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Sample records for monoclonal b-cell proliferation

  1. [Regulatory B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody inhibit CD4(+)T cell proliferation].

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    Wang, Keng; Tao, Lei; Su, Jianbing; Zhang, Yueyang; Zou, Binhua; Wang, Yiyuan; Li, Xiaojuan

    2016-09-01

    Objective To observe the immunosuppressive function of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in vitro after activated by CpG oligodeoxynucleotide (CpG-ODN) and anti-CD40 mAb. Methods Mice splenic CD5(+)CD1d(high)B cells and CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells were sorted by flow cytometry. These B cells were first stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours, and then co-cultured with purified CD4(+)T cells. The interleukin 10 (IL-10) expression in the activated Bregs and other B cell subset, as well as the proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) expression in the CD4(+) T cells activated by anti-CD3 mAb plus anti-CD28 mAb were determined by flow cytometry. Results CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN plus anti-CD40 mAb blocked the up-regulated CD4(+)T proliferation and significantly reduced the IFN-γ level. At the same time, activated CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells showed no inhibitory effect on CD4(+)T cells. Further study revealed that IL-10 expression in the CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells were much higher than that in the CD5(-)CD1d(low)B cells after stimulated with CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb for 24 hours. Conclusion CD5(+)CD1d(high) B cells activated by CpG-ODN combined with anti-CD40 mAb have immune inhibitory effects on CD4(+)T cell activation in vitro , which possibly due to IL-10 secretion.

  2. Telomere length analysis in monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia Binet A

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    F.M. Furtado

    Full Text Available Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL is an asymptomatic clinical entity characterized by the proliferation of monoclonal B cells not meeting the diagnosis criteria for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. MBL may precede the development of CLL, but the molecular mechanisms responsible for disease progression and evolution are not completely known. Telomeres are usually short in CLL and their attrition may contribute to disease evolution. Here, we determined the telomere lengths of CD5+CD19+ cells in MBL, CLL, and healthy volunteers. Twenty-one CLL patients, 11 subjects with high-count MBL, and 6 with low-count MBL were enrolled. Two hundred and sixty-one healthy volunteers aged 0 to 88 years were studied as controls. After diagnosis confirmation, a flow cytometry CD19+CD5+-based cell sorting was performed for the study groups. Telomere length was determined by qPCR. Telomere length was similar in the 3 study groups but shorter in these groups compared to normal age-matched subjects that had been enrolled in a previous study from our group. These findings suggest that telomere shortening is an early event in CLL leukemogenesis.

  3. Immunomodulating effects of heparin on human B cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasik, Maria; Stepien-Sopniewska, Barbara; Gorski, Andrzej

    1993-01-01

    Recent data indicate that heparin may act as an immunomodulator. In this paper we have analyzed the effect of this agent on human B cell proliferation ''in vitro'' induced by ''S. aureus'' Cowan. The action of heparin is complex, but there was a trend for inhibition of B cell responses obtained from defibrinated but not heparinized blood samples. This suggest that heparin interacts with platelet products (growth factors, cytokines) and the results of such interactions determine the final effect. (author). 6 refs, 4 figs

  4. A method for the isolation and characterization of functional murine monoclonal antibodies by single B cell cloning.

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    Carbonetti, Sara; Oliver, Brian G; Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Sack, Brandon; Bergl, Emilee; Kappe, Stefan H I; Sather, D Noah

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibody technologies have enabled dramatic advances in immunology, the study of infectious disease, and modern medicine over the past 40years. However, many monoclonal antibody discovery procedures are labor- and time-intensive, low efficiency, and expensive. Here we describe an optimized mAb discovery platform for the rapid and efficient isolation, cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies in murine systems. In this platform, antigen-binding splenic B cells from immunized mice are isolated by FACS and cocultured with CD40L positive cells to induce proliferation and mAb production. After 12days of coculture, cell culture supernatants are screened for antigen, and IgG positivity and RNA is isolated for reverse-transcription. Positive-well cDNA is then amplified by PCR and the resulting amplicons can be cloned into ligation-independent expression vectors, which are then used directly to transfect HEK293 cells for recombinant antibody production. After 4days of growth, conditioned medium can be screened using biolayer interferometry for antigen binding and affinity measurements. Using this method, we were able to isolate six unique, functional monoclonal antibodies against an antigen of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Importantly, this method incorporates several important advances that circumvent the need for single-cell PCR, restriction cloning, and large scale protein production, and can be applied to a wide array of protein antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cloning of B cell-specific membrane tetraspanning molecule BTS possessing B cell proliferation-inhibitory function.

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    Suenaga, Tadahiro; Arase, Hisashi; Yamasaki, Sho; Kohno, Masayuki; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Hattori, Takamichi; Saito, Takashi

    2007-11-01

    Lymphocyte proliferation is regulated by signals through antigen receptors, co-stimulatory receptors, and other positive and negative modulators. Several membrane tetraspanning molecules are also involved in the regulation of lymphocyte growth and death. We cloned a new B cell-specific tetraspanning (BTS) membrane molecule, which is similar to CD20 in terms of expression, structure and function. BTS is specifically expressed in the B cell line and its expression is increased after the pre-B cell stage. BTS is expressed in intracellular granules and on the cell surface. Overexpression of BTS in immature B cell lines induces growth retardation through inhibition of cell cycle progression and cell size increase without inducing apoptosis. This inhibitory function is mediated predominantly by the N terminus of BTS. The development of mature B cells is inhibited in transgenic mice expressing BTS, suggesting that BTS is involved in the in vivo regulation of B cells. These results indicate that BTS plays a role in the regulation of cell division and B cell growth.

  6. Effects of anti-CD40 mAb on inducing malignant B cells proliferation arrest and apoptosis and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Lin; Zhuang Yumei; Zhou Zhaohua; Yu Gehua; Pan Jianzhong; Zhang Xueguang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the expression of CD 40 molecule and the biological effects mediated by CD 40 molecules on malignant B cells. Methods: Agonistic anti-human CD 40 monoclonal antibody (clone 5C11) was added to cell culture system. Cell counting, PI staining, Annexin-V staining and flow cytometric analysis were used to study the behavior of malignant B cell lines after treatment with mAb clone 5C11. Results: 5C11 induced homotypic aggregation and proliferation arrest and mediated apoptosis in multiple myeloma cell line XG2 that expressed CD 40 strongly; 5C11 induced B lymphoma cell line Daudi homotypic aggregation and proliferation arrest and apoptosis, the apoptosis of XG2 and Daudi by CD40 activation was not mediated by TNF. Conclusion: Agonistic anti-CD 40 mAb 5C11 can inhibit the proliferation of malignant B cells by inducing them to die apoplectically

  7. Differential Effects of Tacrolimus versus Sirolimus on the Proliferation, Activation and Differentiation of Human B Cells.

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    Opas Traitanon

    Full Text Available The direct effect of immunosuppressive drugs calcineurin inhibitor (Tacrolimus, TAC and mTOR inhibitor (Sirolimus, SRL on B cell activation, differentiation and proliferation is not well documented. Purified human B cells from healthy volunteers were stimulated through the B Cell Receptor with Anti-IgM + anti-CD40 + IL21 in the absence / presence of TAC or SRL. A variety of parameters of B cell activity including activation, differentiation, cytokine productions and proliferation were monitored by flow cytometry. SRL at clinically relevant concentrations (6 ng/ml profoundly inhibited CD19(+ B cell proliferation compared to controls whereas TAC at similar concentrations had a minimal effect. CD27(+ memory B cells were affected more by SRL than naïve CD27- B cells. SRL effectively blocked B cell differentiation into plasma cells (CD19(+CD138(+ and Blimp1(+/Pax5(low cells even at low dose (2 ng/ml, and totally eliminated them at 6 ng/ml. SRL decreased absolute B cell counts, but the residual responding cells acquired an activated phenotype (CD25(+/CD69(+ and increased the expression of HLA-DR. SRL-treated stimulated B cells on a per cell basis were able to enhance the proliferation of allogeneic CD4(+CD25(- T cells and induce a shift toward the Th1 phenotype. Thus, SRL and TAC have different effects on B lymphocytes. These data may provide insights into the clinical use of these two agents in recipients of solid organ transplants.

  8. Affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells for generation of phage display-derived human monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditzel, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A method is described for affinity isolation of antigen-specific circulating B cells of interest for subsequent generation of immune antibody phage display libraries. This approach should overcome the problem of low yields of monoclonal antibodies of interest in the libraries generated from...... peripheral blood lymphocytes caused by the low abundance of antigen-specific B cells in the circulation. The preselection of B cells is based on the specificity of the surface Ig receptor and is accomplished using the antigen of interest conjugated to magnetic beads. This method should significantly increase...... the frequency of antibody phage particles of interest in the library and allow for efficient isolation monoclonal antibodies with the predefined specificity....

  9. Mixed Lichenoid and Follicular T- and B-Cell Lymphoid Reaction to Red Tattoos With Monoclonal T Cells.

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    Zaaroura, Hiba; Bergman, Reuven

    2017-09-28

    Pseudolymphomatous reactions have been described to occur in tattoos. Most cases have exhibited T-cell predominance and polyclonal T-cell receptor gene rearrangements. One case with monoclonal IgH gene rearrangements progressed into B-cell lymphoma. Lichenoid infiltrates are commonly described but lymphoid follicles much less frequently. We report a case with mixed lichenoid and follicular T- and B-cell reaction to red tattoos. The histopathology and the immunohistochemical studies were constant with a mixed T- and B-cell pseudolymphoma, the IgH gene rearrangement study was polyclonal, but the T-cell receptor gene rearrangement study was monoclonal. The patient who responded to intralesional corticosteroid injections remains under close scrutiny.

  10. Generation and characterization of tabalumab, a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes both soluble and membrane-bound B-cell activating factor

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    Manetta J

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Manetta, Holly Bina, Paul Ryan, Niles Fox, Derrick R Witcher, Kristine Kikly Biotechnology Discovery Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, IN, USA Abstract: B-cell activating factor (BAFF is a B-cell survival factor with a key role in B-cell homeostasis and tolerance. Dysregulated BAFF expression may contribute to autoimmune diseases or B-cell malignancies via effects on abnormal B-lymphocyte activation, proliferation, survival, and immunoglobulin secretion. Monoclonal antibodies were generated against human BAFF, characterized for species specificity and affinity, and screened for the ability to neutralize both membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. In addition, studies were undertaken to determine the relative potency of membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Tabalumab has a high affinity for human, cynomolgus monkey, and rabbit BAFF. No binding to mouse BAFF was detected. Tabalumab was able to neutralize soluble human, cynomolgus monkey, or rabbit BAFF with equal potency. Our data demonstrate that membrane-bound BAFF can be a more potent stimulus for B-cells than soluble BAFF, and tabalumab also neutralized membrane-bound BAFF. Tabalumab prevented BAFF from binding to BAFF receptors and demonstrated pharmacodynamic effects in human BAFF transgenic mice. Tabalumab is a high-affinity human antibody with neutralizing activity against membrane-bound and soluble BAFF. Given our findings that membrane-bound BAFF can have greater in vitro potency than soluble BAFF, neutralization of both forms of BAFF is likely to be important for optimal therapeutic effect. Keywords: autoimmunity, B-cell malignancies, B-cell survival factor, BAFF

  11. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-10

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  12. No Evidence for JAK2(V617F) Mutation in Monoclonal B Cells in 2 Patients with Polycythaemia Vera and Concurrent Monoclonal B Cell Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stijnis, C.; Kroes, W. G. M.; Balkassmi, S.; Marijt, E. W. A.; van Rossum, A. P.; Bakker, E.; Vlasveld, L. T.

    2012-01-01

    Occurrence of Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (Ph- MPN) and lymphoproliferative disorders, like B cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL), in the same patient is rare. JAK2(V617F) mutation was recently introduced as a powerful diagnostic tool for Ph- MPN. JAK2(V617F)

  13. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiura, Yoshihito; Kotani, Norihiro; Yamashita, Ryusuke; Yamamoto, Harumi; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Honke, Koichi

    2010-01-01

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  14. Anomalous expression of Thy1 (CD90) in B-cell lymphoma cells and proliferation inhibition by anti-Thy1 antibody treatment

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    Ishiura, Yoshihito [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kotani, Norihiro, E-mail: kotani@kochi-u.ac.jp [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Yamashita, Ryusuke [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Yamamoto, Harumi [Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Kozutsumi, Yasunori [CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Shimo-Adachi, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Honke, Koichi [Department of Biochemistry, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kochi System Glycobiology Center, Kochi University Medical School, Kohasu, Okocho, Nankoku, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (Ab) rituximab is accepted to be an effective therapeutic Ab for malignant B-cell lymphoma; however, discovery of other cell surface antigens is required for the option of antibody medicine. Considering that many tumor-associated antigens are glycans, we have searched glycoconjugates for the candidate antigens that therapeutic Abs target. To this end, we first focused on the difference in the glycogenes expression in terms of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection of a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line, Akata. Using DNA array, flow cytometry and Western blotting, we found that Thy1 was highly expressed in EBV-positive Akata cells. Subsequently, Thy1 was found to be expressed in other B-cell lymphoma cell lines: BJAB, MutuI, and MutuIII, irrespective of EBV infection. Treatment of these cells with an anti-Thy1 monoclonal antibody inhibited proliferation more strongly than the therapeutic Ab rituximab. The B-cell lymphoma cell lines were classified based on the extent of the proliferation inhibition, which was not correlated with the expression level of Thy1. It is suggested that stable residence of receptor tyrosine kinases in lipid rafts sustains cell growth in B-cell lymphoma cells.

  15. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism.

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    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-03-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  16. B cell-targeted therapy with anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in a mouse model of Graves' hyperthyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, I; Abiru, N; Kobayashi, M; Nakahara, M; Ichikawa, T; Eguchi, K; Nagayama, Y

    2011-01-01

    Graves' disease is a B cell-mediated and T cell-dependent autoimmune disease of the thyroid which is characterized by overproduction of thyroid hormones and thyroid enlargement by agonistic anti-thyrotrophin receptor (TSHR) autoantibody. In addition to antibody secretion, B cells have recently been recognized to function as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of B cell depletion by anti-mouse (m) CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) on Graves' hyperthyroidism in a mouse model involving repeated injection of adenovirus expressing TSHR A-subunit (Ad-TSHR289). We observe that a single injection of 250 µg/mouse anti-mCD20 mAb eliminated B cells efficiently from the periphery and spleen and to a lesser extent from the peritoneum for more than 3 weeks. B cell depletion before immunization suppressed an increase in serum immunoglobulin (Ig)G levels, TSHR-specific splenocyte secretion of interferon (IFN)-γ, anti-TSHR antibody production and development of hyperthyroidism. B cell depletion 2 weeks after the first immunization, a time-point at which T cells were primed but antibody production was not observed, was still effective at inhibiting antibody production and disease development without inhibiting splenocyte secretion of IFN-γ. By contrast, B cell depletion in hyperthyroid mice was therapeutically ineffective. Together, these data demonstrate that B cells are critical not only as antibody-producing cells but also as antigen-presenting/immune-modulatory cells in the early phase of the induction of experimental Graves' hyperthyroidism and, although therapeutically less effective, B cell depletion is highly efficient for preventing disease development. PMID:21235532

  17. The MHV68 M2 protein drives IL-10 dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation.

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    Andrea M Siegel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 establishes long-term latency in memory B cells similar to the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein Barr Virus (EBV. EBV encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10 homolog and modulates cellular IL-10 expression; however, the role of IL-10 in the establishment and/or maintenance of chronic EBV infection remains unclear. Notably, MHV68 does not encode an IL-10 homolog, but virus infection has been shown to result in elevated serum IL-10 levels in wild-type mice, and IL-10 deficiency results in decreased establishment of virus latency. Here we show that a unique MHV68 latency-associated gene product, the M2 protein, is required for the elevated serum IL-10 levels observed at 2 weeks post-infection. Furthermore, M2 protein expression in primary murine B cells drives high level IL-10 expression along with increased secretion of IL-2, IL-6, and MIP-1alpha. M2 expression was also shown to significantly augment LPS driven survival and proliferation of primary murine B cells. The latter was dependent on IL-10 expression as demonstrated by the failure of IL10-/- B cells to proliferate in response to M2 protein expression and rescue of M2-associated proliferation by addition of recombinant murine IL-10. M2 protein expression in primary B cells also led to upregulated surface expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25 and the activation marker GL7, along with down-regulated surface expression of B220, MHC II, and sIgD. The cells retained CD19 and sIgG expression, suggesting differentiation to a pre-plasma memory B cell phenotype. These observations are consistent with previous analyses of M2-null MHV68 mutants that have suggested a role for the M2 protein in expansion and differentiation of MHV68 latently infected B cells-perhaps facilitating the establishment of virus latency in memory B cells. Thus, while the M2 protein is unique to MHV68, analysis of M2 function has revealed an important role for IL-10 in MHV68 pathogenesis

  18. The MHV68 M2 protein drives IL-10 dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Andrea M; Herskowitz, Jeremy H; Speck, Samuel H

    2008-04-04

    Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) establishes long-term latency in memory B cells similar to the human gammaherpesvirus Epstein Barr Virus (EBV). EBV encodes an interleukin-10 (IL-10) homolog and modulates cellular IL-10 expression; however, the role of IL-10 in the establishment and/or maintenance of chronic EBV infection remains unclear. Notably, MHV68 does not encode an IL-10 homolog, but virus infection has been shown to result in elevated serum IL-10 levels in wild-type mice, and IL-10 deficiency results in decreased establishment of virus latency. Here we show that a unique MHV68 latency-associated gene product, the M2 protein, is required for the elevated serum IL-10 levels observed at 2 weeks post-infection. Furthermore, M2 protein expression in primary murine B cells drives high level IL-10 expression along with increased secretion of IL-2, IL-6, and MIP-1alpha. M2 expression was also shown to significantly augment LPS driven survival and proliferation of primary murine B cells. The latter was dependent on IL-10 expression as demonstrated by the failure of IL10-/- B cells to proliferate in response to M2 protein expression and rescue of M2-associated proliferation by addition of recombinant murine IL-10. M2 protein expression in primary B cells also led to upregulated surface expression of the high affinity IL-2 receptor (CD25) and the activation marker GL7, along with down-regulated surface expression of B220, MHC II, and sIgD. The cells retained CD19 and sIgG expression, suggesting differentiation to a pre-plasma memory B cell phenotype. These observations are consistent with previous analyses of M2-null MHV68 mutants that have suggested a role for the M2 protein in expansion and differentiation of MHV68 latently infected B cells-perhaps facilitating the establishment of virus latency in memory B cells. Thus, while the M2 protein is unique to MHV68, analysis of M2 function has revealed an important role for IL-10 in MHV68 pathogenesis-identifying a

  19. Heterogeneity in both cytokine production and responsiveness of a panel of monoclonal human Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, G. J.; Klein, M. R.; Jordens, R.; Pascual-Salcedo, D.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; van Lier, R. A.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.

    1991-01-01

    To optimize growth and Ig production of in vitro-cultured Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B cells, a panel of six monoclonal EBV B-cell lines was analyzed for autocrine growth factor production and responsiveness to various cytokines. Three cell lines produced Il-I and four produced Il-6,

  20. Identification of one B-cell epitope from NS1 protein of duck Tembusu virus with monoclonal antibodies.

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    Jinfeng Ti

    Full Text Available This study describes the identification of one linear B-cell epitope on TMUV NS1 protein with monoclonal antibody (mAb 3G2 by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, NS1 protein was expressed in prokaryotic expression system and purified. One mAb against NS1 protein was generated from Balb/c mice immunized with recombinant protein NS1. A set of 35 partially-overlapping polypeptides covering the entire NS1 protein was expressed with PGEX-6P-1 vector and screened with mAb 3G2. One polypeptide against the mAb was acquired and identified by indirect ELISA and western-blot. To map the epitope accurately, one or two amino acid residues were removed from the carboxy and amino terminal of polypeptide sequentially. A series of truncated oligopeptides were expressed and purified. The minimal determinant of the linear B cell epitope was recognized and identified with mAb 3G2. The accurate linear B-cell epitope was 269DEKEIV274 located in NS1 protein. Furthermore, sequence alignment showed that the epitope was highly conserved and specific among TMUV strains and other flavivirus respectively. The linear B-cell epitope of TMUV NS1 protein could benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  1. Identification of a sub-population of B cells that proliferates after infection with epstein-barr virus

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    Ye Jianjiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-driven B cell proliferation is critical to its subsequent persistence in the host and is a key event in the development of EBV-associated B cell diseases. Thus, inquiry into early cellular events that precede EBV-driven proliferation of B cells is essential for understanding the processes that can lead to EBV-associated B cell diseases. Methods Infection with high titers of EBV of mixed, primary B cells in different stages of differentiation occurs during primary EBV infection and in the setting of T cell-immunocompromise that predisposes to development of EBV-lymphoproliferative diseases. Using an ex vivo system that recapitulates these conditions of infection, we correlated expression of selected B cell-surface markers and intracellular cytokines with expression of EBV latency genes and cell proliferation. Results We identified CD23, CD58, and IL6, as molecules expressed at early times after EBV-infection. EBV differentially infected B cells into two distinct sub-populations of latently infected CD23+ cells: one fraction, marked as CD23hiCD58+IL6- by day 3, subsequently proliferated; another fraction, marked as CD23loCD58+, expressed IL6, a B cell growth factor, but failed to proliferate. High levels of LMP1, a critical viral oncoprotein, were expressed in individual CD23hiCD58+ and CD23loCD58+ cells, demonstrating that reduced levels of LMP1 did not explain the lack of proliferation of CD23loCD58+ cells. Differentiation stage of B cells did not appear to govern this dichotomy in outcome either. Memory or naïve B cells did not exclusively give rise to either CD23hi or IL6-expressing cells; rather memory B cells gave rise to both sub-populations of cells. Conclusions B cells are differentially susceptible to EBV-mediated proliferation despite expression of viral gene products known to be critical for continuous B cell growth. Cellular events, in addition to viral gene expression, likely play a

  2. Production of mouse monoclonal antibody against Streptococcus dysgalactiae GapC protein and mapping its conserved B-cell epitope.

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    Zhang, Limeng; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Ziyao; Zhou, Xue; Yu, Liquan; Sun, Hunan; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Song, Baifen; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Zhu, Zhanbo; Cui, Yudong

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) GapC protein is a protective antigen that induces partial immunity against S. dysgalactiae infection in animals. To identify the conserved B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactiae GapC, a mouse monoclonal antibody 1E11 (mAb1E11) against GapC was generated and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12). Eleven positive clones recognized by mAb1E11 were identified, most of which matched the consensus motif TGFFAKK. Sequence of the motif exactly matched amino acids 97-103 of the S. dysgalactiae GapC. In addition, the epitope (97)TGFFAKK(103) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Site-directed mutagenic analysis further confirmed that residues G98, F99, F100 and K103 formed the core of (97)TGFFAKK(103), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1E11. Collectively, the identification of conserved B-cell epitope within S. dysgalactiae GapC highlights the possibility of developing the epitope-based vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Early depletion of proliferating B cells of germinal center in rapidly progressive simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiqiang; Casimiro, Danilo R.; Schleif, William A.; Chen, Minchun; Citron, Michael; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Burns, Janine; Liang, Xiaoping; Fu, Tong-Ming; Handt, Larry; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Lack of virus specific antibody response is commonly observed in both HIV-1-infected humans and SIV-infected monkeys with rapid disease progression. However, the mechanisms underlying this important observation still remain unclear. In a titration study of a SIVmac239 viral stock, three out of six animals with viral inoculation rapidly progressed to AIDS within 5 months. Unexpectedly, there was no obvious depletion of CD4 + T cells in both peripheral and lymph node (LN) compartments in these animals. Instead, progressive depletion of proliferating B cells and disruption of the follicular dendritic cell (FDC) network in germinal centers (GC) was evident in the samples collected at as early as 20 days after viral challenge. This coincided with undetectable, or weak and transient, virus-specific antibody responses over the course of infection. In situ hybridization of SIV RNA in the LN samples revealed a high frequency of SIV productively infected cells and large amounts of accumulated viral RNA in the GCs in these animals. Early severe depletion of GC proliferating B cells and disruption of the FDC network may thus result in an inability to mount a virus-specific antibody response in rapid progressors, which has been shown to contribute to accelerated disease progression of SIV infection

  4. Interaction of the B cell-specific transcriptional coactivator OCA-B and galectin-1 and a possible role in regulating BCR-mediated B cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Siegel, Rachael; Roeder, Robert G

    2006-06-02

    OCA-B is a B cell-specific transcriptional coactivator for OCT factors during the activation of immunoglobulin genes. In addition, OCA-B is crucial for B cell activation and germinal center formation. However, the molecular mechanisms for OCA-B function in these processes are not clear. Our previous studies documented two OCA-B isoforms and suggested a novel mechanism for the function of the myristoylated, membrane-bound form of OCA-B/p35 as a signaling molecule. Here, we report the identification of galectin-1, and related galectins, as a novel OCA-B-interacting protein. The interaction of OCA-B and galectin-1 can be detected both in vivo and in vitro. The galectin-1 binding domain in OCA-B has been localized to the N terminus of OCA-B. In B cells lacking OCA-B expression, increased galectin-1 expression, secretion, and cell surface association are observed. Consistent with these observations, and a reported inhibitory interaction of galectin-1 with CD45, the phosphatase activity of CD45 is reduced modestly, but significantly, in OCA-B-deficient B cells. Finally, galectin-1 is shown to negatively regulate B cell proliferation and tyrosine phosphorylation upon BCR stimulation. Together, these results raise the possibility that OCA-B may regulate BCR signaling through an association with galectin-1.

  5. Plant Hsp90 Proteins Interact with B-Cells and Stimulate Their Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corigliano, Mariana G.; Maglioco, Andrea; Laguía Becher, Melina; Goldman, Alejandra; Martín, Valentina; Angel, Sergio O.; Clemente, Marina

    2011-01-01

    Background The molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) plays an important role in folding stabilization and activation of client proteins. Besides, Hsp90 of mammals and mammalian pathogens displays immunostimulatory properties. Here, we investigated the role of plant-derived Hsp90s as B-cell mitogens by measuring their proliferative responses in vitro. Methodology Plant cytosolic Hsp90 isoforms from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtHsp81.2) and Nicotiana benthamiana (NbHsp90.3) were expressed in E. coli. Over-expression of recombinant plant Hsp90s (rpHsp90s) was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blot using and anti-AtHsp81.2 polyclonal anti-body. Both recombinant proteins were purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and their identity confirmed by MALDI-TOF-TOF. Recombinant AtHsp81.2 and NbHsp90.3 proteins induced prominent proliferative responses in spleen cells form BALB/c mice. Polymyxin-B, a potent inhibitor of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), did not eliminate the rpHsp90-induced proliferation. In addition, in vitro incubation of spleen cells with rpHsp90 led to the expansion of CD19-bearing populations, suggesting a direct effect of these proteins on B lymphocytes. This effect was confirmed by immunofluorescence analysis, where a direct binding of rpHsp90 to B- but not to T-cells was observed in cells from BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice. Finally, we examined the involvement of Toll Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) molecules in the rpHsp90s induction of B-cell proliferation. Spleen cells from C3H/HeJ mice, which carry a point mutation in the cytoplasmic region of TLR4, responded poorly to prAtHsp90. However, the interaction between rpHsp90 and B-cells from C3H/HeJ mice was not altered, suggesting that the mutation on TLR4 would be affecting the signal cascade but not the rpHsp90-TLR4 receptor interaction. Conclusions Our results show for the first time that spleen cell proliferation can be stimulated by a non-pathogen-derived Hsp90. Furthermore, our data provide a new example of

  6. APS, an adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains, has a negative regulatory role in B cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseki, Masanori; Kubo-Akashi, Chiyomi; Kwon, Sang-Mo; Yamaguchi, Akiko; Takatsu, Kiyoshi; Takaki, Satoshi

    2005-01-01

    Adaptor molecule containing PH and SH2 domains (APS) is an intracellular adaptor protein that forms part of an adaptor family along with Lnk and SH2-B. APS transcripts are expressed in various tissues including brain, kidney, and muscle, as well as in splenic B cells but not in T cells. We investigated the functions of APS in B cell development and activation by generating APS-transgenic (APS-Tg) mice that overexpressed APS in lymphocytes. The number of B-1 cells in the peritoneal cavity was reduced in APS-Tg mice, as were B-2 cells in the spleen. B cell development in the bone marrow was partially impaired at the transition stage from proliferating large pre-B to small pre-B cells. B cell proliferation induced by B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking but not by other B cell mitogens was also impaired in APS-Tg mice. APS co-localized with BCR complexes and filamentous actin in activated APS-Tg B cells. Thus, APS appears to play novel negative regulatory roles in BCR signaling, actin reorganization pathways, and control of compartment sizes of B-lineage cells

  7. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine.We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity.This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  8. Specific blockade by CD54 and MHC II of CD40-mediated signaling for B cell proliferation and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doyle, I S; Hollmann, C A; Crispe, I N

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of B lymphocyte proliferation is critical to maintenance of self-tolerance, and intercellular interactions are likely to signal such regulation. Here, we show that coligation of either the adhesion molecule ICAM-1/CD54 or MHC II with CD40 inhibited cell cycle progression and promoted...... these effects. Addition of BCR or IL-4 signals did not overcome the effect of ICAM-1 or MHC II on CD40-induced proliferation. FasL expression was not detected in B cell populations. These results show that MHC II and ICAM-1 specifically modulate CD40-mediated signaling, so inhibiting proliferation...

  9. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dale O Starkie

    Full Text Available Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive. These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking

  10. Homeostatic 'bystander' proliferation of human peripheral blood B cells in response to polyclonal T-cell stimulation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiulewicz, Aleksandra; Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Pietruczuk, Krzysztof; Frąckowiak, Joanna; Fulop, Tamas; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2015-11-01

    The mechanisms of maintenance of adequate numbers of B lymphocytes and of protective levels of immunoglobulins in the absence of antigenic (re)stimulation remain not fully understood. Meanwhile, our results presented here show that both peripheral blood naive and memory B cells can be activated strongly and non-specifically (in a mitogen-like fashion) in 5-day in vitro cultures of anti-CD3- or concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells of healthy people. This polyclonal, bystander activation of the B cells includes multiple divisions of most of them (assessed here by the flow cytometric technique of dividing cell tracking) and significant antibody [immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG] secretion. Observed proliferation of the CD19(+) B cells depends on contact with stimulated T helper (Th) cells (via CD40-CD40L interaction) and on the response of B cells to secreted interleukins IL-5, IL-10 and IL-4, and is correlated with the levels of these Th-derived molecules, while it does not involve the ligation of the BCR/CD19 complex. We suggest that the effect might reflect the situation occurring in vivo as the homeostatic proliferation of otherwise non-stimulated, peripheral B lymphocytes, providing an always ready pool for efficient antibody production to any new (or cognate) antigen challenge. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A novel monoclonal antibody, C41, reveals IL-13Ralpha1 expression by murine germinal center B cells and follicular dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poudrier, J; Graber, P; Herren, S; Berney, C; Gretener, D; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    2000-11-01

    Responsiveness to IL-13 involves at least two chains, IL-4Ralpha and IL-13Ralpha1. Although mouse B cells express IL-4Ralpha, little is known about their expression of IL-13Ralpha chains. To investigate this topic further, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (C41) specific for murine IL-13Ralpha1. Using C41, IL-13Ralpha1 expression was detected on germinal center (GC) B cells by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. In addition, IL-13Ralpha1 was observed on follicular dendritic cells, but not interdigitating dendritic cells in the T cell areas. Furthermore, resting B cells also expressed IL-13Ralpha1, and in the presence of IL-13 produced increased amounts of IgM in response to in vitro CD40 stimulation. However, C41 was unable to neutralize this bioactivity. The distribution of IL-13Ralpha1 on murine B cells and during GC reactions suggests a role for IL-13 during B cell differentiation.

  12. IL-15 inhibits pre-B cell proliferation by selectively expanding Mac-1+B220+ NK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Shinsuke; Hida, Shigeaki; Taki, Shinsuke

    2008-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the cells critical for inhibition of repopulation of allogenic bone marrow cells. However, it is not well known if NK cells affect autologous lymphopoiesis. Here, we observed that NK cells could inhibit pre-B cell proliferation in vitro driven by interleukin (IL)-7 in a manner dependent on IL-15. Interestingly, the great majority of expanding NK cells were Mac-1 + B220 + , a recently identified potent interferon (IFN)-γ producer. Indeed, IFN-γ was produced in those cultures, and pre-B cells lacking IFN-γ receptors, but not those lacking type I IFN receptors, were resistant to such an inhibition. Furthermore, even NK cells from mice lacking β2-microglobulin, which were known to be functionally dampened, inhibited pre-B cell proliferation as well. Thus, activated NK cells, which were expanded selectively by IL-15, could potentially regulate B lymphopoiesis through IFN-γ beyond the selection imposed upon self-recognition

  13. Inhibition of B cell proliferation by antisense DNA to both alpha and beta forms of Fc epsilon R II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatti, L; Behle, K; Stevens, R H

    1992-10-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection activates B lymphocyte proliferation through partially understood mechanisms, resulting in phenotypic changes, including the appearance of new antigens. One such antigen is Fc epsilon R II/CD-23 which may be relevant for B cell proliferation. We have used anti-sense oligonucleotides to study the importance of the two forms of this molecule for proliferation in the EBV-transformed, Fc epsilon R II +ve lymphoblastoid B cell line, RPMI 8866. Anti-sense oligodeoxynucleotides were generated to the two forms of Fc epsilon R II; Fc epsilon R IIa (alpha) and IIb (beta) which differ only in their intracytoplasmic domains. Addition of increasing concentrations of anti-sense oligonucleotides, ranging from 1 to 30 microM, significantly decreased cellular proliferation as measured by the incorporation of [3H]thymidine (inhibition range 8-88%). Optimum inhibition of cellular proliferation was apparent at 15 microM concentration of both anti-sense Fc epsilon R IIa and IIb (Fc epsilon R IIa, mean +/- SE = 75 +/- 7% inhibition, p less than 0.001; Fc epsilon R IIb, mean +/- SE = 71 +/- 7% inhibition, p less than 0.001). Anti-sense oligonucleotides complementary to the common part of Fc epsilon R II resulted in a similar inhibition of proliferation. Sense oligonucleotides did not induce significant inhibition. Preincubation of sense and anti-sense oligonucleotides resulted in an abrogation of proliferation inhibition. Moreover, none of these oligonucleotides had any effect on a Fc epsilon R II -ve cell line. Incubation with both anti-sense IIa and IIb resulted in additive, but not synergistic inhibition of proliferation. Addition of soluble Fc epsilon R II did not reverse inhibition of proliferation, suggesting that membrane-bound or intracellular rather than soluble Fc epsilon R II was important for the induced proliferation. Analysis of cell surface expression for Fc epsilon II indicated that while there was a pronounced effect on cell number

  14. A human monoclonal antibody drug and target discovery platform for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and phage display

    OpenAIRE

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Suschak, Jessica M.; Samija, Ivan; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Childs, Richard W.; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Bishop, Michael R.; Rader, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only potentially curative treatment available for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Here, we show that post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires can be mined for the discovery of fully human monoclonal antibodies to B-CLL cell-surface antigens. Sera collected from B-CLL patients at defined times after alloHSCT showed selective binding to primary B-CLL cells. Pre-alloHSCT sera, donor sera, and control sera w...

  15. Effect of bovine pellucid zone 3 monoclonal antibodies on B cell lymphoma 2 expressions of granulosa cell and mice (Mus musculus follicle diameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heti Ira Ayue

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effects of pellucid zone 3 monoclonal antibodies against B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL-2 expression and mice follicle diameter at various time periods.Methods: The animal model of this study was 36 Balb/c mice (Mus musculus. A true experimental design was used with a post-test only control group approach. BCL-2 expression was observed using immunohistochemistry, while the follicle diameter was observed by haematoxylin-eosin staining. The data was analyzed using nested ANOVA to compare the results of the mean expression of BCL-2 on the 5th and 20th day of observation in the pre-antral and antral follicle between the control and treatment groups.Results: No significant differences were found in BCL-2 gene expression. There were also no significant differences in BCL-2 expression on the 10th day of pre-antral follicle analysis. Moreover, there were no significant differences between the mean follicle diameter on the 5th, 10th, and 20th day of pre-antral and antral follicle development between the control and treatment groups. The addition of bovine pellucid zone 3 (bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 5th and 20th day of observation did not decrease the expression of BCL-2 gene in the pre-antral and antral follicle of mice. Administering bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 10th day of observation did not affect BCL-2 expression in the pre-antral follicle but did decrease BCL-2 expression in the antral follicle. Supplying bZP3 monoclonal antibodies on the 5th, 10th and 20th day did not affect the diameter of pre-antral and antral follicles of the mice.Conclusion: The monoclonal antibodies bovine zona pelusida 3 has the potential to be developed as a safe immunocontraception preparation.

  16. Polyclonal activation of rat B cells. I. A single mitogenic signal can stimulate proliferation, but three signals are required for differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stunz, L.L.; Feldbush, T.L.

    1986-01-01

    A water-soluble, proteinaceous preparation derived from the cell walls of Salmonella typhimurium Re mutants has recently been tested in this laboratory for its ability to act as a mitogen for rat lymphocytes. This preparation (STM) has been found to be a potent simulator of B lymphocyte proliferation, as measured both by 3 H-TdR incorporation and by cell cycle analysis performed with flow cytofluorometry. STM stimulates approximately 50% of rat B cells to enter cycle. Previous investigations by others have shown that at least two sets of signals are required for B cell differentiation; (a) proliferation signals that may consist of both a stimulator of B cell conversion from G 0 to G 1 and growth factors, and (b) differentiation signals that probably include at least two B cell differentiation factors (BCDF). When STM was tested in a differentiation system it did not drive purified B cells to differentiate to PFC, either alone or when supplemented with a supernatant from concanavalin A-stimulated spleen cells (CAS). However, when both CAS and dextran sulfate (DXS) were supplied to the STM-stimulated cells, a large number of PFC resulted. DXT does not act by stimulating an additional, CAS-responsive B cell subset, since it has only a marginal effect upon 3 H-TdR uptake and does not increase the number of B cells in cycle when used together with STM. The authors that the two agents may be acting sequentially: STM stimulates the B cells to proliferate, and DXS drives the proliferating cells to become responsive to CAS. This suggests that the signals for B cell differentiation must consist of at least three activities: a trigger to stimulate the cells to proliferate, a factor to drive the cells to a BCDF-responsive state, and a BCDF that can drive the cells to secrete antibody

  17. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seong-Su, E-mail: seong-su-han@uiowa.edu [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Han, Sangwoo [Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kamberos, Natalie L. [Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA (United States)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL.

  18. Piperlongumine inhibits the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines irrespective of glucocorticoid resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Seong-Su; Han, Sangwoo; Kamberos, Natalie L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • PL inhibits the proliferation of B-ALL cell lines irrespective of GC-resistance. • PL selectively kills B-ALL cells by increasing ROS, but not normal counterpart. • PL does not sensitize majority of B-ALL cells to DEX. • PL represses the network of constitutively activated TFs and modulates their target genes. • PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for GC-resistant B-ALL. - Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), a pepper plant alkaloid from Piper longum, has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. PL selectively kills both solid and hematologic cancer cells, but not normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the effect of PL on the proliferation and survival of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), including glucocorticoid (GC)-resistant B-ALL. Regardless of GC-resistance, PL inhibited the proliferation of all B-ALL cell lines, but not normal B cells, in a dose- and time-dependent manner and induced apoptosis via elevation of ROS. Interestingly, PL did not sensitize most of B-ALL cell lines to dexamethasone (DEX). Only UoC-B1 exhibited a weak synergistic effect between PL and DEX. All B-ALL cell lines tested exhibited constitutive activation of multiple transcription factors (TFs), including AP-1, MYC, NF-κB, SP1, STAT1, STAT3, STAT6 and YY1. Treatment of the B-ALL cells with PL significantly downregulated these TFs and modulated their target genes. While activation of AURKB, BIRC5, E2F1, and MYB mRNA levels were significantly downregulated by PL, but SOX4 and XBP levels were increased by PL. Intriguingly, PL also increased the expression of p21 in B-ALL cells through a p53-independent mechanism. Given that these TFs and their target genes play critical roles in a variety of hematological malignancies, our findings provide a strong preclinical rationale for considering PL as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, including B-ALL and GC-resistant B-ALL

  19. EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.Y. Ok (Chi Young); T.G. Papathomas (Thomas); L.J. Medeiros (L. Jeffrey); K.H. Young (Ken)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEpstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the elderly, initially described in 2003, is a provisional entity in the 2008World Health Organization classification system and is defined as an EBV-positive monoclonal large B-cell proliferation that occurs in

  20. The ibrutinib B-cell proliferation inhibition is potentiated in vitro by dexamethasone: Application to chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Delphine; Catallo, Régine; Chebel, Amel; Baseggio, Lucile; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Roualdes, Olivier; Magaud, Jean-Pierre; Salles, Gilles; Ffrench, Martine

    2016-08-01

    New B-cell receptor-targeted therapies such as ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, are now proposed for lymphoid pathologies. The putative benefits of its combination with glucocorticoids were evaluated here. We compared the effects of dexamethasone (DXM), ibrutinib and their in vitro combination on proliferation and metabolic stress markers in stimulated normal B-lymphocytes and in malignant lymphocytes from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients. In both cellular models, cell cycle progression was globally inhibited by DXM and/or ibrutinib. This inhibition was significantly amplified by DXM addition to ibrutinib and was related to a significant decrease in the expression of the cell cycle regulatory proteins CDK4 and cyclin E. Apoptosis increased especially with DXM/ibrutinib combination and was associated with a significant decrease in Mcl-1 expression. Treatment effects on metabolic stress were evaluated by DNA damage recognition after 53BP1 foci labeling. The percentage of cells with more than five 53BP1 foci decreased significantly with ibrutinib in normal and CLL lymphocytes. This decrease was strongly reinforced, in CLL, by DXM addition. Our data indicated that, in vitro, DXM potentiated antiproliferative effects of ibrutinib and decreased DNA damage in lymphoid B-cells. Thus their combination may be proposed for CLL treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A human monoclonal antibody drug and target discovery platform for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia based on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and phage display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskar, Sivasubramanian; Suschak, Jessica M; Samija, Ivan; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Childs, Richard W; Pavletic, Steven Z; Bishop, Michael R; Rader, Christoph

    2009-11-12

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) is the only potentially curative treatment available for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). Here, we show that post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires can be mined for the discovery of fully human monoclonal antibodies to B-CLL cell-surface antigens. Sera collected from B-CLL patients at defined times after alloHSCT showed selective binding to primary B-CLL cells. Pre-alloHSCT sera, donor sera, and control sera were negative. To identify post-alloHSCT serum antibodies and subsequently B-CLL cell-surface antigens they recognize, we generated a human antibody-binding fragment (Fab) library from post-alloHSCT peripheral blood mononuclear cells and selected it on primary B-CLL cells by phage display. A panel of Fab with B-CLL cell-surface reactivity was strongly enriched. Selection was dominated by highly homologous Fab predicted to bind the same antigen. One Fab was converted to immunoglobulin G1 and analyzed for reactivity with peripheral blood mononuclear cells from B-CLL patients and healthy volunteers. Cell-surface antigen expression was restricted to primary B cells and up-regulated in primary B-CLL cells. Mining post-alloHSCT antibody repertoires offers a novel route to discover fully human monoclonal antibodies and identify antigens of potential therapeutic relevance to B-CLL and possibly other cancers. Trials described herein were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as nos. NCT00055744 and NCT00003838.

  2. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  3. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Weibin; Chen, Aizhong; Miao, Yi; Xia, Shengli; Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan; Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling; Shu, Yuelong; Ma, Xiaowei; Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin; Lin, Xiaojun; Bian, Chao; Sun, Bing

    2013-01-01

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  4. Immunoreactivity, stability, pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of a monoclonal antibody to human leukemic B cells after three different methods of radioiodination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhenping Zhu; Ghose, T.; Kralovec, Y.; Chunzheng Yang

    1994-01-01

    Dal B02, a murine monoclonal antibody against human chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was radioiodinated using chloramine T (Chl.T), Bolton-Hunter (B-H) or N-succinimidyl-p-iodobenzoate (PIB). The preparations had comparable radiochemical purity (>97%) and immunoreactive fraction (65-80%) but the Chl.T-based product was most susceptible to deiodination and loss of immunoreactivity. After i.v. injection into CLL-xenografted nude mice, the preparations had identical patterns of clearance from the blood but the PIB-based product led to more radioactivity in liver and spleen and less in the thyroid compared to the other preparations. The Chl.T-based product showed loss of immunoreactivity in circulation and less tumor-localized radioactivity 168 h after administration. The differences between the B-H-based and PIB-based products were less impressive than between PIB-based and Chl.T-based products. (author)

  5. Human lymphoma mutations reveal CARD11 as the switch between self-antigen–induced B cell death or proliferation and autoantibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeelall, Yogesh S.; Wang, James Q.; Law, Hsei-Di; Domaschenz, Heather; Fung, Herman K.H.; Kallies, Axel; Nutt, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Self-tolerance and immunity are actively acquired in parallel through a poorly understood ability of antigen receptors to switch between signaling death or proliferation of antigen-binding lymphocytes in different contexts. It is not known whether this tolerance-immunity switch requires global rewiring of the signaling apparatus or if it can arise from a single molecular change. By introducing individual CARD11 mutations found in human lymphomas into antigen-activated mature B lymphocytes in mice, we find here that lymphoma-derived CARD11 mutations switch the effect of self-antigen from inducing B cell death into T cell–independent proliferation, Blimp1-mediated plasmablast differentiation, and autoantibody secretion. Our findings demonstrate that regulation of CARD11 signaling is a critical switch governing the decision between death and proliferation in antigen-stimulated mature B cells and that mutations in this switch represent a powerful initiator for aberrant B cell responses in vivo. PMID:23027925

  6. Expression of TRIM28 correlates with proliferation and Bortezomib-induced apoptosis in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei-Pei; Ding, Da-Zhi; Shi, Bing; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Gu, Ling-Li; Wang, Yu-Chan; Cheng, Chun

    2018-03-23

    Tripartite motif containing 28 (TRIM28) as a transcriptional co-repressor has been reported playing a role in regulating DNA damage response (DDR), cell differentiation, immune response, and tumorigenesis. The present study was performed to explore the biological function and clinical significance of TRIM28 in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). Results of the study displayed that high expression of TRIM28 was positively associated with the poorer survival of B-NHL patients as an independent prognostic factor. In addition, TRIM28 could promote the B-NHL cells proliferation through modulating cell cycle progression. The change of cyclinA, P21, and PCNA expression after TRIM28 expression modified further illustrated the mechanism in which TRIM28 participated in cell proliferation progression. Moreover, inhibition TRIM28 expression in B-NHL cells enhanced the sensibility to Bortezomib by regulating p53-mediated apoptosis pathway. Taken together, the present study showed that TRIM28 functions as a tumor promoter in B-NHL and may be a novel target for drug resistance to Bortezomib.

  7. Identification of a novel canine distemper virus B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against nucleocapsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cheng, Yuening; Zhang, Miao; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Wang, Jianke; Zhao, Hang; Lin, Peng; Cheng, Shipeng

    2016-02-02

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a member of the genus Morbillivirus within the family Paramyxoviridae and has caused severe economic losses in China. Nucleocapsid protein (N) is the major structural viral protein and can be used to diagnose CDV and other morbilliviruses. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, 1N8, was produced against the CDV N protein (amino acids 277-471). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. The results indicated that (350)LNFGRSYFDPA(360) was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb 1N8. ELISA assays revealed that mouse anti-CDV sera could also recognize the minimal linear epitope. Alignment analysis of the amino acid sequences indicated that the epitope was highly conserved among CDV strains. Furthermore, the epitope was conserved among other morbilliviruses, which was confirmed with PRRV using western blotting. Taken together, the results of this study may have potential applications in the development of suitable diagnostic techniques for CDV or other morbilliviruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A noncognate interaction with anti-receptor antibody-activated helper T cells induces small resting murine B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1988-01-01

    on resting B cells (even in the presence of intact F23.1 antibody), but could induce antibody secretion by anti-Ig-preactivated B cells. Both F23.1+ clones (E9.D4 and 4.35F2) and one F23.1- clone (D2.2) could synergize with supernatants from activated E9.D4 T cells to induce B cell activation. F(ab')2......Culture of small resting allogeneic B cells (of an irrelevant haplotype) with two clones of T helper (Th) cells that were activated by the F23.1 anti-T cell receptor antibody led to the activation of B cells to proliferate and to secrete antibody. Th cell supernatants by themselves had no effect...... fragments of F23.1 induced E9.D4 to activate B cells as efficiently as intact F23.1 and B cell populations that had been incubated with F23.1 were not activated when cultured with E9.D4, although T cells recognized cell-presented F23.1 and were weakly activated. Reduction of the density of F23.1 adsorbed...

  9. miRNA analysis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia : proliferation centres characterized by low miR-150 and high BIC/milk-155 expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.; Tan, L. P.; Dijkstra, M. K.; van Lom, K.; Robertus, J-L; Harms, G.; Blokzijl, T.; Kooistra, K.; van t'Veer, M. B.; Rosati, S.; Visser, L.; Jongen-Lavrencic, M.; Kluin, P. M.; van den Berg, Anke

    Several miRNAs have been reported to be associated with immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) mutation and ZAP-70 expression status in blood samples of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (B-CLL/SLL). In the bone marrow and lymphoid tissues, proliferation centres (PCs)

  10. Phosphodiesterase profile of human B lymphocytes from normal and atopic donors and the effects of PDE inhibition on B cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantner, Florian; Götz, Christine; Gekeler, Volker; Schudt, Christian; Wendel, Albrecht; Hatzelmann, Armin

    1998-01-01

    CD19+ B lymphocytes were purified from the peripheral blood of normal and atopic subjects to analyse and compare the phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity profile, PDE mRNA expression and the importance of PDE activity for the regulation of B cell function.The majority of cyclic AMP hydrolyzing activity of human B cells was cytosolic PDE4, followed by cytosolic PDE7-like activity; marginal PDE3 activity was found only in the particulate B cell fraction. PDE1, PDE2 and PDE5 activities were not detected.By cDNA-PCR analysis mRNA of the PDE4 subtypes A, B (splice variant PDE4B2) and D were detected. In addition, a weak signal for PDE3A was found.No differences in PDE activities or mRNA expression of PDE subtypes were found in B cells from either normal or atopic subjects.Stimulation of B lymphocytes with the polyclonal stimulus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced a proliferative response in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, which was increased in the presence of interleukin-4 (IL-4). PDE4 inhibitors (rolipram, piclamilast) led to an increase in the cellular cyclic AMP concentration and to an augmentation of proliferation, whereas a PDE3 inhibitor (motapizone) was ineffective, which is in accordance with the PDE profile found. The proliferation enhancing effect of the PDE4 inhibitors was partly mimicked by the cyclic AMP analogues dibutyryl (db) cyclic AMP and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp-isomer (dcl-cBIMPS), respectively. However, at concentrations exceeding 100 μM db-cyclic AMP suppressed B lymphocyte proliferation, probably as a result of cytotoxicity. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, 1 μM) and forskolin (10 μM) did not affect B cell proliferation, even when given in combination with rolipram.Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) by differentially acting selective inhibitors (KT 5720, Rp-8-Br-cyclic AMPS) decreased the proliferative response of control cells and reversed the proliferation enhancing effects

  11. Quantitation of multiple myeloma oncogene 1/interferon-regulatory factor 4 gene expression in malignant B-cell proliferations and normal leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M; Asanuma, K; Kobayashi, D; Moriai, R; Yajima, T; Yagihashi, A; Yamamori, S; Watanabe, N

    2001-01-01

    We studied multiple myeloma oncogene 1/interferon-regulatory factor 4 (MUM1/IRF4) mRNA expression in various malignant human hematopoietic cell lines and normal leukocyte fractions. A quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to assess expression and chromosomes were examined for anomalies by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Among 12 cell lines examined, mRNA transcripts were expressed only in B-lymphoblastic and myeloma cell lines. Myeloma cells and malignant cell lines derived from mature B cells expressed more transcript than cell lines derived from immature B cells. Transcript levels, however, showed no association with chromosomal translocations. Expression in B-cell fractions from healthy donors was much less than in the malignant cells. In addition, MUM1/IRF4 mRNA expressed in samples from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia derived from B cells but not T cells. Our results suggested that MUM1/IRF4 gene expression is related to stage of differentiation of malignant B cells and they indicated the possibility that the quantitative analysis of MUM1/IRF4 gene is a useful tool for detection of malignant B-cell proliferations in clinical laboratory tests.

