating antigen specific monoclonal antibody from human memory B cells through in vitro B cell activation coupled with RT-PCT and expression cloning. Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs of HIV-1 infected individuals and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads. Two hundred memory B cells per well were cultured in 96-well round-bottom plates with feeder cells in medium containing EBV and CpG. Env-specific antibodies in supernatants were screened by ELISA after 1~2 weeks' culture. Cells from positive wells of Env-specific antibody were harvested and total RNA was isolated. Human VH and Vκ or VX genes were amplified by RT-PCR and cloned into IgG1 and κ or γ expressing vectors. Functional VH and Vk or VX were identified by cotransfecting 293T cells with individual heavy chain and light chain clones followed by analysis of culture supernatants by ELISA for Env-specific antibodies. Finally, corresponding mAb was produced by transient transfection of 293T cells with the identified VH and V κ/γ pair and purified by protein A affinity chromatography. Purified monocolonal antibodies were used for HIV-1 specific antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and neutralizing activity assay. Four monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 subtype B' infected individual. Two of them showed strong ADCC activity and one showed weak neutralizing activity against HIV-1. Its further studies on their application in therapeutic or prophylactic vaccines against HIV-1 should be grounded.%本研究通过采集1型人类免疫缺陷病毒(Human immunodeficiency virus-1,HIV-1)感染者抗凝全血,分离出外周血单个核细胞,然后用磁珠分选纯化记忆性B细胞和体外活化记忆性B细胞,促使其分泌抗体,用ELISA法识别阳性B细胞克隆,并提取阳性B细胞

  14. Effects of anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody 12G5 on proliferation and apoptosis of human acute myelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Li; KONG Pei-yan; SHI Zhan-zhong; ZENG Dong-feng; CHEN Xing-hua; CHANG Cheng; PENG Xian-gui; ZHANG Yi; LIU Hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of CXCR4 on HL-60 cell line and the proliferation,apoptosis of HL-60 cell line cocultured with bone marrow stromal cells, so as to assess the possibility of 12G5, an anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody, in eradicating the minimal residual disease. Methods: The activity of SDF-1 was inhibited by 10 μg/ml 12G5. After treatment with 12G5, the status of adhesion was observed, and the adhesion rates, apoptosis and cell cycles were detected after 24 h of treatment. Cell growth rates were measured by trypan blue exclusion. Cell growth curve was plotted, and the expression of PCNA and apoptosis related protein including PCNA, Bcl-2 and Fas were detected with immunohistochemical technique. Results: (1) There was middling degree expression of CXCR4 on HL-60 membrane. From 0 h to 6 h, as the time of 12G5 incubation along, the expression of CXCR4 decreased gradually. (2)After treatment for 24 h, the adhesion rates in the experiment group and the control were (39.4±7.9)%and (51.4±5.9)%, respectively. (3)After treatment for 24 h, the percentage of HL-60 cells in G0/G1 phase were (55.21±4.9)%, and that in S phase and G2/M phase were (30.40±4.1)% and (14.39±5.2)%, respectively, with the corresponding proportions being (44.67±2.2)%, (45.30±3.7)%, and (10.03±2.6)% in the control. (4) The percentage of apoptotic HL-60 cells was (8.95±1.7)% in the experiment group, compared to (3.97±2.4)% in the control. (5)The survival rates of HL-60 cells decreased markedly at 48 h to 96 h, and the proliferation slowed down at this time duration. (6)The expression of PCNA and Bcl-2 down-regulated significantly, but the Fas protein expression was up-regulated. Conclusion: 12G5 could inhibit the capability of adhesion and proliferation of HL-60 cells and it can induce more cells to enter G0/G1 phase and promote apoptosis. It may be helpful by inhibiting the bioactivity of SDF-1 with 12G5 in the therapy of marrow residual disease.

  15. Persistent Polyclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis B Cells Can Be Activated through CD40-CD154 Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Dugas-Bourdages

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent polyclonal B cell lymphocytosis (PPBL is a rare disorder, diagnosed primarily in adult female smokers and characterized by an expansion of CD19+CD27+IgM+ memory B cells, by the presence of binucleated lymphocytes, and by a moderate elevation of serum IgM. The clinical course is usually benign, but it is not known whether or not PPBL might be part of a process leading to the emergence of a malignant proliferative disorder. In this study we sought to investigate the functional response of B cells from patients with PPBL by use of an optimal memory B cell culture model based on the CD40-CD154 interaction. We found that the proliferation of PPBL B cells was almost as important as that of B cells from normal controls, resulting in high immunoglobulin secretion with in vitro isotypic switching. We conclude that the CD40-CD154 activation pathway is functional in the memory B cell population of PPBL patients, suggesting that the disorder may be due to either a dysfunction of other cells in the microenvironment or a possible defect in another B cell activation pathway.

  16. Inhibition of UDP-glucosylceramide synthase in mice prevents Gaucher disease-associated B-cell malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Elena V; Archer, Joy; Wang, Susan; Dekker, Nick; Aerts, Johannes Mfg; Karlsson, Stefan; Cox, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    Clonal B-cell proliferation is a frequent manifestation of Gaucher disease - a sphingolipidosis associated with a high risk of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Gaucher disease is caused by genetic deficiency of acid β-glucosidase, the natural substrates of which (β-d-glucosylceramide and β-d-glucosylsphingosine) accumulate, principally in macrophages. Mice with inducible deficiency of β-glucosidase [Gba(tm1Karl/tm1Karl)Tg(MX1-cre)1Cgn/0] serve as an authentic model of human Gaucher disease; we have recently reported clonal B-cell proliferation accompanied by monoclonal serum paraproteins and cognate tumours in these animals. To explore the relationship between B-cell malignancy and the biochemical defect, we treated Gaucher mice with eliglustat tartrate (GENZ 112638), a potent and selective inhibitor of the first committed step in glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. Twenty-two Gaucher mice received 300 mg/kg of GENZ 112638 daily for 3-10 months from 6 weeks of age. Plasma concentrations of β-d-glucosylceramide and the unacylated glycosphingolipid, β-d-glucosylsphingosine, declined. After administration of GENZ 112638 to Gaucher mice for 3-10 months, serum paraproteins were not detected and there was a striking reduction in the malignant lymphoproliferation: neither lymphomas nor plasmacytomas were found in animals that had received the investigational agent. In contrast, 14 out of 60 Gaucher mice without GENZ 112638 treatment developed these tumours; monoclonal paraproteins were detected in plasma from 18 of the 44 age-matched mice with Gaucher disease that had not received GENZ 112638. Long-term inhibition of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis suppresses the development of spontaneous B-cell lymphoma and myeloma in Gaucher mice.

  17. Addition of Rice Bran Arabinoxylan to Curcumin Therapy May Be of Benefit to Patients With Early-Stage B-Cell Lymphoid Malignancies (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance, Smoldering Multiple Myeloma, or Stage 0/1 Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia): A Preliminary Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golombick, Terry; Diamond, Terrence H; Manoharan, Arumugam; Ramakrishna, Rajeev

    2016-06-01

    Hypothesis Prior studies on patients with early B-cell lymphoid malignancies suggest that early intervention with curcumin may lead to delay in progressive disease and prolonged survival. These patients are characterized by increased susceptibility to infections. Rice bran arabinoxylan (Ribraxx) has been shown to have immunostimulatory, anti-inflammatory, and proapoptotic effects. We postulated that addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit. Study design Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)/smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM) or stage 0/1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who had been on oral curcumin therapy for a period of 6 months or more were administered both curcumin (as Curcuforte) and Ribraxx. Methods Ten MGUS/SMM patients and 10 patients with stage 0/1 CLL were administered 6 g of curcumin and 2 g Ribraxx daily. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 2-month intervals for a period of 6 months, and various markers were monitored. MGUS/SMM patients included full blood count (FBC); paraprotein; free light chains/ratio; C-reactive protein (CRP)and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); B2 microglobulin and immunological markers. Markers monitored for stage 0/1 CLL were FBC, CRP and ESR, and immunological markers. Results Of 10 MGUS/SMM patients,5 (50%) were neutropenic at baseline, and the Curcuforte/Ribraxx combination therapy showed an increased neutrophil count, varying between 10% and 90% among 8 of the 10 (80%) MGUS/SMM patients. An additional benefit of the combination therapy was the potent effect in reducing the raised ESR in 4 (44%) of the MGUS/SMM patients. Conclusion Addition of Ribraxx to curcumin therapy may be of benefit to patients with early-stage B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

  18. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  19. Quantitative image analysis in the assessment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot-Richards, Devon S; Martin, David R; Myers, Orrin B; Czuchlewski, David R; Hunt, Kristin E

    2011-12-01

    Proliferation rates in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been associated with conflicting outcomes in the literature, more often with high proliferation associated with poor prognosis. In most studies, the proliferation rate was estimated by a pathologist using an immunohistochemical stain for the monoclonal antibody Ki-67. We hypothesized that a quantitative image analysis algorithm would give a more accurate estimate of the proliferation rate, leading to better associations with survival. In all, 84 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were selected according to the World Health Organization criteria. Ki-67 percentage positivity estimated by the pathologist was recorded from the original report. The same slides were then scanned using an Aperio ImageScope, and Ki-67 percentage positivity was calculated using a computer-based quantitative immunohistochemistry nuclear algorithm. In addition, chart review was performed and survival time was recorded. The Ki-67 percentage estimated by the pathologist from the original report versus quantitative image analysis was significantly correlated (Pquantitative image analysis (P=0.021). There was less agreement at lower Ki-67 percentages. Comparison of Ki-67 percentage positivity versus survival did not show significant association either with pathologist estimate or quantitative image analysis. However, although not significant, there was a trend of worse survival at higher proliferation rates detected by the pathologist but not by quantitative image analysis. Interestingly, our data suggest that the Ki-67 percentage positivity as assessed by the pathologist may be more closely associated with survival outcome than that identified by quantitative image analysis. This may indicate that pathologists are better at selecting appropriate areas of the slide. More cases are needed to assess whether this finding would be statistically significant. Due to the good correlation between pathologist estimate and quantitative image

  20. The Pre-B Cell Receptor and Its Function during B Cell Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinZhang; GopeshSrivastava; LiweiLu

    2004-01-01

    The process of B cell development in the bone marrow occurs by the stepwise rearrangements of the V, D, and J segments of the Ig H and L chain gene loci. During early B cell genesis, productive IgH chain gene rearrangement leads to assembly of the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR), which acts as an important checkpoint at the pro-B/preB transitional stage. The pre-BCR, transiently expressed by developing precursor B cells, comprises the Ig μH chain, surrogate light (SL) chains VpreB and λ5, as well as the signal-transducing hetero-dimer Igα/Igβ. Signaling through the pre-BCR regulates allelic exclusion at the Ig H locus, stimulates cell proliferation, and induces differentiation to small post-mitotic pre-B cells that further undergo the rearrangement of the IgL chain genes. Recent advances in elucidating the key roles of pre-BCR in B cell development have provided a better understanding of normal B lymphopoiesis and its dysregulated state leading to B cell neoplasia. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(2):89-94.

  1. The Pre-B Cell Receptor and Its Function during B Cell Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Zhang; Gopesh Srivastava1; Liwei Lu

    2004-01-01

    The process of B cell development in the bone marrow occurs by the stepwise rearrangements of the V, D, and Jsegments of the Ig H and L chain gene loci. During early B cell genesis, productive IgH chain generearrangement leads to assembly of the pre-B cell receptor (pre-BCR), which acts as an important checkpointat the pro-B/preB transitional stage. The pre-BCR, transiently expressed by developing precursor B cells,comprises the Ig μH chain, surrogate light (SL) chains VpreB and λ5, as well as the signal-transducing heterodimer Igα/Igβ. Signaling through the pre-BCR regulates allelic exclusion at the Ig H locus, stimulates cell proliferation, and induces differentiation to small post-mitotic pre-B cells that further undergo the rearrangement of the IgL chain genes. Recent advances in elucidating the key roles of pre-BCR in B cell development have provided a better understanding of normal B lymphopoiesis and its dysregulated state leading to B cell neoplasia.

  2. Comparative In Vitro Immune Stimulation Analysis of Primary Human B Cells and B Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Belle, Kristien; Herman, Jean; Boon, Louis; Waer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    B cell specific immunomodulatory drugs still remain an unmet medical need. Utilisation of validated simplified in vitro models would allow readily obtaining new insights in the complexity of B cell regulation. For this purpose we investigated which human B lymphocyte stimulation assays may be ideally suited to investigate new B lymphocyte immunosuppressants. Primary polyclonal human B cells underwent in vitro stimulation and their proliferation, production of immunoglobulins (Igs) and of cytokines, and expression of cell surface molecules were analysed using various stimuli. ODN2006, a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) agonist, was the most potent general B cell stimulus. Subsequently, we investigated on which human B cell lines ODN2006 evoked the broadest immunostimulatory effects. The Namalwa cell line proved to be the most responsive upon TLR9 stimulation and hence may serve as a relevant, homogeneous, and stable B cell model in an in vitro phenotypic assay for the discovery of new targets and inhibitors of the B cell activation processes. As for the read-out for such screening assay, it is proposed that the expression of activation and costimulatory surface markers reliably reflects B lymphocyte activation. PMID:28116319

  3. A critical role of Rap1b in B-cell trafficking and marginal zone B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuhong; Yu, Mei; Podd, Andrew; Wen, Renren; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena; White, Gilbert C; Wang, Demin

    2008-05-01

    B-cell development is orchestrated by complex signaling networks. Rap1 is a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins and has 2 isoforms, Rap1a and Rap1b. Although Rap1 has been suggested to have an important role in a variety of cellular processes, no direct evidence demonstrates a role for Rap1 in B-cell biology. In this study, we found that Rap1b was the dominant isoform of Rap1 in B cells. We discovered that Rap1b deficiency in mice barely affected early development of B cells but markedly reduced marginal zone (MZ) B cells in the spleen and mature B cells in peripheral and mucosal lymph nodes. Rap1b-deficient B cells displayed normal survival and proliferation in vivo and in vitro. However, Rap1b-deficient B cells had impaired adhesion and reduced chemotaxis in vitro, and lessened homing to lymph nodes in vivo. Furthermore, we found that Rap1b deficiency had no marked effect on LPS-, BCR-, or SDF-1-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and AKT but clearly impaired SDF-1-mediated activation of Pyk-2, a key regulator of SDF-1-mediated B-cell migration. Thus, we have discovered a critical and distinct role of Rap1b in mature B-cell trafficking and development of MZ B cells.

  4. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    thyroglobulin (Tg) by human peripheral B cells in reconstituted whole blood. Significant binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated-Tg to B cells was observed, and absorption of Tg-reactive antibodies from serum markedly reduced this uptake, as did inactivation of serum complement or blockade...... was strongly inhibited by complement inactivation and by immunoabsorption of Tg-reactive antibodies. Furthermore, this T cell response was abrogated by depletion of B cells from the PBMC culture. These data imply that uptake of complement-opsonized Tg / anti-Tg complexes and subsequent presentation of Tg by B...... of complement receptor types 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21). T cell responsiveness to Tg was examined in a preparation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured in the presence of autologous serum. A subset of CD4(+) T cells exhibited a dose-dependent proliferative response to Tg, which...

  5. Therapeutic strategies targeting B-cells in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Ron

    2016-07-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory and demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that traditionally has been considered to be mediated primarily by T-cells. Increasing evidence, however, suggests the fundamental role of B-cells in the pathogenesis of the disease. Recent strategies targeting B-cells in MS have demonstrated impressive and sometimes surprising results: B-cell depletion by monoclonal antibodies targeting the B-cell surface antigen CD20 (e.g. rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab) was shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory effect in MS with favorable risk-benefit ratio, with ocrelizumab demonstrating efficacy in both relapsing-remitting (RR) and primary-progressive (PP) MS in phase III clinical trials. Depletion of CD52 expressing T- and B-cells and monocytes by alemtuzumab resulted in impressive and durable suppression of disease activity in RRMS patients. On the other hand, strategies targeting B-cell cytokines such as atacicept resulted in increased disease activity. As our understanding of the biology of B-cells in MS is increasing, new compounds that target B-cells continue to be developed which promise to further expand the armamentarium of MS therapies and allow for more individualized therapy for patients with this complex disease.

  6. Identification of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from Chinese HIV-1 infected person by magnetic beads separating B cells and single cell RT-PCR cloning%利用磁珠分选和单细胞RT-PCR筛选HIV-1 Env特异性单克隆抗体的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄湘滢; 余双庆; 程湛; 叶景荣; 徐柯; 冯霞; 曾毅

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a simple and practical method for screening of Env-specific monoclonal antibodies from HIV-1 infected individuals.Methods Human B cells were purified by negative sorting from PBMCs and memory B cells were further enriched using anti-CD27 microbeads.Gp120 antigen labbled with biotin was incubated with memory B cells to specifically bind IgG on cells membrane.The memory B cells expressing the Env-specific antibody were harvested by magnetic beads separating,counted and diluted to the level of single cell in each PCR well that loading with catch buffer containing RNase inhibitor to get RNAs.The antibody genes were amplified by single cell RT-PCR and nested PCR,cloned into eukaryotic expression vectors and transfected into 293T cells.The binding activity of recombinant antibodies to Env were tested by ELISA.Results Three monocolonal Env-specific antibodies were isolated from one HIV-1 infected individual.Conclusion We can obtain Env-specific antibody by biotin labbled antigen,magnetic beads separating technique coupled with single cell RT-PCR and expression cloning.%目的 建立一种简单易行的从HIV-1感染者中筛选包膜糖蛋白(envelope glycoprotein,Env)特异性单克隆抗体的方法.方法 采集HIV-1感染者抗凝全血,分离外周血单个核细胞,利用生物素标记的HIV Gp120抗原与B细胞膜上的IgG特异性结合,然后用链霉亲和素标记的磁珠分选出能够产生Env特异性抗体的记忆性B细胞.用单细胞RT-PCR法从记忆性B细胞中扩增抗体的重链可变区基因与轻链可变区的基因并克隆到表达载体中,将携带重链基因的质粒与携带轻链基因的质粒共转染293T细胞,获得HIV-1特异性人单克隆抗体,并进行抗体结合活性的鉴定.结果 从1例我国HIV-1感染者记忆性B细胞中筛选出3株对HIV-1 Env抗原有结合活性的单克隆抗体.结论 利用生物素标记抗原与记忆性B细胞特异结合,并用亲和素标记的磁珠对细胞

  7. B-cell clonality in the liver of hepatitis C virus-infected patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-Bin Fan; You-Fu Zhu; An-Shen Chen; Mu-Xiu Zhou; Fu-Ming Yan; Xiao-Ju Ma; Hao Zhou

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The association of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with type Ⅱ mixed cryoglobulinemia is well established, but the role of HCV in B-cell lymphoma remains controversial. In patients with HCV infection, B-cell clonal expansions have been detected in peripheral blood and bone marrow, and a high been documented. Liver biopsies in chronic HCV infection frequently show portal lymphoid infiltrates with features of B follicles, whose clonality has not yet been investigated. The object of this study was to determine the frequency of liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells in 40 patients with HCV infection. METHODS: Eight hundred and forty-eight patients were studied prospectively, including 40 HCV-positive patients and 808 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Immunohistochemical study for B- and T-cell markers was performed on the paraffin-embedded liver tissue sections. The clonality of lymphoid B-cells was tested using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach designed to identify immunoglobulin heavy chain gene ( IgH) rearrangements. RESULTS: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells were detected in the liver for 4 (10%) of 40 HCV-positive patients but were present in only 3 (0.37%) of 808 liver biopsy specimens with chronic HBV infection. Chi-square testing showed that the monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver was more frequent in the HCV-infected patients ( P = 0.000). A clonal IgH rearrangement was detected in 5 (71.4%) of 7 liver biopsy specimens with monoclonal B-cells infiltration. In 2 of 5 patients with both a clonal B-cell expansion and monoclonal B-cells infiltration in the liver, a definite B-cell malignancy was finally diagnosed. CONCLUSION: Liver-infiltrating monoclonal B-cells are detected in the liver of patients with chronic HCV and HBV infection. A high percentage of patients with monoclonal B-cells infiltration and B-cell clonality in the liver were finally diagnosed as having a definite B-cell malignancy.

  8. B cell-directed therapies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperi, Christiane; Stüve, Olaf; Hemmer, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory neurological disease of the CNS that goes along with demyelination and neurodegeneration. It is probably caused by an autoimmune response against the CNS, which emerges from the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Although major progress has been made in the treatment of MS, it is still the leading cause for acquired nontraumatic neurological disability in young adults. Several therapeutic agents have been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), aiming at the reduction of relapses and a delay in disability progression. Three therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20-positive B cells (rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab) were investigated in MRI-based Phase II and Phase III trials in RRMS, providing consistent evidence for a disease-ameliorating effect of B cell depleting therapies in MS. Here, we discuss the role of B cells and review current and future therapeutic approaches to target B cells in MS.

  9. Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein beta are targeted by miR-155 in B cells of Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Costinean, Stefan; Sandhu, Sukhinder K; Pedersen, Irene M

    2009-01-01

    We showed that Emicro-MiR-155 transgenic mice develop acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma. Most of these leukemias start at approximately 9 months irrespective of the mouse strain. They are preceded by a polyclonal pre-B-cell proliferation, have variable clinical presentation......, are transplantable, and develop oligo/monoclonal expansion. In this study, we show that in these transgenic mice the B-cell precursors have the highest MiR-155 transgene expression and are at the origin of the leukemias. We determine that Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol-5-phosphatase (SHIP) and CCAAT...... a chain of events that leads to the accumulation of large pre-B cells and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/high-grade lymphoma....

  10. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Plzakova

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ΔiglC and ΔftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis.

  11. BAFF enhances chemotaxis of primary human B cells: a particular synergy between BAFF and CXCL13 on memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Gamal; Borhis, Gwenoline; Lefevre, Eric A; Chaoul, Nada; Deshayes, Frederique; Dessirier, Valérie; Lapree, Genevieve; Tsapis, Andreas; Richard, Yolande

    2008-03-01

    B-cell-activating factor of the TNF family, (BAFF), and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) regulate B-lymphocyte survival and activation. We report that BAFF, but not APRIL, increased the chemotactic response of primary human B cells to CCL21, CXCL12, and CXCL13. The BAFF-induced increase in B-cell chemotaxis was totally abolished by blockade of BAFF-R and was strongly dependent on the activation of PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, and p38MAPK pathways. BAFF had similar effects on the chemotaxis of naive and memory B cells in response to CCL21 but increased more strongly that of memory B cells to CXCL13 than that of naive B cells. Our findings indicate a previously unreported role for the BAFF/BAFF-R pair in mature B-cell chemotaxis. The synergy between CXCL13 and BAFF produced by stromal cells and follicular dendritic cells may have important implications for B-cell homeostasis, the development of normal B-cell areas, and for the formation of germinal center-like follicles that may be observed in various autoimmune diseases.

  12. Anti-B-Cell Therapies in Autoimmune Neurological Diseases: Rationale and Efficacy Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexopoulos, Harry; Biba, Angie; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2016-01-01

    B cells have an ever-increasing role in the etiopathology of a number of autoimmune neurological disorders, acting as antibody-producing cells and, most importantly, as sensors, coordinators, and regulators of the immune response. B cells, among other functions, regulate the T-cell activation process through their participation in antigen presentation and production of cytokines. The availability of monoclonal antibodies or fusion proteins against B-cell surface molecules or B-cell trophic factors bestows a rational approach for treating autoimmune neurological disorders, even when T cells are the main effector cells. This review summarizes basic aspects of B-cell biology, discusses the role(s) of B cells in neurological autoimmunity, and presents anti-B-cell drugs that are either currently on the market or are expected to be available in the near future for treating neurological autoimmune disorders.

  13. Human B cell activating factor (BCAF): production by a human T cell tumor line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fevrier, M; Diu, A; Mollier, P; Abadie, A; Olive, D; Mawas, C; Theze, J

    1989-01-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that supernatants from human T cell clones stimulated by a pair of anti-CD2 monoclonal antibodies cause resting human B cells to become activated and to proliferate in the absence of any other signals. The activity responsible for these effects was shown to be different from already characterized lymphokines and in particular from IL-2 and IL-4, and was named B Cell Activating Factor or BCAF. In this paper, we describe the production of BCAF by a human T cell tumor line T687 after phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulation; this production can be potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). We further show that the stimulatory phase can be separated from the secretory phase thereby avoiding contamination of BCAF-containing supernatant by PMA and PHA. Supernatants produced under these conditions do not contain either IL-4 or IFN but contain traces of lymphotoxin and 2 to 10 ng/ml of IL-2. The T687 cell line will allow us to obtain a large volume of supernatant for biochemical study and purification of the molecule(s) responsible for BCAF activity.

  14. New drugs for aggressive B-cell and T-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Niels; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Over the past decade an unprecedented number of new drugs for lymphomas have been developed. Most of these new drugs target molecules or pathways that are important for the growth and proliferation of lymphomas. The introduction of the B-lymphoma specific monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, rituximab, has improved the prognosis of patients with B-cell lymphomas more than any other drug in the past 50 years; today less than half of the patients with aggressive B-cell lymphomas die of their disease than in the pre-rituximab era. Many new drugs are now available for clinical testing in addition to new CD20 antibodies and antibodies directed against other surface molecules specifically or preferentially expressed on the lymphoma-cell surface. A prerequisite for the development of these drugs was the recognition of aberrant cell-signal transduction involved in lymphoma pathogenesis and progression. New therapeutic targets include receptor tyrosine and cyclin-dependent kinases, histone deacetylases, and molecules involved in the regulation of apoptosis. The definition of the role of these new drugs alone or in combination with established chemotherapy regimens in adequately designed prospective trials represents one of the major challenges in clinical lymphoma research.

  15. Generation and characterization of human B lymphocyte stimulator blocking monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Weiliang; Zhang, Jianjun; Pei, Lili; Fang, Shuping; Liu, Honghao; Wang, Ruixue; Su, Yunpeng

    2016-09-01

    The cytokine, B lymphocyte stimulator (Blys) is essential for activation and proliferation of B cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of B-cell mediated autoimmune diseases. Based on its essential activity, Blys may be a potential therapeutic target for human autoimmune diseases. In this article, we have described the development of a novel humanized anti-Blys antibody, NMB04, that binds with high affinity and specificity to both soluble and membrane bound Blys. This monoclonal antibody has the potential to block Blys binding to all its three receptors, TACI, BCMA and BR-3. Further in vivo studies revealed that NMB04 possessed more potent inhibitory activity against human Blys as compared to an existing antibody, Belimumab. Therefore, NMB04 may have potential as a therapeutic candidate targeting autoimmune diseases.

  16. B cell development in the bone marrow is regulated by homeostatic feedback exerted by mature B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitit eShahaf

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis in the B cell compartment is strictly imposed to balance cell production and cell loss. However, it is not clear whether B cell development in the bone marrow (BM is an autonomous process or subjected to regulation by the peripheral B cell compartment. To specifically address this question, we used mice transgenic for human CD20, where effective depletion of B lineage cells is obtained upon administration of mouse-anti-human CD20 antibodies, in the absence of any effect on other cell lineages and/or tissues. We followed the kinetics of B cell return to equilibrium by BrdU labeling and flow cytometry and analyzed the resulting data by mathematical modeling. Labeling was much faster in depleted mice. Compared to control mice, B cell-depleted mice exhibited a higher proliferation rate in the pro-/pre-B compartment, and higher cell death and lower differentiation in the immature B cell compartment. We validated the first result by analysis of the expression of Ki67, the nuclear protein expressed in proliferating cells, and the second using Annexin-V staining. Collectively, our results suggest that B lymphopoiesis is subjected to homeostatic feedback mechanisms imposed by mature B cells in the peripheral compartment.

  17. B-cell receptor signaling inhibitors for treatment of autoimmune inflammatory diseases and B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Kamal D; Di Paolo, Julie A; Gold, Michael R

    2013-08-01

    B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling is essential for normal B-cell development, selection, survival, proliferation, and differentiation into antibody-secreting cells. Similarly, this pathway plays a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple B-cell malignancies. Genetic and pharmacological approaches have established an important role for the Spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase isoform p110delta (PI3Kδ) in coupling the BCR and other BCRs to B-cell survival, migration, and activation. In the past few years, several small-molecule inhibitory drugs that target PI3Kδ, Btk, and Syk have been developed and shown to have efficacy in clinical trials for the treatment of several types of B-cell malignancies. Emerging preclinical data have also shown a critical role of BCR signaling in the activation and function of self-reactive B cells that contribute to autoimmune diseases. Because BCR signaling plays a major role in both B-cell-mediated autoimmune inflammation and B-cell malignancies, inhibition of this pathway may represent a promising new strategy for treating these diseases. This review summarizes recent achievements in the mechanism of action, pharmacological properties, and clinical activity and toxicity of these BCR signaling inhibitors, with a focus on their emerging role in treating lymphoid malignancies and autoimmune disorders.

  18. B cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Perry

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease.

  19. B-cell-targeted therapy for systemic lupus erythematosus: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Changhai; Foote, Simon; Jones, Graeme

    2008-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a classic autoimmune disease characterized by a myriad of immune system aberrations, most likely resulting from pathogenic autoantibody production, immune complex deposition, and subsequent end-organ damage. B cells play a key role in the pathogenesis; therefore, B-cell-targeted therapies, including B-cell depletion and blockage of B-cell survival factors such as B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are potential therapeutic targets for SLE. In uncontrolled clinical trials from approximately 20 studies, rituximab--a mouse-human chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that effectively depletes B cells--has been demonstrated to reduce disease activity and decrease serum autoantibodies, with a clinical response of 86% in a case series of approximately 400 SLE patients with refractory disease, with or without concomitant use of cyclophosphamide. Epratuzumab, a humanized anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody that partially depletes B cells, has also been shown to reduce disease activity but not to decrease autoantibody levels in patients with moderately active SLE. Randomized controlled phase I/II trials in patients with active SLE have documented that belimumab, a humanized anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody, reduces B-cell numbers, inhibits disease activity and decreases anti-double-stranded DNA autoantibody in SLE patients. All these therapies are well tolerated, but accompanying infectious complications have been observed. Other B-cell-targeted therapies such as 'humanized' monoclonal antibodies to CD20 (e.g. ocrelizumab) and agents that interrupt B-cell/T-cell interactions also have potential, and the efficacy of these, along with rituximab, belimumab and epratuzumab, needs to be determined by randomized controlled trials.

  20. The primate EAE model points at EBV-infected B cells as a preferential therapy target in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Haanstra, Krista; Verschoor, Ernst; Laman, Jon D.; Kap, Yolanda S.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the

  1. The primate EAE model points at EBV-infected B cells as a preferential therapy target in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. 't Hart (Bert); S.A. Jagessar (Anwar); K.G. Haanstra (Krista); E.J. Verschoor (Ernst); J.D. Laman (Jon); Y.S. Kap (Yolanda)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new

  2. Rehabilitation or the death penalty: autoimmune B cells in the dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Lekh N; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-03-01

    CD20-based monoclonal antibodies have become established as treatments for lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis and dermatomyositis, with the principle therapeutic mechanism relating to B-cell depletion through effector cell engagement. An article by Brühl et al. in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 705-715] reveals a fundamentally distinct mechanism of silencing autoimmune B-cell responses. Rather than B-cell depletion, the authors use anti-CD79b antibodies to induce B-cell tolerance and suppress humoral immune responses against collagen to prevent the development of arthritis in mice. Here we highlight the differences in the mechanisms used by anti-CD20 and anti-CD79b Ab therapy and discuss why depletion of B cells may not be required to treat autoimmune arthritis and other B-cell-associated pathologies.

  3. Rationally designed BCL6 inhibitors target activated B cell diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Mariano G; Yu, Wenbo; Beguelin, Wendy; Teater, Matthew R; Geng, Huimin; Goldstein, Rebecca L; Oswald, Erin; Hatzi, Katerina; Yang, Shao-Ning; Cohen, Joanna; Shaknovich, Rita; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Cheng, Huimin; Liang, Dongdong; Cho, Hyo Je; Abbott, Joshua; Tam, Wayne; Du, Wei; Leonard, John P; Elemento, Olivier; Cerchietti, Leandro; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Xue, Fengtian; MacKerell, Alexander D; Melnick, Ari M

    2016-09-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) arise from proliferating B cells transiting different stages of the germinal center reaction. In activated B cell DLBCLs (ABC-DLBCLs), a class of DLBCLs that respond poorly to current therapies, chromosomal translocations and amplification lead to constitutive expression of the B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL6) oncogene. The role of BCL6 in maintaining these lymphomas has not been investigated. Here, we designed small-molecule inhibitors that display higher affinity for BCL6 than its endogenous corepressor ligands to evaluate their therapeutic efficacy for targeting ABC-DLBCL. We used an in silico drug design functional-group mapping approach called SILCS to create a specific BCL6 inhibitor called FX1 that has 10-fold greater potency than endogenous corepressors and binds an essential region of the BCL6 lateral groove. FX1 disrupted formation of the BCL6 repression complex, reactivated BCL6 target genes, and mimicked the phenotype of mice engineered to express BCL6 with corepressor binding site mutations. Low doses of FX1 induced regression of established tumors in mice bearing DLBCL xenografts. Furthermore, FX1 suppressed ABC-DLBCL cells in vitro and in vivo, as well as primary human ABC-DLBCL specimens ex vivo. These findings indicate that ABC-DLBCL is a BCL6-dependent disease that can be targeted by rationally designed inhibitors that exceed the binding affinity of natural BCL6 ligands.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  6. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  7. Exploiting human memory B cell heterogeneity for improved vaccine efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel Thomas Pauli

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The major goal in vaccination is establishment of long-term, prophylactic humoral memory to a pathogen. Two major components to long-lived humoral memory are plasma cells for the production of specific immunoglobulin and memory B cells that survey for their specific antigen in the periphery for later affinity maturation, proliferation, and differentiation. The study of human B cell memory has been aided by the discovery of a general marker for B cell memory, expression of CD27; however, new data suggests the existence of CD27- memory B cells as well. These recently described non-canonical memory populations have increasingly pointed to the heterogeneity of the memory compartment. The novel B memory subsets in humans appear to have unique origins, localization, and functions compared to what was considered to be a classical memory B cell. In this article, we review the known B cell memory subsets, the establishment of B cell memory in vaccination and infection, and how understanding these newly described subsets can inform vaccine design and disease treatment.

  8. The Primate EAE Model Points at EBV-Infected B Cells as a Preferential Therapy Target in Multiple Sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    ‘t Hart, Bert A.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Haanstra, Krista; Verschoor, Ernst; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S.

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the releva...

  9. The primate EAE model points at EBV-infected B cells as a preferential therapy target in multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Bert A. 'T; Sunil Anwar Jagessar; Krista eHaanstra; Ernst eVerschoor; Jon eLaman; Yolanda eKap

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the...

  10. B-cell activation with CD40L or CpG measures the function of B-cell subsets and identifies specific defects in immunodeficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emiliano; Farroni, Chiara; Cascioli, Simona; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Piano Mortari, Eva; Leonardi, Lucia; Scarselli, Alessia; Valentini, Diletta; Cancrini, Caterina; Duse, Marzia; Grimsholm, Ola; Carsetti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Around 65% of primary immunodeficiencies are antibody deficiencies. Functional tests are useful tools to study B-cell functions in vitro. However, no accepted guidelines for performing and evaluating functional tests have been issued yet. Here, we report our experience on the study of B-cell functions in infancy and throughout childhood. We show that T-independent stimulation with CpG measures proliferation and differentiation potential of memory B cells. Switched memory B cells respond better than IgM memory B cells. On the other hand, CD40L, a T-dependent stimulus, does not induce plasma cell differentiation, but causes proliferation of naïve and memory B cells. During childhood, the production of plasmablasts in response to CpG increases with age mirroring the development of memory B cells. The response to CD40L does not change with age. In patients with selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD), we observed that switched memory B cells are reduced due to the absence of IgA memory B cells. In agreement, IgA plasma cells are not generated in response to CpG. Unexpectedly, B cells from SIgAD patients show a reduced proliferative response to CD40L. Our results demonstrate that functional tests are an important tool to assess the functions of the humoral immune system.

  11. 抗东方马脑炎病毒结构蛋白E2单克隆抗体的制备及其抗原表位的鉴定%Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against eastern equine encephalitis virus E2 protein and the B-cell epitopes identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晶; 吴东来; 孙恩成; 刘霓红; 杨涛; 杨银辉; 耿宏伟; 秦永丽; 王凌凤; 徐青元

    2011-01-01

    为制备抗东方马脑炎病毒(EEEV)结构蛋白E2的单克隆抗体(MAb)并鉴定其抗原表位,本研究以Bac-to-Bac真核表达系统表达EEEV E2蛋白,纯化后作为免疫原免疫BALB/c小鼠,取其脾淋巴细胞与小鼠骨髓瘤细胞SP2/0进行融合.以原核表达载体pET-30a表达并纯化的EEEV E2蛋白作为包被抗原建立间接ELISA方法筛选杂交瘤细胞,获得4株稳定分泌抗EEEV E2蛋白MAbs的杂交瘤细胞株,分别命名为6F3、6F11、7C11、8B11.Western blot与间接免疫荧光试验结果表明,获得的4株MAbs均与EEEV呈阳性反应,而与西方马脑炎病毒、乙型脑炎病毒以及登革热病毒1型~4型呈阴性反应.利用部分重叠的原核表达的短肽对E2蛋白抗原表位进行鉴定,初步确定MAb 6F11、7C11和8B11识别的抗原表位均为E-33 (321EGLEYTWGNHPPKRVW336),而MAb 6F3无短肽与其反应,推测可能为构象表位.本研究结果为建立EEEV型特异性检测方法、研究E2蛋白结构功能及该病的进一步防制奠定了基础.%For preparation of monoclonal antibodies (Mab) against eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) structural glycoprotein E2 and identification of the B-cell epitopes, B ALB/c mice were immunized with protein E2 expressed in Bac-to-Bac eukaryotic expression system. Splenocytes of the BALB/c mice were fused with myeloma cell SP2/0 for producing hybridoma. Four hybridomas stably secreting Mabs against the protein E2 were developed, designated 6F3, 6F11, 7C11 and 8B11, and determined by indirect ELISA, coating with purified EEEV E2 expressed in E. Coli. The western blot and IFA demonstrated that the Mabs were able to react positively with EEEV, whereas no cross reaction was found for western equine encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and Dengue virus serotype 1 to 4. Further epitope mapping of EEEV E2 protein with a set of shortpeptides showed that Mab 6F11, 7C11 and 8B11 recognized the linear epitope at E-33 (^'EGLEYTWGNHPPKRVW336), but

  12. Increased BCR responsiveness in B cells from patients with chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jessica L; Tata, Prasanthi V; Fore, Matthew S; Wooten, Jenna; Rudra, Sharmistha; Deal, Allison M; Sharf, Andrew; Hoffert, Todd; Roehrs, Philip A; Shea, Thomas C; Serody, Jonathan S; Richards, Kristy L; Jagasia, Madan; Lee, Stephanie J; Rizzieri, David; Horwitz, Mitchell E; Chao, Nelson J; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie

    2014-03-27

    Although B cells have emerged as important contributors to chronic graft-versus-host-disease (cGVHD) pathogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for their sustained activation remain unknown. We previously showed that patients with cGVHD have significantly increased B cell-activating factor (BAFF) levels and that their B cells are activated and resistant to apoptosis. Exogenous BAFF confers a state of immediate responsiveness to antigen stimulation in normal murine B cells. To address this in cGVHD, we studied B-cell receptor (BCR) responsiveness in 48 patients who were >1 year out from allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). We found that B cells from cGVHD patients had significantly increased proliferative responses to BCR stimulation along with elevated basal levels of the proximal BCR signaling components B cell linker protein (BLNK) and Syk. After initiation of BCR signaling, cGVHD B cells exhibited increased BLNK and Syk phosphorylation compared with B cells from patients without cGVHD. Blocking Syk kinase activity prevented relative post-HSCT BCR hyper-responsiveness of cGVHD B cells. These data suggest that a lowered BCR signaling threshold in cGVHD associates with increased B-cell proliferation and activation in response to antigen. We reveal a mechanism underpinning aberrant B-cell activation in cGVHD and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of the involved kinases may benefit these patients.

  13. Coordinate suppression of B cell lymphoma by PTEN and SHIP phosphatases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miletic, Ana V; Anzelon-Mills, Amy N; Mills, David M

    2010-01-01

    results in lethal T cell lymphomas, we find that animals lacking PTEN or SHIP in B cells show no evidence of malignancy. However, concomitant deletion of PTEN and SHIP (bPTEN/SHIP(-/-)) results in spontaneous and lethal mature B cell neoplasms consistent with marginal zone lymphoma or, less frequently......, follicular or centroblastic lymphoma. bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells exhibit enhanced survival and express more MCL1 and less Bim. These cells also express low amounts of p27(kip1) and high amounts of cyclin D3 and thus appear poised to undergo proliferative expansion. Unlike normal B cells, bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells...... proliferate to the prosurvival factor B cell activating factor (BAFF). Interestingly, although BAFF availability may promote lymphoma progression, we demonstrate that BAFF is not required for the expansion of transferred bPTEN/SHIP(-/-) B cells. This study reveals that PTEN and SHIP act cooperatively...

  14. Nuclear factor XIIIa staining (clone AC-1A1 mouse monoclonal) is a sensitive and specific marker to discriminate sebaceous proliferations from other cutaneous clear cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlenhake, Elizabeth E; Clark, Lindsey N; Smoller, Bruce R; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2016-08-01

    Sebaceous carcinoma is a rare but serious malignancy that may be difficult to diagnose when poorly differentiated. Other epithelial tumors with clear cell change may mimic sebaceous carcinoma. Few useful or specific immunohistochemical markers for sebaceous differentiation are available. Nuclear staining with factor XIIIa (clone AC-1A1) was recently found to be a highly sensitive marker of sebaceous differentiation. We evaluated nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining in sebaceous neoplasms vs. other cutaneous clear cell tumors. We stained 27 sebaceous proliferations: sebaceous hyperplasia (7), sebaceous adenoma (8), sebaceoma (5), sebaceous carcinoma (7). We also stained 67 tumors with clear cell change: basal cell carcinoma (8), squamous cell carcinoma (8), hidradenoma (7), desmoplastic trichilemmoma (2), trichilemmoma (10), trichilemmal carcinoma (3), clear cell acanthoma (9), atypical fibroxanthoma (1), syringoma (8), trichoepithelioma (1), metastatic renal cell carcinoma (2), and nevi with balloon cell change (8). Nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining was present in 100% of sebaceous proliferations; 96% displayed strong staining. Non-sebaceous clear cell tumors were negative or only weakly positive with factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) in 95.5%; only 4.5% showed strong staining. This suggests that strong nuclear factor XIIIa (AC-1A1) staining is a sensitive and specific marker of sebaceous neoplasms vs. other clear cell tumors.

  15. Clinicopathological study of gene rearrangement and immunohistochemical pattern of primary intracranial diffuse large B-cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han X

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinicopathological and imaging characteristics of primary intracranial diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (PIC-DLBCL. Imaging, histopathological findings, and immunohistochemical staining characteristics were analyzed, and the immunoglobulin heavy and light chain gene rearrangement of 25 PIC-DLBCL cases was examined. MicroRNA was extracted from 10 cases each of PIC-DLBCL, extracerebral germinal center DLBCL (GC-DLBCL, and extracerebral non-GC-DLBCL (NGC-DLBCL; we conducted chip hybridization and comparatively analyzed the difference among the three. PIC-DLBCLs typically involved no less than two cerebral lobes (10/25; the frontal lobe was affected most often (6/25. Target-shaped structures were observed in all PIC-DLBCLs due to the proliferation of centroblast-like large lymphocytes surrounding the vessels. There was strong and diffuse immunostaining for CD20 and CD79a, and negative immunostaining for CD3, CD5, CD23, and cyclin D1 for all PIC-DLBCLs. The percentage of cells with nuclear positivity for anti-Ki67 antibody ranged 50-90% (mean, 80%. Three, 19, and 22 PIC-DLBCLs were CD10-, Bcl-6-, and melanoma ubiquitous mutated 1-positive, respectively. Twenty-four PIC-DLBCLs were B-cell monoclonal. MicroRNA hybridization showed that 788 PIC-DLBCL microRNAs/segments increased to at least twice of that of NGC-DLBCLs, and 401 PIC-DLBCL microRNAs/segments declined to less than half of that of NGC-DLBCLs. Six hundred and eleven PIC-DLBCL microRNAs/segments increased to at least twice that of GC-DLBCLs, and 229 PIC-DLBCL microRNAs/segments declined to less than half of that in GC-DLBCLs. PIC-DLBCL typically affected multiple sites, tended to occur in older men, arose from activated B cells, had high B-cell monoclonality; its microRNA expression differed from that of NGC-DLBCL and GC-DLBCL.

  16. B-cell targeted treatments for lupus: the journey counts as much as the destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falgarone, Géraldine; Dhote, Robin; Boissier, Marie-Christophe

    2012-10-01

    Obstacles facing therapeutic trials in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) include the low incidence, seriousness, complexity, and clinical polymorphism of the disease. A large-scale multicenter design has been required in most cases. Over the last few years, several biologics have been evaluated as treatments for lupus nephritis or for the skin and joint manifestations of SLE. The central role for the B-cell in SLE, together with improved knowledge of the targets on the B-cell surface, has prompted efforts to develop monoclonal antibodies as treatments for SLE. The two available monoclonal antibodies are rituximab (anti-CD20 antibody) and belimumab (anti-BlyS antibody). The results obtained with belimumab were used to develop a new measurement tool, the SLE Responder Index (SRI), and prompted an application for a license to use belimumab in SLE. Other targets identified on the B-cell surface are being evaluated.

  17. Transcription factors regulating B cell fate in the germinal centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recaldin, T; Fear, D J

    2016-01-01

    Diversification of the antibody repertoire is essential for the normal operation of the vertebrate adaptive immune system. Following antigen encounter, B cells are activated, proliferate rapidly and undergo two diversification events; somatic hypermutation (followed by selection), which enhances the affinity of the antibody for its cognate antigen, and class-switch recombination, which alters the effector functions of the antibody to adapt the response to the challenge faced. B cells must then differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells or long-lived memory B cells. These activities take place in specialized immunological environments called germinal centres, usually located in the secondary lymphoid organs. To complete the germinal centre activities successfully, a B cell adopts a transcriptional programme that allows it to migrate to specific sites within the germinal centre, proliferate, modify its DNA recombination and repair pathways, alter its apoptotic potential and finally undergo terminal differentiation. To co-ordinate these processes, B cells employ a number of 'master regulator' transcription factors which mediate wholesale transcriptomic changes. These master transcription factors are mutually antagonistic and form a complex regulatory network to maintain distinct gene expression programs. Within this network, multiple points of positive and negative feedback ensure the expression of the 'master regulators', augmented by a number of 'secondary' factors that reinforce these networks and sense the progress of the immune response. In this review we will discuss the different activities B cells must undertake to mount a successful T cell-dependent immune response and describe how a regulatory network of transcription factors controls these processes.

  18. Interleukin-24 inhibits the plasma cell differentiation program in human germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarof, Ghyath; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Gary-Gouy, Hélène; Durand-Gasselin, Ingrid; Krzysiek, Roman; Dalloul, Ali

    2010-03-04

    Complex molecular mechanisms control B-cell fate to become a memory or a plasma cell. Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a class II family cytokine of poorly understood immune function that regulates the cell cycle. We previously observed that IL-24 is strongly expressed in leukemic memory-type B cells. Here we show that IL-24 is also expressed in human follicular B cells; it is more abundant in CD27(+) memory B cells and CD5-expressing B cells, whereas it is low to undetectable in centroblasts and plasma cells. Addition of IL-24 to B cells, cultured in conditions shown to promote plasma cell differentiation, strongly inhibited plasma cell generation and immunoglobulin G (IgG) production. By contrast, IL-24 siRNA increased terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. IL-24 is optimally induced by BCR triggering and CD40 engagement; IL-24 increased CD40-induced B-cell proliferation and modulated the transcription of key factors involved in plasma cell differentiation. It also inhibited activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and inhibited the transcription of IL-10. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-24 is a novel cytokine involved in T-dependent antigen (Ag)-driven B-cell differentiation and suggest its physiologic role in favoring germinal center B-cell maturation in memory B cells at the expense of plasma cells.

  19. HIV-associated memory B cell perturbations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiliang; Luo, Zhenwu; Wan, Zhuang; Wu, Hao; Li, Wei; Zhang, Tong; Jiang, Wei

    2015-05-21

    Memory B-cell depletion, hyperimmunoglobulinemia, and impaired vaccine responses are the hallmark of B cell perturbations inhuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease. Although B cells are not the targets for HIV infection, there is evidence for B cell, especially memory B cell dysfunction in HIV disease mediated by other cells or HIV itself. This review will focus on HIV-associated phenotypic and functional alterations in memory B cells. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanism underlying these perturbations and the effect of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on these perturbations.

  20. DNA methyltransferase 1 and DNA methylation patterning contribute to germinal center B-cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaknovich, Rita; Cerchietti, Leandro; Tsikitas, Lucas;

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of germinal center (GC) B cells includes the unique ability to tolerate rapid proliferation and the mutagenic actions of activation induced cytosine deaminase (AICDA). Given the importance of epigenetic patterning in determining cellular phenotypes, we examined DNA methylation and t......, the GC B cells of Dnmt1 hypomorphic animals showed evidence of increased DNA damage, suggesting dual roles for DNMT1 in DNA methylation and double strand DNA break repair.......The phenotype of germinal center (GC) B cells includes the unique ability to tolerate rapid proliferation and the mutagenic actions of activation induced cytosine deaminase (AICDA). Given the importance of epigenetic patterning in determining cellular phenotypes, we examined DNA methylation...... and the role of DNA methyltransferases in the formation of GCs. DNA methylation profiling revealed a marked shift in DNA methylation patterning in GC B cells versus resting/naive B cells. This shift included significant differential methylation of 235 genes, with concordant inverse changes in gene expression...

  1. High levels of SOX5 decrease proliferative capacity of human B cells, but permit plasmablast differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirzokhid Rakhmanov

    Full Text Available Currently very little is known about the differential expression and function of the transcription factor SOX5 during B cell maturation. We identified two new splice variants of SOX5 in human B cells, encoding the known L-SOX5B isoform and a new shorter isoform L-SOX5F. The SOX5 transcripts are highly expressed during late stages of B-cell differentiation, including atypical memory B cells, activated CD21low B cells and germinal center B cells of tonsils. In tonsillar sections SOX5 expression was predominantly polarized to centrocytes within the light zone. After in vitro stimulation, SOX5 expression was down-regulated during proliferation while high expression levels were permissible for plasmablast differentiation. Overexpression of L-SOX5F in human primary B lymphocytes resulted in reduced proliferation, less survival of CD138neg B cells, but comparable numbers of CD138+CD38hi plasmablasts compared to control cells. Thus, our findings describe for the first time a functional role of SOX5 during late B cell development reducing the proliferative capacity and thus potentially affecting the differentiation of B cells during the germinal center response.

  2. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-02-12

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  3. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Khan MD, FACP

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation. A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion. Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH

  4. Multiple Curricula for B Cell Developmental Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberg, Ellen V

    2016-09-20

    B-1 B cells differ from conventional B-2 B cells functionally, but how these differences relate to the ontogeny of these lineages has been unclear. Two recent Immunity articles, Kristiansen et al. (2016) and Montecino-Rodriguez et al. (2016), now provide insight into the origins of B-1 and B-2 B cells, revealing a multi-layered developmental program and successive waves of B cell precursors.

  5. Ikaros in B cell development and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MacLean; Sellars; Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    The zinc finger transcription factor,Ikaros,is a central regulator of hematopoiesis.It is required for the development of the earliest B cell progenitors and at later stages for VDJ recombination and B cell receptor expression.Mature B cells rely on Ikaros to set the activation threshold for various stimuli,and to choose the correct antibody isotype during class switch recombination.Thus,Ikaros contributes to nearly every level of B cell differentiation and function.

  6. B cell follicle-like structures in multiple sclerosis-with focus on the role of B cell activating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morten, Haugen; Frederiksen, Jette L; Vinter, Matilda Degn

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Follicle-like structures (FLS) have recently been found in the subarachnoid space in the leptomeninges in some patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They contain proliferating B lymphocytes, plasma cells....... In this review, we will discuss the role of FLS in MS pathogenesis and disease course and the possible influence by B cell activating factor (BAFF) and C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13)....

  7. B cells responses and cytokine production are regulated by their immune microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Monica I; Catalan-Dibene, Jovani; Zlotnik, Albert

    2015-08-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of two types of lymphocytes: T and B cells. These two lymphocytes originate from a common precursor, yet are fundamentally different with B cells mediating humoral immunity while T cells mediate cell mediated immunity. In cytokine production, naïve T cells produce multiple cytokines upon activation while naïve activated B cells do not. B cells are capable of producing cytokines, but their cytokine production depends on their differentiation state and activation conditions. Hence, unlike T cells that can produce a large amount of cytokines upon activation, B cells require specific differentiation and activation conditions to produce cytokines. Many cytokines act on B cells as well. Here, we discuss several cytokines and their effects on B cells including: Interleukins, IL-7, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, and Interferons, IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-γ. These cytokines play important roles in the development, survival, differentiation and/or proliferation of B cells. Certain chemokines also play important roles in B cell function, namely antibody production. As an example, we discuss CCL28, a chemokine that directs the migration of plasma cells to mucosal sites. We conclude with a brief overview of B cells as cytokine producers and their likely functional consequences on the immune response.

  8. Induction of polyclonal B cell activation and differentiation by the AIDS retrovirus (HTLV-III/LAV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, S.E.; Schnittman, S.M.; Lane, H.C.; Folks, T.; Koenig, S.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-03-05

    The immune systems of individuals infected with HTLV-III/LAV are characterized by a profound defect in cellular immunity together with paradoxical polyclonal B cell activation. The present study examined the direct effects of HTLV-III/LAV on B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells from healthy donors were incubated with a variety of HTLV-III/LAV isolates for 1 h and /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation was measured at multiple time points. Responses ranged from 9000-28,000 cpm and peaked on day 4. This B cell activation was not enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2 to culture, was not synergistic with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, was not modulated by the addition of T lymphocytes to culture, and was not associated with B cell transformation. Supernatant Ig could first be detected in virus-activated cultures at day 4, plateaued by day 8, and yielded a mean of 12,500 ng IgG+IgM/ml/50,000 B cells. Thus, HTLV-III/LAV is a potent T cell independent B cell mitogen capable of inducing B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation comparable in magnitude to that of the most potent B cell activators. This biological property of HTLV-III/LAV may help explain the profound polyclonal B cell activation observed in patients with AIDS and may provide investigators with another probe for investigating the mechanisms of B cell activation.

  9. Role of B Cells and Antibodies in Acquired Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Chan, John; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has documented a role for B cells and antibodies (Abs) in the immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Passive transfer studies with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against mycobacterial antigens have shown protection against the tubercle bacillus. B cells and Abs are believed to contribute to an enhanced immune response against Mtb by modulating various immunological components in the infected host including the T-cell compartment. Nevertheless, the extent and contribution of B cells and Abs to protection against Mtb remains uncertain. In this article we summarize the most relevant findings supporting the role of B cells and Abs in the defense against Mtb and discuss the potential mechanisms of protection. PMID:25301934

  10. Inherited predisposition to CLL is detectable as subclinical monoclonal B-lymphocyte expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, Andy C; Yuille, Martin R; Fuller, Julie; Cullen, Matthew; Kennedy, Ben; Richards, Stephen J; Jack, Andrew S; Matutes, Estella; Catovsky, Daniel; Hillmen, Peter; Houlston, Richard S

    2002-10-01

    Monoclonal chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)-phenotype cells are detectable in 3.5% of otherwise healthy persons using flow cytometric analysis of CD5/CD20/CD79b expression on CD19-gated B cells. To determine whether detection of such CLL-phenotype cells is indicative of an inherited predisposition, we examined 59 healthy, first-degree relatives of patients from 21 families with CLL. CLL-phenotype cells were detected in 8 of 59 (13.5%) relatives, representing a highly significant increase in risk (P =.00002). CLL-phenotype cell levels were stable with time and had the characteristics of indolent CLL. Indolent and aggressive clinical forms were found in family members, suggesting that initiation and proliferation involves distinct factors. The detection of CLL-phenotype cells provides a surrogate marker of carrier status, potentially facilitating gene identification through mapping in families and direct analysis of isolated CLL-phenotype cells.

  11. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  12. B Cell Autonomous TLR Signaling and Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Bahlburg, Almut; Rawlings, David J

    2009-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases and the recognition of importance of B cells in these disorders has grown dramatically in association with the remarkable success of B-cell depletion as a treatment for autoimmunity. The precise mechanisms that promote alterations in B cell tolerance remain incompletely defined. There is increasing evidence, however, that TLRs play a major role in these events. Stimulation of B cells via the TLR pathway not only leads to an increase in antibody production but also promotes additional changes including cytokine production and upregulation of activation markers increasing the effectiveness of B cells as APCs. Understanding the role of TLRs in systemic autoimmunity will not only provide insight into the disease pathogenesis but may also lead to the development of novel therapies. This article gives an overview of TLR signaling in B cells and the possible involvement of such signals in autoimmune diseases. PMID:18295736

  13. Memory B cells in mouse models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, B; Grimsholm, O; Thorarinsdottir, K; Ren, W; Jirholt, P; Gjertsson, I; Mårtensson, I-L

    2013-08-01

    One of the principles behind vaccination, as shown by Edward Jenner in 1796, and host protection is immunological memory, and one of the cells central to this is the antigen-experienced memory B cell that responds rapidly upon re-exposure to the initiating antigen. Classically, memory B cells have been defined as progenies of germinal centre (GC) B cells expressing isotype-switched and substantially mutated B cell receptors (BCRs), that is, membrane-bound antibodies. However, it has become apparent over the last decade that this is not the only pathway to B cell memory. Here, we will discuss memory B cells in mice, as defined by (1) cell surface markers; (2) multiple layers; (3) formation in a T cell-dependent and either GC-dependent or GC-independent manner; (4) formation in a T cell-independent fashion. Lastly, we will touch upon memory B cells in; (5) mouse models of autoimmune diseases.

  14. Antigen-specific memory B cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHeyzer-Williams, Louise J; McHeyzer-Williams, Michael G

    2005-01-01

    Helper T (Th) cell-regulated B cell immunity progresses in an ordered cascade of cellular development that culminates in the production of antigen-specific memory B cells. The recognition of peptide MHC class II complexes on activated antigen-presenting cells is critical for effective Th cell selection, clonal expansion, and effector Th cell function development (Phase I). Cognate effector Th cell-B cell interactions then promote the development of either short-lived plasma cells (PCs) or germinal centers (GCs) (Phase II). These GCs expand, diversify, and select high-affinity variants of antigen-specific B cells for entry into the long-lived memory B cell compartment (Phase III). Upon antigen rechallenge, memory B cells rapidly expand and differentiate into PCs under the cognate control of memory Th cells (Phase IV). We review the cellular and molecular regulators of this dynamic process with emphasis on the multiple memory B cell fates that develop in vivo.

  15. Rationale for B cell targeting in SLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, Iñaki

    2014-01-01

    B cells are central pathogenic players in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and multiple other autoinmune diseases through antibody production as well as antibody independent functiona. At the same time, B cells are known to play important regulatory functions that may protect against autoimmune manifestations. Yet, the functional role of different B cell populations and their contribution to disease remain to be understood. The advent of agents that specifically target B cells, in particular anti-CD20 and ant-BLyS antibodies, have demonstrated the efficacy of this approach for the treatment of human autoimmunity. The analysis of patients treated with these and other B cell agents provide a unique opportunity to understand the correlates of clinical response and the significance of different B cell subsets. Here we discuss this information and how it could be used to better understand SLE and improve the rational design of B cell directed therapies in this disease. PMID:24763533

  16. Early B-cell-specific inactivation of ATM synergizes with ectopic CyclinD1 expression to promote pre-germinal center B-cell lymphomas in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, K; Lee, B J; Li, C; Dubois, R L; Hobeika, E; Bhagat, G; Zha, S

    2015-06-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B cells causes cell autonomous, clonal mature B-cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly, naive B-cell-specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. Although EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increases the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas toward pre-GC-derived small lymphocytic neoplasms, sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naive B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.e. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-GC B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL.

  17. Early B-cell Specific Inactivation of ATM Synergizes with Ectopic CyclinD1 Expression to Promote Pre-germinal center B-cell Lymphomas in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lee, Brian J.; Li, Chen; Dubois, Richard L.; Hobeika, Elias; Bhagat, Govind; Zha, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase is a master regulator of the DNA damage response. ATM is frequently inactivated in human B-cell non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (B-NHL), including ~50% of mantle cell lymphomas (MCLs) characterized by ectopic expression of CyclinD1. Here we report that early and robust deletion of ATM in precursor/progenitor B-cells causes cell-autonomous, clonal mature B cell lymphomas of both pre- and post-germinal center (GC) origins. Unexpectedly naïve B cell specific deletion of ATM is not sufficient to induce lymphomas in mice, highlighting the important tumor suppressor function of ATM in immature B cells. While EμCyclinD1 is not sufficient to induce lymphomas, EμCyclinD1 accelerates the kinetics and increased the incidence of clonal lymphomas in ATM-deficient B-cells and skews the lymphomas towards pre-GC derived small lymphocytic neoplasms sharing morphological features of human MCL. This is in part due to CyclinD1-driven expansion of ATM-deficient naïve B cells with genomic instability, which promotes the deletions of additional tumor suppressor genes (i.g. Trp53, Mll2, Rb1 and Cdkn2a). Together these findings define a synergistic function of ATM and CyclinD1 in pre-germinal center B-cell proliferation and lymphomagenesis and provide a prototypic animal model to study the pathogenesis of human MCL. PMID:25676421

  18. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

  19. B cells are multifunctional players in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: insights from therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele eClaes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a severe disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by autoimmune inflammation and neurodegeneration. Historically, damage to the CNS was thought to be mediated predominantly by activated pro-inflammatory T cells. B cell involvement in the pathogenesis of MS was solely attributed to autoantibody production. The first clues for the involvement of antibody-independent B cell functions in MS pathology came from positive results in clinical trials of the B cell depleting treatment rituximab in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS. The survival of antibody-secreting plasma cells and decrease in T cell numbers indicated the importance of other B cell functions in MS such as antigen presentation, costimulation and cytokine production. Rituximab provided us with an example of how clinical trials can lead to new research opportunities concerning B cell biology. Moreover, analysis of the antibody-independent B cell functions in MS has gained interest since these trials. Limited information is present on the effects of current immunomodulatory therapies on B cell functions, although effects of both first-line (interferon, glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide, second-line (fingolimod, natalizumab and even third-line (monoclonal antibody therapies treatments on B cell subtype distribution, expression of functional surface markers and secretion of different cytokines by B cells have been studied to some extent. In this review, we summarize the effects of different MS related treatments on B cell functions that have been described up to now in order to find new research opportunities and contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells abrogate plasmablast formation and induce regulatory B cells independently of T helper cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franquesa, M; Mensah, F K; Huizinga, R; Strini, T; Boon, L; Lombardo, E; DelaRosa, O; Laman, J D; Grinyó, J M; Weimar, W; Betjes, M G H; Baan, C C; Hoogduijn, M J

    2015-03-01

    Mesenchymal or stromal stem cells (MSC) interact with cells of the immune system in multiple ways. Modulation of the immune system by MSC is believed to be a therapeutic option for autoimmune disease and transplant rejection. In recent years, B cells have moved into the focus of the attention as targets for the treatment of immune disorders. Current B-cell targeting treatment is based on the indiscriminate depletion of B cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether human adipose tissue-derived MSC (ASC) interact with B cells to affect their proliferation, differentiation, and immune function. ASC supported the survival of quiescent B cells predominantly via contact-dependent mechanisms. Coculture of B cells with activated T helper cells led to proliferation and differentiation of B cells into CD19(+) CD27(high) CD38(high) antibody-producing plasmablasts. ASC inhibited the proliferation of B cells and this effect was dependent on the presence of T cells. In contrast, ASC directly targeted B-cell differentiation, independently of T cells. In the presence of ASC, plasmablast formation was reduced and IL-10-producing CD19(+) CD24(high) CD38(high) B cells, known as regulatory B cells, were induced. These results demonstrate that ASC affect B cell biology in vitro, suggesting that they can be a tool for the modulation of the B-cell response in immune disease.

  1. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  2. Accumulation of self-reactive naive and memory B cell reveals sequential defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in Sjogren's syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Corsiero

    Full Text Available Sjögren's syndrome (SS is an autoimmune disease characterised by breach of self-tolerance towards nuclear antigens resulting in high affinity circulating autoantibodies. Although peripheral B cell disturbances have been described in SS, with predominance of naïve and reduction of memory B cells, the stage at which errors in B cell tolerance checkpoints accumulate in SS is unknown. Here we determined the frequency of self- and poly-reactive B cells in the circulating naïve and memory compartment of SS patients. Single CD27-IgD+ naïve, CD27+IgD+ memory unswitched and CD27+IgD- memory switched B cells were sorted by FACS from the peripheral blood of 7 SS patients. To detect the frequency of polyreactive and autoreactive clones, paired Ig VH and VL genes were amplified, cloned and expressed as recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs displaying identical specificity of the original B cells. IgVH and VL gene usage and immunoreactivity of SS rmAbs were compared with those obtained from healthy donors (HD. From a total of 353 VH and 293 VL individual sequences, we obtained 114 rmAbs from circulating naïve (n = 66 and memory (n = 48 B cells of SS patients. Analysis of the Ig V gene repertoire did not show significant differences in SS vs. HD B cells. In SS patients, circulating naïve B cells (with germline VH and VL genes displayed a significant accumulation of clones autoreactive against Hep-2 cells compared to HD (43.1% vs. 25%. Moreover, we demonstrated a progressive increase in the frequency of circulating anti-nuclear naïve (9.3%, memory unswitched (22.2% and memory switched (27.3% B cells in SS patients. Overall, these data provide novel evidence supporting the existence of both early and late defects in B cell tolerance checkpoints in patients with SS resulting in the accumulation of autoreactive naïve and memory B cells.

  3. Further evidence for a human B cell activating factor distinct from IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Février, M; Mollier, P; Charron, D; Banchereau, J; Reinherz, E L; Thèze, J

    1990-01-01

    Supernatants from activated human T cell clones were previously shown to contain B cell-activating factor (BCAF), an activity which results in polyclonal resting B cell stimulation. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between this activity and human interleukin-4 which was also shown to act on resting B cells. The supernatant of the T cell clone TT9 contains IL-4 but anti-IL-4 antiserum does not affect the response of B cells as measured by thymidine uptake or cell volume increase. Furthermore, IL-4 induces Fc epsilon-receptor (CD23) expression on 30% of unstimulated human B cells, whereas BCAF-containing supernatants from clone P2, that do not contain detectable amounts of IL-4, promote B cell proliferation without inducing CD23 expression. Our results therefore establish that IL-4 and BCAF are distinct activities and suggest that they trigger different activation pathways in human B cells. In addition, culture of B cells with T cell supernatants for 72 hr induces a three- to fourfold increase in the expression of HLA-DR, -DP, and -DQ antigens in 50% of B cells. The addition of inhibiting concentrations of anti-IFN-gamma, LT, or IL-4 antisera to the cultures does not change these results. Finally, 30% of B cells cultured with T cell supernatants leave the G1 phase of the cell cycle and 20% reach mitosis. Taken together, our findings further support the existence of a B cell-activating factor responsible for the activation of resting human B cells.

  4. Soluble mediators can replace helper T cells in the activation of resting B lymphocytes: evidence for a human B cell activating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diu, A; Février, M; Moreau, J L; Gougeon, M L; Abadie, A; Thèze, J

    1988-01-01

    We were interested in studying the participation of T cell-derived soluble factors in the early steps of B cell activation. Thus supernatants containing such factors were obtained following activation of human T cell clones and their effects on isolated B cells investigated. These supernatants induced activation, blastogenesis and proliferation of purified resting human B cells. Our results strongly suggest the existence of a B cell Activating Factor (BCAF) of apparent molecular weight (m.w.) of 12,000-15,000 daltons which acts directly on resting B cells and replaces helper T cells in B cell activation.

  5. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and N-WASP are critical for peripheral B-cell development and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlberg, Carin; Baptista, Marisa; Moran, Christopher J.; Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Eston, Michelle A.; Alt, Frederick W.; Terhorst, Cox; Notarangelo, Luigi D.

    2012-01-01

    The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) is a key cytoskeletal regulator of hematopoietic cells. Although WASP-knockout (WKO) mice have aberrant B-cell cytoskeletal responses, B-cell development is relatively normal. We hypothesized that N-WASP, a ubiquitously expressed homolog of WASP, may serve some redundant functions with WASP in B cells. In the present study, we generated mice lacking WASP and N-WASP in B cells (conditional double knockout [cDKO] B cells) and show that cDKO mice had decreased numbers of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. Receptor-induced activation of cDKO B cells led to normal proliferation but a marked reduction of spreading compared with wild-type and WKO B cells. Whereas WKO B cells showed decreased migration in vitro and homing in vivo compared with wild-type cells, cDKO B cells showed an even more pronounced decrease in the migratory response in vivo. After injection of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP)–Ficoll, cDKO B cells had reduced antigen uptake in the splenic marginal zone. Despite high basal serum IgM, cDKO mice mounted a reduced immune response to the T cell–independent antigen TNP-Ficoll and to the T cell–dependent antigen TNP–keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Our results reveal that the combined activity of WASP and N-WASP is required for peripheral B-cell development and function. PMID:22411869

  6. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Rajkannan; E J Padma Malar

    2007-09-01

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the crystal structure of monoclonal antibody specific for the pres1 region of the hepatitis B virus. At the optimized docked conformation, the interactions between the amino acids of antigen and antibody were examined. It is found that the docked complex is stabilized by 59.3 kcal/mol. The stability of the docked antigen-antibody complex is due to hydrogen bonding and van der Waals interactions. The amino acids of the antigen and antibody responsible for the interaction were identified.

  7. B Cell Depletion: Rituximab in Glomerular Disease and Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marinaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Selective targeting can be achieved with the use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab. In addition to being a drug for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rituximab is also an FDA-approved treatment for refractory rheumatoid arthritis and, since recently, ANCA vasculitis. It has shown efficacy in many autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss current evidence and the rationale of the use of rituximab in glomerular diseases, including randomized controlled trials. The focus will be on the use of rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy, systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis. The emerging role of rituximab in renal transplantation, where it seems to be important for the desensitization protocols for highly sensitized patients as well as for the preconditioning of ABO-incompatible recipients and the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, will also be addressed.

  8. Targeting B-cell maturation antigen in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2015-01-01

    Novel effective immunotherapies are needed for patients with multiple myeloma (MM), since disease recurrence remains a major obstacle. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA), a cell surface protein universally expressed on malignant plasma cells , has emerged as a very selective antigen to be targeted in novel treatments for MM. We here first review BCMA-related biology, and then highlight the recent clinical development of a novel afucosylated anti-BCMA monoclonal antibody conjugated with monomethyl auristatin F via noncleavable linker (GSK2857916). Chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cells targeting BCMA may also induce specific and durable anti-MM responses by patients’ own effector cells. Clinical trials testing these two approaches (NCT02064387, NCT02215967) are currently ongoing in relapsed and refractory MM patients. PMID:26370838

  9. Early Growth Response-1 Plays a Non-redundant Role in the Differentiation of B Cells into Plasma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yeon-Kyung; Jang, Eunkyeong; Paik, Doo-Jin; Youn, Jeehee

    2015-06-01

    Early growth response (Egr)-1 is a Cys2-His2-type zincfinger transcription factor. It has been shown to induce survival and proliferation of immature and mature B cells, respectively, but its role in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells remains unclear. To examine the effects of Egr-1 deficiency on the activation of B cells, naive B cells from Egr1 (-/-) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates were activated to proliferate and differentiate, and then assayed by FACS. Proportions of cells undergoing proliferation and apoptosis did not differ between Egr1 (-/-) and WT mice. However, Egr1 (-/-) B cells gave rise to fewer plasma cells than WT B cells. Consistently, Egr1 (-/-) mice produced significantly lower titer of antigen-specific IgG than their WT littermates upon immunization. Our results demonstrate that Egr-1 participates in the differentiation program of B cells into plasma cells, while it is dispensable for the proliferation and survival of mature B cells.

  10. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  11. A role for adhesion molecules in contact-dependent T help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    . There was no correlation between the level of expression of adhesion molecules by T cells and their ability to induce B cell responses. Anti-LFA-1 abrogated T-dependent responses to IL2 which were inducible after 2 days in culture, but did not inhibit the induction of this IL2 responsiveness. These results suggest...... that continued cell contact involving adhesion/accessory molecules induces B cells to proliferate and to respond to T cell lymphokines. A signaling role for cell interaction molecules on B cells is proposed, similar to the role of these and analogous molecules on T cells....

  12. The immunophenotypic characteristics of 260 patients with CD5~+ B cell lymphoproliferative disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易树华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the immunophenotypic characteristics of CD5+B cell lymphoproliferative disorders(BLPD)of Chinese patients.Methods Immunophenotyping of bone marrow and(or)of peripheral blood was performed in patients with B-LPD by four color multiparameter flow cytometry analysis using a panel of monoclonal antibodes,and the patients clinical data were retrospectively analyzed.The difference in immunophenotypes and

  13. Inhibition of the function of the FcgammaRIIB by a monoclonal antibody to thymic shared antigen-1, a Ly-6 family antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, L; Shevach, E M

    2001-09-01

    Thymic shared antigen-1 (TSA-1) is a member of the Ly-6 family of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins. While it has been proposed that TSA-1 may play a role in thymic development, a physiological ligand for this antigen has not been identified. Here we report that a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to TSA-1, generated by immunizing a hamster with CD40 ligand (CD40L)-activated B cells, interferes with the function of FcgammaRIIB on splenic B cells and the B-cell lymphoma cell line, M12, by binding to TSA on the same cells. The interaction of anti-TSA with FcgammaRIIB resulted in an inhibition of the ability of the FcgammaRIIB to cross-link and/or aggregate soluble anti-CD3 or soluble anti-Cbeta T-cell receptor (TCR), leading to an inhibition of induction of expression of CD25 and CD69, interleukin (IL)-2 production and proliferation of naive T cells. Cross-blocking studies with mAbs strongly suggested that a physical association exists between TSA-1 and the FcgammaRIIB on the surface of activated B cells and favour the view that a functional intermolecular association exists between these two distinct membrane antigens.