  12. Effects of Monoclonal Antibody Cetuximab on Proliferation of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen CHEN

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab has been used widely in non-small cell lung cancer patients. The aim of this study is to explore the effect of lung cancer cells (A549, H460, H1299, SPC-A-1 which were treated by cetuximab in vitro. Methods We studied the effects of increasing concentrations of cetuximab (1 nmol/L-625 nmol/L in four human lung cancer cell lines (A549, SPC-A-1, H460, H1229. CCK8 measured the inhibition of cell proliferation in each group. A549, SPC-A-1 were marked by PI and the statuses of apoptosis were observed. Western blot were used to detect the proliferation-related signaling protein and apoptosis-related protein in A549. Results The treatment with cetuximab resulted in the effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis in a time- and dosedependent manner. The expression of activated key enzymes (p-AKT, p-EGFR, p-MAPK in EGFR signaling transduction pathway were down-regulated more obviously. Conclusion Cetuximab is an effective targeted drug in the treatment of lung cancer cell lines, tissues, most likely to contribute to the inhibition of key enzymes in EGFR signaling transduction pathway.

  13. The truncate mutation of Notch2 enhances cell proliferation through activating the NF-κB signal pathway in the diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxia Zhang

    Full Text Available The Notch2 is a critical membrane receptor for B-cell functions, and also displays various biological roles in lymphoma pathogenesis. In this article, we reported that 3 of 69 (4.3% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs exhibited a truncate NOTCH2 mutation at the nucleotide 7605 (G/A in the cDNA sequence, which led to partial deletion of the C-terminal of PEST (proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain. The truncate Notch2 activated both the Notch2 and the NF-κB signals and promoted the proliferation of B-cell lymphoma cell lines, including DLBCL and Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines. Moreover, the ectopic proliferation was completely inhibited by ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate (PDTC, an NF-κB inhibitor. Simultaneously, PDTC also reduced the expression level of Notch2. Based on these results, we conclude that the Notch2 receptor with PEST domain truncation enhances cell proliferation which may be associated with the activation of the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling. Our results are expected to provide a possible target for new DLBCL therapies by suppressing the Notch2 and the NF-κB signaling.

  14. B-Cell Hematologic Malignancy Vaccination Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-29

    Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance; Multiple Myeloma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Lymphocytosis; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Hematological Malignancies

  15. Distinction between asymptomatic monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with cyclin D1 overexpression and mantle cell lymphoma: from molecular profiling to flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinet, Blanca; Ferrer, Ana; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Nonell, Lara; Salar, Antonio; Fernández-Rodríguez, Concepción; Puigdecanet, Eulàlia; Gimeno, Javier; Garcia-Garcia, Mar; Vela, Maria Carmen; Luño, Elisa; Collado, Rosa; Navarro, José Tomás; de la Banda, Esmeralda; Abrisqueta, Pau; Arenillas, Leonor; Serrano, Cristina; Lloreta, Josep; Miñana, Belén; Cerutti, Andrea; Florensa, Lourdes; Orfao, Alberto; Sanz, Ferran; Solé, Francesc; Dominguez-Sola, David; Serrano, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    According to current diagnostic criteria, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) encompasses the usual, aggressive variants and rare, nonnodal cases with monoclonal asymptomatic lymphocytosis, cyclin D1-positive (MALD1). We aimed to understand the biology behind this clinical heterogeneity and to identify markers for adequate identification of MALD1 cases. We compared 17 typical MCL cases with a homogeneous group of 13 untreated MALD1 cases (median follow-up, 71 months). We conducted gene expression profiling with functional analysis in five MCL and five MALD1. Results were validated in 12 MCL and 8 MALD1 additional cases by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in 24 MCL and 13 MALD1 cases by flow cytometry. Classification and regression trees strategy was used to generate an algorithm based on CD38 and CD200 expression by flow cytometry. We found 171 differentially expressed genes with enrichment of neoplastic behavior and cell proliferation signatures in MCL. Conversely, MALD1 was enriched in gene sets related to immune activation and inflammatory responses. CD38 and CD200 were differentially expressed between MCL and MALD1 and confirmed by flow cytometry (median CD38, 89% vs. 14%; median CD200, 0% vs. 24%, respectively). Assessment of both proteins allowed classifying 85% (11 of 13) of MALD1 cases whereas 15% remained unclassified. SOX11 expression by qRT-PCR was significantly different between MCL and MALD1 groups but did not improve the classification. We show for the first time that MALD1, in contrast to MCL, is characterized by immune activation and driven by inflammatory cues. Assessment of CD38/CD200 by flow cytometry is useful to distinguish most cases of MALD1 from MCL in the clinical setting. MALD1 should be identified and segregated from the current MCL category to avoid overdiagnosis and unnecessary treatment. ©2013 AACR

  16. The bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib (PCI-32765) blocks hairy cell leukaemia survival, proliferation and B cell receptor signalling: a new therapeutic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivina, Mariela; Kreitman, Robert J; Arons, Evgeny; Ravandi, Farhad; Burger, Jan A

    2014-07-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling plays a critical role in the progression of several B-cell malignancies, but its role in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL) is ambiguous. Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK), a key player in BCR signalling, as well as B cell migration and adhesion, can be targeted with ibrutinib, a selective, irreversible BTK inhibitor. We analysed BTK expression and function in HCL and analysed the effects of ibrutinib on HCL cells. We demonstrated uniform BTK protein expression in HCL cells. Ibrutinib significantly inhibited HCL proliferation and cell cycle progression. Accordingly, ibrutinib also reduced HCL cell survival after BCR triggering with anti-immunoglobulins and abrogated the activation of kinases downstream of the BCR (PI3K and MAPK). Ibrutinib also inhibited BCR-dependent secretion of the chemokines CCL3 and CCL4 by HCL cells. Interestingly, ibrutinib inhibited also CXCL12-induced signalling, a key pathway for bone marrow homing. Collectively, our data support the clinical development of ibrutinib in patients with HCL. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway by microRNA-22 results in CLL B-cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, F; Abreu, C; Prieto, D; Morande, P; Ruiz, S; Fernández-Calero, T; Naya, H; Libisch, G; Robello, C; Landoni, A I; Gabus, R; Dighiero, G; Oppezzo, P

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by accumulation of clonal B cells arrested in G0/G1 stages that coexist, in different proportions, with proliferative B cells. Understanding the crosstalk between the proliferative subsets and their milieu could provide clues on CLL biology. We previously identified one of these subpopulations in the peripheral blood from unmutated patients that appears to be a hallmark of a progressive disease. Aiming to characterize the molecular mechanism underlying this proliferative behavior, we performed gene expression analysis comparing the global mRNA and microRNA expression of this leukemic subpopulation, and compared it with their quiescent counterparts. Our results suggest that proliferation of this fraction depend on microRNA-22 overexpression that induces phosphatase and tensin homolog downregulation and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway activation. Transfection experiments demonstrated that miR-22 overexpression in CLL B cells switches on PI3K/AKT, leading to downregulation of p27(-Kip1) and overexpression of Survivin and Ki-67 proteins. We also demonstrated that this pathway could be triggered by microenvironment signals like CD40 ligand/interleukin-4 and, more importantly, that this regulatory loop is also present in lymph nodes from progressive unmutated patients. Altogether, these results underline the key role of PI3K/AKT pathway in the generation of the CLL proliferative pool and provide additional rationale for the usage of PI3K inhibitors.

  18. Safety and efficacy of ofatumumab, a fully human monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, in patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coiffier, Bertrand; Lepretre, Stéphane; Pedersen, Lars Møller

    2008-01-01

    Safety and efficacy of the fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, ofatumumab, was analyzed in a multicenter dose-escalating study including 33 patients with relapsed or refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Three cohorts of 3 (A), 3 (B), and 27 (C) patients received 4, once weekly, infusio...

  19. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grayson, J.; Dooley, N.J.; Koski, I.R.; Blaese, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by [/sup 3/H]thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells

  20. TLR5 signaling enhances the proliferation of human allogeneic CD40-activated B cell induced CD4hiCD25+ regulatory T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Lung Chan

    Full Text Available Although diverse functions of different toll-like receptors (TLR on human natural regulatory T cells have been demonstrated recently, the role of TLR-related signals on human induced regulatory T cells remain elusive. Previously our group developed an ex vivo high-efficient system in generating human alloantigen-specific CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells from naïve CD4(+CD25(- T cells using allogeneic CD40-activated B cells as stimulators. In this study, we investigated the role of TLR5-related signals on the generation and function of these novel CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. It was found that induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells expressed an up-regulated level of TLR5 compared to their precursors. The blockade of TLR5 using anti-TLR5 antibodies during the co-culture decreased CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells proliferation by induction of S phase arrest. The S phase arrest was associated with reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. However, TLR5 blockade did not decrease the CTLA-4, GITR and FOXP3 expressions, and the suppressive function of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells. In conclusion, we discovered a novel function of TLR5-related signaling in enhancing the proliferation of CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells by promoting S phase progress but not involved in the suppressive function of human CD40-activated B cell-induced CD4(hiCD25(+ regulatory T cells, suggesting a novel role of TLR5-related signals in the generation of induced regulatory T cells.

  1. ASCT2 (SLC1A5-Deficient Mice Have Normal B-Cell Development, Proliferation, and Antibody Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Masle-Farquhar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available SLC1A5 (solute carrier family 1, member 5 is a small neutral amino acid exchanger that is upregulated in rapidly proliferating lymphocytes but also in many primary human cancers. Furthermore, cancer cell lines have been shown to require SLC1A5 for their survival in vitro. One of SLC1A5’s primary substrates is the immunomodulatory amino acid glutamine, which plays an important role in multiple key processes, such as energy supply, macromolecular synthesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, and resistance against oxidative stress. These processes are also essential to immune cells, including neutrophils, macrophages, B and T lymphocytes. We show here that mice with a stop codon in Slc1a5 have reduced glutamine uptake in activated lymphocytes and primary fibroblasts. B and T cell populations and maturation in resting mice were not affected by absence of SLC1A5. Antibody production in resting and immunized mice and the germinal center response to immunization were also found to be normal. SLC1A5 has been recently described as a novel target for the treatment of a variety of cancers, and our results indicate that inhibition of SLC1A5 in cancer therapy may be tolerated well by the immune system of cancer patients.

  2. B-cell translocation gene 3 overexpression inhibits proliferation and invasion of colorectal cancer SW480 cells via Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, D; Qiao, L; Lu, H; Feng, Y

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have shown that B-cell translocation gene 3 (BTG3) inhibits metastasis of multiple cancer cells. However, the role of BTG3 in colorectal cancer (CRC) and its possible mechanism have not yet been reported. In our study, we evaluated BTG3 expression in several CRC cell lines. Then, pcDNA3.1-BTG3 was transfected into SW480 cells. We found that BTG3 was upregulated in SW480 cells after overexpression plasmid transfection. BTG3 overexpression significantly inhibited cell growth and decreased PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) and Ki67 levels. BTG3 overexpression markedly downregulated Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E1 levels, whereas elevated p27. Overexpression of BTG3 arrested the cell cycle at G1 phase, which was abrogated by p27 silencing. Furthermore, migration, invasion and EMT of SW480 cells were significantly suppressed by BTG3 overexpression. Further investigations showed the inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We then used GSK3β specific inhibitor SB-216763 to activate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We found that Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation reversed the effect of BTG3 overexpression on cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, invasion and EMT. In conclusion, BTG3 overexpression inhibited cell growth, induced cell cycle arrest and suppressed the metastasis of SW480 cells via the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. BTG3 may be considered as a therapeutic target in CRC treatment.

  3. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan [Department of Pathogen, Medical College, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Yunhua [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohongnantong@126.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1{sup S102} nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. - Highlights: • The expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} are reversely correlated with outcomes of DLBCL patients. • YB-1 promotes cell proliferation by accelerating G1/S transition in DLBCL. • YB-1 confers drug resistance to mitoxantrone in DLBCL.

  4. Immunohistochemical expression of protein 53, murine double minute 2, B-cell lymphoma 2, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvão, Hebel Cavalcanti; Gordón-Núñez, Manuel Antonio; de Amorim, Rivadavio Fernandes Batista; Freitas, Roseana de Almeida; de Souza, Lelia Batista

    2013-01-01

    Even though odontogenic cysts share a similar histogenesis, they show different growth and differentiation profile due to differences in the proliferative cellular activity. We perform an immunohistochemical assessment of protein 53 (p53), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), B-cell lymphoma 2 (bcl-2), and murine double minute 2 (MDM2) expression in odontogenic cysts and keratocystic odontogenic tumor analyzing their correlation with the biological behavior of these lesions. By the streptavidin-biotin-peroxidase method with antibodies against p53, PCNA, bcl-2, and MDM2 proteins, 11 radicular cysts, 11 dentigerous cysts, and 11 keratocystic odontogenic tumor were analyzed. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test and Kruskall-Wallis test (P ≤ 0.05) were used to analyze the data. Immunopositivity for PCNA was observed in all cases appraised, predominantly in the suprabasal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor epithelial lining (SD ± 19.44), but no significant differences were found among the groups of lesions. Bcl-2 immunoexpression was observed especially in the basal layer of keratocystic odontogenic tumor. PCNA LI was significantly higher than bcl-2 LI in keratocystic odontogenic tumor. MDM2 and p53 immunoexpression were not detected in the lesions studied. Among the evaluated lesions, the keratocystic odontogenic tumor showed different immunoexpression of the proliferation and apoptosis markers. The results of this study suggest that the keratocystic odontogenic tumor presents distinct biological behavior of the odontogenic cysts, as for the processes of proliferation, apoptosis, and differentiation, reinforcing the information in favor of the neoplastic nature of this lesion.

  5. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto......'s thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture...

  6. Autoantibodies in autoimmune thyroid disease promote immune complex formation with self antigens and increase B cell and CD4+ T cell proliferation in response to self antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2004-01-01

    's thyroiditis (HT), Graves' disease (GD) and healthy controls were incubated with human thyroglobulin (Tg) before adding normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The deposition of immunoglobulins and C3 fragments on B cells was then assessed. Inclusion of Tg in serum from HT patients promoted B cell capture......B cells are centrally involved as antigen-presenting cells in certain autoimmune diseases. To establish whether autoantibodies form immune complexes (IC) with self-antigens in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) and promote B cell uptake of self-antigen, sera from patients with Hashimoto...

  7. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell and antigen-specific proliferating T cell clones can be induced to cytolytic activity by monoclonal antibodies against T3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spits, H.; Yssel, H.; Leeuwenberg, J.; de Vries, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    T3 is a human differentiation antigen expressed exclusively on mature T cells. In this study it is shown that anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies, in addition to their capacity to induce T cells to proliferate, are able to induce antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones to mediate antigen

  8. A theoretical investigation of the effect of proliferation and adhesion on monoclonal conversion in the colonic crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Mirams, Gary R.

    2012-11-01

    The surface epithelium lining the intestinal tract renews itself rapidly by a coordinated programme of cell proliferation, migration and differentiation events that is initiated in the crypts of Lieberkühn. It is generally believed that colorectal cancer arises due to mutations that disrupt the normal cellular dynamics of the crypts. Using a spatially structured cell-based model of a colonic crypt, we investigate the likelihood that the progeny of a mutated cell will dominate, or be sloughed out of, a crypt. Our approach is to perform multiple simulations, varying the spatial location of the initial mutation, and the proliferative and adhesive properties of the mutant cells, to obtain statistical distributions for the probability of their domination. Our simulations lead us to make a number of predictions. The process of monoclonal conversion always occurs, and does not require that the cell which initially gave rise to the population remains in the crypt. Mutations occurring more than one to two cells from the base of the crypt are unlikely to become the dominant clone. The probability of a mutant clone persisting in the crypt is sensitive to dysregulation of adhesion. By comparing simulation results with those from a simple one-dimensional stochastic model of population dynamics at the base of the crypt, we infer that this sensitivity is due to direct competition between wild-type and mutant cells at the base of the crypt. We also predict that increases in the extent of the spatial domain in which the mutant cells proliferate can give rise to counter-intuitive, non-linear changes to the probability of their fixation, due to effects that cannot be captured in simpler models. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. A Case of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Primary Effusion Lymphoma-Like Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Usuda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A 93-year-old female was transferred to the emergency ward of our hospital due to disturbance of consciousness and hypotension. Computed tomography showed bilateral pleural and pericardial effusion without evidence of tumor masses or lymphadenopathy. Cytodiagnosis of pleural effusion revealed proliferation of atypical lymphoid-like cells with pan-B surface markers. We suspected primary effusion lymphoma-like lymphoma; however, the monoclonality of these cells was not confirmed. Cytodiagnosis of bone marrow revealed lymphoma cells with monoclonal B-cell markers. These findings prompted a diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with bone marrow invasion. In the case of pericardial or pleural effusion, clinicians should consider carefully both hematological malignancy and its classification.

  10. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    of complement receptor types 1 (CR1, CD35) and 2 (CR2, CD21). T cell responsiveness to Tg was examined in a preparation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultured in the presence of autologous serum. A subset of CD4(+) T cells exhibited a dose-dependent proliferative response to Tg, which...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....... was strongly inhibited by complement inactivation and by immunoabsorption of Tg-reactive antibodies. Furthermore, this T cell response was abrogated by depletion of B cells from the PBMC culture. These data imply that uptake of complement-opsonized Tg / anti-Tg complexes and subsequent presentation of Tg by B...

  11. Anti-B cell antibody therapies for inflammatory rheumatic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, Mikkel; Jayne, David R W

    2014-01-01

    Several monoclonal antibodies targeting B cells have been tested as therapeutics for inflammatory rheumatic diseases. We review important observations from randomized clinical trials regarding the efficacy and safety of anti-B cell antibody-based therapies for rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus...... and functions in rheumatic disorders. Future studies should also evaluate how to maintain disease control by means of conventional and/or biologic immunosuppressants after remission-induction with anti-B cell antibodies....

  12. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heizmann, Beate; Sellars, MacLean; Macias-Garcia, Alejandra; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  13. Ikaros limits follicular B cell activation by regulating B cell receptor signaling pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heizmann, Beate [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Sellars, MacLean [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Macias-Garcia, Alejandra [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Institute for Medical Engineering and Science at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chan, Susan, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Kastner, Philippe, E-mail: scpk@igbmc.fr [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), INSERM U964, CNRS UMR 7104, Université de Strasbourg, 67404 Illkirch (France); Faculté de Médecine, Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France)

    2016-02-12

    The Ikaros transcription factor is essential for early B cell development, but its effect on mature B cells is debated. We show that Ikaros is required to limit the response of naive splenic B cells to B cell receptor signals. Ikaros deficient follicular B cells grow larger and enter cell cycle faster after anti-IgM stimulation. Unstimulated mutant B cells show deregulation of positive and negative regulators of signal transduction at the mRNA level, and constitutive phosphorylation of ERK, p38, SYK, BTK, AKT and LYN. Stimulation results in enhanced and prolonged ERK and p38 phosphorylation, followed by hyper-proliferation. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK and p38 abrogates the increased proliferative response of Ikaros deficient cells. These results suggest that Ikaros functions as a negative regulator of follicular B cell activation.

  14. miR-320a regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis in multiple myeloma by targeting pre-B-cell leukemia transcription factor 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yinghao [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Wu, Depei, E-mail: wudepei@medmail.com.cn [Jiangsu Institute of Hematology, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Key Laboratory of Thrombosis and Hemostasis Under Ministry of Health, Collaborative Innovation Center of Hematology, Suzhou, 215006 (China); Wang, Jishi, E-mail: lgylhlyh@aliyun.com [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China); Li, Yan; Chai, Xiao; Kang, Qian [Department of Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, The Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Center of Guizhou Province, Blood Diseases Diagnosis and Treatment Center of Guizhou Province, Guiyang, 550004, Guizhou Province (China)

    2016-05-13

    Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is implicated in cancer development and progression. While miR-320a is reported to be deregulated in many malignancy types, its biological role in multiple myeloma (MM) remains unclear. Here, we observed reduced expression of miR-320a in MM samples and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-320a dramatically suppressed cell viability and clonogenicity and induced apoptosis in vitro. Mechanistic investigation led to the identification of Pre-B-cellleukemia transcription factor 3 (PBX3) as a novel and direct downstream target of miR-320a. Interestingly, reintroduction of PBX3 abrogated miR-320a-induced MM cell growth inhibition and apoptosis. In a mouse xenograft model, miR-320a overexpression inhibited tumorigenicity and promoted apoptosis. Our findings collectively indicate that miR-320a inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in MM cells by directly targeting PBX3, supporting its utility as a novel and potential therapeutic agent for miRNA-based MM therapy. -- Highlights: •Expression of miR-320a in MM cell induces apoptosis in vitro. •miR-320a represses PBX3 via targeting specific sequences in the 3′UTR region. •Exogenous expression of PBX3 reverses the effects of miR-320a in inhibiting MM cell growth and promoting apoptosis. •Overexpression of miR-320a inhibits tumor growth and increases apoptosis in vivo.

  15. A theoretical investigation of the effect of proliferation and adhesion on monoclonal conversion in the colonic crypt

    KAUST Repository

    Mirams, Gary R.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    The surface epithelium lining the intestinal tract renews itself rapidly by a coordinated programme of cell proliferation, migration and differentiation events that is initiated in the crypts of Lieberkühn. It is generally believed that colorectal

  16. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Takayuki; Murata, Kazuko; Murata, Ryo; Sun, Shu-lan; Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi; Moriya, Kunihiko; Kasai, Noriyuki; Sugamura, Kazuo; Ishii, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs flox/flox ;mb1 cre/+ :Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes

  17. Hepatocyte growth factor regulated tyrosine kinase substrate in the peripheral development and function of B-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Takayuki [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Murata, Kazuko, E-mail: murata-k@iwakimu.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Murata, Ryo [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Sun, Shu-lan [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Saito, Yutaro; Yamaga, Shuhei [Department of Pharmacy, Iwaki Meisei University, 5-5-1 Chuodai Iino, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan); Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tamai, Keiichi [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Moriya, Kunihiko [Department of Pediatrics, Tohoku University School of Medicine, 1-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Kasai, Noriyuki [Institute for Animal Experimentation, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Sugamura, Kazuo [Division of Immunology, Miyagi Cancer Research Institute, 47-1 Nodayama, Medeshima-Shiode, Natori 981-1293 (Japan); Ishii, Naoto [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-machi, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •ESCRT-0 protein regulates the development of peripheral B-cells. •BCR expression on cell surface should be controlled by the endosomal-sorting system. •Hrs plays important roles in responsiveness to Ag stimulation in B lymphocytes. -- Abstract: Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hrs) is a vesicular sorting protein that functions as one of the endosomal-sorting proteins required for transport (ESCRT). Hrs, which binds to ubiquitinated proteins through its ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM), contributes to the lysosomal transport and degradation of ubiquitinated membrane proteins. However, little is known about the relationship between B-cell functions and ESCRT proteins in vivo. Here we examined the immunological roles of Hrs in B-cell development and functions using B-cell-specific Hrs-deficient (Hrs{sup flox/flox};mb1{sup cre/+}:Hrs-cKO) mice, which were generated using a cre-LoxP recombination system. Hrs deficiency in B-cells significantly reduced T-cell-dependent antibody production in vivo and impaired the proliferation of B-cells treated in vitro with an anti-IgM monoclonal antibody but not with LPS. Although early development of B-cells in the bone marrow was normal in Hrs-cKO mice, there was a significant decrease in the number of the peripheral transitional B-cells and marginal zone B-cells in the spleen of Hrs-cKO mice. These results indicate that Hrs plays important roles during peripheral development and physiological functions of B lymphocytes.

  18. Iodine-131 treatment of thyroid cancer cells leads to suppression of cell proliferation followed by induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest by regulation of B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated JNK/NF-κB pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, L.M.; Pang, A.X., E-mail: zhaoliming515@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China); Department of Urology, Linyi People' s Hospital, Linyi (China)

    2017-10-01

    Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) is widely used for the treatment of thyroid-related diseases. This study aimed to investigate the expression of p53 and BTG2 genes following {sup 131}I therapy in thyroid cancer cell line SW579 and the possible underlying mechanism. SW579 human thyroid squamous carcinoma cells were cultured and treated with {sup 131}I. They were then assessed for {sup 131}I uptake, cell viability, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, p53 expression, and BTG2 gene expression. SW579 cells were transfected with BTG2 siRNA, p53 siRNA and siNC and were then examined for the same aforementioned parameters. When treated with a JNK inhibitor of SP600125 and {sup 131}I or with a NF-kB inhibitor of BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, non-transfected SW579 cells were assessed in JNK/NFkB pathways. It was observed that {sup 131}I significantly inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Both BTG2 and p53 expression were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner. An increase in cell viability by up-regulation in Bcl2 gene, a decrease in apoptosis by enhanced CDK2 gene expression and a decrease in cell cycle arrest at G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase were also observed in SW579 cell lines transfected with silenced BTG2 gene. When treated with SP600125 and {sup 131}I, the non transfected SW579 cell lines significantly inhibited JNK pathway, NF-kB pathway and the expression of BTG2. However, when treated with BMS-345541 and {sup 131}I, only the NF-kB pathway was suppressed. {sup 131}I suppressed cell proliferation, induced cell apoptosis, and promoted cell cycle arrest of thyroid cancer cells by up-regulating B-cell translocation gene 2-mediated activation of JNK/NF--κB pathways. (author)

  19. Effect of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to class I and class II HLA antigens on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Y; Zicht, R; Ferrone, S; Bonnard, G D; Herberman, R B

    1985-04-01

    We have examined the effect of several monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) to monomorphic determinants of class II HLA antigens, and MoAb to monomorphic determinants of class I HLA antigens and to beta-2-microglobulin (beta 2-mu) on lectin- and MoAb OKT3-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and cultured T cells (CTC). Some, but not all, anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of PBMNC to MoAb OKT3 and pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The degree of inhibitory effect varied considerably. This effect was not limited to anti-class II HLA MoAb since anti-class I HLA MoAb and anti-beta 2-mu MoAb also inhibited MoAb OKT3- or PWM-induced proliferative responses. In contrast, the response of PBMNC to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A) was not blocked by any anti-class II HLA MoAb. However, some anti-class II HLA MoAb also inhibited the proliferative response of CTC plus allogeneic peripheral blood adherent accessory cells (AC) to PHA or Con A as well as to MoAb OKT3 or PWM. This may be attributable to the substantially greater class II HLA antigen expression by CTC than by fresh lymphocytes. Pretreatment of either CTC or AC with anti-class II HLA MoAb inhibited OKT3-induced proliferation. In contrast, pretreatment of CTC, but not AC, with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited the proliferative response of CTC to OKT3. Pretreatment of CTC with anti-class I HLA MoAb inhibited PHA-, Con A and PWM-induced proliferation, to a greater degree than the anti-class II HLA MoAb. It appears as if lymphocyte activation by different mitogens exhibits variable requirements for the presence of cells expressing major histocompatibility determinants. Binding of Ab to membrane markers may interfere with lymphocyte-AC cooperation, perhaps by inhibiting binding of mitogens to their receptors or by interfering with lymphocyte and AC function. We also have examined the role of class II HLA antigens on CTC by depleting class II HLA-positive cells

  20. Unique B cell differentiation profile in tolerant kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneau, M; Pallier, A; Braza, F; Lacombe, G; Le Gallou, S; Baron, D; Giral, M; Danger, R; Guerif, P; Aubert-Wastiaux, H; Néel, A; Michel, L; Laplaud, D-A; Degauque, N; Soulillou, J-P; Tarte, K; Brouard, S

    2014-01-01

    Operationally tolerant patients (TOL) display a higher number of blood B cells and transcriptional B cell signature. As they rarely develop an allo-immune response, they could display an abnormal B cell differentiation. We used an in vitro culture system to explore T-dependent differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. B cell phenotype, apoptosis, proliferation, cytokine, immunoglobulin production and markers of differentiation were followed in blood of these patients. Tolerant recipients show a higher frequency of CD20(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) transitional and CD20(+) CD38(lo) CD24(lo) naïve B cells compared to patients with stable graft function, correlating with a decreased frequency of CD20(-) CD38(+) CD138(+) differentiated plasma cells, suggestive of abnormal B cell differentiation. B cells from TOL proliferate normally but produce more IL-10. In addition, B cells from tolerant recipients exhibit a defective expression of factors of the end step of differentiation into plasma cells and show a higher propensity for cell death apoptosis compared to patients with stable graft function. This in vitro profile is consistent with down-regulation of B cell differentiation genes and anti-apoptotic B cell genes in these patients in vivo. These data suggest that a balance between B cells producing IL-10 and a deficiency in plasma cells may encourage an environment favorable to the tolerance maintenance. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  1. Identification of a novel linear B-cell epitope using a monoclonal antibody against the carboxy terminus of the canine distemper virus nucleoprotein and sequence analysis of the identified epitope in different CDV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Li; Cao, Zhigang; Tong, Mingwei; Cheng, Yuening; Yang, Yong; Li, Shuang; Wang, Jianke; Lin, Peng; Sun, Yaru; Zhang, Miao; Cheng, Shipeng

    2017-09-29

    The Nucleoprotein (NP) is the most abundant and highly immunogenic protein in canine distemper virus (CDV), playing an important role in CDV viral replication and assembly. In this study, a specific monoclonal antibody, named C8, was produced against the NP protein C terminal (amino acids 401-523). A linear N protein epitope was identified by subjecting a series of partially overlapping synthesized peptides to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis.The results indicated that 444 GDKYPIHFNDER 455 was the minimal linear epitope that could be recognized by mAb C8. Sequence alignments demonstrated that this linear epitope is less conserved among three CDV genotypes. We next analyzed the level of conservation of the defined epitope in19 Chinese CDV clinical isolates, and it has one site variation in amino acid among these CDV isolations. 2 isolates have the amino acid mutations F451L, while one has P448Ssubstitution.Phylogenetic analysis showed the two isolates with F451Lsubstitution had a closer relationship in a virulent strain ZJ-7, so the epitope may be a significant tag associated with virus virulence. This collection of mAb along with defined linear epitope may provide useful reagents for investigations of NP protein function and the development of CDV specific diagnostics.

  2. Change of CD20 Expression in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Treated with Rituximab, an Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody: A Study of the Osaka Lymphoma Study Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Wada

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Change of CD20 expression was examined in cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. CD20 expression after treatment with anti-CD20 antibody (rituximab, Rx for DLBCL was examined in 23 cases who received serial biopsy by immunohistochemistry (IHC and flow cytometry (FCM. CD20– by IHC and/or FCM was defined as CD20–. Four cases were CD20– at initial biopsy but became CD20+ after chemotherapy with Rx (CH-R (group A. Recurrent tumors in three group A cases became resistant to CH-R. Initial and recurrent tumors were CD20+ before and after CH-R in 17 cases (group B. Tumors before CH-R were CD20– in two cases (group C and continued to be CD20– in one and turned CD20+ in the other with survival time after the relapse of 8 and 23 months, respectively. Evaluation of CD20 expression with immunohistochemical and flow cytometric methods is used for the prediction of responsiveness of relapsed DLBCL for CH-R.

  3. Can resting B cells present antigen to T cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Antigen stimulation of T lymphocytes can occur only in the presence of an antigen-presenting cell (APC). An ever-increasing number of cell types have been found to act as APCs; these include macrophages, splenic and lymph node dendritic cells, and Langerhans cells of the skin. Although activated B lymphocytes and B cell lymphomas are known to serve as APCs, it has been generally believed that resting B cells cannot perform this function. However, in recent studies the authors have found that resting B cells can indeed present soluble antigen to T cell clones as well as to antigen-primed T cells. The previous difficulty in demonstrating this activity can be explained by the finding that, in contrast to macrophages and dendritic cells, the antigen-presenting ability of resting B cells is very radiosensitive. Macrophages are usually irradiated with 2000-3300 rads to prevent them from incorporating [ 3 H]thymidine in the T cell proliferation assay. Resting B cells, however, begin to lose presenting function at 1500 rads and have completely lost this activity at 3300 rads. It was also possible to distinguish two distinct T cell clonal phenotypes when resting B cells were used as APCs on the basis of two different assays (T cell proliferation, and B cell proliferation resulting from T cell activation). The majority of T cell clones tested were capable of both proliferating themselves and inducing the proliferation of B cells. Some T cells clones, however, could not proliferate in the presence of antigen and B cell APCs, although they were very good at inducing the proliferation of B cells

  4. Inhibition of UDP-glucosylceramide synthase in mice prevents Gaucher disease-associated B-cell malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, Elena V; Archer, Joy; Wang, Susan; Dekker, Nick; Aerts, Johannes Mfg; Karlsson, Stefan; Cox, Timothy M

    2015-01-01

    Clonal B-cell proliferation is a frequent manifestation of Gaucher disease - a sphingolipidosis associated with a high risk of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Gaucher disease is caused by genetic deficiency of acid β-glucosidase, the natural substrates of which (β-d-glucosylceramide and β-d-glucosylsphingosine) accumulate, principally in macrophages. Mice with inducible deficiency of β-glucosidase [Gba(tm1Karl/tm1Karl)Tg(MX1-cre)1Cgn/0] serve as an authentic model of human Gaucher disease; we have recently reported clonal B-cell proliferation accompanied by monoclonal serum paraproteins and cognate tumours in these animals. To explore the relationship between B-cell malignancy and the biochemical defect, we treated Gaucher mice with eliglustat tartrate (GENZ 112638), a potent and selective inhibitor of the first committed step in glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. Twenty-two Gaucher mice received 300 mg/kg of GENZ 112638 daily for 3-10 months from 6 weeks of age. Plasma concentrations of β-d-glucosylceramide and the unacylated glycosphingolipid, β-d-glucosylsphingosine, declined. After administration of GENZ 112638 to Gaucher mice for 3-10 months, serum paraproteins were not detected and there was a striking reduction in the malignant lymphoproliferation: neither lymphomas nor plasmacytomas were found in animals that had received the investigational agent. In contrast, 14 out of 60 Gaucher mice without GENZ 112638 treatment developed these tumours; monoclonal paraproteins were detected in plasma from 18 of the 44 age-matched mice with Gaucher disease that had not received GENZ 112638. Long-term inhibition of glycosphingolipid biosynthesis suppresses the development of spontaneous B-cell lymphoma and myeloma in Gaucher mice. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. B cells as a target of immune modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawker Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available B cells have recently been identified as an integral component of the immune system; they play a part in autoimmunity through antigen presentation, antibody secretion, and complement activation. Animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS suggest that myelin destruction is partly mediated through B cell activation (and plasmablasts. MS patients with evidence of B cell involvement, as compared to those without, tend to have a worse prognosis. Finally, the significant decrease in new gadolinium-enhancing lesions, new T2 lesions, and relapses in MS patients treated with rituximab (a monoclonal antibody against CD20 on B cells leads us to the conclusion that B cells play an important role in MS and that immune modulation of these cells may ameliorate the disease. This article will explore the role of B cells in MS and the rationale for the development of B cell-targeted therapeutics. MS is an immune-mediated disease that affects over 2 million people worldwide and is the number one cause of disability in young patients. Most therapeutic targets have focused on T cells; however, recently, the focus has shifted to the role of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS and the potential of B cells as a therapeutic target.

  6. Interleukin-2 production by human leukemia cell lines of pre-B cell origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    Cells of 7 tested human leukemia cell lines of pre-B cell origin (as characterized by immunophenotyping and by the expression of cytoplasmic micro chains, but not by surface immunoglobulins) produced after stimulation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) a lymphokine activity which supported the growth of the interleukin-2 (IL-2)-dependent CTLL-2 cell line. Three pieces of evidence indicate that the secreted lymphokine was functionally and antigenically very similar, if not identical, to human IL-2: (1) The lymphokine supported the growth of murine IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells, which did not respond to human lymphokines other than IL-2, but it did not stimulate the growth of murine IL-3-dependent FDC-P2 cells, (2) the biological activity of the lymphokine was was inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) anti-human-IL-2, and (3) the proliferation of IL-2-dependent cells in the presence of the active materials was completely inhibited by the inclusion of the anti-mouse-IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) mAb. Since leukemia cells of immature B-cell origin also synthesize IL-2R, the human pre-B cell leukemias could represent another type of hematological malignancy where the autocrine processes of IL-2 production and utilization are involved in the expansion of the disease. (author)

  7. CD38 is a signaling molecule in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaglio, Silvia; Capobianco, Andrea; Bergui, Luciana; Dürig, Jan; Morabito, Fortunato; Dührsen, Ulrich; Malavasi, Fabio

    2003-09-15

    The prognosis for patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) is generally less favorable for those expressing CD38. Our working hypothesis is that CD38 is not merely a marker in B-CLL, but that it plays a receptor role with pathogenetic potential ruling the proliferation of the malignant clone. CD38 levels were generally low in the patients examined and monoclonal antibody (mAb) ligation was inefficient in signaling. Other cellular models indicated that molecular density and surface organization are critical for CD38 functionality. Interleukin 2 (IL-2) induced a marked up-modulation and surface rearrangement of CD38 in all the patients studied. On reaching a specific expression threshold, CD38 becomes an efficient receptor in purified B-CLL cells. Indeed, mAb ligation is followed by Ca2+ fluxes and by a markedly increased proliferation. The unsuitability of CD38 to perform as a receptor is obviated through close interaction with the B-cell-receptor (BCR) complex and CD19. On mAb binding, CD38 translocates to the membrane lipid microdomains, as shown by a colocalization with the GM1 ganglioside and with CD81, a raft-resident protein. Finally, CD38 signaling in IL-2-treated B-CLL cells prolonged survival and induced the appearance of plasmablasts, providing a pathogenetic hypothesis for the occurrence of Richter syndrome.

  8. Foxp1 controls mature B cell survival and the development of follicular and B-1 B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzelt, Thomas; Keppler, Selina J.; Gorka, Oliver; Thoene, Silvia; Wartewig, Tim; Reth, Michael; Förster, Irmgard; Lang, Roland; Buchner, Maike; Ruland, Jürgen

    2018-01-01

    The transcription factor Foxp1 is critical for early B cell development. Despite frequent deregulation of Foxp1 in B cell lymphoma, the physiological functions of Foxp1 in mature B cells remain unknown. Here, we used conditional gene targeting in the B cell lineage and report that Foxp1 disruption in developing and mature B cells results in reduced numbers and frequencies of follicular and B-1 B cells and in impaired antibody production upon T cell-independent immunization in vivo. Moreover, Foxp1-deficient B cells are impaired in survival even though they exhibit an increased capacity to proliferate. Transcriptional analysis identified defective expression of the prosurvival Bcl-2 family gene Bcl2l1 encoding Bcl-xl in Foxp1-deficient B cells, and we identified Foxp1 binding in the regulatory region of Bcl2l1. Transgenic overexpression of Bcl2 rescued the survival defect in Foxp1-deficient mature B cells in vivo and restored peripheral B cell numbers. Thus, our results identify Foxp1 as a physiological regulator of mature B cell survival mediated in part via the control of Bcl-xl expression and imply that this pathway might contribute to the pathogenic function of aberrant Foxp1 expression in lymphoma. PMID:29507226

  9. Docking of B-cell epitope antigen to specific hepatitis B antibody

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interaction of pres1 region of hepatitis B virus B-cell epitope antigen with specific hepatitis B neutralizing monoclonal antibody was examined by docking study. We modelled the 3D complex structure of B-cell epitope antigen residues CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNCY by homology modelling and docked it with the ...

  10. Entry of Francisella tularensis into Murine B Cells: The Role of B Cell Receptors and Complement Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Plzakova

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, the etiological agent of tularemia, is an intracellular pathogen that dominantly infects and proliferates inside phagocytic cells but can be seen also in non-phagocytic cells, including B cells. Although protective immunity is known to be almost exclusively associated with the type 1 pathway of cellular immunity, a significant role of B cells in immune responses already has been demonstrated. Whether their role is associated with antibody-dependent or antibody-independent B cell functions is not yet fully understood. The character of early events during B cell-pathogen interaction may determine the type of B cell response regulating the induction of adaptive immunity. We used fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry to identify the basic requirements for the entry of F. tularensis into B cells within in vivo and in vitro infection models. Here, we present data showing that Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strain LVS significantly infects individual subsets of murine peritoneal B cells early after infection. Depending on a given B cell subset, uptake of Francisella into B cells is mediated by B cell receptors (BCRs with or without complement receptor CR1/2. However, F. tularensis strain FSC200 ΔiglC and ΔftdsbA deletion mutants are defective in the ability to enter B cells. Once internalized into B cells, F. tularensis LVS intracellular trafficking occurs along the endosomal pathway, albeit without significant multiplication. The results strongly suggest that BCRs alone within the B-1a subset can ensure the internalization process while the BCRs on B-1b and B-2 cells need co-signaling from the co receptor containing CR1/2 to initiate F. tularensis engulfment. In this case, fluidity of the surface cell membrane is a prerequisite for the bacteria's internalization. The results substantially underline the functional heterogeneity of B cell subsets in relation to F. tularensis.

  11. Effects of type I/type II interferons and transforming growth factor-beta on B-cell differentiation and proliferation. Definition of costimulation and cytokine requirements for immunoglobulin synthesis and expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, D M; Tuo, W; Brown, W C; Goin, J

    1998-12-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the role of selected type I interferons [interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon-tau (IFN-tau)], IFN-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) in the regulation of bovine antibody responses. B cells were stimulated via CD40 in the presence or absence of B-cell receptor (BCR) cross-linking. IFN-alpha enhanced IgM, IgG2 and IgA responses but did not enhance IgG1 responses. BCR signalling alone was more effective at inducing IgG2 responses with IFN-alpha than dual cross-linking with CD40. Recombinant ovine IFN-tau was less effective at inducing IgG2 responses when compared with IFN-alpha, though IgA responses were similar in magnitude following BCR cross-linking. At higher concentrations, IFN-tau enhanced IgA responses greater than twofold over the levels observed with IFN-alpha. Previous studies have shown that addition of IFN-gamma to BCR or pokeweed mitogen-activated bovine B cells stimulates IgG2 production. However, following CD40 stimulation alone, IFN-gamma was relatively ineffective at stimulating high-rate synthesis of any non-IgM isotype. Dual cross-linking via CD40 and the BCR resulted in decreased synthesis of IgM with a concomitant increase in IgA and similar levels of IgG2 production to those obtained via the BCR alone. We also assessed the effects of endogenous and exogenous TGF-beta on immunoglobulin synthesis by bovine B cells. Exogenous TGF-beta stimulates both IgG2 and IgA production following CD40 and BCR cross-linking in the presence of IL-2. Blocking endogenous TGF-beta did not inhibit the up-regulation of IgG2 or IgA by interferons.

  12. Monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Hiyoshimaru

    1987-01-01

    Some aspects of monoclonal antibodies are described, centering on studies made by the author and those presented at the Second International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer held in March this year (1987). The history of immuno-nuclear medicine and procedures for producing monoclonal antibodies are briefly outlined. Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins. Here, the structure of IgG, which is used most frequently, is described. An IgG is composed of two antigen binding fragments (Fab) and one crystallizable fragment (Fc). The end portion of a Fab reacts with an antigen. One of the major applications of immuno-nuclear medicine is the diagnosis of cancer. As label nucleides, 131 I and 111 I were selected in most cases in the past while 123 I and 99m Tc are currently used more often. Advantages and disadvantages of this diagnosis method is discussed citing studies presented at the First (1986) and Second (1987) International Conference on Monoclonal Antibody Immunoconjugates for Cancer. The present status of the application of monoclonal antibodies to treatment of cancer is also described. (Nogami, K.)

  13. Natural autoantibodies and complement promote the uptake of a self antigen, human thyroglobulin, by B cells and the proliferation of thyroglobulin-reactive CD4(+) T cells in healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Leslie, R G; Jepsen, B S

    2001-01-01

    Serum from normal individuals contains substantial amounts of natural antibodies (NA) capable of recognizing self antigens. However, the physiological implications of this autoreactivity remain unclear. We have examined the role of self-reactive NA and complement in mediating the uptake of human...... cells are prerequisites for the proliferation of Tg-reactive CD4(+) T cells, suggesting a novel role for natural autoantibodies and complement in the regulation of autoreactivity under physiological conditions....

  14. CEACAM1 induces B-cell survival and is essential for protective antiviral antibody production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Vishal; Duhan, Vikas; Maney, Sathish Kumar; Honke, Nadine; Shaabani, Namir; Pandyra, Aleksandra A.; Seifert, Marc; Pozdeev, Vitaly; Xu, Haifeng C.; Sharma, Piyush; Baldin, Fabian; Marquardsen, Florian; Merches, Katja; Lang, Elisabeth; Kirschning, Carsten; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Häussinger, Dieter; Lang, Florian; Dittmer, Ulf; Küppers, Ralf; Recher, Mike; Hardt, Cornelia; Scheffrahn, Inka; Beauchemin, Nicole; Göthert, Joachim R.; Singer, Bernhard B.; Lang, Philipp A.; Lang, Karl S.

    2015-01-01

    B cells are essential for antiviral immune defence because they produce neutralizing antibodies, present antigen and maintain the lymphoid architecture. Here we show that intrinsic signalling of CEACAM1 is essential for generating efficient B-cell responses. Although CEACAM1 exerts limited influence on the proliferation of B cells, expression of CEACAM1 induces survival of proliferating B cells via the BTK/Syk/NF-κB-axis. The absence of this signalling cascade in naive Ceacam1−/− mice limits the survival of B cells. During systemic infection with cytopathic vesicular stomatitis virus, Ceacam1−/− mice can barely induce neutralizing antibody responses and die early after infection. We find, therefore, that CEACAM1 is a crucial regulator of B-cell survival, influencing B-cell numbers and protective antiviral antibody responses. PMID:25692415

  15. IL-21: an executor of B cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konforte, Danijela; Simard, Nathalie; Paige, Christopher J

    2009-02-15

    IL-21 is a type I cytokine that shares the common receptor gamma-chain with IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, and IL-15. B cells are one of the lymphoid cell types whose development and function are regulated by IL-21. Depending on the interplay with costimulatory signals and on the developmental stage of a B cell, IL-21 can induce proliferation, differentiation into Ig-producing plasma cells, or apoptosis in both mice and humans. Alone and in combination with Th cell-derived cytokines IL-21 can regulate class switch recombination to IgG, IgA, or IgE isotypes, indicating its important role in shaping the effector function of B cells. This review highlights the role of IL-21 in B cell development, function, and disease and provides some perspectives on the future studies in this area.

  16. Ia-restricted B-B cell interaction. I. The MHC haplotype of bone marrow cells present during B cell ontogeny dictates the self-recognition specificity of B cells in the polyclonal B cell activation by a B cell differentiation factor, B151-TRF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hamaoka, T.

    1987-01-01

    We have demonstrated that B cell recognition of Ia molecules is involved in polyclonal B cell differentiation by B151-TRF2. The present study was undertaken to examine the Ia recognition specificity of B151-TRF2-responsive B cells in fully major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-allogeneic P1----P2, semiallogeneic P1----(P1 x P2)F1, and double donor (P1 + P2)----(P1 x P2)F1 and (P1 + P2)----P1 radiation bone marrow chimeras. The B cells from both P1----P2 and P1----(P1 x P2)F1 chimeras could give rise to in vitro immunoglobulin M-producing cells upon stimulation with B151-TRF2 comparable in magnitude to that of normal P1 B cells, and their responses were inhibited by anti-I-AP1 but not by anti-I-AP2 monoclonal antibody even in the presence of mitomycin C-treated T cell-depleted P2 spleen cells as auxiliary cells. In contrast, the B151-TRF2 responses of P1 B cells isolated from both (P1 + P2)----(P1 x P2)F1 and (P1 + P2)----P1 double bone marrow chimeras became sensitive to the inhibition of not only anti-I-AP1 but also anti-I-AP2 monoclonal antibody only when the culture was conducted in the presence of P2 auxiliary cells, demonstrating that they adaptively differentiate to recognize as self-structures allogeneic as well as syngeneic Ia molecules. Moreover, the experiments utilizing B cells from H-2-congenic mice and B cell hybridoma clones as auxiliary cells revealed that B151-TRF2-responsive B cells recognize Ia molecules expressed on B cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that B151-TRF2-responsive B cells recognize Ia molecules expressed by B cells as self-structures and that their self-recognition specificity is dictated by the MHC haplotype of bone marrow cells present during the B cell ontogeny but not by the MHC haplotype of a radiation-resistant host environment

  17. Targeting the BCR signalosome in B cell malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Rooij, M.F.M.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), and Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) are B-cell malignancies which are still incurable. In these lymphomas, the cells proliferate in specialized niches in lymph nodes and bone marrow, in which they are provided by stromal-derived

  18. Role of Bruton's tyrosine kinase in B cells and malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pal Singh, S. (Simar); F. Dammeijer (Floris); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractBruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) is a non-receptor kinase that plays a crucial role in oncogenic signaling that is critical for proliferation and survival of leukemic cells in many B cell malignancies. BTK was initially shown to be defective in the primary immunodeficiency X-linked

  19. B-cell activation with CD40L or CpG measures the function of B-cell subsets and identifies specific defects in immunodeficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasco, Emiliano; Farroni, Chiara; Cascioli, Simona; Marcellini, Valentina; Scarsella, Marco; Giorda, Ezio; Piano Mortari, Eva; Leonardi, Lucia; Scarselli, Alessia; Valentini, Diletta; Cancrini, Caterina; Duse, Marzia; Grimsholm, Ola; Carsetti, Rita

    2017-01-01

    Around 65% of primary immunodeficiencies are antibody deficiencies. Functional tests are useful tools to study B-cell functions in vitro. However, no accepted guidelines for performing and evaluating functional tests have been issued yet. Here, we report our experience on the study of B-cell functions in infancy and throughout childhood. We show that T-independent stimulation with CpG measures proliferation and differentiation potential of memory B cells. Switched memory B cells respond better than IgM memory B cells. On the other hand, CD40L, a T-dependent stimulus, does not induce plasma cell differentiation, but causes proliferation of naïve and memory B cells. During childhood, the production of plasmablasts in response to CpG increases with age mirroring the development of memory B cells. The response to CD40L does not change with age. In patients with selective IgA deficiency (SIgAD), we observed that switched memory B cells are reduced due to the absence of IgA memory B cells. In agreement, IgA plasma cells are not generated in response to CpG. Unexpectedly, B cells from SIgAD patients show a reduced proliferative response to CD40L. Our results demonstrate that functional tests are an important tool to assess the functions of the humoral immune system. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  1. A role for adhesion molecules in contact-dependent T help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T

    1991-01-01

    The role of cell contact in T-dependent B cell activation was examined. Small resting B cells from C57BL/6 mice were cultured with CBA-derived, non-alloreactive cloned T helper cells in anti-T cell receptor V beta 8-coated microwells. This induced polyclonal B cell activation to enter cell cycle...... that continued cell contact involving adhesion/accessory molecules induces B cells to proliferate and to respond to T cell lymphokines. A signaling role for cell interaction molecules on B cells is proposed, similar to the role of these and analogous molecules on T cells....