  14. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  15. Cyclin D3 is selectively required for proliferative expansion of germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cato, Matthew H; Chintalapati, Suresh K; Yau, Irene W; Omori, Sidne A; Rickert, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    The generation of robust T-cell-dependent humoral immune responses requires the formation and expansion of germinal center structures within the follicular regions of the secondary lymphoid tissues. B-cell proliferation in the germinal center drives ongoing antigen-dependent selection and the generation of high-affinity class-switched plasma and memory B cells. However, the mechanisms regulating B-cell proliferation within this microenvironment are largely unknown. Here, we report that cyclin D3 is uniquely required for germinal center progression. Ccnd3(-/-) mice exhibit a B-cell-intrinsic defect in germinal center maturation and fail to generate an affinity-matured IgG response. We determined that the defect resulted from failed proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells. Mechanistically, sustained expression of cyclin D3 was found to be regulated at the level of protein stability and controlled by glycogen synthase kinase 3 in a cyclic AMP-protein kinase A-dependent manner. The specific defect in proliferative expansion of GL7(+) IgD(-) PNA(+) B cells in Ccnd3(-/-) mice defines an underappreciated step in germinal center progression and solidifies a role for cyclin D3 in the immune response, and as a potential therapeutic target for germinal center-derived B-cell malignancies.

  16. Rituximab efficiently depletes B cells in lung tumors and normal lung tissue [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albane Joly-Battaglini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody that targets the CD20 B-cell-specific antigen and is widely used as therapy for B-cell lymphoma. Since rituximab depletes both malignant and normal B cells, it is increasingly being used to treat various conditions in which normal B cells have a pathogenic role, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. It is well-established that rituximab efficiently eliminates B cells in blood, lymph nodes, and spleen. In contrast, the effect of rituximab in non-lymphoid tissues remains poorly documented and is debated. Here, we report a rheumatoid arthritis patient who was treated with rituximab before receiving thoracic surgery for non-small cell lung cancer. Using flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, we show that rituximab efficiently depleted CD20-positive B cells in a primary lung tumor, in lung-associated lymph nodes, and in normal lung tissue. We conclude that rituximab may be very efficient at depleting normal B cells in the lungs. This property of rituximab may potentially be exploited for the treatment of conditions in which pathogenic B cells reside in the lungs. On the other hand, the clearance of lung B cells may provide an explanation for the rare cases of severe non-infectious pulmonary toxicity of rituximab.

  17. The B cell antigen receptor and overexpression of MYC can cooperate in the genesis of B cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Refaeli

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A variety of circumstantial evidence from humans has implicated the B cell antigen receptor (BCR in the genesis of B cell lymphomas. We generated mouse models designed to test this possibility directly, and we found that both the constitutive and antigen-stimulated state of a clonal BCR affected the rate and outcome of lymphomagenesis initiated by the proto-oncogene MYC. The tumors that arose in the presence of constitutive BCR differed from those initiated by MYC alone and resembled chronic B cell lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma (B-CLL, whereas those that arose in response to antigen stimulation resembled large B-cell lymphomas, particularly Burkitt lymphoma (BL. We linked the genesis of the BL-like tumors to antigen stimulus in three ways. First, in reconstruction experiments, stimulation of B cells by an autoantigen in the presence of overexpressed MYC gave rise to BL-like tumors that were, in turn, dependent on both MYC and the antigen for survival and proliferation. Second, genetic disruption of the pathway that mediates signaling from the BCR promptly killed cells of the BL-like tumors as well as the tumors resembling B-CLL. And third, growth of the murine BL could be inhibited by any of three distinctive immunosuppressants, in accord with the dependence of the tumors on antigen-induced signaling. Together, our results provide direct evidence that antigenic stimulation can participate in lymphomagenesis, point to a potential role for the constitutive BCR as well, and sustain the view that the constitutive BCR gives rise to signals different from those elicited by antigen. The mouse models described here should be useful in exploring further the pathogenesis of lymphomas, and in preclinical testing of new therapeutics.

  18. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... and m972 (SMB-002) monoclonal antibodies as therapies for the treatment of B cell cancers and... designated m971 and m972 (SMB-002; applicant designation). CD22 is a cell surface antigen that is...

  19. 77 FR 41792 - Prospective Grant of Co-Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... of the m971 and m972 (SMB-002) monoclonal antibodies as therapies for the treatment of B cell cancers... covered by this technology are designated m971 and m972 (SMB-002; applicant designation). CD22 is a cell...

  20. Rituximab induces sustained reduction of pathogenic B cells in patients with peripheral nervous system autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Michael A.; Rakocevic, Goran; Leung, Carol S.; Quast, Isaak; Lukačišin, Martin; Goebels, Norbert; Münz, Christian; Wardemann, Hedda; Dalakas, Marinos; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2012-01-01

    The B cell–depleting IgG1 monoclonal antibody rituximab can persistently suppress disease progression in some patients with autoimmune diseases. However, the mechanism underlying these long-term beneficial effects has remained unclear. Here, we evaluated Ig gene usage in patients with anti–myelin-associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) neuropathy, an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system that is mediated by IgM autoantibodies binding to MAG antigen. Patients with anti-MAG neuropathy showed substantial clonal expansions of blood IgM memory B cells that recognized MAG antigen. The group of patients showing no clinical improvement after rituximab therapy were distinguished from clinical responders by a higher load of clonal IgM memory B cell expansions before and after therapy, by persistence of clonal expansions despite efficient peripheral B cell depletion, and by a lack of substantial changes in somatic hypermutation frequencies of IgM memory B cells. We infer from these data that the effectiveness of rituximab therapy depends on efficient depletion of noncirculating B cells and is associated with qualitative immunological changes that indicate reconfiguration of B cell memory through sustained reduction of autoreactive clonal expansions. These findings support the continued development of B cell–depleting therapies for autoimmune diseases. PMID:22426210

  1. Deletion of Dock10 in B Cells Results in Normal Development but a Mild Deficiency upon In Vivo and In Vitro Stimulations

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    Eva Severinson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We sought to identify genes necessary to induce cytoskeletal change in B cells. Using gene expression microarray, we compared B cells stimulated with interleukin-4 (IL-4 and anti-CD40 antibodies that induce B cell spreading, cell motility, tight aggregates, and extensive microvilli with B cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide that lack these cytoskeletal changes. We identified 84 genes with 10-fold or greater expression in anti-CD40 + IL-4 stimulated B cells, one of these encoded the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF dedicator of cytokinesis 10 (Dock10. IL-4 selectively induced Dock10 expression in B cells. Using lacZ expression to monitor Dock10 promoter activity, we found that Dock10 was expressed at all stages during B cell development. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild phenotype with normal B cell development and normal B cell spreading, polarization, motility, chemotaxis, aggregation, and Ig class switching. Dock10-deficient B cells showed lower proliferation in response to anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulation. Moreover, the IgG response to soluble antigen in vivo was lower when Dock10 was specifically deleted in B cells. Together, we found that most B cell responses were intact in the absence of Dock10. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild reduction in B cell activation in vitro and in vivo.

  2. Suppression of B-cell lymphomagenesis by the BH3-only proteins Bmf and Bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Anna; Labi, Verena; Chmelewskij, Waldemar; Ploner, Christian; Geley, Stephan; Fiegl, Heidelinde; Tzankov, Alexandar; Villunger, Andreas

    2010-02-04

    Oncogenic c-Myc is known to balance excessive proliferation by apoptosis that can be triggered by p53-dependent and p53-independent signaling networks. Here, we provide evidence that the BH3-only proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bcl-2 modifying factor (Bmf) and Bcl-2 antagonist of cell death (Bad) are potent antagonists of c-Myc-driven B-cell lymphomagenesis. Tumor formation was preceded by the accumulation of preneoplastic pre-B and immature immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) B cells in hematopoietic organs of Emu-myc/bmf(-/-) mice, whereas Emu-myc/bad(-/-) mice showed an increase of pre-B cells limited to the spleen. Although the loss of Bad had no impact on the tumor immunophenotype, Bmf deficiency favored the development of IgM(+) B cell over pre-B cell tumors. This phenomenon was caused by a strong protection of immature IgM(+) B cells from oncogene-driven apoptosis caused by loss of bmf and c-Myc-induced repression of Bmf expression in premalignant pre-B cells. Steady-state levels of B-cell apoptosis also were reduced in the absence of Bad, in support of its role as a sentinel for trophic factor-deprivation. Loss of Bmf reduced the pressure to inactivate p53, whereas Bad deficiency did not, identifying Bmf as a novel component of the p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway triggered by c-Myc.

  3. Novel Function of TNF Cytokines in Regulating Bone Marrow B Cell Survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MinZhang; King-HungKo; QueenieLaiKwanLam; CherryKamChunLo; DanielJiaLinXu; LijunShen; BojianZheng; GopeshSrivastava; LiweiLu

    2004-01-01

    Two newly identified tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family cytokines, B cell activation factor from the TNF family (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), have recently been shown to enhance the maturation and survival of peripheral B cells. However, whether BAFF and APRIL are expressed in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment and if these two cytokines modulate early B cell development remain unclear.In the present study, we have detected the abundant expression of BAFF and APRIL transcripts in BM non-lymphoid cells. Low levels of BAFF and APRIL mRNA are also found in developing B cells. Furthermore,we have determined the expression patterns of BAFF receptors during B lymphopoiesis. In cultures, both recombinant BAFF and APRIL significantly promote the survival of precursor B cells whereas only BAFF can suppress apoptosis of immature B cells. These findings suggest that BAFF and APRIL, in addition to their well established role in regulating peripheral B cell growth, can modulate the survival of developing B cells in the BM. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(6):447-453.

  4. Transcription factor ABF-1 suppresses plasma cell differentiation but facilitates memory B cell formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Kai; Lin, I-Ying; Su, Shin-Tang; Wang, Kuan-Hsiung; Yang, Shii-Yi; Tsai, Dong-Yan; Hsieh, Yi-Ting; Lin, Kuo-I

    2014-09-01

    Ag-primed B cells that result from an immune response can form either memory B cells or Ab-secreting plasma cells; however, the molecular machinery that controls this cellular fate is poorly understood. In this study, we show that activated B cell factor-1 (ABF-1), which encodes a basic helix-loop-helix transcriptional repressor, participates in this regulation. ABF-1 was prevalently expressed in purified memory B cells and induced by T follicular helper cell-mediated signals. ABF-1 expression declined by the direct repression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 during differentiation. Ectopic expression of ABF-1 reduced the formation of Ab-secreting cells in an in vitro differentiation system of human memory B cells. Accordingly, knockdown of ABF-1 potentiates the formation of Ab-secreting cells. A transgenic mouse that expresses inducible ABF-1 in a B cell-specific manner was generated to demonstrate that the formation of germinal center and memory B cells was augmented by induced ABF-1 in an immune response, whereas the Ag-specific plasma cell response was dampened. This effect was associated with the ability of ABF-1 to limit cell proliferation. Together, our results demonstrate that ABF-1 facilitates formation of memory B cells but prevents plasma cell differentiation.

  5. Identification of a negative regulatory role for spi-C in the murine B cell lineage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Stephen K H; Solomon, Lauren A; Fulkerson, Patricia C; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2015-04-15

    Spi-C is an E26 transformation-specific family transcription factor that is highly related to PU.1 and Spi-B. Spi-C is expressed in developing B cells, but its function in B cell development and function is not well characterized. To determine whether Spi-C functions as a negative regulator of Spi-B (encoded by Spib), mice were generated that were germline knockout for Spib and heterozygous for Spic (Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-)). Interestingly, loss of one Spic allele substantially rescued B cell frequencies and absolute numbers in Spib(-/-) mouse spleens. Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) B cells had restored proliferation compared with Spib(-/-) B cells in response to anti-IgM or LPS stimulation. Investigation of a potential mechanism for the Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) phenotype revealed that steady-state levels of Nfkb1, encoding p50, were elevated in Spib(-/-)Spic(+/-) B cells compared with Spib(-/-) B cells. Spi-B was shown to directly activate the Nfkb1 gene, whereas Spi-C was shown to repress this gene. These results indicate a novel role for Spi-C as a negative regulator of B cell development and function.

  6. Human peripheral blood B-Cell compartments: A crossroad in B-cell traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Perez-Andres; B. Paiva; W.G. Nieto (Wendy); A. Caraux; A. Schmitz; J. Almeida (Julia); R.F. Vogt; G.E. Marti; A.C. Rawstron; M.C. van Zelm (Menno); J.J.M. van Dongen (Jacques); H.E. Johnsen (Hans); B. Klein (Binie); A. Orfao (Alberto)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractA relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lympho

  7. Human Peripheral Blood B-Cell Compartments : A Crossroad in B-Cell Traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Andres, M.; Paiva, B.; Nieto, W. G.; Caraux, A.; Schmitz, A.; Almeida, J.; Vogt, R. F.; Marti, G. E.; Rawstron, A. C.; Van Zelm, M. C.; Van Dongen, J. J. M.; Johnsen, H. E.; Klein, B.; Orfao, A.

    2010-01-01

    A relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lymphoid tissues.

  8. Human Peripheral Blood B-Cell Compartments : A Crossroad in B-Cell Traffic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Andres, M.; Paiva, B.; Nieto, W. G.; Caraux, A.; Schmitz, A.; Almeida, J.; Vogt, R. F.; Marti, G. E.; Rawstron, A. C.; Van Zelm, M. C.; Van Dongen, J. J. M.; Johnsen, H. E.; Klein, B.; Orfao, A.

    2010-01-01

    A relatively high number of different subsets of B-cells are generated through the differentiation of early B-cell precursors into mature B-lymphocytes in the bone marrow (BM) and antigen-triggered maturation of germinal center B-cells into memory B-lymphocytes and plasmablasts in lymphoid tissues.

  9. Engagement of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II molecules up-regulates intercellular adhesion of human B cells via a CD11/CD18-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcover, A; Juillard, V; Acuto, O

    1992-02-01

    We have studied the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules in the regulation of intercellular adhesion of human B cells. We found that molecules able to bind to MHC class II molecules, such as monoclonal antibodies or staphylococcal enterotoxins, induced rapid and sustained homotypic adhesion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cell lines as well as peripheral blood B lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-MHC class I monoclonal antibodies also stimulated intercellular adherence. Adhesion induced upon MHC engagement was faster and stronger than that triggered by phorbol esters. It needed active metabolism, but divalent cations were not required. Monoclonal antibodies directed against LFA-1 (CD11a/CD18) or its ligand ICAM-1 (CD54) did not inhibit MHC class II-induced homotypic adhesion of various EBV-transformed B cell lines, nor of a variant of the B cell line Raji expressing very low LFA-1 surface levels. Moreover, EBV-transformed B cells from a severe lymphocyte adhesion deficiency patient, lacking surface CD11/CD18, also aggregated in response to anti-MHC class I or class II monoclonal antibodies. Together these data indicate that engagement of MHC molecules may transduce signals to B cells resulting in up-regulation of intercellular adhesion, via an LFA-1-independent mechanism. This may play a role in the stabilization of T cell/antigen-presenting cell conjugates at the moment of antigen recognition.

  10. IL-7 modulates B cells survival and activation by inducing BAFF and CD70 expression in T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammicheli, Stefano; Ruffin, Nicolas; Lantto, Rebecka; Vivar, Nancy; Chiodi, Francesca; Rethi, Bence

    2012-06-01

    Interleukin-7 (IL-7) promotes the maintenance and activation of peripheral T cells, whereas it does not act directly on mature B cells due to the lack of IL-7Rα expression on these. We report here that, in spite of the insensitivity of B cells to IL-7, high concentration of IL-7 can lead to increased B cell survival and antibody production in the presence of T cells, without the use of any further B cell stimulatory signal. IL-7 promoted B cell activation through inducing CD70 expression on resting T cells, particularly on CD4+ memory cells. The interaction of CD70 molecules with the B cell costimulatory receptor CD27 led to B cell proliferation, the accumulation of CD38 + CD20- plasmablasts and antibody production. In addition, IL-7 treatment induced BAFF secretion from resting peripheral T cells thereby promoting B cell survival. IL-7 levels can increase in lymphopenic conditions, in autoimmune diseases or in patients receiving T cell regenerative IL-7 therapy. Based on our findings high IL-7 levels can lead to increased B cell activation by inducing the B cell regulatory proteins CD70 and BAFF in resting T cells. Such activity might be beneficial in short term immune-stimulatory IL-7 therapies; permanently increased IL-7 levels, on the other hand, can contribute to impaired B cell tolerance.

  11. Viral particles drive rapid differentiation of memory B cells into secondary plasma cells producing increased levels of antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Mohanan, Deepa; Bessa, Juliana; Link, Alexander; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Saudan, Philippe; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2014-06-15

    Extensive studies have been undertaken to describe naive B cells differentiating into memory B cells at a cellular and molecular level. However, relatively little is known about the fate of memory B cells upon Ag re-encounter. We have previously established a system based on virus-like particles (VLPs), which allows tracking of VLP-specific B cells by flow cytometry as well as histology. Using allotype markers, it is possible to adoptively transfer memory B cells into a naive mouse and track responses of naive and memory B cells in the same mouse under physiological conditions. We have observed that VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into plasma cells that drove the early onset of a strong humoral IgG response. However, neither IgM(+) nor IgG(+) memory B cells proliferated extensively or entered germinal centers. Remarkably, plasma cells derived from memory B cells preferentially homed to the bone marrow earlier and secreted increased levels of Abs when compared with primary plasma cells derived from naive B cells. Hence, memory B cells have the unique phenotype to differentiate into highly effective secondary plasma cells.

  12. Reappraisal of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): comparative analysis between EBV-positive and EBV-negative DLBCL with EBV-positive bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Akiko; Kato, Seiichi; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Satou, Akira; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Emi, Nobuhiko; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2017-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) not otherwise specified is defined as monoclonal EBV+ B-cell proliferation affecting patients without any known immunosuppression. Non-neoplastic EBV+ cells proliferating in or adjacent to EBV- DLBCL were reported recently, but their clinical significance is unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic impact of EBV+ cells in DLBCL. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics of 30 EBV+ DLBCL patients and 29 and 604 EBV- DLBCL patients with and without EBV+ bystander cells (median age of onset 71, 67 and 62 years, respectively). Both EBV+ DLBCL patients and EBV- DLBCL patients with EBV+ bystander cells tended to have high and high-intermediate International Prognostic Index scores (60% and 59%, respectively), as compared with only 46% of EBV- DLBCL patients without EBV+ bystander cells. EBV- DLBCL patients with EBV+ bystander cells showed a significantly higher incidence of lung involvement than those without EBV+ bystander cells (10% versus 2%, P bystander cells had a poorer prognosis than patients without any detectable EBV+ cells [median overall survival (OS) of 100 months and 40 months versus not reached, P bystander cells treated with rituximab showed overlapping survival curves (OS, P = 0.77; progression-free survival, P = 1.0). EBV- DLBCL with bystander EBV+ cells has similar clinical characteristics to EBV+ DLBCL. DLBCL with EBV+ bystander cells may be related to both age-related and microenvironment-related immunological deterioration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce extended remissions in transgenic mice with mature B cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refaeli Yosef

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a mouse model based on overexpression of c-Myc in B cells genetically engineered to be self-reactive to test the hypothesis that farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs can effectively treat mature B cell lymphomas. FTIs are undergoing clinical trials to treat both lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies and we wished to obtain evidence to support the inclusion of B cell lymphomas in future trials. Results We report that two FTIs, L-744,832 and SCH66336, blocked the growth of mature B cell lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The FTI treatment affected the proliferation and survival of the transformed B cells to a greater extent than naïve B cells stimulated with antigen. In syngeneic mice transplanted with the transgenic lymphoma cells, L-744,832 treatment prevented the growth of the tumor cells and the morbidity associated with the resulting lymphoma progression. Tumors that arose from transplantation of the lymphoma cells regressed with as little as three days of treatment with L-744,832 or SCH66336. Treatment of these established lymphomas with L-744,832 for seven days led to long-term remission of the disease in approximately 25% of animals. Conclusion FTI treatment can block the proliferation and survival of self-reactive transformed B cells that overexpress Myc. In mice transplanted with mature B cell lymphomas, we found that FTI treatment led to regression of disease. FTIs warrant further consideration as therapeutic agents for mature B cell lymphomas and other lymphoid tumors.

  14. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  15. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  16. The primate EAE model points at EBV-infected B cells as a preferential therapy target in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert A 'T Hart

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus, a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the relevance of these data for MS.Different from rodent EAE models, but similar to MS, disease progression in marmosets can develop independent of autoantibodies. Progressive disease is mediated by MHC class Ib (Caja-E restricted cytotoxic T cells, which are activated by γ-herpesvirus-infected B cells and cause widespread demyelination of cortical grey matter. B-cell directed monoclonal antibody therapies (anti-CD20 versus anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL have a variable effect on EAE progression, which we found associated with variable depletion of the EBV-like γ-herpesvirus CalHV3 from lymphoid organs. These findings support an important pathogenic role of CD20+ B cell in MS, especially of the subset infected with Epstein Barr virus (EBV.

  17. The Primate EAE Model Points at EBV-Infected B Cells as a Preferential Therapy Target in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart, Bert A; Jagessar, S Anwar; Haanstra, Krista; Verschoor, Ernst; Laman, Jon D; Kap, Yolanda S

    2013-01-01

    The remarkable clinical efficacy of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis points at the critical involvement of B cells in the disease. However, the exact pathogenic contribution of B cells is poorly understood. In this publication we review new data on the role of CD20+ B cells in a unique experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), a small-bodied neotropical primate. We will also discuss the relevance of these data for MS. Different from rodent EAE models, but similar to MS, disease progression in marmosets can develop independent of autoantibodies. Progressive disease is mediated by MHC class Ib (Caja-E) restricted cytotoxic T cells, which are activated by γ-herpesvirus-infected B cells and cause widespread demyelination of cortical gray matter. B-cell directed monoclonal antibody therapies (anti-CD20 versus anti-BLyS and anti-APRIL) have a variable effect on EAE progression, which we found associated with variable depletion of the Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-like γ-herpesvirus CalHV3 from lymphoid organs. These findings support an important pathogenic role of CD20+ B cell in MS, especially of the subset infected with EBV.

  18. Anticancer Effect of Curcumin on B Cell non- Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Chunyan; LIU Xinyue; CHEN Yan; LIU Fang

    2005-01-01

    To explore the anticancer effect of curcumin on human B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and compare its effects on human B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (NPBMNCs). MTT assay was used to study the effect of curcumin on the growth of Raji cells and NPBMNCs. The effect of curcumin on the apoptosis of Raji cells and NPBMNC were studied by flow cytometry and TDT-mediated dUTP nick and labeling (TUNEL). The effect of curcumin on the cell cycle of Raji cells were examined by propidium iodide staining flow cytometry. The results showed that curcumin strongly inhibited ±1.82 μmol/L and curcumin induced Raji cell apoptosis in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Raji cells treated with curcumin showed curcumin did not demonstrate apparent proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction in NPBMNCs. It was concluded that curcumin is able to inhibit the proliferation of Raji cells by regulating the cell cycle and inducing the cell apoptosis. Morever, curcumin has low toxicity on NPBMNCs but can selectively induce apoptosis in Raji cells.

  19. The early history of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Max D

    2015-03-01

    The separate development of functionally intertwined lineages of lymphocytes known as B cells and T cells is now recognized as a fundamental organizing principle of the adaptive immune system in all vertebrates. Immunologists strive to define the different sublineages of the clonally diverse B cells and T cells, how they interact with each other and how they interact with innate lymphoid cells and other elements of the innate immune system to counter infections, cancer and the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. On the 50th anniversary of the recognition of B cells as a discrete cell lineage, this Timeline article recounts some of the milestones marking the development of the concept that B cells are a functionally and developmentally distinct arm of the adaptive immune system.

  20. B Cell Epitope-Based Vaccination Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many peptide vaccines are undergoing clinical studies. Most of these vaccines were developed to activate cytotoxic T cells; however, the response is not robust. Unlike vaccines, anti-cancer antibodies based on passive immunity have been approved as a standard treatment. Since passive immunity is more effective in tumor treatment, the evidence suggests that limited B cell epitope-based peptide vaccines may have similar activity. Nevertheless, such peptide vaccines have not been intensively developed primarily because humoral immunity is thought to be preferable to cancer progression. B cells secrete cytokines, which suppress immune functions. This review discusses the possibility of therapeutic antibody induction by a peptide vaccine and the role of active and passive B cell immunity in cancer patients. We also discuss the use of humanized mice as a pre-clinical model. The necessity of a better understanding of the activity of B cells in cancer is also discussed.

  1. Increasing the efficacy of CD20 antibody therapy through the engineering of a new type II anti-CD20 antibody with enhanced direct and immune effector cell-mediated B-cell cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moessner, Ekkehard; Bruenker, Peter; Moser, Samuel; Puentener, Ursula; Schmidt, Carla; Herter, Sylvia; Grau, Roger; Gerdes, Christian; Nopora, Adam; van Puijenbroek, Erwin; Ferrara, Claudia; Sondermann, Peter; Jaeger, Christiane; Strein, Pamela; Fertig, Georg; Friess, Thomas; Schuell, Christine; Bauer, Sabine; Dal Porto, Joseph; Del Nagro, Christopher; Dabbagh, Karim; Dyer, Martin J. S.; Poppema, Sibrand; Klein, Christian; Umana, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    CD20 is an important target for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including non-Hodgkin lymphoma as well as autoimmune disorders. B-cell depletion therapy using monoclonal antibodies against CD20, such as rituximab, has revolutionized the treatment of these disorders, greatly improving overall s

  2. Differential requirements of MyD88 and TRIF pathways in TLR4-mediated immune responses in murine B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagibashi, Tsutomu; Nagai, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yasuharu; Ikutani, Masashi; Hirai, Yoshikatsu; Takatsu, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    LPS stimulates the TLR4/Myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2) complex and promotes a variety of immune responses in B cells. TLR4 has two main signaling pathways, MyD88 and Toll/IL-1R (TIR)-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathways, but relatively few studies have examined these pathways in B cells. In this study, we investigated MyD88- or TRIF-dependent LPS responses in B cells by utilizing their knockout mice. Compared with wild-type (WT) B cells, MyD88(-/-) B cells were markedly impaired in up-regulation of CD86 and proliferation induced by lipid A moiety of LPS. TRIF(-/-) B cells were also impaired in these responses compared with WT B cells, but showed better responses than MyD88(-/-) B cells. Regarding class switch recombination (CSR) elicited by lipid A plus IL-4, MyD88(-/-) B cells showed similar patterns of CSR to WT B cells. However, TRIF(-/-) B cells showed the impaired in the CSR. Compared with WT and MyD88(-/-) B cells, TRIF(-/-) B cells exhibited reduced cell division, fewer IgG1(+) cells per division, and decreased activation-induced cytidine deaminase (Aicda) mRNA expression in response to lipid A plus IL-4. Finally, IgG1 production to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS immunization was impaired in TRIF(-/-) mice, while MyD88(-/-) mice exhibited increased IgG1 production. Thus, MyD88 and TRIF pathways differently regulate TLR4-induced immune responses in B cells.

  3. DNA Methylation Dynamics of Germinal Center B Cells Are Mediated by AID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Pilar M; Teater, Matt; Chambwe, Nyasha; Kormaksson, Matthias; Redmond, David; Ishii, Jennifer; Vuong, Bao; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Melnick, Ari; Vasanthakumar, Aparna; Godley, Lucy A; Papavasiliou, F Nina; Elemento, Olivier; Shaknovich, Rita

    2015-09-29

    Changes in DNA methylation are required for the formation of germinal centers (GCs), but the mechanisms of such changes are poorly understood. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) has been recently implicated in DNA demethylation through its deaminase activity coupled with DNA repair. We investigated the epigenetic function of AID in vivo in germinal center B cells (GCBs) isolated from wild-type (WT) and AID-deficient (Aicda(-/-)) mice. We determined that the transit of B cells through the GC is associated with marked locus-specific loss of methylation and increased methylation diversity, both of which are lost in Aicda(-/-) animals. Differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs) between GCBs and naive B cells (NBs) are enriched in genes that are targeted for somatic hypermutation (SHM) by AID, and these genes form networks required for B cell development and proliferation. Finally, we observed significant conservation of AID-dependent epigenetic reprogramming between mouse and human B cells.

  4. VNAR single-domain antibodies specific for BAFF inhibit B cell development by molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häsler, Julien; Flajnik, Martin F; Williams, Gareth; Walsh, Frank S; Rutkowski, J Lynn

    2016-07-01

    B cell-activating factor (BAFF) plays a dominant role in the B cell homeostasis. However, excessive BAFF promotes the development of autoreactive B-cells and several antibodies have been developed to block its activity. Bispecific antibodies with added functionality represent the next wave of biologics that may be more effective in the treatment of complex autoimmune disease. The single variable domain from the immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (VNAR) is one of the smallest antibody recognition units that could be combined with monospecific antibodies to develop bispecific agents. We isolated a panel of BAFF-binding VNARs with low nM potency from a semi-synthetic phage display library and examined their functional activity. The anti-BAFF VNARs blocked the binding of BAFF to all three of its receptors (BR3, TACI and BCMA) and the presence of the conserved DXL receptor motif found in the CDR3 regions suggests molecular mimicry as the mechanism of antagonism. One clone was formatted as an Fc fusion for functional testing and it was found to inhibit both mouse and human BAFF with equal potency ex vivo in a splenocyte proliferation assay. In mice, subchronic administration reduced the number of immature and transitional intermediates B cells and mature B cell subsets. These results indicate that VNAR single domain antibodies function as selective B-cell inhibitors and offer an alternative molecular format for targeting B-cell disorders.

  5. B-cell receptor signalling and its crosstalk with other pathways in normal and malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seda, Vaclav; Mraz, Marek

    2015-03-01

    The physiology of B cells is intimately connected with the function of their B-cell receptor (BCR). B-cell lymphomas frequently (dys)regulate BCR signalling and thus take advantage of this pre-existing pathway for B-cell proliferation and survival. This has recently been underscored by clinical trials demonstrating that small molecules (fosfamatinib, ibrutinib, idelalisib) inhibiting BCR-associated kinases (SYK, BTK, PI3K) have an encouraging clinical effect. Here we describe the current knowledge of the specific aspects of BCR signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and normal B cells. Multiple factors can contribute to BCR pathway (dys)regulation in these malignancies and the activation of 'chronic' or 'tonic' BCR signalling. In lymphoma B cells, the balance of initiation, amplitude and duration of BCR activation can be influenced by a specific immunoglobulin structure, the expression and mutations of adaptor molecules (like GAB1, BLNK, GRB2, CARD11), the activity of kinases (like LYN, SYK, PI3K) or phosphatases (like SHIP-1, SHP-1 and PTEN) and levels of microRNAs. We also discuss the crosstalk of BCR with other signalling pathways (NF-κB, adhesion through integrins, migration and chemokine signalling) to emphasise that the 'BCR inhibitors' target multiple pathways interconnected with BCR, which might explain some of their clinical activity.

  6. Differing Requirements for MALT1 Function in Peripheral B Cell Survival and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Peishan; Zhu, Zilu; Hachmann, Janna; Nojima, Takuya; Kitamura, Daisuke; Salvesen, Guy; Rickert, Robert C

    2017-02-01

    During a T cell-dependent immune response, formation of the germinal center (GC) is essential for the generation of high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. The canonical NF-κB pathway has been implicated in the initiation of GC reaction, and defects in this pathway have been linked to immune deficiencies. The paracaspase MALT1 plays an important role in regulating NF-κB activation upon triggering of Ag receptors. Although previous studies have reported that MALT1 deficiency abrogates the GC response, the relative contribution of B cells and T cells to the defective phenotype remains unclear. We used chimeric mouse models to demonstrate that MALT1 function is required in B cells for GC formation. This role is restricted to BCR signaling where MALT1 is critical for B cell proliferation and survival. Moreover, the proapoptotic signal transmitted in the absence of MALT1 is dominant to the prosurvival effects of T cell-derived stimuli. In addition to GC B cell differentiation, MALT1 is required for plasma cell differentiation, but not mitogenic responses. Lastly, we show that ectopic expression of Bcl-2 can partially rescue the GC phenotype in MALT1-deficient animals by prolonging the lifespan of BCR-activated B cells, but plasma cell differentiation and Ab production remain defective. Thus, our data uncover previously unappreciated aspects of MALT1 function in B cells and highlight its importance in humoral immunity.

  7. Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase with ibrutinib in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Zhang, L L; Champlin, R E; Wang, M L

    2015-05-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway, which is critical to the development and maturation of normal B-cells, is emerging as an attractive therapeutic target in B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib is a potent irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk), a key kinase important for signal transduction in the B-cell receptor (BCR) pathway. In preclinical studies, ibrutinib potently bound to Btk, inhibited BCR signaling, and decreased tumor cell proliferation and survival in many B-cell malignancy models. Excellent safety and efficacy data in clinical trials have led to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval of ibrutinib for previously treated mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), as well as CLL with 17p deletion. Ongoing clinical studies have also demonstrated great potency of ibrutinib in treating other types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), follicular lymphoma (FL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Combination of ibrutinib with chemoimmunotherapy and other promising novel agents in B-cell malignancy therapy has also been under clinical investigation. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  9. DNA methyltransferase 1 and DNA methylation patterning contribute to germinal center B-cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaknovich, Rita; Cerchietti, Leandro; Tsikitas, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    The phenotype of germinal center (GC) B cells includes the unique ability to tolerate rapid proliferation and the mutagenic actions of activation induced cytosine deaminase (AICDA). Given the importance of epigenetic patterning in determining cellular phenotypes, we examined DNA methylation and t...

  10. Clinical Implications of Phosphorylated STAT3 Expression in de novo Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ok, Chi Y; Chen, Jiayu; Xu-Monette, Ziju

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) regulates tumor growth, invasion, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, immune response, and survival. Data regarding expression of phosphorylated (activated) STAT3 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of...

  11. Clinical Implications of Phosphorylated STAT3 Expression in De Novo Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ok, C.Y.; Chen, J.; Xu-Monette, Z.Y.; Tzankov, A.; Manyam, G.C.; Li, L.; Visco, C.; Montes-Moreno, S.; Dybkaer, K.; Chiu, A.; Orazi, A.; Zu, Y.; Bhagat, G.; Richards, K.L.; Hsi, E.D.; Choi, W.W.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Huh, J.; Zhao, X.; Ponzoni, M.; Ferreri, A.J.; Bertoni, F.; Farnen, J.P.; Moller, M.B.; Piris, M.A.; Winter, J.N.; Medeiros, L.J.; Young, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) regulates tumor growth, invasion, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, immune response, and survival. Data regarding expression of phosphorylated (activated) STAT3 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of ph

  12. B-cell-independent lymphoid tissue infection by a B-cell-tropic rhadinovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Brittany; Frederico, Bruno; Stevenson, Philip G

    2015-09-01

    Lymphocytes provide gammaherpesviruses with a self-renewing substrate for persistent infection and with transport to mucosal sites for host exit. Their role in the initial colonization of new hosts is less clear. Murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4), an experimentally accessible, B-cell-tropic rhadinovirus (gamma-2 herpesvirus), persistently infects both immunocompetent and B-cell-deficient mice. A lack of B-cells did not compromise MuHV-4 entry into lymphoid tissue, which involved myeloid cell infection. However, it impaired infection amplification and MuHV-4 exit from lymphoid tissue, which involved myeloid to B-cell transfer.

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  15. Dysfunction of CD24+CD38+ B cells in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis is associated with a lack of interleukin 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Qi, Yanhua; Wang, Hua; Jiang, Jue; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Qi

    2017-09-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is characterized by immune attacks on the person's own thyroid. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is a subtype of AITD and is a common cause of hypothyroidism and related symptoms. Regulatory B (Breg) cells can express interleukin 10 (IL-10) and have recently emerged as a critical participant in suppression pathogenic inflammation and promoting peripheral tolerance. The role of Breg cells in HT is not yet clear. In this study, we first examined the IL-10 production by B cells in healthy controls and HT patients, and found that the healthy control B cells demonstrated significantly higher IL-10 expression than HT B cells after CpG stimulation. In both groups, the IL-10-producing B cells were highly enriched in the CD24(+)CD38(+) compartment. However, compared to healthy controls, HT patients presented higher levels of circulating CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells, but lower percentage of IL-10(+) cells in the CD24(+)CD38(+) B cell compartment. In healthy controls, we performed coculture experiments of T cells with autologous total B cells, CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells, and non-CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells, and found significantly lower T cell proliferation as well as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in cell cultures containing CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells. In contrast, the HT CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells demonstrated reduced capacity in suppressing T cell proliferation and did not suppress TNF and IFN-γ production. This lack of inhibitory activity in HT CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells was related to a lack of IL-10, since addition of exogenous IL-10 in CD24(+)CD38(+) B cell-T cell coculture significantly suppressed the proliferation of T cells and reduced proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Together, our study identified an upregulation of CD24(+)CD38(+) B cells but a downregulation in their regulatory activity in HT patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Normal and malignant B-cell development with special reference to Hodgkin's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajewsky, K; Kanzler, H; Hansmann, M L; Küppers, R

    1997-01-01

    During their development, B lymphocytes are repeatedly selected for the expression of an appropriate surface receptor: the pre-B-cell receptor at the pre-B-cell stage and surface immunoglobulin (Ig) at the transition from a pre-B cell to a mature B cell. Furthermore, stringent selection for B cells expressing high affinity antibodies operates when antigen-activated B cells proliferate within germinal centers (GC). Here, somatic point mutations are introduced into rearranged V region genes at a high rate, and B cells acquiring favorable mutations are selected to differentiate into memory B cells or plasma cells. In the frame of this developmental scheme, extending a recent analysis, we investigated 10 primary cases of Hodgkin's disease (HD) for B-lineage origin and clonality [1]. Single Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (H-RS) cells were micromanipulated from frozen tissue sections and analyzed by PCR for rearranged V genes. Clonal VH and/or V kappa/ V delta gene rearrangements were obtained from 9 of the cases. This shows that H-RS cells represent a clonal, B-lineage-derived population of tumor cells. Somatic mutations were found in all clonal VH gene rearrangements. Interestingly, mutations leading to stop codons in in-frame V gene rearrangements were detected in four cases. Since GC B cells acquiring such crippling mutations are usually efficiently eliminated within the GC, the finding of those mutations indicates that H-RS cells are derived from precursors within the GC that escaped apoptosis by a transforming event.

  17. A splenic marginal zone-like peripheral blood CD27+B220- B cell population is preferentially depleted in HIV type 1-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Matthew; Valentin, Antonio; Little, Richard; Yarchoan, Robert; Pavlakis, George N

    2008-04-01

    Peripheral blood CD27(+) B cells are reduced in HIV-1-infected individuals. In healthy individuals, the human peripheral blood CD27(+) B cell pool consists of two subsets defined by the expression, or lack thereof, of the CD45 isoform B220. We investigated the presence of circulating B220(+) and B220(-) memory B cells in HIV(+) individuals and found that the reduction in CD27(+) memory B cells occurs primarily among CD27(+)B220(-) B cells. Studies conducted using healthy controls indicate that CD27(+)B220(-) B cells have a splenic marginal zone like the immunophenotype IgM(hi)IgD(lo)CD21(+)CD23(-), express TLR9, and proliferate and secrete IgG and IgM in response to B cell-specific ODN. CD27(+)B220(+) B cells have the immunophenotype IgM(lo)IgD(hi)CD21(+)CD23(+), express activation-induced cytidine deaminase, and proliferate in response to SAC but do not secrete immunoglobulin. The AICD expression, along with CD86 expression, by CD27(+)B220(+) suggests these cells are of germinal center origin. The preferential depletion of CD27(+)B220(-) B cells mirrors alterations in spleen morphology and resident B cell populations due to HIV infection reported by other investigators and may play an important role in the defective B cell immunity against T-independent pathogens such as pneumococcus observed in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  18. Aspectos morfológicos da infiltração da medula óssea por condições exibindo diferenciação plasmocitária e gamopatia monoclonal Morphological aspects of bone marrow infiltration by diseases characterized by plasma cell proliferation and monoclonal gamopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor P. Andrade

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As doenças linfoproliferativas com diferenciação plasmocitária e pico monoclonal são causas de dificuldade diagnóstica no estudo de espécimes de medula óssea. Conhecer os aspectos clínicos, morfológicos, imunofenotípicos e citogenéticos é fundamental para o diagnóstico correto. Descrevemos os aspectos práticos mais relevantes para a interpretação de biópsias de medula óssea frente às situações mais frequentes.Some lymphoproliferative diseases with plasma cell differentiation and monoclonal gammopathy are challenging to diagnose when dealing with bone marrow biopsies. Knowledge of clinical, morphological, phenotypic and cytogenetic aspects is crucial to establish the correct diagnosis. We describe practical relevant aspects that help in the interpretation of bone marrow biopsies in these situations.

  19. B-Cell Depletion Promotes Aortic Infiltration of Immunosuppressive Cells and Is Protective of Experimental Aortic Aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaheen, Basil; Downs, Emily A; Serbulea, Vlad; Almenara, Camila C P; Spinosa, Michael; Su, Gang; Zhao, Yunge; Srikakulapu, Prasad; Butts, Cherié; McNamara, Coleen A; Leitinger, Norbert; Upchurch, Gilbert R; Meher, Akshaya K; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2016-11-01

    B-cell depletion therapy is widely used for treatment of cancers and autoimmune diseases. B cells are abundant in abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA); however, it is unknown whether B-cell depletion therapy affects AAA growth. Using experimental models of murine AAA, we aim to examine the effect of B-cell depletion on AAA formation. Wild-type or apolipoprotein E-knockout mice were treated with mouse monoclonal anti-CD20 or control antibodies and subjected to an elastase perfusion or angiotensin II infusion model to induce AAA, respectively. Anti-CD20 antibody treatment significantly depleted B1 and B2 cells, and strikingly suppressed AAA growth in both models. B-cell depletion resulted in lower circulating IgM levels, but did not affect the levels of IgG or cytokine/chemokine levels. Although the total number of leukocyte remained unchanged in elastase-perfused aortas after anti-CD20 antibody treatment, the number of B-cell subtypes was significantly lower. Interestingly, plasmacytoid dendritic cells expressing the immunomodulatory enzyme indole 2,3-dioxygenase were detected in the aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In accordance with an increase in indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells, the number of regulatory T cells was higher, whereas the expression of proinflammatory genes was lower in aortas of B-cell-depleted mice. In a coculture model, the presence of B cells significantly lowered the number of indole 2,3-dioxygenase+ plasmacytoid dendritic cells without affecting total plasmacytoid dendritic cell number. The present results demonstrate that B-cell depletion protects mice from experimental AAA formation and promotes emergence of an immunosuppressive environment in aorta. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. A case of cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs appearing as chronic venous ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Rossi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of a woman with a cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs. She had a plaque lesion, superficially ulcerated and necrotized with tumorous borders situated on the posterior side of the right leg and two red or bluish-red nodular lesions. A skin biopsy from both nodular and plaque lesion showed a diffuse infiltrate of atypical large B cells CD20+ and CD79a+, spanning epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. A therapeutic approach containing anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab was suggested.

  1. Chromosomal aberrations are shared by malignant plasma cells and a small fraction of circulating CD19+ cells in patients with myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zojer, Niklas; Schuster-Kolbe, Judith; Assmann, Irene; Ackermann, Jutta; Strasser, Kathrin; Hubl, Wolfgang; Drach, Johannes; Ludwig, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to identify distinct structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood B cells of patients with myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS...

  2. UCH-L1 is induced in germinal center B cells and identifies patients with aggressive germinal center diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedekovics, Tibor; Hussain, Sajjad; Feldman, Andrew L; Galardy, Paul J

    2016-03-24

    Gene expression profiling has identified 2 major subclasses of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Cases resembling germinal center (GC) B cells (GCB-DLBCL) generally occur in younger patients, have a distinct molecular pathophysiology, and have improved outcomes compared with those similar to activated post-GC cells (activated B-cell DLBCL). We previously found that the ubiquitin hydrolase UCH-L1 is frequently overexpressed in mature B-cell malignancies and is a potent oncogene in mice. The cause for its overexpression in lymphoma, and whether it impacts the outcome of patients with DLBCL is unknown. Here, we show that UCH-L1 reflects GC lineage in lymphoma and is an oncogenic biomarker of aggressive GCB-DLBCL. We find that UCH-L1 is specifically induced in GC B cells in mice and humans, and that its expression correlates highly with the GCB subtype in DLBCL. We also find that UCH-L1 cooperates with BCL6 in a mouse model of GC B-cell lymphoma, but not with the development of multiple myeloma derived from post-GC cells. Despite the typically good outcomes of GCB-DLBCL, increased UCHL1 identifies a subgroup with early relapses independent of MYC expression, suggesting biological diversity in this subset of disease. Consistent with this, forced Uchl1 overexpression had a substantial impact on gene expression in GC B cells including pathways of cell cycle progression, cell death and proliferation, and DNA replication. These data demonstrate a novel role for UCH-L1 outside of the nervous system and suggest its potential use as a biomarker and therapeutic target in DLBCL.

  3. Regulation of B cell linker protein transcription by PU.1 and Spi-B in murine B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li S; Sokalski, Kristen M; Hotke, Kathryn; Christie, Darah A; Zarnett, Oren; Piskorz, Jan; Thillainadesan, Gobi; Torchia, Joseph; DeKoter, Rodney P

    2012-10-01

    B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is frequently associated with mutations or chromosomal translocations of genes encoding transcription factors. Conditional deletion of genes encoding the E26-transformation-specific transcription factors, PU.1 and Spi-B, in B cells (ΔPB mice) leads to B-ALL in mice at 100% incidence rate and with a median survival of 21 wk. We hypothesized that PU.1 and Spi-B may redundantly activate transcription of genes encoding tumor suppressors in the B cell lineage. Characterization of aging ΔPB mice showed that leukemia cells expressing IL-7R were found in enlarged thymuses. IL-7R-expressing B-ALL cells grew in culture in response to IL-7 and could be maintained as cell lines. Cultured ΔPB cells expressed reduced levels of B cell linker protein (BLNK), a known tumor suppressor gene, compared with controls. The Blnk promoter contained a predicted PU.1 and/or Spi-B binding site that was required for promoter activity and occupied by PU.1 and/or Spi-B as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Restoration of BLNK expression in cultured ΔPB cells opposed IL-7-dependent proliferation and induced early apoptosis. We conclude that the tumor suppressor BLNK is a target of transcriptional activation by PU.1 and Spi-B in the B cell lineage.

  4. Control of the B cell-intrinsic tolerance programs by ubiquitin ligases Cbl and Cbl-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R; Gu, Hua

    2007-05-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-/-Cblb-/-) manifested systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl double deficiency resulted in a substantial increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells were not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B cell anergy to protein antigen appeared to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk tyrosine kinase, Phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLC-gamma2), and Rho-family GTP-GDP exchange factor Vav, and Ca2+ mobilization were enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of adaptor protein BLNK was substantially attenuated in the mutant B cells. These results suggested that the loss of coordination between these pathways was responsible for the impaired B cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction.

  5. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...

  6. Deletion of Rb1 induces both hyperproliferation and cell death in murine germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwen; O'Neal, Julie; Wilson, William C; Mahajan, Nitin; Luo, Jun; Wang, Yinan; Su, Mack Y; Lu, Lan; Skeath, James B; Bhattacharya, Deepta; Tomasson, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    The retinoblastoma gene (RB1) has been implicated as a tumor suppressor in multiple myeloma (MM), yet its role remains unclear because in the majority of cases with 13q14 deletions, un-mutated RB1 remains expressed from the retained allele. To explore the role of Rb1 in MM, we examined the functional consequences of single- and double-copy Rb1 loss in germinal center B cells, the cells of origin of MM. We generated mice without Rb1 function in germinal center B cells by crossing Rb1(Flox/Flox) with C-γ-1-Cre (Cγ1) mice expressing the Cre recombinase in class-switched B cells in a p107(-/-) background to prevent p107 from compensating for Rb1 loss (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)). All mice developed normally, but B cells with two copies of Rb1 deleted (Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-)) exhibited increased proliferation and cell death compared with Cγ1-Rb1(+/+)-p107(-/-) controls ex vivo. In vivo, Cγ1-Rb1(F/F)-p107(-/-) mice had a lower percentage of splenic B220+ cells and reduced numbers of bone marrow antigen-specific secreting cells compared with control mice. Our data indicate that Rb1 loss induces both cell proliferation and death in germinal center B cells. Because no B-cell malignancies developed after 1 year of observation, our data also suggest that Rb1 loss is not sufficient to transform post-germinal center B cells and that additional, specific mutations are likely required to cooperate with Rb1 loss to induce malignant transformation.

  7. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Frederico

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4 is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+ and CD11c(+ myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  8. Myeloid infection links epithelial and B cell tropisms of Murid Herpesvirus-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederico, Bruno; Milho, Ricardo; May, Janet S; Gillet, Laurent; Stevenson, Philip G

    2012-09-01

    Gamma-herpesviruses persist in lymphocytes and cause disease by driving their proliferation. Lymphocyte infection is therefore a key pathogenetic event. Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4) is a rhadinovirus that like the related Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus persists in B cells in vivo yet infects them poorly in vitro. Here we used MuHV-4 to understand how virion tropism sets the path to lymphocyte colonization. Virions that were highly infectious in vivo showed a severe post-binding block to B cell infection. Host entry was accordingly an epithelial infection and B cell infection a secondary event. Macrophage infection by cell-free virions was also poor, but improved markedly when virion binding improved or when macrophages were co-cultured with infected fibroblasts. Under the same conditions B cell infection remained poor; it improved only when virions came from macrophages. This reflected better cell penetration and correlated with antigenic changes in the virion fusion complex. Macrophages were seen to contact acutely infected epithelial cells, and cre/lox-based virus tagging showed that almost all the virus recovered from lymphoid tissue had passed through lysM(+) and CD11c(+) myeloid cells. Thus MuHV-4 reached B cells in 3 distinct stages: incoming virions infected epithelial cells; infection then passed to myeloid cells; glycoprotein changes then allowed B cell infection. These data identify new complexity in rhadinovirus infection and potentially also new vulnerability to intervention.

  9. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F; Schett, Georg; Mielenz, Dirk; David, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-20

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell-specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression.

  10. The Role of c-MYC in B-Cell Lymphomas: Diagnostic and Molecular Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lynh; Papenhausen, Peter; Shao, Haipeng

    2017-04-05

    c-MYC is one of the most essential transcriptional factors, regulating a diverse array of cellular functions, including proliferation, growth, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of c-MYC is essential in the pathogenesis of a number of B-cell lymphomas, but is rarely reported in T-cell lymphomas. c-MYC dysregulation induces lymphomagenesis by loss of the tight control of c-MYC expression, leading to overexpression of intact c-MYC protein, in contrast to the somatic mutations or fusion proteins seen in many other oncogenes. Dysregulation of c-MYC in B-cell lymphomas occurs either as a primary event in Burkitt lymphoma, or secondarily in aggressive lymphomas such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, plasmablastic lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, or double-hit lymphoma. Secondary c-MYC changes include gene translocation and gene amplification, occurring against a background of complex karyotype, and most often confer aggressive clinical behavior, as evidenced in the double-hit lymphomas. In low-grade B-cell lymphomas, acquisition of c-MYC rearrangement usually results in transformation into highly aggressive lymphomas, with some exceptions. In this review, we discuss the role that c-MYC plays in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas, the molecular alterations that lead to c-MYC dysregulation, and their effect on prognosis and diagnosis in specific types of B-cell lymphoma.

  11. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinari, L; Quinion, C; Blum, K A

    2015-05-01

    The B-cell receptor pathway (BCR) is aberrantly activated in select B-cell malignancies. This knowledge has allowed for the development of inhibitors of different crucial steps of this pathway. Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a key component of BCR signaling and functions as an important regulator of multiple cell functions including differentiation, proliferation, and survival in various B-cell malignancies. Ibrutinib is a potent, selective BTK inhibitor that has shown significant activity in specific subtypes of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs). Given the high response rates, tolerability, and acceptable toxicities, ibrutinib was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of patients with relapsed mantle cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. It is also currently being evaluated in combination with chemotherapy and as frontline therapy in B-cell NHL. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical development of ibrutinib in the treatment of B-cell NHL. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  12. The meaning and relevance of B-cell receptor structure and function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Freda K; Forconi, Francesco; Packham, Graham

    2014-07-01

    The B-cell receptor (BCR) is of critical importance for normal B cells and for the majority of B-cell malignancies, especially chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The two major subsets of CLL are biologically distinct, being derived from B cells at different stages of differentiation and carrying unmutated (U-CLL) or mutated (M-CLL) IGHV genes. U-CLL, which has a poorer prognosis, often has relatively conserved (stereotypic) IGHV-HD-HJ sequences, indicative of interaction with large (super)antigens and similar to those in normal naive innate B cells. Conserved sequences are less evident in M-CLL, in keeping with its postfollicular origin. However, both subsets exhibit features of chronic antigen exposure in tissue sites, with local proliferative events, but also downregulation of surface immunoglobulin M but not surface immunoglobulin D, a characteristic of normal anergic B cells. BCR-mediated anergy can spread to other receptors such as CXCR4. Circulating CLL cells retain a shadow of tissue-based events that can reverse over time, but the overall extent of anergy is greater in M-CLL. Despite this stereotypic variety and more genomic complexity, BCR-mediated responses in vitro appear relatively homogeneous in U-CLL, but M-CLL is more heterogeneous. The differential balance between antigen-induced proliferation or anergy is the likely determinant of clinical behavior and possibly of response to kinase inhibitors.

  13. B-cell responses to HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, Susan; Fauci, Anthony S

    2017-01-01

    The induction of neutralizing antibodies directed against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has received considerable attention in recent years, in part driven by renewed interest and opportunities for antibody-based strategies for prevention such as passive transfer of antibodies and the development of preventive vaccines, as well as immune-based therapeutic interventions. Advances in the ability to screen, isolate, and characterize HIV-specific antibodies have led to the identification of a new generation of potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). The majority of these antibodies have been isolated from B cells of chronically HIV-infected individuals with detectable viremia. In this review, we provide insight into the phenotypic and functional attributes of human B cells, with a focus on HIV-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/cells that are responsible for sustaining humoral immune responses against HIV. We discuss the abnormalities in B cells that occur in HIV infection both in the peripheral blood and lymphoid tissues, especially in the setting of persisting viremia. Finally, we consider the opportunities and drawbacks of intensively interrogating antibodies isolated from HIV-infected individuals to guide strategies aimed at developing effective antibody-based vaccine and therapeutic interventions for HIV. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  14. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies.

  15. T regulatory cells and B cells cooperate to form a regulatory loop that maintains gut homeostasis and suppresses dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Ray, A; Jiang, X; Wang, J-y; Basu, S; Liu, X; Qian, T; He, R; Dittel, B N; Chu, Y

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and B cells present in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) are both implicated in the resolution of colitis. However, how the functions of these cells are coordinated remains elusive. We used the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis model combined with gene-modified mice to monitor the progression of colitis, and simultaneously examine the number of Tregs and B cells, and the production of IgA antibodies. We found that DSS-treated mice exhibited more severe colitis in the absence of B cells, and that the adoptive transfer of B cells attenuated the disease. Moreover, the transfer of IL-10−/− B cells also attenuated colitis, suggesting that B cells inhibited colitis through an interleukin-10 (IL-10)-independent pathway. Furthermore, antibody depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbated colitis. Intriguingly, the number of GALT Tregs in B cell-deficient mice was significantly decreased during colitis and the adoptive transfer of B cells into these mice restored the Treg numbers, indicating that B cells contribute to Treg homeostasis. We also found that B cells induced the proliferation of Tregs that in turn promoted B-cell differentiation into IgA-producing plasma cells. These results demonstrate that B cells and Tregs interact and cooperate to prevent excessive immune responses that can lead to colitis. PMID:25807185

  16. A primitive cell origin for B-cell precursor ALL?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, C V; Blair, A

    2005-01-01

    A stem cell origin has been described for both acute and chronic myelogenous leukemias. In contrast, childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is thought to arise in committed B-lineage cells. Recently described in vitro and in vivo model systems that support the proliferation and expansion of ALL cells have provided new tools to investigate the cellular targets for the origin of this malignancy. Evidence suggests that some subtypes of childhood ALL have a primitive cell origin and share many immunophenotypic characteristics with normal progenitor cells. These leukemic stem cells may be resistant to current therapeutic strategies designed to kill the bulk ALL cell population and subsequent relapses may arise from this population. More precise definition of these ALL stem cells through combined analyses of antigen expression, genetic lesions, and functionality is essential for the development of more effective, targeted therapeutic strategies.

  17. The Role of CaMKII in Calcium-Activated Death Pathways in Bone Marrow B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Calcium is an essential signaling molecule in developing B cells, thus altering calcium dynamics represents a potential target for toxicant effects. GW7845, a tyrosine analog and potent peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, induces rapid mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)–dependent apoptosis in bone marrow B cells. Changes in calcium dynamics are capable of mediating rapid initiation of cell death; therefore, we investigated the contribution of calcium to GW7845-induced a...

  18. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  19. Salmonella Infection Drives Promiscuous B Cell Activation Followed by Extrafollicular Affinity Maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Niro, Roberto; Lee, Seung-Joo; Vander Heiden, Jason A; Elsner, Rebecca A; Trivedi, Nikita; Bannock, Jason M; Gupta, Namita T; Kleinstein, Steven H; Vigneault, Francois; Gilbert, Tamara J; Meffre, Eric; McSorley, Stephen J; Shlomchik, Mark J

    2015-07-21

    The B cell response to Salmonella typhimurium (STm) occurs massively at extrafollicular sites, without notable germinal centers (GCs). Little is known in terms of its specificity. To expand the knowledge of antigen targets, we screened plasmablast (PB)-derived monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for Salmonella specificity, using ELISA, flow cytometry, and antigen microarray. Only a small fraction (0.5%-2%) of the response appeared to be Salmonella-specific. Yet, infection of mice with limited B cell receptor (BCR) repertoires impaired the response, suggesting that BCR specificity was important. We showed, using laser microdissection, that somatic hypermutation (SHM) occurred efficiently at extrafollicular sites leading to affinity maturation that in turn led to detectable STm Ag-binding. These results suggest a revised vision of how clonal selection and affinity maturation operate in response to Salmonella. Clonal selection initially is promiscuous, activating cells with virtually undetectable affinity, yet SHM and selection occur during the extrafollicular response yielding higher affinity, detectable antibodies.

  20. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: Radioactive Drones for B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Susan J; Levy, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    In a study published in the March 1, 1996, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Knox and colleagues (1) demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Yttirium-90 ((90)Y)-anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, as well as the benefit of preinfusion of unlabeled antibody on radiolabeled antibody biodistribution. Subsequent clinical trials with this radiolabeled antibody led to regulatory approval of this treatment for B-cell lymphoma. See related article by Knox et al., Clin Cancer Res 1996;2(3) Mar 1996; 457-70.

  1. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  2. B-cell lymphomas with features intermediate between distinct pathologic entities. From pathogenesis to pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Antonino; Gloghini, Annunziata; Aiello, Antonella; Testi, Adele; Cabras, Antonello

    2010-05-01

    Published in September 2008, the updated World Health Organization Classification of Tumors of Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Tissues introduces provisional borderline categories for lymphoma cases that demonstrate overlapping clinical, morphological, and/or immunophenotypic features between well-established entities. These overlapping features pose real diagnostic challenges especially in identifying atypical cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. Lymphoma cases showing borderline features between T-cell/histiocyte-rich large B-cell lymphoma and nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are not included within the borderline categories provisionally recognized by the updated classification. Within the borderline categories, there are cases combining features of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma. Many of these cases resemble classical Hodgkin lymphoma but have a large number of tumor cells expressing CD20, CD45, and B-cell transcription factors. Alternatively, these cases may resemble primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma but contain tumor cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells and displaying an aberrant phenotype such as CD20(-), CD15(-/+) CD45(+), CD30(+), Pax5(+), OCT2(+/-), and BOB1(+/-). Another new borderline category defining B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt lymphoma, represents a biologically heterogeneous group. Cases with morphologic features intermediate and with CD10/BCL6 coexpression should be placed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma/Burkitt lymphoma category if tumor cells also show strong BCL2 staining and/or a Ki67 proliferation index of less than 90%. When MYC rearrangements are present in these cases, the lymphomas often have atypical features, including concurrent rearrangements of BCL2 and/or BCL6 genes (so-called double/triple-hit lymphomas) and more aggressive behavior. For the

  3. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Anna; Anginot, Adrienne; Mancini, Stéphane J C; Schiff, Claudine; Carle, Georges F; Wakkach, Abdelilah; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine

    2011-07-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  4. Osteoclast activity modulates B-cell development in the bone marrow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anna Mansour; Adrienne Anginot; Stéphane J C Mancini; Claudine Schiff; Georges F Carle; Abdelilah Wakkach; Claudine Blin-Wakkach

    2011-01-01

    B-cell development is dependent on the interactions between B-cell precursors and bone marrow stromal cells, but the role of osteoclasts (OCLs) in this process remains unknown. B lymphocytopenia is a characteristic of osteopetrosis, suggesting a modulation of B lymphopoiesis by OCL activity. To address this question, we first rescued OCL function in osteopetrotic oc/oc mice by dendritic cell transfer, leading to a restoration of both bone phenotype and B-cell development. To further explore the link between OCL activity and B lymphopoiesis, we induced osteopetrosis in normal mice by injections of zoledronic acid (ZA), an inhibitor of bone resorption. B-cell number decreased specifically in the bone marrow of ZA-treated mice. ZA did not directly affect B-cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, but induced a decrease in the expression of CXCL12 and IL-7 by stromal cells, associated with reduced osteoblastic engagement. Equivalent low osteoblastic engagement in oc/oc mice confirmed that it resulted from the reduced OCL activity rather than from a direct effect of ZA on osteoblasts. These dramatic alterations of the bone microenvironment were disadvantageous for B lymphopoiesis, leading to retention of B-cell progenitors outside of their bone marrow niches in the ZA-induced osteopetrotic model. Altogether, our data revealed that OCLs modulate B-cell development in the bone marrow by controlling the bone microenvironment and the fate of osteoblasts. They provide novel basis for the regulation of the retention of B cells in their niche by OCL activity.

  5. Dysregulated cytokine production by dendritic cells modulates B cell responses in the NZM2410 mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying-Yi; Yin, Yiming; Dozmorov, Igor; Li, Hao; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown in tolerance of autoreactive B cells in the lupus-prone NZM2410-derived B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice results in the secretion of autoantibodies. TC dendritic cells (DCs) enhance B cell proliferation and antibody secretion in a cytokine-dependent manner. However, the specific cytokine milieu by which TC DCs activate B cells was not known. In this study, we compared TC and C57BL/6 (B6) control for the distribution of DC subsets and for their production of cytokines affecting B cell responses. We show that TC DCs enhanced B cell proliferation through the production of IL-6 and IFN-γ, while antibody secretion was only dependent on IL-6. Pre-disease TC mice showed an expanded PDCA1(+) cells prior to disease onset that was localized to the marginal zone and further expanded with age. The presence of PDCA1(+) cells in the marginal zone correlated with a Type I Interferon (IFN) signature in marginal zone B cells, and this response was higher in TC than B6 mice. In vivo administration of anti-chromatin immune complexes upregulated IL-6 and IFN-γ production by splenic DCs from TC but not B6 mice. The production of BAFF and APRIL was decreased upon TC DC stimulation both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that these B cell survival factors do not play a role in B cell modulation by TC DCs. Finally, TC B cells were defective at downregulating IL-6 expression in response to anti-inflammatory apoptotic cell exposure. Overall, these results show that the TC autoimmune genetic background induces the production of B cell-modulating inflammatory cytokines by DCs, which are regulated by the microenvironment as well as the interplay between DC.

  6. B cell depletion in treating primary biliary cirrhosis: Pros and cons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Feng Yin; Xuan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a progressive autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology that affects almost exclusively women.Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is currently the only approved drug by Food and Drug Administration for patients with PBC.Although the precise pathogenesis of PBC remains unclear,it has been postulated that many cell populations,including B cells,are involved in the ongoing inflammatory process,which implicates,not surprisingly,a potential therapeutic target of depleting B cell to treat this disorder.Rituximab is a chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has been approved for the treatment of lymphoma and some autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.Whether it is effective in the treatment of PBC has not been evaluated.Recently,Tsuda et al[1] demonstrated that B cell depletion with rituximab significantly reduced the number of anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA)-producing B cells,AMA titers,the plasma levels of immunoglobulins (IgA,IgM and IgG) as well as serum alkaline phosphatase,and it was well tolerated by all the treated patients with no serious adverse events.This observation provides a novel treatment option for the patients with PBC who have incomplete response to UDCA.

  7. Favorable outcome of Epstein-Barr virus-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder complicated by immunoglobulin G4-related disease treated with rituximab-based therapy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Koki; Ikeda, Kazuhiko; Ogawa, Kazuei; Sukegawa, Masumi; Sano, Takahiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Suzuki, Osamu; Hashimoto, Yuko; Takeishi, Yasuchika

    2016-01-01

    Background After acute infection of Epstein-Barr virus, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells survive but usually do not show clonal proliferation. However, Epstein-Barr virus-infected B cells occasionally acquire a proliferative capacity that provokes clonal lymphoproliferative disorders. We herein present a case with Epstein-Barr virus-infected CD30+ B cell and immunoglobulin G4+ plasmacytoid cell proliferation in the lymph nodes, suggesting a pathological and clinical interaction between Eps...

  8. Single-Cell Analysis of the Plasmablast Response to Vibrio cholerae Demonstrates Expansion of Cross-Reactive Memory B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffman, Robert C.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R.; Nakajima, Rie; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Rahman, Atiqur; Bhaumik, Siddhartha K.; Harris, Levelle; O'Neal, Justin T.; Trost, Jessica F.; Alam, Nur Haq; Jasinskas, Algis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized the acute B cell response in adults with cholera by analyzing the repertoire, specificity, and functional characteristics of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from single-cell-sorted plasmablasts. We found that the cholera-induced responses were characterized by high levels of somatic hypermutation and large clonal expansions. A majority of the expansions targeted cholera toxin (CT) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a novel proteomics approach, we were able...

  9. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody 19A2 and a new antigen retrieval technique has prognostic impact in archival paraffin-embedded node-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siitonen, S M; Kallioniemi, O P; Isola, J J

    1993-04-01

    We evaluated whether proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry with antigen retrieval could be used as a measure of cell proliferation in archival, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues and whether the staining results have long-term prognostic significance in axillary node-negative breast cancer. Primary tumor samples obtained from 109 axillary-node-negative breast cancer cases were used for the study. The best staining results were obtained with the 19A2 antibody after microwave heating in a solution of saturated lead thiocyanate. Using this method, there was a significant correlation (linear regression, r = 0.580, P treatment may offer a useful alternative to DNA flow cytometry for the analysis of cell proliferation activity from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded breast carcinomas.

  10. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  11. Pre-existing T- and B-cell defects in one progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Sottini

    Full Text Available Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML usually occurs in patients with severe immunosuppression, hematological malignancies, chronic inflammatory conditions or receiving organ transplant. Recently, PML has also been observed in patients treated with monoclonal antibodies. By taking advantage of the availability of samples from a multiple sclerosis (MS patient treated with natalizumab, the antibody anti-α4 integrin, who developed PML and was monitored starting before therapy initiation, we investigated the fate of T and B lymphocytes in the onset of PML. Real-time PCR was used to measure new T- and B-cell production by means of T-cell receptor excision circle (TREC and K-deleting recombination excision circle (KREC analysis and to quantify transcripts for CD34, terminal-deoxynucleotidyltransferase, and V pre-B lymphocyte gene 1. T- and B-cell subsets and T-cell heterogeneity were measured by flow cytometry and spectratyping. The data were compared to those of untreated and natalizumab-treated MS patients and healthy donors. Before therapy, a patient who developed PML had a low TREC and KREC number; TRECs remained low, while KRECs and pre-B lymphocyte gene 1 transcripts peaked at 6 months of therapy and then decreased at PML diagnosis. Flow cytometry confirmed the deficient number of newly produced T lymphocytes, counterbalanced by an increase in TEMRA cells. The percentage of naive B cells increased by approximately 70% after 6 months of therapy, but B lymphocyte number remained low for the entire treatment period. T-cell heterogeneity and immunoglobulins were reduced. Although performed in a single patient, all results showed that an immune deficit, together with an increase in newly produced B cells a few months after therapy initiation, may predispose the patient to PML. These findings indicate the TREC/KREC assay is a potential tool to identify patients at risk of developing PML and may provide insights into the immunological

  12. Generation and selection of immunized Fab phage display library against human B cell lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongmei Shen; Xiaochun Yang; Ningzheng Dong; Xiaofang Xie; Xia Bai; Yizhen Shi

    2007-01-01

    The approval of using monoclonal antibodies as a targeted therapy in the management of patients with B cell lymphoma has led to new treatment options for this group of patients. Production of monoclonal antibodies by the traditional hybridoma technology is costly, and the resulting murine antibodies often have the disadvantage of triggering human anti-mouse antibody (HAMA) response. Therefore recombinant Fab antibodies generated by the phage display technology can be a suitable alternative in managing B cell lymphoma. In this study, we extracted total RNA from spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with human B lymphoma cells, and used RT-PCR to amplify cDNAs coding for the K light chains and Fd fragments of heavy chains. After appropriate restriction digests, these cDNA fragments were successively inserted into the phagemid vector pComb3H-SS to construct an immunized Fab phage display library. The diversity of the constructed library was approximately 1.94×107. Following five rounds of biopanning, soluble Fab antibodies were produced from positive clones identified by ELISA. From eight positive clones, FabC06, FabC21, FabC43 and FabC59 were selected for sequence analysis. At the level of amino acid sequences, the variable heavy domains (VH) and variable light domains (VL) were found to share 88-92% and 89-94% homology with sequences coded by the corresponding murine germline genes respectively. Furthermore, reactivity with membrane proteins of the B cell lymphoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. These immunized Fab antibodies may provide a valuable tool for further study of B cell lymphoma and could also contribute to the improvement of disease therapy.

  13. B cells from knock-in mice expressing broadly neutralizing HIV antibody b12 carry an innocuous B cell receptor responsive to HIV vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Takayuki; Doyle-Cooper, Colleen; Cooper, Anthony B; Doores, Katherine J; Aoki-Ota, Miyo; Le, Khoa; Schief, William R; Wyatt, Richard T; Burton, Dennis R; Nemazee, David

    2013-09-15

    Broadly neutralizing Abs against HIV protect from infection, but their routine elicitation by vaccination has not been achieved. To generate small animal models to test vaccine candidates, we have generated targeted transgenic ("knock-in") mice expressing, in the physiological Ig H and L chain loci, two well-studied broadly neutralizing Abs: 4E10, which interacts with the membrane proximal external region of gp41, and b12, which binds to the CD4 binding site on gp120. 4E10HL mice are described in the companion article (Doyle-Cooper et al., J. Immunol. 191: 3186-3191). In this article, we describe b12 mice. B cells in b12HL mice, in contrast to the case in 4E10 mice, were abundant and essentially monoclonal, retaining the b12 specificity. In cell culture, b12HL B cells responded avidly to HIV envelope gp140 trimers and to BCR ligands. Upon transfer to wild-type recipients, b12HL B cells responded robustly to vaccination with gp140 trimers. Vaccinated b12H mice, although generating abundant precursors and Abs with affinity for Env, were unable to rapidly generate neutralizing Abs, highlighting the importance of developing Ag forms that better focus responses to neutralizing epitopes. The b12HL and b12H mice should be useful in optimizing HIV vaccine candidates to elicit a neutralizing response while avoiding nonprotective specificities.

  14. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  15. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Advances in human B cell phenotypic profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise A Kaminski

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available To advance our understanding and treatment of disease, research immunologists have been called-upon to place more centralized emphasis on impactful human studies. Such endeavors will inevitably require large-scale study execution and data management regulation (Big Biology, necessitating standardized and reliable metrics of immune status and function. A well-known example setting this large-scale effort in-motion is identifying correlations between eventual disease outcome and T lymphocyte phenotype in large HIV-patient cohorts using multiparameter flow cytometry. However, infection, immunodeficiency, and autoimmunity are also characterized by correlative and functional contributions of B lymphocytes, which to-date have received much less attention in the human Big Biology enterprise. Here, we review progress in human B cell phenotyping, analysis, and bioinformatics tools that constitute valuable resources for the B cell research community to effectively join in this effort.

  17. Co-stimulation by anti-immunoglobulin is required for B cell activation by CD40Llow T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    During cognate B:T interactions, B cells encounter antigen (Ag) through surface immuno-globulin (sIg) and present antigenic peptides to T helper (Th) cells. However, most in vitro systems used to study contact events involved in the delivery of T help for B cells circumvent the requirement for T...... cell Ag specificity by using anti-CD3/T cell receptor (TcR) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to activate T cells. To study the role of sIg engagement in the responsiveness of B cells to T help, we pre-treated small resting B cells with soluble anti-kappa mAb prior to contact with an activated Th1 clone....... By reducing the concentration of anti-TcR mAb we obtained low levels of CD40 ligand (CD40Llow) on Th cells, comparable to those expressed by lymph node T cells activated in vitro (ex vivo T cells). In contrast to untreated B cells, which did not respond to CD40Llow Th, anti-Ig-treated B cells responded...