  2. Regulation of normal B-cell differentiation and malignant B-cell survival by OCT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodson, Daniel J; Shaffer, Arthur L; Xiao, Wenming; Wright, George W; Schmitz, Roland; Phelan, James D; Yang, Yandan; Webster, Daniel E; Rui, Lixin; Kohlhammer, Holger; Nakagawa, Masao; Waldmann, Thomas A; Staudt, Louis M

    2016-04-05

    The requirement for the B-cell transcription factor OCT2 (octamer-binding protein 2, encoded by Pou2f2) in germinal center B cells has proved controversial. Here, we report that germinal center B cells are formed normally after depletion of OCT2 in a conditional knockout mouse, but their proliferation is reduced and in vivo differentiation to antibody-secreting plasma cells is blocked. This finding led us to examine the role of OCT2 in germinal center-derived lymphomas. shRNA knockdown showed that almost all diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell lines are addicted to the expression of OCT2 and its coactivator OCA-B. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis and gene-expression profiling revealed the broad transcriptional program regulated by OCT2 that includes the expression of STAT3, IL-10, ELL2, XBP1, MYC, TERT, and ADA. Importantly, genetic alteration of OCT2 is not a requirement for cellular addiction in DLBCL. However, we detected amplifications of the POU2F2 locus in DLBCL tumor biopsies and a recurrent mutation of threonine 223 in the DNA-binding domain of OCT2. This neomorphic mutation subtly alters the DNA-binding preference of OCT2, leading to the transactivation of noncanonical target genes including HIF1a and FCRL3 Finally, by introducing mutations designed to disrupt the OCT2-OCA-B interface, we reveal a requirement for this protein-protein interface that ultimately might be exploited therapeutically. Our findings, combined with the predominantly B-cell-restricted expression of OCT2 and the absence of a systemic phenotype in our knockout mice, suggest that an OCT2-targeted therapeutic strategy would be efficacious in both major subtypes of DLBCL while avoiding systemic toxicity.

  3. Human Memory B Cells in Healthy Gingiva, Gingivitis, and Periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahanonda, Rangsini; Champaiboon, Chantrakorn; Subbalekha, Keskanya; Sa-Ard-Iam, Noppadol; Rattanathammatada, Warattaya; Thawanaphong, Saranya; Rerkyen, Pimprapa; Yoshimura, Fuminobu; Nagano, Keiji; Lang, Niklaus P; Pichyangkul, Sathit

    2016-08-01

    The presence of inflammatory infiltrates with B cells, specifically plasma cells, is the hallmark of periodontitis lesions. The composition of these infiltrates in various stages of homeostasis and disease development is not well documented. Human tissue biopsies from sites with gingival health (n = 29), gingivitis (n = 8), and periodontitis (n = 21) as well as gingival tissue after treated periodontitis (n = 6) were obtained and analyzed for their composition of B cell subsets. Ag specificity, Ig secretion, and expression of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand and granzyme B were performed. Although most of the B cell subsets in healthy gingiva and gingivitis tissues were CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(-) memory B cells, the major B cell component in periodontitis was CD19(+)CD27(+)CD38(+)CD138(+)HLA-DR(low) plasma cells, not plasmablasts. Plasma cell aggregates were observed at the base of the periodontal pocket and scattered throughout the gingiva, especially apically toward the advancing front of the lesion. High expression of CXCL12, a proliferation-inducing ligand, B cell-activating factor, IL-10, IL-6, and IL-21 molecules involved in local B cell responses was detected in both gingivitis and periodontitis tissues. Periodontitis tissue plasma cells mainly secreted IgG specific to periodontal pathogens and also expressed receptor activator of NF-κB ligand, a bone resorption cytokine. Memory B cells resided in the connective tissue subjacent to the junctional epithelium in healthy gingiva. This suggested a role of memory B cells in maintaining periodontal homeostasis. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Altered B cell homeostasis and Toll-like receptor 9-driven response in patients affected by autoimmune polyglandular syndrome Type 1: Altered B cell phenotype and dysregulation of the B cell function in APECED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perri, Valentina; Gianchecchi, Elena; Scarpa, Riccardo; Valenzise, Mariella; Rosado, Maria Manuela; Giorda, Ezio; Crinò, Antonino; Cappa, Marco; Barollo, Susi; Garelli, Silvia; Betterle, Corrado; Fierabracci, Alessandra

    2017-02-01

    APECED is a T-cell mediated disease with increased frequencies of CD8+ effector and reduction of FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. Antibodies against affected organs and neutralizing to cytokines are found in the peripheral blood. The contribution of B cells to multiorgan autoimmunity in Aire-/- mice was reported opening perspectives on the utility of anti-B cell therapy. We aimed to analyse the B cell phenotype of APECED patients compared to age-matched controls. FACS analysis was conducted on PBMC in basal conditions and following CpG stimulation. Total B and switched memory (SM) B cells were reduced while IgM memory were increased in patients. In those having more than 15 years from the first clinical manifestation the defect included also mature and transitional B cells; total memory B cells were increased, while SM were unaffected. In patients with shorter disease duration, total B cells were unaltered while SM and IgM memory behaved as in the total group. A defective B cell proliferation was detected after 4day-stimulation. In conclusion APECED patients show, in addition to a significant alteration of the B cell phenotype, a dysregulation of the B cell function involving peripheral innate immune mechanisms particularly those with longer disease duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Rituximab and chemotherapy in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonet, Anne; Bosly, André

    2009-06-01

    Rituximab is an anti-CD20 chimeric monoclonal antibody with activity in nearly all subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Association of rituximab with chemotherapy (mostly the cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone [CHOP] regimen) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) represents an extraordinary revolution in the prognosis of DLBCL, and is the new standard of therapy in elderly and young, low-risk patients. Despite the lack of randomized, clinical trials in younger patients with high risk, rituximab is also a standard of care in these patients in clinical practice, at least in North America. The practice is based on observational trials (e.g., the British Columbia Registry) and the missing logic in classifying patients as 'younger' or 'older': 60 years old or 65 years old. In Europe, trials are ongoing to establish the best treatment for young, high-risk patients. Association of rituximab and chemotherapy deeply modifies prognostic factors defined before the rituximab era.

  6. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. → Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. → TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3 + anti-CD28-stimulated CD4 + T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  7. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Juan [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Usui, Yoshihiko [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Ophthalmology, Tokyo Medical University, 6-7-1 Nishi-shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-0023 (Japan); Takeda, Kazuyoshi [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Harada, Norihiro [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Research Institute for Diseases of Old Ages, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Akiba, Hisaya, E-mail: hisaya@juntendo.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Juntendo University, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan)

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Recombinant human interleukin 2 acts as a B cell growth and differentiation promoting factor

    OpenAIRE

    Emmrich, F.; Moll, Heidrun; Simon, Markus M.

    2009-01-01

    Human B cells appropriately activated by a B cell mitogen are rendered susceptible to human Interleukin 2 (IL-2) as demonstrated with recombinant human IL-2 (rec. h IL-2). They show increased proliferation and drastically enhanced immunoglobulin secretion. Susceptibility to IL-2 is accompanied with the expression of the IL-2 receptor (Tac antigen) on B cells. The data suggest that IL-2 is one of the lymphokines directly involved in the activation of B lymphocytes.

  9. Lymphoma and the control of B cell growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Lixin; Goodnow, Christopher C

    2006-05-01

    It is now widely accepted that lymphomagenesis is a multistep transformation process. A number of genetic changes and environmental and infectious factors contributing to the development and malignant progression of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders are well documented. Reciprocal chromosomal translocations involving the immunoglobulin loci are a hallmark of most mature B cell lymphomas and lead to dysregulated expression of proto-oncogenes (c-myc) important for cell proliferation or genes involved in cell cycle progression (cyclin D1), differentiation block (bcl-6, PAX5) and cell survival (bcl-2, NF-kappaB). In addition, genetic alterations that inactivate tumor suppressor genes (p53, p16) have been frequently detected in some lymphoma tissues. Many of these genes are normally regulated by signals from the B cell antigen receptor. The high prevalence of bacterial and viral infection in lymphoma patients supports the hypothesis that infectious agents may play a contributory role in the development and evolution of B cell lymphoproliferative disorders by either directly inducing polyclonal B cell hyperactivation (EBV, HCV), or providing a chronic antigenic stimulus (EBV, HCV, HBV, H. pylori), or mimicking B cell antigen receptor signaling (EBV, HCV, HHV8), although whether these are causative factors or they are secondary to genetic changes in lymphomagenesis remains to be defined. Stimulatory signals from reactive T cells, local cytokines and growth factors can also contribute, to some extent, to the progression of transformation. Modulation of B cell antigen receptor signaling therefore emerges as a potentially powerful strategy for controlling the growth of certain B cell lymphomas.

  10. B cells in operational tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesneau, M; Danger, R; Soulillou, J-P; Brouard, S

    2018-02-16

    Transplantation is currently the therapy of choice for endstage organ failure even though it requires long-term immunosuppresive therapy, with its numerous side effects, for acceptance of the transplanted organ. In rare cases however, patients develop operational tolerance, that is, graft survival without immunosuppression. Studies conducted on these patients reveal genetic, phenotypic, and functional signatures. They provide a better understanding of the immunological mechanisms involved in operational tolerance and define biomarkers that could be used to adapt immunosuppressive treatment to the individual, safely reduce immunosuppression doses, and ideally and safely guide immunosuppression withdrawal. This review summarizes studies that suggest a role for B cells as biomarkers of operational tolerance and discusses the use of B cells as a predictive tool for immunologic risk. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria S. Khan MD, FACP

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Case Presentation . A 69-year-old Hispanic male, with a past history of diabetes and coronary disease, was admitted for fever, diarrhea, and confusion of 4 weeks duration. Physical examination showed a disoriented patient with multiple ecchymoses, possible ascites, and bilateral scrotal swelling. Hemoglobin was 6.7, prothrombin time (PT 21.4 seconds with international normalized ratio 2.1, partial thromboplastin time (PTT 55.6 seconds, fibrin split 10 µg/L, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH 1231 IU/L. Except for a positive DNA test for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV infection, extensive diagnostic workup for infections, malignancy, or a neurological cause was negative. Mixing studies revealed a nonspecific inhibitor of PT and PTT but Factor VIII levels were normal. The patient was empirically treated with antibiotics but developed hypotension and died on day 27 of admission. At autopsy, patient was found to have intravascular diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving skin, testes, lung, and muscles. The malignant cells were positive for CD20, CD791, Mum-1, and Pax-5 and negative for CD3, CD5, CD10, CD30, and Bcl-6. The malignant cells were 100% positive for Ki-67. Discussion . Intravascular large cell B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL is rare form of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and tends to proliferate within small blood vessels, particularly capillaries and postcapillary venules. The cause of its affinity for vascular bed remains unknown. In many reports, IVLBCL was associated with HIV, HHV8, and EBV infections. The fact that our case showed evidence of EBV infection lends support to the association of this diagnosis to viral illness. The available literature on this subject is scant, and in many cases, the diagnosis was made only at autopsy. The typical presentation of this disorder is with B symptoms, progressive neurologic deficits, and skin findings. Bone marrow, spleen, and liver are involved in a minority of patients. Nearly all patients have elevated LDH

  12. B-cell exposure to self-antigen induces IL-10 producing B cells as well as IL-6- and TNF-α-producing B-cell subsets in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Anina; Kristensen, Birte; Hansen, Bjarke E

    2012-01-01

    Human B cells are able to secrete IL-10 after stimulation with mitogens, but their ability to produce IL-10 and regulate T-cell responses after stimulation with self-antigens is unclear. We co-cultured thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells from healthy donors with autologous T cells and observed production...... of IL-10 and TGF-β, in addition to TNF-α and IL-6. Pulsing with foreign antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), induced a Th1-response with minimal IL-10 production. After thyroglobulin-pulsing, 1.10±0.50% of B cells and 1.00±0.20% of CD4(+) T cells produced IL-10, compared to 0.29±0.19% of B cells (P=0.01) and 0.......13±0.15% of CD4(+) T cells (P=0.006) following TT-pulsing. Thyroglobulin-stimulated, IL-10-secreting B cells were enriched within CD5(+) and CD24(high) cells. While thyroglobulin-pulsed B cells induced only modest proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, B cells pulsed with TT induced vigorous proliferation. Thus, B...

  13. Induction of polyclonal B cell activation and differentiation by the AIDS retrovirus (HTLV-III/LAV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, S.E.; Schnittman, S.M.; Lane, H.C.; Folks, T.; Koenig, S.; Fauci, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The immune systems of individuals infected with HTLV-III/LAV are characterized by a profound defect in cellular immunity together with paradoxical polyclonal B cell activation. The present study examined the direct effects of HTLV-III/LAV on B lymphocytes. Peripheral blood B cells from healthy donors were incubated with a variety of HTLV-III/LAV isolates for 1 h and 3 H-thymidine incorporation was measured at multiple time points. Responses ranged from 9000-28,000 cpm and peaked on day 4. This B cell activation was not enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2 to culture, was not synergistic with Staphylococcus aureus Cowan I, was not modulated by the addition of T lymphocytes to culture, and was not associated with B cell transformation. Supernatant Ig could first be detected in virus-activated cultures at day 4, plateaued by day 8, and yielded a mean of 12,500 ng IgG+IgM/ml/50,000 B cells. Thus, HTLV-III/LAV is a potent T cell independent B cell mitogen capable of inducing B cell activation, proliferation, and differentiation comparable in magnitude to that of the most potent B cell activators. This biological property of HTLV-III/LAV may help explain the profound polyclonal B cell activation observed in patients with AIDS and may provide investigators with another probe for investigating the mechanisms of B cell activation

  14. HCV Infection and B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiko Ito

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV has been recognized as a major cause of chronic liver diseases worldwide. It has been suggested that HCV infects not only hepatocytes but also mononuclear lymphocytes including B cells that express the CD81 molecule, a putative HCV receptor. HCV infection of B cells is the likely cause of B-cell dysregulation disorders such as mixed cryoglobulinemia, rheumatoid factor production, and B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders that may evolve into non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. Epidemiological data indicate an association between HCV chronic infection and the occurrence of B-cell NHL, suggesting that chronic HCV infection is associated at least in part with B-cell lymphomagenesis. In this paper, we aim to provide an overview of recent literature, including our own, to elucidate a possible role of HCV chronic infection in B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  15. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B-cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-like B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Kubale, Valentina; Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Egerod, Kristoffer L; Bassi, Maria R; Spiess, Katja; Schwartz, Thue W; Wang, Hongsheng; Morse, Herbert C; Holst, Peter J; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2017-02-16

    Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develops from CD5 + B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B-cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center (GC) development, and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced GC formation. As a major mediator of follicular B-cell migration, the G protein-coupled receptor Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 ( EBI2 or GPR183 ) directs B-cell migration in the lymphoid follicles in response to its endogenous ligands, oxysterols. Thus, upregulation of EBI2 drives the B cells toward the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for GC formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to CLL. Here, we demonstrate that B-cell-targeted expression of human EBI2 (hEBI2) in mice reduces GC-dependent immune responses, reduces total immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG levels, and leads to increased proliferation and upregulation of cellular oncogenes. Furthermore, hEBI2 overexpression leads to an abnormally expanded CD5 + B1a B-cell subset (present as early as 4 days after birth), late-onset lymphoid cancer development, and premature death. These findings are highly similar to those observed in CLL patients and identify EBI2 as a promoter of B-cell malignancies.

  16. Transcriptional profiling of PBMCs unravels B cell mediated immunopathogenic imprints of HCV vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, Emily; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Murphy, Alison; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Zhang, Xi; Sneller, Michael; Poonia, Bhawna; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2017-01-01

    B cell depletion therapy using rituximab has been shown to be effective in achieving remission in patients with HCV-mixed cryoglobulinemic (MC) vasculitis. Previously, we have demonstrated abnormalities in peripheral immune cells involving neutrophils, chemotaxis, and innate immune activation among patients with HCV-MC vasculitis when compared to HCV patients without vasculitis. In this study, we evaluated the effect of B cell depletion therapy on transcriptional profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after riruximab therapy, in order to unravel the pathogenic mechanism involved in HCV-MC vasculitis induced by abnormal B cell proliferation. DNA microarray analysis was performed using RNA from PBMCs from seven patients with HCV-MC vasculitis and seven normal volunteers. DNA was hybridized to Affymetrix U133A chips. After normalization, differentially expressed gene list with treatment was generated using partitional clustering. RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was used to validate DNA microarray findings. Differentially expressed genes included B cells and non-B cell genes. Validation of genes using purified cell subsets demonstrated distinct effect of B cell depletion therapy on non-B cells, such as monocytes, T cells, and NK cells. Notably, B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS) levels were persistently elevated in patients who subsequently relapsed. In conclusion, pathogenesis of HCV-MC vasculitis is mediated by abnormal proliferation of B cells, driven by BLyS, leading to significant effects on non-B cells in mediating symptomatology. Future therapeutics using a combination approach of B cell depletion and proliferation may be desired to achieve long-term remission.

  17. Secondary immunization generates clonally related antigen-specific plasma cells and memory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Daniela; Giesecke, Claudia; Mei, Henrik E; Reiter, Karin; Daridon, Capucine; Lipsky, Peter E; Dörner, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Rechallenge with T cell-dependent Ags induces memory B cells to re-enter germinal centers (GCs) and undergo further expansion and differentiation into plasma cells (PCs) and secondary memory B cells. It is currently not known whether the expanded population of memory B cells and PCs generated in secondary GCs are clonally related, nor has the extent of proliferation and somatic hypermutation of their precursors been delineated. In this study, after secondary tetanus toxoid (TT) immunization, TT-specific PCs increased 17- to 80-fold on days 6-7, whereas TT-specific memory B cells peaked (delayed) on day 14 with a 2- to 22-fold increase. Molecular analyses of V(H)DJ(H) rearrangements of individual cells revealed no major differences of gene usage and CDR3 length between TT-specific PCs and memory B cells, and both contained extensive evidence of somatic hypermutation with a pattern consistent with GC reactions. This analysis identified clonally related TT-specific memory B cells and PCs. Within clusters of clonally related cells, sequences shared a number of mutations but also could contain additional base pair changes. The data indicate that although following secondary immunization PCs can derive from memory B cells without further somatic hypermutation, in some circumstances, likely within GC reactions, asymmetric mutation can occur. These results suggest that after the fate decision to differentiate into secondary memory B cells or PCs, some committed precursors continue to proliferate and mutate their V(H) genes.

  18. Differential radiosensitivity among B cell subpopulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riggs, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The selective radiosensitivity of sIgM >> sIgD marginal zone B cells is associated with the selective loss of B cell function. The simultaneous restoration of impaired function and recovery of these cells with time supports this premise. B cell recovery, delayed one week after irradiation, is in progress at two weeks, and virtually complete by three weeks. XID mice reveal similar recovery kinetics although there are fewer recovering cells and these bear reduced levels of Ia. This observation represents additional evidence that xid B cells are distinct from those of normal mice. The simultaneous loss, and concurrent recovery, of sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness in irradiated mice suggests the existence of a unique B cell subpopulation possessing both phenotypes. Additional support for this hypothesis is provided by demonstrating that splenocytes, depleted of IgD + cells adoptively reconstitute this response in XID mice. The peritoneal B cell pool, which, compared to the spleen, consist of increased numbers of sIgM >> sIgD B cells, is shown to be a source of radiosensitive B cells that are TI-2 responsive. These observations represent additional evidence for an association between sIgM >> sIgD B cells and TI-2 responsiveness

  19. B cells are multifunctional players in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis: insights from therapeutic interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nele eClaes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is a severe disease of the central nervous system (CNS characterized by autoimmune inflammation and neurodegeneration. Historically, damage to the CNS was thought to be mediated predominantly by activated pro-inflammatory T cells. B cell involvement in the pathogenesis of MS was solely attributed to autoantibody production. The first clues for the involvement of antibody-independent B cell functions in MS pathology came from positive results in clinical trials of the B cell depleting treatment rituximab in patients with relapsing-remitting (RR MS. The survival of antibody-secreting plasma cells and decrease in T cell numbers indicated the importance of other B cell functions in MS such as antigen presentation, costimulation and cytokine production. Rituximab provided us with an example of how clinical trials can lead to new research opportunities concerning B cell biology. Moreover, analysis of the antibody-independent B cell functions in MS has gained interest since these trials. Limited information is present on the effects of current immunomodulatory therapies on B cell functions, although effects of both first-line (interferon, glatiramer acetate, dimethyl fumarate and teriflunomide, second-line (fingolimod, natalizumab and even third-line (monoclonal antibody therapies treatments on B cell subtype distribution, expression of functional surface markers and secretion of different cytokines by B cells have been studied to some extent. In this review, we summarize the effects of different MS related treatments on B cell functions that have been described up to now in order to find new research opportunities and contribute to the understanding of the pathogenesis of MS.

  20. Quantitative regulation of B cell division destiny by signal strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Marian L; Hawkins, Edwin D; Hodgkin, Philip D

    2008-07-01

    Differentiation to Ab secreting and isotype-switched effector cells is tightly linked to cell division and therefore the degree of proliferation strongly influences the nature of the immune response. The maximum number of divisions reached, termed the population division destiny, is stochastically distributed in the population and is an important parameter in the quantitative outcome of lymphocyte responses. In this study, we further assessed the variables that regulate B cell division destiny in vitro in response to T cell- and TLR-dependent stimuli. Both the concentration and duration of stimulation were able to regulate the average maximum number of divisions undergone for each stimulus. Notably, a maximum division destiny was reached during provision of repeated saturating stimulation, revealing that an intrinsic limit to proliferation exists even under these conditions. This limit was linked directly to division number rather than time of exposure to stimulation and operated independently of the survival regulation of the cells. These results demonstrate that a B cell population's division destiny is regulable by the stimulatory conditions up to an inherent maximum value. Division destiny is a crucial parameter in regulating the extent of B cell responses and thereby also the nature of the immune response mounted.

  1. TGFβ activated kinase 1 (TAK1 at the crossroad of B cell receptor and Toll-like receptor 9 signaling pathways in human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dániel Szili

    Full Text Available B cell development and activation are regulated by combined signals mediated by the B cell receptor (BCR, receptors for the B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF-R and the innate receptor, Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9. However, the underlying mechanisms by which these signals cooperate in human B cells remain unclear. Our aim was to elucidate the key signaling molecules at the crossroads of BCR, BAFF-R and TLR9 mediated pathways and to follow the functional consequences of costimulation.Therefore we stimulated purified human B cells by combinations of anti-Ig, B-cell activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family (BAFF and the TLR9 agonist, CpG oligodeoxynucleotide. Phosphorylation status of various signaling molecules, B cell proliferation, cytokine secretion, plasma blast generation and the frequency of IgG producing cells were investigated. We have found that BCR induced signals cooperate with BAFF-R- and TLR9-mediated signals at different levels of cell activation. BCR and BAFF- as well as TLR9 and BAFF-mediated signals cooperate at NFκB activation, while BCR and TLR9 synergistically costimulate mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, ERK, JNK and p38. We show here for the first time that the MAP3K7 (TGF beta activated kinase, TAK1 is responsible for the synergistic costimulation of B cells by BCR and TLR9, resulting in an enhanced cell proliferation, plasma blast generation, cytokine and antibody production. Specific inhibitor of TAK1 as well as knocking down TAK1 by siRNA abrogates the synergistic signals. We conclude that TAK1 is a key regulator of receptor crosstalk between BCR and TLR9, thus plays a critical role in B cell development and activation.

  2. B Cell Depletion: Rituximab in Glomerular Disease and Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marinaki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available B cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune diseases. Selective targeting can be achieved with the use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab. In addition to being a drug for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, rituximab is also an FDA-approved treatment for refractory rheumatoid arthritis and, since recently, ANCA vasculitis. It has shown efficacy in many autoimmune diseases. This review will discuss current evidence and the rationale of the use of rituximab in glomerular diseases, including randomized controlled trials. The focus will be on the use of rituximab in idiopathic membranous nephropathy, systemic lupus erythematosus and ANCA-associated vasculitis. The emerging role of rituximab in renal transplantation, where it seems to be important for the desensitization protocols for highly sensitized patients as well as for the preconditioning of ABO-incompatible recipients and the treatment of antibody-mediated rejection, will also be addressed.

  3. IL-10-produced by human transitional B-cells down-regulates CD86 expression on B-cells leading to inhibition of CD4+T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Fanelli, Giorgia; Becker, Pablo D; Chana, Prabhjoat; Elgueta, Raul; Dodd, Philippa C; Lord, Graham M; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P

    2016-01-22

    A novel subset of human regulatory B-cells has recently been described. They arise from within the transitional B-cell subpopulation and are characterised by the production of IL-10. They appear to be of significant importance in regulating T-cell immunity in vivo. Despite this important function, the molecular mechanisms by which they control T-cell activation are incompletely defined. Here we show that transitional B-cells produced more IL-10 and expressed higher levels of IL-10 receptor after CD40 engagement compared to other B-cell subsets. Furthermore, under this stimulatory condition, CD86 expressed by transitional B-cells was down regulated and T-cell proliferation was reduced. We provide evidence to demonstrate that the down-regulation of CD86 expression by transitional B-cells was due to the autocrine effect of IL-10, which in turn leads to decreased T-cell proliferation and TNF-α production. This analysis was further extended to peripheral B-cells in kidney transplant recipients. We observed that B-cells from patients tolerant to the graft maintained higher IL-10 production after CD40 ligation, which correlates with lower CD86 expression compared to patients with chronic rejection. Hence, the results obtained in this study shed light on a new alternative mechanism by which transitional B-cells inhibit T-cell proliferation and cytokine production.

  4. IL-10-produced by human transitional B-cells down-regulates CD86 expression on B-cells leading to inhibition of CD4+T-cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Fanelli, Giorgia; Becker, Pablo D.; Chana, Prabhjoat; Elgueta, Raul; Dodd, Philippa C.; Lord, Graham M.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    A novel subset of human regulatory B-cells has recently been described. They arise from within the transitional B-cell subpopulation and are characterised by the production of IL-10. They appear to be of significant importance in regulating T-cell immunity in vivo. Despite this important function, the molecular mechanisms by which they control T-cell activation are incompletely defined. Here we show that transitional B-cells produced more IL-10 and expressed higher levels of IL-10 receptor after CD40 engagement compared to other B-cell subsets. Furthermore, under this stimulatory condition, CD86 expressed by transitional B-cells was down regulated and T-cell proliferation was reduced. We provide evidence to demonstrate that the down-regulation of CD86 expression by transitional B-cells was due to the autocrine effect of IL-10, which in turn leads to decreased T-cell proliferation and TNF-α production. This analysis was further extended to peripheral B-cells in kidney transplant recipients. We observed that B-cells from patients tolerant to the graft maintained higher IL-10 production after CD40 ligation, which correlates with lower CD86 expression compared to patients with chronic rejection. Hence, the results obtained in this study shed light on a new alternative mechanism by which transitional B-cells inhibit T-cell proliferation and cytokine production. PMID:26795594

  5. Co-stimulation by anti-immunoglobulin is required for B cell activation by CD40Llow T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    cell Ag specificity by using anti-CD3/T cell receptor (TcR) monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to activate T cells. To study the role of sIg engagement in the responsiveness of B cells to T help, we pre-treated small resting B cells with soluble anti-kappa mAb prior to contact with an activated Th1 clone...... strongly. Low buoyant density B cells also responded to CD40Llow Th cells. There was no B cell response to resting Th cells. mAb against CD54/intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II completely inhibited B cell responses to CD40Llow Th1 cells, equivalent...

  6. The impact of TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1) expression in precursor B cells and implications for leukaemia using three different genome-wide screening methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linka, Y; Ginzel, S; Krüger, M; Novosel, A; Gombert, M; Kremmer, E; Harbott, J; Thiele, R; Borkhardt, A; Landgraf, P

    2013-01-01

    The reciprocal translocation t(12;21)(p13;q22), the most common structural genomic alteration in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children, results in a chimeric transcription factor TEL-AML1 (ETV6-RUNX1). We identified directly and indirectly regulated target genes utilizing an inducible TEL-AML1 system derived from the murine pro B-cell line BA/F3 and a monoclonal antibody directed against TEL-AML1. By integration of promoter binding identified with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip, gene expression and protein output through microarray technology and stable labelling of amino acids in cell culture, we identified 217 directly and 118 indirectly regulated targets of the TEL-AML1 fusion protein. Directly, but not indirectly, regulated promoters were enriched in AML1-binding sites. The majority of promoter regions were specific for the fusion protein and not bound by native AML1 or TEL. Comparison with gene expression profiles from TEL-AML1-positive patients identified 56 concordantly misregulated genes with negative effects on proliferation and cellular transport mechanisms and positive effects on cellular migration, and stress responses including immunological responses. In summary, this work for the first time gives a comprehensive insight into how TEL-AML1 expression may directly and indirectly contribute to alter cells to become prone for leukemic transformation

  7. Diagnostic value of immunoglobulin κ light chain gene rearrangement analysis in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokovic, Ira; Jezersek Novakovic, Barbara; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of the immunoglobulin κ light chain (IGK) gene is an alternative method for B-cell clonality assessment in the diagnosis of mature B-cell proliferations in which the detection of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangements fails. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the added value of standardized BIOMED-2 assay for the detection of clonal IGK gene rearrangements in the diagnostic setting of suspected B-cell lymphomas. With this purpose, 92 specimens from 80 patients with the final diagnosis of mature B-cell lymphoma (37 specimens), mature T-cell lymphoma (26 specimens) and reactive lymphoid proliferation (29 specimens) were analyzed for B-cell clonality. B-cell clonality analysis was performed using the BIOMED-2 IGH and IGK gene clonality assays. The determined sensitivity of the IGK assay was 67.6%, while the determined sensitivity of the IGH assay was 75.7%. The sensitivity of combined IGH+IGK assay was 81.1%. The determined specificity of the IGK assay was 96.2% in the group of T-cell lymphomas and 96.6% in the group of reactive lesions. The determined specificity of the IGH assay was 84.6% in the group of lymphomas and 86.2% in the group of reactive lesions. The comparison of GeneScan (GS) and heteroduplex pretreatment-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (HD-PAGE) methods for the analysis of IGK gene rearrangements showed a higher efficacy of GS analysis in a series of 27 B-cell lymphomas analyzed by both methods. In the present study, we demonstrated that by applying the combined IGH+IGK clonality assay the overall detection rate of B-cell clonality was increased by 5.4%. Thus, we confirmed the added value of the standardized BIOMED-2 IGK assay for assessment of B-cell clonality in suspected B-cell lymphomas with inconclusive clinical and cyto/histological diagnosis.

  8. EBI2 overexpression in mice leads to B1 B cell expansion and chronic lymphocytic leukemia-(CLL)-like B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss Arfelt, Kristine; Barington, Line; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-01-01

    -targeted expression of human EBI2 in mice reduces germinal center-dependent immune responses, reduces total IgM and IgG levels, and leads to increased proliferation and upregulation of cellular oncogenes. Furthermore, hEBI2 overexpression leads to an abnormally expanded CD5+ B1a B cell subset present as early as 4......Human and mouse chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) develop from CD5+ B cells that in mice and macaques are known to define the distinct B1a B cell lineage. B1a cells are characterized by lack of germinal center development and the B1a cell population is increased in mice with reduced germinal...... cells towards the extrafollicular area, whereas downregulation is essential for germinal center formation. We therefore speculated whether increased expression of EBI2 would lead to an expanded B1 cell subset and, ultimately, progression to chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Here we demonstrate that B cell...

  9. Antigen presentation by resting B cells. Radiosensitivity of the antigen-presentation function and two distinct pathways of T cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this report we have examined the ability of small resting B cells to act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) to antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cells as assessed by either T cell proliferation or T cell-dependent B cell stimulation. We found that 10 of 14 in vitro antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cell clones and lines and three of four T cell hybridomas could be induced to either proliferate or secrete IL-2 in the presence of lightly irradiated (1,000 rads) purified B cells and the appropriate foreign antigen. All T cell lines and hybridomas were stimulated to proliferate or make IL-2 by macrophage- and dendritic cell-enriched populations and all T cells tested except one hybridoma caused B cell activation when stimulated with B cells as APC. Furthermore, lightly irradiated, highly purified syngeneic B cells were as potent a source of APC for inducing B cell activation as were low density dendritic and macrophage-enriched cells. Lymph node T cells freshly taken from antigen-primed animals were also found to proliferate when cultured with purified B cells and the appropriate antigen. This APC function was easily measured when the cells were irradiated with 1,000 rads, but was greatly diminished or absent when they were irradiated with 3,300 rads. In addition, this radiosensitivity allowed us to easily distinguish B cell antigen presentation from presentation by the dendritic cell and macrophage, as the latter was resistant to 3,300 rads. Finally, one T cell clone that failed to proliferate when B cells were used as APC was able to recruit allogeneic B cells to proliferate in the presence of syngeneic B cells and the appropriate antigen. This result suggests that there are at least two distinct pathways of activation in T cells, one that leads to T cell proliferation and one that leads to the secretion of B cell recruitment factor(s)

  10. B cells and B cell products-helping to restore cellular immunity?

    OpenAIRE

    Cascalho, Marilia; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2006-01-01

    T cells that provide vital protection against tumors, viruses and intracellular bacteria are thought to develop independently of B cells. However, recent discoveries suggest that development of T cells depends on B cells. One way B cells promote T cell development is by providing diverse peptides that may promote positive selection of thymocytes. Diverse peptides and B cells help in diversification of the T cell receptor repertoire and may decrease cross-reactivity in the mature T cell compar...

  11. Rehabilitation or the death penalty: autoimmune B cells in the dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Lekh N; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-03-01

    CD20-based monoclonal antibodies have become established as treatments for lymphoma, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis and dermatomyositis, with the principle therapeutic mechanism relating to B-cell depletion through effector cell engagement. An article by Brühl et al. in this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [Eur. J. Immunol. 2015. 45: 705-715] reveals a fundamentally distinct mechanism of silencing autoimmune B-cell responses. Rather than B-cell depletion, the authors use anti-CD79b antibodies to induce B-cell tolerance and suppress humoral immune responses against collagen to prevent the development of arthritis in mice. Here we highlight the differences in the mechanisms used by anti-CD20 and anti-CD79b Ab therapy and discuss why depletion of B cells may not be required to treat autoimmune arthritis and other B-cell-associated pathologies. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. B Cell Tolerance in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murali Gururajan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available B lymphocyte receptors are generated randomly during the bone marrow developmental phase of B cells. Hence, the B cell repertoire consists of both self and foreign antigen specificities necessitating specific tolerance mechanisms to eliminate self-reactive B cells. This review summarizes the major mechanisms of B cell tolerance, which include clonal deletion, anergy and receptor editing. In the bone marrow presentation of antigen in membrane bound form is more effective than soluble form and the role of dendritic cells in this process is discussed. Toll like receptor derived signals affect activation of B cells by certain ligands such as nucleic acids and have been shown to play crucial roles in the development of autoimmunity in several animal models. In the periphery availability of BAFF, a B cell survival factor plays a critical role in the survival of self-reactive B cells. Antibodies against BAFF have been found to be effective therapeutic agents in lupus like autoimmune diseases. Recent developments are targeting anergy to control the growth of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

  13. B Cells and Autoantibodies in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Katrin Pröbstel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available While over the past decades T cells have been considered key players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS, it has only recently become evident that B cells have a major contributing role. Our understanding of the role of B cells has evolved substantially following the clinical success of B cell-targeting therapies and increasing experimental evidence for significant B cell involvement. Rather than mere antibody-producing cells, it is becoming clear that they are team players with the capacity to prime and regulate T cells, and function both as pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. However, despite tremendous efforts, the target antigen(s of B cells in MS have yet to be identified. The first part of this review summarizes the clinical evidence and results from animal studies pointing to the relevance of B cells in the pathogenesis of MS. The second part gives an overview of the currently known potential autoantigen targets. The third part recapitulates and critically appraises the currently available B cell-directed therapies.

  14. Deletion of Dock10 in B Cells Results in Normal Development but a Mild Deficiency upon In Vivo and In Vitro Stimulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Severinson

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We sought to identify genes necessary to induce cytoskeletal change in B cells. Using gene expression microarray, we compared B cells stimulated with interleukin-4 (IL-4 and anti-CD40 antibodies that induce B cell spreading, cell motility, tight aggregates, and extensive microvilli with B cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide that lack these cytoskeletal changes. We identified 84 genes with 10-fold or greater expression in anti-CD40 + IL-4 stimulated B cells, one of these encoded the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF dedicator of cytokinesis 10 (Dock10. IL-4 selectively induced Dock10 expression in B cells. Using lacZ expression to monitor Dock10 promoter activity, we found that Dock10 was expressed at all stages during B cell development. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild phenotype with normal B cell development and normal B cell spreading, polarization, motility, chemotaxis, aggregation, and Ig class switching. Dock10-deficient B cells showed lower proliferation in response to anti-CD40 and IL-4 stimulation. Moreover, the IgG response to soluble antigen in vivo was lower when Dock10 was specifically deleted in B cells. Together, we found that most B cell responses were intact in the absence of Dock10. However, specific deletion of Dock10 in B cells was associated with a mild reduction in B cell activation in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Reappraisal of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): comparative analysis between EBV-positive and EBV-negative DLBCL with EBV-positive bystander cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Akiko; Kato, Seiichi; Okamoto, Akinao; Inaguma, Yoko; Satou, Akira; Tsuzuki, Toyonori; Emi, Nobuhiko; Okamoto, Masataka; Nakamura, Shigeo

    2017-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) not otherwise specified is defined as monoclonal EBV+ B-cell proliferation affecting patients without any known immunosuppression. Non-neoplastic EBV+ cells proliferating in or adjacent to EBV- DLBCL were reported recently, but their clinical significance is unclear. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic impact of EBV+ cells in DLBCL. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics of 30 EBV+ DLBCL patients and 29 and 604 EBV- DLBCL patients with and without EBV+ bystander cells (median age of onset 71, 67 and 62 years, respectively). Both EBV+ DLBCL patients and EBV- DLBCL patients with EBV+ bystander cells tended to have high and high-intermediate International Prognostic Index scores (60% and 59%, respectively), as compared with only 46% of EBV- DLBCL patients without EBV+ bystander cells. EBV- DLBCL patients with EBV+ bystander cells showed a significantly higher incidence of lung involvement than those without EBV+ bystander cells (10% versus 2%, P bystander cells had a poorer prognosis than patients without any detectable EBV+ cells [median overall survival (OS) of 100 months and 40 months versus not reached, P bystander cells treated with rituximab showed overlapping survival curves (OS, P = 0.77; progression-free survival, P = 1.0). EBV- DLBCL with bystander EBV+ cells has similar clinical characteristics to EBV+ DLBCL. DLBCL with EBV+ bystander cells may be related to both age-related and microenvironment-related immunological deterioration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Farnesyl transferase inhibitors induce extended remissions in transgenic mice with mature B cell lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refaeli Yosef

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have used a mouse model based on overexpression of c-Myc in B cells genetically engineered to be self-reactive to test the hypothesis that farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTIs can effectively treat mature B cell lymphomas. FTIs are undergoing clinical trials to treat both lymphoid and non-lymphoid malignancies and we wished to obtain evidence to support the inclusion of B cell lymphomas in future trials. Results We report that two FTIs, L-744,832 and SCH66336, blocked the growth of mature B cell lymphoma cells in vitro and in vivo. The FTI treatment affected the proliferation and survival of the transformed B cells to a greater extent than naïve B cells stimulated with antigen. In syngeneic mice transplanted with the transgenic lymphoma cells, L-744,832 treatment prevented the growth of the tumor cells and the morbidity associated with the resulting lymphoma progression. Tumors that arose from transplantation of the lymphoma cells regressed with as little as three days of treatment with L-744,832 or SCH66336. Treatment of these established lymphomas with L-744,832 for seven days led to long-term remission of the disease in approximately 25% of animals. Conclusion FTI treatment can block the proliferation and survival of self-reactive transformed B cells that overexpress Myc. In mice transplanted with mature B cell lymphomas, we found that FTI treatment led to regression of disease. FTIs warrant further consideration as therapeutic agents for mature B cell lymphomas and other lymphoid tumors.

  17. Authentication of primordial characteristics of the CLBL-1 cell line prove the integrity of a canine B-cell lymphoma in a murine in vivo model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara C Rütgen

    Full Text Available Cell lines are key tools in cancer research allowing the generation of neoplasias in animal models resembling the initial tumours able to mimic the original neoplasias closely in vivo. Canine lymphoma is the major hematopoietic malignancy in dogs and considered as a valuable spontaneous large animal model for human Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL. Herein we describe the establishment and characterisation of an in vivo model using the canine B-cell lymphoma cell line CLBL-1 analysing the stability of the induced tumours and the ability to resemble the original material. CLBL-1 was injected into Rag2(-/-γ(c (-/- mice. The generated tumor material was analysed by immunophenotyping and histopathology and used to establish the cell line CLBL-1M. Both cell lines were karyotyped for detection of chromosomal aberrations. Additionally, CLBL-1 was stimulated with IL-2 and DSP30 as described for primary canine B-cell lymphomas and NHL to examine the stimulatory effect on cell proliferation. CLBL-1 in vivo application resulted in lymphoma-like disease and tumor formation. Immunophenotypic analysis of tumorous material showed expression of CD45(+, MHCII(+, CD11a(+ and CD79αcy(+. PARR analysis showed positivity for IgH indicating a monoclonal character. These cytogenetic, molecular, immunophenotypical and histological characterisations of the in vivo model reveal that the induced tumours and thereof generated cell line resemble closely the original material. After DSP30 and IL-2 stimulation, CLBL-1 showed to respond in the same way as primary material. The herein described CLBL-1 in vivo model provides a highly stable tool for B-cell lymphoma research in veterinary and human medicine allowing various further in vivo studies.

  18. Authentication of primordial characteristics of the CLBL-1 cell line prove the integrity of a canine B-cell lymphoma in a murine in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rütgen, Barbara C; Willenbrock, Saskia; Reimann-Berg, Nicola; Walter, Ingrid; Fuchs-Baumgartinger, Andrea; Wagner, Siegfried; Kovacic, Boris; Essler, Sabine E; Schwendenwein, Ilse; Nolte, Ingo; Saalmüller, Armin; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Cell lines are key tools in cancer research allowing the generation of neoplasias in animal models resembling the initial tumours able to mimic the original neoplasias closely in vivo. Canine lymphoma is the major hematopoietic malignancy in dogs and considered as a valuable spontaneous large animal model for human Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL). Herein we describe the establishment and characterisation of an in vivo model using the canine B-cell lymphoma cell line CLBL-1 analysing the stability of the induced tumours and the ability to resemble the original material. CLBL-1 was injected into Rag2(-/-)γ(c) (-/-) mice. The generated tumor material was analysed by immunophenotyping and histopathology and used to establish the cell line CLBL-1M. Both cell lines were karyotyped for detection of chromosomal aberrations. Additionally, CLBL-1 was stimulated with IL-2 and DSP30 as described for primary canine B-cell lymphomas and NHL to examine the stimulatory effect on cell proliferation. CLBL-1 in vivo application resulted in lymphoma-like disease and tumor formation. Immunophenotypic analysis of tumorous material showed expression of CD45(+), MHCII(+), CD11a(+) and CD79αcy(+). PARR analysis showed positivity for IgH indicating a monoclonal character. These cytogenetic, molecular, immunophenotypical and histological characterisations of the in vivo model reveal that the induced tumours and thereof generated cell line resemble closely the original material. After DSP30 and IL-2 stimulation, CLBL-1 showed to respond in the same way as primary material. The herein described CLBL-1 in vivo model provides a highly stable tool for B-cell lymphoma research in veterinary and human medicine allowing various further in vivo studies.

  19. Lipid rafts and B cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neetu; DeFranco, Anthony L

    2007-10-01

    B cells comprise an essential component of the humoral immune system. They are equipped with the unique ability to synthesize and secrete pathogen-neutralizing antibodies, and share with professional antigen presenting cells the ability to internalize foreign antigens, and process them for presentation to helper T cells. Recent evidence indicates that specialized cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich microdomains in the plasma membrane commonly referred to as lipid rafts, serve to compartmentalize key signaling molecules during the different stages of B cell activation including B cell antigen receptor (BCR)-initiated signal transduction, endocytosis of BCR-antigen complexes, loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC class II molecules, MHC-II associated antigen presentation to helper T cells, and receipt of helper signals via the CD40 receptor. Here we review the recent literature arguing for a role of lipid rafts in the spatial organization of B cell function.

  20. B-cell waste classification sampling plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the methods used to collect samples and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream

  1. B Cells and B Cell Blasts Withstand Cryopreservation While Retaining Their Functionality for Producing Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Fecher

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In individuals who have once developed humoral immunity to an infectious/foreign antigen, the antibodies present in their body can mediate instant protection when the antigen re-enters. Such antigen-specific antibodies can be readily detected in the serum. Long term humoral immunity is, however, also critically dependent on the ability of memory B cells to engage in a secondary antibody response upon re-exposure to the antigen. Antibody molecules in the body are short lived, having a half-life of weeks, while memory B cells have a life span of decades. Therefore, the presence of serum antibodies is not always a reliable indicator of B cell memory and comprehensive monitoring of humoral immunity requires that both serum antibodies and memory B cells be assessed. The prevailing view is that resting memory B cells and B cell blasts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC cannot be cryopreserved without losing their antibody secreting function, and regulated high throughput immune monitoring of B cell immunity is therefore confined to—and largely limited by—the need to test freshly isolated PBMC. Using optimized protocols for freezing and thawing of PBMC, and four color ImmunoSpot® analysis for the simultaneous detection of all immunoglobulin classes/subclasses we show here that both resting memory B cells and B cell blasts retain their ability to secrete antibody after thawing, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of B cell immune monitoring using cryopreserved PBMC.

  2. B Cells and B Cell Blasts Withstand Cryopreservation While Retaining Their Functionality for Producing Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecher, Philipp; Caspell, Richard; Naeem, Villian; Karulin, Alexey Y; Kuerten, Stefanie; Lehmann, Paul V

    2018-05-31

    In individuals who have once developed humoral immunity to an infectious/foreign antigen, the antibodies present in their body can mediate instant protection when the antigen re-enters. Such antigen-specific antibodies can be readily detected in the serum. Long term humoral immunity is, however, also critically dependent on the ability of memory B cells to engage in a secondary antibody response upon re-exposure to the antigen. Antibody molecules in the body are short lived, having a half-life of weeks, while memory B cells have a life span of decades. Therefore, the presence of serum antibodies is not always a reliable indicator of B cell memory and comprehensive monitoring of humoral immunity requires that both serum antibodies and memory B cells be assessed. The prevailing view is that resting memory B cells and B cell blasts in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cannot be cryopreserved without losing their antibody secreting function, and regulated high throughput immune monitoring of B cell immunity is therefore confined to-and largely limited by-the need to test freshly isolated PBMC. Using optimized protocols for freezing and thawing of PBMC, and four color ImmunoSpot ® analysis for the simultaneous detection of all immunoglobulin classes/subclasses we show here that both resting memory B cells and B cell blasts retain their ability to secrete antibody after thawing, and thus demonstrate the feasibility of B cell immune monitoring using cryopreserved PBMC.

  3. PTIP chromatin regulator controls development and activation of B cell subsets to license humoral immunity in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Dan; Vanhee, Stijn; Soria, Rebeca

    2017-01-01

    B cell receptor signaling and downstream NF-κB activity are crucial for the maturation and functionality of all major B cell subsets, yet the molecular players in these signaling events are not fully understood. Here we use several genetically modified mouse models to demonstrate that expression...... of the multifunctional BRCT (BRCA1 C-terminal) domain-containing PTIP (Pax transactivation domain-interacting protein) chromatin regulator is controlled by B cell activation and potentiates steady-state and postimmune antibody production in vivo. By examining the effects of PTIP deficiency in mice at various ages during...... ontogeny, we demonstrate that PTIP promotes bone marrow B cell development as well as the neonatal establishment and subsequent long-term maintenance of self-reactive B-1 B cells. Furthermore, we find that PTIP is required for B cell receptor- and T:B interaction-induced proliferation, differentiation...

  4. [Monoclonal antibodies in diagnosis of acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyńska, A; Robak, T

    1996-01-01

    Immunophenotyping has become an essential component for the study of acute myeloblastic (AML) and lymphoblastic (ALL) leukaemias. The recent development of highly specific monoclonal antibodies (Mc Ab) to differentiation antigens (CD) of haematopoetic cells have made it readily available to clinical laboratories in most major hospitals. Immunophenotyping complements standard morphology by providing information on lineage, stage of differentiation and clonality. In addition some of the flow cytometry findings have independent prognostic significance. Monoclonal antibodies useful in defining lineage (B-cell versus T-cell) and stages of differentiation of ALL. It can be also used in identifying characteristic feature of AML and aiding in lineage determination in acute leukaemias that are morphologically undifferentiated. Surface immunophenotyping is especially helpful for recognizing mixed lineage acute leukaemia and diagnosing certain rare entities such as erythroleukaemia (M6), acute megakaryocytic leukaemia (M7) and minimally differentiation acute myeloid leukaemia.