  18. Influenza vaccination-induced B cell response in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tete, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Monoklonale gammopathie van onbepaalde betekenis (MGUS) is een proliferatieve plasma cel stoornis die voornamelijk voorkomt onder ouderen. Deze stoornis kan uiteindelijk leiden tot een kwaadaardige vorm van multipel myeloom. Er is sprake van een intrinsiek defect in de productie van immunoglobulines

  19. BP8, a novel peptide from avian immune system, modulates B cell developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Dong; Zhou, Bin; Feng, Xiu-Li; Cao, Rui-Bing; Chen, Pu-Yan

    2014-12-01

    The bursa of Fabricius (BF) is the key humoral immune organ unique to birds, and is critical for early B-lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation. However, the molecular basis and mechanisms through which the BF regulates B cell development are not fully understood. In this study, we isolated and identified a new bursal peptide (BP8, AGHTKKAP) by RP-HPLC and MALDI-TOF-MS. BP8 promoted colony-forming pre-B formation, bound B cell precursor, regulated B cell development in vitro as well as in vivo, upstream of the EBF-E2A-Pax5 regulatory complex and increased immunoglobulin secretion. These data revealed a bursal-derived multifunctional factor BP8 as a novel biomaterial which is essential for the development of the immune system. This study elucidates further the mechanisms involved in humoral immune system and has implications in treating human diseases.

  20. Autoreactive helper T cells alleviate the need for intrinsic TLR signaling in autoreactive B cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Josephine R.; Neves, Adriana Turqueti; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    T cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus; however, there is relatively little information on the nature and specificity of autoreactive T cells. Identifying such cells has been technically difficult because they are likely to be rare and low affinity. Here, we report a method for identifying autoreactive T cell clones that recognize proteins contained in autoantibody immune complexes, providing direct evidence that functional autoreactive helper T cells exist in the periphery of normal mice. These T cells significantly enhanced autoreactive B cell proliferation and altered B cell differentiation in vivo. Most importantly, these autoreactive T cells were able to rescue many aspects of the TLR-deficient AM14 (anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor) B cell response, suggesting that TLR requirements can be bypassed. This result has implications for the efficacy of TLR-targeted therapy in the treatment of ongoing disease. PMID:28239656

  1. Control of the B Cell-Intrinsic Tolerance Program by c-Cbl and Cbl-b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn-Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J.; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R.; Gu, Hua

    2007-01-01

    BCR signaling plays a critical role in B-cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both c-Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-dko) manifest systemic lupus erythymatosis (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl-dko mutation results in a significant increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells are not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B-cell anergy to protein antigen appears to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, PLCγ-2, and Vav and Ca2+ mobilization, are enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of BLNK is significantly attenuated in the mutant B cells, suggesting that the loss of coordination between these pathways is responsible for the impaired B-cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction. PMID:17493844

  2. Primary Hepatosplenic Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Morales-Polanco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma. It usually begins in the lymph nodes; up to 40% may have an extranodal presentation. According to a definition of primary extranodal lymphoma with presentation only in extranodal sites, there are reports of large B-cell lymphomas limited to liver or spleen as separate entities, and to date there have been only three documented cases of primary hepatosplenic presentation. This paper reports a fourth case. Due to a review of the literature and the clinical course of the case reported, we conclude that primary hepatosplenic large B-cell lymphoma has been found predominantly in females older than 60 years. The patients reported had <2 months of evolution prior to diagnosis, prominent B symptoms, splenomegaly in three and hepatomegaly in two, none with lymph node involvement. All had thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function tests; three had anemia and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, two with hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. Because of the previously mentioned data, it can be stated that primary hepatosplenic lymphoma is an uncommon and aggressive form of disease that requires immediate recognition and treatment.

  3. Human pregnancy-associated malaria-specific B cells target polymorphic, conformational epitopes in VAR2CSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, L.; Bernasconi, N. L.; Dahlback, M.

    2007-01-01

    , are targets of IgG-mediated protective immunity to PAM. Here, we report an investigation of the specificity of naturally acquired immunity to PAM, using eight human monoclonal IgG1 antibodies that react exclusively with intact CSA-adhering IEs expressing VSA(PAM). Four reacted in Western blotting with high......-specific protective immunity, and demonstrate the value of human monoclonal antibodies and conformationally intact recombinant antigens in VSA characterization....... to evaluate B-cell epitope diversity among parasite isolates, and identified the binding site of one monoclonal antibody using a chimeric DBL3-X construct. Our findings show that there is a high-frequency memory response to VSA(PAM), indicating that VAR2CSA is a primary target of naturally acquired PAM...

  4. Gene expression predicts overall survival in paraffin-embedded tissues of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with R-CHOP

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBlanc, Michael L.; Unger, Joseph M.; Miller, Thomas P.; Grogan, Thomas M.; Persky, Daniel O.; Martel, Ralph R.; Sabalos, Constantine M.; Seligmann, Bruce; Braziel, Rita M.; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Connors, Joseph M.; Sehn, Laurie H.; Johnson, Nathalie; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2008-01-01

    Gene expression profiling (GEP) on frozen tissues has identified genes predicting outcome in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Confirmation of results in current patients is limited by availability of frozen samples and addition of monoclonal antibodies to treatment regimens. We used a quantitative nuclease protection assay (qNPA) to analyze formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks for 36 previously identified genes (N = 209, 93 chemotherapy; 116 rituximab + chemotherapy). By qNPA, 208 cases were successfully analyzed (99.5%). In addition, 15 of 36 and 11 of 36 genes, representing each functional group previously identified by GEP, were associated with survival (P 80%) as independent indicators of survival, together distinguishing cases with the worst prognosis. Our results solve a clinical research problem by demonstrating that prognostic genes can be meaningfully quantified using qNPA technology on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues; previous GEP findings in DLBCL are relevant with current treatments; and 2 genes, representing immune escape and proliferation, are the common features of the most aggressive DLBCL. PMID:18544678

  5. A critical role for the protein kinase PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells and the development of B1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Luojing; Oleksyn, David; Pulvino, Mary; Sanz, Ignacio; Ryan, Daniel; Ryan, Charlotte; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Poligone, Brian; Pentland, Alice P; Ritchlin, Christopher; Zhao, Jiyong

    2016-04-01

    Protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) regulates NF-κB activation and is required for the survival of certain lymphoma cells. Mice lacking PKK die soon after birth, and previous studies suggest that the role of PKK in B cell development might be context dependent. We have generated a mouse strain harboring conditional null alleles for PKK and a Cre-recombinase transgene under the control of the endogenous CD19 promoter. In the present study, we show that knockout of PKK in B cells results in the reduction of long-lived recirculating mature B cell population in lymph nodes and bone marrow as well as a decrease in peritoneal B1 cells, while PKK deficiency has no apparent effect on early B cell development in bone marrow or the development of follicular and marginal zone B cells in the spleen. In addition, we demonstrate that PKK-deficient B cells display defective proliferation and survival responses to stimulation of B cell receptor (BCR), which may underlie the reduction of recirculating mature B cells in PKK mutant mice. Consistently, BCR-mediated NF-κB activation, known to be required for the survival of activated but not resting B cells, is attenuated in PKK-deficient B cells. Thus, our results reveal a critical role of PKK in the maintenance of recirculating mature B cells as well as the development of B1 cells in mice. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interleukin 35 Rescues Regulatory B Cell Function, but the Effect Is Dysregulated in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoxuan; Qin, Chengyong

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-time inflammatory condition arising from aberrant immune activation in the colon and the rectum. Interleukin (IL)-35 plays critical roles in autoimmune disorders. In this study, we explored the pathways of IL-35 in affecting UC. First, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from UC patients were obtained. Pretreating PBMCs with IL-35 resulted in significantly elevated IL-10 production from whole PBMCs as well as B cells, whereas pretreating PBMCs with IL-12 or IL-27 did not demonstrate a similar effect. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8(+) T cells, but did not inhibit the proliferation of B cells. IL-35-mediated IL-10 secretion in B cells did not require the presence of Treg cells. After treatment with IL-35, B cells from UC patients presented significantly enhanced regulatory function, characterized by inhibiting cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion from autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells and CD8(+) T cells, which was dependent on IL-10 signaling. However, IL-35-treatment did not demonstrate an effect on regulating IL-5 and IL-13 responses. These discoveries identified a Th1, Th17, and CD8(+) T cell-targeting role of IL-35 in UC patients. Next, we examined the IL-35 expression in the intestinal mucosal in UC patients. Data showed that both noninflamed and inflamed tissues from UC patients presented significantly lower IL-35 secretion compared to healthy control tissues, which was associated with suppressed p35 transcription. UC patients with higher IL-35 also presented higher IL-10 secretion in gut mucosa. Together, our study identified that IL-35 could mediate anti-inflammatory function through promoting regulatory B cell functions, but this effect was suppressed in UC patients.

  7. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  8. A B-Cell Superantigen Induces the Apoptosis of Murine and Human Malignant B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Daniela; Duarte, Alejandra; Mundiñano, Juliana; Berguer, Paula; Nepomnaschy, Irene; Piazzon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    B-cell superantigens (Sags) bind to conserved sites of the VH or VL regions of immunoglobulin molecules outside their complementarity-determining regions causing the apoptosis of normal cognate B cells. No attempts to investigate whether B-cell Sags are able to induce the apoptosis of cognate malignant B cells were reported. In the present study we show that protein L (PpL), secreted by Finegoldia magna, a B-cell Sag which interacts with κ+ bearing cells, induces the apoptosis of murine and human κ+ lymphoma B cells both in vitro and in vivo. Apoptosis was not altered by caspase-8 inhibitor. No alterations in the levels of Bid, Fas and Fas-L were found suggesting that PpL does not activate the extrinsic pathway of apoptosis. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was clearly indicated by: i) alterations in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) both in murine and human lymphoma cells exposed to PpL; ii) decreased levels of apoptosis in the presence of caspase-9 inhibitor; iii) significant increases of Bim and Bax protein levels and downregulation of Bcl-2; iv) the translocation from the cytoplasm to the mitochondria of Bax and Bim pro-apoptotic proteins and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor and v) the translocation of Bcl-2 protein from the mitochondria to the cytosol and its inhibition by caspase-9 inhibitor but not by caspase-8 inhibitor. The possibility of a therapeutic use of Sags in lymphoma/leukemia B cell malignancies is discussed. PMID:27603942

  9. PKK deficiency in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle lupus mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksyn, D; Zhao, J; Vosoughi, A; Zhao, J C; Misra, R; Pentland, A P; Ryan, D; Anolik, J; Ritchlin, C; Looney, J; Anandarajah, A P; Schwartz, G; Calvi, L M; Georger, M; Mohan, C; Sanz, I; Chen, L

    2017-05-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies that can result in damage to multiple organs. It is well documented that B cells play a critical role in the development of the disease. We previously showed that protein kinase C associated kinase (PKK) is required for B1 cell development as well as for the survival of recirculating mature B cells and B-lymphoma cells. Here, we investigated the role of PKK in lupus development in a lupus mouse model. We demonstrate that the conditional deletion of PKK in B cells prevents lupus development in Sle1Sle3 mice. The loss of PKK in Sle mice resulted in the amelioration of multiple classical lupus-associated phenotypes and histologic features of lupus nephritis, including marked reduction in the levels of serum autoantibodies, proteinuria, spleen size, peritoneal B-1 cell population and the number of activated CD4 T cells. In addition, the abundance of autoreactive plasma cells normally seen in Sle lupus mice was also significantly decreased in the PKK-deficient Sle mice. Sle B cells deficient in PKK display defective proliferation responses to BCR and LPS stimulation. Consistently, B cell receptor-mediated NF-κB activation, which is required for the survival of activated B cells, was impaired in the PKK-deficient B cells. Taken together, our work uncovers a critical role of PKK in lupus development and suggests that targeting the PKK-mediated pathway may represent a promising therapeutic strategy for lupus treatment. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Human memory B cells originate from three distinct germinal center-dependent and -independent maturation pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowska, Magdalena A; Driessen, Gertjan J A; Bikos, Vasilis; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Cerutti, Andrea; He, Bing; Biermann, Katharina; Lange, Johan F; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Dongen, Jacques J M; van Zelm, Menno C

    2011-08-25

    Multiple distinct memory B-cell subsets have been identified in humans, but it remains unclear how their phenotypic diversity corresponds to the type of responses from which they originate. Especially, the contribution of germinal center-independent responses in humans remains controversial. We defined 6 memory B-cell subsets based on their antigen-experienced phenotype and differential expression of CD27 and IgH isotypes. Molecular characterization of their replication history, Ig somatic hypermutation, and class-switch profiles demonstrated their origin from 3 different pathways. CD27⁻IgG⁺ and CD27⁺IgM⁺ B cells are derived from primary germinal center reactions, and CD27⁺IgA⁺ and CD27⁺IgG⁺ B cells are from consecutive germinal center responses (pathway 1). In contrast, natural effector and CD27⁻IgA⁺ memory B cells have limited proliferation and are also present in CD40L-deficient patients, reflecting a germinal center-independent origin. Natural effector cells at least in part originate from systemic responses in the splenic marginal zone (pathway 2). CD27⁻IgA⁺ cells share low replication history and dominant Igλ and IgA2 use with gut lamina propria IgA+ B cells, suggesting their common origin from local germinal center-independent responses (pathway 3). Our findings shed light on human germinal center-dependent and -independent B-cell memory formation and provide new opportunities to study these processes in immunologic diseases.

  11. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  12. Arginine methylation regulates antibody responses through modulating cell division and isotype switching in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kikumi; Mizuguchi, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    Protein arginine methylation plays crucial roles, including signal transduction, transcriptional control, cell proliferation and/or differentiation. B cells undergo clonal division, isotype switching and differentiate into antibody forming cells following stimulation with Toll-like receptor-ligand, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and T cell-derived signals, including CD40-ligand (CD40-L) and interleukin 4 (IL-4). Whether protein arginine methylation affects B cell division and/or isotype switching to IgG1 in response to LPS, IL-4, and CD40-L was examined using the arginine methyl transferase inhibitor adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde (AdOx). Addition of AdOx substantially reduced the number of division cycles of stimulated B cells, whereas cell viability remained intact. Upon stimulation with LPS/IL-4/CD40-L, the proportion of surface IgG1 positive cells in each division cycle was slightly diminished by AdOx. However, the degree of expression of γ1 germ line transcript and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L were unaffected by addition of AdOx, suggesting that AdOx influences class switch recombination independent of AID expression through transcriptional control. Taken together, arginine methylation appears to be involved in B cell isotype switching, as well as in clonal expansion of B cells in response to LPS/IL-4/CD40-L. © 2012 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. MYC/BCL2 double-hit high-grade B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shaoying; Lin, Pei; Young, Ken H; Kanagal-Shamanna, Rashmi; Yin, C Cameron; Medeiros, L Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    Double-hit lymphoma (DHL) has been defined by others as a B-cell lymphoma with MYC/8q24 rearrangement in combination with a translocation involving another gene, such as BCL2, BCL3, or BCL6. The most common form of DHL has translocations involving MYC and BCL2, also known as MYC/BCL2 DHL. In recent years, a number of case series of MYC/BCL2 DHL have been published. Most cases of MYC/BCL2 DHL morphologically resemble diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between DLBCL and Burkitt lymphoma. These tumors are of B-cell lineage, have a germinal center B-cell immunophenotype with a high proliferation rate, and a complex karyotype. Patients with these tumors have an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis despite high-intensity chemotherapy. More recently, studies have suggested expanding the spectrum of MYC/BCL2 DHL to include cases that have concurrent MYC and BCL2 cytogenetic abnormalities, but not necessarily translocations. In addition, overexpression of MYC and BCL2 has been shown in an appreciable subset of DLBCL tumors. These tumors show overlap with MYC/BCL2 DHL, but are not equivalent. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and prognostic features of MYC/BCL2 DHL.

  14. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  15. T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma associated with a microenvironment of thymic asteroid B cells in the bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Kikkeri N; May, Philippa C; Reid, Alistair G; Marks, Alexandra J; Macdonald, Donald; Kanfer, Ed

    2010-10-01

      Asteroid B cells are a component of normal thymus. It is currently unclear whether these cells are identifiable in T cell lymphoblastic leukaemia/lymphoma (T-ALL/LBL) of the thymus. The aim of this study was to identify asteroid B cells both in thymic and extrathymic tissue involved by T-ALL/LBL.   Thymic, lymph node (LN) and bone marrow trephine biopsy (BMTB) samples from eight patients with T-ALL/LBL were reviewed. All had been investigated by immunohistochemistry and one by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). The BMTB samples of two of eight T-ALL/LBLs and LN sample in one of them showed the presence of asteroid-shaped B cells with dendritic cytoplasmic processes. These B cells also expressed CD23 and the features were akin to the unique thymic asteroid B cells. Both patients had aggressive/resistant disease. Cytogenetic analysis in one showed a complex translocation involving the T cell receptor beta (TCRB) gene at 7q35 and a distal region of 9q known to harbour the NOTCH1 gene.   This is the first report of T-ALL/LBL documenting the presence of an asteroid B cell-rich microenvironment at bone marrow and LN sites. In this small subset, T-ALL/LBL cells are possibly dependent upon asteroid B cells, and whether targeting of asteroid B cells with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in such cases will result in clinical benefit remains to be determined. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  16. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma

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    Junxin Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  17. Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Jonathan W.

    2008-01-01

    Synopsis Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) remains a curable lymphoma, with improved outcome due in large part to incorporation of rituximab in standard regimens. The disease is heterogeneous clinically, morphologically, and molecularly. Recent insights into the molecular heterogeneity of DLBCL are beginning to yield novel therapeutics with significant promise for key subsets of patients. Although CHOP chemotherapy with rituximab remains a standard therapeutic approach for most patients with DLBCL, we anticipate that novel agents will be included in treatment regimens for many patients in the near future. PMID:18954744

  18. Dynamics of B cells in germinal centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Nilushi S; Klein, Ulf

    2015-03-01

    Humoral immunity depends on the germinal centre (GC) reaction during which somatically mutated high-affinity memory B cells and plasma cells are generated. Recent studies have uncovered crucial cues that are required for the formation and the maintenance of GCs and for the selection of high-affinity antibody mutants. In addition, it is now clear that these events are promoted by the dynamic movements of cells within and between GCs. These findings have resolved the complexities of the GC reaction in greater detail than ever before. This Review focuses on these recent advances and discusses their implications for the establishment of humoral immunity.

  19. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

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    Sophia R. Balderman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease. In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  20. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  1. The origin of marginal zone B cells in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, PM; de Boer, NK; Deenen, GJ; Nieuwenhuis, P; Kroese, FGM

    1999-01-01

    The marginal zone is a unique compartment that is only found in the spleen. Rat marginal zone B cells (MZ-B) can be distinguished from other B cells, e.g. recirculating follicular B cells (RF-B), by several phenotypic characteristics. Typically MZ-B cells are surface (s)IgM(hi), sIgD(lo) and CD45R(B

  2. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

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    Sabyasachi Halder

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  3. IL-10-overexpressing B cells regulate innate and adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, Barbara; van de Veen, Willem; Wirz, Oliver F; Rückert, Beate; Morita, Hideaki; Söllner, Stefan; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2015-03-01

    Distinct human IL-10-producing B-cell subsets with immunoregulatory properties have been described. However, the broader spectrum of their direct cellular targets and suppressive mechanisms has not been extensively studied, particularly in relation to direct and indirect IL-10-mediated functions. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of IL-10 overexpression on the phenotype and immunoregulatory capacity of B cells. Primary human B cells were transfected with hIL-10, and IL-10-overexpressing B cells were characterized for cytokine and immunoglobulin production by means of specific ELISA and bead-based assays. Antigen presentation, costimulation capacity, and transcription factor signatures were analyzed by means of flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR. Effects of IL-10-overexpresing B cells on Toll-like receptor-triggered cytokine release from PBMCs, LPS-triggered maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and tetanus toxoid-induced PBMC proliferation were assessed in autologous cocultures. IL-10-overexpressing B cells acquired a prominent immunoregulatory profile comprising upregulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), the IL-2 receptor α chain (CD25), and programmed cell death 1 ligand 1 (PD-L1). Concurrently, their secretion profile was characterized by a significant reduction in levels of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-8, and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α) and augmented production of anti-inflammatory IL-1 receptor antagonist and vascular endothelial growth factor. Furthermore, IL-10 overexpression was associated with a decrease in costimulatory potential. IL-10-overexpressing B cells secreted less IgE and potently suppressed proinflammatory cytokines in PBMCs, maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (rendering their profile to regulatory phenotype), and antigen-specific proliferation in vitro. Our data demonstrate an essential role for IL-10 in inducing an

  4. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  5. Inherited polymorphisms in hyaluronan synthase 1 predict risk of systemic B-cell malignancies but not of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemalatha Kuppusamy

    Full Text Available Genetic variations in the hyaluronan synthase 1 gene (HAS1 influence HAS1 aberrant splicing. HAS1 is aberrantly spliced in malignant cells from multiple myeloma (MM and Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, but not in their counterparts from healthy donors. The presence of aberrant HAS1 splice variants predicts for poor survival in multiple myeloma (MM. We evaluated the influence of inherited HAS1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP on the risk of having a systemic B cell malignancy in 1414 individuals compromising 832 patients and 582 healthy controls, including familial analysis of an Icelandic kindred. We sequenced HAS1 gene segments from 181 patients with MM, 98 with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS, 72 with Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, 169 with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, as well as 34 members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone Icelandic family, 212 age-matched healthy donors and a case-control cohort of 295 breast cancer patients with 353 healthy controls. Three linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in HAS1 intron3 are significantly associated with B-cell malignancies (range p = 0.007 to p = 10(-5, but not MGUS or breast cancer, and predict risk in a 34 member Icelandic family (p = 0.005, Odds Ratio = 5.8 (OR, a relatively homogeneous cohort. In contrast, exon3 SNPs were not significantly different among the study groups. Pooled analyses showed a strong association between the linked HAS1 intron3 SNPs and B-cell malignancies (OR = 1.78, but not for sporadic MGUS or for breast cancer (OR<1.0. The minor allele genotypes of HAS1 SNPs are significantly more frequent in MM, WM, CLL and in affected members of a monoclonal gammopathy-prone family than they are in breast cancer, sporadic MGUS or healthy donors. These inherited changes may increase the risk for systemic B-cell malignancies but not for solid tumors.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  7. Tolerance without clonal expansion: self-antigen-expressing B cells program self-reactive T cells for future deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Friederike; Heinen, Tobias J A J; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Yogev, Nir; Buch, Thorsten; Roers, Axel; Bettelli, Estelle; Müller, Werner; Anderton, Stephen M; Waisman, Ari

    2008-10-15

    B cells have been shown in various animal models to induce immunological tolerance leading to reduced immune responses and protection from autoimmunity. We show that interaction of B cells with naive T cells results in T cell triggering accompanied by the expression of negative costimulatory molecules such as PD-1, CTLA-4, B and T lymphocyte attenuator, and CD5. Following interaction with B cells, T cells were not induced to proliferate, in a process that was dependent on their expression of PD-1 and CTLA-4, but not CD5. In contrast, the T cells became sensitive to Ag-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that B cells participate in the homeostasis of the immune system by ablation of conventional self-reactive T cells.

  8. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Expression in Human B Cell Precursors Is Essential for Central B Cell Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantaert, Tineke; Schickel, Jean-Nicolas; Bannock, Jason M; Ng, Yen-Shing; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Wu, Renee; Lavoie, Aubert; Walter, Jolan E; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Al-Herz, Waleed; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Ochs, Hans D; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Durandy, Anne; Meffre, Eric

    2015-11-17

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme-mediating class-switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) of immunoglobulin genes, is essential for the removal of developing autoreactive B cells. How AID mediates central B cell tolerance remains unknown. We report that AID enzymes were produced in a discrete population of immature B cells that expressed recombination-activating gene 2 (RAG2), suggesting that they undergo secondary recombination to edit autoreactive antibodies. However, most AID+ immature B cells lacked anti-apoptotic MCL-1 and were deleted by apoptosis. AID inhibition using lentiviral-encoded short hairpin (sh)RNA in B cells developing in humanized mice resulted in a failure to remove autoreactive clones. Hence, B cell intrinsic AID expression mediates central B cell tolerance potentially through its RAG-coupled genotoxic activity in self-reactive immature B cells.

  9. BIP induces mice CD19(hi) regulatory B cells producing IL-10 and highly expressing PD-L1, FasL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youfa; Jiang, Qing; Ou, Yanghui; Zhang, Fan; Qing, Kai; Sun, Yuanli; Lu, Wenjie; Zhu, Huifen; Gong, Feili; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that B cells possess a regulatory function in mouse models of autoimmune diseases. Regulatory B cells can modulate immune response through many types of molecular mechanisms, including the production of IL-10 and the expression of PD-1 Ligand and Fas Ligand, but the microenvironmental factors and mechanisms that induce regulatory B cells have not been fully identified. BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein), a member of the heat shock protein 70 family, is a type of evolutionarily highly conserved protein. In this article, we have found that IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells are discrete cell populations, but enriched in CD19(hi) cells. BIP can induce IL-10-producing splenic B cells, IL-10 secretion and B cells highly expressing PD-L1 and FasL. CD40 signaling acts in synergy with BIP to induce regulatory B cells. BIP increased surface CD19 molecule expression intensity and IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells induced by BIP share the CD19(hi) phenotype. Furthermore, B cells treated with BIP and anti-CD40 can lead to suppression of T cell proliferation and the effect is partially IL-10-dependent and mainly BIP-induced. Taken together, our findings identify a novel function of BIP in the induction of regulatory B cells and add a new reason for the therapy of autoimmune disorders or other inflammatory conditions.

  10. The role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in the development and BCR/TLR-dependent activation of AM14 rheumatoid factor B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nündel, Kerstin; Busto, Patricia; Debatis, Michelle; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The protein kinase Btk has been implicated in the development, differentiation, and activation of B cells through its role in the BCR and TLR signaling cascades. These receptors and in particular, the BCR and either TLR7 or TLR9 also play a critical role in the activation of autoreactive B cells by RNA- or DNA-associated autoantigens. To explore the role of Btk in the development of autoreactive B cells, as well as their responses to nucleic acid-associated autoantigens, we have now compared Btk-sufficient and Btk-deficient mice that express a prototypic RF BCR encoded by H- and L-chain sdTgs. These B cells bind autologous IgG2a with low affinity and only proliferate in response to IgG2a ICs that incorporate DNA or RNA. We found that Btk-sufficient RF+ B cells mature into naïve FO B cells, all of which express the Tg BCR, despite circulating levels of IgG2a. By contrast, a significant proportion of Btk-deficient RF+ B cells acquires a MZ or MZ precursor phenotype. Remarkably, despite the complete inability of RF+ Xid/y B cells to respond to F(ab′)2 anti-IgM, RF+ Xid/y B cells could respond well to autoantigen-associated ICs. These data reveal unique features of the signaling cascades responsible for the activation of autoreactive B cells. PMID:23804807

  11. HIV-Infected Spleens Present Altered Follicular Helper T Cell (Tfh Subsets and Skewed B Cell Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Colineau

    Full Text Available Follicular helper T (Tfh cells within secondary lymphoid organs control multiple steps of B cell maturation and antibody (Ab production. HIV-1 infection is associated with an altered B cell differentiation and Tfh isolated from lymph nodes of HIV-infected (HIV+ individuals provide inadequate B cell help in vitro. However, the mechanisms underlying this impairment of Tfh function are not fully defined. Using a unique collection of splenocytes, we compared the frequency, phenotype and transcriptome of Tfh subsets in spleens from HIV negative (HIV- and HIV+ subjects. We observed an increase of CXCR5+PD-1highCD57-Tfh and germinal center (GC CD57+ Tfh in HIV+ spleens. Both subsets showed a reduced mRNA expression of the transcription factor STAT-3, co-stimulatory, regulatory and signal transduction molecules as compared to HIV- spleens. Similarly, Foxp3 expressing follicular regulatory T (Tfr cells were increased, suggesting sustained GC reactions in chronically HIV+ spleens. As a consequence, GC B cell populations were expanded, however, complete maturation into memory B cells was reduced in HIV+ spleens where we evidenced a compromised production of B cell-activating cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-10. Collectively our data indicate that, although Tfh proliferation and GC reactions seem to be ongoing in HIV-infected spleens, Tfh "differentiation" and expression of costimulatory molecules is skewed with a profound effect on B cell maturation.

  12. Clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes and progression to B cell lymphoma in cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G S; Ngan, B Y; Tung, R; Hoffman, T E; Abel, E A; Hoppe, R T; Warnke, R A; Cleary, M L; Sklar, J

    1989-07-01

    Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia (CLH) is a disorder characterized by the development of one or more skin lesions containing dense lymphoid infiltrates that exhibit the histopathologic features of a benign, reactive process. Nevertheless, some cases have been associated with the subsequent development of clinically overt lymphomas. This suggests that monoclonal populations may exist in some cases of CLH and that these cases may represent a subset more likely to evolve into lymphoma. To determine if such a subset of CLH can be distinguished, Southern blot analysis of DNA was used to study the immunogenotypic features of lesions from 14 patients with clinical, histopathologic, and immunopathologic findings characteristic of CLH. Five cases exhibited detectable clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin genes. Furthermore, one of these five cases evolved into overt diffuse large cell lymphoma of B cell lineage during a 2-year follow-up of recurrent disease at the original cutaneous site. The immunoglobulin gene rearrangements of this lymphoma were identical to those of the prior CLH lesion. There was no evidence of detectable t(14;18) chromosomal translocations or clonal rearrangements of the beta gene of the T cell receptor in any case. It was concluded that CLH can be divided into two subsets based on the presence or absence of a clonal B cell population, and that overt lymphoma can arise from the former subset and contain the same B cell clone identified in the pre-existent CLH lesion.

  13. Glomerulonephritis associated with marginal zone B-cell lymphoma: clinical, pathological characteristics of renal injury and treatment (clinical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. T. Dzhumabaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerulonephritis associated with marginal zone B-cell lymphoma at the onset of disease is rarely diagnosed. In this article we reported two patient of the extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with kidney damage. The first patient with the extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma involved the stomach, lymph nodes, bone marrow and associated with mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis and renal failure. The second patient with the splenic form of marginal zone B-cell lymphoma associated with fibrillary glomerulonephritis and hepatitis C and involve the lymph nodes, liver, bone marrow, and synthesis monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgMκ, cryoglobulin type II. Glomerulonephritis of the both cases were established on the renal biopsies by the morphological investigation, immunofluorescence, and electron microscopy.Both patients received therapy with bendamustine and rituximab, which has resulted in complete remission for lymphatic tumors and improve of kidney function. Overall and event-free survival in the first case corresponds to 21 and 16 months, the second 29 and 20, respectively.These cases illustrates that the kidney may be initially involved by extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, and the need for expanded investigation of the possible dissemination. Combination of bendamustine and rituximab were effective and safety treatment in these cases.

  14. AKT Hyperactivation and the Potential of AKT-Targeted Therapy in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinfen; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Jabbar, Kausar J

    2017-01-01

    AKT signaling is important for proliferation and survival of tumor cells. The clinical significance of AKT activation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is not well analyzed. Here, we assessed expression of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) in 522 DLBCL patients. We found high levels of p-AKT nucl...

  15. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  16. Role of prolactin in B cell regulation in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, Jorge; Farez, Mauricio F; Ysrraelit, María Célica

    2014-04-15

    The role of prolactin in MS pathogenesis was investigated. Prolactin levels were higher in MS subjects both during remission and exacerbation compared to control subjects. Prolactin increased JAK2 expression and Stat phosphorylation on B cells, up-regulated anti-MOG antibody secreting cell numbers, BAFF levels, and Bcl-2expression, and down-regulated expression of Trp63. Prolactin levels correlated positively with anti-MOG secreting cell numbers, and negatively with induced apoptotic B cells. Additionally, prolactin decreased B cell receptor-mediated activation threshold, and induced CD40 expression in B cells. These findings suggest that prolactin promotes B cell autoreactivity in MS through different mechanisms.

  17. Clinical Consequences of Defects in B cell Development

    OpenAIRE

    Vale, Andre M.; Schroeder, Harry (Trey) W

    2010-01-01

    Abnormalities in humoral immunity typically reflect a generalized or selective failure of effective B cell development. The developmental processes can be followed through analysis of cell surface markers such as IgM, IgD, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD21, and CD38. Early phases of B cell development are devoted to the creation of immunoglobulin and testing B cell antigen receptor signaling. Failure leads to the absence of B cells and immunoglobulin in the blood from birth. As the developing B cells be...

  18. B cell lymphomas express CX3CR1 a non-B cell lineage adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, U.; Ek, S.; Merz, H.

    2008-01-01

    To study the differential expression of cell membrane-bound receptors and their potential role in growth and/or survival of the tumor cells, highly purified follicular lymphoma cells were analyzed, using gene expression analysis, and compared to non-malignant B cell populations. Filtering...... the genome for overexpressed genes coding for cell membrane-bound proteins/receptors resulted in a hit list of 27 identified genes. Among these, we have focused on the aberrant over expression of CX3CR1, in different types of B cell lymphoma, as compared to non-malignant B cells. We show that CX3CR1, which...... normally is not expressed on B cells, is expressed both at the mRNA and protein level in several subtypes of lymphoma. CX3CR1 has also shown to be involved in the homing to specific tissues that express the ligand, CX3CL1, in breast and prostate cancer and may thus be involved in dissemination of lymphoma...

  19. Effect of B-cell receptor engagement on CD40-stimulated B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilizzi, BM; Boonstra, R; The, TH; deLeij, LFMH

    1997-01-01

    Activation of human B cells in vitro either by cross-linking of surface immunoglobulins (sig) or by triggering CD40 antigen, in the presence of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-2 (IL-2), may result in high levels of immunoglobulin secretion in vitro. We studied the combined effects of ligation

  20. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  1. Rheumatoid factors, B cells and immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferis, R

    1995-04-01

    The paradigm of self, non-self discrimination in the immune system is under review as autoreactive B or T cells are increasingly delineated within normal individuals. The products of autoreactive B cells are, mostly, polyspecific IgM antibodies of low affinity. These 'natural' antibodies include rheumatoid factors (RF) encoded by unmutated germline immunoglobulin genes. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) the RF may be of the IgM, IgG or IgA isotype, show evidence of somatic mutation and have increased affinity; consistent with maturation of an antigen driven immune response. This response could be initiated or driven by an auto-immunogenic form of IgG or an exogenous cross-reactive antigen. Changes in galactosylation of IgG have been reported to be a valuable diagnostic and prognostic indicator in RA. Speculation that these changes may precipitate some of the disease processes is critically reviewed.

  2. Multiple layers of B cell memory with different effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ismail; Bertocci, Barbara; Vilmont, Valérie; Delbos, Frédéric; Mégret, Jérome; Storck, Sébastien; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès; Weill, Jean-Claude

    2009-12-01

    Memory B cells are at the center of longstanding controversies regarding the presence of antigen for their survival and their re-engagement in germinal centers after secondary challenge. Using a new mouse model of memory B cell labeling dependent on the cytidine deaminase AID, we show that after immunization with a particulate antigen, B cell memory appeared in several subsets, comprising clusters of immunoglobulin M-positive (IgM(+)) and IgG1(+) B cells in germinal center-like structures that persisted up to 8 months after immunization, as well as IgM(+) and IgG1(+) B cells with a memory phenotype outside of B cell follicles. After challenge, the IgG subset differentiated into plasmocytes, whereas the IgM subset reinitiated a germinal center reaction. This model, in which B cell memory appears in several layers with different functions, reconciles previous conflicting propositions.

  3. Presence of Rheumatoid Factor during Chronic HCV Infection Is Associated with Expansion of Mature Activated Memory B-Cells that Are Hypo-Responsive to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation and Persist during the Early Stage of IFN Free Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Avilés, Elane; Kostadinova, Lenche; Rusterholtz, Anne; Cruz-Lebrón, Angelica; Falck-Ytter, Yngve; Anthony, Donald D

    2015-01-01

    Approximately half of those with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection have circulating rheumatoid factor (RF), and a portion of these individuals develop cryoglobulinemic vasculitis. B cell phenotype/function in relation to RF in serum has been unclear. We examined B cell subset distribution, activation state (CD86), cell cycle state (Ki67), and ex-vivo response to BCR, TLR9 and TLR7/8 stimulation, in chronic HCV-infected donors with or without RF, and uninfected donors. Mature-activated B-cells of HCV-infected donors had lower CD86 expression compared to uninfected donors, and in the presence of RF they also showed reduced CD86 expression in response to BCR and TLR9 stimulation. Additionally, mature activated memory B cells of HCV RF+ donors less commonly expressed Ki67+ than HCV RF- donors, and did not proliferate as well in response to BCR stimulation. Proportions of mature-activated B cells were enhanced, while naïve B-cells were lower in the peripheral blood of HCV-RF+ compared to RF- and uninfected donors. None of these parameters normalize by week 8 of IFN free direct acting antiviral (DAA) therapy in HCV RF+ donors, while in RF- donors, mature activated B cell proportions did normalize. These data indicate that while chronic HCV infection alone results in a lower state of activation in mature activated memory B cells, the presence of RF in serum is associated with a more pronounced state of unresponsiveness and an overrepresentation of these B cells in the blood. This phenotype persists at least during the early time window after removal of HCV from the host.

  4. Ablation of STAT3 in the B Cell Compartment Restricts Gammaherpesvirus Latency In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep Steven; Foreman, Hui-Chen Chang; Sioux, Thubten Ozula; Park, Gee Ho; Poli, Valeria; Reich, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A challenging property of gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish lifelong persistence. The establishment of latency in B cells is thought to involve active virus engagement of host signaling pathways. Pathogenic effects of these viruses during latency or following reactivation can be devastating to the host. Many cancers, including those associated with members of the gammaherpesvirus family, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus, express elevated levels of active host signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). STAT3 is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation in response to many cytokines and can orchestrate effector responses that include proliferation, inflammation, metastasis, and developmental programming. However, the contribution of STAT3 to gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis remains to be completely understood. This is the first study to have identified STAT3 as a critical host determinant of the ability of gammaherpesvirus to establish long-term latency in an animal model of disease. Following an acute infection, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) established latency in resident B cells, but establishment of latency was dramatically reduced in animals with a B cell-specific STAT3 deletion. The lack of STAT3 in B cells did not impair germinal center responses for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching in the spleen and did not reduce either total or virus-specific IgG titers. Although ablation of STAT3 in B cells did not have a global effect on these assays of B cell function, it had long-term consequences for the viral load of the host, since virus latency was reduced at 6 to 8 weeks postinfection. Our findings establish host STAT3 as a mediator of gammaherpesvirus persistence. PMID:27486189

  5. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2017-05-04

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Mintao [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Peng [Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Cao, Hong [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yongzhen [The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Zheng; Su, Tingting [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-05-10

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  7. Defining terminally differentiating B cell populations in rainbow trout immune tissues using the transcription factor XbpI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Maggie; Mott, Katrina; Zwollo, Patty

    2011-12-01

    The nature of antibody-secreting cells in the rainbow trout is poorly defined. Here we describe a flow cytometric approach to help differentiate between four major trout B cell subsets present during terminal B cell differentiation: resting B cells, activated B cells, plasmablasts, and plasma cells. To aid in the identification of B cell subsets, the LPS-inducible transcription factor XbpI-S was used as a marker. An antibody specific to the stable form of inducible transcription factor X-box protein I (XbpI) was generated, which detects XbpI-S protein expression for species within the Oncorhyncus genus, including rainbow trout. Combinatorial expression patterns, or B cell signatures, were established using antibodies to XbpI-S, Pax5, and IgM in combination with a proliferation marker. We show that XbpI-S induction in trout splenic B cells increases throughout a 10-day in vitro LPS-induction period and that increased XbpI-S expression correlates with increased HCmu expression in the cell. PBLs displayed a lower level of XbpI-S induction during this incubation period, compared to spleen. We conclude that trout B cells follow a highly conserved B cell activation pathway, albeit slower than what has been observed in mammalian species. The use of XbpI-S as an activation marker for trout humoral immune activation promises to be useful for future in vivo studies, and can be applied to a broad range of teleost species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  9. Breach of autoreactive B cell tolerance by post-translationally modified proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Jacqueline S; Verheul, Marije K; Stoop, Jeroen N; Liu, Bisheng; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; van Veelen, Peter A; de Ru, Arnoud H; Janssen, George M C; Hegen, Martin; Rapecki, Steve; Huizinga, Tom W J; Trouw, Leendert A; Toes, René E M

    2017-08-01

    Over 50% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) harbour a variety of anti-modified protein antibodies (AMPA) against different post-translationally modified (PTM) proteins, including anti-carbamylated protein (anti-CarP) antibodies. At present, it is unknown how AMPA are generated and how autoreactive B cell responses against PTM proteins are induced. Here we studied whether PTM foreign antigens can breach B cell tolerance towards PTM self-proteins. Serum reactivity towards five carbamylated proteins was determined for 160 patients with RA and 40 healthy individuals. Antibody cross-reactivity was studied by inhibition experiments. Mass spectrometry was performed to identify carbamylated self-proteins in human rheumatic joint tissue. Mice were immunised with carbamylated or non-modified (auto)antigens and analysed for autoantibody responses. We show that anti-CarP antibodies in RA are highly cross-reactive towards multiple carbamylated proteins, including modified self-proteins and modified non-self-proteins. Studies in mice show that anti-CarP antibody responses recognising carbamylated self-proteins are induced by immunisation with carbamylated self-proteins and by immunisation with carbamylated proteins of non-self-origin. Similar to the data observed with sera from patients with RA, the murine anti-CarP antibody response was, both at the monoclonal level and the polyclonal level, highly cross-reactive towards multiple carbamylated proteins, including carbamylated self-proteins. Self-reactive AMPA responses can be induced by exposure to foreign proteins containing PTM. These data show how autoreactive B cell responses against PTM self-proteins can be induced by exposure to PTM foreign proteins and provide new insights on the breach of autoreactive B cell tolerance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. The majority of human memory B cells recognizing RhD and tetanus resides in IgM+ B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Valle, Luciana; Dohmen, Serge E; Verhagen, Onno J H M; Berkowska, Magdalena A; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ellen van der Schoot, C

    2014-08-01

    B cell memory to T cell-dependent (TD) Ags are considered to largely reside in class-switched CD27(+) cells. However, we previously observed that anti-RhD (D) Igs cloned from two donors, hyperimmunized with D(+) erythrocytes, were predominantly of the IgM isotype. We therefore analyzed in this study the phenotype and frequency of D- and tetanus toxoid-specific B cells by culturing B cells in limiting dilution upon irradiated CD40L-expressing EL4.B5 cells and testing the culture supernatant. Most Ag-specific B cells for both TD Ags were found to reside in the IgM-expressing B cells, including CD27(-) B cells, in both hyperimmunized donors and nonhyperimmunized volunteers. Only shortly after immunization a sharp increase in Ag-specific CD27(+)IgG(+) B cells was observed. Next, B cells were enriched with D(+) erythrocyte ghosts and sorted as single cells. Sequencing of IGHV, IGLV, IGKV, and BCL6 genes from these D-specific B cell clones demonstrated that both CD27(-)IgM(+) and CD27(+)IgM(+) B cells harbored somatic mutations, documenting their Ag-selected nature. Furthermore, sequencing revealed a clonal relationship between the CD27(-)IgM(+), CD27(+)IgM(+), and CD27(+)IgG(+) B cell subsets. These data strongly support the recently described multiple layers of memory B cells to TD Ags in mice, where IgM(+) B cells represent a memory reservoir which can re-enter the germinal center and ensure replenishment of class-switched memory CD27(+) B cells from Ag-experienced precursors.

  11. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID, signifying class switch recombination (CSR. Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  12. Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitors in B-cell lymphoma: current experience and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, T; Dreyling, M

    2017-08-01

    The Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a central hub in the B cell receptor (BCR) pathway and strongly influences B cell maturation, differentiation and proliferation. Not surprisingly, BTK plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of various B cell lymphomas. Inhibitors of BTK have broadened our therapeutic options in several B cell lymphomas and already are an integral element in the treatment of Mantle Cell Lymphoma (MCL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and Waldenström's marcoglobulinemia. Several second generation BTK inhibitors are in clinical development and might further improve tolerability and efficacy of therapy in advanced stage CLL and MCL. Areas covered: This review illustrates the mechanism of action of BTK inhibitors and provides a comprehensive summary of key clinical trials in the development of BTK inhibitors. Characteristics of second generation BTK-inhibitors are described. Expert opinion: With accumulation of clinical experience after drug approval, longer patient follow-up and larger numbers of treated patients, future development will focus on the identification of intelligent treatment combinations. Individual selection of patients with distinct biologically properties might guide treatment decisions. While BTK inhibitors are moving to earlier treatment lines, the incorporation of these drugs into a comprehensive therapeutic strategy is still difficult to date.

  13. Development of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayko, Urte; Fung, Mann; Clow, Fong; Sun, Steven; Faust, Elizabeth; Price, Samiyeh; James, Danelle; Doyle, Margaret; Bari, Samina; Zhuang, Sen Hong

    2015-11-01

    Ibrutinib is a first-in-class oral covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase that has demonstrated clinical benefit for many patients with B cell malignancies. Positive results in initial trials led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to grant ibrutinib three breakthrough therapy designations for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), del17p chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Ibrutinib was approved for these three cancers within 14 months of the original U.S. approval. Additionally, ibrutinib is approved for patient subsets with MCL and/or CLL in >45 other countries. Via a unique mechanism of action, ibrutinib inhibits B cell signaling pathways that regulate the survival, proliferation, adhesion, and homing of cancerous cells. This marks a paradigm shift from the conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy approach to treating B cell malignancies. Ibrutinib continues to be evaluated across a range of B cell malignancies, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other therapies, and continues to transform the lives of these patients. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  14. Essential role for CAML in follicular B cell survival and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zane, Nicholas A; Gundelach, Justin H; Lindquist, Lonn D; Bram, Richard J

    2012-04-01

    Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that is important during thymopoiesis. However, whether it serves a function in mature lymphocytes is unknown. In this article, we show that CAML is essential for survival of peripheral follicular (Fo) B cells. Conditional deletion of CAML in CD19-Cre transgenic mice caused a significant reduction in Fo cell numbers and increased rates of homeostatic proliferation. CAML-deficient Fo cells showed increased cellular turnover and normal proliferative ability. Although CAML-deficient Fo cells responded to AgR stimulation and to B cell activating factor, they displayed decreased survival and increased apoptosis following stimulation with LPS and IL-4 in vitro. Failure to survive was not due to aberrant B cell development in the absence of CAML, because induced deletion of the gene in mature cells resulted in a similar phenotype. These data establish an essential and ongoing role for CAML in the long-term survival of mature B cells.

  15. Impairment of B-cell functions during HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amu, Sylvie; Ruffin, Nicolas; Rethi, Bence; Chiodi, Francesca

    2013-09-24

    A variety of B-cell dysfunctions are manifested during HIV-1 infection, as reported early during the HIV-1 epidemic. It is not unusual that the pathogenic mechanisms presented to elucidate impairment of B-cell responses during HIV-1 infection focus on the impact of reduced T-cell numbers and functions, and lack of germinal center formation in lymphoid tissues. To our understanding, however, perturbation of B-cell phenotype and function during HIV-1 infection may begin at several different B-cell developmental stages. These impairments can be mediated by intrinsic B-cell defects as well as by the lack of proper T-cell help. In this review, we will highlight some of the pathways and molecular interactions leading to B-cell impairment prior to germinal center formation and B-cell activation mediated through the B-cell receptor in response to HIV-1 antigens. Recent studies indicate a regulatory role for B cells on T-cell biology and immune responses. We will discuss some of these novel findings and how these regulatory mechanisms could potentially be affected by the intrinsic defects of B cells taking place during HIV-1 infection.

  16. Detection of clonal B cells in microdissected reactive lymphoproliferations: possible diagnostic pitfalls in PCR analysis of immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, X.G.; Sandvej, K.; Gregersen, Niels

    1999-01-01

    rearrangement analysis is a sensitive and specific method for demonstrating B cell clonality in whole paraffin wax embedded sections. However, oligoclonal and monoclonal rearrangement patterns are regularly encountered in small tissue fragments from otherwise unremarkable reactive lymphoproliferations, possibly...... because of preferential priming or detection of local B cell clones. Data from clonal analysis of small, microdissected or lymphocyte poor samples must be evaluated critically. It is recommended that analyses should be run in parallel on at least two tissue specimens. Only reproducible bands present...

  17. Regulation of VH replacement by B cell receptor-mediated signaling in human immature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Lange, Miles D; Hong, Sang Yong; Xie, Wanqin; Xu, Kerui; Huang, Lin; Yu, Yangsheng; Ehrhardt, Götz R A; Zemlin, Michael; Burrows, Peter D; Su, Kaihong; Carter, Robert H; Zhang, Zhixin

    2013-06-01

    VH replacement provides a unique RAG-mediated recombination mechanism to edit nonfunctional IgH genes or IgH genes encoding self-reactive BCRs and contributes to the diversification of Ab repertoire in the mouse and human. Currently, it is not clear how VH replacement is regulated during early B lineage cell development. In this article, we show that cross-linking BCRs induces VH replacement in human EU12 μHC(+) cells and in the newly emigrated immature B cells purified from peripheral blood of healthy donors or tonsillar samples. BCR signaling-induced VH replacement is dependent on the activation of Syk and Src kinases but is inhibited by CD19 costimulation, presumably through activation of the PI3K pathway. These results show that VH replacement is regulated by BCR-mediated signaling in human immature B cells, which can be modulated by physiological and pharmacological treatments.

  18. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  19. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease.

  20. Importance of the CCR5-CCL5 axis for mucosal Trypanosoma cruzi protection and B cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Nicole L; Eickhoff, Christopher S; Zhang, Xiuli; Giddings, Olivia K; Lane, Thomas E; Hoft, Daniel F

    2011-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is an intracellular parasite and the causative agent of Chagas disease. Previous work has shown that the chemokine receptor CCR5 plays a role in systemic T. cruzi protection. We evaluated the importance of CCR5 and CCL5 for mucosal protection against natural oral and conjunctival T. cruzi challenges. T. cruzi-immune CCR5(-/-) and wild-type C57BL/6 mice were generated by repeated infectious challenges with T. cruzi. CCR5(-/-) and wild-type mice developed equivalent levels of cellular, humoral, and protective mucosal responses. However, CCR5(-/-)-immune mice produced increased levels of CCL5 in protected gastric tissues, suggesting compensatory signaling through additional receptors. Neutralization of CCL5 in CCR5(-/-)-immune mice resulted in decreased mucosal inflammatory responses, reduced T. cruzi-specific Ab-secreting cells, and significantly less mucosal T. cruzi protection, confirming an important role for CCL5 in optimal immune control of T. cruzi replication at the point of initial mucosal invasion. To investigate further the mechanism responsible for mucosal protection mediated by CCL5-CCR5 signaling, we evaluated the effects of CCL5 on B cells. CCL5 enhanced proliferation and IgM secretion in highly purified B cells triggered by suboptimal doses of LPS. In addition, neutralization of endogenous CCL5 inhibited B cell proliferation and IgM secretion during stimulation of highly purified B cells, indicating that B cell production of CCL5 has important autocrine effects. These findings demonstrate direct effects of CCL5 on B cells, with significant implications for the development of mucosal adjuvants, and further suggest that CCL5 may be important as a general B cell coactivator.

  1. Presentation of antigen by B cell subsets. Pt. 4. Defective T-B cell signalling causes inability to present antigen by B cells from immunodeficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimecki, Michal [Polish Academy of Sciences, Wroclaw (Poland). Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy; Kapp, Judith A. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Medicine

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in T-B cell signalling between B cells from normal and immunodeficient mice. B cell blasts from normal and immunodeficient mice expressed comparable levels of membrane-associated IL-1. B cells from normal, but not immunodeficient mice, prefixed with glutar-aldehyde and cultured with thymocytes or a T cell line BK33, induce in T cells production of a factor which causes release of IL-1 by macrophages. This factor, preincubated with B cells from immunodeficient mice significantly enhances their APC function. Furthermore, this cytokine induces expression of Lyb-5 alloantigen on B cells from immunodeficient mice. This effect could be blocked by neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 but not to IL-2, IL-4 or GM-CSF. We conclude that immature B cells from immunodeficient (CBA/N x BALB/c)F{sub 1} mice are unable to stimulate interacting T cells to produce IL-6 and therefore are inefficient antigen presenting cells. (author). 30 refs, 2 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. Lipoxin A₄ modulates adaptive immunity by decreasing memory B-cell responses via an ALX/FPR2-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Sesquile; Bancos, Simona; Serhan, Charles N; Phipps, Richard P

    2014-02-01

    Specialized proresolving mediators are endogenous bioactive lipid molecules that play a fundamental role in the regulation of inflammation and its resolution. Lipoxins and other specialized proresolving mediators have been identified in important immunological tissues including bone marrow, spleen, and blood. Lipoxins regulate functions of the innate immune system including the promotion of monocyte recruitment and increase macrophage phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils. A major knowledge gap is whether lipoxins influence adaptive immune cells. Here, we analyzed the actions of lipoxin A₄ (LXA₄) and its receptor ALX/FPR2 on human and mouse B cells. LXA₄ decreased IgM and IgG production on activated human B cells through ALX/FPR2-dependent signaling, which downregulated NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation. LXA₄ also inhibited human memory B-cell antibody production and proliferation, but not naïve B-cell function. Lastly, LXA₄ decreased antigen-specific antibody production in an OVA immunization mouse model. To our knowledge, this is the first description of the actions of lipoxins on human B cells, demonstrating a link between resolution signals and adaptive immunity. Regulating antibody production is crucial to prevent unwanted inflammation. Harnessing the ability of lipoxins to decrease memory B-cell antibody production can be beneficial to threat inflammatory and autoimmune disorders.

  3. Nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma with monocional IgM:2 cases report and review of literatures%结内边缘带B细胞淋巴瘤伴有单克隆IgM增高两例并文献复习

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王欢; 周小鸽; 熊梅; 王昭

    2009-01-01

    Objective To elucidate the clinical and pathological features, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of nodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma (NMZL). Methods 2 patients, with NMZL who has extremely elevated monoclonal IgM were analyzed and review were included. Results The common pathological diagnosis caused by the association of monoclonal gammopathy with indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas was marginal zone lymphoma or B small cell lymphocytic lymphoma/B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. According to our cases and literatures, the main distribution of involved sites in NMZL were lymph nodes, spleen and bone marrow. Sixty percent of the NMZL patients presented with advanced stage with, high risk of IPI. The diagnosis of NMZL was based on pathology of the lymph node. The proliferation and distribution of the differentiation monocytoid cell had a specified significance. Prognosis of early stage ( I or Ⅱ) NMZL were much better than that of advanced stage NMZL even the patients had received chemotherapy.Conclusion NMZL mainly involved lymph nodes, bone marrow and spleen, sporadically associated with the elevated monoclonal IgM. Most of the NMZL patients presented with advanced stage.The prognoses were poor.%目的 分析结内边缘带B细胞淋巴瘤(NMZL)伴有单克隆lgM增高病例的临床及病理特点、诊断、治疗及预后.方法 对2例NMZL病例进行分析并进行文献综述.结果 惰性B细胞淋巴瘤伴有单克隆免疫球蛋白升高,最常见的两种病理类型为NMZL和B-SLL/CLL.NMZL主要累及淋巴结、脾脏、骨髓,60%发病时为进展期,国际预后指数(IPI)评分为高危,诊断主要依据淋巴结病理,单核样B细胞增生及分布有重要的参考价值.Ⅰ和(或)Ⅱ期化疗疗效好,进展期疗效差.结论 NMZL主要累积淋巴结、脾脏、骨髓,町伴有单克隆IgM增多,发病时多处于疾病进展期,预后不佳.

  4. mTOR Promotes Antiviral Humoral Immunity by Differentially Regulating CD4 Helper T Cell and B Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lilin; Lee, Junghwa; Xu, Lifan; Mohammed, Ata-Ur-Rasheed; Li, Weiyan; Hale, J Scott; Tan, Wendy G; Wu, Tuoqi; Davis, Carl W; Ahmed, Rafi; Araki, Koichi

    2017-02-15

    mTOR has important roles in regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity, but whether and how mTOR modulates humoral immune responses have yet to be fully understood. To address this issue, we examined the effects of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, on B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Rapamycin treatment resulted in suppression of virus-specific B cell responses by inhibiting proliferation of germinal center (GC) B cells. In contrast, the number of memory CD4 T cells was increased in rapamycin-treated mice. However, the drug treatment caused a striking bias of CD4 T cell differentiation into Th1 cells and substantially impaired formation of follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, which are essential for humoral immunity. Further experiments in which mTOR signaling was modulated by RNA interference (RNAi) revealed that B cells were the primary target cells of rapamycin for the impaired humoral immunity and that reduced Tfh formation in rapamycin-treated mice was due to lower GC B cell responses that are essential for Tfh generation. Additionally, we found that rapamycin had minimal effects on B cell responses activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which stimulates B cells in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting that rapamycin specifically inhibits B cell responses induced by B cell receptor stimulation with antigen. Together, these findings demonstrate that mTOR signals play an essential role in antigen-specific humoral immune responses by differentially regulating B cell and CD4 T cell responses during acute viral infection and that rapamycin treatment alters the interplay of immune cell subsets involved in antiviral humoral immunity. mTOR is a serine/threonine kinase involved in a variety of cellular activities. Although its specific inhibitor, rapamycin, is currently used as an immunosuppressive drug in transplant patients, it has been reported that rapamycin can also stimulate pathogen

  5. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Campos-Sanchez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS, a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1 gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients.

  6. A Rare Case of Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma with Epstein-Barr Virus-Negative Reed-Sternberg-Like B-Cells, Chylous Ascites, and Chylothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemsen, Mathijs; Dielis, Arne W J H; Samarska, Iryna V; Koster, Ad; van Marion, Arienne M

    2017-01-01

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma is a rare non-Hodgkin lymphoma with dismal prognosis. The median age of presentation ranges from 62 to 69 years with generalized lymphadenopathy, B symptoms, and hepatosplenomegaly as the most prevalent symptoms. The combination of B-cell and T-cell proliferations is common in AITL and the B-cell component may resemble Reed-Sternberg-like B-cells. Epstein-Barr virus is estimated to be present in 80-95% of AITL biopsies. Only a handful of EBV-negative AITL cases with EBV-negative RS-like B-cells have been reported over the last decade. We present a rare case of EBV-negative AITL with chylous ascites and chylothorax. Microscopic and immunohistochemical analysis revealed the presence of EBV-negative Reed-Sternberg-like B-cells in the tumor.

  7. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyle, Robert A; Vincent Rajkumar, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the natural history, pathogenesis, mechanisms of progression and prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS...

  8. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  9. Transcriptional networks in developing and mature B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, Patrick; Rolink, Antonius G

    2005-06-01

    The development of B cells from haematopoietic stem cells proceeds along a highly ordered, yet flexible, pathway. At multiple steps along this pathway, cells are instructed by transcription factors on how to further differentiate, and several check-points have been identified. These check-points are initial commitment to lymphocytic progenitors, specification of pre-B cells, entry to the peripheral B-cell pool, maturation of B cells and differentiation into plasma cells. At each of these regulatory nodes, there are transcriptional networks that control the outcome, and much progress has recently been made in dissecting these networks. This article reviews our current understanding of this exciting field.

  10. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

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    María C. Amezcua Vesely

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non related antigens. To protect themselves, the parasites have evolved unique ways to evade B cell immune responses inducing apoptosis of MZ and conventional mature B cells. As a consequence of the parasite induced-apoptosis, the early IgM response and an already establish humoral immunity are affected during the protozoan parasite infection. Moreover, some trypanosomatides trigger bone marrow immature B cell apoptosis, influencing the generation of new mature B cells. Simultaneously with their ability to release antibodies, B cells produce cytokines/quemokines that influence the characteristic of cellular immune response and consequently the progression of parasite infections.

  11. Primary gastric T cell lymphoma mimicking marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Danniele; Zhao, Merry Y; Rapoport, Aaron P; Garofalo, Michael; Chen, Qing; Zhao, X Frank

    2008-07-01

    Primary gastric T cell lymphoma is rare and mostly of large cell type. In this paper, we present a case of gastric T cell lymphoma morphologically similar to the gastric marginal zone B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT). Morphologically, the cells are small with abundant clear cytoplasm. Lymphoepithelial lesions are readily identified with diffuse destruction of gastric glands. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells are CD3+/CD4+/CD8-/Granzyme B-. Molecular studies revealed monoclonal T cell receptor gamma gene rearrangement. Clinically, the patient responded initially to four cycles of R-CHOP, but then progressed. Because peripheral T cell lymphoma is usually associated with a poor prognosis, whereas marginal zone B cell lymphoma is an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder, this morphologic mimicry should be recognized and completely investigated when atypical small lymphoid infiltrates with lymphoepithelial lesions are encountered in the stomach.

  12. FcγRIIb expression on B cells is associated with treatment efficacy for acute rejection after kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Juan; Gong, Jianguang; Lin, Bo; Li, Yiwen; He, Qiang

    2017-05-01

    Fcγ receptors (FcγR) play a role in the acute rejection (AR) of organ transplants. FcγRIIB is an inhibitory FcγR expressed on B cells. Intravenous IgG (IVIG) and CD28 monoclonal antibody (mAb) have been shown to have immunomodulatory properties against AR. To examine the association between FcγRIIB expression on B cell subpopulations and AR treatment efficacy. Male F344 rats were used as kidney donors and Lewis rats as recipients to establish models of renal transplantation. Rats were divided into five groups: sham, AR-PBS, AR-IVIG, AR-PNGase F-IVIG, and AR-CD28. Serum creatinine (Scr), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and urine protein content were determined. Inflammatory markers were measured by ELISA, FcγR by western blotting, and spleen B cell activation by flow cytometry. Scr, BUN, urinary protein content, levels of CRP, IL-10, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and IgG were all increased in the AR-PBS group compared with the sham group (all PIVIG, AR-PNGase F IVIG, and AR-CD28 groups (all PIVIG showing the better efficacy than PNGase F IVIG. Furthermore, blood and spleen FcγRIA and FcγRIIIA were increased by AR, while FcγRIIB expressions in splenic activated B cells and regulatory B cells were decreased; these changes were partly alleviated by all three treatments, with IVIG having the better effect than PNGase F IVIG. We observed an association between B cell FcγRIIB expression and treatment efficacy for AR after kidney transplantation in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Lidamycin Induces Apoptosis of B-Cell Lymphoma Cells and Inhibits Xenograft Growth in Nude Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Fang; Shenghua Zhang; Qingfang Miao; Dongsheng Xiong; Yongsu Zhen

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the cytotoxicity of Lidamycin (LDM) and its induction of apoptosis in Raji and Daudi cells of B-cell lymphoma, and the inhibition of growth of the lymphoma Raji xenograft in nude mice.METHODS MTT assay was used to observe the inhibition by LDM on the proliferation of the Raji and Daudi cells. Annexin V-FITC/PI double-stain, in combination with flow cytometry (FCM), was used to determine the induction of apoptosis by LDM in Raji cells. The B-cell lymphoma Raji xenograft model in nude mice was set up to detect the in vivo antitumor activity of LDM.RESULTS LDM markedly inhibited the proliferation of the Raji and Daudi cells in vitro, with IC50 values of 7.13×10-11 mol/L and 2.91×10-10 mol/L, respectively. The apoptotic rates of Raji cells were respectively 77.98% and 67.63% at 0.5 nmol/L and 0.25 nmol/L of LDM, indicating an obvious induction of apoptosis in Raji cells. LDM inhibited the formation and growth of human B-cell lymphoma Raji xenograft in nude mice. The inhibition rates of tumor growth were respectively 74.9% and 65.2% in LDM at dosage group of 0.05 mg/kg and 0.025 mg/kg, suggesting an apparent prolongation of survival time in the nude mouse bearing lymphoma.CONCLUSION LDM can effectively induce apoptosis of the B-cell lymphoma cells and inhibit the xenograft growth in nude mice.

  14. Clear cell variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahatciu-Meka Vjollca

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is a diffuse proliferation of large neoplastic B lymphoid cells with a nuclear size equal to or exceeding the normal macrophage nuclei. We report a case of a clear cell variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving a lymph node in the neck, which was clinically suspected of being metastatic carcinoma. Case presentation A 39-year-old Caucasian ethnic Albanian man from Kosovo presented with a rapidly enlarging lymph node in his neck, but he also disclosed B symptoms and fatigue. A cytological aspirate of the lymph node revealed pleomorphic features. Our patient underwent a cervical lymph node biopsy (large excision. The mass was homogeneously fish-flesh, pale white tissue replacing almost the whole structure of the lymph node. The lymph node biopsy showed a partial alveolar growth pattern, which raised clinical suspicion that it was an epithelial neoplasm. With regard to morphological and phenotypic features, we discovered large nodules in diffuse areas, comprising large cells with slightly irregular nuclei and clear cytoplasm admixed with a few mononuclear cells. In these areas, there was high mitotic activity, and in some areas there were macrophages with tangible bodies. Staining for cytokeratins was negative. These areas had the following phenotypes: cluster designation marker 20 (CD20 positive, B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2-positive, Bcl-6-, CD5-, CD3-, CD21+ (in alveolar patterns, prostate-specific antigen-negative, human melanoma black marker 45-negative, melanoma marker-negative, cytokeratin-7-negative and multiple myeloma marker 1-positive in about 30% of cells, and exhibited a high proliferation index marker (Ki-67, 80%. Conclusion According to the immunohistochemical findings, we concluded that this patient has a clear cell variant of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of activated cell type, post-germinal center cell origin. Our patient is undergoing R-CHOP chemotherapy treatment.

  15. Identification of B-Cell Epitope of Dengue Virus Type 1 and Its Application in Diagnosis of Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Han-Chung; Huang, Yue-Ling; Chao, Ting-Ting; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Huang, Jau-Ling; Chiang, Hsien-Yuan; King, Chwan-Chuen; Shaio, Men-Fang

    2001-01-01

    Using a serotype-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) of dengue virus type 1 (DEN-1), 15F3-1, we identified the B-cell epitope of DEN-1 from a random peptide library displayed on phage. Fourteen immunopositive phage clones that bound specifically to MAb 15F3-1 were selected. These phage-borne peptides had a consensus motif of HxYaWb (a = S/T, b = K/H/R) that mimicked the sequence HKYSWK, which corresponded to amino acid residues 111 to 116 of the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of DEN-1. Among th...

  16. Targeting B cells in immune-mediated inflammatory disease: a comprehensive review of mechanisms of action and identification of biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörner, Thomas; Kinnman, Nils; Tak, Paul P

    2010-03-01

    B cell-depletion therapy, particularly using anti-CD20 treatment, has provided proof of concept that targeting B cells and the humoral response may result in clinical improvements in immune-mediated inflammatory disease. In this review, the mechanisms of action of B cell-targeting drugs are investigated, and potential biomarkers associated with response to treatment in patients with autoimmune diseases are identified. Most available data relate to B cell depletion using anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Treatment leads to significant clinical benefit, but apparently fails to deplete long-lived plasma cells, and discontinuation is associated with relapse. Biomarkers commonly used in studies of B cell-targeted therapies include rheumatoid factor, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies, and immunoglobulin (Ig) levels. More recently, there has been interest in markers such as B cell phenotype analysis, and B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)/a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL), the latter particularly in studies of the IgG Fc-transmembrane activator and CAML interactor (TACI) fusion protein (atacicept) and anti-BLyS therapy (belimumab). Data from clinical trials of B cell-depleting agents in RA suggest that specific autoantibodies, BLyS, APRIL, and circulating and synovial B lineage cell levels may have potential as biomarkers predictive of response to treatment. Further trials validating these markers against clinical outcomes in RA are required. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Fc receptors and levels of circulating immune cells (including B cells and natural killer cells) may be relevant markers.

  17. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  18. Distinct morphophenotypic features of chronic B-cell leukaemias identified with CD1c and CD23 antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazi, A; Cattoretti, G; Polli, N; Delia, D; Rilke, F

    1991-07-01

    Morphological criteria usually applied to diagnose various subtypes of B-cell chronic lymphoid leukaemia are largely subjective. Immunophenotyping of 61 relevant cases using a selected panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb), showed that CD1c and CD23 mAb were able to separate B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) from other chronic B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. Lymphocytes of B-CLL were CD1c-, CD23+, whereas those of other types of chronic B-cell leukaemia were CD1c+/-, CD23-, and CD38/-. Non-B-CLL cases had a significantly higher amount of large peroxidase-negative (unstained) cells analyzed with an automated blood cell counter (Technicon H6000). This type of volumetric assessment allowed a separation between typical and "atypical" B-CLL, which otherwise were both CD1c-, and CD23+. These combinations of phenotypic markers corresponded to well-defined haematopathologic entities, conventionally diagnosed on peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow smears, and on histologic sections of lymph nodes and spleen.

  19. Idelalisib therapy of indolent B-cell malignancies: chronic lymphocytic leukemia and small lymphocytic or follicular lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madanat YF

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Yazan F Madanat,1 Mitchell R Smith,2 Alexandru Almasan,3 Brian T Hill2 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, 3Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia, small lymphocytic lymphoma, and follicular lymphoma are indolent B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that mainly affect an older population. Although the majority of patients in need of treatment derive significant benefit from conventional chemotherapeutic agents as well as monoclonal antibodies, less toxic and more effective treatments are needed. Novel agents that inhibit the B-cell receptor signaling pathway have shown promising outcomes in these disorders. Idelalisib is a potent selective oral inhibitor of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase delta and has shown significant clinical activity in B-cell malignancies. In this review, we summarize the clinical trial data using idelalisib as monotherapy or in combination with rituximab for the treatment of relapsed/refractory disease. The adverse effect profile includes autoimmune disorders such as transaminitis, colitis, and pneumonitis. Given the efficacy and manageable toxicity profile of idelalisib, it is being increasingly incorporated into the management of indolent B-cell malignancies. Keywords: idelalisib, PI3Kδ inhibitors, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, follicular lymphoma

  20. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines.

  1. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  2. The IL-15R alpha chain signals through association with Syk in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, E; Budagian, V; Pohl, T; Krause, H; Dürkop, H; Paus, R; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2001-12-01

    The alpha-chain of the IL-15R (IL-15Ralpha) serves as the specific, high-affinity receptor for IL-15. It is expressed by lymphoid and nonlymphoid cells, including B cell lymphoma lines. In this study, we have further explored IL-15Ralpha-mediated signaling in activated primary B cells and in Raji cells, a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line which expresses the IL-15Ralpha and IL-2Rgamma chains, but lacks the IL-2Rbeta chain. Stimulation of Raji cells with IL-15 induces their proliferation and rescues them from C2-ceramide-induced apoptosis. By immunoprecipitation and Western blotting, we show that treatment of Raji cells and activated primary B cells with IL-15 induces coprecipitation of Syk kinase with the IL-15Ralpha chain. Upon association, the activated Syk kinase phosphorylates the IL-15Ralpha chain as well as phospholipase Cgamma, which coprecipitates with Syk. Furthermore, transfection of Raji cells with stem-loop Syk antisense oligonucleotides prevents IL-15Ralpha and phospholipase Cgamma phosphorylation as well as the inhibition of apoptosis by IL-15. Mutation of a defined region of the intracellular signaling portion of IL-15Ralpha (Tyr227) abrogates both the IL-15Ralpha/Syk association and IL-15Ralpha phosphorylation. Taken together, this suggests that Syk kinase physically and functionally associates with the IL-15Ralpha chain in B cells and that Syk plays a key role in mediating IL-15-induced signal transduction, thus accounting for the distinct functional consequences of IL-15 vs IL-2 binding to B cells.

  3. Rebamipide attenuates autoimmune arthritis severity in SKG mice via regulation of B cell and antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, J-K; Moon, S-J; Jhun, J-Y; Kim, E-K; Park, J-S; Youn, J; Min, J-K; Park, S-H; Kim, H-Y; Cho, M-L

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated the therapeutic potential of rebamipide, a gastroprotective agent with a property of reactive oxygen species scavenger, on the development of inflammatory polyarthritis and the pathophysiological mechanisms by which rebamipide might confer anti-arthritic effects in SKG mice, an animal model of RA. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of rebamipide attenuated the severity of clinical and histological arthritis. Rebampide treatment reduced the number of T helper type 1 (Th1), Th2, Th17, inducible T cell co-stimulator (ICOS)(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) transitional type (T2) and mature B cells in the spleen, but increased the number of regulatory T (Treg ), CD19(+) CD1d(high) CD5(high) , CD19(+) CD25(high) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) regulatory B (Breg ) cells, memory B cells, and transitional type 1 (T1) B cells. In addition, flow cytometric analysis revealed significantly decreased populations of FAS(+) GL-7(+) germinal centre B cells and B220(-) CD138(+) plasma cells in the spleens of rebamipide-treated SKG mice compared to controls. Rebamipide decreased germinal centre B cells and reciprocally induced Breg cells in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Rebamipide-induced Breg cells had more suppressive capacity in relation to T cell proliferation and also inhibited Th17 differentiation from murine CD4(+) T cells. Together, these data show that i.p. administration of rebamipide suppresses arthritis severity by inducing Breg and Treg cells and suppressing Tfh and Th17 cells in a murine model of RA. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  4. Dynamic Epstein-Barr virus gene expression on the path to B-cell transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander M; Luftig, Micah A

    2014-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic human herpesvirus in the γ-herpesvirinae subfamily that contains a 170-180kb double-stranded DNA genome. In vivo, EBV commonly infects B and epithelial cells and persists for the life of the host in a latent state in the memory B-cell compartment of the peripheral blood. EBV can be reactivated from its latent state, leading to increased expression of lytic genes that primarily encode for enzymes necessary to replicate the viral genome and structural components of the virion. Lytic cycle proteins also aid in immune evasion, inhibition of apoptosis, and the modulation of other host responses to infection. In vitro, EBV has the potential to infect primary human B cells and induce cellular proliferation to yield effectively immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines, or LCLs. EBV immortalization of B cells in vitro serves as a model system for studying EBV-mediated lymphomagenesis. While much is known about the steady-state viral gene expression within EBV-immortalized LCLs and other EBV-positive cell lines, relatively little is known about the early events after primary B-cell infection. It was previously thought that upon latent infection, EBV only expressed the well-characterized latency-associated transcripts found in LCLs. However, recent work has characterized the early, but transient, expression of lytic genes necessary for efficient transformation and delayed responses in the known latency genes. This chapter summarizes these recent findings that show how dynamic and controlled expression of multiple EBV genes can control the activation of B cells, entry into the cell cycle, the inhibition of apoptosis, and innate and adaptive immune responses.