  5. Expression of HER2/Neu in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Pomerantz, Alan; Demichelis-Gomez, Roberta; Barrera-Lumbreras, Georgina; Barrales-Benitez, Olga; Aguayo-Gonzalez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    The expression of HER2/neu in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia has been reported in previous studies. The objective of this research was to study the expression of HER2/neu on the blasts of patients with acute leukemia from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran. From June 2015 to February 2016, a HER2/neu monoclonal antibody was added to the panel of antibodies that we routinely use in patients with acute leukemia. An expression of ≥ 30% was considered positive. We studied 33 patients: 19 had de novo leukemia (57.6%), three (9.1%) were in relapse, and in 11 (33.3%) their status could not be specified. Seventeen patients (51.5%) were classified as B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with a median expression of HER2/neu of 0.3% (range 0-90.2). Three patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia were positive for HER2/neu: 89.4%, 90.9%, and 62.4%. The first and third patient had de novo B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The second patient was in second relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplant. All three patients were categorized as high-risk at the time of diagnosis. In the studied Mexican population, we found a positive expression of HER2/neu in 17% of the B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, similar to previous studies in which the expression was found in 15-50%.

  6. Specific Depletion of Myelin-Reactive B Cells via BCR-Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanov, A V; Belogurov, A A; Kothapalli, P; Shamborant, O G; Knorre, V D; Telegin, G B; Ovsepyan, A A; Ponomarenko, N A; Deyev, S M; Kaveri, S V; Gabibov, A G

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a crucial role in the development and pathogenesis of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Autoreactive B cells not only produce antibodies, but also secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines and present specific autoantigens to T cells. The treatment of autoimmune diseases via the elimination of the majority of B cells using the monoclonal anti-CD19/20 antibody (Rituximab) causes systemic side effects and, thus, requires a major revision. Therapeutic intervention directed towards selective elimination of pathogenic autoreactive B cells has the potential to become a universal approach to the treatment of various autoimmune abnormalities. Here, we developed a recombinant immunotoxin based on the immunodominant peptide of the myelin basic protein (MBP), fused to the antibody Fc domain. We showed that the obtained immunotoxin provides selective in vivo elimination of autoreactive B cells in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The proposed conception may be further used for the development of new therapeutics for a targeted treatment of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune disorders.

  7. Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder and its differential diagnosis: a case with long-term follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kensuke Matsuda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Hairy B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder (HBLD is one of chronic polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. We report a 47-year-old female Japanese patient diagnosed as having HBLD based on lymphocytosis with hairy cell appearance and characteristic phenotypes including CD11c+, and without B-cell monoclonalities. She was a non-smoker, and possessed HLA-DR4. She has been closely followed up without treatment and lymphoma development for over five years. Although this disease is quite rare and has been reported, to our knowledge, in only 13 Japanese cases, an accurate diagnosis, particularly differential diagnosis from persistent polyclonal B-cell lymphocytosis or hairy cell leukemia-Japanese variant is essential for the prevention of unnecessary treatments.

  8. Metabolic activity is necessary for activation of T suppressor cells by B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, K.L.; Stashak, P.W.; Baker, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Ag-primed B cells must express cell-surface IgM, but not IgD or Ia Ag, and must remain metabolically active, in order to activate suppressor T cells (Ts) specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. Ag-primed B cells that were gamma-irradiated with 1000r, or less, retained the ability to activate Ts; however, Ag-primed B cells exposed to UV light were not able to do so. gamma-Irradiated and UV-treated Ag-primed B cells both expressed comparable levels of cell-surface IgM, and both localized to the spleen after in vivo transfer; neither could proliferate in vitro in response to mitogens. By contrast, gamma-irradiated primed B cells were still able to synthesize proteins, whereas UV-treated primed B cells could not. These findings suggest that in order for Ag-primed B cells to activate Ts, they must (a) express cell-associated IgM (sIgM) antibody bearing the idiotypic determinants of antibody specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide, and (b) be able to synthesize protein for either the continued expression of sIgM after cell transfer, or for the elaboration of another protein molecule that is also required for the activation of Ts; this molecule does not appear to be Ia Ag

  9. Antibody-independent control of gamma-herpesvirus latency via B cell induction of anti-viral T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly B McClellan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available B cells can use antibody-dependent mechanisms to control latent viral infections. It is unknown whether this represents the sole function of B cells during chronic viral infection. We report here that hen egg lysozyme (HEL-specific B cells can contribute to the control of murine gamma-herpesvirus 68 (gammaHV68 latency without producing anti-viral antibody. HEL-specific B cells normalized defects in T cell numbers and proliferation observed in B cell-/- mice during the early phase of gammaHV68 latency. HEL-specific B cells also reversed defects in CD8 and CD4 T cell cytokine production observed in B cell-/- mice, generating CD8 and CD4 T cells necessary for control of latency. Furthermore, HEL-specific B cells were able to present virally encoded antigen to CD8 T cells. Therefore, B cells have antibody independent functions, including antigen presentation, that are important for control of gamma-herpesvirus latency. Exploitation of this property of B cells may allow enhanced vaccine responses to chronic virus infection.

  10. Clinical Implications of Phosphorylated STAT3 Expression in de novo Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ok, Chi Y; Chen, Jiayu; Xu-Monette, Ziju

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) regulates tumor growth, invasion, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, immune response, and survival. Data regarding expression of phosphorylated (activated) STAT3 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and the impact of...

  11. Signals sustaining human immunoglobulin V gene hypermutation in isolated germinal centre B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Dahlenborg; J.D. Pound (J.); J. Gordon (Jocelynne); C.A.K. Borrebaeck (C. A K); R. Carlsson (R.)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAffinity maturation of antibody responses depends on somatic hypermutation of the immunoglobulin V genes. Hypermutation is initiated specifically in proliferating B cells in lymphoid germinal centres but the signals driving this process remain unknown. This study identifies signals that

  12. Prognosis in monoclonal proteinaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaar, Cornelis Gerardus

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal proteinaemia (M-proteinemia) is associated with multiple myeloma (MM) or other hematological malignancies. In the absence of these diseases the term MGUS (Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance) is used. During 1991-1993 1464 patients with newly diagnosed M-proteinemia in the

  13. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  14. Nuclear medicine: Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Sakahara, H.; Koizumi, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Torizuka, K.; Yokoyama, A.

    1986-01-01

    Antitumor monoclonal antibody was successfully labeled with Tc-99m by using dithiosemicarbazone (DTS) as a bifunctional chelating agent. In the first step, DTS was coupled to antibody without loss of immunoreactivity; the compound then efficiently formed a neutral 1:1 chelate with pentavalent or tetravalent Tc-99m. Imaging with Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody to human osteosarcoma (OST-7) clearly displayed a small tumor in nude mice at 6 and 24 hours after intravenous administration. The tumor-to-blood ratio of the Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody was higher than that of a radioiodinated antibody and similar to that of an In-111-labeled antibody. Thus, conjugation of DTS to monoclonal antibody followed by radiometalation is a simple and efficient method of preparing Tc-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody

  15. A case of cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs appearing as chronic venous ulceration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carlesimo

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We report here a case of a woman with a cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma of the legs. She had a plaque lesion, superficially ulcerated and necrotized with tumorous borders situated on the posterior side of the right leg and two red or bluish-red nodular lesions. A skin biopsy from both nodular and plaque lesion showed a diffuse infiltrate of atypical large B cells CD20+ and CD79a+, spanning epidermis, dermis and subcutaneous tissue. A therapeutic approach containing anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (rituximab was suggested.

  16. Use of radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B1 antibody for B lymphocyte imaging in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Letvin, N.L.; Zalutsky, M.R.; Chalifoux, L.V.; Atkins, H.L.

    1987-01-01

    Imaging tissues rich in B lymphocytes in man using a radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B cell antibody would be extremely useful in the clinical staging of non-Hodgkins lymphomas. Studies were done in rhesus monkeys using radiolabeled monoclonal anti-B1 antibody to determine the feasibility of such an approach. Immunohistologic studies demonstrated that infused monoclonal anti-B1 binds in vivo with specificity to B cells in lymph nodes and spleen. The kinetics of clearance of 131 I-labeled anti-B1 were determined. The B lymphocyte-rich spleen could be readily visualized by gamma camera scanning without significant background and without the need for image intensification or blood background subtraction techniques. These data support the feasibility of using anti-B1 for staging B cell lymphomas in man. (author)

  17. Interaction of Staphylococci with Human B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler K Nygaard

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human infections worldwide. The pathogen produces numerous molecules that can interfere with recognition and binding by host innate immune cells, an initial step required for the ingestion and subsequent destruction of microbes by phagocytes. To better understand the interaction of this pathogen with human immune cells, we compared the association of S. aureus and S. epidermidis with leukocytes in human blood. We found that a significantly greater proportion of B cells associated with S. epidermidis relative to S. aureus. Complement components and complement receptors were important for the binding of B cells with S. epidermidis. Experiments using staphylococci inactivated by ultraviolet radiation and S. aureus isogenic deletion mutants indicated that S. aureus secretes molecules regulated by the SaeR/S two-component system that interfere with the ability of human B cells to bind this bacterium. We hypothesize that the relative inability of B cells to bind S. aureus contributes to the microbe's success as a human pathogen.

  18. Double-hit B-cell lymphomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aukema, Sietse M.; Siebert, Reiner; Schuuring, Ed; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Boerma, Evert-Jan; Kluin, Philip M.

    2011-01-01

    In many B-cell lymphomas, chromosomal translocations are biologic and diagnostic hallmarks of disease. An intriguing subset is formed by the so-called double-hit (DH) lymphomas that are defined by a chromosomal breakpoint affecting the MYC/8q24 locus in combination with another recurrent breakpoint,

  19. Gaucher disease and comorbidities: B-cell malignancy and parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Timothy M; Rosenbloom, Barry E; Barker, Roger A

    2015-07-01

    Data emerging from the International Collaborative Gaucher Group (ICGG) Gaucher Registry together with other contemporary clinical surveys have revealed a close association between Gaucher disease and non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma and myeloma and Gaucher disease and Parkinson's disease. Several possible explanations for increased B-cell proliferation and neoplasia in Gaucher disease have been proposed, including the possible influence of sphingosine (derived from the extra lysosomal metabolism of glucosylceramide), gene modifiers, splenectomy and immune system deregulation induced by cytokines, chemokines, and hydrolases released from Gaucher cells. Parkinson's disease is frequently seen in the otherwise-healthy relatives of Gaucher disease patients leading to the finding that GBA mutations represent a genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The mechanism of the association between GBA mutations and Parkinson's disease has yet to be elucidated but the pathogenesis appears distinct from that of Gaucher disease. Several pathogenic pathways have been proposed including lysosomal and/or mitochondrial dysfunction. The effect of Gaucher disease specific therapies on the incidence of cancer or Parkinson's disease are not clear and will likely be evaluated in future ICGG Gaucher Registry studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. JSI-124 inhibits IgE production in an IgE B cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Lulu; Bi, Jiacheng; Yan, Dehong; Ye, Xiufeng; Zheng, Mingxing; Yu, Guang; Wan, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    IgE is a key effector molecule in atopic diseases; however, the regulation mechanisms of IgE production in IgE B cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that JSI-124 (cucurbitacin I), a selective STAT3 inhibitor, selectively inhibits production of IgE by a human IgE B cell line, CRL-8033 cells, while does not affect the IgG production by IgG B cell lines. In the aspect of molecular mechanism, we found that Igλ, but not Ighe, gene expression was suppressed by JSI-124. The above effects of JSI-124 were not mediated by affecting cellular proliferation or apoptosis. Furthermore, multiple B cell differentiation-related genes expression was not significantly affected by JSI-124. Taken together, we demonstrate a potential strategy of therapeutically suppressing IgE production without affecting IgG production in atopic patients. - Highlights: • JSI-124 inhibits IgE production in an IgE B cell line, CRL-8033 cells. • JSI-124 does not affect IgG production by IgG B cell lines. • JSI-124 inhibits IgE production mainly by suppressing transcription of Igλ.

  1. CCR 20th anniversary commentary: Radioactive Drones for B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Susan J; Levy, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    In a study published in the March 1, 1996, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, Knox and colleagues (1) demonstrated the safety and efficacy of Yttirium-90 ((90)Y)-anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy, as well as the benefit of preinfusion of unlabeled antibody on radiolabeled antibody biodistribution. Subsequent clinical trials with this radiolabeled antibody led to regulatory approval of this treatment for B-cell lymphoma. See related article by Knox et al., Clin Cancer Res 1996;2(3) Mar 1996; 457-70. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  2. Metabolic changes during B cell differentiation for the production of intestinal IgA antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisawa, Jun

    2017-04-01

    To sustain the bio-energetic demands of growth, proliferation, and effector functions, the metabolism of immune cells changes dramatically in response to immunologic stimuli. In this review, I focus on B cell metabolism, especially regarding the production of intestinal IgA antibody. Accumulating evidence has implicated not only host-derived factors (e.g., cytokines) but also gut environmental factors, including the possible involvement of commensal bacteria and diet, in the control of B cell metabolism during intestinal IgA antibody production. These findings yield new insights into the regulation of immunosurveillance and homeostasis in the gut.

  3. A tick B-cell inhibitory protein from salivary glands of the hard tick, Hyalomma asiaticum asiaticum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Da; Liang Jiangguo; Yu Haining; Wu Haifeng; Xu Chunhua; Liu Jingze; Lai Ren

    2006-01-01

    Some studies done to date suggest that B-cell inhibitory factor occurred in tick saliva. In this study, a novel protein having B-cell inhibitory activity was purified and characterized from the salivary glands of the hard tick, Hyalomma asiaticum asiaticum. This protein was named B-cell inhibitory factor (BIF). The cDNA encoding BIF was cloned by cDNA library screening. The predicted protein from the cDNA sequence is composed of 138 amino acids including the mature BIF. No similarity was found by Blast search. The lipopolysaccharide-induced B-cell proliferation was inhibited by BIF. This is First report of the identification and characterization of B-cell inhibitory protein from tick. The current study facilitates the study of identifying the interaction among tick, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease, and host

  4. B cell follicle-like structures in multiple sclerosis-with focus on the role of B cell activating factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morten, Haugen; Frederiksen, Jette L; Vinter, Matilda Degn

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocytes play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Follicle-like structures (FLS) have recently been found in the subarachnoid space in the leptomeninges in some patients with secondary progressive MS (SPMS). They contain proliferating B lymphocytes, plasma cells......, helper T lymphocytes and a network of follicular dendritic cells. FLS have been shown to correlate with increased cortical demyelination, neuronal loss, meningeal infiltration and central nervous system inflammation, as well as lower age at disease onset and progression to severe disability and death....... In this review, we will discuss the role of FLS in MS pathogenesis and disease course and the possible influence by B cell activating factor (BAFF) and C-X-C motif chemokine 13 (CXCL13)....

  5. [Shengqifuzheng Injection promotes the recovery of B cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues of mice treated with cyclophosphamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangliang; Huang, Rongrong; Wen, Ruyan; Luo, Xia; Zhou, Lian

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of Shengqifuzheng Injection (SQFZ) on the number recovery of B cells in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALTs) of mice receiving cyclophosphamide-based chemotherapy. Methods BALB/c mice were randomly divided into control group, cyclophosphamide (Cy) group and SQFZ group. Mice in Cy group and SQFZ group were injected intraperitoneally with Cy (100 mg/kg), while the control mice were injected with an equal volume of normal saline. Twenty-four hours later, mice in SQFZ group were administrated intragastricly with 1 mL SQFZ once daily for 10 consecutive days, and mice in the other groups were given the same volume of normal saline. Body mass of all the mice was measured every day. Mice were killed on day 10, and the indexes of spleen and thymus were measured. Cell cycles of bone marrow cells and the percentage of B cells in lymphocytes in mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and Peyer's patch (PP) were detected by flow cytometry. In vitro, after being treated with SQFZ, activity of lymphocytes was evaluzed by MTT assay; expression of CD86 on B cell surface was analyzed by flow cytometry; and B cell proliferation was tested by carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE)-based lymphocyte proliferation assay. Results SQFZ alleviated the loss of body mass caused by Cy and promoted the recovery of thymus indexes, spleen indexes and B cell number in MLN and PP. But it did not alleviate the bone marrow suppression of mice in this condition. In vitro, SQFZ enhanced lymphocyte activity, and improved the activation and proliferation of B cells. Conclusion SQFZ could accelerate the recovery of B cells in GALTs of mice receiving chemotherapy and it might act by promoting B cell proliferation.

  6. Establishment of a novel feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-negative B-cell cell line from a cat with B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Masashi; Nishigaki, Kazuo; Ide, Tetsuya; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Watanabe, Shinya; Sato, Hirofumi; Sato, Masahiko; Kotera, Yukiko; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2011-04-15

    We established a novel feline B-cell line, MS4, from the neoplastic pleural effusion of a cat with cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. Immunophenotype staining of the MS4 cells was positive for CD20, CD79α, and IgA and negative for CD3, CD4, CD5, CD8α, CD18, CD21, CD22, IgM, IgG, Ig light chain, and MHC class II. PCR analysis for immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements revealed a monoclonal rearrangement, whereas no clonal rearrangement of the T-cell receptor γ gene was detected. Southern blotting with an exogenous feline leukemia virus (FeLV) U3 probe revealed no integration of exogenous FeLV provirus. The MS4 cell line is the first FeLV-negative feline B-cell lymphoma cell line, and may be used to investigate the pathogenesis of spontaneously occurring feline lymphoma and the development of new therapies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Distinct and Overlapping Functions of TEC Kinase and BTK in B Cell Receptor Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; Rip, Jasper; van der Ploeg, Esmee K; van Greuningen, Lars W; Ta, Van T B; Kil, Laurens P; Langerak, Anton W; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Hendriks, Rudi W; Corneth, Odilia B J

    2017-04-15

    The Tec tyrosine kinase is expressed in many cell types, including hematopoietic cells, and is a member of the Tec kinase family that also includes Btk. Although the role of Btk in B cells has been extensively studied, the role of Tec kinase in B cells remains largely unclear. It was previously shown that Tec kinase has the ability to partly compensate for loss of Btk activity in B cell differentiation, although the underlying mechanism is unknown. In this study, we confirm that Tec kinase is not essential for normal B cell development when Btk is present, but we also found that Tec-deficient mature B cells showed increased activation, proliferation, and survival upon BCR stimulation, even in the presence of Btk. Whereas Tec deficiency did not affect phosphorylation of phospholipase Cγ or Ca 2+ influx, it was associated with significantly increased activation of the intracellular Akt/S6 kinase signaling pathway upon BCR and CD40 stimulation. The increased S6 kinase phosphorylation in Tec-deficient B cells was dependent on Btk kinase activity, as ibrutinib treatment restored pS6 to wild-type levels, although Btk protein and phosphorylation levels were comparable to controls. In Tec-deficient mice in vivo, B cell responses to model Ags and humoral immunity upon influenza infection were enhanced. Moreover, aged mice lacking Tec kinase developed a mild autoimmune phenotype. Taken together, these data indicate that in mature B cells, Tec and Btk may compete for activation of the Akt signaling pathway, whereby the activating capacity of Btk is limited by the presence of Tec kinase. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  9. Identification of relevant drugable targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using a genome-wide unbiased CD20 guilt-by association approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Mathilde R. W.; Visser, Lydia; Huls, Gerwin; Diepstra, Arjan; van Vugt, Marcel; Ammatuna, Emanuele; van Rijn, Rozemarijn S.; Vellenga, Edo; van den Berg, Anke; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; van Meerten, Tom

    2018-01-01

    Forty percent of patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) show resistant disease to standard chemotherapy (CHOP) in combination with the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab (R). Although many new anti-cancer drugs were developed in the last years, it is unclear which of these drugs

  10. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  11. Clonal heterogeneity of thymic B cells from early-onset myasthenia gravis patients with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrolix, Kathleen; Fraussen, Judith; Losen, Mario; Stevens, Jo; Lazaridis, Konstantinos; Molenaar, Peter C; Somers, Veerle; Bracho, Maria Alma; Le Panse, Rozen; Stinissen, Piet; Berrih-Aknin, Sonia; Maessen, Jos G; Van Garsse, Leen; Buurman, Wim A; Tzartos, Socrates J; De Baets, Marc H; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2014-08-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) with antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor (AChR-MG) is considered as a prototypic autoimmune disease. The thymus is important in the pathophysiology of the disease since thymus hyperplasia is a characteristic of early-onset AChR-MG and patients often improve after thymectomy. We hypothesized that thymic B cell and antibody repertoires of AChR-MG patients differ intrinsically from those of control individuals. Using immortalization with Epstein-Barr Virus and Toll-like receptor 9 activation, we isolated and characterized monoclonal B cell lines from 5 MG patients and 8 controls. Only 2 of 570 immortalized B cell clones from MG patients produced antibodies against the AChR (both clones were from the same patient), suggesting that AChR-specific B cells are not enriched in the thymus. Surprisingly, many B cell lines from both AChR-MG and control thymus samples displayed reactivity against striated muscle proteins. Striational antibodies were produced by 15% of B cell clones from AChR-MG versus 6% in control thymus. The IgVH gene sequence analysis showed remarkable similarities, concerning VH family gene distribution, mutation frequency and CDR3 composition, between B cells of AChR-MG patients and controls. MG patients showed clear evidence of clonal B cell expansion in contrast to controls. In this latter aspect, MG resembles multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, but differs from systemic lupus erythematosus. Our results support an antigen driven immune response in the MG thymus, but the paucity of AChR-specific B cells, in combination with the observed polyclonal expansions suggest a more diverse immune response than expected. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Rituximab does not reset defective early B cell tolerance checkpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Nicolas; Massad, Christopher; Oe, Tyler; Cantaert, Tineke; Herold, Kevan C.; Meffre, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients show abnormalities in early B cell tolerance checkpoints, resulting in the accumulation of large numbers of autoreactive B cells in their blood. Treatment with rituximab, an anti-CD20 mAb that depletes B cells, has been shown to preserve β cell function in T1D patients and improve other autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. However, it remains largely unknown how anti–B cell therapy thwarts autoimmunity in these pathologies. Here, we analyzed the reactivity of Abs expressed by single, mature naive B cells from 4 patients with T1D before and 52 weeks after treatment to determine whether rituximab resets early B cell tolerance checkpoints. We found that anti–B cell therapy did not alter the frequencies of autoreactive and polyreactive B cells, which remained elevated in the blood of all patients after rituximab treatment. Moreover, the limited proliferative history of autoreactive B cells after treatment revealed that these clones were newly generated B cells and not self-reactive B cells that had escaped depletion and repopulated the periphery through homeostatic expansion. We conclude that anti–B cell therapy may provide a temporary dampening of autoimmune processes through B cell depletion. However, repletion with autoreactive B cells may explain the relapse that occurs in many autoimmune patients after anti–B cell therapy. PMID:26642366

  13. Primary Hepatosplenic Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Morales-Polanco

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common form of lymphoma. It usually begins in the lymph nodes; up to 40% may have an extranodal presentation. According to a definition of primary extranodal lymphoma with presentation only in extranodal sites, there are reports of large B-cell lymphomas limited to liver or spleen as separate entities, and to date there have been only three documented cases of primary hepatosplenic presentation. This paper reports a fourth case. Due to a review of the literature and the clinical course of the case reported, we conclude that primary hepatosplenic large B-cell lymphoma has been found predominantly in females older than 60 years. The patients reported had <2 months of evolution prior to diagnosis, prominent B symptoms, splenomegaly in three and hepatomegaly in two, none with lymph node involvement. All had thrombocytopenia and abnormal liver function tests; three had anemia and elevated serum lactic dehydrogenase levels, two with hemophagocytosis in bone marrow. Because of the previously mentioned data, it can be stated that primary hepatosplenic lymphoma is an uncommon and aggressive form of disease that requires immediate recognition and treatment.

  14. Expansion of murine gammaherpesvirus latently infected B cells requires T follicular help.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Collins

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available X linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP is an inherited immunodeficiency resulting from mutations in the gene encoding the slam associated protein (SAP. One of the defining characteristics of XLP is extreme susceptibility to infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, a gammaherpesvirus belonging to the genus Lymphocryptovirus, often resulting in fatal infectious mononucleosis (FIM. However, infection of SAP deficient mice with the related Murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68, a gammaherpesvirus in the genus Rhadinovirus, does not recapitulate XLP. Here we show that MHV68 inefficiently establishes latency in B cells in SAP deficient mice due to insufficient CD4 T cell help during the germinal center response. Although MHV68 infected B cells can be found in SAP-deficient mice, significantly fewer of these cells had a germinal center phenotype compared to SAP-sufficient mice. Furthermore, we show that infected germinal center B cells in SAP-deficient mice fail to proliferate. This failure to proliferate resulted in significantly lower viral loads, and likely accounts for the inability of MHV68 to induce a FIM-like syndrome. Finally, inhibiting differentiation of T follicular helper (TFH cells in SAP-sufficient C57Bl/6 mice resulted in decreased B cell latency, and the magnitude of the TFH response directly correlated with the level of infection in B cells. This requirement for CD4 T cell help during the germinal center reaction by MHV68 is in contrast with EBV, which is thought to be capable of bypassing this requirement by expressing viral proteins that mimic signals provided by TFH cells. In conclusion, the outcome of MHV68 infection in mice in the setting of loss of SAP function is distinct from that observed in SAP-deficient patients infected with EBV, and may identify a fundamental difference between the strategies employed by the rhadinoviruses and lymphocryptoviruses to expand B cell latency during the early phase of infection.

  15. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  16. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.J.

    1987-01-01

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111 In, 67 Ga and 131 I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  17. B-Cell Metabolic Remodeling and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchina, Davide G.; Grusdat, Melanie; Brenner, Dirk

    2018-01-01

    Cells of the immune system display varying metabolic profiles to fulfill their functions. B lymphocytes overcome fluctuating energy challenges as they transition from the resting state and recirculation to activation, rapid proliferation, and massive antibody production. Only through a controlled...

  18. NKT Cell Responses to B Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junxin; Sun, Wenji; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B; Page, Carly; Younger, Kenisha M; Tiper, Irina V; Frieman, Matthew; Kimball, Amy S; Webb, Tonya J

    2014-06-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a unique subset of CD1d-restricted T lymphocytes that express characteristics of both T cells and natural killer cells. NKT cells mediate tumor immune-surveillance; however, NKT cells are numerically reduced and functionally impaired in lymphoma patients. Many hematologic malignancies express CD1d molecules and co-stimulatory proteins needed to induce anti-tumor immunity by NKT cells, yet most tumors are poorly immunogenic. In this study, we sought to investigate NKT cell responses to B cell lymphoma. In the presence of exogenous antigen, both mouse and human NKT cell lines produce cytokines following stimulation by B cell lymphoma lines. NKT cell populations were examined ex vivo in mouse models of spontaneous B cell lymphoma, and it was found that during early stages, NKT cell responses were enhanced in lymphoma-bearing animals compared to disease-free animals. In contrast, in lymphoma-bearing animals with splenomegaly and lymphadenopathy, NKT cells were functionally impaired. In a mouse model of blastoid variant mantle cell lymphoma, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with a potent NKT cell agonist, α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer), resulted in a significant decrease in disease pathology. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that NKT cells from α-GalCer treated mice produced IFN-γ following α-GalCer restimulation, unlike NKT cells from vehicle-control treated mice. These data demonstrate an important role for NKT cells in the immune response to an aggressive hematologic malignancy like mantle cell lymphoma.

  19. Identification of transcription coactivator OCA-B-dependent genes involved in antigen-dependent B cell differentiation by cDNA array analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Unkyu; Siegel, Rachael; Ren, Xiaodi; Gunther, Cary S; Gaasterland, Terry; Roeder, Robert G

    2003-07-22

    The tissue-specific transcriptional coactivator OCA-B is required for antigen-dependent B cell differentiation events, including germinal center formation. However, the identity of OCA-B target genes involved in this process is unknown. This study has used large-scale cDNA arrays to monitor changes in gene expression patterns that accompany mature B cell differentiation. B cell receptor ligation alone induces many genes involved in B cell expansion, whereas B cell receptor and helper T cell costimulation induce genes associated with B cell effector function. OCA-B expression is induced by both B cell receptor ligation alone and helper T cell costimulation, suggesting that OCA-B is involved in B cell expansion as well as B cell function. Accordingly, several genes involved in cell proliferation and signaling, such as Lck, Kcnn4, Cdc37, cyclin D3, B4galt1, and Ms4a11, have been identified as OCA-B-dependent genes. Further studies on the roles played by these genes in B cells will contribute to an understanding of B cell differentiation.

  20. Both cladribine and alemtuzumab may effect MS via B-cell depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David; Herrod, Samuel S; Alvarez-Gonzalez, Cesar; Zalewski, Lukasz; Albor, Christo; Schmierer, Klaus

    2017-07-01

    To understand the efficacy of cladribine (CLAD) treatment in MS through analysis of lymphocyte subsets collected, but not reported, in the pivotal phase III trials of cladribine and alemtuzumab induction therapies. The regulatory submissions of the CLAD Tablets Treating Multiple Sclerosis Orally (CLARITY) (NCT00213135) cladribine and Comparison of Alemtuzumab and Rebif Efficacy in Multiple Sclerosis, study one (CARE-MS I) (NCT00530348) alemtuzumab trials were obtained from the European Medicine Agency through Freedom of Information requests. Data were extracted and statistically analyzed. Either dose of cladribine (3.5 mg/kg; 5.25 mg/kg) tested in CLARITY reduced the annualized relapse rate to 0.16-0.18 over 96 weeks, and both doses were similarly effective in reducing the risk of MRI lesions and disability. Surprisingly, however, T-cell depletion was rather modest. Cladribine 3.5 mg/kg depleted CD4 + cells by 40%-45% and CD8 + cells by 15%-30%, whereas alemtuzumab suppressed CD4 + cells by 70%-95% and CD8 + cells by 47%-55%. However, either dose of cladribine induced 70%-90% CD19 + B-cell depletion, similar to alemtuzumab (90%). CD19 + cells slowly repopulated to 15%-25% of baseline before cladribine redosing. However, alemtuzumab induced hyperrepopulation of CD19 + B cells 6-12 months after infusion, which probably forms the substrate for B-cell autoimmunities associated with alemtuzumab. Cladribine induced only modest depletion of T cells, which may not be consistent with a marked influence on MS, based on previous CD4 + T-cell depletion studies. The therapeutic drug-response relationship with cladribine is more consistent with lasting B-cell depletion and, coupled with the success seen with monoclonal CD20 + depletion, suggests that B-cell suppression could be the major direct mechanism of action.

  1. Lunatic, Manic and Radical Fringe Each Promote T and B Cell Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yinghui; Kumar, Vivek; Wei, Hua-Xing; Qiu, Ju; Stanley, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Lunatic, Manic and Radical Fringe (LFNG, MFNG and RFNG) are N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases that modify Notch receptors and regulate Notch signaling. Loss of LFNG affects thymic T cell development and LFNG and MFNG are required for marginal zone (MZ) B cell development. However, roles for MFNG and RFNG in T cell development, RFNG in B cell development, or Fringes in T and B cell activation, are not identified. Here we show that Lfng/Mfng/Rfng triple knockout (Fng tKO) mice exhibited reduced binding of DLL4 Notch ligand to CD4/CD8 double-negative (DN) T cell progenitors, and reduced expression of NOTCH1 targets Deltex1 and CD25. Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of DN1/cKit+ and DN2 T cell progenitors and CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP) T cell precursors, but increased frequencies of CD4+ and CD8+ single positive (SP) T cells in thymus. In spleen, Fng tKO mice had reduced frequencies of CD4+, CD8+, central memory T cells and marginal zone (MZ) B cells, and an increased frequency of effector memory T cells, neutrophils, follicular (Fo) and MZ P B cells. The Fng tKO phenotype was cell-autonomous and largely rescued in mice expressing one allele of a single Fng gene. Stimulation of Fng tKO splenocytes with anti-CD3/CD28 beads or lipopolysaccharide gave reduced proliferation compared to controls, and the generation of activated T cells by concanavalin A or L-PHA was also reduced in Fng tKO mice. Therefore, each Fringe contributes to T and B cell development, and Fringe is required for optimal in vitro stimulation of T and B cells. PMID:26608918

  2. T Follicular Helper Cells and B Cell Dysfunction in Aging and HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallikkuth, Suresh; de Armas, Lesley; Rinaldi, Stefano; Pahwa, Savita

    2017-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a subset of CD4 T cells that provide critical signals to antigen-primed B cells in germinal centers to undergo proliferation, isotype switching, and somatic hypermutation to generate long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells during an immune response. The quantity and quality of Tfh cells therefore must be tightly controlled to prevent immune dysfunction in the form of autoimmunity and, on the other hand, immune deficiency. Both Tfh and B cell perturbations appear during HIV infection resulting in impaired antibody responses to vaccines such as seasonal trivalent influenza vaccine, also seen in biologic aging. Although many of the HIV-associated defects improve with antiretroviral therapy (ART), excess immune activation and antigen-specific B and T cell responses including Tfh function are still impaired in virologically controlled HIV-infected persons on ART. Interestingly, HIV infected individuals experience increased risk of age-associated pathologies. This review will discuss Tfh and B cell dysfunction in HIV infection and highlight the impact of chronic HIV infection and aging on Tfh-B cell interactions.

  3. Distinct types of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma identified by gene expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagel, Juliette J; Dijkman, Remco; Basso, Katia; Jansen, Patty M; Hallermann, Christian; Willemze, Rein; Tensen, Cornelis P; Vermeer, Maarten H

    2005-05-01

    In the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) classification 2 types of primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphoma (PCLBCL) are distinguished: primary cutaneous follicle center cell lymphomas (PCFCCL) and PCLBCL of the leg (PCLBCL-leg). Distinction between both groups is considered important because of differences in prognosis (5-year survival > 95% and 52%, respectively) and the first choice of treatment (radiotherapy or systemic chemotherapy, respectively), but is not generally accepted. To establish a molecular basis for this subdivision in the EORTC classification, we investigated the gene expression profiles of 21 PCLBCLs by oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Hierarchical clustering based on a B-cell signature (7450 genes) classified PCLBCL into 2 distinct subgroups consisting of, respectively, 8 PCFCCLs and 13 PCLBCLsleg. PCLBCLs-leg showed increased expression of genes associated with cell proliferation; the proto-oncogenes Pim-1, Pim-2, and c-Myc; and the transcription factors Mum1/IRF4 and Oct-2. In the group of PCFCCL high expression of SPINK2 was observed. Further analysis suggested that PCFCCLs and PCLBCLs-leg have expression profiles similar to that of germinal center B-cell-like and activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, respectively. The results of this study suggest that different pathogenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of PCFCCLs and PCLBCLs-leg and provide molecular support for the subdivision used in the EORTC classification.

  4. Radioimmunotherapy of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eBodet-Milin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript reviews current advances in the use of radioimmunotherapy (RIT for the treatment of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. RIT has been in use for more than 20 years and has progressed significantly with the discovery of new molecular targets, the development of new stable chelates, the humanization of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs, and the use of pretargeting techniques. Today, two products targeting the CD20 antigen are approved: 131I-tositumomab, (Bexxar® and 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan, (Zevalin®. 131I-tositumomab is available in the United States, and 90Y-ibritumumab tiuxetan in Europe, the United States, Asia, and Africa. RIT can be integrated in clinical practice using non-ablative activities for treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma (FL or as consolidation after induction chemotherapy in front-line treatment in FL patients. Despite the lack of phase III studies to clearly define the efficacy of RIT in the management of B lymphoma in the era of rituximab-based therapy, RIT efficacy in NHL has been demonstrated. In relapsing refractory FL and transformed NHL, RIT as a monotherapy induces around 30% complete response with a possibility of durable remissions. RIT consolidation after induction therapy significantly improves the quality of the response. Dose-limiting toxicity of RIT is hematological, depending on bone marrow involvement and prior treatment. Non-hematological toxicity is generally low. Different studies have been published assessing innovative protocols of RIT or new indications, in particular treatment in patients with aggressive lymphomas. High-dose treatment, RIT as consolidation after different therapeutic induction modalities, RIT in first-line treatment or fractionated RIT showed promising results. New MAbs, in particular humanized MAbs, or combinations of naked and radiolabeled MAbs, also appear promising. Personalized dosimetry protocols should be developed to determine

  5. Self-reactive CD4+ T cells and B cells in the blood in health and autoimmune disease: increased frequency of thyroglobulin-reactive cells in Graves' disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Moeller, Ane Christine; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2006-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying activation of potentially self-reactive circulating B cells and T cells remain unclear. We measured the uptake of a self-antigen, thyroglobulin, by antigen presenting cells, and the subsequent proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells from healthy controls and patients...... with autoimmune thyroiditis. In Hashimoto's thyroiditis, B cells bound increased amounts of thyroglobulin in a complement- and autoantibody-dependent manner, and the thyroglobulin-elicited proliferation of CD4(+) T cells and B cells was complement dependent. Increased proportions of Tg-responsive CD4(+) T cells...... and B cells were found in patients with Graves' disease. Notably, both patient groups and healthy controls exhibited higher proliferative responses to thyroglobulin than to a foreign recall antigen, tetanus toxoid. Our results suggest that self-tolerance can be broken by exposure of circulating...

  6. Monoclonal antibodies in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, S.Y.T.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) can be used to differentiate between normal and neoplastic cells and thus exploited for diagnostic and, ultimately, therapeutic gain. The evidence for the existence of human tumour antigens is reviewed. Several areas of diagnosis are already benefiting from the application of the monoclonal technology. Immunohistology can help the pathologist with difficult diagnostic problems. New classifications of lymphoma and leukaemia can be based on specific surface molecules. Similarly, the detection of shed tumour antigens is already established as part of the routine assessment of many patients with common solid tumours. Isotopically labeled monoclonal antibodies have been used to localise primary and metastatic tumours. The use of antibodies in this way is not only a promising diagnostic tool but also the first step in studying the possibility of arming antibodies to provide therapeutic agents. Such trials are currently in progress. (Auth.)

  7. B cell lymphoma and myeloma in murine Gaucher's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, E. V.; Wang, S. Z.; Archer, J.; Dekker, N. [=Nick; Aerts, J. M. F. G.; Karlsson, S.; Cox, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma and B cell lymphoma are leading causes of death in Gaucher's disease but the nature of the stimulus driving the often noted clonal expansion of immunoglobulin-secreting B cells and cognate lymphoid malignancy is unknown. We investigated the long-term development of B cell

  8. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Halder

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  9. Myelin Basic Protein-Induced Production of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-6, and Presentation of the Immunodominant Peptide MBP85-99 by B Cells from Patients with Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus H; Börnsen, Lars; Sellebjerg, Finn

    2016-01-01

    to study cytokine production by B cells, but here we used the physiologically relevant self-antigen myelin basic protein (MBP) to stimulate B cells from untreated patients with RRMS and healthy donors. Moreover, we took advantage of the unique ability of the monoclonal antibody MK16 to recognize...... the immunodominant peptide MBP85-99 presented on HLA-DR15, and used it as a probe to directly study B-cell presentation of self-antigenic peptide. The proportions of B cells producing TNF-α or IL-6 after stimulation with MBP were higher in RRMS patients than in healthy donors, indicating a pro-inflammatory profile...... for self-reactive patient B cells. In contrast, polyclonal stimulation with PMA + ionomycin and MBP revealed no difference in cytokine profile between B cells from RRMS patients and healthy donors. Expanded disability status scale (EDSS) as well as multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS) correlated...

  10. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Alok R.; Peirce, Susan K.; Joshi, Shweta; Durden, Donald L.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN fl/fl mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI-3

  11. PTEN and PI-3 kinase inhibitors control LPS signaling and the lymphoproliferative response in the CD19+ B cell compartment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Alok R. [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Peirce, Susan K. [Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Joshi, Shweta [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Durden, Donald L., E-mail: ddurden@ucsd.edu [UCSD Department of Pediatrics, Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Division of Pediatric Hematology-Oncology, UCSD Rady Children' s Hospital, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2014-09-10

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), e.g. toll receptors (TLRs) that bind ligands within the microbiome have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cancer. LPS is a ligand for two TLR family members, TLR4 and RP105 which mediate LPS signaling in B cell proliferation and migration. Although LPS/TLR/RP105 signaling is well-studied; our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms controlling these PRR signaling pathways remains incomplete. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for PTEN/PI-3K signaling in B cell selection and survival, however a role for PTEN/PI-3K in TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the B cell compartment has not been reported. Herein, we crossed a CD19cre and PTEN{sup fl/fl} mouse to generate a conditional PTEN knockout mouse in the CD19+ B cell compartment. These mice were further crossed with an IL-14α transgenic mouse to study the combined effect of PTEN deletion, PI-3K inhibition and expression of IL-14α (a cytokine originally identified as a B cell growth factor) in CD19+ B cell lymphoproliferation and response to LPS stimulation. Targeted deletion of PTEN and directed expression of IL-14α in the CD19+ B cell compartment (IL-14+PTEN-/-) lead to marked splenomegaly and altered spleen morphology at baseline due to expansion of marginal zone B cells, a phenotype that was exaggerated by treatment with the B cell mitogen and TLR4/RP105 ligand, LPS. Moreover, LPS stimulation of CD19+ cells isolated from these mice display increased proliferation, augmented AKT and NFκB activation as well as increased expression of c-myc and cyclinD1. Interestingly, treatment of LPS treated IL-14+PTEN-/- mice with a pan PI-3K inhibitor, SF1126, reduced splenomegaly, cell proliferation, c-myc and cyclin D1 expression in the CD19+ B cell compartment and normalized the splenic histopathologic architecture. These findings provide the direct evidence that PTEN and PI-3K inhibitors control TLR4/RP105/LPS signaling in the CD19+ B cell compartment and that pan PI

  12. B cell lymphomas express CX3CR1 a non-B cell lineage adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasson, U.; Ek, S.; Merz, H.

    2008-01-01

    normally is not expressed on B cells, is expressed both at the mRNA and protein level in several subtypes of lymphoma. CX3CR1 has also shown to be involved in the homing to specific tissues that express the ligand, CX3CL1, in breast and prostate cancer and may thus be involved in dissemination of lymphoma......To study the differential expression of cell membrane-bound receptors and their potential role in growth and/or survival of the tumor cells, highly purified follicular lymphoma cells were analyzed, using gene expression analysis, and compared to non-malignant B cell populations. Filtering...... the genome for overexpressed genes coding for cell membrane-bound proteins/receptors resulted in a hit list of 27 identified genes. Among these, we have focused on the aberrant over expression of CX3CR1, in different types of B cell lymphoma, as compared to non-malignant B cells. We show that CX3CR1, which...

  13. B cell biology: implications for treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anolik, J H

    2013-04-01

    B cells are critical players in the orchestration of properly regulated immune responses, normally providing protective immunity without autoimmunity. Balance in the B cell compartment is achieved through the finely regulated participation of multiple B cell populations with different antibody-dependent and independent functions. Both types of functions allow B cells to modulate other components of the innate and adaptive immune system. Autoantibody-independent B cell functions include antigen presentation, T cell activation and polarization, and dendritic cell modulation. Several of these functions are mediated by the ability of B cells to produce immunoregulatory cytokines and chemokines and by their critical contribution to lymphoid tissue development and organization including the development of ectopic tertiary lymphoid tissue. Additionally, the functional versatility of B cells enables them to play either protective or pathogenic roles in autoimmunity. In turn, B cell dysfunction has been critically implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a complex disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies and heterogeneous clinical involvement. Thus, the breakdown of B cell tolerance is a defining and early event in the disease process and may occur by multiple pathways, including alterations in factors that affect B cell activation thresholds, B cell longevity, and apoptotic cell processing. Once tolerance is broken, autoantibodies contribute to autoimmunity by multiple mechanisms including immune-complex mediated Type III hypersensitivity reactions, type II antibody-dependent cytotoxicity, and by instructing innate immune cells to produce pathogenic cytokines including IFNα, TNF and IL-1. The complexity of B cell functions has been highlighted by the variable success of B cell-targeted therapies in multiple autoimmune diseases, including those conventionally viewed as T cell-mediated conditions. Given the widespread

  14. Production of human anti-HLA monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, M.C.; Mercier, F.; Roger, J.; Varin, M.

    1986-03-01

    Only 40% of the several hundred anti-HLA murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that have been made detect HLA-A,B,C or DR specificities previously defined by human alloantisera, the range of recognized specificities is very narrow, and few of the MAbs have proven useful as tissue typing reagents. In hopes of obtaining HLA typing reagents, the authors are developing a protocol for the production of human anti-HLA MAbs from HLA-antigen (Ag) immunized peripheral blood B cells of volunteering renal patients, immunized to one or more HLA Ags through therapeutic blood transfusions. A simple enrichment of the donor B cells has not been sufficient for anti-HLA MAb production, the authors are currently delineating the conditions necessary for increasing the number of HLA-specific donor B cells by in vitro stimulation with cells expressing the HLA Ag to which the B cell donor is immunized. For the production of MAbs, the stimulated B cells are transformed with Epstein-Barr virus and subsequently fused with KR-4 lymphoblastoid cells. Hybridomas are selected by HAT and Ouabain. Supernatants are screened for anti-HLA activity against lymphocyte targets expressing the original immunizing HLA Ag by complement mediated /sup 51/Cr release assay. Antibody specificity is determined by the complement-dependent microcytotoxicity test used for HLA typing.

  15. Tolerance without clonal expansion: self-antigen-expressing B cells program self-reactive T cells for future deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommer, Friederike; Heinen, Tobias J A J; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Yogev, Nir; Buch, Thorsten; Roers, Axel; Bettelli, Estelle; Müller, Werner; Anderton, Stephen M; Waisman, Ari

    2008-10-15

    B cells have been shown in various animal models to induce immunological tolerance leading to reduced immune responses and protection from autoimmunity. We show that interaction of B cells with naive T cells results in T cell triggering accompanied by the expression of negative costimulatory molecules such as PD-1, CTLA-4, B and T lymphocyte attenuator, and CD5. Following interaction with B cells, T cells were not induced to proliferate, in a process that was dependent on their expression of PD-1 and CTLA-4, but not CD5. In contrast, the T cells became sensitive to Ag-induced cell death. Our results demonstrate that B cells participate in the homeostasis of the immune system by ablation of conventional self-reactive T cells.

  16. Enhanced CDC of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells mediated by rituximab combined with a novel anti-complement factor H antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Winkler

    Full Text Available Rituximab therapy for B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL has met with mixed success. Among several factors to which resistance can be attributed is failure to activate complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC due to protective complement regulatory proteins, including the soluble regulator complement factor H (CFH. We hypothesized that rituximab killing of non-responsive B-CLL cells could be augmented by a novel human monoclonal antibody against CFH. The B cells from 11 patients with B-CLL were tested ex vivo in CDC assays with combinations of CFH monoclonal antibody, rituximab, and a negative control antibody. CDC of rituximab non-responsive malignant B cells from CLL patients could in some cases be augmented by the CFH monoclonal antibody. Antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of cells was dependent upon functional complement. In one case where B-CLL cells were refractory to CDC by the combination of rituximab plus CFH monoclonal antibody, additionally neutralizing the membrane complement regulatory protein CD59 allowed CDC to occur. Inhibiting CDC regulatory proteins such as CFH holds promise for overcoming resistance to rituximab therapy in B-CLL.

  17. Cell of origin associated classification of B-cell malignancies by gene signatures of the normal B-cell hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, Hans Erik; Bergkvist, Kim Steve; Schmitz, Alexander; Kjeldsen, Malene Krag; Hansen, Steen Møller; Gaihede, Michael; Nørgaard, Martin Agge; Bæch, John; Grønholdt, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Frank Svendsen; Johansen, Preben; Bødker, Julie Støve; Bøgsted, Martin; Dybkær, Karen

    2014-06-01

    Recent findings have suggested biological classification of B-cell malignancies as exemplified by the "activated B-cell-like" (ABC), the "germinal-center B-cell-like" (GCB) and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL) subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and "recurrent translocation and cyclin D" (TC) classification of multiple myeloma. Biological classification of B-cell derived cancers may be refined by a direct and systematic strategy where identification and characterization of normal B-cell differentiation subsets are used to define the cancer cell of origin phenotype. Here we propose a strategy combining multiparametric flow cytometry, global gene expression profiling and biostatistical modeling to generate B-cell subset specific gene signatures from sorted normal human immature, naive, germinal centrocytes and centroblasts, post-germinal memory B-cells, plasmablasts and plasma cells from available lymphoid tissues including lymph nodes, tonsils, thymus, peripheral blood and bone marrow. This strategy will provide an accurate image of the stage of differentiation, which prospectively can be used to classify any B-cell malignancy and eventually purify tumor cells. This report briefly describes the current models of the normal B-cell subset differentiation in multiple tissues and the pathogenesis of malignancies originating from the normal germinal B-cell hierarchy.

  18. B Cell Receptor-Mediated Internalization of Salmonella: A Novel Pathway for Autonomous B Cell Activation and Antibody Production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri; Griekspoor, Alexander; Jorritsma, Tineke; de Wit, Jelle; Janssen, Hans; Neefjes, Jacques; van Ham, S. Marieke

    2009-01-01

    The present paradigm is that primary B cells are nonphagocytosing cells. In this study, we demonstrate that human primary B cells are able to internalize bacteria when the bacteria are recognized by the BCR. BCR-mediated internalization of Salmonella typhimurium results in B cell differentiation and

  19. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  20. BIP induces mice CD19(hi) regulatory B cells producing IL-10 and highly expressing PD-L1, FasL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youfa; Jiang, Qing; Ou, Yanghui; Zhang, Fan; Qing, Kai; Sun, Yuanli; Lu, Wenjie; Zhu, Huifen; Gong, Feili; Lei, Ping; Shen, Guanxin

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have shown that B cells possess a regulatory function in mouse models of autoimmune diseases. Regulatory B cells can modulate immune response through many types of molecular mechanisms, including the production of IL-10 and the expression of PD-1 Ligand and Fas Ligand, but the microenvironmental factors and mechanisms that induce regulatory B cells have not been fully identified. BIP (binding immunoglobulin protein), a member of the heat shock protein 70 family, is a type of evolutionarily highly conserved protein. In this article, we have found that IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells are discrete cell populations, but enriched in CD19(hi) cells. BIP can induce IL-10-producing splenic B cells, IL-10 secretion and B cells highly expressing PD-L1 and FasL. CD40 signaling acts in synergy with BIP to induce regulatory B cells. BIP increased surface CD19 molecule expression intensity and IL-10(+), PD-L1(hi) and FasL(hi) B cells induced by BIP share the CD19(hi) phenotype. Furthermore, B cells treated with BIP and anti-CD40 can lead to suppression of T cell proliferation and the effect is partially IL-10-dependent and mainly BIP-induced. Taken together, our findings identify a novel function of BIP in the induction of regulatory B cells and add a new reason for the therapy of autoimmune disorders or other inflammatory conditions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The regulatory roles of B cell subsets in transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Zhulang; Zou, Weilong; Xu, Yanan; Sun, Qiquan; Zhao, Yong

    2018-02-01

    B cells mediate allograft rejection through antigen presentation, and production of cytokines and antibodies. More and more immunosuppressive agents specifically targeting B cells and plasma cells have been applied in clinical transplantation. However, recent studies have indicated the regulatory roles of B cells. Therefore, it is vital to clarify the different effects of B cell subsets in organ transplantation so that we can completely understand the diverse functions of B cells in transplantation. Areas covered: This review focuses on the regulatory roles of B cells in transplantation. B cell subsets with immune modulation and factors mediating immunosuppressive functions of regulatory B (Breg) cells were analyzed. Therapies targeting B cells and the application of B cells for transplant tolerance induction were discussed. Expert commentary: Besides involving rejection, B cells could also play regulatory roles in transplantation. Breg cells and the related markers may be used to predict the immune tolerant state in transplant recipients. New therapeutic strategies targeting B cells should be explored to promote tolerance induction with less impact on the host's protective immunity in organ transplanted patients.