  5. Modulation of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and B-cells by MCS-18 a natural product isolated from Helleborus purpurascens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littmann, Leonie; Rössner, Susanne; Kerek, Franz; Steinkasserer, Alexander; Zinser, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    MCS-18, a natural product isolated from Helleborus purpurascens has been shown to have several beneficial effects in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders. However, very little is known regarding the immuno-modulatory capacity of MCS-18 in respect to murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC) and B-cells. Thus, in the present study we examined the effect of MCS-18 on murine BM-DC and B-cells. Interestingly MCS-18 inhibited the expression of important DC-specific molecules and lead to an impaired T-cell stimulation capacity. In addition, MCS-18 also reduced B-cell proliferation and immunoglobulin production.

  6. The B cell transcription program mediates hypomethylation and overexpression of key genes in Epstein-Barr virus-associated proliferative conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, Henar; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Islam, Abul B; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C; Javierre, Biola M; Mangas, Cristina; Fernández, Agustín F; Parra, Maribel; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Esteller, Manel; López-Granados, Eduardo; Fraga, Mario F; López-Bigas, Nuria; Ballestar, Esteban

    2013-01-15

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is a well characterized etiopathogenic factor for a variety of immune-related conditions, including lymphomas, lymphoproliferative disorders and autoimmune diseases. EBV-mediated transformation of resting B cells to proliferating lymphoblastoid cells occurs in early stages of infection and is an excellent model for investigating the mechanisms associated with acquisition of unlimited growth. We investigated the effects of experimental EBV infection of B cells on DNA methylation profiles by using high-throughput analysis. Remarkably, we observed hypomethylation of around 250 genes, but no hypermethylation. Hypomethylation did not occur at repetitive sequences, consistent with the absence of genomic instability in lymphoproliferative cells. Changes in methylation only occurred after cell divisions started, without the participation of the active demethylation machinery, and were concomitant with acquisition by B cells of the ability to proliferate. Gene Ontology analysis, expression profiling, and high-throughput analysis of the presence of transcription factor binding motifs and occupancy revealed that most genes undergoing hypomethylation are active and display the presence of NF-κB p65 and other B cell-specific transcription factors. Promoter hypomethylation was associated with upregulation of genes relevant for the phenotype of proliferating lymphoblasts. Interestingly, pharmacologically induced demethylation increased the efficiency of transformation of resting B cells to lymphoblastoid cells, consistent with productive cooperation between hypomethylation and lymphocyte proliferation. Our data provide novel clues on the role of the B cell transcription program leading to DNA methylation changes, which we find to be key to the EBV-associated conversion of resting B cells to proliferating lymphoblasts.

  7. Clinical consequences of defects in B-cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Andre M; Schroeder, Harry W

    2010-04-01

    Abnormalities in humoral immunity typically reflect a generalized or selective failure of effective B-cell development. The developmental processes can be followed through analysis of cell-surface markers, such as IgM, IgD, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD21, and CD38. Early phases of B-cell development are devoted to the creation of immunoglobulin and testing of B-cell antigen receptor signaling. Failure leads to the absence of B cells and immunoglobulin in the blood from birth. As the developing B cells begin to express a surface B-cell receptor, they become subject to negative and positive selection pressures and increasingly depend on survival signals. Defective signaling can lead to selective or generalized hypogammaglobulinemia, even in the presence of normal numbers of B cells. In the secondary lymphoid organs some B cells enter the splenic marginal zone, where preactivated cells lie ready to rapidly respond to T-independent antigens, such as the polysaccharides that coat some microorganisms. Other cells enter the follicle and, with the aid of cognate follicular T cells, divide to help form a germinal center (GC) after their interaction with antigen. In the GC B cells can undergo the processes of class switching and somatic hypermutation. Failure to properly receive T-cell signals can lead to hyper-IgM syndrome. B cells that leave the GC can develop into memory B cells, short-lived plasma cells, or long-lived plasma cells. The latter ultimately migrate back to the bone marrow, where they can continue to produce protective antigen-specific antibodies for decades.

  8. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouali, Moncef; Richard, Yolande

    2011-01-01

    To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptive branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ) and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount a local antibody response against type-2 T-cell-independent (TI-2) antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-cell-dependent (TD) immune responses through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in humans, non-human primates, and rodents. We also summarize studies - performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and in macaques whose infection with Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans - showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus) as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells - MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells - with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies.

  9. Pro-B cells propagated in stromal cell-free cultures reconstitute functional B-cell compartments in immunodeficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Muenchow, Lilly; Tsapogas, Panagiotis; Albertí-Servera, Llucia; Capoferri, Giuseppina; Doelz, Marianne; Rolink, Hannie; Bosco, Nabil; Ceredig, Rhodri; Rolink, Antonius G

    2017-02-01

    Up to now long-term in vitro growth of pro-B cells was thought to require stromal cells. However, here we show that fetal liver (FL) and bone marrow (BM) derived pro-B cells can be propagated long-term in stromal cell-free cultures supplemented with IL-7, stem cell factor and FLT3 ligand. Within a week, most cells expressed surface CD19, CD79A, λ5, and VpreB antigens and had rearranged immunoglobulin D-J heavy chain genes. Both FL and BM pro-B cells reconstituted the B-cell compartments of immuno-incompetent Rag2-deficient mice, with FL pro-B cells generating follicular, marginal zone (MZB) and B1a B cells, and BM pro-B cells giving rise mainly to MZB cells. Reconstituted Rag2-deficient mice generated significant levels of IgM and IgG antibodies to a type II T-independent antigen; mice reconstituted with FL pro-B cells generated surprisingly high IgG1 titers. Finally, we show for the first time that mice reconstituted with mixtures of pro-B and pro-T cells propagated in stromal cell-free in vitro cultures mounted a T-cell-dependent antibody response. This novel stromal cell-free culture system facilitates our understanding of B-cell development and might be applied clinically. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  11. The Different Clinical Effects of Anti-BLyS, Anti-APRIL and Anti-CD20 Antibodies Point at a Critical Pathogenic Role of gamma-Herpesvirus Infected B Cells in the Marmoset EAE Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagessar, S. Anwar; Fagrouch, Zahra; Heijmans, Nicole; Bauer, Jan; Laman, Jon D.; Oh, Luke; Migone, Thi; Verschoor, Ernst J.; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2013-01-01

    The robust and rapid clinical effect of depleting anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAb) in multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrates a critical pathogenic contribution of B cells. The clinical effect of anti-CD20 mAb has been replicated in a relevant preclinical MS model, experimental autoimmune encephal

  12. Transitional B cells in early human B cell development - time to revisit the paradigm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria G Martin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig genes, and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, then cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire, and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDR-H3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small and only the size of the CDR-H3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B>>immature>>transitional>>naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages.

  13. B-cell depletion inhibits arthritis in a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, but does not adversely affect humoral responses in a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunussi-Joannopoulos, Kyri; Hancock, Gerald E; Kunz, Arthur; Hegen, Martin; Zhou, Xiaochuan X; Sheppard, Barbara J; Lamothe, Jennifer; Li, Evelyn; Ma, Hak-Ling; Hamann, Philip R; Damle, Nitin K; Collins, Mary

    2005-10-01

    We report the development of a mouse B cell-depleting immunoconjugate (anti-CD22 monoclonal antibody [mAb] conjugated to calicheamicin) and its in vivo use to characterize the kinetics of CD22+ B-cell depletion and reconstitution in murine primary and secondary lymphoid tissues. The effect of B-cell depletion was further studied in a murine collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model and a respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccination model. Our results show that (1) the immunoconjugate has B-cell-specific in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity; (2) B-cell reconstitution starts in the bone marrow and spleen around day 30 after depletion and is completed in all tissues tested by day 50; (3) B-cell depletion inhibits the development of clinical and histologic arthritis in the CIA model; (4) depletion of type II collagen antibody levels is not necessary for clinical and histologic prevention of CIA; and (5) B-cell depletion does not adversely affect memory antibody responses after challenge nor clearance of infectious virus from lungs in the RSV vaccination model. These results demonstrate for the first time that only B-cell reduction but not type II collagen antibody levels correlate with the prevention of arthritis and represent key insights into the role of CD22-targeted B-cell depletion in mouse autoimmunity and vaccination models.

  14. Monoclonal B-cell hyperplasia and leukocyte imbalance precede development of B-cell malignancies in uracil-DNA glycosylase deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sonja; Ericsson, Madelene; Dai, Hong Yan;

    2005-01-01

    causes a significant reduction of T-helper cells, and 50% of the young Ung(-/-) mice investigated have no detectable NK/NKT-cell population in their spleen. The immunological imbalance is confirmed in experiments with spleen cells where the production of the cytokines interferon gamma, interleukin 6...

  15. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    erythematosus, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, and primary Sjögren's syndrome. For some anti-B cell agents, clinical benefits have been convincingly demonstrated, while other B cell-targeted therapies failed to improve outcomes when added to standard...

  16. Bidirectional regulation between B cells and T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Margry, B.

    2014-01-01

    B cells were often thought of as simple precursors of end-stage effector cells that are merely in charge of antibody production. Research in the last decades has shown that B cells possess important other roles as well, including their involvement in the regulation and functioning of T cell-mediated

  17. A fine romance: T follicular helper cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Cecile

    2011-06-24

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells help B cells to generate affinity-matured antibodies. Three papers in this issue of Immunity (Choi et al., 2011; Kerfoot et al., 2011; Kitano et al., 2011) provide information about the reciprocal relationship between B cells and Tfh cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  19. Chicken SLAMF4 (CD244, 2B4), a receptor expressed on thrombocytes, monocytes, NK cells, and subsets of αβ-, γδ- T cells and B cells binds to SLAMF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Christian; Neulen, Marie-Luise; Viertlboeck, Birgit C; Göbel, Thomas W

    2014-02-01

    The SLAM family of membrane receptors is involved in the regulation of immune responses by controlling cytokines production, cytotoxicity as well as cell development, differentiation and proliferation, but has only been described in chickens, recently. The aim of this study was to characterize the avian homologue to mammalian SLAMF4 (CD244, 2B4), a cell surface molecule which belongs to the SLAM family of membrane receptors. We generated a SLAMF4 specific monoclonal antibody (mab) designated 8C7 and analyzed the SLAMF4 expression on cells isolated from various lymphoid organs. Subsets of αβ and γδ T cells found in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and spleen coexpressed SLAMF4. The expression was restricted to CD8α(+) T cells, whereas CD4(+) T cells and all thymocytes showed little or no reactivity upon staining with the 8C7 mab. Blood and splenic γδ T cells could be further differentiated according to their expression levels of SLAMF4 into two and three subsets, respectively. SLAMF4 was absent from bursal and splenic B cells, however, it was expressed by a distinct fraction of circulating B cells that were characterized by high level expression of Bu1, Ig, and CD40. SLAMF4 was also present on NK cells isolated from intestine of adult chickens or embryonic splenocytes identified by their coexpression of the 28-4 NK cell marker. Moreover, SLAMF4 expression was found on thrombocytes and monocytes. The interaction of SLAMF4 with SLAMF2 was proven by a reporter assay and could be blocked with the 8C7 mab. In conclusion, the avian SLAMF4 expression markedly differs from mammals; it binds to SLAMF2 and will be an important tool to discriminate several γδ T cell subsets. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Disodium cromoglycate inhibits S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination and IgE synthesis in human B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    IgE synthesis requires interleukin 4 (IL-4) and a T-B cell interaction that involves the B cell antigen CD40 and its ligand expressed on activated T cells. IL-4 induces epsilon germline transcription whereas ligation of CD40 results in deletional S mu-->S epsilon switch recombination, expression of mature epsilon transcripts, and IgE synthesis and secretion. We demonstrate that disodium cromoglycate (DSCG), a drug commonly used for the prophylactic treatment of allergic disease, inhibits T cell-driven IgE synthesis by human B cells at concentrations readily achievable in the course of inhaled therapy for asthma. Inhibition of IgE synthesis by DSCG was not the result of drug toxicity because DSCG did not affect the viability of T and B cells or their proliferation to mitogens. DSCG did not interfere with CD40 ligand expression by T cells but clearly targeted the B cells because it inhibited IgE synthesis induced by anti-CD40 and IL-4 in populations of highly purified B cells. DSCG had no effect on the induction of epsilon germline transcripts by IL-4 but strongly inhibited CD40 mediated S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination in IL-4- treated B cells as assayed by nested primer PCR. The effect of DSCG was not specific for CD40-mediated induction of IgE isotype switching because DSCG inhibited IgE synthesis as well as S mu-->S epsilon deletional switch recombination induced by hydrocortisone and IL-4 in B cells. Moreover, the effect of DSCG was not specific for IgE isotype switching because DSCG inhibited the synthesis of IgG4 by B cells sorted for lack of surface expression of IgG4 and stimulated with anti- CD40 and IL-4. DSCG caused only minimal inhibition (< 15%) of spontaneous IgE synthesis by lymphocytes from patients with the hyper- IgE syndrome and did not affect pokeweed mitogen-induced IgG and IgA synthesis by lymphocytes suggesting that it has little effect on B cells that have already undergone isotype switching. These results indicate that DSCG

  1. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Miguel; May, Janet S; Sukla, Soumi; Frederico, Bruno; Gill, Michael B; Smith, Christopher M; Belz, Gabrielle T; Stevenson, Philip G

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4), infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  2. The B Cell-Stimulatory Cytokines BLyS and APRIL Are Elevated in Human Periodontitis and Are Required for B Cell-Dependent Bone Loss in Experimental Murine Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Toshiharu; AlSarhan, Mohammed; Benakanakere, Manjunatha R; Maekawa, Tomoki; Kinane, Denis F; Cancro, Michael P; Korostoff, Jonathan M; Hajishengallis, George

    2015-08-15

    B-lineage cells (B lymphocytes and plasma cells) predominate in the inflammatory infiltrate of human chronic periodontitis. However, their role in disease pathogenesis and the factors responsible for their persistence in chronic lesions are poorly understood. In this regard, two cytokines of the TNF ligand superfamily, a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) and B-lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS), are important for the survival, proliferation, and maturation of B cells. Thus, we hypothesized that APRIL and/or BLyS are upregulated in periodontitis and contribute to induction of periodontal bone loss. This hypothesis was addressed in both human and mouse experimental systems. We show that, relative to healthy controls, the expression of APRIL and BLyS mRNA and protein was upregulated in natural and experimental periodontitis in humans and mice, respectively. The elevated expression of these cytokines correlated with increased numbers of B cells/plasma cells in both species. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS partially colocalized with κ L chain-expressing B-lineage cells at the epithelial-connective tissue interface. Ligature-induced periodontitis resulted in significantly less bone loss in B cell-deficient mice compared with wild-type controls. Ab-mediated neutralization of APRIL or BLyS diminished the number of B cells in the gingival tissue and inhibited bone loss in wild-type, but not in B cell-deficient, mice. In conclusion, B cells and specific cytokines involved in their growth and differentiation contribute to periodontal bone loss. Moreover, APRIL and BLyS have been identified as potential therapeutic targets in periodontitis.

  3. Re-engaging cross-reactive memory B Cells: The influenza puzzle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H. eEllebedy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of a novel influenza A virus strain into humans poses a continuous public health threat. Vaccination is the most effective means of protection against influenza. The generation of memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells (PCs that can maintain protective levels of influenza-specific antibodies for protracted periods of time is the foundation for the success of such vaccines. Influenza vaccines elicit an antibody response that is primarily targeting viral surface glycoproteins. However, frequent amino acid mutations within the immunodominant epitopes allow the virus to efficiently escape neutralization by pre-existing antibodies and consequently cause annual epidemics and occasional pandemics. Recently, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that target subdominant influenza epitopes have been extensively characterized. These epitopes are immunogenic, can mediate virus neutralization, and most importantly are conserved among different influenza strains. It remains puzzling, however, that despite being repeatedly exposed to such conserved domains of influenza HA either in the form of vaccination or natural infection, most humans do not develop immunological memory that can provide broad protection against emerging virus strains. Here we will discuss the conditions that may be required for engaging such cross-reactive memory B cells in the immune response to influenza infection and vaccination in humans.

  4. Marginal zone B-cells, a gatekeeper of innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moncef eZOUALI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To maintain the integrity of an organism constantly challenged by pathogens, the immune system is endowed with a variety of cell types. B-lymphocytes were initially thought to only play a role in the adaptative branch of immunity. However, a number of converging observations revealed that two B-cell subsets, marginal zone (MZ and B1 cells, exhibit unique developmental and functional characteristics, and can contribute to innate immune responses. In addition to their capacity to mount local antibody response against type 2 T-independent (TI-2 antigens, MZ B-cells can participate to T-dependent (TD immune response through the capture and import of blood-borne antigens to follicular areas of the spleen. Here, we discuss the multiple roles of MZ B-cells in rodents and primates. We also summarize studies —performed in transgenic mice expressing fully human antibodies on their B-cells and macaques whose infection with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV represents a suitable model for HIV-1 infection in humans— showing that infectious agents have developed strategies to subvert MZ B-cell functions. In these two experimental models, we observed that two microbial superantigens for B-cells (protein A from Staphylococcus aureus and protein L from Peptostreptococcus magnus as well as inactivated AT-2 virions of HIV-1 and infectious SIV preferentially deplete innate-like B-cells —MZ B-cells and/or B1 B-cells— with different consequences on TI and TD antibody responses. These data revealed that viruses and bacteria have developed strategies to deplete innate-like B-cells during the acute phase of infection and to impair the antibody response. Unraveling the intimate mechanisms responsible for targeting MZ B-cells in humans will be important for understanding disease pathogenesis and for designing novel vaccine strategies.

  5. B-cell receptor-associated protein 31 regulates human embryonic stem cell adhesion, stemness, and survival via control of epithelial cell adhesion molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Tae; Seo Choi, Hong; Min Lee, Hyun; Jang, Young-Joo; Ryu, Chun Jeih

    2014-10-01

    B-Cell receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) regulates the export of secreted membrane proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the downstream secretory pathway. Previously, we generated a monoclonal antibody 297-D4 against the surface molecule on undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Here, we found that 297-D4 antigen was localized to pluripotent hESCs and downregulated during early differentiation of hESCs and identified that the antigen target of 297-D4 was BAP31 on the hESC-surface. To investigate the functional role of BAP31 in hESCs, BAP31 expression was knocked down by small interfering RNA. BAP31 depletion impaired hESC self-renewal and pluripotency and drove hESC differentiation into multicell lineages. BAP31 depletion hindered hESC proliferation by arresting cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and inducing caspase-independent cell death. Interestingly, BAP31 depletion reduced hESC adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM). Analysis of cell surface molecules showed decreased expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in BAP31-depleted hESCs, while ectopic expression of BAP31 elevated the expression of EpCAM. EpCAM depletion also reduced hESC adhesion to ECM, arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 phase and induced cell death, producing similar effects to those of BAP31 depletion. BAP31 and EpCAM were physically associated and colocalized at the ER and cell surface. Both BAP31 and EpCAM depletion decreased cyclin D1 and E expression and suppressed PI3K/Akt signaling, suggesting that BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression. These findings provide, for the first time, mechanistic insights into how BAP31 regulates hESC stemness and survival via control of EpCAM expression.

  6. CD9 may contribute to the survival of human germinal center B cells by facilitating the interaction with follicular dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ok Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The germinal center (GC is a dynamic microenvironment where antigen (Ag-activated B cells rapidly expand and differentiate, generating plasma cells (PC that produce high-affinity antibodies. Precise regulation of survival and proliferation of Ag-activated B cells within the GC is crucial for humoral immune responses. The follicular dendritic cells (FDC are the specialized stromal cells in the GC that prevent apoptosis of GC-B cells. Recently, we reported that human GC-B cells consist of CD9+ and CD9− populations and that it is the CD9+ cells that are committed to the PC lineage. In this study, we investigated the functional role of CD9 on GC-B cells. Tonsillar tissue section staining revealed that in vivo CD9+ GC-B cells localized in the light zone FDC area. Consistent this, in vitro CD9+ GC-B cells survived better than CD9− GC-B cells in the presence of HK cells, an FDC line, in a cell–cell contact-dependent manner. The frozen tonsillar tissue section binding assay showed that CD9+ GC-B cells bound to the GC area of tonsillar tissues significantly more than the CD9− GC-B cells did and that the binding was significantly inhibited by neutralizing anti-integrin β1 antibody. Furthermore, CD9+ cells bound to soluble VCAM-1 more than CD9− cells did, resulting in activation and stabilization of the active epitope of integrin β1. All together, our data suggest that CD9 on GC-B cells contributes to survival by strengthening their binding to FDC through the VLA4/VCAM-1 axis.

  7. A reappraisal of immunoglobulin variable gene primers and its impact on assessing clonal relationships between PB B cells and BM plasma cells in AL amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Nagaaki; Poshusta, Tanya L; Manske, Michelle K; Dispenzieri, Angela; Gertz, Morie A; Abraham, Roshini S; Ramirez-Alvarado, Marina

    2011-12-01

    Monoclonal tumor plasma cells as well as non-terminally differentiated B cells having a clonal relationship to the tumor cells have been detected in the peripheral blood (PB) of some multiple myeloma (MM) patients but rarely in light chain (primary systemic) amyloidosis (AL) patients. Previously, our group found these peripheral clonotypic B cells in three AL patients. Here, we report detailed analysis of a larger cohort of AL patients to validate the prior findings and to investigate the effect of this cell population on clinical outcome. Fourteen AL patients were selected from a clinical prospective trial, and the relationship between immunoglobulin light chain variable gene (V(L)) representation in PB B cells and the clonal population in the bone marrow (BM) was investigated. A clonal relationship was not detected, and the present study provides important insights into the disparity with the earlier data, including clinical history of the patients and methodological analysis.

  8. A Unique “Composite” PTLD with Diffuse Large B-Cell and T/Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma Components Occurring 17 Years after Transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin La Fortune

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD comprises a spectrum ranging from polyclonal hyperplasia to aggressive monoclonal lymphomas. The majority of PTLDs are of B-cell origin while T-cell PTLDs and Hodgkin lymphoma-like PTLDs are uncommon. Here, we report a unique case of a 56-year-old man in whom a lymphoma with two distinct components developed as a duodenal mass seventeen years following a combined kidney-pancreas transplant. This PTLD, which has features not previously reported in the literature, consisted of one component of CD20 positive and EBV negative monomorphic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The other component showed anaplastic morphology, expressed some but not all T-cell markers, failed to express most B-cell markers except for PAX5, and was diffusely EBV positive. Possible etiologies for this peculiar constellation of findings are discussed and the literature reviewed for “composite-like” lymphomas late in the posttransplant setting.

  9. Myeloma clonotypic B cells are hampered in their ability to undergo B-cell differentiation in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Bakkus, MHC; Bos, NA

    2002-01-01

    In the peripheral blood (PB) of multiple myeloma (MM) patients, clonotypic B cells are present that express the identical V( D) J rearrangements as the malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow. In the present study, the proliferative capacity of clonotypic B cells from MM patients (n = 10) and the

  10. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  11. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Fernández, Rocio; Blanco-Favela, Francisco; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Gorocica-Rosete, Patricia; Pizaña-Venegas, Alberto; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina

    2016-01-01

    Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease. PMID:27314053

  12. Prolactin Rescues Immature B-Cells from Apoptosis Induced by B-Cell Receptor Cross-Linking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Flores-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prolactin has an immunomodulatory effect and has been associated with B-cell-triggered autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. In mice that develop SLE, the PRL receptor is expressed in early bone marrow B-cells, and increased levels of PRL hasten disease manifestations, which are correlated with a reduction in the absolute number of immature B-cells. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of PRL in an in vitro system of B-cell tolerance using WEHI-231 cells and immature B-cells from lupus prone MRL/lpr mice. WEHI-231 cells express the long isoform of the PRL receptor, and PRL rescued the cells from cell death by decreasing the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR as measured by Annexin V and active caspase-3. This decrease in apoptosis may have been due to the PRL and receptor interaction, which increased the relative expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-xL and decreased the relative expression of proapoptotic Bad. In immature B-cells from MRL/lpr mice, PRL increased the viability and decreased the apoptosis induced by the cross-linking of BCR, which may favor the maturation of self-reactive B-cells and contribute to the onset of disease.

  13. The PPARα agonist fenofibrate suppresses B-cell lymphoma in mice by modulating lipid metabolism☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianfeng; Das, Suman Kumar; Jha, Pooja; Al Zoughbi, Wael; Schauer, Silvia; Claudel, Thierry; Sexl, Veronika; Vesely, Paul; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Kratky, Dagmar; Trauner, Michael; Hoefler, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk for malignant lymphoma development. We used Bcr/Abl transformed B cells to determine the impact of aggressive lymphoma formation on systemic lipid mobilization and turnover. In wild-type mice, tumor size significantly correlated with depletion of white adipose tissues (WAT), resulting in increased serum free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations which promote B-cell proliferation in vitro. Moreover, B-cell tumor development induced hepatic lipid accumulation due to enhanced hepatic fatty acid (FA) uptake and impaired FA oxidation. Serum triglyceride, FFA, phospholipid and cholesterol levels were significantly elevated. Consistently, serum VLDL/LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B levels were drastically increased. These findings suggest that B-cell tumors trigger systemic lipid mobilization from WAT to the liver and increase VLDL/LDL release from the liver to promote tumor growth. Further support for this concept stems from experiments where we used the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist and lipid-lowering drug fenofibrate that significantly suppressed tumor growth independent of angiogenesis and inflammation. In addition to WAT depletion, fenofibrate further stimulated FFA uptake by the liver and restored hepatic FA oxidation capacity, thereby accelerating the clearance of lipids released from WAT. Furthermore, fenofibrate blocked hepatic lipid release induced by the tumors. In contrast, lipid utilization in the tumor tissue itself was not increased by fenofibrate which correlates with extremely low expression levels of PPARα in B-cells. Our data show that fenofibrate associated effects on hepatic lipid metabolism and deprivation of serum lipids are capable to suppress B-cell lymphoma growth which may direct novel treatment strategies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Lipid Metabolism in Cancer. PMID:23628473

  14. Reversal of New-Onset Type 1 Diabetes With an Agonistic TLR4/MD-2 Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednar, Kyle J; Tsukamoto, Hiroki; Kachapati, Kritika; Ohta, Shoichiro; Wu, Yuehong; Katz, Jonathan D; Ascherman, Dana P; Ridgway, William M

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is currently an incurable disease, characterized by a silent prodromal phase followed by an acute clinical phase, reflecting progressive autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Autoreactive T cells play a major role in β-cell destruction, but innate immune cell cytokines and costimulatory molecules critically affect T-cell functional status. We show that an agonistic monoclonal antibody to TLR4/MD-2 (TLR4-Ab) reverses new-onset diabetes in a high percentage of NOD mice. TLR4-Ab induces antigen-presenting cell (APC) tolerance in vitro and in vivo, resulting in an altered cytokine profile, decreased costimulatory molecule expression, and decreased T-cell proliferation in APC:T-cell assays. TLR4-Ab treatment increases T-regulatory cell (Treg) numbers in both the periphery and the pancreatic islet, predominantly expanding the Helios(+)Nrp-1(+)Foxp3(+) Treg subset. TLR4-Ab treatment in the absence of B cells in NOD.scid mice prevents subsequent T cell-mediated disease, further suggesting a major role for APC tolerization in disease protection. Specific stimulation of the innate immune system through TLR4/MD-2, therefore, can restore tolerance in the aberrant adaptive immune system and reverse new-onset T1D, suggesting a novel immunological approach to treatment of T1D in humans.

  15. B cells regulate CD4+ T cell responses to papain following B cell receptor-independent papain uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel F; Woodruff, Matthew C; Carroll, Michael C; Austen, K Frank; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-07-15

    Papain, a cysteine protease allergen with inherent adjuvant activity, induces potent IL-4 expression by T cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of mice following footpad immunization. In this study, we identify a novel, non-BCR-mediated capacity for B cells to rapidly bind and internalize papain. B cells subsequently regulate the adaptive immune response by enhancing ICOS expression on CD4(+) T cells and amplifying Th2 and follicular helper T cell induction. Ab blockade of ICOS ligand, expressed by popliteal lymph node B cells, but not dendritic cells, at the peak of the response inhibits IL-4 responses in wild-type mice but not B cell-deficient mice. Thus, B cells play a critical role in amplifying adjuvant-dependent Th2 polarization following noncanonical acquisition and internalization of the cysteine protease papain.

  16. The rap GTPases regulate B cell morphology, immune-synapse formation, and signaling by particulate B cell receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kevin B L; Freeman, Spencer A; Zabetian, Saba; Brugger, Hayley; Weber, Michele; Lei, Victor; Dang-Lawson, May; Tse, Kathy W K; Santamaria, Rene; Batista, Facundo D; Gold, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    B lymphocytes spread and extend membrane processes when searching for antigens and form immune synapses upon contacting cells that display antigens on their surface. Although these dynamic morphological changes facilitate B cell activation, the signaling pathways underlying these processes are not fully understood. We found that activation of the Rap GTPases was essential for these changes in B cell morphology. Rap activation was important for B cell receptor (BCR)- and lymphocyte-function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-induced spreading, for BCR-induced immune-synapse formation, and for particulate BCR ligands to induce localized F-actin assembly and membrane-process extension. Rap activation and F-actin assembly were also required for optimal BCR signaling in response to particulate antigens but not soluble antigens. Thus by controlling B cell morphology and cytoskeletal organization, Rap might play a key role in the activation of B cells by particulate and cell-associated antigens.

  17. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChunsongHu; JeiXiong; LinjeiZhang; BaojunHuang; QiupingZhang; QunLi; MingzhenYang; YaouWu; QunWu; QianShen; QingpingGao; KejianZhang; ZhiminSun; JunyanLin; YouxinJin

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34 B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevatedlevel of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially naive B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis. Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration, resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  18. PEG10 Activation by Co-Stimulation of CXCR5 and CCR7 Essentially Contributes to Resistance to Apoptosis in CD19+CD34+ B Cells from Patients with B Cell Lineage Acute and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunsong Hu; Qian Shen; Qingping Gao; Kejian Zhang; Zhimin Sun; Junyan Liu; Youxin Jin; Jinquan Tan; Jei Xiong; Linjei zhang; Baojun Huang; Qiuping Zhang; Qun Li; Mingzhen Yang; Yaou Wu; Qun Wu

    2004-01-01

    We investigated CD19+CD34+ and CD19+CD34- B cells from cord blood (CB) and typical patients with B cell lineage acute and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-ALL and B-CLL) in terms of expression and functions of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19. CXCR5 and CCR7 were selectively frequent expressed on B-ALL, B-CLL and CB CD19+CD34+ B cells, but not on CD19+CD34- B cells. Instead of induction of impressive chemotactic responsiveness, CXCL13 and CCL19 together induced significant resistance to TNF-α-mediated apoptosis in B-ALL and B-CLL but not CB CD19+CD34+ B cells. B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells expressed elevated level of Paternally Expressed Gene 10 (PEG10), and CXCL13 and CCL19 together significantly up-regulated PEG10 expression in the cells. We found that CXCL13 and CCL19 together by means of activation of CXCR5 and CCR7 up-regulated PEG10 expression and function, subsequent stabilized caspase-3 and caspase-8 in B-ALL and B-CLL CD19+CD34+ B cells, and rescued the cells from TNF-α-mediated apoptosis. We suggested that normal lymphocytes, especially na(I)ve B and T cells, utilized CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for migration, homing, maturation, and cell homeostasis as well as secondary lymphoid tissues organogenesis.Meanwhile certain malignant cells took advantages of CXCR5/CXCL13 and CCR7/CCL19 for infiltration,resistance to apoptosis, and inappropriate proliferation.

  19. Phenotypic characterization of autoreactive B cells--checkpoints of B cell tolerance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett M Jacobi

    Full Text Available DNA-reactive B cells play a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; DNA antibodies precede clinical disease and in established disease correlate with renal inflammation and contribute to dendritic cell activation and high levels of type 1 interferon. A number of central and peripheral B cell tolerance mechanisms designed to control the survival, differentiation and activation of autoreactive B cells are thought to be disturbed in patients with SLE. The characterization of DNA-reactive B cells has, however, been limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood. Using a tetrameric configuration of a peptide mimetope of DNA bound by pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies, we can identify B cells producing potentially pathogenic DNA-reactive antibodies. We, therefore, characterized the maturation and differentiation states of peptide, (ds double stranded DNA cross-reactive B cells in the peripheral blood of lupus patients and correlated these with clinical disease activity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of tetramer-binding B cells in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. We demonstrated the existence of a novel tolerance checkpoint at the transition of antigen-naïve to antigen-experienced. We further demonstrate that patients with moderately active disease have more autoreactive B cells in both the antigen-naïve and antigen-experienced compartments consistent with greater impairment in B cell tolerance in both early and late checkpoints in these patients than in patients with quiescent disease. This methodology enables us to gain insight into the development and fate of DNA-reactive B cells in individual patients with SLE and paves the way ultimately to permit better and more customized therapies.

  20. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios.

  1. Transitional B Cells in Early Human B Cell Development – Time to Revisit the Paradigm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Victoria G.; Wu, Yu-Chang Bryan; Townsend, Catherine L.; Lu, Grace H. C.; O’Hare, Joselli Silva; Mozeika, Alexander; Coolen, Anthonius C. C.; Kipling, David; Fraternali, Franca; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.

    2016-01-01

    The B cell repertoire is generated in the adult bone marrow by an ordered series of gene rearrangement processes that result in massive diversity of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes and consequently an equally large number of potential specificities for antigen. As the process is essentially random, the cells exhibiting excess reactivity with self-antigens are generated and need to be removed from the repertoire before the cells are fully mature. Some of the cells are deleted, and some will undergo receptor editing to see if changing the light chain can rescue an autoreactive antibody. As a consequence, the binding properties of the B cell receptor are changed as development progresses through pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve phenotypes. Using long-read, high-throughput, sequencing we have produced a unique set of sequences from these four cell types in human bone marrow and matched peripheral blood, and our results describe the effects of tolerance selection on the B cell repertoire at the Ig gene level. Most strong effects of selection are seen within the heavy chain repertoire and can be seen both in gene usage and in CDRH3 characteristics. Age-related changes are small, and only the size of the CDRH3 shows constant and significant change in these data. The paucity of significant changes in either kappa or lambda light chain repertoires implies that either the heavy chain has more influence over autoreactivity than light chain and/or that switching between kappa and lambda light chains, as opposed to switching within the light chain loci, may effect a more successful autoreactive rescue by receptor editing. Our results show that the transitional cell population contains cells other than those that are part of the pre-B ≫ immature ≫ transitional ≫ naïve development pathway, since the population often shows a repertoire that is outside the trajectory of gene loss/gain between pre-B and naïve stages. PMID:27994589

  2. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis.

  3. Salmonella induces PD-L1 expression in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2015-10-01

    Salmonella persists for a long time in B cells; however, the mechanism(s) through which infected B cells avoid effector CD8 T cell responses has not been characterized. In this study, we show that Salmonella infects and survives within all B1 and B2 cell subpopulations. B cells are infected with a Salmonella typhimurium strain expressing an ovalbumin (OVA) peptide (SIINFEKL) to evaluate whether B cells process and present Salmonella antigens in the context of MHC-I molecules. Our data showed that OVA peptides are presented by MHC class I K(b)-restricted molecules and the presented antigen is generated through proteasomal degradation and vacuolar processing. In addition, Salmonella-infected B cells express co-stimulatory molecules such as CD40, CD80, and CD86 as well as inhibitory molecules such as PD-L1. Thus, the cross-presentation of Salmonella antigens and the expression of activation molecules suggest that infected B cells are able to prime and activate specific CD8(+) T cells. However, the Salmonella infection-stimulated expression of PD-L1 suggests that the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may be involved in turning off the cytotoxic effector response during Salmonella persistent infection, thereby allowing B cells to become a reservoir for the bacteria.