  2. Inhibition of UDP-glucosylceramide synthase in mice prevents Gaucher disease-associated B-cell malignancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlova, Elena V.; Archer, Joy; Wang, Susan; Dekker, Nick; Aerts, Johannes Mfg; Karlsson, Stefan; Cox, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Clonal B-cell proliferation is a frequent manifestation of Gaucher disease - a sphingolipidosis associated with a high risk of multiple myeloma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Gaucher disease is caused by genetic deficiency of acid β-glucosidase, the natural substrates of which (β-d-glucosylceramide and

  3. AKT Hyperactivation and the Potential of AKT-Targeted Therapy in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jinfen; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Jabbar, Kausar J

    2017-01-01

    AKT signaling is important for proliferation and survival of tumor cells. The clinical significance of AKT activation in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is not well analyzed. Here, we assessed expression of phosphorylated AKT (p-AKT) in 522 DLBCL patients. We found that high levels of p-AKT...

  4. ALK activation by the CLTC-ALK fusion is a recurrent event in large B-cell lymphoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paepe, P. de; Baens, M; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Verhasselt, B.; Stul, M.; Simons, A.; Poppe, B.; Laureys, G.; Brons, P.P.T.; Vandenberghe, P.; Speleman, F.; Praet, M.; Wolf-Peeters, C. de; Marynen, P.; Wlodarska, I.

    2003-01-01

    We present 3 cases of large B-cell lymphoma (LBCL) with a granular cytoplasmic staining for anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). All of the cases showed striking similarities in morphology and immunohistochemical profile characterized by a massive monomorphic proliferation of CD20-/CD138+

  5. Monoclonal gammopathy in rheumatic diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Chen, Long; Jia, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Wen, Lei; Liang, Yaoxian; An, Yuan; Chen, Shi; Su, Yin; Li, Zhanguo

    2018-07-01

    switch, 1 progressed to multiple myeloma (MM), and another 2 experienced renal injuries attributed by monoclonal or polyclonal plasma cell interstitial infiltration. Seven (17.1%) of the 41 MG patients presented hematological neoplasias, 4 with MM, 2 with smoldering multiple myeloma, and 1 with B cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) type. The presence of light-chain MG was associated with the development of MM [OR 17.5 (95%CI 1.551-197.435), P = 0.041], but not with an increased risk of lymphoma or SMM. MG was observed in patients with various rheumatic disorders, with SS being the most common type. The presence of MG might be associated with higher disease activity. The development of hematological neoplasias including MM and lymphoma was seen in this setting. Therefore, we recommend the screening for MG and close monitoring for potential malignant transformation in patients with rheumatic diseases as needed.

  6. Eμ/miR-125b transgenic mice develop lethal B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Y; Kitaura, J; Hatakeyama, K; Watanuki, J; Akasaka, T; Kato, N; Shimanuki, M; Nishimura, K; Takahashi, M; Taniwaki, M; Haferlach, C; Siebert, R; Dyer, M J S; Asou, N; Aburatani, H; Nakakuma, H; Kitamura, T; Sonoki, T

    2011-12-01

    MicroRNA-125b-1 (miR-125b-1) is a target of a chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q24;q32) recurrently found in human B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). This translocation results in overexpression of miR-125b controlled by immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IGH) regulatory elements. In addition, we found that six out of twenty-one BCP-ALL patients without t(11;14)(q24;q32) showed overexpression of miR-125b. Interestingly, four out of nine patients with BCR/ABL-positive BCP-ALL and one patient with B-cell lymphoid crisis that had progressed from chronic myelogenous leukemia overexpressed miR-125b. To examine the role of the deregulated expression of miR-125b in the development of B-cell tumor in vivo, we generated transgenic mice mimicking the t(11;14)(q24;q32) (Eμ/miR-125b-TG mice). Eμ/miR-125b-TG mice overexpressed miR-125b driven by IGH enhancer and promoter and developed IgM-negative or IgM-positive lethal B-cell malignancies with clonal proliferation. B cells obtained from the Eμ/miR-125b-TG mice were resistant to apoptosis induced by serum starvation. We identified Trp53inp1, a pro-apoptotic gene induced by cell stress, as a novel target gene of miR-125b in hematopoietic cells in vitro and in vivo. Our results provide direct evidence that miR-125b has important roles in the tumorigenesis of precursor B cells.

  7. EVALUATION OF CYTOKINE GENE POLYMORPHISM IN B CELL LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Nazarova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies with some solid tumors has shown that polymorphisms of certain cytokine genes may be used as predictors of clinical outcome in the patients. It seemed important to evaluate potential correlations between production of certain pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and co-receptor molecules, and promoter polymorphism of the cytokine genes involved into regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism and blood clotting in the patients with hematological malignancies. The article contains our results concerning associations between of IL-1β, -2, -4, -10, -17, TNFα, and allelic polymorphisms of their genes in 62 patients with B cell lymphoid malignancies in an ethnically homogenous group (self-identified as Russians. We have shown that the GА and AA genotypes of the G-308A polymorphism in TNFα gene are significantly associated with increased production of this cytokine, being more common in aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas, more rare in multiple myeloma and in indolent non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  8. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F; Tutt, Andrew N J; Nestle, Frank O; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E; Karagiannis, Sophia N

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  9. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Correa

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1 specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires.

  10. Evaluation of Antigen-Conjugated Fluorescent Beads to Identify Antigen-Specific B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Isabel; Ilieva, Kristina M.; Crescioli, Silvia; Lombardi, Sara; Figini, Mariangela; Cheung, Anthony; Spicer, James F.; Tutt, Andrew N. J.; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Lacy, Katie E.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2018-01-01

    Selection of single antigen-specific B cells to identify their expressed antibodies is of considerable interest for evaluating human immune responses. Here, we present a method to identify single antibody-expressing cells using antigen-conjugated fluorescent beads. To establish this, we selected Folate Receptor alpha (FRα) as a model antigen and a mouse B cell line, expressing both the soluble and the membrane-bound forms of a human/mouse chimeric antibody (MOv18 IgG1) specific for FRα, as test antibody-expressing cells. Beads were conjugated to FRα using streptavidin/avidin-biotin bridges and used to select single cells expressing the membrane-bound form of anti-FRα. Bead-bound cells were single cell-sorted and processed for single cell RNA retrotranscription and PCR to isolate antibody heavy and light chain variable regions. Variable regions were then cloned and expressed as human IgG1/k antibodies. Like the original clone, engineered antibodies from single cells recognized native FRα. To evaluate whether antigen-coated beads could identify specific antibody-expressing cells in mixed immune cell populations, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were spiked with test antibody-expressing cells. Antigen-specific cells could comprise up to 75% of cells selected with antigen-conjugated beads when the frequency of the antigen-positive cells was 1:100 or higher. In PBMC pools, beads conjugated to recombinant antigens FRα and HER2 bound antigen-specific anti-FRα MOv18 and anti-HER2 Trastuzumab antibody-expressing cells, respectively. From melanoma patient-derived B cells selected with melanoma cell line-derived protein-coated fluorescent beads, we generated a monoclonal antibody that recognized melanoma antigen-coated beads. This approach may be further developed to facilitate analysis of B cells and their antibody profiles at the single cell level and to help unravel humoral immune repertoires. PMID:29628923

  11. Distinction of the memory B cell response to cognate antigen versus bystander inflammatory signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Micah J; Elgueta, Raul; Schpero, William; Molloy, Michael; Zhang, Weijun; Usherwood, Edward; Noelle, Randolph J

    2009-08-31

    The hypothesis that bystander inflammatory signals promote memory B cell (B(MEM)) self-renewal and differentiation in an antigen-independent manner is critically evaluated herein. To comprehensively address this hypothesis, a detailed analysis is presented examining the response profiles of B-2 lineage B220(+)IgG(+) B(MEM) toward cognate protein antigen in comparison to bystander inflammatory signals. After in vivo antigen encounter, quiescent B(MEM) clonally expand. Surprisingly, proliferating B(MEM) do not acquire germinal center (GC) B cell markers before generating daughter B(MEM) and differentiating into plasma cells or form structurally identifiable GCs. In striking contrast to cognate antigen, inflammatory stimuli, including Toll-like receptor agonists or bystander T cell activation, fail to induce even low levels of B(MEM) proliferation or differentiation in vivo. Under the extreme conditions of adjuvanted protein vaccination or acute viral infection, no detectable bystander proliferation or differentiation of B(MEM) occurred. The absence of a B(MEM) response to nonspecific inflammatory signals clearly shows that B(MEM) proliferation and differentiation is a process tightly controlled by the availability of cognate antigen.

  12. Impact of tofacitinib treatment on human B-cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Marta; Lorenzetti, Raquel; Fischer, Kathleen; Staniek, Julian; Janowska, Iga; Troilo, Arianna; Strohmeier, Valentina; Erlacher, Miriam; Kunze, Mirjam; Bannert, Bettina; Kyburz, Diego; Voll, Reinhard E; Venhoff, Nils; Thiel, Jens

    2017-02-01

    B-cells are pivotal to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and tofacitinib, a JAK inhibitor, is effective and safe in its treatment. Tofacitinib interferes with signal transduction via cytokine receptors using the common γ-chain. Despite extensive data on T-lymphocytes, the impact of tofacitinib on B-lymphocytes is poorly understood. In this study we assessed the effect of tofacitinib on B-lymphocyte differentiation and function. Tofacitinib treatment strongly impaired in vitro plasmablast development, immunoglobulin secretion and induction of B-cell fate determining transcription factors, Blimp-1, Xbp-1, and IRF-4, in naïve B-cells. Interestingly, class switch and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AICDA) induction was only slightly reduced in activated naïve B-cells. The effect of tofacitinib on plasmablast formation, immunoglobulin secretion and proliferation was less profound, when peripheral blood B-cells, including not only naïve but also memory B-cells, were stimulated. In line with these in vitro results, the relative distribution of B-cell populations remained stable in tofacitinib treated patients. Nevertheless, a temporary increase in absolute B-cell numbers was observed 6-8 weeks after start of treatment. In addition, B-cells isolated from tofacitinib treated patients responded rapidly to in vitro activation. We demonstrate that tofacitinib has a direct impact on human naïve B-lymphocytes, independently from its effect on T-lymphocytes, by impairing their development into plasmablasts and immunoglobulin secretion. The major effect of tofacitinib on naïve B-lymphocyte development points to the potential inability of tofacitinib-treated patients to respond to novel antigens, and suggests planning vaccination strategies prior to tofacitinib treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. BAFF promotes regulatory T-cell apoptosis and blocks cytokine production by activating B cells in primary biliary cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Hu, Mintao [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Zhang, Peng [Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Cao, Hong [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yongzhen [The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Zheng; Su, Tingting [Department of Hepatology, Wuxi Infectious Diseases Hospital, Wuxi, Jiangsu (China)

    2013-05-10

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) is a chronic and slowly progressive cholestatic liver disease of autoimmune etiology. A number of questions regarding its etiology are unclear. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in self-tolerance and, for unknown reasons, their relative number is reduced in PBC patients. B-cell-activating factor (BAFF) is a key survival factor during B-cell maturation and its concentration is increased in peripheral blood of PBC patients. It has been reported that activated B cells inhibit Treg cell proliferation and there are no BAFF receptors on Tregs. Therefore, we speculated that excessive BAFF may result in Treg reduction via B cells. To prove our hypothesis, we isolated Tregs and B cells from PBC and healthy donors. BAFF and IgM concentrations were then analyzed by ELISA and CD40, CD80, CD86, IL-10, and TGF-β expression in B cells and Tregs were measured by flow cytometry. BAFF up-regulated CD40, CD80, CD86, and IgM expression in B cells. However, BAFF had no direct effect on Treg cell apoptosis and cytokine secretion. Nonetheless, we observed that BAFF-activated B cells could induce Treg cell apoptosis and reduce IL-10 and TGF-β expression. We also showed that BAFF-activated CD4+ T cells had no effect on Treg apoptosis. Furthermore, we verified that bezafibrate, a hypolipidemic drug, can inhibit BAFF-induced Treg cell apoptosis. In conclusion, BAFF promotes Treg cell apoptosis and inhibits cytokine production by activating B cells in PBC patients. The results of this study suggest that inhibition of BAFF activation is a strategy for PBC treatment.

  14. Adipose Tissue Inflammation Induces B Cell Inflammation and Decreases B Cell Function in Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Frasca

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aging is the greatest risk factor for developing chronic diseases. Inflamm-aging, the age-related increase in low-grade chronic inflammation, may be a common link in age-related diseases. This review summarizes recent published data on potential cellular and molecular mechanisms of the age-related increase in inflammation, and how these contribute to decreased humoral immune responses in aged mice and humans. Briefly, we cover how aging and related inflammation decrease antibody responses in mice and humans, and how obesity contributes to the mechanisms for aging through increased inflammation. We also report data in the literature showing adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and how these cells are recruited and contribute to local and systemic inflammation. We show that several types of immune cells infiltrate the adipose tissue and these include macrophages, neutrophils, NK cells, innate lymphoid cells, eosinophils, T cells, B1, and B2 cells. Our main focus is how the adipose tissue affects immune responses, in particular B cell responses and antibody production. The role of leptin in generating inflammation and decreased B cell responses is also discussed. We report data published by us and by other groups showing that the adipose tissue generates pro-inflammatory B cell subsets which induce pro-inflammatory T cells, promote insulin resistance, and secrete pathogenic autoimmune antibodies.

  15. The distribution of IL-13 receptor alpha1 expression on B cells, T cells and monocytes and its regulation by IL-13 and IL-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, P; Gretener, D; Herren, S; Aubry, J P; Elson, G; Poudrier, J; Lecoanet-Henchoz, S; Alouani, S; Losberger, C; Bonnefoy, J Y; Kosco-Vilbois, M H; Gauchat, J F

    1998-12-01

    To study the expression of IL-13 receptor alpha1 (IL-13Ralpha1), specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were generated. Surface expression of the IL-13Ralpha1 on B cells, monocytes and T cells was assessed by flow cytometry using these specific mAb. Among tonsillar B cells, the expression was the highest on the IgD+ CD38- B cell subpopulation which is believed to represent naive B cells. Expression was also detectable on a large fraction of the IgD-CD38- B cells but not on CD38+ B cells. Activation under conditions which promote B cell Ig class switching up-regulated the expression of the receptor. However, the same stimuli had an opposite effect for IL-13Ralpha1 expression levels on monocytes. While IL-13Ralpha1 mRNA was clearly detectable in T cell preparations, no surface expression was detected. However, permeabilization of the T cells showed a clear intracellular expression of the receptor. A soluble form of the receptor was immunoprecipitated from the supernatant of activated peripheral T cells, suggesting that T cell IL-13Ralpha1 might have functions unrelated to the capacity to form a type II IL-4/IL-13R with IL-4Ralpha.

  16. Development of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib for B cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayko, Urte; Fung, Mann; Clow, Fong; Sun, Steven; Faust, Elizabeth; Price, Samiyeh; James, Danelle; Doyle, Margaret; Bari, Samina; Zhuang, Sen Hong

    2015-11-01

    Ibrutinib is a first-in-class oral covalent inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase that has demonstrated clinical benefit for many patients with B cell malignancies. Positive results in initial trials led the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to grant ibrutinib three breakthrough therapy designations for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), del17p chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Ibrutinib was approved for these three cancers within 14 months of the original U.S. approval. Additionally, ibrutinib is approved for patient subsets with MCL and/or CLL in >45 other countries. Via a unique mechanism of action, ibrutinib inhibits B cell signaling pathways that regulate the survival, proliferation, adhesion, and homing of cancerous cells. This marks a paradigm shift from the conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy approach to treating B cell malignancies. Ibrutinib continues to be evaluated across a range of B cell malignancies, either as single-agent therapy or in combination with other therapies, and continues to transform the lives of these patients. © 2015 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Jain

    Full Text Available Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID, signifying class switch recombination (CSR. Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  18. CD40 signaling synergizes with TLR-2 in the BCR independent activation of resting B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shweta; Chodisetti, Sathi Babu; Agrewala, Javed N

    2011-01-01

    Conventionally, signaling through BCR initiates sequence of events necessary for activation and differentiation of B cells. We report an alternative approach, independent of BCR, for stimulating resting B (RB) cells, by involving TLR-2 and CD40--molecules crucial for innate and adaptive immunity. CD40 triggering of TLR-2 stimulated RB cells significantly augments their activation, proliferation and differentiation. It also substantially ameliorates the calcium flux, antigen uptake capacity and ability of B cells to activate T cells. The survival of RB cells was improved and it increases the number of cells expressing activation induced deaminase (AID), signifying class switch recombination (CSR). Further, we also observed increased activation rate and decreased threshold period required for optimum stimulation of RB cells. These results corroborate well with microarray gene expression data. This study provides novel insights into coordination between the molecules of innate and adaptive immunity in activating B cells, in a BCR independent manner. This strategy can be exploited to design vaccines to bolster B cell activation and antigen presenting efficiency, leading to faster and better immune response.

  19. DNA Methylation Dynamics of Germinal Center B Cells Are Mediated by AID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M. Dominguez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in DNA methylation are required for the formation of germinal centers (GCs, but the mechanisms of such changes are poorly understood. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID has been recently implicated in DNA demethylation through its deaminase activity coupled with DNA repair. We investigated the epigenetic function of AID in vivo in germinal center B cells (GCBs isolated from wild-type (WT and AID-deficient (Aicda−/− mice. We determined that the transit of B cells through the GC is associated with marked locus-specific loss of methylation and increased methylation diversity, both of which are lost in Aicda−/− animals. Differentially methylated cytosines (DMCs between GCBs and naive B cells (NBs are enriched in genes that are targeted for somatic hypermutation (SHM by AID, and these genes form networks required for B cell development and proliferation. Finally, we observed significant conservation of AID-dependent epigenetic reprogramming between mouse and human B cells.

  20. Study on serum TNF-α level, B-cell count and T-cell subsets distribution in peripheral blood in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Buqing

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of serum TNF-α levels, B-cell count and T-cell subsets distribution in peripheral blood in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Methods: Serum TNF-α levels (with RIA), B cell as well as T cell subsets distribution type (with monoclonal antibody technique) were examined in 37 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 30 controls. Results Serum TNF-α levels and B lymphocytes count were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 3 , CD 4 and CD 4 /CD 8 were obviously lower (P<0.01). Conclusion: Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease with abnormal immunoregulation. (authors)

  1. Brucella abortus-infected B cells induce osteoclastogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Viglietti, Ayelén Ivana; Arriola Benitez, Paula Constanza; Giambartolomei, Guillermo Hernán; Delpino, María Victoria

    2016-09-01

    Brucella abortus is an intracellular bacterium that establishes lifelong infections in livestock and humans although the mechanisms of its chronicity are poorly understood. Activated B cells have long lifespan and B. abortus infection activates B cells. Our results indicate that the direct infection of B cells with B. abortus induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), receptor activator for NF κB ligand (RANKL), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin (IL)-6 secretion. In addition, supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells induced bone marrow-derived monocytes to undergo osteoclastogenesis. Using osteoprotegerin, RANKL's decoy receptor, we determined that RANKL is involved in osteoclastogenesis induced by supernatants from B. abortus-infected B cells. The results presented here shed light on how the interactions of B. abortus with B cells may have a role in the pathogenesis of brucellar osteoarticular disease. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Differential programming of B cells in AID deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A Hogenbirk

    Full Text Available The Aicda locus encodes the activation induced cytidine deaminase (AID and is highly expressed in germinal center (GC B cells to initiate somatic hypermutation (SHM and class switch recombination (CSR of immunoglobulin (Ig genes. Besides these Ig specific activities in B cells, AID has been implicated in active DNA demethylation in non-B cell systems. We here determined a potential role of AID as an epigenetic eraser and transcriptional regulator in B cells. RNA-Seq on different B cell subsets revealed that Aicda(-/- B cells are developmentally affected. However as shown by RNA-Seq, MethylCap-Seq, and SNP analysis these transcriptome alterations may not relate to AID, but alternatively to a CBA mouse strain derived region around the targeted Aicda locus. These unexpected confounding parameters provide alternative, AID-independent interpretations on genotype-phenotype correlations previously reported in numerous studies on AID using the Aicda(-/- mouse strain.

  3. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  4. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-06-13

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes.

  5. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  6. Regulatory T cells and B cells: implication on autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Ping; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    The regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the prevention of autoimmune diseases. Although most studies are focusing on the role of Treg cells in T cells and T cells-mediated diseases, these cells also directly affect B cells and other non-T cells. This manuscript updates the role of Treg cells on the B cells and B cell-mediated diseases. In addition, the mechanisms whereby Treg cells suppress B cell responses have been discussed.

  7. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Deleyto-Seldas, Nerea; Dominguez, Veronica; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Ura, Kiyoe; Rocha, Pedro P; Kim, JungHyun; Aljoufi, Arafat; Esteve-Codina, Anna; Dabad, Marc; Gut, Marta; Heyn, Holger; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Nimura, Keisuke; Skok, Jane A; Martinez-Frias, Maria Luisa; Cobaleda, Cesar

    2017-05-23

    Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS), a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1) gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Necessary for Correct Hematopoietic and B Cell Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Campos-Sanchez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency is one of the most important causes of mortality associated with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS, a severe rare disease originated by a deletion in chromosome 4p. The WHS candidate 1 (WHSC1 gene has been proposed as one of the main genes responsible for many of the alterations in WHS, but its mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we present in vivo genetic evidence showing that Whsc1 plays an important role at several points of hematopoietic development. Particularly, our results demonstrate that both differentiation and function of Whsc1-deficient B cells are impaired at several key developmental stages due to profound molecular defects affecting B cell lineage specification, commitment, fitness, and proliferation, demonstrating a causal role for WHSC1 in the immunodeficiency of WHS patients.

  9. Apoptosis-Inducing-Factor-Dependent Mitochondrial Function Is Required for T Cell but Not B Cell Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milasta, Sandra; Dillon, Christopher P; Sturm, Oliver E; Verbist, Katherine C; Brewer, Taylor L; Quarato, Giovanni; Brown, Scott A; Frase, Sharon; Janke, Laura J; Perry, S Scott; Thomas, Paul G; Green, Douglas R

    2016-01-19

    The role of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) in promoting cell death versus survival remains controversial. We report that the loss of AIF in fibroblasts led to mitochondrial electron transport chain defects and loss of proliferation that could be restored by ectopic expression of the yeast NADH dehydrogenase Ndi1. Aif-deficiency in T cells led to decreased peripheral T cell numbers and defective homeostatic proliferation, but thymic T cell development was unaffected. In contrast, Aif-deficient B cells developed and functioned normally. The difference in the dependency of T cells versus B cells on AIF for function and survival correlated with their metabolic requirements. Ectopic Ndi1 expression rescued homeostatic proliferation of Aif-deficient T cells. Despite its reported roles in cell death, fibroblasts, thymocytes and B cells lacking AIF underwent normal death. These studies suggest that the primary role of AIF relates to complex I function, with differential effects on T and B cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-08-15

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation.

  11. Mitogenic activation of B cells in vitro: the properties of adherent accessory cells as revealed by partition analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kettman, J.R.; Soederberg, A.; Lefkovits, I.

    1986-01-01

    The requirement of B cells activated by mitogen (dextran sulfate plus lipopolysaccharide) for accessory cells was studied by partition analysis. Small numbers of splenic B cells were activated to clonal growth, as determined by visual inspection, and to immunoglobulin (Ig) synthesis, as determined by release of Ig into the culture fluid. By placing irradiated adherent cells in the periphery of the microculture wells and forcing responding cells to different areas of the well (slant experiments), it was observed that no cell contact was necessary for B cell activation, and that promoted contact (Rock and Roll experiments) does not increase the efficiency of activation. Sequential microcultures suggest that only some irradiated adherent cells act as accessory cells, but they can perform this function to more than one B cell. Attempts to perform limiting dilution analysis by varying irradiated adherent cell input showed non-single-hit behavior. When the data were rearranged, taking into account the distribution of irradiated adherent cells, then single-hit behavior with about 1 to 5% of irradiated adherent cells acting as an accessory cells for B cell clonal activation was observed. The evidence suggests that an uncommon irradiated adherent cell releases a soluble factor necessary for B cell activation and/or clonal proliferation

  12. Lymphocyte targeting with /sup 111/In-labelled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loutfi, I.; Batchelor, J.R.; Lavender, J.P.; Epenetos, A.A.

    1988-01-01

    In vitro tests were conducted using human T and B cell lines, as well as whole blood, to establish the usefulness of 2 murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), an anti-CD5 (Pan T) and a Pan B, for potential radioimmunolocalization and therapy. Both MAbs showed specificity for the cell line in question as tested by indirect immunofluorescence and radioimmunoassay. Assays carried out on whole blood showed 40-70% of the added activity of /sup 111/In-labelled Pan B antibody binding to B cells and 20-24% of /sup 111/In-Pan T antibody binding to T cells. The amount of internalised /sup 111/In-labelled Pan B was 6% of total amount at 24 hr indicating a slow internalization process. These results should allow for in vivo targeting of normal and neoplastic B and T cells.

  13. A novel and effective cancer immunotherapy mouse model using antigen-specific B cells selected in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Moutai

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies such as adoptive transfer of T cells or natural killer cells, or monoclonal antibody (MoAb treatment have recently been recognized as effective means to treat cancer patients. However, adoptive transfer of B cells or plasma cells producing tumor-specific antibodies has not been applied as a therapy because long-term culture and selective expansion of antigen-specific B cells has been technically very difficult. Here, we describe a novel cancer immunotherapy that uses B-cell adoptive transfer. We demonstrate that germinal-center-like B cells (iGB cells induced in vitro from mouse naïve B cells become plasma cells and produce IgG antibodies for more than a month in the bone marrow of non-irradiated recipient mice. When transferred into mice, iGB cells producing antibody against a surrogate tumor antigen suppressed lung metastasis and growth of mouse melanoma cells expressing the same antigen and prolonged survival of the recipients. In addition, we have developed a novel culture system called FAIS to selectively expand antigen-specific iGB cells utilizing the fact that iGB cells are sensitive to Fas-induced cell death unless their antigen receptors are ligated by membrane-bound antigens. The selected iGB cells efficiently suppressed lung metastasis of melanoma cells in the adoptive immunotherapy model. As human blood B cells can be propagated as iGB cells using culture conditions similar to the mouse iGB cell cultures, our data suggest that it will be possible to treat cancer-bearing patients by the adoptive transfer of cancer-antigen-specific iGB cells selected in vitro. This new adoptive immunotherapy should be an alternative to the laborious development of MoAb drugs against cancers for which no effective treatments currently exist.

  14. Silenced B-Cell Receptor Response To Autoantigen In A Poor-Prognostic Subset Of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergh, Ann-Charlotte; Evaldsson, Chamilly; Pedersen, Lone Bredo

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells express auto/xeno antigen-reactive antibodies that bind to self-epitopes and resemble natural IgM antibodies in their repertoire. One of the antigenic structures recognized is oxidation-induced malonedialdehyde that is present on low-density lipoprotein......-cell receptor unresponsiveness to cognate self-antigen on its own in poor-prognostic subset #1 chronic lymphocytic leukemia, indicating that these cells proliferate by other mechanisms that may override B-cell receptor silencing brought about in a context of self-tolerance/anergy. These novel findings have...

  15. B-cell-mediated strategies to fight chronic allograft rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Dalloul

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after one year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of tolerant vs effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic

  16. How B cells influence bone biology in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Mark C; Fretz, Jackie A; Lorenzo, Joseph A

    2010-09-01

    It is now well established that important regulatory interactions occur between the cells in the hematopoietic, immune and skeletal systems (osteoimmunology). B lymphocytes (B cells) are responsible for the generation and production of antibodies or immunoglobulins in the body. Together with T cells these lymphocytes comprise the adaptive immune system, which allows an individual to develop specific responses to an infection and retain memory of that infection, allowing for a faster and more robust response if that same infection occurs again. In addition to this immune function, B cells have a close and multifaceted relationship with bone cells. B cells differentiate from hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in supportive niches found on endosteal bone surfaces. Cells in the osteoblast lineage support HSC and B cell differentiation in these niches. B cell differentiation is regulated, at least in part, by a series of transcription factors that function in a temporal manner. While these transcription factors are required for B cell differentiation, their loss causes profound changes in the bone phenotype. This is due, in part, to the close relationship between macrophage/osteoclast and B cell differentiation. Cross talk between B cells and bone cells is reciprocal with defects in the RANKL-RANK, OPG signaling axis resulting in altered bone phenotypes. While the role of B cells during normal bone remodeling appears minimal, activated B cells play an important role in many inflammatory diseases with associated bony changes. This review examines the relationship between B cells and bone cells and how that relationship affects the skeleton and hematopoiesis during health and disease. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tissue-specific B-cell dysfunction and generalized memory B-cell loss during acute SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Peruchon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary HIV-infected patients display severe and irreversible damage to different blood B-cell subsets which is not restored by highly efficient anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Because longitudinal investigations of primary HIV-infection is limited by the availability of lymphoid organs, we studied the tissue-specific B-cell dysfunctions in acutely simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV mac251-infected Cynomolgus macaques. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Experiments were performed on three groups of macaques infected for 14, 21 or 28 days and on three groups of animals treated with HAART for two-weeks either initiated at 4 h, 7 or 14 days post-infection (p.i.. We have simultaneously compared changes in B-cell phenotypes and functions and tissue organization of B-cell areas in various lymphoid organs. We showed that SIV induced a steady decline in SIgG-expressing memory (SIgD(-CD27(+ B-cells in spleen and lymph nodes during the first 4 weeks of infection, concomitant to selective homing/sequestration of B-cells to the small intestine and spleen. SIV non-specific Ig production was transiently increased before D14p.i., whereas SIV-specific Ig production was only detectable after D14p.i., coinciding with the presence of CD8(+ T-cells and IgG-expressing plasma cells within germinal centres. Transient B-cell apoptosis on D14p.i. and commitment to terminal differentiation contributed to memory B-cell loss. HAART abrogated B-cell apoptosis, homing to the small intestine and SIV-specific Ig production but had minimal effect on early Ig production, increased B-cell proportions in spleen and loss of memory B-cells. Therefore, virus-B-cell interactions and SIV-induced inflammatory cytokines may differently contribute to early B-cell dysfunction and impaired SIV/HIV-specific antibody response. CONCLUSIONS: These data establish tissue-specific impairments in B-cell trafficking and functions and a generalized and steady memory B-cell loss in secondary lymphoid

  18. Nanoscale mapping and organization analysis of target proteins on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Mi [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xiao, Xiubin [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China); Liu, Lianqing, E-mail: lqliu@sia.cn [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xi, Ning, E-mail: xin@egr.msu.edu [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Wang, Yuechao; Dong, Zaili [State Key Laboratory of Robotics, Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhang, Weijing, E-mail: zhangwj3072@163.com [Department of Lymphoma, Affiliated Hospital of Military Medical Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100071 (China)

    2013-11-01

    CD20, a membrane protein highly expressed on most B-cell lymphomas, is an effective target demonstrated in clinical practice for treating B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Rituximab is a monoclonal antibody against CD20. In this work, we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to map the nanoscale distribution of CD20 molecules on the surface of cancer cells from clinical B-cell NHL patients under the assistance of ROR1 fluorescence recognition (ROR1 is a specific cell surface marker exclusively expressed on cancer cells). First, the ROR1 fluorescence labeling experiments showed that ROR1 was expressed on cancer cells from B-cell lymphoma patients, but not on normal cells from healthy volunteers. Next, under the guidance of ROR1 fluorescence, the rituximab-conjugated AFM tips were moved to cancer cells to image the cellular morphologies and detect the CD20-rituximab interactions on the cell surfaces. The distribution maps of CD20 on cancer cells were constructed by obtaining arrays of (16×16) force curves in local areas (500×500 nm{sup 2}) on the cell surfaces. The experimental results provide a new approach to directly investigate the nanoscale distribution of target protein on single clinical cancer cells. - Highlights: • Cancer cells were recognized from healthy cells by ROR1 fluorescence labeling. • The nanoscale distribution of CD20 on cancer cells was characterized. • The distribution of CD20 was non-uniform on the surface of cancer cells.

  19. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  20. Monitoring the Systemic Human Memory B Cell Compartment of Melanoma Patients for Anti-Tumor IgG Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy E.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Lacy, Katie; Josephs, Debra H.; Takhar, Pooja; Geh, Jenny L. C.; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M.; Rudman, Sarah M.; Beavil, Rebecca L.; Blower, Philip J.; Beavil, Andrew J.; Gould, Hannah J.; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10) to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10) (P<0.0001). Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21) (P<0.0001). Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800) compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600) produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer. PMID:21559411

  1. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on the GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Limeng; Zhou, Xue; Fan, Ziyao; Tang, Wei; Chen, Liang; Dai, Jian; Wei, Yuhua; Zhang, Jianxin; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Xijing; Liu, Daolong; Yu, Liquan; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Zhijun; Yu, Yongzhong; Sun, Hunan; Cui, Yudong

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactia) GapC is a highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among the streptococcus spp., which is responsible for inducing protective antibody immune responses in animals. However, the B-cell epitope of S. dysgalactia GapC have not been well characterized. In this study, a monoclonal antibody 1F2 (mAb1F2) against S. dysgalactiae GapC was generated by the hybridoma technique and used to screen a phage-displayed 12-mer random peptide library (Ph.D.-12) for mapping the linear B-cell epitope. The mAb1F2 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif TRINDLT. Amino acid sequence of the motif exactly matched (30)TRINDLT(36) of the S. dysgalactia GapC. Subsequently, site-directed mutagenic analysis further demonstrated that residues R31, I32, N33, D34 and L35 formed the core of (30)TRINDLT(36), and this core motif was the minimal determinant of the B-cell epitope recognized by the mAb1F2. The epitope (30)TRINDLT(36) showed high homology among different streptococcus species. Overall, our findings characterized a conserved B-cell epitope, which will be useful for the further study of epitope-based vaccines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. CD83 Antibody Inhibits Human B Cell Responses to Antigen as well as Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD4 T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kuan Y; Baron, Rebecca; Seldon, Therese A; Jones, Martina L; Rice, Alison M; Munster, David J

    2018-05-15

    Anti-CD83 Ab capable of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can deplete activated CD83 + human dendritic cells, thereby inhibiting CD4 T cell-mediated acute graft-versus-host disease. As CD83 is also expressed on the surface of activated B lymphocytes, we hypothesized that anti-CD83 would also inhibit B cell responses to stimulation. We found that anti-CD83 inhibited total IgM and IgG production in vitro by allostimulated human PBMC. Also, Ag-specific Ab responses to immunization of SCID mice xenografted with human PBMC were inhibited by anti-CD83 treatment. This inhibition occurred without depletion of all human B cells because anti-CD83 lysed activated CD83 + B cells by Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and spared resting (CD83 - ) B cells. In cultured human PBMC, anti-CD83 inhibited tetanus toxoid-stimulated B cell proliferation and concomitant dendritic cell-mediated CD4 T cell proliferation and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A, with minimal losses of B cells (80% of B cells but had no effect on CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine expression. By virtue of the ability of anti-CD83 to selectively deplete activated, but not resting, B cells and dendritic cells, with the latter reducing CD4 T cell responses, anti-CD83 may be clinically useful in autoimmunity and transplantation. Advantages might include inhibited expansion of autoantigen- or alloantigen-specific B cells and CD4 T cells, thus preventing further production of pathogenic Abs and inflammatory cytokines while preserving protective memory and regulatory cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Internalization of rituximab and the efficiency of B Cell depletion in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Venkat; Cambridge, Geraldine; Isenberg, David A; Glennie, Martin J; Cragg, Mark S; Leandro, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Rituximab, a type I anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb), induces incomplete B cell depletion in some patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), thus contributing to a poor clinical response. The mechanisms of this resistance remain elusive. The purpose of this study was to determine whether type II mAb are more efficient than type I mAb at depleting B cells from RA and SLE patients, whether internalization influences the efficiency of depletion, and whether Fcγ receptor type IIb (FcγRIIb) and the B cell receptor regulate this internalization process. We used an in vitro whole blood B cell-depletion assay to assess the efficiency of depletion, flow cytometry to study cell surface protein expression, and surface fluorescence-quenching assays to assess rituximab internalization, in samples from patients with RA and patients with SLE. Paired t-test or Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare groups, and Spearman's rank correlation test was used to assess correlation. We found that type II mAb internalized significantly less rituximab than type I mAb and depleted B cells from patients with RA and SLE at least 2-fold more efficiently than type I mAb. Internalization of rituximab was highly variable between patients, was regulated by FcγRIIb, and inversely correlated with cytotoxicity in whole blood B cell-depletion assays. The lowest levels of internalization were seen in IgD- B cells, including postswitched (IgD-CD27+) memory cells. Internalization of type I anti-CD20 mAb was also partially inhibited by anti-IgM stimulation. Variability in internalization of rituximab was observed and was correlated with impaired B cell depletion. Therefore, slower-internalizing type II mAb should be considered as alternative B cell-depleting agents for the treatment of RA and SLE. © 2015 The Authors. Arthritis & Rheumatology is published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Molecular mechanism of immunoglobulin V-region diversification regulated by transcription and RNA metabolism in antigen-driven B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, N; Maeda, K; Kuwahara, K

    2011-06-01

    The immune system produces specific antibodies (Ab) against any antigens (Ag) of exogenous and endogenous origins with a diverse repertoire of V-region specificities. The primary V-region repertoire is created by the rearrangement of immunoglobulin (Ig) V-region, D- and J-segments with the insertion of N- and P-sequences during early B cell differentiation. Recent studies revealed that secondary diversification of the IgV-region generated in the peripheral lymphoid organs plays a critical role in the generation of effective Ab production for protection from various pathogens. Naïve B cells that react with Ags initiate proliferation and differentiation in the follicular region and create the germinal centres (GCs), where activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID)-dependent IgV-region somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination generate high-affinity and class-switched mature Ag-specific B cells. Our studies have discovered a 210-kDa nuclear protein, named GC-associated nuclear protein (GANP) that is up-regulated in GC B cells during the T cell-dependent (TD) immune responses. By studying mice with mutant forms of the ganp gene, we demonstrated that GANP is essential for the generation of high-affinity B cells against TD-Ag by affecting SHM at the IgV-regions. GANP is associated with AID in the cytoplasm and the GANP/AID complex is recruited to the nucleus, specifically, the chromatin, and targeted selectively to the IgV-region gene in B cells. GANP augments the access of AID towards IgV-regions in B cells. Here, we review the role of GANP in acquired immunity through the detailed analysis of the molecular mechanism generating SHM specifically at IgV-regions in B cells. © 2011 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Monoclonal B-cell hyperplasia and leukocyte imbalance precede development of B-cell malignancies in uracil-DNA glycosylase deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sonja; Ericsson, Madelene; Dai, Hong Yan

    2005-01-01

    causes a significant reduction of T-helper cells, and 50% of the young Ung(-/-) mice investigated have no detectable NK/NKT-cell population in their spleen. The immunological imbalance is confirmed in experiments with spleen cells where the production of the cytokines interferon gamma, interleukin 6....... The immunological imbalances shown here in the Ung-deficient mice may be central in the development of lymphomas in a background of generalised lymphoid hyperplasia....

  6. DNA breaks early in replication in B cell cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research by scientists at the NCI has identified a new class of DNA sites in cells that break early in the replication process. They found that these break sites correlate with damage often seen in B cell cancers, such as diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

  7. Bach2 regulates aberrant activation of B cell in systemic lupus erythematosus and can be negatively regulated by BCR-ABL/PI3K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengwei; Yang, Chao; Wen, Leilei; Liu, Lu; Zuo, Xianbo; Zhou, Fusheng; Gao, Jinping; Zheng, Xiaodong; Shi, Yinjuan; Zhu, Caihong; Liang, Bo; Yin, Xianyong; Wang, Wenjun; Cheng, Hui; Shen, Songke; Tang, Xianfa; Tang, Huayang; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Anping; Yang, Sen; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun; Sheng, Yujun

    2018-04-01

    This study was aimed to explore the effect of Bach2 on B cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as the underlying mechanisms. Expression of Bach2, phosphorylated-Bach2 (p-Bach2), Akt, p-Akt and BCR-ABL (p210) in B cells isolated from SLE patients and the healthy persons were assessed by Western blot. Immunofluorescence staining was performed to assess the localization of Bach2 in B cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was employed to detect IgG produced by B cells. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) and Annexin-V FITC/PI double staining assay were adopted to evaluate cell proliferation and apoptosis in B cells, respectively. Compared to the healthy controls, Bach2, p-Akt and p210 were significantly decreased, while nuclear translocation of Bach2, IgG, CD40 and CD86 obviously up-regulated in B cells from SLE patients. Bach2 significantly inhibited the proliferation, promoted apoptosis of B cells from SLE patients, whereas BCR-ABL dramatically reversed cell changes induced by Bach2. Besides, BCR-ABL also inhibited nuclear translocation of Bach2 in B cells from SLE patients. Further, LY294002 treatment had no effect on decreased expression of Bach2 induced by BCR-ABL, but significantly eliminated BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation of Bach2 and restored reduced nuclear translocation of Bach2 induced by BCR-ABL in B cells from SLE. Bach2 may play a suppressive role in B cells from SLE, and BCR-ABL may inhibit the nuclear translocation of Bach2 via serine phosphorylation through the PI3K pathway. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Murid herpesvirus-4 exploits dendritic cells to infect B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gaspar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play a central role in initiating immune responses. Some persistent viruses infect DCs and can disrupt their functions in vitro. However, these viruses remain strongly immunogenic in vivo. Thus what role DC infection plays in the pathogenesis of persistent infections is unclear. Here we show that a persistent, B cell-tropic gamma-herpesvirus, Murid Herpesvirus-4 (MuHV-4, infects DCs early after host entry, before it establishes a substantial infection of B cells. DC-specific virus marking by cre-lox recombination revealed that a significant fraction of the virus latent in B cells had passed through a DC, and a virus attenuated for replication in DCs was impaired in B cell colonization. In vitro MuHV-4 dramatically altered the DC cytoskeleton, suggesting that it manipulates DC migration and shape in order to spread. MuHV-4 therefore uses DCs to colonize B cells.

  9. B-cell activating factor in the pathophysiology of multiple myeloma: a target for therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengeveld, P J; Kersten, M J

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a currently incurable malignancy of plasma cells. Malignant myeloma cells (MMCs) are heavily dependent upon the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment for their survival. One component of this tumor microenvironment, B-Cell Activating Factor (BAFF), has been implicated as a key player in this interaction. This review discusses the role of BAFF in the pathophysiology of MM, and the potential of BAFF-inhibitory therapy for the treatment of MM. Multiple studies have shown that BAFF functions as a survival factor for MMCs. Furthermore, MMCs express several BAFF-binding receptors. Of these, only Transmembrane Activator and CAML Interactor (TACI) correlates with the MMC's capability to ligate BAFF. Additionally, the level of expression of TACI correlates with the level of the MMC's BM dependency. Ligation of BAFF receptors on MMCs causes activation of the Nuclear Factor of κ-B (NF-κB) pathway, a crucial pathway for the pathogenesis of many B-cell malignancies. Serum BAFF levels are significantly elevated in MM patients when compared to healthy controls, and correlate inversely with overall survival. BAFF signaling is thus an interesting target for the treatment of MM. Several BAFF-inhibitory drugs are currently under evaluation for the treatment of MM. These include BAFF-monoclonal antibodies (tabalumab) and antibody-drug conjugates (GSK2857916)

  10. Aberrant immunoglobulin and c-myc gene rearrangements in patients with nonmalignant monoclonal cryoglobulinemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perl, A.; Wang, N.; Williams, J.M.; Hunt, M.J.; Rosenfeld, S.I.; Condemi, J.J.; Packman, C.H.; Abraham, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    The status of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes was investigated in patients with idiopathic nonmalignant monoclonal IgG cryoglobulinemia (NCG). In NCG, monoclonal antibodies are synthesized at an accelerated rate by nonmalignant B lymphocytes. In order to determine whether this high production rate is related to a clonal B cell expansion, the rearrangement of the Ig genes was investigated by Southern blot analysis of genomic, 32 P-labelled, DNA extracted from the peripheral blood lymphocytes of four NCG patients. In three of four (VI, BR, and CH) clonal expansion of B cells was detected using probes specific for the genes. BamHI digestion of DNA from VI and BR produced three rearranged fragments which cohybridized with two of the probes. This finding suggested the presence of additional nonsecretory B cell clones and/or disruption of the gene segments spanned by and detected with the probes. In addition, the possibility of aberrant gene rearrangements was supported by noting the alteration of the c-myc gene locus in genomic DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes of VI and CH. Northern blot analysis of RNA isolated from peripheral blood B cells of VI and CH demonstrated aberrant transcripts of the c-myc gene, showing an active role of the altered c-myc locus. Detection of c-myc rearrangement in NCG patients clearly shows that this event may not be a final step in malignant B cell transformation

  11. Primary immunodeficiencies and B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Mateos, María Anunciación; Piquer Gibert, Mónica

    In primary immunodeficiencies there is a failure in the anti-tumor defense. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is one of the most common primary immunodeficiencies characterized by an alteration in the differentiation of B lymphocytes (BL). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an ubiquitous virus that selectively infects the BL. In patients with immunodeficiency, uncontrolled proliferation of infected BL and the action of viral proteins promote the development of lymphomas. At the University Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona, 28 patients were diagnosed with CVID from 2000 to 2013. This paper describes four patients who developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The lymphoma was associated with EBV in two of the cases. Patients were<18 years old, diagnosed with lymphoma between 4 and 13 years old. Two patients were treated with rituximab as monotherapy and achieved complete remission. Two patients were treated with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone) and radiotherapy or rituximab and achieved complete remission. Early detection of EBV infections and NHL in all patients diagnosed with CVID is recommended, regardless of age at diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevado Castro, B.E.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x10 7 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x10 7 spleen cells to 1x10 6 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  13. Human CD40 ligand-expressing type 3 innate lymphoid cells induce IL-10-producing immature transitional regulatory B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komlósi, Zsolt I; Kovács, Nóra; van de Veen, Willem; Kirsch, Anna Isabella; Fahrner, Heinz Benedikt; Wawrzyniak, Marcin; Rebane, Ana; Stanic, Barbara; Palomares, Oscar; Rückert, Beate; Menz, Günter; Akdis, Mübeccel; Losonczy, György; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2017-09-20

    Type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) are involved in maintenance of mucosal homeostasis; however, their role in immunoregulation has been unknown. Immature transitional regulatory B (itBreg) cells are innate-like B cells with immunosuppressive properties, and the in vivo mechanisms by which they are induced have not been fully clarified. We aimed to investigate the ILC3-B-cell interaction that probably takes place in human tonsils. ILC3s were isolated from peripheral blood and palatine tonsils, expanded, and cocultured with naive B cells. Tonsillar ILC3s and regulatory B cells were visualized with immunofluorescence histology. ILC3 frequencies were measured in tonsil tissue of allergic and nonallergic patients and in peripheral blood of allergic asthmatic patients and healthy control subjects. A mutually beneficial relationship was revealed between ILC3s and B cells: ILC3s induced IL-15 production in B cells through B cell-activating factor receptor, whereas IL-15, a potent growth factor for ILC3s, induced CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression on circulating and tonsillar ILC3s. IL-15-activated CD40L + ILC3s helped B-cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation of IL-10-secreting, PD-L1-expressing functional itBreg cells in a CD40L- and B cell-activating factor receptor-dependent manner. ILC3s and regulatory B cells were in close connection with each other in palatine tonsils. ILC3 frequency was reduced in tonsil tissue of allergic patients and in peripheral blood of allergic asthmatic patients. Human CD40L + ILC3s provide innate B-cell help and are involved in an innate immunoregulatory mechanism through induction of itBreg cell differentiation, which takes place in palatine tonsils in vivo. This mechanism, which can contribute to maintenance of immune tolerance, becomes insufficient in allergic diseases. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii r...

  15. Intravascular Large B-Cell Lymphoma Presenting with Diffuse Gallbladder Wall Thickening: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayf Al-Katib

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma is a rare subtype of extranodal diffuse B-cell lymphoma characterized by proliferation of neoplastic cells within the lumen of small and medium sized vessels. Clinical and imaging findings are nebulous as the intravascular subtype of lymphoma can involve a multitude of organs. Involvement of the gallbladder is extremely uncommon, and imaging findings can be easily confused for more prevalent pathologies. We report a case of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma in an 83-year-old male and review clinical presentation and imaging findings on CT, ultrasound, hepatobiliary iminodiacetic acid (HIDA scan, and MRI. It is important for the radiologist to know about this disease as the imaging findings are atypical of other types of lymphoma, and this may lead to a delay in diagnosis and treatment.

  16. Phenotypic characterization of autoreactive B cells--checkpoints of B cell tolerance in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett M Jacobi

    Full Text Available DNA-reactive B cells play a central role in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; DNA antibodies precede clinical disease and in established disease correlate with renal inflammation and contribute to dendritic cell activation and high levels of type 1 interferon. A number of central and peripheral B cell tolerance mechanisms designed to control the survival, differentiation and activation of autoreactive B cells are thought to be disturbed in patients with SLE. The characterization of DNA-reactive B cells has, however, been limited by their low frequency in peripheral blood. Using a tetrameric configuration of a peptide mimetope of DNA bound by pathogenic anti-DNA antibodies, we can identify B cells producing potentially pathogenic DNA-reactive antibodies. We, therefore, characterized the maturation and differentiation states of peptide, (ds double stranded DNA cross-reactive B cells in the peripheral blood of lupus patients and correlated these with clinical disease activity. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated a significantly higher frequency of tetramer-binding B cells in SLE patients compared to healthy controls. We demonstrated the existence of a novel tolerance checkpoint at the transition of antigen-naïve to antigen-experienced. We further demonstrate that patients with moderately active disease have more autoreactive B cells in both the antigen-naïve and antigen-experienced compartments consistent with greater impairment in B cell tolerance in both early and late checkpoints in these patients than in patients with quiescent disease. This methodology enables us to gain insight into the development and fate of DNA-reactive B cells in individual patients with SLE and paves the way ultimately to permit better and more customized therapies.

  17. Comparison of EBV DNA viral load in whole blood, plasma, B-cells and B-cell culture supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouedraogo, David Eric; Bollore, Karine; Viljoen, Johannes; Foulongne, Vincent; Reynes, Jacques; Cartron, Guillaume; Vendrell, Jean-Pierre; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-05-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome quantitation in whole blood is used widely for therapeutic monitoring of EBV-associated disorders in immunosuppressed individuals and in patients with EBV-associated lymphoma. However, the most appropriate biological material to be used for EBV DNA quantitation remains a subject of debate. This study compare the detection rate and levels of EBV DNA from whole blood, plasma, enriched B-cells, and B-cell short-term culture supernatant using quantitative real-time PCR. Samples were collected from 33 subjects with either HIV infection or B-cell lymphoma. Overall, EBV DNA was detected in 100% of enriched B-cell samples, in 82% of B-cell culture supernatants, in 57% of plasma, and 42% of whole blood samples. A significant correlation for EBV viral load was found between enriched B-cell and B-cell culture supernatant material (ρ = 0.92; P cells (ρ = -0.02; P = 0.89), whole blood and plasma (ρ = 0.24; P = 0.24), or enriched B-cells and plasma (ρ = 0.08; P = 0.77). Testing of enriched B-cells appeared to be the most sensitive method for detection of EBV DNA as well as for exploration of the cellular reservoir. Quantitation of EBV DNA in plasma and B-cell culture supernatant may be of interest to assess EBV reactivation dynamics and response to treatment as well as to decipher EBV host-pathogen interactions in various clinical scenarios. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Murine B cell development and antibody responses to model antigens are not impaired in the absence of the TNF receptor GITR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Sinik Teodorovic

    Full Text Available The Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumor necrosis factor Receptor GITR, a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily, has been shown to be important in modulating immune responses in the context of T cell immunity. B lymphocytes also express GITR, but a role of GITR in humoral immunity has not been fully explored. To address this question, we performed studies to determine the kinetics of GITR expression on naïve and stimulated B cells and the capacity of B cells to develop and mount antibody responses in GITR(-/- mice. Results of our studies indicate that all mature B cells express GITR on the cell surface, albeit at different levels. Expression of GITR on naïve mature B cells is upregulated by BCR signaling, but is counteracted by helper T cell-related factors and other inflammatory signals in vitro. In line with these findings, expression of GITR on germinal center and memory B cells is lower than that on naïve B cells. However, the expression of GITR is strongly upregulated in plasma cells. Despite these differences in GITR expression, the absence of GITR has no effect on T cell-dependent and T cell-independent antibody responses to model antigens in GITR(-/- mice, or on B cell activation and proliferation in vitro. GITR deficiency manifests only with a slight reduction of mature B cell numbers and increased turnover of naïve B cells, suggesting that GITR slightly contributes to mature B cell homeostasis. Overall, our data indicate that GITR does not play a significant role in B cell development and antibody responses to T-dependent and independent model antigens within the context of a GITR-deficient genetic background.

  19. Invasin of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis activates human peripheral B cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Lundgren, E; Carballeira, N; Vazquez, R; Dubinina, E; Bränden, H; Persson, H; Wolf-Watz, H

    1996-01-01

    The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis cell surface-located protein invasin was found to promote binding between the pathogen and resting peripheral B cells via beta 1 integrin receptors (CD29). B cells responded by expressing several activation markers and by growing, In contrast, T cells did not react, although these cells express CD29. An isogenic invA mutant failed to activate B cells. The mutation could be complemented by providing the invA+ gene in trans. Purified invasin alone did not activat...

  20. Effect of IL-6 on proliferation and IG production of human EBV-transformed cell lines in serum free culture media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochems, G. J.; Jordens, R.; van Lier, R. A.; Zeijlemaker, W. P.

    1990-01-01

    To optimalize growth and Ig production of EBV transformed B cells for large scale tissue culture, we analyzed five stable monoclonal EBV-B cell lines for their responsiveness to interleukin (IL)-6 in standard medium with 5% FCS and in several serum-free media. As we previously demonstrated these

  1. Immune TB Antibody Phage Display Library as a Tool To Study B Cell Immunity in TB Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidon, Nurul Hamizah; Suraiya, Siti; Sarmiento, Maria E; Acosta, Armando; Norazmi, Mohd Nor; Lim, Theam Soon

    2018-03-01

    B cells and in particular antibodies has always played second fiddle to cellular immunity in regard to tuberculosis (TB). However, recent studies has helped position humoral immunity especially antibodies back into the foray in relation to TB immunity. Therefore, the ability to correlate the natural antibody responses of infected individuals toward TB antigens would help strengthen this concept. Phage display is an intriguing approach that can be utilized to study antibody-mediated responses against a particular infection via harvesting the B cell repertoire from infected individuals. The development of disease-specific antibody libraries or immune libraries is useful to better understand antibody-mediated immune responses against specific disease antigens. This study describes the generation of an immune single-chain variable fragment (scFv) library derived from TB-infected individuals. The immune library with an estimated diversity of 10 9 independent clones was then applied for the identification of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium tuberculosis α-crystalline as a model antigen. Biopanning of the library isolated three monoclonal antibodies with unique gene usage. This strengthens the role of antibodies in TB immunity in addition to the role played by cellular immunity. The developed library can be applied against other TB antigens and aid antibody-derived TB immunity studies in the future.

  2. Epstein-Barr virus ensures B cell survival by uniquely modulating apoptosis at early and late times after infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Alexander M; Dai, Joanne; Bazot, Quentin; Patel, Luv; Nikitin, Pavel A; Djavadian, Reza; Winter, Peter S; Salinas, Cristina A; Barry, Ashley Perkins; Wood, Kris C; Johannsen, Eric C; Letai, Anthony; Allday, Martin J; Luftig, Micah A

    2017-04-20

    Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is causally linked to several human cancers. EBV expresses viral oncogenes that promote cell growth and inhibit the apoptotic response to uncontrolled proliferation. The EBV oncoprotein LMP1 constitutively activates NFκB and is critical for survival of EBV-immortalized B cells. However, during early infection EBV induces rapid B cell proliferation with low levels of LMP1 and little apoptosis. Therefore, we sought to define the mechanism of survival in the absence of LMP1/NFκB early after infection. We used BH3 profiling to query mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis and defined a transition from uninfected B cells (BCL-2) to early-infected (MCL-1/BCL-2) and immortalized cells (BFL-1). This dynamic change in B cell survival mechanisms is unique to virus-infected cells and relies on regulation of MCL-1 mitochondrial localization and BFL-1 transcription by the viral EBNA3A protein. This study defines a new role for EBNA3A in the suppression of apoptosis with implications for EBV lymphomagenesis.

  3. The transcriptional profiling of human in vivo-generated plasma cells identifies selective imbalances in monoclonal gammopathies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Valor

    Full Text Available Plasma cells (PC represent the heterogeneous final stage of the B cells (BC differentiation process. To characterize the transition of BC into PC, transcriptomes from human naïve BC were compared to those of three functionally-different subsets of human in vivo-generated PC: i tonsil PC, mainly consisting of early PC; ii PC released to the blood after a potent booster-immunization (mostly cycling plasmablasts; and, iii bone marrow CD138+ PC that represent highly mature PC and include the long-lived PC compartment. This transcriptional transition involves subsets of genes related to key processes for PC maturation: the already known protein processing, apoptosis and homeostasis, and of new discovery including histones, macromolecule assembly, zinc-finger transcription factors and neuromodulation. This human PC signature is partially reproduced in vitro and is conserved in mouse. Moreover, the present study identifies genes that define PC subtypes (e.g., proliferation-associated genes for circulating PC and transcriptional-related genes for tonsil and bone marrow PC and proposes some putative transcriptional regulators of the human PC signatures (e.g., OCT/POU, XBP1/CREB, E2F, among others. Finally, we also identified a restricted imbalance of the present PC transcriptional program in monoclonal gammopathies that correlated with PC malignancy.

  4. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  5. B-Cell-Specific Diversion of Glucose Carbon Utilization Reveals a Unique Vulnerability in B Cell Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gang; Chan, Lai N; Klemm, Lars; Braas, Daniel; Chen, Zhengshan; Geng, Huimin; Zhang, Qiuyi Chen; Aghajanirefah, Ali; Cosgun, Kadriye Nehir; Sadras, Teresa; Lee, Jaewoong; Mirzapoiazova, Tamara; Salgia, Ravi; Ernst, Thomas; Hochhaus, Andreas; Jumaa, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Weinstock, David M; Graeber, Thomas G; Müschen, Markus

    2018-04-05

    B cell activation during normal immune responses and oncogenic transformation impose increased metabolic demands on B cells and their ability to retain redox homeostasis. While the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) was identified as a tumor suppressor in multiple types of cancer, our genetic studies revealed an essential role of PP2A in B cell tumors. Thereby, PP2A redirects glucose carbon utilization from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) to salvage oxidative stress. This unique vulnerability reflects constitutively low PPP activity in B cells and transcriptional repression of G6PD and other key PPP enzymes by the B cell transcription factors PAX5 and IKZF1. Reflecting B-cell-specific transcriptional PPP-repression, glucose carbon utilization in B cells is heavily skewed in favor of glycolysis resulting in lack of PPP-dependent antioxidant protection. These findings reveal a gatekeeper function of the PPP in a broad range of B cell malignancies that can be efficiently targeted by small molecule inhibition of PP2A and G6PD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. B-cell activating factor detected on both naïve and memory B cells in bullous pemphigoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Hua; Kusuhara, Masahiro; Li, Xiaoguang; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Tsuchisaka, Atsunari; Ishii, Norito; Koga, Hiroshi; Hayakawa, Taihei; Ohara, Koji; Karashima, Tadashi; Ohyama, Bungo; Ohata, Chika; Furumura, Minao; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF), an important immune regulatory cytokine, is involved in development of autoimmune diseases. Although BAFF is expressed in various cells, including dendritic cells (DCs) and monocytes, BAFF expression on B cells has not been well documented. In the present study, BAFF molecules on DCs and naïve and memory B cells in autoimmune bullous diseases, including pemphigus vulgaris, pemphigus foliaceus and bullous pemphigoid (BP), were analysed by flow cytometry. Compared with healthy controls (HC), BAFF expression on naïve and memory B cells increased significantly in BP. No difference in BAFF receptor expression in naïve and memory B cells was shown among all study groups. Furthermore, BAFF expression in both naïve and memory B cells of BP, but not HC, was detected by confocal microscopic analysis. These results implied that BAFF expressed by B cells may play a pathogenic role in autoimmune bullous diseases, particularly BP. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren’s syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Subjects with primary Sjögren’s syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. Methods To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Results Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. Conclusions For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an

  8. Persistence and selection of an expanded B-cell clone in the setting of rituximab therapy for Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberg, Uri; Meng, Wenzhao; Zhang, Bochao; Haff, Nancy; St Clair, E William; Cohen, Philip L; McNair, Patrice D; Li, Ling; Levesque, Marc C; Luning Prak, Eline T

    2014-02-11

    Subjects with primary Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) have an increased risk of developing B-cell lymphoma and may harbor monoclonal B-cell expansions in the peripheral blood. Expanded B-cell clones could be pathogenic, and their persistence could exacerbate disease or predispose toward the development of lymphoma. Therapy with anti-CD20 (rituximab) has the potential to eliminate expanded B-cell clones and thereby potentially ameliorate disease. This study was undertaken to identify and track expanded B-cell clones in the blood of subjects with primary SjS who were treated with rituximab. To determine whether circulating B-cell clones in subjects with primary SjS emerge or remain after B cell-depleting therapy with rituximab, we studied the antibody heavy-chain repertoire. We performed single-memory B-cell and plasmablast sorting and antibody heavy-chain sequencing in six rituximab-treated SjS subjects over the course of a 1-year follow-up period. Expanded B-cell clones were identified in four out of the six rituximab-treated SjS subjects, based upon the independent amplification of sequences with identical or highly similar VH, DH, and JH gene segments. We identified one SjS subject with a large expanded B-cell clone that was present prior to therapy and persisted after therapy. Somatic mutations in the clone were numerous but did not increase in frequency over the course of the 1-year follow-up, suggesting that the clone had been present for a long period of time. Intriguingly, a majority of the somatic mutations in the clone were silent, suggesting that the clone was under chronic negative selection. For some subjects with primary SjS, these data show that (a) expanded B-cell clones are readily identified in the peripheral blood, (b) some clones are not eliminated by rituximab, and (c) persistent clones may be under chronic negative selection or may not be antigen-driven. The analysis of sequence variation among members of an expanded clone may provide a novel means

  9. B-Cell waste classification sampling and analysis plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOBART, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents the methods used to collect and analyze samples to obtain data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the 324 Facility B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream

  10. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leili Aghebati

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells.

  11. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sineh sepehr, Koushan; Baradaran, Behzad; Majidi, Jafar; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Aghebati, leili; Zare Shahneh, Fatemeh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously been primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After twelve days, approximately 7 ml ascetic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. Evaluation of mAb titration was assessed by ELISA method. In the present study, we describe a protocol for large scale production of MAbs. Results: We prepared monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with high specificity and sensitivity against human CD20 by hybridoma method and characterized them by ELISA. The subclass of antibody was IgG2a and its light chain was kappa. Ascetic fluid was purified by Protein-A Sepharose affinity chromatography and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with FITC and Immunofluorescence was done for confirming the specific binding. Conclusion: The conjugated monoclonal antibody could have application in diagnosis B-cell lymphomas, hairy cell leukemia, B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and melanoma cancer stem cells. PMID:24312821

  12. Atypical memory B cells in human chronic infectious diseases: An interim report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portugal, Silvia; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Moir, Susan; Crompton, Peter D; Pierce, Susan K

    2017-11-01

    Immunological memory is a remarkable phenomenon in which survival of an initial infection by a pathogen leads to life-long protection from disease upon subsequent exposure to that same pathogen. For many infectious diseases, long-lived protective humoral immunity is induced after only a single infection in a process that depends on the generation of memory B cells (MBCs) and long-lived plasma cells. However, over the past decade it has become increasingly evident that many chronic human infectious diseases to which immunity is not readily established, including HIV-AIDS, malaria and TB, are associated with fundamental alterations in the composition and functionality of MBC compartments. A common feature of these diseases appears to be a large expansion of what have been termed exhausted B cells, tissue-like memory B cells or atypical memory B cells (aMBCs) that, for simplicity's sake, we refer to here as aMBCs. It has been suggested that chronic immune activation and inflammation drive the expansion of aMBCs and that in some way aMBCs contribute to deficiencies in the acquisition of immunity in chronic infectious diseases. Although aMBCs are heterogeneous both within individuals and between diseases, they have several features in common including low expression of the cell surface markers that define classical MBCs in humans including CD21 and CD27 and high expression of genes not usually expressed by classical MBCs including T-bet, CD11c and a variety of inhibitory receptors, notably members of the FcRL family. Another distinguishing feature is their greatly diminished ability to be stimulated through their B cell receptors to proliferate, secrete cytokines or produce antibodies. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the phenotypic markers of aMBCs, their specificity in relation to the disease-causing pathogen, their functionality, the drivers of their expansion in chronic infections and their life span. We briefly summarize the features of a

  13. 'Big bang' of B-cell development revealed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murre, Cornelis

    2018-01-15

    Earlier studies have identified transcription factors that specify B-cell fate, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be revealed. Two new studies by Miyai and colleagues (pp. 112-126) and Li and colleagues (pp. 96-111) in this issue of Genes & Development provide new and unprecedented insights into the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that establish B-cell identity. © 2018 Murre; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the quality process plan for the restart of a hot cell in the B Plant, originally a bismuth phosphate processing facility, but later converted to a waste fractionation plant. B-Cell is currently being cleaned out and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/1999. This report describes the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone

  15. B-cell lymphoma with Mott cell differentiation in two young adult dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacy, Nicole I; Nabity, Mary B; Hackendahl, Nicole; Buote, Melanie; Ward, Jennifer; Ginn, Pamela E; Vernau, William; Clapp, William L; Harvey, John W

    2009-03-01

    Two young adult dogs with gastrointestinal signs were each found to have an intra-abdominal mass based on physical examination and diagnostic imaging. On exploratory laparotomy, small intestinal masses and mesenteric lymphadenopathy were found in both dogs; a liver mass was also found in dog 1. Cytologic and histologic examination of intestinal and liver masses and mesenteric lymph nodes revealed 2 distinct lymphoid cell populations: lymphoblasts and atypical Mott cells. With Romanowsky stains, the atypical Mott cells contained many discrete, clear to pale blue cytoplasmic inclusions consistent with Russell bodies that were positive by immunohistochemistry for IgM and CD79a in both dogs and for IgG in dog 2. The Mott cells and occasional lymphoblasts stained strongly positive with periodic acid-Schiff. Using flow cytometric immunophenotyping in dog 1, 60% of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and 85% of cells in an affected lymph node were positive for CD21, CD79a, IgM, and MCH II, indicative of B-cells. With electron microscopy, disorganized and dilated endoplasmic reticulum was seen in Mott cells in tumors from both dogs. Antigen receptor gene rearrangement analysis of lymph node and intestinal masses indicated a clonal B-cell population. Based on cell morphology, tissue involvement, and evidence for clonal B-cell proliferation, we diagnosed neoplasms involving Mott cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the second report of Mott cell tumors or, more appropriately, B-cell lymphoma with Mott cell differentiation, in dogs. More complete characterization of this neoplasm requires further investigation of additional cases. This lymphoproliferative disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis for canine gastrointestinal tumors.

  16. Origin of B-Cell Neoplasms in Autoimmune Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Hemminki

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs are associated with a number of B-cell neoplasms but the associations are selective in regard to the type of neoplasm and the conferred risks are variable. So far no mechanistic bases for these differential associations have been demonstrated. We speculate that developmental origin of B-cells might propose a mechanistic rationale for their carcinogenic response to autoimmune stimuli and tested the hypothesis on our previous studies on the risks of B-cell neoplasms after any of 33 ADs. We found that predominantly germinal center (GC-derived B-cells showed multiple associations with ADs: diffuse large B cell lymphoma associated with 15 ADs, follicular lymphoma with 7 ADs and Hodgkin lymphoma with 11 ADs. Notably, these neoplasms shared significant associations with 5 ADs (immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosis. By contrast, primarily non-GC neoplasms, acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and myeloma associated with 2 ADs only and mantle cell lymphoma with 1 AD. None of the neoplasms shared associated ADs. These data may suggest that autoimmune stimulation critically interferes with the rapid cell division, somatic hypermutation, class switch recombination and immunological selection of maturing B-cell in the GC and delivers damage contributing to transformation.

  17. Dissecting Immunogenicity of Monoclonal Antibodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Snyder, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    The potential of monoclonal antibodies, (mAbs), for use in therapeutic and diagnostic applications has not been fully realized in part due to counter-immune responses that often arise in patient recipients of mAb...

  18. Endothelial Plasmalemma Vesicle Associated Protein regulates the homeostasis of splenic immature B cell and B1 B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Raul; Tse, Dan; Deharvengt, Sophie J.; Luciano, Marcus R.; Carriere, Catherine; Noelle, Randolph J.; Stan, Radu V.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalemma vesicle associated protein (Plvap) is an endothelial protein with roles in endothelial diaphragm formation and maintenance of basal vascular permeability. At the same time Plvap has roles in immunity by facilitating leukocyte diapedesis at inflammatory sites and controlling peripheral lymph node morphogenesis and the entry of soluble antigens into lymph node conduits. Based on its postulated role in diapedesis, we have investigated the role of Plvap in hematopoiesis and show that deletion of Plvap results in a dramatic decrease of IgM+IgDlo B cells in both the spleen and peritoneal cavity. Tissue specific deletion of Plvap demonstrates that the defect is B cell extrinsic, as B cell and pan hematopoietic Plvap deletion has no effect on IgM+IgDlo B cell numbers. Endothelial specific deletion of Plvap in the embryo or at adult stage recapitulates the full Plvap knockout phenotype whereas endothelial specific reconstitution of Plvap under the Chd5 promoter rescues the IgM+IgDlo B cell phenotype. Taken together, these results show that Plvap expression in endothelial cells is important in the maintenance of IgM+ B cells in the spleen and peritoneal cavity. PMID:27742829

  19. Endothelial Plasmalemma Vesicle-Associated Protein Regulates the Homeostasis of Splenic Immature B Cells and B-1 B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Raul; Tse, Dan; Deharvengt, Sophie J; Luciano, Marcus R; Carriere, Catherine; Noelle, Randolph J; Stan, Radu V

    2016-11-15

    Plasmalemma vesicle-associated protein (Plvap) is an endothelial protein with roles in endothelial diaphragm formation and maintenance of basal vascular permeability. At the same time, Plvap has roles in immunity by facilitating leukocyte diapedesis at inflammatory sites and controlling peripheral lymph node morphogenesis and the entry of soluble Ags into lymph node conduits. Based on its postulated role in diapedesis, we have investigated the role of Plvap in hematopoiesis and show that deletion of Plvap results in a dramatic decrease of IgM + IgD lo B cells in both the spleen and the peritoneal cavity. Tissue-specific deletion of Plvap demonstrates that the defect is B cell extrinsic, because B cell and pan-hematopoietic Plvap deletion has no effect on IgM + IgD lo B cell numbers. Endothelial-specific deletion of Plvap in the embryo or at adult stage recapitulates the full Plvap knockout phenotype, whereas endothelial-specific reconstitution of Plvap under the Chd5 promoter rescues the IgM + IgD lo B cell phenotype. Taken together, these results show that Plvap expression in endothelial cells is important in the maintenance of IgM + B cells in the spleen and peritoneal cavity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. Human regulatory B cells control the TFH cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Achouak; Simon, Quentin; Mohr, Audrey; Séité, Jean-François; Youinou, Pierre; Bendaoud, Boutahar; Ghedira, Ibtissem; Pers, Jacques-Olivier; Jamin, Christophe

    2017-07-01

    Follicular helper T (T FH ) cells support terminal B-cell differentiation. Human regulatory B (Breg) cells modulate cellular responses, but their control of T FH cell-dependent humoral immune responses is unknown. We sought to assess the role of Breg cells on T FH cell development and function. Human T cells were polyclonally stimulated in the presence of IL-12 and IL-21 to generate T FH cells. They were cocultured with B cells to induce their terminal differentiation. Breg cells were included in these cultures, and their effects were evaluated by using flow cytometry and ELISA. B-cell lymphoma 6, IL-21, inducible costimulator, CXCR5, and programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) expressions increased on stimulated human T cells, characterizing T FH cell maturation. In cocultures they differentiated B cells into CD138 + plasma and IgD - CD27 + memory cells and triggered immunoglobulin secretions. Breg cells obtained by Toll-like receptor 9 and CD40 activation of B cells prevented T FH cell development. Added to T FH cell and B-cell cocultures, they inhibited B-cell differentiation, impeded immunoglobulin secretions, and expanded Foxp3 + CXCR5 + PD-1 + follicular regulatory T cells. Breg cells modulated IL-21 receptor expressions on T FH cells and B cells, and their suppressive activities involved CD40, CD80, CD86, and intercellular adhesion molecule interactions and required production of IL-10 and TGF-β. Human Breg cells control T FH cell maturation, expand follicular regulatory T cells, and inhibit the T FH cell-mediated antibody secretion. These novel observations demonstrate a role for the Breg cell in germinal center reactions and suggest that deficient activities might impair the T FH cell-dependent control of humoral immunity and might lead to the development of aberrant autoimmune responses. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Restoration of human B-cell differentiation into NOD-SCID mice engrafted with gene-corrected CD34+ cells isolated from Artemis or RAG1-deficient patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagresle-Peyrou, Chantal; Benjelloun, Fatine; Hue, Christophe; Andre-Schmutz, Isabelle; Bonhomme, Delphine; Forveille, Monique; Beldjord, Kheira; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Charneau, Pierre; Durandy, Anne; Fischer, Alain; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2008-02-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by mutation of the recombination-activating gene 1 (RAG1) or Artemis gene lead to the absence of B- and T-cell differentiation. The only curative treatment is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) transplantation, which displays a high survival rate when an HLA compatible donor is available but has a poorer prognosis when the donor is partially compatible. Consequently, gene therapy may be a promising alternative strategy for these diseases. Here, we report that lentiviral gene-corrected BM CD34(+) cells (isolated from Artemis- or RAG1-deficient patients) sustain human B-cell differentiation following injection into non-obese diabetic/SCID (NOD-SCID) mice previously infused with anti-interleukin-2 receptor beta chain monoclonal antibody. In most of the mice BM, engrafted with Artemis-transduced cells, human B-cell differentiation occurred until the mature stage. The B cells were functional as human immunoglobulin M (IgM) was present in the serum. Following injection with RAG1-transduced cells, human engraftment occurred in vivo but B-cell differentiation until the mature stage was less frequent. However, when it occurred, it was always associated with human IgM production. This overall approach represents a useful tool for evaluating gene transfer efficiency in human SCID forms affecting B-cell development (such as Artemis deficiency) and for testing new vectors for improving in vivo RAG1 complementation.

  2. High Inter-Individual Diversity of Point Mutations, Insertions, and Deletions in Human Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein-Specific Memory B Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Reiche

    Full Text Available The diversity of virus-specific antibodies and of B cells among different individuals is unknown. Using single-cell cloning of antibody genes, we generated recombinant human monoclonal antibodies from influenza nucleoprotein-specific memory B cells in four adult humans with and without preceding influenza vaccination. We examined the diversity of the antibody repertoires and found that NP-specific B cells used numerous immunoglobulin genes. The heavy chains (HCs originated from 26 and the kappa light chains (LCs from 19 different germ line genes. Matching HC and LC chains gave rise to 43 genetically distinct antibodies that bound influenza NP. The median lengths of the CDR3 of the HC, kappa and lambda LC were 14, 9 and 11 amino acids, respectively. We identified changes at 13.6% of the amino acid positions in the V gene of the antibody heavy chain, at 8.4% in the kappa and at 10.6 % in the lambda V gene. We identified somatic insertions or deletions in 8.1% of the variable genes. We also found several small groups of clonal relatives that were highly diversified. Our findings demonstrate broadly diverse memory B cell repertoires for the influenza nucleoprotein. We found extensive variation within individuals with a high number of point mutations, insertions, and deletions, and extensive clonal diversification. Thus, structurally conserved proteins can elicit broadly diverse and highly mutated B-cell responses.

  3. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8+ T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a−/− CD8+ T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8+ T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8+ T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8+ T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8+ T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas. PMID:28344876

  4. 2B4-SAP signaling is required for the priming of naive CD8+ T cells by antigen-expressing B cells and B lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Hsuan; Tsai, Kevin; Tan, Sara Y; Kang, Sohyeong; Ford, Mandy L; Harder, Kenneth W; Priatel, John J

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in SH2D1A gene that encodes SAP (SLAM-associated protein) result in X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP), a rare primary immunodeficiency disease defined by exquisite sensitivity to the B-lymphotropic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and B cell lymphomas. However, the precise mechanism of how the loss of SAP function contributes to extreme vulnerability to EBV and the development of B cell lymphomas remains unclear. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that SAP is critical for CD8 + T cell immune surveillance of antigen (Ag)-expressing B cells or B lymphoma cells under conditions of defined T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells exhibited greatly diminished proliferation relative to wild type when Ag-presenting-B cells or -B lymphoma cells served as the primary Ag-presenting cell (APC). By contrast, Sh2d1a - / - CD8 + T cells responded equivalently to wild-type CD8 + T cells when B cell-depleted splenocytes, melanoma cells or breast carcinoma cells performed Ag presentation. Through application of signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) family receptor blocking antibodies or SLAM family receptor-deficient CD8 + T cells and APCs, we found that CD48 engagement on the B cell surface by 2B4 is crucial for initiating SAP-dependent signaling required for the Ag-driven CD8 + T cell proliferation and differentiation. Altogether, a pivotal role for SAP in promoting the expansion and differentiation of B cell-primed viral-specific naive CD8 + T cells may explain the selective immune deficiency of XLP patients to EBV and B cell lymphomas.

  5. T(14;18) is Not Associated with Mixed Cryoglobulinemia or with Clonal B Cell Expansion in Egyptian Patients with Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ABBAS, O.M.; OMAR, N.A.; HASSAN, Z.K.

    2008-01-01

    Background/Aim: The mechanisms of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders in chronic hepatitis C virus (Hv) infection are unclear. An increased prevalence of circulating monoclonal B-cells and t(14;18) has been reported. Geographic heterogeneity of prevalence of t(14;18) has been shown to exist. We investigated the prevalence of t(14;18) and B-cell clonality as possible mechanisms of lymphoma genesis in chronic HCV patients, in whom cryoglobulinemia status was previously detected. Methods: A cohort of 111 patients was studied, including 87 patients with chronic HCV disease (18 cryoglobulinemic and 69 non- cryoglobulinemic); 24 HCV negative, cryoglobulin negative patients with other nonimmune chronic liver diseases were enrolled as controls. The t(14;18) and IgH rearrangement (as a marker of B cell clonality) were detected by the polymerase chain reaction. Results: t(14;18) was detected in 27.6% of HCV patients and in none of the controls. Detection rates were comparable in both cryoglobulin-positive and negative groups (22.2% and 29%, respectively), p=0.769. IgH rearrangement was detected in 39.1% of HCV patients and in none of the controls. The cryo globulin-positive group showed significantly higher prevalence of IgH rearrangement compared to the cryoglobulin-negative group (61.1% and 33.3%, respectively), p=0.03, OR=3.13 and 95% CI=1.07-9.17. t(14;18) and monoclonal IgH rearrangement detection rates were not associated with each other, p=0.467. Conclusion: t(14;18) is uncommon in HCV-mixed cryogoblulinemia Egyptian patients; it does not seem to play a role in HCV-associated MC and lymphoma genesis in our geographical area. HCV may play a role in mixed cryogoblulinemia and lymphoma genesis, probably by inducing clonal B-cell expansions.

  6. Characterization of a Broadly Reactive Anti-CD40 Agonistic Monoclonal Antibody for Potential Use as an Adjuvant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Martin

    Full Text Available Lack of safe and effective adjuvants is a major hindrance to the development of efficacious vaccines. Signaling via CD40 pathway leads to enhanced antigen processing and presentation, nitric oxide expression, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by antigen presenting cells, and stimulation of B-cells to undergo somatic hypermutation, immunoglobulin class switching, and proliferation. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have shown promising adjuvant qualities in human and mouse vaccine studies. An anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated 2E4E4, was identified and shown to have strong agonistic effects on primary cells from multiple livestock species. The mAb recognize swine, bovine, caprine, and ovine CD40, and evoked 25-fold or greater proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from these species relative to cells incubated with an isotype control (p<0.001. In addition, the mAb induced significant nitric oxide (p<0.0001 release by bovine macrophages. Furthermore, the mAb upregulated the expression of MHC-II by PBMCs, and stimulated significant (p<0.0001 IL-1α, IL6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression by PBMCs. These results suggest that the mAb 2E4E4 can target and stimulate cells from multiple livestock species and thus, it is a potential candidate for adjuvant development. This is the first study to report an anti-swine CD40 agonistic mAb that is also broadly reactive against multiple species.

  7. Constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase predisposes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines to CD40-mediated cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollmann, C Annette; Owens, Trevor; Nalbantoglu, Josephine

    2006-01-01

    CD40 promotes survival, proliferation, and differentiation of normal B cells but can cause activation-induced cell death in malignant B lymphocytes. CD40 ligand and anti-CD40 antibodies have been used successfully to induce apoptosis in lymphoma lines both in vitro and in xenograft tumor models. ...

  8. CD20-based Immunotherapy of B-cell Derived Hematologic Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanehbandi, Dariush; Majidi, Jafar; Kazemi, Tohid; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati-Maleki, Leili

    2017-01-01

    CD20 is a surface antigen, which is expressed at certain stages of B-cell differentiation. Targeting the CD20-positive B-cells with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has been an effectual strategy in the treatment of hematologic malignancies such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Initial success with Rituximab (RTX) has encouraged the creation and development of more effective CD20 based therapeutics. However, treatment with conventional MAbs has not been adequate to overcome the problems such as refractory/ relapsed disease. In this regard, new generations of MAbs with enhanced affinity or improved anti-tumor properties have been developed. CD20 directed therapeutics have heterogeneous features and mechanisms of action. Hence, having sufficient knowledge on the immunological and molecular aspects of CD20 based cancer therapy is necessary for predicting the clinical outcomes and taking the necessary measures. An extensive search was performed in PubMed and similar databases for peer-reviewed articles concerning the biology, function and characteristics of CD20 molecule as well as the mechanisms of action and evolutionary process of CD20 targeting agents. This review provides information about the current situation of CD20 targeting immunotherapeutics including MAbs, bispecific antibodies (which exert multiple functions or involve Tcells in tumor elimination) and CAR T-cells (engineered T-cells armed with chimeric antigen receptors). Moreover, limitations, challenges and available solutions regarding the application of CD20 targeting treatments are addressed. Utilization of CD20-targeted therapeutics, due to their diverse properties, requires special considerations. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  9. Microenvironment-Centred Dynamics in Aggressive B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Cacciatore

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive B-cell lymphomas share high proliferative and invasive attitudes and dismal prognosis despite heterogeneous biological features. In the interchained sequence of events leading to cancer progression, neoplastic clone-intrinsic molecular events play a major role. Nevertheless, microenvironment-related cues have progressively come into focus as true determinants for this process. The cancer-associated microenvironment is a complex network of nonneoplastic immune and stromal cells embedded in extracellular components, giving rise to a multifarious crosstalk with neoplastic cells towards the induction of a supportive milieu. The immunological and stromal microenvironments have been classically regarded as essential partners of indolent lymphomas, while considered mainly negligible in the setting of aggressive B-cell lymphomas that, by their nature, are less reliant on external stimuli. By this paper we try to delineate the cardinal microenvironment-centred dynamics exerting an influence over lymphoid clone progression in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

  10. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    chains and mRNA to levels comparable to those seen in activated T cells. Anti-mu-stimulated B cells responded to IL-2 by incorporation of [3H]thymidine and high rate immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion. Both IL-5 (at optimal concentration) and suboptimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) induced surface...... expression of IL-2R alpha. The level of expression induced by IL-5 was equivalent to that on anti-Ig-activated B cells. Neither stimulus induced detectable expression of IL-2R beta, and neither induced B cells to respond to IL-2. IL-2R alpha expression was strongly enhanced, and low levels of IL-2R beta...

  11. The cell biology of T-dependent B cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, T; Zeine, R

    1989-01-01

    The requirement that CD4+ helper T cells recognize antigen in association with class II Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) encoded molecules constrains T cells to activation through intercellular interaction. The cell biology of the interactions between CD4+ T cells and antigen-presenting cells...... includes multipoint intermolecular interactions that probably involve aggregation of both polymorphic and monomorphic T cell surface molecules. Such aggregations have been shown in vitro to markedly enhance and, in some cases, induce T cell activation. The production of T-derived lymphokines that have been...... implicated in B cell activation is dependent on the T cell receptor for antigen and its associated CD3 signalling complex. T-dependent help for B cell activation is therefore similarly MHC-restricted and involves T-B intercellular interaction. Recent reports that describe antigen-independent B cell...

  12. Dataset of transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Garruss

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Signaling via B cell receptors (BCR and Toll-like receptors (TLRs result in activation of B cells with distinct physiological outcomes, but transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that drive activation and distinguish these pathways remain unknown. At early time points after BCR and TLR ligand exposure, 0.5 and 2 h, RNA-seq was performed allowing observations on rapid transcriptional changes. At 2 h, ChIP-seq was performed to allow observations on important regulatory mechanisms potentially driving transcriptional change. The dataset includes RNA-seq, ChIP-seq of control (Input, RNA Pol II, H3K4me3, H3K27me3, and a separate RNA-seq for miRNA expression, which can be found at Gene Expression Omnibus Dataset GSE61608. Here, we provide details on the experimental and analysis methods used to obtain and analyze this dataset and to examine the transcriptional landscape of B cell early activation.

  13. Effect of antigen on localization of immunologically specific B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzio, N.M.; Chapman, J.M.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1976-01-01

    Studies were conducted to demonstrate homing of memory B cells to sites of antigen localization in lymph nodes, using functional criteria to detect local presence of memory cells at varying intervals after intravenous injection. Cell suspensions were prepared from spleens of donor mice injected with complete Freund's adjuvant. Recipient mice were injected with Escherichia coli endotoxin and immune or normal spleen cells and were gamma-irradiated. Results indicated that passively transferred unilateral B cell memory was established. The development over a period of several days of this difference between left and right lymph nodes suggests that recirculating memory B cells are being progressively selected by antigen in the lymph node, rather than that this difference is due to a specific exit of cells from the circulation towards the antigen

  14. A rare cause of ischemic stroke: Intravasculer B cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeyma Çiftçi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular B cell lymphoma is rare and an agressive form of large B cell lymphoma which can affect central nervous system. Because of its varied clinical symptoms and the absence of lymphadenopathy, it is generally diagnosed postmortem. Cerebral infarction due to occlusion of arteries can be seen as a rare clinical form of central nervous system involvement. Large artery atherosclerosis, cardiyoembolism and small artery occlusion are the important causes of ischemic stroke but no any cause is detected in %15-40 of all cases. In this report, with the discussion of a case with ischemia like encephalopathy and multiple cerebral ischemic lesions at different stages in cranial MRI which was diagnosed by the help of brain biopsy as a intravascular B cell lymphoma, it is aimed to take attention intravascular lymphoma as a rare cause of ischemic stroke.

  15. IgM and IgD B cell receptors differentially respond to endogenous antigens and control B cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noviski, Mark; Mueller, James L; Satterthwaite, Anne; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Brombacher, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Naive B cells co-express two BCR isotypes, IgM and IgD, with identical antigen-binding domains but distinct constant regions. IgM but not IgD is downregulated on autoreactive B cells. Because these isotypes are presumed to be redundant, it is unknown how this could impose tolerance. We introduced the Nur77-eGFP reporter of BCR signaling into mice that express each BCR isotype alone. Despite signaling strongly in vitro, IgD is less sensitive than IgM to endogenous antigen in vivo and developmental fate decisions are skewed accordingly. IgD-only Lyn−/− B cells cannot generate autoantibodies and short-lived plasma cells (SLPCs) in vivo, a fate thought to be driven by intense BCR signaling induced by endogenous antigens. Similarly, IgD-only B cells generate normal germinal center, but impaired IgG1+ SLPC responses to T-dependent immunization. We propose a role for IgD in maintaining the quiescence of autoreactive B cells and restricting their differentiation into autoantibody secreting cells. PMID:29521626

  16. Understanding B-cell activation and autoantibody repertoire selection in systemic lupus erythematosus: A B-cell immunomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Christopher M; Hom, Jennifer R; Fucile, Christopher F; Rosenberg, Alexander F; Sanz, Inaki

    2018-07-01

    Understanding antibody repertoires and in particular, the properties and fates of B cells expressing potentially pathogenic antibodies is critical to define the mechanisms underlying multiple immunological diseases including autoimmune and allergic conditions as well as transplant rejection. Moreover, an integrated knowledge of the antibody repertoires expressed by B cells and plasma cells (PC) of different functional properties and longevity is essential to develop new therapeutic strategies, better biomarkers for disease segmentation, and new assays to measure restoration of B-cell tolerance or, at least, of normal B-cell homeostasis. Reaching these goals, however, will require a more precise phenotypic, functional and molecular definition of B-cell and PC populations, and a comprehensive analysis of the antigenic reactivity of the antibodies they express. While traditionally hampered by technical and ethical limitations in human experimentation, new technological advances currently enable investigators to address these questions in a comprehensive fashion. In this review, we shall discuss these concepts as they apply to the study of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Reprogramming of B cells into macrophages: mechanistic insights

    OpenAIRE

    Di Tullio, Alessandro, 1982-

    2012-01-01

    Our earlier work has shown that pre-B cells can be converted into macrophages by the transcription factor C/EBPα at very high frequencies and also that a clonal pre-B cell line with an inducible form of C/EBPα can be converted into macrophage-like cells. Using these systems we have performed a systematic analysis of the questions whether during transdifferentiation the cells retrodifferentiate to a precursor cell state and whether cell cycle is required for reprogramming. As for the first ...

  18. Epigenetics of peripheral B cell differentiation and the antibody response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eZan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications, such as histone post-translational modifications, DNA methylation, and alteration of gene expression by non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs (miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, are heritable changes that are independent from the genomic DNA sequence. These regulate gene activities and, therefore, cellular functions. Epigenetic modifications act in concert with transcription factors and play critical roles in B cell development and differentiation, thereby modulating antibody responses to foreign- and self-antigens. Upon antigen encounter by mature B cells in the periphery, alterations of these lymphocytes epigenetic landscape are induced by the same stimuli that drive the antibody response. Such alterations instruct B cells to undergo immunoglobulin class switch DNA recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM, as well as differentiation to memory B cells or long-lived plasma cells for the immune memory. Inducible histone modifications, together with DNA methylation and miRNAs modulate the transcriptome, particularly the expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, which is essential for CSR and SHM, and factors central to plasma cell differentiation, such as B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1. These inducible B cell-intrinsic epigenetic marks guide the maturation of antibody responses. Combinatorial histone modifications also function as histone codes to target CSR and, possibly, SHM machinery to the Ig loci by recruiting specific adaptors that can stabilize CSR/SHM factors. In addition, lncRNAs, such as recently reported lncRNA-CSR and an lncRNA generated through transcription of the S region that form G-quadruplex structures, are also important for CSR targeting. Epigenetic dysregulation in B cells, including the aberrant expression of non-coding RNAs and alterations of histone modifications and DNA methylation, can result in aberrant antibody responses to foreign antigens

  19. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie K Harrington

    Full Text Available Acalabrutinib (ACP-196 is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR was 25% (5/20 with a median progression free survival (PFS of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20 of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL.

  20. Anti-HIV-1 B cell responses are dependent on B cell precursor frequency and antigen-binding affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenovic, Pia; Kara, Ervin E; Pettersson, Anna-Klara; McGuire, Andrew T; Gray, Matthew; Hartweger, Harald; Thientosapol, Eddy S; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2018-04-16

    The discovery that humans can produce potent broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) to several different epitopes on the HIV-1 spike has reinvigorated efforts to develop an antibody-based HIV-1 vaccine. Antibody cloning from single cells revealed that nearly all bNAbs show unusual features that could help explain why it has not been possible to elicit them by traditional vaccination and instead would require a sequence of different immunogens. This idea is supported by experiments with genetically modified immunoglobulin (Ig) knock-in mice. Sequential immunization with a series of specifically designed immunogens was required to shepherd the development of bNAbs. However, knock-in mice contain superphysiologic numbers of bNAb precursor-expressing B cells, and therefore how these results can be translated to a more physiologic setting remains to be determined. Here we make use of adoptive transfer experiments using knock-in B cells that carry a synthetic intermediate in the pathway to anti-HIV-1 bNAb development to examine how the relationship between B cell receptor affinity and precursor frequency affects germinal center (GC) B cell recruitment and clonal expansion. Immunization with soluble HIV-1 antigens can recruit bNAb precursor B cells to the GC when there are as few as 10 such cells per mouse. However, at low precursor frequencies, the extent of clonal expansion is directly proportional to the affinity of the antigen for the B cell receptor, and recruitment to GCs is variable and dependent on recirculation.

  1. Proliferation risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.

    1998-09-01

    The report gives an overview of different aspects related to safeguards of fissile materials. Existing treaties including the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and the Tlatelolco and the Rarotonga Treaties are discussed. An overview of safeguards systems for the control of fissile materials as well as the role of various authorities is given. An overall overview of proliferation risks, the physical protection of fissile materials and the trade in fissile materials is given. Finally, the status in problem countries and de facto nuclear weapon states is discussed

  2. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. This includes: (1) Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment. This activity is the restart of hotwork in B-Cell to size reduce the remainder of Tank 119 and other miscellaneous pieces of equipment into sizes that can be loaded into a grout container. This activity also includes the process of preparing the containers for shipment from the cell. The specific activities and procedures used are detailed in a table. (2) Load and Ship Low-Level Waste. This activity covers the process of taking a grouted LLW container from B-Cell and loading it into the cask in the REC airlock and Cask Handling Area (CHA) for shipment to the LLBG. The detailed activities and procedures for this part of cell cleanout are included in second table

  3. [Ibrutinib: A new drug of B-cell malignancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieblemont, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Ibrutinib (Imbruvica®) is a first-in-class, orally administered once-daily, that inhibits B-cell antigen receptor signaling downstream of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Ibrutinib has been approved in USA in February 2014 and in France in October 2014 for the treatment of patients with relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) or chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) and for the treatment of patients with CLL and a chromosome 17 deletion (del 17p) or TP53 mutation. In clinical studies, ibrutinib induced an impressive overall response rate (68%) in patients with relapsed/refractory MCL (phase II study). In CLL, ibrutinib has shown to significantly improve progression-free survival, response rate and overall survival in patients with relapsed/refractory CLL, including in those with del 17p. Ibrutinib had an acceptable tolerability profile. Less than 10% of patients discontinued their treatment because of adverse events. Results are pending in other B-cell lymphomas subtypes such as in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and in follicular lymphoma. An approval extension has already been enregistered for Waldenström disease in USA in January 2015. Given its efficacy and tolerability, ibrutinib is an emerging treatment option for patients with B-cell malignancies. Copyright © 2015 Société Françise du Cancer. Publié par Elsevier Masson SAS. Tous droits réservés. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Immunomodulatory effect of Mesenchymal Stem Cells on B cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella eFranquesa

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The research on T cell immunosuppression therapies has attracted most of the attention in clinical transplantation. However, B cells and humoral immune responses are increasingly acknowledged as crucial mediators of chronic allograft rejection. Indeed, humoral immune responses can lead to renal allograft rejection even in patients whose cell-mediated immune responses are well controlled. On the other hand, newly studied B cell subsets with regulatory effects have been linked to tolerance achievement in transplantation. Better understanding of the regulatory and effector B cell responses may therefore lead to new therapeutic approaches.Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC are arising as a potent therapeutic tool in transplantation due to their regenerative and immunomodulatory properties. The research on MSCs has mainly focused on their effects on T cells and although data regarding the modulatory effects of MSCs on alloantigen-specific humoral response in humans is scarce, it has been demonstrated that MSCs significantly affect B cell functioning. In the present review we will analyze and discuss the results in this field.

  5. Profiling of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma by immunohistochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Lene Dissing; Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Hansen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a frequent lymphoma subtype with a heterogeneous behavior and a variable response to conventional chemotherapy. This clinical diversity is believed to reflect differences in the molecular pathways leading to lymphomagenesis. In this study, we have analyzed...

  6. Likelihood-Based Inference of B Cell Clonal Families.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan K Ralph

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The human immune system depends on a highly diverse collection of antibody-making B cells. B cell receptor sequence diversity is generated by a random recombination process called "rearrangement" forming progenitor B cells, then a Darwinian process of lineage diversification and selection called "affinity maturation." The resulting receptors can be sequenced in high throughput for research and diagnostics. Such a collection of sequences contains a mixture of various lineages, each of which may be quite numerous, or may consist of only a single member. As a step to understanding the process and result of this diversification, one may wish to reconstruct lineage membership, i.e. to cluster sampled sequences according to which came from the same rearrangement events. We call this clustering problem "clonal family inference." In this paper we describe and validate a likelihood-based framework for clonal family inference based on a multi-hidden Markov Model (multi-HMM framework for B cell receptor sequences. We describe an agglomerative algorithm to find a maximum likelihood clustering, two approximate algorithms with various trade-offs of speed versus accuracy, and a third, fast algorithm for finding specific lineages. We show that under simulation these algorithms greatly improve upon existing clonal family inference methods, and that they also give significantly different clusters than previous methods when applied to two real data sets.

  7. Prognostic significance of metallothionein in B-cell lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bjørn; Borup, Rehannah; Borregaard, Niels

    2006-01-01

    -cell (ABC) and 3 of 9 type-3 lesions. In contrast, MT mRNA was low to undetectable in 16 germinal center B-cell (GCB)-type DLBCLs. Only 1 of 15 patients with up-regulated MT mRNA achieved a sustained remission, suggesting that up-regulated MT mRNA constitutes a significant risk factor for treatment failure...

  8. Engaging the lysosomal compartment to combat B cell malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronbaek, K.; Jaattela, M.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of rituximab, a type I anti-CD20 mAb, with conventional chemotherapy has significantly improved the outcome of patients with B cell malignancies. Regardless of this success, many patients still relapse with therapy-resistant disease, highlighting the need for the development of m...

  9. Lymphoma classification update: B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Manli; Bennani, N Nora; Feldman, Andrew L

    2017-05-01

    Lymphomas are classified based on the normal counterpart, or cell of origin, from which they arise. Because lymphocytes have physiologic immune functions that vary both by lineage and by stage of differentiation, the classification of lymphomas arising from these normal lymphoid populations is complex. Recent genomic data have contributed additional complexity. Areas covered: Lymphoma classification follows the World Health Organization (WHO) system, which reflects international consensus and is based on pathological, genetic, and clinical factors. A 2016 revision to the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms recently was reported. The present review focuses on B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, the most common group of lymphomas, and summarizes recent changes most relevant to hematologists and other clinicians who care for lymphoma patients. Expert commentary: Lymphoma classification is a continually evolving field that needs to be responsive to new clinical, pathological, and molecular understanding of lymphoid neoplasia. Among the entities covered in this review, the 2016 revision of the WHO classification particularly impact the subclassification and genetic stratification of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and high-grade B-cell lymphomas, and reflect evolving criteria and nomenclature for indolent B-cell lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders.

  10. First clinical use of ofatumumab, a novel fully human anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody in relapsed or refractory follicular lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagenbeek, Anton; Gadeberg, Ole Vestergaard; Johnson, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Ofatumumab is a unique monoclonal antibody that targets a distinct small loop epitope on the CD20 molecule. Preclinical data show that ofatumumab is active against B-cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with low CD20-antigen density and high expression of complement inhibitory molecules...

  11. Antibodies directed against monomorphic and evolutionary conserved self epitopes may be generated in 'knock-out' mice. Development of monoclonal antibodies directed against monomorphic MHC class I determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Claesson, M H; Endel, B; Ulrik, J

    1994-01-01

    Beta-2 microglobulin (beta 2m) gene 'knock-out' mice (C1D) were primed with purified H-2Kb and H-2Db molecules and spleen cells from immunized mice were used to generate monoclonal antibody secreting B-cell hybridomas. Approximately 0.2% of the Ig-secreting primary microcultures contained H-2b...

  12. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  13. Intratracheal administration of fullerene nanoparticles activates splenic CD11b+ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Ning; Kunugita, Naoki; Ichinose, Takamichi; Song, Yuan; Yokoyama, Mitsuru; Arashidani, Keiichi; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Fullerene administration triggered splenic responses. → Splenic responses occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. → CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene. - Abstract: Fullerene nanoparticles ('Fullerenes'), which are now widely used materials in daily life, have been demonstrated to induce elevated pulmonary inflammation in several animal models; however, the effects of fullerenes on the immune system are not fully understood. In the present study, mice received fullerenes intratracheally and were sacrificed at days 1, 6 and 42. Mice that received fullerenes exhibited increased proliferation of splenocytes and increased splenic production of IL-2 and TNF-α. Changes in the spleen in response to fullerene treatment occurred at different time-points than in the lung tissue. Furthermore, fullerenes induced CDK2 expression and activated NF-κB and NFAT in splenocytes at 6 days post-administration. Finally, CD11b + cells were demonstrated to function as responder cells to fullerene administration in the splenic inflammatory process. Taken together, in addition to the effects on pulmonary responses, fullerenes also modulate the immune system.

  14. Transformation of a Cutaneous Follicle Center Lymphoma to a Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma—An Unusual Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dias Coelho

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary cutaneous follicle center lymphoma (PCFCL is characterized by a proliferation of follicle center cells in the skin. A definitive diagnosis is frequently delayed because of difficulties in interpretation of the histopathologic findings. It has an excellent prognosis with a 5-year survival over 95% and its risk of transformation has not been established. We describe a case report of man with a gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL referred to our clinic because of nodules in the back that had gradually developed over a period of 10 years. A biopsy performed 3 years before was interpreted as reactive follicular hyperplasia. A new skin biopsy revealed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements from the initial skin biopsy (PCBCL and the DLBCL gastric biopsy were studied by polymerase chain reaction and an identical clonal rearrangement was detected which was highly suggestive of a transformation lymphoma.

  15. Overexpression of the human BCL-2 gene product results in growth enhancement of Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Yoshihide

    1989-01-01

    The biological activity of the human BCL-2 gene product was analyzed in an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected human lymphoblastoid B-cell line transfected with BCL-2 sequences driven by the simian virus 40 promoter and enhancer. Overproduction of the BCL-2 protein conferred a selective growth advantage to the EBV-infected B cells as compared with control transfectants in low-serum medium and also after seeding at limiting dilution but did not render the cells tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. This growth enhancement was also seen in cells transfected with the BCL-2 gene with its own promoter juxtaposed to the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene enhancer, which represents the translocated form of the BCL-2 gene observed in follicular lymphomas with the t(14;18) translocation. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells overproducing the BCL-2 protein is neither due to the enhanced growth factor production nor due to an enhanced sensitivity of the BCL-2 transfectants to interleukins 1 or 6, although both lymphokines are known to stimulate proliferation of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B-cell lines. The growth advantage of EBV-infected B cells by overproduction of the BCL-2 protein suggests the direct involvement of the BCL-2 gene product in the pathogenesis of follicular lymphoma

  16. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rastad, Jessica L. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Green, William R., E-mail: William.R.Green@dartmouth.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Lebanon, NH 03756 (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  17. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells in murine AIDS inhibit B-cell responses in part via soluble mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, and TGF-β

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rastad, Jessica L.; Green, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Monocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) were increased during LP-BM5 retroviral infection, and were capable of suppressing not only T-cell, but also B-cell responses. In addition to previously demonstrating iNOS- and VISTA-dependent M-MDSC mechanisms, in this paper, we detail how M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators, including the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitric oxide, and TGF-β, to suppress B cells in a predominantly contact-independent manner. Suppression was independent of cysteine-depletion and hydrogen peroxide production. When two major mechanisms of suppression (iNOS and VISTA) were eliminated in double knockout mice, M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice were able to compensate using other, soluble mechanisms in order to maintain suppression of B cells. The IL-10 producing regulatory B-cell compartment was among the targets of M-MDSC-mediated suppression. -- Highlights: •LP-BM5-expanded M-MDSCs utilized soluble mediators nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, and TGF-β to suppress B cells. •When two major mechanisms of suppression were eliminated through knockouts, M-MDSCs maintained suppression. •M-MDSCs from LP-BM5-infected mice decreased proliferation of IL-10 producing regulatory B cells.

  18. Type I CD20 Antibodies Recruit the B Cell Receptor for Complement-Dependent Lysis of Malignant B Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelberts, Patrick J.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Schuurman, Janine; van Meerten, Tom; Bakker, Joost M.; Vink, Tom; Mackus, Wendy J. M.; Breij, Esther C. W.; Derer, Stefanie; Valerius, Thomas; van de Winkel, Jan G. J.; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Beurskens, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Human IgG1 type I CD20 Abs, such as rituximab and ofatumumab (OFA), efficiently induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of CD20(+) B cells by binding of C1 to hexamerized Fc domains. Unexpectedly, we found that type I CD20 Ab F(ab ')2 fragments, as well as C1q-binding-deficient IgG mutants,

  19. Generation of Monoclonal Antibodies against Immunoglobulin Proteins of the Domestic Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) serves as an animal model for the study of several viruses that cause human disease, most notably influenza. Despite the importance of this animal model, characterization of the immune response by flow cytometry (FCM) is severely hampered due to the limited number of commercially available reagents. To begin to address this unmet need and to facilitate more in-depth study of ferret B cells including the identification of antibody-secreting cells, eight unique murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with specificity for ferret immunoglobulin (Ig) were generated using conventional B cell hybridoma technology. These mAb were screened for reactivity against ferret peripheral blood mononuclear cells by FCM and demonstrate specificity for CD79β+ B cells. Several of these mAb are specific for the light chain of surface B cell receptor (BCR) and enable segregation of kappa and lambda B cells. Additionally, a mAb that yielded surface staining of nearly all surface BCR positive cells (i.e., pan ferret Ig) was generated. Collectively, these MαF-Ig mAb offer advancement compared to the existing portfolio of polyclonal anti-ferret Ig detection reagents and should be applicable to a wide array of immunologic assays including the identification of antibody-secreting cells by FCM. PMID:28286781

  20. High resolution melting analysis (HRM) for the assessment of clonality in feline B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Manfred; Scheffold, Svenja; Hecht, Werner; Reinacher, Manfred

    2018-06-01

    Analysis of clonality is gaining importance in diagnosing lymphomas in veterinary medicine. Usually, PCR for the analysis of antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) is followed by electrophoretic separation of the PCR products. Aim of this study was to test the feasibility of HRM for the assessment of clonality in B-cell lymphomas of cats. High resolution melting analysis differentiates PCR products by their different melting point using the decrease in fluorescence of an intercalating dye during melting of the PCR product. Additionally, the method is easy to use with no post-PCR manipulation of the samples. Forty-seven feline B-cell lymphomas and 31 reactive lymphatic proliferations of cats were investigated by PARR followed either by capillary electrophoresis or an HRM assay. To objectify the interpretation of the HRM results a recently published mathematical approach was applied to the melting curve. To overcome discrepancies between the visual interpretation and the mathematical approach, the latter was modified to include testing of reproducibility and recognition of pseudoclonality. In 11 of 47 lymphoma cases clonal populations were detectable by HRM assay compared to 14 of 47 lymphomas in which clonal populations were detected by capillary electrophoresis assay. Neither of the methods showed a clonal pattern in any of the reactive samples. However, the HRM assay showed a unique pattern in cases of follicular lymphatic hyperplasia that had no corresponding pattern in capillary electrophoresis. The capillary electrophoresis assay could identify 3 lymphomas that were not detected by the HRM assay and is therefore regarded superior to the HRM assay. The comparison however, was hampered by the overall bad performance of the PARR, that might be the consequence of insufficient primer binding due to somatic hypermutation of the binding sites during antigen stimulated proliferation of the B lymphocytes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haisma, H.; Hilgers, J.

    1987-01-01

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123 I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111 In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab) 2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  2. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Okada, H.

    1990-05-01

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author) [pt

  3. Assessment of CD37 B-cell antigen and cell of origin significantly improves risk prediction in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Li, Ling; Byrd, John C

    2016-01-01

    CD37 (tetraspanin TSPAN26) is a B-cell surface antigen widely expressed on mature B cells. CD37 is involved in immune regulation and tumor suppression but its function has not been fully elucidated. We assessed CD37 expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and investigated its...

  4. The nanoscale spatial organization of B-cell receptors on immunoglobulin M- and G-expressing human B-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinmin; Sengupta, Prabuddha; Brzostowski, Joseph; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer; Pierce, Susan K

    2017-02-15

    B-cell activation is initiated by the binding of antigen to the B-cell receptor (BCR). Here we used dSTORM superresolution imaging to characterize the nanoscale spatial organization of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG BCRs on the surfaces of resting and antigen--activated human peripheral blood B-cells. We provide insights into both the fundamental process of antigen-driven BCR clustering and differences in the spatial organization of IgM and IgG BCRs that may contribute to the characteristic differences in the responses of naive and memory B-cells to antigen. We provide evidence that although both IgM and IgG BCRs reside in highly heterogeneous protein islands that vary in size and number of BCR single-molecule localizations, both resting and activated B-cells intrinsically maintain a high -frequency of single isolated BCR localizations, which likely represent BCR monomers. IgG BCRs are more clustered than IgM BCRs on resting cells and form larger protein islands after antigen activation. Small, dense BCR clusters likely formed via protein-protein interactions are present on the surface of resting cells, and antigen activation induces these to come together to form less dense, larger islands, a process likely governed, at least in part, by protein-lipid interactions. © 2017 Lee, Sengupta, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Newly Identified TLR9 Stimulant, M6-395 Is a Potent Polyclonal Activator for Murine B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Mi-Hee; Jung, Yu-Jin; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2012-02-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been extensively studied in recent years. However, functions of these molecules in murine B cell biology are largely unknown. A TLR4 stimulant, LPS is well known as a powerful polyclonal activator for murine B cells. In this study, we explored the effect of a murine TLR9 stimulant, M6-395 (a synthetic CpG ODNs) on B cell proliferation and Ig production. First, M6-395 was much more potent than LPS in augmenting B cell proliferation. As for Ig expression, M6-395 facilitated the expression of both TGF-β1-induced germ line transcript α (GLTα) and IL-4-induced GLTγ1 as levels as those by LPS and Pam3CSK4 (TLR1/2 agonist) : a certain Ig GLT expression is regarded as an indicative of the corresponding isotype switching recombination. However, IgA and IgG1 secretion patterns were quite different--these Ig isotype secretions by M6-395 were much less than those by LPS and Pam3CSK4. Moreover, the increase of IgA and IgG1 production by LPS and Pam3CSK4 was virtually abrogated by M6-395. The same was true for the secretion of IgG3. We found that this unexpected phenomena provoked by M6-395 is attributed, at least in part, to its excessive mitogenic nature. Taken together, these results suggest that M6-395 can act as a murine polyclonal activator but its strong mitogenic activity is unfavorable to Ig isotype switching.

  6. Increased expression of TACI on NOD B cells results in germinal centre reaction anomalies, enhanced plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Viqar S; Thyagarajan, Radha; Sundström, Mia; Lejon, Kristina

    2016-11-01

    B cells have an important pathogenic role in the development of type 1 diabetes in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. We have previously reported that NOD mice display an increased percentage of TACI high -expressing B cells compared with C57BL/6 mice and this trait is linked to chromosomes 1 and 8. In this paper the genetic association of the transmembrane activator, calcium modulator and cyclophilin ligand interactor (TACI) trait was confirmed using double congenic NOD.B6C1/Idd22 mice. TACI ligation by a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) has been shown to influence plasma cell differentiation, immunoglobulin production and isotype switch. Hence, the functional consequence of the up-regulation of TACI on NOD B cells was analysed both in vitro and in vivo. NOD B cells stimulated with APRIL showed an enhanced plasma cell differentiation and class switch to IgG and IgA compared with B cells from C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, flow cytometry analyses revealed that germinal centre B cells in NOD failed to down-regulate TACI. Availability of the TACI ligand B-cell activating factor (BAFF) has been shown to be a limiting factor in the germinal centre reaction. In line with this, upon immunization with 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl hapten-conjugated hen egg lysozyme, NOD mice produced higher titres of low-affinity antibodies compared with C57BL/6 mice. This observation was supported by the detection of increased levels of BAFF in NOD germinal centres after immunization compared with C57BL/6 by immunofluorescence. Our results support the hypothesis that increased TACI expression on NOD B cells contributes to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The A-myb transcription factor in neoplastic and normal B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golay, J; Facchinetti, V; Ying, G; Introna, M

    1997-07-01

    The myb family of transcription factors has been strongly implicated in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation in the haematopoietic system. The v-myb oncogene, carried by avian defective retroviruses, causes leukaemias in the chicken and transforms haematopoietic cells in vitro. Its normal cellular equivalent c-myb, has been shown to promote the proliferation and block the differentiation of haematopoietic cells in several experimental models and is required for fetal haematopoiesis. Two other members of the family have been cloned more recently, A-myb and B-myb, which show sequence homology with c-myb in several domains, of which the DNA binding domain as well as other regulatory domains. Both have been shown to be transcription factors. B-myb is also involved in the control of proliferation and differentiation, but, unlike c-myb, it is expressed in many cell types. The third member of the family, A-myb, shows the most restricted pattern of expression, suggesting a very specific role for this transcription factor. A-myb is expressed in a subpopulation of normal B lymphocytes activated in vivo and localised in the germinal center of peripheral lymphoid organs and is not detected at significant levels in all other mature or immature haematopoietic populations studied, including bone marrow cells, T lymphocytes, granulocytes, monocytes, either at rest or after in vitro activation. These studies indicate that A-myb plays a role during a narrow window of normal B cell differentiation. A-myb expression has also been studied in a wide range of neoplastic B cells, representing the whole spectrum of B cell differentiation. A-myb is strongly expressed in Burkitt's lymphomas (BL) and slg+ B-acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (B-ALL) and not in all other leukaemias/lymphomas tested, with the exception of a subset of CLL (about 25% of cases). It is intriguing that the A-myb genome has been localised relatively close to the c-myc gene on chromosome 8, suggesting that

  8. Nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The terms and reactions to President Carter's nuclear policy, culminating in the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, are reviewed and analyzed. The new law increases restrictions on nuclear exports, encourages continued use of light water reactors in preference to plutonium-fueled reactors, and emphasizes technical solutions to proliferation problems. Critics of the law point out that it will hurt U.S. trade unfairly, that other countries do not have as many fuel options as the U.S. has, and that nuclear sales have as many political and economic as technical solutions. Compromise areas include new international safety guidelines, the possibility of an international nuclear fuel bank, and a willingness to consider each case on its merits. 21 references

  9. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  10. Th1 and Th2 help for B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1995-01-01

    that IL-5 (125 U/ml) synergizes with Th1 cells to induce B cell responses to IL-2, that are maintained following T-cell removal, e.g. autonomous. Th1 help in the absence of IL-5 resulted in weak or undetectable responses following T cell removal. The mechanism of IL-5 synergy involved persistence of IL-2R...... anti-Ig did not circumvent the need for IL-5 for autonomous IL-2 responses. Consistent with the above, interaction with an IL-5-producing Th2 clone induced strong autonomous B cell responses to IL-2. Qualitative differences of Th2 help over that of Th1 may thus be attributable to their differential...

  11. T. B-cell subpopulation in patients with malignant diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Motoyoshi; Goto, Tatsuhiko; Naruto, Mamiko.

    1978-01-01

    T, B cells in the peripheural blood of patients with malignant diseases were investigated. The percentages of T cells in patients with malignant lymphomas correlated to the extent of disease determined by clinical stagings of Ann Arbor's classification, in stages III and IV T-cells decreased to compare with those in stages I and II, while B-cells did not show any changes. Absolute numbers of lymphocytes, blastogenesis induced by PHA or PWM decreased remarkably during combination chemotherapies and during radiotherapy whereas the percentages of T-cells measuring in the same patients did not influenced consistently by these treatments. The DNA pattern of lymphocytes during treatments was examined by Flow-Microphotometry and the result suggested that those lymphocytes were damaged by treatments and subsequently they were refractory to the action of mitogens. The results indicate that selective timing needs between chemotherapy and immunotherapy. (auth.)

  12. Epigenetic Impact on EBV Associated B-Cell Lymphomagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shatadru Ghosh Roy

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic modifications leading to either transcriptional repression or activation, play an indispensable role in the development of human cancers. Epidemiological study revealed that approximately 20% of all human cancers are associated with tumor viruses. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, the first human tumor virus, demonstrates frequent epigenetic alterations on both viral and host genomes in associated cancers—both of epithelial and lymphoid origin. The cell type-dependent different EBV latent gene expression patterns appear to be determined by the cellular epigenetic machinery and similarly viral oncoproteins recruit epigenetic regulators in order to deregulate the cellular gene expression profile resulting in several human cancers. This review elucidates the epigenetic consequences of EBV–host interactions during development of multiple EBV-induced B-cell lymphomas, which may lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic interventions against EBV-associated B-cell lymphomas by alteration of reversible patho-epigenetic markings.

  13. Recombinant human interleukin 2 directly provides signals for the proliferation and functional maturation of murine B lymphocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Moll, Heidrun; Emmrich, F.; Simon, Markus M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study the effect of recombinant human interleukin 2 (rec.hIL-2) on the proliferation and maturation of B lymphocytes was investigated. It was found that the presence of rec.hIL 2 results in proliferation of mitogen (LPS)-activated B cell blasts. In addition, it is shown that highly enriched murine B cells can be induced by rec.hIL-2 to proliferate and to develop into antibody-secreting cells (PFC) in the presence of antigen (SRBC). When tested for its effect on B cell preparations enr...

  14. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Giardia muris trophozoites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyworth, M F; Ho, K E; Pappo, J

    1989-11-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against Giardia muris trophozoite surface antigens. To generate B-cell hybridomas, P3/NS1/1-Ag4-1 myeloma cells were fused with splenic lymphocytes from BALB/c mice that had been immunized parenterally with G. muris trophozoites. Hybridoma culture supernatants were screened for mAb by flow cytometry of G. muris trophozoites incubated with culture supernatant followed by fluorescein-conjugated anti-mouse IgG and IgM. Flow cytometry showed three types of trophozoite staining by mAb: (i) bright staining of greater than 90% of trophozoites, with aggregation of the organisms; (ii) bright staining of approximately 90% of trophozoites, with little or no aggregation; (iii) dull staining of approximately 20% of trophozoites, without aggregation. Western blotting of mAb on G. muris trophozoite antigens separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that a mAb exhibiting the third of these flow cytometry staining patterns recognized trophozoite antigens of MW approximately 31,000 and 35,000. Immunoprecipitation studies indicated that the same mAb specifically precipitated two 125I-labelled trophozoite surface antigens of MW approximately 30,000. Monoclonal antibodies generated in this study may facilitate the purification and biochemical characterization of trophozoite antigens that are targets for protective intestinal antibody in G. muris-infected mice.

  15. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  16. Genetics and Pathogenesis of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roland; Wright, George W; Huang, Da Wei; Johnson, Calvin A; Phelan, James D; Wang, James Q; Roulland, Sandrine; Kasbekar, Monica; Young, Ryan M; Shaffer, Arthur L; Hodson, Daniel J; Xiao, Wenming; Yu, Xin; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Xu, Weihong; Liu, Xuelu; Zhou, Bin; Du, Wei; Chan, Wing C; Jaffe, Elaine S; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Rimsza, Lisa M; Tay Kuang Wei, Kevin; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Leonard, John P; Bartlett, Nancy L; Tran, Bao; Shetty, Jyoti; Zhao, Yongmei; Soppet, Dan R; Pittaluga, Stefania; Wilson, Wyndham H; Staudt, Louis M

    2018-04-12

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) are phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous. Gene-expression profiling has identified subgroups of DLBCL (activated B-cell-like [ABC], germinal-center B-cell-like [GCB], and unclassified) according to cell of origin that are associated with a differential response to chemotherapy and targeted agents. We sought to extend these findings by identifying genetic subtypes of DLBCL based on shared genomic abnormalities and to uncover therapeutic vulnerabilities based on tumor genetics. We studied 574 DLBCL biopsy samples using exome and transcriptome sequencing, array-based DNA copy-number analysis, and targeted amplicon resequencing of 372 genes to identify genes with recurrent aberrations. We developed and implemented an algorithm to discover genetic subtypes based on the co-occurrence of genetic alterations. We identified four prominent genetic subtypes in DLBCL, termed MCD (based on the co-occurrence of MYD88 L265P and CD79B mutations), BN2 (based on BCL6 fusions and NOTCH2 mutations), N1 (based on NOTCH1 mutations), and EZB (based on EZH2 mutations and BCL2 translocations). Genetic aberrations in multiple genes distinguished each genetic subtype from other DLBCLs. These subtypes differed phenotypically, as judged by differences in gene-expression signatures and responses to immunochemotherapy, with favorable survival in the BN2 and EZB subtypes and inferior outcomes in the MCD and N1 subtypes. Analysis of genetic pathways suggested that MCD and BN2 DLBCLs rely on "chronic active" B-cell receptor signaling that is amenable to therapeutic inhibition. We uncovered genetic subtypes of DLBCL with distinct genotypic, epigenetic, and clinical characteristics, providing a potential nosology for precision-medicine strategies in DLBCL. (Funded by the Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health and others.).

  17. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    an additional novel pathway in which complement C3 and its receptors enhance humoral immunity through delivery of Ag to the B cell compartment. In this review, we discuss this pathway and highlight several novel exceptions recently found with a model influenza vaccine, such as mannose-binding lectin...... opsonization of influenza and uptake by macrophages, and the capture of virus by dendritic cells residing in the medullary compartment of peripheral lymph nodes....

  18. Contemporary conceptions of etiology, pathogenesis, management and treatment of primary diffuse large b-cell central nervous system lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Voloshin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the most up-to-date information about etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment principles of primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We propose algorithm of diagnosis and treatment based on literature review and own experience. The main methods for diagnosis verification are magneto-resonance tomography and stereotactic biopsy of mass with subsequent histological examination including immune staining. The common first-line therapy regimen is high-dose methotrexate therapy. However long-term prognosis still remains poor. Adverse prognostic factors for therapy response are age > 60 years, multifocal lesions, neurologic symptoms,previous treated disease. Considerable part of patient have contraindications or high-risk of adverse events for high-dose chemotherapy treatment. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has no neurological toxicity with intravenous and intrathecal administrations. Combination therapy with reduced dose methotrexate and monoclonal antibody can be a reasonable treatment alternative for old and disable persons. The further survival improvement would be achieved by patient stratification and using of risk-adapted treatment algorithm. 

  19. Contemporary conceptions of etiology, pathogenesis, management and treatment of primary diffuse large b-cell central nervous system lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Voloshin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present the most up-to-date information about etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostic and treatment principles of primary central nervous system diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We propose algorithm of diagnosis and treatment based on literature review and own experience. The main methods for diagnosis verification are magneto-resonance tomography and stereotactic biopsy of mass with subsequent histological examination including immune staining. The common first-line therapy regimen is high-dose methotrexate therapy. However long-term prognosis still remains poor. Adverse prognostic factors for therapy response are age > 60 years, multifocal lesions, neurologic symptoms,previous treated disease. Considerable part of patient have contraindications or high-risk of adverse events for high-dose chemotherapy treatment. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody has no neurological toxicity with intravenous and intrathecal administrations. Combination therapy with reduced dose methotrexate and monoclonal antibody can be a reasonable treatment alternative for old and disable persons. The further survival improvement would be achieved by patient stratification and using of risk-adapted treatment algorithm. 

  20. The small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and full-length FOXP1 exert similar oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Keimpema, Martine; Grüneberg, Leonie J; Schilder-Tol, Esther J M; Oud, Monique E C M; Beuling, Esther A; Hensbergen, Paul J; de Jong, Johann; Pals, Steven T; Spaargaren, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 is generally regarded as an oncogene in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Previous studies have suggested that a small isoform of FOXP1 rather than full-length FOXP1, may possess this oncogenic activity. Corroborating those studies, we herein show that activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines and primary activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells predominantly express a small FOXP1 isoform, and that the 5'-end of the Foxp1 gene is a common insertion site in murine lymphomas in leukemia virus- and transposon-mediated insertional mutagenesis screens. By combined mass spectrometry, (quantative) reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction/sequencing, and small interfering ribonucleic acid-mediated gene silencing, we determined that the small FOXP1 isoform predominantly expressed in activated B cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma lacks the N-terminal 100 amino acids of full-length FOXP1. Aberrant overexpression of this FOXP1 isoform (ΔN100) in primary human B cells revealed its oncogenic capacity; it repressed apoptosis and plasma cell differentiation. However, no difference in potency was found between this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1. Furthermore, overexpression of full-length FOXP1 or this small FOXP1 isoform in primary B cells and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cell lines resulted in similar gene regulation. Taken together, our data indicate that this small FOXP1 isoform and full-length FOXP1 have comparable oncogenic and transcriptional activity in human B cells, suggesting that aberrant expression or overexpression of FOXP1, irrespective of the specific isoform, contributes to lymphomagenesis. These novel insights further enhance the value of FOXP1 for the diagnostics, prognostics, and treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  1. Memory control by the B cell antigen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Niklas; Wienands, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    The generation of memory B cells (MBCs) that have undergone immunoglobulin class switching from IgM, which dominates primary antibody responses, to other immunoglobulin isoforms is a hallmark of immune memory. Hence, humoral immunological memory is characterized by the presence of serum immunoglobulins of IgG subtypes known as the γ-globulin fraction of blood plasma proteins. These antibodies reflect the antigen experience of B lymphocytes and their repeated triggering. In fact, efficient protection against a previously encountered pathogen is critically linked to the production of pathogen-specific IgG molecules even in those cases where the primary immune response required cellular immunity, for example, T cell-mediated clearance of intracellular pathogens such as viruses. Besides IgG, also IgA and IgE can provide humoral immunity depending on the microbe's nature and infection route. The molecular mechanisms underlying the preponderance of switched immunoglobulin isotypes during memory antibody responses are a matter of active and controversial debate. Here, we summarize the phenotypic characteristics of distinct MBC subpopulations and discuss the decisive roles of different B cell antigen receptor isotypes for the functional traits of class-switched B cell populations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. B cell remote-handled waste shipment cask alternatives study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RIDDELLE, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    The decommissioning of the 324 Facility B Cell includes the onsite transport of grouted remote-handled radioactive waste from the 324 Facility to the 200 Areas for disposal. The grouted waste has been transported in the leased ATG Nuclear Services 3-82B Radioactive Waste Shipping Cask (3-82B cask). Because the 3-82B cask is a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified Type B shipping cask, the lease cost is high, and the cask operations in the onsite environment may not be optimal. An alternatives study has been performed to develop cost and schedule information on alternative waste transportation systems to assist in determining which system should be used in the future. Five alternatives were identified for evaluation. These included continued lease of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, development and fabrication of an onsite cask, modification of the existing U.S. Department of Energy-owned cask (OH-142), and the lease of a different commercially available cask. Each alternative was compared to acceptance criteria for use in the B Cell as an initial screening. Only continued leasing of the 3-82B cask, fabrication of a new 3-82B cask, and the development and fabrication of an onsite cask were found to meet all of the B Cell acceptance criteria

  3. Defective Circulating Regulatory B Cells in Patients with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiao Jiao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Newly identified IL-10-producing regulatory B cells (Bregs have been shown to play an important role in the suppression of immune responses. Chronic immune activation participates in the pathogenesis of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM but whether Bregs are involved in its development remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the circulating frequency and function of Bregs in DCM. Methods: In total, 35 DCM patients (20 men and 15 women and 44 healthy controls (23 men and 21 women were included in the experiment, and the frequency of Bregs was detected using flow cytometry. Results: According to our results, the frequency of circulating IL-10-producing Bregs was significantly lower in DCM patients compared with healthy controls. Furthermore, the CD24hiCD27+ B cell subset in which IL-10-producing Bregs were mainly enriched from DCM patients showed impaired IL-10 expression and a decreased ability to suppress the TNF-α production of CD4+CD25- Tconv cells and to maintain Tregs differentiation. Correlation analysis showed that the frequency of IL-10-producing Bregs and the suppressive function of CD24hiCD27+ B cells were positively correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction and negatively correlated with NT-proBNP in DCM patients. Conclusions: In conclusion, the reduced frequency and impaired functions suggest a potential role of Bregs in the development of DCM.

  4. Generation of memory B cells and their reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Moran, Imogen; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Phan, Tri Giang; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2018-05-01

    The successful establishment of humoral memory response depends on at least two layers of defense. Pre-existing protective antibodies secreted by long-lived plasma cells act as a first line of defense against reinfection ("constitutive humoral memory"). Previously, a second line of defense in which pathogen-experienced memory B cells are rapidly reactivated to produce antibodies ("reactive humoral memory"), was considered as simply a back-up system for the first line (particularly for re-infection with homologous viruses). However, in the case of re-infection with similar but different strains of viruses, or in response to viral escape mutants, the reactive humoral memory plays a crucial role. Here, we review recent progress in our understanding of how memory B cells are generated in the pre-GC stage and during the GC reaction, and how these memory B cells are robustly reactivated with the help of memory Tfh cells to generate the secondary antibody response. In addition, we discuss how these advances may be relevant to the quest for a vaccine that can induce broadly reactive antibodies against influenza and HIV. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. B-cell-depleting Therapy in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Sanz, Iñaki; Bosch, Xavier; Stone, John H.; Khamashta, Munther A.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of a new class of agents (B-cell-depleting therapies) has opened a new era in the therapeutic approach to systemic lupus erythematosus, with belimumab being the first drug licensed for use in systemic lupus erythematosus in more than 50 years. Four agents deserve specific mention: rituximab, ocrelizumab, epratuzumab, and belimumab. Controlled trials have shown negative results for rituximab, promising results for epratuzumab, and positive results for belimumab. Despite these negative results, rituximab is the most-used agent in patients who do not respond or are intolerant to standard therapy and those with life-threatening presentations. B-cell-depleting agents should not be used in patients with mild disease and should be tailored according to individual patient characteristics, including ethnicity, organ involvement, and the immunological profile. Forthcoming studies of B-cell-directed strategies, particularly data from investigations of off-label rituximab use and postmarketing studies of belimumab, will provide new insights into the utility of these treatments in the routine management of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:22444096

  6. CD3-positive B cells: a storage-dependent phenomenon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Nagel

    Full Text Available The majority of clinical studies requires extensive management of human specimen including e.g. overnight shipping of blood samples in order to convey the samples in a central laboratory or to simultaneously analyze large numbers of patients. Storage of blood samples for periods of time before in vitro/ex vivo testing is known to influence the antigen expression on the surface of lymphocytes. In this context, the present results show for the first time that the T cell antigen CD3 can be substantially detected on the surface of human B cells after ex vivo storage and that the degree of this phenomenon critically depends on temperature and duration after blood withdrawal. The appearance of CD3 on the B cell surface seems to be a result of contact-dependent antigen exchange between T and B lymphocytes and is not attributed to endogenous production by B cells. Since cellular subsets are often classified by phenotypic analyses, our results indicate that ex vivo cellular classification in peripheral blood might result in misleading interpretations. Therefore, in order to obtain results reflecting the in vivo situation, it is suggested to minimize times of ex vivo blood storage after isolation of PBMC. Moreover, to enable reproducibility of results between different research groups and multicenter studies, we would emphasize the necessity to specify and standardize the storage conditions, which might be the basis of particular findings.

  7. Specific B-cell Epitope of Per a 1: A Major Allergen of American Cockroach (Periplaneta americana) and Anatomical Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sookrung, Nitat; Khetsuphan, Thanyathon; Chaisri, Urai; Indrawattana, Nitaya; Reamtong, Onrapak; Chaicumpa, Wanpen; Tungtrongchitr, Anchalee

    2014-07-01

    Cockroach (CR) is a common source of indoor allergens, and Per a 1 is a major American CR (Periplaneta americana) allergen; however, several attributes of this protein remain unknown. This study identifies a novel specific B cell epitope and anatomical locations of Per a 1.0105. Recombinant Per a 1.0105 (rPer a 1.0105) was used as BALB/c mouse immunogen for the production of monoclonal antibodies (MAb). The MAb specific B cell epitope was identified by determining phage mimotopic peptides and pair-wise alignment of the peptides with the rPer a 1.0105 amino acid sequence. Locations of the Per a 1.0105 in P. americana were investigated by immunohistochemical staining. The rPer a 1.0105 (~13 kDa) had 100%, 98% and ≥90% identity to Per a 1.0105, Per a 1.0101, and Cr-PII, respectively. The B-cell epitope of the Per a 1.0105 specific-MAb was located at residues(99) QDLLLQLRDKGV(110) contained in all 5 Per a 1.01 isoforms and Per a 1.02. The epitope was analogous to the Bla g 1.02 epitope; however, this B-cell epitope was not an IgE inducer. Per a 1.0105 was found in the midgut and intestinal content of American CR but not in the other organs. The amount of the Per a 1 was ~544 ℃g per gram of feces. The novel Per a 1 B-cell epitope described in this study is a useful target for allergen quantification in samples; however, the specific MAb can be used as an allergen detection reagent. The MAb based-affinity resin can be made for allergen purification, and the so-purified protein can serve as a standard and diagnostic allergen as well as a therapeutic vaccine component. The finding that the Per a 1 is contained in the midgut and feces is useful to increase yield and purity when preparing this allergen.

  8. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies with predetermined conformational epitope specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton M Sholukh

    Full Text Available Existing technologies allow isolating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from B cells. We devised a direct approach to isolate mAbs with predetermined conformational epitope specificity, using epitope mimetics (mimotopes that reflect the three-dimensional structure of given antigen subdomains. We performed differential biopanning using bacteriophages encoding random peptide libraries and polyclonal antibodies (Abs that had been affinity-purified with either native or denatured antigen. This strategy yielded conformational mimotopes. We then generated mimotope-fluorescent protein fusions, which were used as baits to isolate single memory B cells from rhesus monkeys (RMs. To amplify RM immunoglobulin variable regions, we developed RM-specific PCR primers and generated chimeric simian-human mAbs with predicted epitope specificity. We established proof-of-concept of our strategy by isolating mAbs targeting the conformational V3 loop crown of HIV Env; the new mAbs cross-neutralized viruses of different clades. The novel technology allows isolating mAbs from RMs or other hosts given experimental immunogens or infectious agents.

  9. Major histocompatibility complex-restricted self-recognition in responses to trinitrophenyl-Ficoll. A novel cell interaction pathway requiring self-recognition of accessory cell H-2 determinants by both T cells and B cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodes, R.J.; Hathcock, K.S.; Singer, A.

    1983-01-01

    In vitro primary antibody responses to limiting concentrations of trinitrophenyl (TNP)-Ficoll were shown to be T cell dependent, requiring the cooperation of T helper (TH) cells, B cells, and accessory cells. Under these conditions, TH cells derived from long-term radiation bone marrow chimeras were major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restricted in their ability to cooperate with accessory cells expressing host-type MHC determinants. The requirement for MHC-restricted self-recognition by TNP-Ficoll-reactive B cells was assessed under these T-dependent conditions. In the presence of competent TH cells, chimeric B cells were found to be MHC restricted, cooperating only with accessory cells that expressed host-type MHC products. In contrast, the soluble products of certain monoclonal T cell lines were able to directly activate B cells in response to TNP-Ficoll, bypassing any requirement for MHC-restricted self-recognition. These findings demonstrate the existence of a novel cell interaction pathway in which B cells as well as TH cells are each required to recognize self-MHC determinants on accessory cells, but are not required to recognize each other. They further demonstrate that the requirement for self-recognition by B cells may be bypassed in certain T-dependent activation pathways

  10. TRPM4 expression is associated with activated B cell subtype and poor survival in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loo, Suet K; Ch'ng, Ewe S; Md Salleh, Md Salzihan

    2017-01-01

    to investigate TRPM4 protein expression pattern in non-malignant tissues and DLBCL cases, and its association with clinico-demographic parameters and survival in DLBCL. METHODS AND RESULTS: Analysis of publicly available DLBCL microarray data sets showed that TRPM4 transcripts were up-regulated in DLBCL compared...... to normal germinal centre B (GCB) cells, were expressed more highly in the activated B cell-like DLBCL (ABC-DLBCL) subtype and higher TRPM4 transcripts conferred worse overall survival (OS) in R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone)-treated DLBCL cases (P ... immunohistochemical analysis showed that TRPM4 was expressed in various human tissues but not in normal B cells within lymphoid tissues (reactive tonsil, lymph node and appendix). TRPM4 protein was present in 26% (n = 49 of 189) of our cohort of R-CHOP-treated DLBCL cases and this was associated significantly...

  11. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of regulatory T cells in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpakou, Vassiliki E; Ioannidou, Heleni-Dikaia; Konsta, Eugene; Vikentiou, Myrofora; Spathis, Aris; Kontsioti, Frieda; Kontos, Christos K; Velentzas, Athanassios D; Papageorgiou, Sotiris; Vasilatou, Diamantina; Gkontopoulos, Konstantinos; Glezou, Irene; Stavroulaki, Georgia; Mpazani, Efthimia; Kokkori, Stella; Kyriakou, Elias; Karakitsos, Petros; Dimitriadis, George; Pappa, Vasiliki

    2017-09-01

    Accumulated data indicate a significant role of T cell dysfunction in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In CLL, regulatory T cells are significantly higher and show lower apoptotic levels compared to healthy donors. We demonstrate that CLL derived CD4 + CD25 - CD127 - and CD4 + CD25 low CD127 - subpopulations share a common immunophenotypic profile with conventional Tregs and are associated with advanced stage disease. We further provide evidence that the increased number of Tregs contributes indirectly to the proliferation of the CLL clone, by suppressing the proliferation of Teffs which in turn suppress CLL cells. These data are further supported by our observations that CLL derived Tregs appear rather incapable of inducing apoptosis of both normal B cells and CLL cells, in contrast to normal Tregs, suggesting an immunoediting effect of CLL cells on Tregs which negatively affects the functionality of the latter and contributes to the failure of Tregs in CLL to efficiently eliminate the abnormal clone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Type i CD20 antibodies recruit the B cell receptor for complement-dependent lysis of malignant B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelberts, P. J.; Voorhorst, M.; Schuurman, J.

    2016-01-01

    . We hypothesized that CD20 Ab-induced clustering of the IgM or IgG BCR was involved in accessory CDC. Indeed, accessory CDC was consistently observed in B cell lines expressing an IgM BCR and in some cell lines expressing an IgG BCR, but it was absent in BCR- B cell lines. A direct relationship...... between BCR expression and accessory CDC was established by transfecting the BCR into CD20+ cells: OFA-F(ab')2 fragments were able to induce CDC in the CD20+BCR+ cell population, but not in the CD20+BCR- population. Importantly, OFA-F(ab')2 fragments were able to induce CDC ex vivo in malignant B cells...... isolated from patients with mantle cell lymphoma and Waldenström macroglobulinemia. In summary, accessory CDC represents a novel effector mechanism that is dependent on type I CD20 Ab-induced BCR clustering. Accessory CDC may contribute to the excellent capacity of type I CD20 Abs to induce CDC...

  13. Splenic B cells and antigen-specific B cells process anti-Ig in a similar manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, C.D.; Vitetta, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    B lymphocytes can process and present antigen to T cells. However, the fate of native antigen after its binding to specific B cells, i.e., the intracellular events involved in the processing and recycling of the antigenic fragments to the cell surface for antigen presentation, are not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that murine B cells degrade anti-Ig molecules bound to their surface and release acid soluble fragments into the supernatant. We also demonstrate that the kinetics of this process are identical for anti-mu, anti-delta, and anti-light chain antibodies, indicating that both surface IgM and surface IgD are equally effective in binding antigen and directing its processing. We also describe the effects of azide, chloroquine, and irradiation on this process. To extend these studies to the processing of specifically bound antigen, we demonstrate that highly purified trinitrophenyl antigen-binding cells degrade anti-Ig molecules with the same kinetics as unpurified splenic B cells. Thus, this purified population provides a suitable model system for the analysis of antigen degradation by antigen-specific cells

  14. Intrinsic Plasma Cell Differentiation Defects in B Cell Expansion with NF-κB and T Cell Anergy Patient B Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swadhinya Arjunaraja

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available B cell Expansion with NF-κB and T cell Anergy (BENTA disease is a novel B cell lymphoproliferative disorder caused by germline, gain-of-function mutations in the lymphocyte scaffolding protein CARD11, which drives constitutive NF-κB signaling. Despite dramatic polyclonal expansion of naive and immature B cells, BENTA patients also present with signs of primary immunodeficiency, including markedly reduced percentages of class-switched/memory B cells and poor humoral responses to certain vaccines. Using purified naive B cells from our BENTA patient cohort, here we show that BENTA B cells exhibit intrinsic defects in B cell differentiation. Despite a profound in vitro survival advantage relative to normal donor B cells, BENTA patient B cells were severely impaired in their ability to differentiate into short-lived IgDloCD38hi plasmablasts or CD138+ long-lived plasma cells in response to various stimuli. These defects corresponded with diminished IgG antibody production and correlated with poor induction of specific genes required for plasma cell commitment. These findings provide important mechanistic clues that help explain both B cell lymphocytosis and humoral immunodeficiency in BENTA disease.

  15. Neurotoxic, cytotoxic, apoptotic and antiproliferative effects of some marine algae extracts on the NA2B cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, O; Özdal-Kurt, F; Akçora, C M; Özkut, M; Tuğlu, M I

    2018-02-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to cancer pathologies and to apoptosis. Marine algae exhibit cytotoxic, antiproliferative and apoptotic effects; their metabolites have been used to treat many types of cancer. We investigated in culture extracts of Petalonia fascia, Jania longifurca and Halimeda tuna to determine their effects on mouse neuroblastoma cell line, NA2B. NA2B cells were treated with algae extracts, and the survival and proliferation of NA2B cells were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of algae extracts on oxidative stress in NA2B cells also were investigated using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunocytochemistry and apoptosis was assessed using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. We observed significant neurite inhibition with moderate damage by the neurotoxicity-screening test (NST) at IC 50 dilutions of the extracts. MTT demonstrated that J. longifurca extracts were more toxic than P. fascia and H. tuna extracts. We found an increase of endothelial and inducible NOS immunostaining for oxidative stress and TUNEL analysis revealed increased apoptosis after application of extract. Our findings suggest that the algae we tested may have potential use for treatment of cancer.

  16. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlos Bortoluzzi, Marcelo

    2010-01-01

    The authors report a case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) of the oral cavity. The patient was a 73-year-old white man who first presented at the Division of Stomatology with a large nodular mass in the hard palate and a nodular lesion in the upper lip, which were diagnosed as DLBL. The patient was treated with eight cycles of CHOP chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone), but the disease recurred 22 months after the end of the therapy. Both primary sites hard palate and upper lip were involved again and the patient was resubmitted to chemotherapy. (author)

  17. B cell markers in Ph1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimena, G; De Rossi, G; Gastaldi, R; Guglielmi, C; Mandelli, F

    1980-01-01

    A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) where the blast cells had B cell markers and displayed the presence of a typical Ph1 chromosome, originated by a standard t (9;22) translocation, is reported. Cytological and clinical aspects during the entire course of the disease were consistent with the diagnosis of ALL. Evidence of differentiation along a well-defined lymphoid cell line in a Ph1-positive cell confirms the presence of the Ph1 chromosome in conditions other than chronic granulocytic leukemia and shows that it possibly does not occur in an exclusively undifferentiated totipotent stem cell.

  18. CD47 limits antibody dependent phagocytosis against non-malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sandra; Turman, Sean; Lekstrom, Kristen; Wilson, Susan; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of CD47 in protecting malignant B cells from antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Combined treatment of anti-CD47 and -CD20 antibodies synergistically augment elimination of tumor B cells in xenograft mouse models. This has led to the development of novel reagents that can potentially enhance killing of malignant B cells in patients. B cell depleting therapy is also a promising treatment for autoimmune patients. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether or not CD47 protects non-malignant B cells from ADCP. We show that CD47 is expressed on all B cells in mice, with the highest level on plasma cells in bone marrow and spleen. Although its expression is dispensable for B cell development in mice, CD47 on B cells limits antibody mediated phagocytosis. B cell depletion following in vivo anti-CD19 treatment is more efficient in CD47-/- mice than in wild type mice. In vitro, both naïve and activated B cells from CD47-/- mice are more sensitive to ADCP than wild type B cells. Lastly, we show in an ADCP assay that blocking CD47 can enhance anti-CD19 antibody mediated phagocytosis of wild type B cells. These results suggest that in addition to its already demonstrated benefit in cancer, targeting CD47 may be used as an adjunct in combination with B cell depletion antibodies for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical impact of B-cell depletion with the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab in chronic fatigue syndrome: a preliminary case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mella Olav

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a disease of unknown aetiology. A patient with CFS had unexpected, marked recovery of CFS symptoms lasting for five months during and after cytotoxic chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease. We reasoned that the transient CFS recovery was related to methotrexate treatment, which induces immunomodulation in part through B-cell depletion. Methods In a case series, this patient and two additional CFS patients were B-cell depleted by infusion of the monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody rituximab. Results All three had improvement of all CFS symptoms. Patients 1 and 2 had major amelioration from 6 weeks after intervention, patient 3 slight improvement from the same time, but then improved markedly from 26 weeks after intervention. The symptomatic effect lasted until weeks 16, 18 and 44, respectively. At relapse, all were retreated with a single (patient 1 or double rituximab infusion (patients 2 and 3. Again, all three had marked symptom improvement, mimicking their first response. After new symptom recurrence, patients 1 and 2 were given weekly oral methotrexate, patient 1 having effect also from this agent. Patients 1 and 2 were again treated for a third rituximab infusion after new relapse, again with a marked clinical benefit. No unexpected toxicity was seen. Conclusion These observations suggest that B-lymphocytes are involved in CFS pathogenesis for a subset of patients. Benefit for all CFS symptoms, the delayed symptom relief following B-cell depletion, the kinetics of relapses, and the effect also from methotrexate treatment, provide suggestive evidence that B-cells play a significant role in the ongoing clinical features, and that CFS may be amenable to therapeutic interventions aimed at modifying B-cell number and function. More systematic investigations of this therapeutic strategy, and of its biological basis, are now needed.

  20. Monoclonal antibody studies in B(non-T)-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Nagai, M; Hirose, M

    1983-09-01

    Tumor cells suspensions prepared from 129 B- or non-T cell malignancies were investigated with a panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies and conventional surface marker techniques. Surface immunoglobulin (sIg) and B1 antigen proved to be the most useful markers for B-cell lineage. Six major subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) of non-T cell nature are now recognized by these immunological techniques, including null-ALL, Ia-ALL, lymphoid stem cell ALL, pre-pre-B ALL, pre-B ALL and B-ALL. In cases of chronic leukemias and lymphomas of non-T cell nature, 80% of the tumor was defined by sIg and 88% by B1 antigen as definitely of B-cell lineage. The clonal character was also defined in 68% of the tumor on the basis of the detection of predominant single light chain in sIg. Ia-like antigen was detected in almost all cases (96%). Leukemic cells from all cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), chronic lymphosarcoma cell leukemia (CLsCL) and hairy cell leukemia (HCL) reacted with OKIa1 and anti-B1, and leukemic cells from most of them with anti-pan T monoclonal antibody (10.2). In more than half of CLL and CLsCL, leukemic cells were reactive with J5, OKM1, 9.6 and OKT8, but not with OKT3, OKT4 and OKT6. HCL cells had almost the same reactivity with these monoclonal antibodies as CLL and CLsCL cells except that J5 remained unreactive. These results indicated that Japanese CLL, CLsCL and HCL were different from Western ones at least with respect to surface marker characteristics. In cases of lymphomas, heavy chains of sIg were expressed in polyclonal fashion, especially in follicular lymphoma and diffuse lymphomas of medium sized cell type and large cell type, indicating that lymphomas of these types may originate from follicular center cells of the heavy chain switching stage. Anti-T monoclonals were also reactive with lymphoma cells. In about half of follicular lymphomas and diffuse lymphomas of the medium sized cell type, lymphoma cells reacted with 10.2, and less

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: State of the Art and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Motta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies have been the most successful therapeutics ever brought to cancer treatment by immune technologies. The use of monoclonal antibodies in B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL represents the greatest example of these advances, as the introduction of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab has had a dramatic impact on how we treat this group of diseases today. Despite this success, several questions about how to optimize the use of monoclonal antibodies in NHL remain open. The best administration schedules, as well as the optimal duration of rituximab treatment, have yet to be determined. A deeper knowledge of the mechanisms underlying resistance to rituximab is also necessary in order to improve the activity of this and of similar therapeutics. Finally, new antibodies and biological agents are entering the scene and their advantages over rituximab will have to be assessed. We will discuss these issues and present an overview of the most significant clinical studies with monoclonal antibodies for NHL treatment carried out to date.

  2. A Case of Monoclonal Lymphoplasmacytosis of the Bone Marrow with IgM-Positive Russell Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekazu Kayano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old Japanese male patient infected with HCV was diagnosed with thrombocytopenia. Histological examination of the bone marrow aspirate showed numerous lymphoid aggregates with Russell bodies. Immunohistochemistry and flow cytometric analysis demonstrated clonal expansion of CD5+ CD23+ B cells. Russell bodies were positive for IgM and lambda immunoglobulin light chain. The patient also underwent gastric biopsy, which revealed Helicobacter pylori (HP infection. Subsequent eradication of the bacteria resulted in improvement of his thrombocytopenia. The clinical course remained uneventful at 15-month follow-up, consistent with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. The observed clonal expansion with plasmacytic differentiation may have occurred under the influence of HCV with HP infection.

  3. Preventing proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjens, G.

    1983-01-01

    Challenging the argument that nuclear proliferation may be stabilizing, the author cites the Israeli attack on Iraq as evidence that emergent nuclear states may be moved to attack their adversaries.The larger the number of decision makers who can unleash nuclear weapons, the greater the liklihood of their use. Several reasons are cited for nations to seek nuclear capability: the accelerated spread of technology, the deterioration in US-Soviet relations and strength relative to their nations, the high cost of conventional weapons, and a loss of confidence in the international safeguards system. The imposition of constraints, such as a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, on nuclear trade and technology transfer are likely to have a high cost. The US position on this issue is likely to be determined by the balance of power with the Soviet Union. 5 references

  4. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies specific for Progesterone

    OpenAIRE

    YÜCEL, Fatıma

    2014-01-01

    Progesterone levels in milk and serum are indicators of pregnancy in cattle. The progesterone level reaches a peak on the 21 st and 22 nd days of pregnancy. Monoclonal antibodies specific to progesterone could be used for the immunodetection of milk and serum progesterone levels. We report here the development of hybrid cells prdoducing monoclonal antibodies specific for progesterone using hybridoma technology. Hybridoma cells secreting monoclonal antibodies against progesterone (MAM 2H1...

  5. Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of the kidney: A case report

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    Jia Nan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a 41-year-old Chinese woman with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed by percutaneous renal biopsy. The patient was admitted to Nanfang Hospital of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China with complaints of high spiking fever for a month and bilateral lower limb fatigue with difficulty ambulating for the past 5 months. She had renal dysfunction with a total urinary protein of 5.61 g/dL (56.1 g/L, serum albumin of 2.89 g/dL (28.9 g/L, urea nitrogen of 2.24 mg/dL (1.6 mmol/L, and serum creatinine of 0.54 mg/dL (48 μmol/L. Bone marrow biopsy revealed myeloproliferative disorder without abnormal myeloid or lymphocytic proliferation. Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography (PET-CT showed marked bilateral swelling and enlargement of the renal parenchyma with splenic enlargement and involvement of multiple vertebrae. Percutaneous renal biopsy showed island-like accumulations of medium to large lymphoid cells in many areas of the interstitium, with round vesicular nuclei containing distinct basophilic nucleoli. Immunohistochemical analysis together with other supportive investigation confirmed the diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma. Ten days later, she was started on chemotherapy with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, leurocristime and prednisone for a week. Palliative radiotherapy DT 40Gy/20F with other supportive treatment was provided for metastatic foci in the medullary cavity of the sternum, T1-T7. The patient regained muscle strength in both lower limbs and was able to walk again after three weeks. The patient was discharged after hepatic and renal function and proteinuria values had returned to normal. Follow-up data shows the patient to be alive nine months after discharge.

  6. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  7. Mechanism of altered B-cell response induced by changes in dietary protein type in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounous, G.; Shenouda, N.; Kongshavn, P.A.; Osmond, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of 20 g/100 g dietary lactalbumin (L) or casein (C) diets or a nonpurified (NP) diet on the immune responsiveness of C57Bl/6J, C3H/HeJ and BALB/cJ mice has been investigated by measuring the response to the T cell-independent antigen, TNP-Ficoll. To investigate the possible influence of dietary protein type on the supply of B lymphocytes, bone marrow lymphocyte production has been examined by a radioautographic assay of small lymphocyte renewal and an immunofluorescent stathmokinetic assay of pre-B cells and their proliferation. The humoral response of all mice fed the L diet was found to be higher than that of mice fed the C diet or nonpurified diet. A similar pattern of dietary protein effect in (CBA/N X DBA/2J) F1 mice carrying the xid defect was observed following challenge with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). An even greater enhancing effect of dietary L was noted in normal (DBA/2J X CBA/N) F1 mice after immunization with SRBC, but in contrast, the normal large-scale production of B lymphocytes in mouse bone marrow was independent of the type of dietary protein. Dietary protein type did not affect blood level of minerals and trace metals. The free plasma amino acid profile essentially conformed to the amino acid composition of the ingested protein, suggesting that the changes in plasma amino acid profile might be a crucial factor in diet-dependent enhancement or depression of the B-cell response

  8. Murine gammaherpesvirus M2 protein induction of IRF4 via the NFAT pathway leads to IL-10 expression in B cells.

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    Udaya S Rangaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of the gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV and murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 from latently infected B cells has been linked to plasma cell differentiation. We have previously shown that the MHV68 M2 protein is important for virus reactivation from B cells and, when expressed alone in primary murine B cells, can drive B cell differentiation towards a pre-plasma cell phenotype. In addition, expression of M2 in primary murine B cells leads to secretion of high levels of IL-10 along with enhanced proliferation and survival. Furthermore, the absence of M2 in vivo leads to a defect in the appearance of MHV68 infected plasma cells in the spleen at the peak of MHV68 latency. Here, employing an inducible B cell expression system, we have determined that M2 activates the NFAT pathway in a Src kinase-dependent manner--leading to induction of the plasma cell-associated transcription factor, Interferon Regulatory Factor-4 (IRF4. Furthermore, we show that expression of IRF4 alone in a B cell line up-regulates IL-10 expression in culture supernatants, revealing a novel role for IRF4 in B cell induced IL-10. Consistent with the latter observation, we show that IRF4 can regulate the IL-10 promoter in B cells. In primary murine B cells, addition of cyclosporine (CsA resulted in a significant decrease in M2-induced IL-10 levels as well as IRF4 expression, emphasizing the importance of the NFAT pathway in M2- -mediated induction of IL-10. Together, these studies argue in favor of a model wherein M2 activation of the NFAT pathway initiates events leading to increased levels of IRF4--a key player in plasma cell differentiation--which in turn triggers IL-10 expression. In the context of previous findings, the data presented here provides insights into how M2 facilitates plasma cell differentiation and subsequent virus reactivation.

  9. B-Cell Activation and Tolerance Mediated by B-Cell Receptor, Toll-Like Receptor, and Survival Signal Crosstalk in SLE Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Dec, 2016 "Integrating innate , adaptive, & survival signals to control B cell selection, homeostasis and tolerance" Pasteur Institute of Shanghai...secondary lymphoid tissues. Aging Dis. 2: 361–373. 8. Goenka, R., J. L. Scholz, M. S. Naradikian, and M. P. Cancro. 2014. Memory B cells form in aged...Scholz, and M. P. Cancro. 2011. A B- cell subset uniquely responsive to innate stimuli accumulates in aged mice. Blood 118: 1294–1304. 10. Rubtsov, A

  10. The Transcriptional Coactivator Bob1 Is Associated With Pathologic B Cell Responses in Autoimmune Tissue Inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levels, Maria J.; Van Tok, Melissa N.; Cantaert, Tineke; Canete, Juan D.; Kroese, Frans G. M.; Germar, Kristine; Spits, Hergen; Baeten, Dominique L. P.; Yeremenko, Nataliya G.

    Objective. The molecular mechanisms steering abnormal B cell responses in autoimmune diseases remain poorly understood. We undertook this study to identify molecular switches controlling pathologic B cell responses in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Candidate molecules were identified by gene

  11. Bcl-2 antisense therapy in B-cell malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanan-Khan, Asher

    2005-07-01

    Bcl-2 is an apoptosis regulating protein, overexpression of which is associated with chemotherapy resistant disease, aggressive clinical course, and poor survival in patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders. Overexpression of Bcl-2 protein results in an aberrant intrinsic apoptotic pathway that confers a protective effect on malignant cells against a death signal (e.g., chemotherapy or radiotherapy). Downregulation of this oncoprotein, thus, represents a possible new way to target clinically aggressive disease. Preclinical studies have shown that this oncoprotein can be effectively decreased by Bcl-2 antisense in malignant lymphoid cells and can reverse chemotherapy resistance, as well as enhance the anti-apoptotic potential of both chemotherapeutic and biologic agents. Ongoing clinical trials are exploring the role of Bcl-2 downregulation with oblimersen (Bcl-2 antisense) in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Early results from these studies are promising and support the proof of the principle. As these studies are completed and mature data emerges, the role of Bcl-2 antisense therapy in the treatment of B-cell malignancies will become clearer.

  12. Towards the generation of B-cell receptor retrogenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Freitag

    Full Text Available Transgenic expression of B- and T-cell receptors (BCRs and TCRs, respectively has been a standard tool to study lymphocyte development and function in vivo. The generation of transgenic mice is time-consuming and, therefore, a faster method to study the biology of defined lymphocyte receptors in vivo would be highly welcome. Using 2A peptide-linked multicistronic retroviral vectors to transduce stem cells, TCRs can be expressed rapidly in mice of any background. We aimed at adopting this retrogenic technology to the in vivo expression of BCRs. Using a well characterised BCR specific for hen egg lysozyme (HEL, we achieved surface expression of the retrogenically encoded BCR in a Rag-deficient pro B-cell line in vitro. In vivo, retrogenic BCRs were detectable only intracellularly but not on the surface of B cells from wild type or Rag2-deficient mice. This data, together with the fact that no BCR retrogenic mouse model has been published in the 7 years since the method was originally published for TCRs, strongly suggests that achieving BCR-expression in vivo with retrogenic technology is highly challenging if not impossible.

  13. Primary intravascular large B-cell lymphoma of pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K R Anila

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 68-year-old retired nurse, who was a known hypertensive on medication, presented with prolonged fever of 2-month duration without any clinical evidence of infection. On examination she had altered mental status. She also had other nonspecific complaints such as sleep disturbances, loss of weight, etc. On investigation, she was found to have anemia, thrombocytopenia, raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR, C-reactive protein (CRP, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH values. She also had electrolyte imbalance. Radiological evaluation of brain showed mass lesion in the sella turcica, suggestive of pituitary adenoma. Biochemical evaluation showed hypopituitarism. Trans-sphenoidal biopsy was done. Based on histopathological and immunohistochemical findings a diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL of pituitary was made. Our patient′s condition deteriorated rapidly and she succumbed to her illness before therapy could be initiated. We are reporting this case because of the rare subtype of large B-cell lymphoma presenting at an extremely unusual primary site.

  14. Modulation of B-cell receptor and microenvironment signaling by a guanine exchange factor in B-cell malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells over-express a guanine exchange factor (GEF), Rasgrf-1. This GEF increases active Ras as it catalyzes the removal of GDP from Ras so that GTP can bind and activate Ras. This study aims to study the mechanism of action of Rasgrf-1 in B-cell malignancies. Methods: N-terminus truncated Rasgrf-1 variants have a higher GEF activity as compared to the full-length transcript therefore a MCL cell line with stable over-expression of truncated Rasgrf-1 was established. The B-cell receptor (BCR) and chemokine signaling pathways were compared in the Rasgrf-1 over-expressing and a control transfected cell line. Results: Cells over-expressing truncated form of Rasgrf-1 have a higher proliferative rate as compared to control transfected cells. BCR was activated by lower concentrations of anti-IgM antibody in Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells as compared to control cells indicating that these cells are more sensitive to BCR signaling. BCR signaling also phosphorylates Rasgrf-1 that further increases its GEF function and amplifies BCR signaling. This activation of Rasgrf-1 in over-expressing cells resulted in a higher expression of phospho-ERK, AKT, BTK and PKC-alpha as compared to control cells. Besides BCR, Rasgrf-1 over-expressing cells were also more sensitive to microenvironment stimuli as determined by resistance to apoptosis, chemotaxis and ERK pathway activation. Conclusions: This GEF protein sensitizes B-cells to BCR and chemokine mediated signaling and also upregulates a number of other signaling pathways which promotes growth and survival of these cells

  15. NF-κB2 mutation targets survival, proliferation and differentiation pathways in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors

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    McCarthy Brian A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal NF-κB2 activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells. However, a causal role for aberrant NF-κB2 signaling in the development of plasma cell tumors has not been established. Also unclear is the molecular mechanism that drives the tumorigenic process. We investigated these questions by using a transgenic mouse model with lymphocyte-targeted expression of p80HT, a lymphoma-associated NF-κB2 mutant, and human multiple myeloma cell lines. Methods We conducted a detailed histopathological characterization of lymphomas developed in p80HT transgenic mice and microarray gene expression profiling of p80HT B cells with the goal of identifying genes that drive plasma cell tumor development. We further verified the significance of our findings in human multiple myeloma cell lines. Results Approximately 40% of p80HT mice showed elevated levels of monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein in the serum and developed plasma cell tumors. Some of these mice displayed key features of human multiple myeloma with accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow, osteolytic bone lesions and/or diffuse osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling of B cells from M-protein-positive p80HT mice revealed aberrant expression of genes known to be important in the pathogenesis of multiple myeloma, including cyclin D1, cyclin D2, Blimp1, survivin, IL-10 and IL-15. In vitro assays demonstrated a critical role of Stat3, a key downstream component of IL-10 signaling, in the survival of human multiple myeloma cells. Conclusions These findings provide a mouse model for human multiple myeloma with aberrant NF-κB2 activation and suggest a molecular mechanism for NF-κB2 signaling in the pathogenesis of plasma cell tumors by coordinated regulation of plasma cell generation, proliferation and survival.

  16. Expression of the Grb2-related protein of the lymphoid system in B cell subsets enhances B cell antigen receptor signaling through mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankee, Thomas M; Solow, Sasha A; Draves, Kevin D; Clark, Edward A

    2003-01-01

    Adapter proteins play a critical role in regulating signals triggered by Ag receptor cross-linking. These small molecules link receptor proximal events with downstream signaling pathways. In this study, we explore the expression and function of the Grb2-related protein of the lymphoid system (GrpL)/Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc adapter protein in human B cells. GrpL is expressed in naive B cells and is down-regulated following B cell Ag receptor ligation. By contrast, germinal center and memory B cells express little or no GrpL. Using human B cell lines, we detected constitutive interactions between GrpL and B cell linker protein, Src homology (SH)2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa, hemopoietic progenitor kinase 1, and c-Cbl. The N-terminal SH3 domain of GrpL binds c-Cbl while the C-terminal SH3 domain binds B cell linker protein and SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa. Exogenous expression of GrpL in a GrpL-negative B cell line leads to enhanced Ag receptor-induced extracellular signal-related kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. Thus, GrpL expression in human B cell subsets appears to regulate Ag receptor-mediated signaling events.

  17. Dual-reactive B cells are autoreactive and highly enriched in the plasmablast and memory B cell subsets of autoimmune mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Emilie M.; Velez, Maria-Gabriela; Leahy, Katelyn; Swanson, Cristina L.; Rubtsov, Anatoly V.; Torres, Raul M.

    2012-01-01

    Rare dual-reactive B cells expressing two types of Ig light or heavy chains have been shown to participate in immune responses and differentiate into IgG+ cells in healthy mice. These cells are generated more often in autoreactive mice, leading us to hypothesize they might be relevant in autoimmunity. Using mice bearing Igk allotypic markers and a wild-type Ig repertoire, we demonstrate that the generation of dual-κ B cells increases with age and disease progression in autoimmune-prone MRL and MRL/lpr mice. These dual-reactive cells express markers of activation and are more frequently autoreactive than single-reactive B cells. Moreover, dual-κ B cells represent up to half of plasmablasts and memory B cells in autoimmune mice, whereas they remain infrequent in healthy mice. Differentiation of dual-κ B cells into plasmablasts is driven by MRL genes, whereas the maintenance of IgG+ cells is partly dependent on Fas inactivation. Furthermore, dual-κ B cells that differentiate into plasmablasts retain the capacity to secrete autoantibodies. Overall, our study indicates that dual-reactive B cells significantly contribute to the plasmablast and memory B cell populations of autoimmune-prone mice suggesting a role in autoimmunity. PMID:22927551

  18. Pregnancy alters the circulating B cell compartment in atopic asthmatic women, and transitional B cells are positively associated with the development of allergy manifestations in their progeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Catarina; Lima, Jorge; Nunes, Glória; Borrego, Luís Miguel

    2016-12-01

    Maternal atopy is a risk factor for allergy. B cells are poorly studied in reproduction and atopy. We aimed to assess how pregnancy affects B cells in atopic women and whether B cells relate to allergic manifestations in offspring. Women with and without atopic asthma, pregnant and non-pregnant were enrolled for the study, and circulating B cells were evaluated by flow cytometry, using CD19, CD27, CD38, IgD, and IgM. Compared to healthy non-pregnant, atopic asthmatic non-pregnant (ANP) women presented increased B cell counts, enlarged memory subsets, less transitional cells, and plasmablasts. Atopic asthmatic pregnant (AP) and healthy pregnant (HP) women showed similarities: reduced B cell counts and percentages, fewer memory cells, especially switched, and higher plasmablast percentages. Transitional B cell percentages were increased in AP women with allergic manifestations in their progeny. Atopic asthmatic non-pregnant women have a distinctive B cell compartment. B cells change in pregnancy, similarly in AP and HP women. The recognition that AP women with allergy in their progeny have a typical immune profile may help, in the future, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid the manifestation of allergic diseases in their newborns. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. B-cell subset alterations and correlated factors in HIV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensieroso, Simone; Galli, Laura; Nozza, Silvia; Ruffin, Nicolas; Castagna, Antonella; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Hejdeman, Bo; Misciagna, Donatella; Riva, Agostino; Malnati, Mauro; Chiodi, Francesca; Scarlatti, Gabriella

    2013-05-15

    During HIV-1 infection, the development, phenotype, and functionality of B cells are impaired. Transitional B cells and aberrant B-cell populations arise in blood, whereas a declined percentage of resting memory B cells is detected. Our study aimed at pinpointing the demographic, immunological, and viral factors driving these pathological findings, and the role of antiretroviral therapy in reverting these alterations. B-cell phenotype and correlating factors were evaluated. Variations in B-cell subsets were evaluated by flow cytometry in HIV-1-infected individuals naive to therapy, elite controllers, and patients treated with antiretroviral drugs (virological control or failure). Multivariable analysis was performed to identify variables independently associated with the B-cell alterations. Significant differences were observed among patients' groups in relation to all B-cell subsets. Resting memory B cells were preserved in patients naive to therapy and elite controllers, but reduced in treated patients. Individuals naive to therapy and experiencing multidrug failure, as well as elite controllers, had significantly higher levels of activated memory B cells compared to healthy controls. In the multivariate analysis, plasma viral load and nadir CD4 T cells independently correlated with major B-cell alterations. Coinfection with hepatitis C but not hepatitis B virus also showed an impact on specific B-cell subsets. Successful protracted antiretroviral treatment led to normalization of all B-cell subsets with exception of resting memory B cells. Our results indicate that viremia and nadir CD4 T cells are important prognostic markers of B-cell perturbations and provide evidence that resting memory B-cell depletion during chronic infection is not reverted upon successful antiretroviral therapy.

  20. Mouse dendritic cells pulsed with capsular polysaccharide induce resistance to lethal pneumococcal challenge: roles of T cells and B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Cohen

    Full Text Available Mice are exceedingly sensitive to intra-peritoneal (IP challenge with some virulent pneumococci (LD50 = 1 bacterium. To investigate how peripheral contact with bacterial capsular polysaccharide (PS antigen can induce resistance, we pulsed bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC of C57BL/6 mice with type 4 or type 3 PS, injected the BMDC intra-foot pad (IFP and challenged the mice IP with supra-lethal doses of pneumococci. We examined the responses of T cells and B cells in the draining popliteal lymph node and measured the effects on the bacteria in the peritoneum and blood. We now report that: 1 The PS co-localized with MHC molecules on the BMDC surface; 2 PS-specific T and B cell proliferation and IFNγ secretion was detected in the draining popliteal lymph nodes on day 4; 3 Type-specific resistance to lethal IP challenge was manifested only after day 5; 4 Type-specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in the sera of only some of the mice, but B cells were essential for resistance; 5 Control mice vaccinated with a single injection of soluble PS did not develop a response in the draining popliteal lymph node and were not protected; 6 Mice injected with unpulsed BMDC also did not resist challenge: In unprotected mice, pneumococci entered the blood shortly after IP inoculation and multiplied exponentially in both blood and peritoneum killing the mice within 20 hours. Mice vaccinated with PS-pulsed BMDC trapped the bacteria in the peritoneum. The trapped bacteria proliferated exponentially IP, but died suddenly at 18-20 hours. Thus, a single injection of PS antigen associated with intact BMDC is a more effective vaccine than the soluble PS alone. This model system provides a platform for studying novel aspects of PS-targeted vaccination.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillman, R.O.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  2. Monoclonal antibody-based immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, P; Reischl, U

    1998-01-01

    An immunoassay may be defined as an assay that employs an immunological reagent, usually an antibody, to confer specificity for the ligand being measured. As a corollary to this, the discovery, and subsequent development, of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has greatly expanded the application and use of immunoassays. Polyclonal reagents, with their associated problems of specificity and quality control, have now been largely replaced by readily available MAbs of potential immortality and well-defined specificity and affinity. This has resulted, in the last two decades, in a great expansion in the range of immunoassays available and also a significant improvement in their reproducibility and reliability.

  3. Cigarette smoke-induced emphysema : A role for the B cell?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Strate, BWA; Postma, DS; Brandsma, CA; Melgert, BN; Luinge, MA; Geerlings, M; Hylkema, MN; van den Berg, Anke; Timens, W; Kerstjens, HAM

    2006-01-01

    Rationale: Little is known about what drives the inflammatory reaction in the development of chronic obstructive lung disease. B cells have been found. Objective: To study the involvement of B cells in the development of emphysema. Methods: The presence of B-cell follicles and their interaction with

  4. Monovalent engagement of the BCR activates ovalbumin-specific transnuclear B cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Avalos, Ana M.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Witte, Martin D.; Tai, Albert K.; He, Jiang; Frushicheva, Maria P.; Thill, Peter D.; Meyer-Wentrup, Friederike; Theile, Christopher S.; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2014-01-01

    Valency requirements for B cell activation upon antigen encounter are poorly understood. OB1 transnuclear B cells express an IgG1 B cell receptor (BCR) specific for ovalbumin (OVA), the epitope of which can be mimicked using short synthetic peptides to allow antigen-specific engagement of the BCR.

  5. Galectin-1 is required for the regulatory function of B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabbab, R; Blair, P; Smyth, L A; Ratnasothy, K; Peng, Q; Moreau, A; Lechler, R; Elgueta, R; Lombardi, G

    2018-02-09

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) is required for the development of B cells in the bone marrow (BM), however very little is known about the contribution of Gal-1 to the development of B cell regulatory function. Here, we report an important role for Gal-1 in the induction of B cells regulatory function. Mice deficient of Gal-1 (Gal-1 -/- ) showed significant loss of Transitional-2 (T2) B cells, previously reported to include IL-10 + regulatory B cells. Gal-1 -/- B cells stimulated in vitro via CD40 molecules have impaired IL-10 and Tim-1 expression, the latter reported to be required for IL-10 production in regulatory B cells, and increased TNF-α expression compared to wild type (WT) B cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, T2 and T1 Gal-1 -/- B cells did not suppress TNF-α expression by CD4 + T cells activated in vitro with allogenic DCs (allo-DCs), nor were they suppressive in vivo, being unable to delay MHC-class I mismatched skin allograft rejection following adoptive transfer. Moreover, T cells stimulated with allo-DCs show an increase in their survival when co-cultured with Gal-1 -/- T2 and MZ B cells compared to WT T2 and MZ B cells. Collectively, these data suggest that Gal-1 contributes to the induction of B cells regulatory function.

  6. Transitional-2 B cells acquire regulatory function during tolerance induction and contribute to allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Aurélie; Blair, Paul A; Chai, Jian-Guo; Ratnasothy, Kulachelvy; Stolarczyk, Emilie; Alhabbab, Rowa; Rackham, Chloe L; Jones, Peter M; Smyth, Lesley; Elgueta, Raul; Howard, Jane K; Lechler, Robert I; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-03-01

    In humans, tolerance to renal transplants has been associated with alterations in B-cell gene transcription and maintenance of the numbers of circulating transitional B cells. Here, we use a mouse model of transplantation tolerance to investigate the contribution of B cells to allograft survival. We demonstrate that transfer of B cells from mice rendered tolerant to MHC class I mismatched skin grafts can prolong graft survival in a dose-dependent and antigen-specific manner to a degree similar to that afforded by graft-specific regulatory T (Treg) cells. Tolerance in this model was associated with an increase in transitional-2 (T2) B cells. Only T2 B cells from tolerized mice, not naïve T2 nor alloantigen experienced T2, were capable of prolonging skin allograft survival, and suppressing T-cell activation. Tolerized T2 B cells expressed lower levels of CD86, increased TIM-1, and demonstrated a preferential survival in vivo. Furthermore, we demonstrate a synergistic effect between tolerized B cells and graft-specific Treg cells. IL-10 production by T2 B cells did not contribute to tolerance, as shown by transfer of B cells from IL-10(-/-) mice. These results suggest that T2 B cells in tolerant patients may include a population of regulatory B cells that directly inhibit graft rejection. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. File list: ALL.Bld.05.AllAg.Lymphoma,_B-Cell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: His.Bld.20.AllAg.Pro-B_cells [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  2. CP-25, a Novel Anti-inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Drug, Inhibits the Functions of Activated Human B Cells through Regulating BAFF and TNF-alpha Signaling and Comparative Efficacy with Biological Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Paeoniflorin-6′-O-benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25 was the chemistry structural modifications of Paeoniflorin (Pae. CP-25 inhibited B cells proliferation stimulated by B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF or Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha. CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept reduced the percentage and numbers of CD19+ B cells, CD19+CD20+ B cells, CD19+CD27+ B cells and CD19+CD20+CD27+ B cells induced by BAFF or TNF-alpha. There was significant difference between CP-25 and Rituximab or CP-25 and Etanercept. CP-25 down-regulated the high expression of BAFFR, BCMA, and TACI stimulated by BAFF or TNF-alpha. The effects of Rituximab and Etanercept on BAFFR or BCMA were stronger than that of CP-25. CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept down-regulated significantly the expression of TNFR1 and TNFR2 on B cell stimulated by BAFF or TNF-alpha. CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept down-regulated the expression of MKK3, P-p38, P-p65, TRAF2, and p52 in B cells stimulated by BAFF and the expression of TRAF2 and P-p65 in B cells stimulated by TNF-alpha. These results suggest that CP-25 regulated moderately activated B cells function by regulating the classical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathway mediated by BAFF and TNF-alpha-TRAF2-NF-κB signaling pathway. This study suggests that CP-25 may be a promising anti-inflammatory immune and soft regulation drug.

  3. CP-25, a Novel Anti-inflammatory and Immunomodulatory Drug, Inhibits the Functions of Activated Human B Cells through Regulating BAFF and TNF-alpha Signaling and Comparative Efficacy with Biological Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Shu, Jin-Ling; Li, Ying; Wu, Yu-Jing; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Han, Le; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Chen; Wang, Qing-Tong; Chen, Jing-Yu; Chang, Yan; Wu, Hua-Xun; Zhang, Ling-Ling; Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Paeoniflorin-6'- O -benzene sulfonate (code: CP-25) was the chemistry structural modifications of Paeoniflorin (Pae). CP-25 inhibited B cells proliferation stimulated by B cell activating factor belonging to the TNF family (BAFF) or Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept reduced the percentage and numbers of CD19 + B cells, CD19 + CD20 + B cells, CD19 + CD27 + B cells and CD19 + CD20 + CD27 + B cells induced by BAFF or TNF-alpha. There was significant difference between CP-25 and Rituximab or CP-25 and Etanercept. CP-25 down-regulated the high expression of BAFFR, BCMA, and TACI stimulated by BAFF or TNF-alpha. The effects of Rituximab and Etanercept on BAFFR or BCMA were stronger than that of CP-25. CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept down-regulated significantly the expression of TNFR1 and TNFR2 on B cell stimulated by BAFF or TNF-alpha. CP-25, Rituximab and Etanercept down-regulated the expression of MKK3, P-p38, P-p65, TRAF2, and p52 in B cells stimulated by BAFF and the expression of TRAF2 and P-p65 in B cells stimulated by TNF-alpha. These results suggest that CP-25 regulated moderately activated B cells function by regulating the classical and alternative NF-κB signaling pathway mediated by BAFF and TNF-alpha-TRAF2-NF-κB signaling pathway. This study suggests that CP-25 may be a promising anti-inflammatory immune and soft regulation drug.

  4. Tracking Differential Gene Expression in MRL/MpJ Versus C57BL/6 Anergic B Cells: Molecular Markers of Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy G. Clark

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anergy is a key mechanism controlling expression of autoreactive B cells and a major site for failed regulation in autoimmune diseases. Yet the molecular basis for this differentiated cell state remains poorly understood. The current lack of well-characterized surface or molecular markers hinders the isolation of anergic cells for further study. Global gene profiling recently identified transcripts whose expression differentiates anergic from naïve B cells in model mouse systems. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the molecular and cellular processes that differentiate anergic cells that develop in the healthy C57BL/6 (B6 milieu from those that develop in the autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ (MRL background. This approach takes advantage of B6 and MRL mice bearing an anti-laminin Ig transgene with a well characterized anergic B cell phenotype.Results: Global gene expression was evaluated in purified transgenic B cells using Operon version 3.0 oligonucleotide microarray assaying 31,000 oligoprobes. Genes with a 2-fold expression difference in B6 as compared to MRL anergic B cells were identified. Expression of selected genes was confirmed using quantitative RT-PCR. This approach identified 43 probes corresponding to 37 characterized genes, including Ptpn22, CD74, Birc1f/Naip, and Ctla4, as differentially expressed in anergic B cells in the two strains. Gene Ontology classification identified differentiation, cell cycle, proliferation, development, apoptosis, and cell death as prominently represented ontology groups. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified two major networks incorporating 27 qualifying genes. Network 1 centers on beta-estradiol and TP53, and Network 2 encompasses RB1, p38 MAPK, and NFkB cell growth, proliferation, and cell cycle signaling pathways.Conclusion: Using microarray analysis we identified 37 characterized genes and two functional pathways engaged in maintenance of B cell anergy for which expression is

  5. Maternal and fetal mechanisms of B cell regulation during pregnancy: human Chorionic Gonadotropin stimulates B cells to produce IL-10 while alpha-fetoprotein drives them into apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Fettke

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Maternal immune tolerance towards the fetus is an essential requisite for pregnancy. While T cell functions are well documented, little is known about the participation of B cells. We have previously suggested that IL-10 producing B cells are involved in pregnancy tolerance in mice and humans. By employing murine and human systems, we report now that fetal trophoblasts positively regulate the generation of IL-10 producing B cells. We next studied the participation of hormones produced by the placenta as well as the fetal protein alpha-fetoprotein (AFP in B cell modulation. Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG, but not progesterone, estrogen or a combination of both, was able to promote changes in B cell phenotype and boost their IL-10 production, which was abolished after blocking hCG. The hCG-induced B cell phenotype was not associated with augmented galactosylation, sialylation or fucosylation of IgG subclasses in their Fc. In vitro, hCG induced the synthesis of asymmetrically glycosylated antibodies in their Fab region. Interestingly, AFP had dual effects depending on the concentration. At concentrations corresponding to maternal serum levels, it did not modify the phenotype or IL-10 secretion of B cells. At fetal concentrations, however, AFP was able to drive B cells into apoptosis, which may indicate a protective mechanism to avoid maternal B cells to reach the fetus.Our data suggests that the fetus secrete factors that promote a pregnancy-friendly B cell phenotype, unraveling interesting aspects of B cell function and modulation by pregnancy hormones and fetal proteins.

  6. Specific Antibody Production by Blood B Cells is Retained in Late Stage Drug-naïve HIV-infected Africans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydie Béniguel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Unseparated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs obtained from drug-naïve African individuals living in a context of multi-infections and presenting with high viral load (VL, were cultured in vitro and tested for their ability to produce antibodies (Abs reacting with HIV-1 antigens. Within these PBMCs, circulating B cells were differentiated in vitro and produced IgG Abs against not only ENV, but also GAG and POL proteins. Under similar experimental conditions, HAART treated patients produced Abs to ENV proteins only. The in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs depended on exogenous cytokines (IL-2 and IL-10 but neither on the re-stimulation of reactive cells in cultures by purified HIV-1-gp 160 antigen nor on the re-engagement of CD40 surface molecules. Further, it was not abrogated by the addition of various monoclonal Abs (mAbs to co-stimulatory molecules. This suggests that the in vitro antibody production by drug-naïve individuals' PBMCs resulted from the maturation of already envelope and core antigen-primed, differentiated B cells, presumably pre-plasma cells, which are not known to circulate at homeostasy. As in vitro produced Abs retained the capacity of binding antigen and forming complexes, this study provides pre-clinical support for functional humoral responses despite major HIV- and other tropical pathogen-induced B cell perturbations.

  7. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B-Cell Normal Cellular Counterpart: Clues From a Functional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwiche, Walaa; Gubler, Brigitte; Marolleau, Jean-Pierre; Ghamlouch, Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by the clonal expansion of small mature-looking CD19+ CD23+ CD5+ B-cells that accumulate in the blood, bone marrow, and lymphoid organs. To date, no consensus has been reached concerning the normal cellular counterpart of CLL B-cells and several B-cell types have been proposed. CLL B-cells have remarkable phenotypic and gene expression profile homogeneity. In recent years, the molecular and cellular biology of CLL has been enriched by seminal insights that are leading to a better understanding of the natural history of the disease. Immunophenotypic and molecular approaches (including immunoglobulin heavy-chain variable gene mutational status, transcriptional and epigenetic profiling) comparing the normal B-cell subset and CLL B-cells provide some new insights into the normal cellular counterpart. Functional characteristics (including activation requirements and propensity for plasma cell differentiation) of CLL B-cells have now been investigated for 50 years. B-cell subsets differ substantially in terms of their functional features. Analysis of shared functional characteristics may reveal similarities between normal B-cell subsets and CLL B-cells, allowing speculative assignment of a normal cellular counterpart for CLL B-cells. In this review, we summarize current data regarding peripheral B-cell differentiation and human B-cell subsets and suggest possibilities for a normal cellular counterpart based on the functional characteristics of CLL B-cells. However, a definitive normal cellular counterpart cannot be attributed on the basis of the available data. We discuss the functional characteristics required for a cell to be logically considered to be the normal counterpart of CLL B-cells.

  8. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  9. B cell receptor inhibition as a target for CLL therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyakumar, Deepa; O'Brien, Susan

    2016-03-01

    Inhibitors of the B cell receptor (BCR) represent an attractive therapeutic option for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Recently approved inhibitors of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (ibrutinib) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (idelalisib), are promising agents because they are generally well tolerated and highly effective. These agents may be particularly important in the treatment of older patients who are less able to tolerate the myelosuppression (and infections) associated with chemoimmunotherapy. As a class of medications, BCR inhibitors have some unique side effects including redistribution lymphocytosis. Ibrutinib has specific toxicities including increased risk for bleeding and atrial fibrillation. Idelalisib also has some unique toxicities consisting of transaminitis, diarrhea and pneumonitis. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating these agents in combination with antibodies, chemotherapy and other small molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. T cell-B cell interactions in primary immunodeficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangye, Stuart G; Deenick, Elissa K; Palendira, Umaimainthan; Ma, Cindy S

    2012-02-01

    Regulated interactions between cells of the immune system facilitate the generation of successful immune responses, thereby enabling efficient neutralization and clearance of pathogens and the establishment of both cell- and humoral-mediated immunological memory. The corollary of this is that impediments to efficient cell-cell interactions, normally necessary for differentiation and effector functions of immune cells, underly the clinical features and disease pathogenesis of primary immunodeficiencies. In affected individuals, these defects manifest as impaired long-term humoral immunity and susceptibility to infection by specific pathogens. In this review, we discuss the importance of, and requirements for, effective interactions between B cells and T cells during the formation of CD4(+) T follicular helper cells and the elicitation of cytotoxic function of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, as well as how these processes are abrogated in primary immunodeficiencies due to loss-of-function mutations in defined genes. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. [Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas: study of 22 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Carrasco, Pablo; Morillo Andújar, Mercedes; Pérez Ruiz, Carmen; de Zulueta Dorado, Teresa; Cabrera Pérez, Rocío; Conejo-Mir, Julián

    2016-09-02

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphoma (CBCL) is a very low prevalence neoplasm and constitutes 25% of all primary cutaneous lymphomas. Our objective was to discover the epidemiological, clinic and histologic characteristics of CBCL in our area. Retrospective descriptive study with patients with histologic diagnosis of CBCL followed up in our department between 2004 and 2015. Twenty-two patients with CBCL were included; 65% were men and 35% were women. Follicle centre lymphoma was the most common subtype (41%). Only 3 cases presented with node involvement and one with bone marrow invasion. Five recurrences were detected and one patient died because of the CBCL. This is one of the first CBCL series in theSpanish population. The incidence, sex, age, subtype distribution, clinical features and immunohistochemical patterns are very similar to those of the other series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebral toxoplasmosis in a diffuse large B cell lymphoma patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savsek, Lina; Opaskar, Tanja Ros

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is an opportunistic protozoal infection that has, until now, probably been an underestimated cause of encephalitis in patients with hematological malignancies, independent of stem cell or bone marrow transplant. T and B cell depleting regimens are probably an important risk factor for reactivation of a latent toxoplasma infection in these patients. We describe a 62-year-old HIV-negative right-handed Caucasian female with systemic diffuse large B cell lymphoma who presented with sudden onset of high fever, headache, altered mental status, ataxia and findings of pancytopenia, a few days after receiving her final, 8 th cycle of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, prednisolone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy regimen. A progression of lymphoma to the central nervous system was suspected. MRI of the head revealed multiple on T2 and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) hyperintense parenchymal lesions with mild surrounding edema, located in both cerebral and cerebellar hemispheres that demonstrated moderate gadolinium enhancement. The polymerase chain reaction on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF PCR) was positive for Toxoplasma gondii. The patient was diagnosed with toxoplasmic encephalitis and successfully treated with sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine and folic acid. Due to the need for maintenance therapy with rituximab for lymphoma remission, the patient now continues with secondary prophylaxis of toxoplasmosis. With this case report, we wish to emphasize the need to consider cerebral toxoplasmosis in patients with hematological malignancies on immunosuppressive therapy when presenting with new neurologic deficits. In such patients, there are numerous differential diagnoses for cerebral toxoplasmosis, and the CNS lymphoma is the most difficult among all to distinguish it from. If left untreated, cerebral toxoplasmosis has a high mortality rate; therefore early recognition and treatment are of essential importance

  13. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2018-04-10

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  14. Loss of PRDM1/BLIMP-1 function contributes to poor prognosis of activated B-cell-like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Yi; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Tzankov, A

    2017-01-01

    PRDM1/BLIMP-1, a master regulator of plasma-cell differentiation, is frequently inactivated in activated B-cell-like (ABC) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. Little is known about its genetic aberrations and relevant clinical implications. A large series of patients with de novo DLBC...

  15. Genetic modification of human B-cell development: B-cell development is inhibited by the dominant negative helix loop helix factor Id3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaleco, A. C.; Stegmann, A. P.; Heemskerk, M. H.; Couwenberg, F.; Bakker, A. Q.; Weijer, K.; Spits, H.

    1999-01-01

    Transgenic and gene targeted mice have contributed greatly to our understanding of the mechanisms underlying B-cell development. We describe here a model system that allows us to apply molecular genetic techniques to the analysis of human B-cell development. We constructed a retroviral vector with a

  16. The progeny of a single virgin B cell predominates the human recall B cell response to the capsular polysaccharide of Haemophilus influenzae type b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barington, T; Hougs, L; Juul, L

    1996-01-01

    of the cells originated from a common virgin B cell. Kinetic considerations implied that an extremely selected population of hypermutated memory B cells must have existed in these individuals before the first systemic immunization with the Ag. A possible role for the mucosal immune system in the priming...

  17. Study of the quantitative, functional, cytogenetic, and immunoregulatory properties of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Kastrinaki, Maria-Christina; Klaus, Mirjam; Kalpadakis, Christina; Katonis, Pavlos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-05-01

    The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has clearly been implicated in the pathogenesis of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). However, the potential involvement of BM stromal progenitors, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), in the pathophysiology of the disease has not been extensively investigated. We expanded in vitro BM-MSCs from B-CLL patients (n=11) and healthy individuals (n=16) and comparatively assessed their reserves, proliferative potential, differentiation capacity, and immunoregulatory effects on T- and B-cells. We also evaluated the anti-apoptotic effect of patient-derived MSCs on leukemic cells and studied their cytogenetic characteristics in comparison to BM hematopoietic cells. B-CLL-derived BM MSCs exhibit a similar phenotype, differentiation potential, and ability to suppress T-cell proliferative responses as compared with MSCs from normal controls. Furthermore, they do not carry the cytogenetic abnormalities of the leukemic clone, and they exert a similar anti-apoptotic effect on leukemic cells and healthy donor-derived B-cells, as their normal counterparts. On the other hand, MSCs from B-CLL patients significantly promote normal B-cell proliferation and IgG production, in contrast to healthy-donor-derived MSCs. Furthermore, they have impaired reserves, defective cellular growth due to increased apoptotic cell death and exhibit aberrant production of stromal cell-derived factor 1, B-cell activating factor, a proliferation inducing ligand, and transforming growth factor β1, cytokines that are crucial for the survival/nourishing of the leukemic cells. We conclude that ex vivo expanded B-CLL-derived MSCs harbor intrinsic qualitative and quantitative abnormalities that may be implicated in disease development and/or progression.

  18. Proton pump inhibitors induce apoptosis of human B-cell tumors through a caspase-independent mechanism involving reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Milito, Angelo; Iessi, Elisabetta; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Lozupone, Francesco; Spada, Massimo; Marino, Maria Lucia; Federici, Cristina; Perdicchio, Maurizio; Matarrese, Paola; Lugini, Luana; Nilsson, Anna; Fais, Stefano

    2007-06-01

    Proton pumps like the vacuolar-type H+ ATPase (V-ATPase) are involved in the control of cellular pH in normal and tumor cells. Treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPI) induces sensitization of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics via modifications of cellular pH gradients. It is also known that low pH is the most suitable condition for a full PPI activation. Here, we tested whether PPI treatment in unbuffered culture conditions could affect survival and proliferation of human B-cell tumors. First, we showed that PPI treatment increased the sensitivity to vinblastine of a pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell line. PPI, per se, induced a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation of tumor B cells, which was associated with a dose- and time-dependent apoptotic-like cytotoxicity in B-cell lines and leukemic cells from patients with pre-B ALL. The effect of PPI was mediated by a very early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), that preceded alkalinization of lysosomal pH, lysosomal membrane permeabilization, and cytosol acidification, suggesting an early destabilization of the acidic vesicular compartment. Lysosomal alterations were followed by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, release of cytochrome c, chromatin condensation, and caspase activation. However, inhibition of caspase activity did not affect PPI-induced cell death, whereas specific inhibition of ROS by an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine) significantly delayed cell death and protected both lysosomal and mitochondrial membranes. The proapoptotic activity of PPI was consistent with a clear inhibition of tumor growth following PPI treatment of B-cell lymphoma in severe combined immunodeficient mice. This study further supports the importance of acidity and pH gradients in tumor cell homeostasis and suggests new therapeutic approaches for human B-cell tumors based on PPI.

  19. B cell subsets and dysfunction of regulatory B cells in IgG4-related diseases and primary Sjögren’s syndrome: the similarities and differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a multisystem-involved autoimmune disease. Abnormally activated and differentiated B cells may play important roles. Regulatory B cells (Breg) are newly defined B cell subgroups with immunosuppressive functions. In this study, we investigated the differences of B cell subsets, the expressions of co-stimulatory molecules on B cells, and the function of Breg cells in patients with IgG4-RD, primary Sjögren’s syndrome (pSS) as well as in healthy controls (HC). Methods Newly diagnosed IgG4-RD patients (n = 48) were enrolled, 38 untreated pSS patients and 30 healthy volunteers were recruited as disease and healthy controls. To analyze B cell subsets and B cell activity, PBMCs were surface stained and detected by flow cytometry. The function of Breg cells was tested by coculturing isolated CD19 + CD24hiCD38hi Breg cells with purified CD4 + CD25- T cells. Serum cytokines were measured by ELISA and cytometric bead array. Relationship between clinical data and laboratory findings were analyzed as well. Results Compared with pSS patients and HC, IgG4-RD patients had a lower frequency of peripheral Breg cells. Interestingly, CD19 + CD24-CD38hi B cell subsets were significantly higher in peripheral B cells from IgG4-RD patients than in pSS patients and HC, which correlated with serum IgG4 levels. The expression of BAFF-R and CD40 on B cells was significantly lower in IgG4-RD patients compared with those in pSS patients and HC. Unlike HC, Breg cells from pSS patients lacked suppressive functions. Conclusions B cells in patients with IgG4-RD and pSS display a variety of abnormalities, including disturbed B cell subpopulations, abnormal expression of key signaling molecules, co-stimulatory molecules, and inflammatory cytokines. In addition, a significantly increased B cell subset, CD19 + CD24-CD38hi B cells, may play an important role in the pathogenesis of IgG4-RD. PMID:24887143

  20. B cell sub-types following acute malaria and associations with clinical immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Richard T; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Wamala, Samuel; Nankya, Felistas; Jagannathan, Prasanna; Tappero, Jordan W; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Muhindo, Mary K; Arinaitwe, Emmanuel; Kamya, Moses; Dorsey, Grant; Feeney, Margaret E; Riley, Eleanor M; Drakeley, Chris J; Greenhouse, Bryan; Sullivan, Richard

    2016-03-03

    Repeated exposure to Plasmodium falciparum is associated with perturbations in B cell sub-set homeostasis, including expansion atypical memory B cells. However, B cell perturbations immediately following acute malaria infection have been poorly characterized, especially with regard to their relationship with immunity to malaria. To better understand the kinetics of B cell sub-sets following malaria, the proportions of six B cell sub-sets were assessed at five time points following acute malaria in four to 5 years old children living in a high transmission region of Uganda. B cell sub-set kinetics were compared with measures of clinical immunity to malaria-lower parasite density at the time of malaria diagnosis and recent asymptomatic parasitaemia. Atypical memory B cell and transitional B cell proportions increased following malaria. In contrast, plasmablast proportions were highest at the time of malaria diagnosis and rapidly declined following treatment. Increased proportions of atypical memory B cells were associated with greater immunity to malaria, whereas increased proportions of transitional B cells were associated with evidence of less immunity to malaria. These findings highlight the dynamic changes in multiple B cell sub-sets following acute, uncomplicated malaria, and how these sub-sets are associated with developing immunity to malaria.

  1. A role for gut-associated lymphoid tissue in shaping the human B cell repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossenkämper, Anna; Blair, Paul A; Safinia, Niloufar; Fraser, Louise D; Das, Lisa; Sanders, Theodore J; Stagg, Andrew J; Sanderson, Jeremy D; Taylor, Kirstin; Chang, Fuju; Choong, Lee M; D'Cruz, David P; Macdonald, Thomas T; Lombardi, Giovanna; Spencer, Jo

    2013-08-26

    We have tracked the fate of immature human B cells at a critical stage in their development when the mature B cell repertoire is shaped. We show that a major subset of bone marrow emigrant immature human B cells, the transitional 2 (T2) B cells, homes to gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) and that most T2 B cells isolated from human GALT are activated. Activation in GALT is a previously unknown potential fate for immature human B cells. The process of maturation from immature transitional B cell through to mature naive B cell includes the removal of autoreactive cells from the developing repertoire, a process which is known to fail in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We observe that immature B cells in SLE are poorly equipped to access the gut and that gut immune compartments are depleted in SLE. Thus, activation of immature B cells in GALT may function as a checkpoint that protects against autoimmunity. In healthy individuals, this pathway may be involved in generating the vast population of IgA plasma cells and also the enigmatic marginal zone B cell subset that is poorly understood in humans.

  2. Identification of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of multiple sclerosis by measurements of brain-reactive B cells in the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pommerschein, Giovanna; Barth, Stefanie K; Hohmann, Christopher; Milles, Bianca; Sammer, Fabian W; Duffy, Cathrina E; Wunsch, Marie; Rovituso, Damiano M; Schroeter, Michael; Addicks, Klaus; Kaiser, Claudia C; Lehmann, Paul V

    2014-01-01

    B cells are increasingly coming into play in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Here, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), MS, other non-inflammatory neurological, inflammatory neurological or autoimmune diseases, and healthy donors for their B cell reactivity to CNS antigen using the enzyme-linked immunospot technique (ELISPOT) after 96 h of polyclonal stimulation. Our data show that nine of 15 patients with CIS (60.0%) and 53 of 67 patients with definite MS (79.1%) displayed CNS-reactive B cells, compared to none of the control donors. The presence of CNS-reactive B cells in the blood of the majority of patients with MS or at risk to develop MS along with their absence in control subjects suggests that they might be indicative of a B cell-dependent subpopulation of the disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. B Cells Promote Th1- Skewed NKT Cell Response by CD1d-TCR Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jung Hoon; Park, Se-Ho

    2013-10-01

    CD1d expressing dendritic cells (DCs) are good glyco-lipid antigen presenting cells for NKT cells. However, resting B cells are very weak stimulators for NKT cells. Although α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) loaded B cells can activate NKT cells, it is not well defined whether B cells interfere NKT cell stimulating activity of DCs. Unexpectedly, we found in this study that B cells can promote Th1-skewed NKT cell response, which means a increased level of IFN-γ by NKT cells, concomitant with a decreased level of IL-4, in the circumstance of co-culture of DCs and B Cells. Remarkably, the response promoted by B cells was dependent on CD1d expression of B cells.

  4. B cells exposed to enterobacterial components suppress development of experimental colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Larsen, Hjalte List; Kristensen, Nanna Ny

    2012-01-01

    ). RESULTS: We demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to ebx produce large amounts of IL-10 in vitro and express CD1d and CD5 previously known to be associated with regulatory B cells. In SCID mice transplanted with colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells, co-transfer of ebx-B cells significantly suppressed...... development of colitis. Suppression was dependent on B cell-derived IL-10, as co-transfer of IL-10 knockout ebx-B cells failed to suppress colitis. Ebx-B cell-mediated suppression of colitis was associated with a decrease in interferon gamma (IFN-¿)-producing T(H) 1 cells and increased frequencies of Foxp3......-expressing T cells. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate that splenic B cells exposed to enterobacterial components acquire immunosuppressive functions by which they can suppress development of experimental T cell-mediated colitis in an IL-10-dependent way. (Inflamm Bowel Dis 2011;)....

  5. Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in children: a disease reminiscent of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccini, Stefania; Al-Jadiry, Mazin F; Scarpino, Stefania; Ferraro, Daniela; Alsaadawi, Adel R; Al-Darraji, Amir F; Moleti, Maria Luisa; Testi, Anna Maria; Al-Hadad, Salma A; Ruco, Luigi

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV+ DLBCL) is a rare disease in nonimmunocompromised hosts. In a review of 231 cases of malignant lymphoma (87 Hodgkin lymphoma and 144 non-Hodgkin lymphoma) occurring in Iraqi children, 7 cases (5% of NHLs) were classified as EBV+ DLBCL. Six children presented with nodal disease, and 1 presented with extranodal localization (bone). In all cases, the disease was at an advanced clinical stage (III/IV). Evidence of immunodeficiency (Evans syndrome and selective IgA deficiency) was observed in a single case. Two cases were "monomorphic" with immunoblastic histology, and 5 cases were "polymorphic" with histologic aspects reminiscent of nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (2 cases) and of CD30+ classical Hodgkin lymphoma (3 cases). In all cases, tumor cells were EBV infected (EBER+/LMP-1+), were medium-large B-cells (CD20+/CD79a+/PAX-5+/BOB-1+/OCT-2+) of non-germinal center (non-GC) origin (CD10-/MUM-1+), and had high proliferative activity (50%-70%). Chromosomal translocations involving BCL2, MYC, and IGH genes were not observed. IGH monoclonality could be demonstrated in 3 of 3 investigated cases. Six cases of EBV-negative DLBCL (4% of NHL) were present in the same series. All had monomorphic histology with centroblastic/immunoblastic morphology; 3 cases were of GC type and 3 of non-GC type. Our findings indicate that in Iraq, DLBCLs are 9% of NHLs. Moreover, 2 different types of the disease do exist; the EBV-positive cases, with strong histologic and immunohistochemical resemblance with EBV+ DLBCL of the elderly, and the EBV-negative cases, which are similar to the pediatric DLBCL usually observed in Western populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells acquire regulatory B-cell properties in response to TLR9 and CD40 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelstein-Harlev, Shimrit; Avivi, Irit; Fanadka, Mona; Horowitz, Netanel A; Katz, Tami

    2018-02-15

    Circulating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells share phenotypic features with certain subsets of regulatory B-cells (Bregs). The latter cells have been reported to negatively regulate immune cell responses, mostly by provision of IL-10. The purpose of the current study was to identify and delineate Breg properties of CLL cells. B-cells and T-cells were obtained from the peripheral blood of untreated CLL patients diagnosed according to the 2008 Guidelines of the International Workshop on Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. Co-culture assays were used to examine the ability of CLL cells to suppress autologous T-cell immune responses. IL-10 potency of CLL cells was assessed following stimulation with activators of the toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) or CD40 and was correlated with the inhibitory activity of the cells. TLR9-activated CLL cells were found to increase the frequency of CD4 + CD25 hi FOXp3 + regulatory T-cells (Tregs) and to inhibit autologous CD4 + T-cell proliferation. This signaling cascade proved to control IL-