  4. YY1 Is Required for Germinal Center B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anupam; Sindhava, Vishal; Vuyyuru, Raja; Jha, Vibha; Hodewadekar, Suchita; Manser, Tim; Atchison, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    YY1 has been implicated as a master regulator of germinal center B cell development as YY1 binding sites are frequently present in promoters of germinal center-expressed genes. YY1 is known to be important for other stages of B cell development including the pro-B and pre-B cells stages. To determine if YY1 plays a critical role in germinal center development, we evaluated YY1 expression during B cell development, and used a YY1 conditional knock-out approach for deletion of YY1 in germinal center B cells (CRE driven by the immunoglobulin heavy chain γ1 switch region promoter; γ1-CRE). We found that YY1 is most highly expressed in germinal center B cells and is increased 3 fold in splenic B cells activated by treatment with anti-IgM and anti-CD40. In addition, deletion of the yy1 gene by action of γ1-CRE recombinase resulted in significant loss of GC cells in both un-immunized and immunized contexts with corresponding loss of serum IgG1. Our results show a crucial role for YY1 in the germinal center reaction.

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy and spurious hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Chaudhuri, Anita; Blauth, Kathleen; DeRubertis, Frederick R

    2003-02-01

    Spuriously low levels of plasma phosphate have been reported previously in patients with multiple myeloma and polyclonal gammopathy. We report 2 cases of spurious hypophosphatemia in patients with elevated concentrations of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins, 1 of whom had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and the other multiple myeloma. Plasma phosphate concentrations were measured using nondeproteinized and deproteinized plasma samples from patients with monoclonal gammopathies. In 2 patients with monoclonal gammopathy, the levels of plasma inorganic phosphate were reported as <1.0 mg/dL when the phosphate concentration was determined using an analyzer that employs nondeproteinized plasma. When the samples were reanalyzed using a laboratory method that removes serum proteins, normal or elevated concentrations of phosphate were found. Plasma levels of phosphate in 4 other patients with monoclonal gammopathy were normal by both methods. These data confirm previous reports that spurious hypophosphatemia occurs in some patients with increased levels of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins when laboratory methods using nondeproteinized samples are employed. The occurrence of unusually low plasma phosphate concentrations in patients without symptoms or clinically apparent causes of hypophosphatemia should alert physicians to search for monoclonal gammopathy.

  6. In-vitro derived germinal centre B cells differentially generate memory B or plasma cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Takuya; Haniuda, Kei; Moutai, Tatsuya; Matsudaira, Moeko; Mizokawa, Sho; Shiratori, Ikuo; Azuma, Takachika; Kitamura, Daisuke

    2011-09-06

    In response to T cell-dependent antigens, B cells proliferate extensively to form germinal centres (GC), and then differentiate into memory B (B(mem)) cells or long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) by largely unknown mechanisms. Here we show a new culture system in which mouse naïve B cells undergo massive expansion and isotype switching, and generate GC-phenotype B (iGB) cells. The iGB cells expressing IgG1 or IgM/D, but not IgE, differentiate into B(mem) cells in vivo after adoptive transfer and can elicit rapid immune responses with the help of cognate T cells. Secondary culture with IL-21 maintains the proliferation of the iGB cells, while shifting their in vivo developmental fate from B(mem) cells to LLPCs, an outcome that can be reversed by withdrawal of IL-21 in tertiary cultures. Thus, this system enables in vitro manipulation of B-cell fate, into either B(mem) cells or LLPCs, and will facilitate dissection of GC-B cell differentiation programs.

  7. Role of the tumor microenvironment in mature B-cell lymphoid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Nathan H; Cheah, Chan Yoon; Gascoyne, Randy D; Gribben, John; Neelapu, Sattva S; Ghia, Paolo; Bollard, Catherine; Ansell, Stephen; Curran, Michael; Wilson, Wyndham H; O'Brien, Susan; Grant, Cliona; Little, Richard; Zenz, Thorsten; Nastoupil, Loretta J; Dunleavy, Kieron

    2016-05-01

    The tumor microenvironment is the cellular and molecular environment in which the tumor exists and with which it continuously interacts. In B-cell lymphomas, this microenvironment is intriguing in that it plays critical roles in the regulation of tumor cell survival and proliferation, fostering immune escape as well as the development of treatment resistance. The purpose of this review is to summarize the proceedings of the Second Annual Summit on the Immune Microenvironment in Hematologic Malignancies that took place on September 11-12, 2014 in Dublin, Ireland. We provide a timely overview of the composition and biological relevance of the cellular and molecular microenvironment interface and discuss the role of interactions between the microenvironment and neoplastic cells in a variety of B-cell lymphomas. In addition, we focus on various novel therapeutic strategies that target the tumor microenvironment, including agents that modulate B-cell receptor pathways and immune-checkpoints, chimeric antigen receptor T cells and immunomodulatory agents. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Specific Btk inhibition suppresses B cell- and myeloid cell-mediated arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paolo, Julie A.; Huang, Tao; Balazs, Mercedesz; Barbosa, James; Barck, Kai H.; Bravo, Brandon J.; Carano, Richard A.D.; Darrow, James; Davies, Douglas R.; DeForge, Laura E.; Diehl, Lauri; Ferrando, Ronald; Gallion, Steven L.; Giannetti, Anthony M.; Gribling, Peter; Hurez, Vincent; Hymowitz, Sarah G.; Jones, Randall; Kropf, Jeffrey E.; Lee, Wyne P.; Maciejewski, Patricia M.; Mitchell, Scott A.; Rong, Hong; Staker, Bart L.; Whitney, J. Andrew; Yeh, Sherry; Young, Wendy B.; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Juan; Reif, Karin; Currie, Kevin S. (CGI); (Emerald); (Genentech)

    2011-09-20

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Btk mediates inflammation are poorly understood. Here we describe the discovery of CGI1746, a small-molecule Btk inhibitor chemotype with a new binding mode that stabilizes an inactive nonphosphorylated enzyme conformation. CGI1746 has exquisite selectivity for Btk and inhibits both auto- and transphosphorylation steps necessary for enzyme activation. Using CGI1746, we demonstrate that Btk regulates inflammatory arthritis by two distinct mechanisms. CGI1746 blocks B cell receptor-dependent B cell proliferation and in prophylactic regimens reduces autoantibody levels in collagen-induced arthritis. In macrophages, Btk inhibition abolishes Fc{gamma}RIII-induced TNF{alpha}, IL-1{beta} and IL-6 production. Accordingly, in myeloid- and Fc{gamma}R-dependent autoantibody-induced arthritis, CGI1746 decreases cytokine levels within joints and ameliorates disease. These results provide new understanding of the function of Btk in both B cell- or myeloid cell-driven disease processes and provide a compelling rationale for targeting Btk in rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Massive transcriptional perturbation in subgroups of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Rosolowski

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption that molecular mechanisms involved in cancerogenesis are characterized by groups of coordinately expressed genes, we developed and validated a novel method for analyzing transcriptional data called Correlated Gene Set Analysis (CGSA. Using 50 extracted gene sets we identified three different profiles of tumors in a cohort of 364 Diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL and related mature aggressive B-cell lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma. The first profile had high level of expression of genes related to proliferation whereas the second profile exhibited a stromal and immune response phenotype. These two profiles were characterized by a large scale gene activation affecting genes which were recently shown to be epigenetically regulated, and which were enriched in oxidative phosphorylation, energy metabolism and nucleoside biosynthesis. The third and novel profile showed only low global gene activation similar to that found in normal B cells but not cell lines. Our study indicates novel levels of complexity of DLBCL with low or high large scale gene activation related to metabolism and biosynthesis and, within the group of highly activated DLBCLs, differential behavior leading to either a proliferative or a stromal and immune response phenotype.

  10. Clinical adjuvant combinations stimulate potent B-cell responses in vitro by activating dermal dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Matthews

    Full Text Available CD14(+ dermal DCs (CD14(+ DDCs have a natural capacity to activate naïve B-cells. Targeting CD14(+ DDCs is therefore a rational approach for vaccination strategies aimed at improving humoral responses towards poorly immunogenic antigens, for example, HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env. Here, we show that two clinically relevant TLR ligand combinations, Hiltonol plus Resiquimod and Glucopyranosyl lipid A plus Resiquimod, potently activate CD14(+ DDCs, as shown by enhanced expression of multiple cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the responses of CD14(+ DDCs to these TLR ligands were not compromised by the presence of HIV-1 gp120, which can drive immunosuppressive effects in vitro and in vivo. The above TLR ligand pairs were better than the individual agents at boosting the inherent capacity of CD14(+ DDCs to induce naïve B-cells to proliferate and differentiate into CD27(+ CD38(+ B-cells that secrete high levels of immunoglobulins. CD14(+ DDCs stimulated by these TLR ligand combinations also promoted the differentiation of Th1 (IFN-γ-secreting, but not Th17, CD4(+ T-cells. These observations may help to identify adjuvant strategies aimed at inducing better antibody responses to vaccine antigens, including, but not limited to HIV-1 Env.

  11. [The role of IRA B cells in selected inflammatory processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasada, Magdalena; Rutkowska-Zapała, Magdalena; Lenart, Marzena; Kwinta, Przemko

    2016-03-16

    The first report about the discovery of new, previously unknown immune cells named IRA B cells (innate response activator B cells) appeared in 2012. So far, their presence has been verified in both mice and humans. However, IRA B cells belong to the family of B lymphocytes and have a number of characteristics unique to this group of cells. IRA B cells are formed from activated B1a lymphocytes after their contact with a pathogen. B1a lymphocytes mainly reside within body cavities. Activated by the pathogen, they move on into secondary lymphoid organs (spleen, lymph nodes) where they differentiate into IRA B cells. IRA B cells are a rich source of granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). GM-CSF can stimulate IRA B cells in an autocrine manner for the secretion of intracellular stocks of immunoglobulin M (IgM), which can facilitate pathogens' phagocytosis by neutrophils. GM-CSF also stimulates neutrophils into active phagocytosis. Rapid eradication of the pathogen can prevent the development of an excessive inflammatory response, which can be dangerous for the organism. Until now the involvement of IRA B lymphocytes in the pathogenesis of sepsis and pneumonia has been proven, as well as their role in the progression of atherosclerotic lesions in mice. There is research in progress on the possibility of increasing the number of IRA B cells, for example by intravenous supply of modified immunoglobulins. It is necessary to characterize human IRA B cells and to determine their role in the functioning of the immune system.

  12. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Kataoka

    Full Text Available Native cholera toxin (nCT as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs and nasal passages (NPs. Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  13. Oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells mediate T cell-independent IgA class switching on B-1 B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kosuke; Fujihashi, Keiko; Terao, Yutaka; Gilbert, Rebekah S; Sekine, Shinichi; Kobayashi, Ryoki; Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Kawabata, Shigetada; Fujihashi, Kohtaro

    2011-01-01

    Native cholera toxin (nCT) as a nasal adjuvant was shown to elicit increased levels of T-independent S-IgA antibody (Ab) responses through IL-5- IL-5 receptor interactions between CD4+ T cells and IgA+ B-1 B cells in murine submandibular glands (SMGs) and nasal passages (NPs). Here, we further investigate whether oral-nasopharyngeal dendritic cells (DCs) play a central role in the induction of B-1 B cell IgA class switch recombination (CSR) for the enhancement of T cell-independent (TI) mucosal S-IgA Ab responses. High expression levels of activation-induced cytidine deaminase, Iα-Cμ circulation transcripts and Iμ-Cα transcripts were seen on B-1 B cells purified from SMGs and NPs of both TCRβ⁻/⁻ mice and wild-type mice given nasal trinitrophenyl (TNP)-LPS plus nCT, than in the same tissues of mice given nCT or TNP-LPS alone. Further, DCs from SMGs, NPs and NALT of mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT expressed significantly higher levels of a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) than those in mice given TNP-LPS or nCT alone, whereas the B-1 B cells in SMGs and NPs showed elevated levels of transmembrane activator and calcium modulator cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) expression. Interestingly, high frequencies of IgA+ B-1 B cells were induced when peritoneal IgA⁻ IgM+ B cells were stimulated with mucosal DCs from mice given nasal TNP-LPS plus nCT. Taken together, these findings show that nasal nCT plays a key role in the enhancement of mucosal DC-mediated TI IgA CSR by B-1 B cells through their interactions with APRIL and TACI.

  14. Seeking help: B cells adapting to flu variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Most, Robbert G; Roman, François P; Innis, Bruce; Hanon, Emmanuel; Vaughn, David W; Gillard, Paul; Walravens, Karl; Wettendorff, Martine

    2014-07-23

    The study of influenza vaccines has revealed potential interactions between preexisting immunological memory and antigenic context and/or adjuvantation. In the face of antigenic diversity, the process of generating B cell adaptability is driven by cross-reactive CD4 memory cells, such as T follicular helper cells from previous infections or vaccinations. Although such "helped" B cells are capable of adapting to variant antigens, lack of CD4 help could lead to a suboptimal antibody response. Collectively, this indicates an interplay between CD4 T cells, adjuvant, and B cell adaptability.

  15. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2017-09-07

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10(9) independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  16. A regulatory effect of IL-21 on T follicular helper-like cell and B cell in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Wu, Qian; Su, Dinglei; Che, Nan; Chen, Haifeng; Geng, Linyu; Chen, Jinyun; Chen, Wanjun; Li, Xia; Sun, Lingyun

    2012-11-23

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a member of type I cytokine family. Recent studies indicate that IL-21 can promote T follicular helper (Tfh) cell differentiation and survival, a specialized T cell subset which provides help for B cell. It can also regulate the activation, proliferation and differentiation of human B cell and immunoglobulin (Ig) production as well as isotype switching of plasma cell. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by auto-antibodies overproduction such as rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody, suggesting a pivotal role of Tfh cell and B cell in the pathogenesis of RA. This study aimed to investigate whether IL-21 had a regulatory effect on Tfh cell and B cell in RA. Serum IL-21 concentrations were measured by ELISA. The correlations between serum IL-21 levels and clinical features of RA patients were analyzed by Spearman's rank test. The percentages of Tfh-like cells, IL-21 receptor (R) expression on Tfh-like cells and B cells in peripheral blood (PB) were analyzed by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stimulated by rIL-21 (100 ng/ml) in the presence or absence of anti-CD40 and/or anti-IgM, and changes of IL-21R, activation-associated surface markers (CD25, CD69 and CD40), the proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation of B cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Production of IgG and IgM in the culture supernatants was determined by ELISA. The results showed that the serum IL-21 levels in RA patients were significantly higher than that of healthy controls (HC). IL-21 concentrations were positively correlated with 28-joint count disease activity score (DAS28) and anti-CCP antibody in RA patients with high IL-21 levels. Furthermore, the frequencies of peripheral CXCR5+PD-1+CD4+ Tfh-like cells markedly increased in RA patients and the percentages of Tfh-like cells were positively correlated with DAS28 and anti-CCP antibody levels. Moreover, elevated IL-21 levels were also

  17. HIV-1 Env-Specific Memory and Germinal Center B Cells in C57BL/6 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Soldemo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Continued efforts to define the immunogenic properties of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env are needed to elicit effective antibody (Ab responses by vaccination. HIV-1 is a highly neutralization-resistant virus due to conformational and glycan shielding of conserved Ab determinants on the virus spike. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing Abs that bind poorly accessible epitope regions on Env is therefore extremely challenging and will likely require selective targeting of specific sub-determinants. To evaluate such approaches there is a pressing need for in vivo studies in both large and small animals, including mice. Currently, most mouse immunization studies are performed in the BALB/c strain; however, the C57BL/6 strain offers improved possibilities for mechanistic studies due to the availability of numerous knock-out strains on this genetic background. Here, we compared Env immunogenicity in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and found that the magnitude of the antigen-specific response was somewhat lower in C57BL/6 than in BALB/c mice by ELISA but not significantly different by B cell ELISpot measurements. We then established protocols for the isolation of single Env-specific memory B cells and germinal center (GC B cells from immunized C57BL/6 mice to facilitate future studies of the elicited response at the monoclonal Ab level. We propose that these protocols can be used to gain an improved understanding of the early recruitment of Env-specific B cells to the GC as well as the archiving of such responses in the memory B cell pool following immunization.

  18. Effects of anti-IgM suppression on polyclonally activated murine B cells: analysis of immunoglobulin mRNA, gene specific nuclear factors and cell cycle distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcuzzi, A; Van Ness, B; Rouse, T; Lafrenz, D

    1989-01-01

    Polyclonal activation of murine B cells with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and dextran sulfate (DxS) results in cell proliferation as well as increased immunoglobulin gene transcription and antibody secretion. When added to B cell cultures during mitogen activation, anti-mu antibody suppresses the rate of proliferation and immunoglobulin gene expression. Using this model system we show that co-cultures of B cells with LPS/DxS and anti-mu resulted in a decrease of both mu and kappa chain mRNA. Suppression did not prevent B cell entry into cycle nor a significant alteration in the distribution of cells in phases of cell cycle, although it did prolong the cycle transit time in a dose dependent fashion as determined by bromodeoxyuridine pulse labelling. Analysis of B cell specific nuclear binding factors, which previously have been shown to be important in regulating immunoglobulin gene transcription were examined. Results show that the kappa-specific enhancer binding activity of NF-kappa B was induced in activated as well as suppressed cultures. The lymphoid specific factor NF-A2, which recognizes the octamer sequence motif in the promoters of immunoglobulin genes, was induced by the polyclonal activation but was selectively lost in extracts from suppressed cells. Thus, specific regulation of the nuclear factor which plays a critical role in both heavy and light chain immunoglobulin gene expression may contribute to the transcriptional suppression observed in anti-mu treated B cells. Images PMID:2481271

  19. Multiparametric flow cytometry for identification and fluorescence activated cell sorting of five distinct B-cell subpopulations in normal tonsil tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Perez-Andres, Martin; Schmitz, Alexander; Johansen, Preben; Boegsted, Martin; Nyegaard, Mette; Gaihede, Michael; Bukh, Anne; Johnsen, Hans E; Orfao, Alberto; Dybkaer, Karen

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a procedure capable of isolating distinct B-cell subpopulations from human tonsils as a basis for subsequent molecular analyses. Overall, 5 distinct B-cell subpopulations were purified from fresh tonsils based on their fluorescence surface marker expression: naive B cells, centroblasts, centrocytes, memory B cells, and plasmablasts. The immunophenotypic identity of the subpopulations was verified by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction using the proliferation marker MKI-67 and 6 B-cell-associated differentiation markers (BACH2, BCL6, PAX5, IRF4, PRDM1, and XBP1). Furthermore, within the centroblast compartment, large and small centroblasts could be distinguished and large centroblasts were shown to proliferate with a morphologic appearance of a "centroblast"-like cell but with lower gene expression of the germinal center markers BCL6 and BACH2 vs small centroblasts. This study has established a detailed and fast procedure for simultaneous sorting of up to 5 distinct maturation-associated B-cell subpopulations from human tonsils.

  20. Bendamustine increases interleukin-10 secretion from B cells via p38 MAP kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Le; Yoshimoto, Keiko; Morita, Atsuho; Kameda, Hideto; Takeuchi, Tsutomu

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the effects of bendamustine on B cell functions and explored potential clinical applications of the drugs to autoimmune diseases. Proliferation of Ramos cells, a human B cell line, was significantly inhibited by 25-100μM of bendamustine in a dose-dependent manner. Concordantly, IgM secretion from Ramos cells was significantly inhibited at these concentrations by up to 70%. Interestingly, however, the production and secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) were dramatically (at least >10-fold) increased by bendamustine at growth inhibitory concentrations. Exploration of the molecular mechanism of IL-10 production revealed that bendamustine enhanced the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase. Further, Sp1 was identified as a downstream transcription factor, and the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase and Sp1 with their inhibitors led to the abrogation of bendamustine-induced IL-10 production and the DNA binding of Sp1. Importantly, when PBMC from healthy donors were cultured with bendamustine at the concentration of 30μM, under the stimulation with an anti-IgM antibody, an anti-CD40 antibody, recombinant human IL-21 (rhIL-21) and recombinant human soluble BAFF (rhsBAFF), IL-10 production by B cells (CD20+CD4-CD8-CD14-) among peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) was significantly enhanced by adding bendamustine. These results collectively suggest that the p38 MAP kinase-Sp1 pathway plays a crucial role in bendamustine-induced IL-10 production by B cells. Our findings suggest a novel therapeutic possibility for autoimmune diseases through the upregulation of IL-10 which has an anti-inflammatory effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Peroxiredoxin 3 is resistant to oxidation-induced apoptosis of Hep-3b cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y-G; Li, L; Liu, C-H; Hong, S; Zhang, M-J

    2014-06-01

    Although peroxiredoxin 3 (PRX3) was reported to be overexpressed in liver cancer, the precise function of PRX3 in the development and/or progression of liver cancer remained to be obscure. The present study was conducted to investigate the response of PRX3 to oxidative stress in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. After successful knockdown of PRX3 expression by small interfering RNA, we treated HCC cell lines Hep-3b and Hep-G2 with gradient concentrations of H2O2 and detected cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells. After low-dose (5-20 μmol/l) H2O2 treatment, the ROS level was significantly higher in PRX3-knockdown Hep-3b cells than in controls. In addition, PRX3 down-regulation resulted in decreased proliferation, increased apoptosis, and increased caspase 3 activity of Hep-3b cells. We did not notice significant difference between PrxIII knockdown and control Hep-G2 cells in ROS level, cell viability or apoptosis. Our results suggest that PRX3 is an indispensable ROS scavenger that protects tumor cells against oxidative damage and subsequent apoptosis, which provides a clue that PRX3 may be involved in the chemotherapeutic resistance of liver cancer. The underlying mechanism for PRX3 function needs further investigation.

  2. COMPUTATION MODELING OF TCDD DISRUPTION OF B CELL TERMINAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we established a computational model describing the molecular circuit underlying B cell terminal differentiation and how TCDD may affect this process by impinging upon various molecular targets.

  3. An eruption of European B-cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Volcanic ash clouds disrupted the 2010 ESF/EMBO meeting on B cells and protection. Nevertheless, the delegates who did make it to Catalonia put together their own programme of talks covering a range of themes from mutualism to epigenetics.

  4. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  5. B-Cell waste classification sampling and analysis plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-09-22

    This report documents the methods used to collect and analyze samples to obtain data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream.

  6. Disruption of B-cell homeostatic control mediated by the BLV-Tax oncoprotein: association with the upregulation of Bcl-2 and signaling through NF-kappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szynal, Maud; Cleuter, Yvette; Beskorwayne, Terry; Bagnis, Claude; Van Lint, Carine; Kerkhofs, Pierre; Burny, Aisene; Martiat, Philippe; Griebel, Philip; Van den Broeke, Anne

    2003-07-17

    Transactivating proteins associated with complex onco-retroviruses including human T-cell leukemia virus-1 (HTLV-1) and bovine leukemia virus (BLV) mediate transformation using poorly understood mechanisms. To gain insight into the processes that govern tumor onset and progression, we have examined the impact of BLV-Tax expression on ovine B-cells, the targets of BLV in experimentally infected sheep, using B-cell clones that are dependent on CD154 and gammac-common cytokines. Tax was capable of mediating progression of B-cells from cytokine dependence to cytokine independence, indicating that the transactivator can over-ride signaling pathways typically controlled by cytokine receptor activation in B-cells. When examined in the presence of both CD154 and interleukin-4, Tax had a clear supportive role on B-cell growth, with an impact on B-cell proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, and survival. Apoptotic B-cell death mediated by growth factor withdrawal, physical insult, and NF-kappaB inhibition was dramatically reduced in the presence of Tax. Furthermore, the expression of Tax was associated with higher Bcl-2 protein levels, providing rationale for the rescue signals mediated by the transactivator. Finally, Tax expression in B-cells led to a dramatic increase of nuclear RelB/p50 and p50/p50 NF-kappaB dimers, indicating that cellular signaling through NF-kappaB is a major contributory mechanism in the disruption of B-cell homeostasis. Although Tax is involved in aspects of pathogenesis that are unique to complex retroviruses, the viral strategies associated with this transactivating oncoprotein may have wide-ranging effects that are relevant to other B-cell malignancies.

  7. A generalized quantitative antibody homeostasis model: regulation of B-cell development by BCR saturation and novel insights into bone marrow function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prechl, József

    2017-01-01

    In a pair of articles, we present a generalized quantitative model for the homeostatic function of clonal humoral immune system. In this first paper, we describe the cycles of B-cell expansion and differentiation driven by B-cell receptor engagement. The fate of a B cell is determined by the signals it receives via its antigen receptor at any point of its lifetime. We express BCR engagement as a function of apparent affinity and free antigen concentration, using the range of 10−14–10−3 M for both factors. We assume that for keeping their BCR responsive, B cells must maintain partial BCR saturation, which is a narrow region defined by [Ag]≈KD. To remain in this region, B cells respond to changes in [Ag] by proliferation or apoptosis and modulate KD by changing BCR structure. We apply this framework to various niches of B-cell development such as the bone marrow, blood, lymphoid follicles and germinal centers. We propose that clustered B cells in the bone marrow and in follicles present antigen to surrounding B cells by exposing antigen captured on complement and Fc receptors. The model suggests that antigen-dependent selection in the bone marrow results in (1) effector BI cells, which develop in blood as a consequence of the inexhaustible nature of soluble antigens, (2) memory cells that survive in antigen rich niches, identified as marginal zone B cells. Finally, the model implies that memory B cells could derive survival signals from abundant non-cognate antigens. PMID:28265373

  8. Constitutive CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminates germinal center response and leads to augmented plasma cell production in T cell areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T-B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction.

  9. [Eosinophilic pneumonia revealing B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikal, Siham; Sajiai, Hafsa; Serhane, Hind; Aitbatahar, Salma; Amro, Lamyae

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia is rare and malignant etiology remains exceptional. Eosinophilic pneumonia etiology varies and is mainly dominated by allergic and drug causes. We report the case of a 61-year-old patient with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma revealed by eosinophilic pneumonia. The diagnosis of eosinophilic pneumonia was confirmed by eosinophil count of 56% in bronchoalveolar lavage. Immunohistochemical examination of bone marrow biopsy revealed malignant Small B cells non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  10. Trafficking of B cell antigen in lymph nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Degn, Søren Egedal; Pitcher, Lisa A.

    2011-01-01

    The clonal selection theory first proposed by Macfarlane Burnet is a cornerstone of immunology ( 1 ). At the time, it revolutionized the thinking of immunologists because it provided a simple explanation for lymphocyte specificity, immunological memory, and elimination of self-reactive clones ( 2......, 5 ) have provided new insights into the trafficking of B cells and their antigen. In this review, we summarize these advances in the context of our current view of B cell circulation and activation....

  11. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-03-12

    This report documents the quality process plan for the restart of a hot cell in the B Plant, originally a bismuth phosphate processing facility, but later converted to a waste fractionation plant. B-Cell is currently being cleaned out and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/1999. This report describes the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone.

  12. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  13. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  14. Plasma markers of B-cell activation and clonality in pediatric liver and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Eric A.; Savoldo, Barbara; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Costello, Rene; Zingone, Adriana; Heslop, Helen E.; Landgren, Ola

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Transplant recipients are at risk of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD). Methods: Thirty-six pediatric transplant recipients were evaluated (18 hematopoietic stem cell and 18 liver recipients; 12 had PTLD). We studied 207 longitudinal plasma samples from these recipients for three markers of B-cell activation or clonality: immunoglobulin free light chains (FLCs), soluble CD30 (sCD30), and monoclonal immunoglobulins (M-proteins). Results Kappa FLCs, lambda FLCs, and sCD30 were elevated in 20.8%, 28.0%, and 94.2% of plasma specimens, respectively. FLC and sCD30 levels increased significantly 1.18–1.82 fold per log10 Epstein Barr virus (EBV) load in peripheral blood. Five PTLD cases manifested elevated FLCs with an abnormal kappa/lambda ratio, suggesting monoclonal FLC production. M-proteins were present in 91% of PTLD cases, vs. 50–67% of other recipients with high or low EBV loads (p=0.13). Concordance of FLCs, M-proteins, and PTLD tumor light chain restriction was imperfect. For example, one PTLD case with an IgG lambda M-protein had a tumor that was kappa restricted, and another case with an M-protein had a T-cell PTLD. In an additional case, an IgM kappa M-protein and excess kappa FLCs were both detected in plasma at PTLD diagnosis; while the tumor was not restricted at diagnosis, kappa restriction was present 5 years later when the PTLD relapsed. Discussion Plasma markers of B-cell dysfunction are frequent following transplantation and associated with poor EBV control. These abnormal markers may be produced by oligoclonal B-cell populations or PTLD tumor cells, and could potentially help identify recipients at high risk of PTLD. PMID:23222884

  15. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...... receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns...

  16. Class-switched marginal zone B cells in spleen have relatively low numbers of somatic mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricks, Jacobus; Visser, Annie; Dammers, Peter M.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Kroese, Frans G. M.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of rodent splenic marginal zone (MZ)-B cells are naive IgM(+) cells. A small fraction of these MZ-B cells carry mutated V-genes, and represent IgM(+) memory MZ-B cells. Here we reveal further heterogeneity of B cells with a MZ-B cell phenotype, by providing evidence for the existen

  17. Ibrutinib inhibits CD20 upregulation on CLL B cells mediated by the CXCR4/SDF-1 axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlasova, Gabriela; Borsky, Marek; Seda, Vaclav; Cerna, Katerina; Osickova, Jitka; Doubek, Michael; Mayer, Jiri; Calogero, Raffaele; Trbusek, Martin; Pospisilova, Sarka; Davids, Matthew S; Kipps, Thomas J; Brown, Jennifer R; Mraz, Marek

    2016-09-22

    Agents targeting B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling-associated kinases such as Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase can induce mobilization of neoplastic B cells from the lymphoid tissues into the blood, which makes them potentially ideal to combine with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (such as rituximab, obinutuzumab, or ofatumumab) for treatment of B-cell lymphomas and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Here we show that interactions between leukemia cells and stromal cells (HS-5) upregulate CD20 on CLL cells and that administering ibrutinib downmodulates CD20 (MS4A1) expression in vivo. We observed that CLL cells that have recently exited the lymph node microenvironment and moved into the peripheral blood (CXCR4(dim)CD5(bright) subpopulation) have higher cell surface levels of CD20 than the cells circulating in the bloodstream for a longer time (CXCR4(bright)CD5(dim) cells). We found that CD20 is directly upregulated by CXCR4 ligand stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1α, CXCL12) produced by stromal cells, and BTK-inhibitor ibrutinib and CXCR4-inhibitor plerixafor block SDF-1α-mediated CD20 upregulation. Ibrutinib also downmodulated Mcl1 levels in CLL cells in vivo and in coculture with stromal cells. Overall, our study provides a first detailed mechanistic explanation of CD20 expression regulation in the context of chemokine signaling and microenvironmental interactions, which may have important implications for microenvironment-targeting therapies.

  18. Targeting malignant B cells as antigen-presenting cells: TLR-9 agonist induces systemic regression of lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-González, Nela; Holtick, Udo; Fairfax, Kirsten; Weihrauch, Martin R; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael S

    2011-03-01

    Evaluation of: Brody JD, Ai WZ, Czerwinski DK et al. In situ vaccination with a TLR9 agonist induces systemic lymphoma regression: a Phase I/II study. J. Clin. Oncol. 28(28), 4324-4332 (2010). Despite high response rates of the follicular B-cell lymphoma to monoclonal antibodies, the clinical course of lymphoma is still characterized by a continuous pattern of relapse. Brody and colleagues treated 15 patients with relapsed, low-grade lymphoma using low-dose radiotherapy applied to one of the tumor sites with combined injection of a TLR-9 agonist at the same site. This strategy induced specific immunity and tumor regression in several patients with an objective response rate of 27%. The results indicate an involvement of the tumor TLR-9-expressing B cells acting as antigen-presenting cells. TLR-9 in situ vaccination combined with local radiotherapy clearly warrants further in-depth analysis and investigation in a Phase III randomized trial, and may provide a new opportunity for the treatment of B-cell malignancies.

  19. In silico prediction of B cell epitopes of the extracellular domain of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Bayrami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R is a transmembrane receptor with tyrosine kinase activity. The receptor plays a critical role in cancer. Using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against the IGF-1R, typically blocks ligand binding and enhances down-regulation of the cell-surface IGF-1R. Some MAbs such as cixutumumab are under clinical trial investigation. Targeting multiple distinct epitopes on IGF-1R, might be an effective strategy to inhibit IGF-1R pathway in cancer. In this study, new linear B cell epitopes for the extracellular domains of IGF-1R were predicted by in silico methods using a combination of linear B cell epitope prediction web servers such as ABCpred, Bepired, BCPREDs, Bcepred and Elliprro. Moreover, Discotope, B-pred and PEPOP web server tools were employed to predict new conformational B cell epitopes. In contrast to previously reported epitopes from extracellular region of the IGF-1R, we predicted new linear P8: (RQPQDGYLYRHNYCSK and conformational Pc4: (HYYYAGVCVPACPPNTYRFE, Ppc6: (KMCPSTGKRENNESAPDNDT and Ppc20: (ANILSAESSDSEFMQEPSGFI epitopes. These epitopes are useful for further study as peptide antigens to actively immune host animals to develop new MAbs. Furthermore, the epitopes can be used in peptide-based cancer vaccines design.

  20. New B-cell Lymphomas in the Setting of a Previous Rare Breast Implant–Associated B-cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Alison; Wang, Wei; Duvic, Madeleine

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We present a follow-up of a patient who underwent right-sided subtotal mastectomy and placement of right-sided saline implant in 1968 for a phyllodes tumor and then in 2012 was diagnosed with a rare B-cell type lymphoma of the right breast. In 2015, she was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involvement of the left breast and left leg and experienced subsequent self-regression of leg lesions without therapy. PMID:27975038

  1. Essential role of MALT1 protease activity in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Hailfinger, Stephan; Lenz, Georg; Ngo, Vu; Posvitz-Fejfar, Anita; Rebeaud, Fabien; Guzzardi, Montserrat; Penas, Eva-Maria Murga; Dierlamm, Judith; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.; Thome, Margot

    2009-01-01

    A key element for the development of suitable anti-cancer drugs is the identification of cancer-specific enzymatic activities that can be therapeutically targeted. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue transformation protein 1 (MALT1) is a proto-oncogene that contributes to tumorigenesis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, the least curable subtype of DLBCL. Recent data suggest that MALT1 has proteolytic activity, but it is unknown whether this activity...

  2. Restoration of human B-cell differentiation into NOD-SCID mice engrafted with gene-corrected CD34+ cells isolated from Artemis or RAG1-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hue, Christophe; Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Forveille, Monique; Beldjord, Kheira; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Charneau, Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by mutation of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) or Artemis gene lead to the absence of B- and T-cell differentiation. The only curative treatment is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which displays a high survival rate when an HLA compatible donor is available but has a poorer prognosis when the donor is partially compatible. Consequently, gene therapy may be a promising alternative strategy for these diseases. Here, we report that lentiviral gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells (isolated from Artemis- or RAG1-deficient patients) sustain human B-cell differentiation following injection into non-obese diabetic/SCID (NOD-SCID) mice previously infused with anti-interleukin-2 receptor beta chain monoclonal antibody. In most of the mice BM, engrafted with Artemis-transduced cells, human B-cell differentiation occurred until the mature stage. The B cells were functional as human immunoglobulin M (IgM) was present in the serum. Following injection with RAG1-transduced cells, human engraftment occurred in vivo but B-cell differentiation until the mature stage was less frequent. However, when it occurred, it was always associated with human IgM production. This overall approach represents a useful tool for evaluating gene transfer efficiency in human SCID forms affecting B-cell development (such as Artemis deficiency) and for testing new vectors for improving in vivo RAG1 complementation.

  3. High Inter-Individual Diversity of Point Mutations, Insertions, and Deletions in Human Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Reiche

    Full Text Available The diversity of virus-specific antibodies and of B cells among different individuals is unknown. Using single-cell cloning of antibody genes, we generated recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory B cells in four adult humans with and without preceding influenza vaccination. We examined the diversity of the antibody repertoires and found that NP-specific B cells used numerous immunoglobulin genes. The heavy chains (HCs originated from 26 and the kappa light chains (LCs from 19 different germ line genes. Matching HC and LC chains gave rise to 43 genetically distinct antibodies that bound influenza NP. The median lengths of the CDR3 of the HC, kappa and lambda LC were 14, 9 and 11 amino acids, respectively. We identified changes at 13.6% of the amino acid positions in the V gene of the antibody heavy chain, at 8.4% in the kappa and at 10.6 % in the lambda V gene. We identified somatic insertions or deletions in 8.1% of the variable genes. We also found several small groups of clonal relatives that were highly diversified. Our findings demonstrate broadly diverse memory B cell repertoires for the influenza nucleoprotein. We found extensive variation within individuals with a high number of point mutations, insertions, and deletions, and extensive clonal diversification. Thus, structurally conserved proteins can elicit broadly diverse and highly mutated B-cell responses.

  4. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8(+) T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Sara Y; Kang, Sohyeong; Ford, Mandy L; Harder, Kenneth W; Priatel, John J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8(+) T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a(-)(/)(-) CD8(+) T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a(-)(/)(-) CD8(+) T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8(+) T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8(+) T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8(+) T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8(+) T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas.

  5. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  6. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira,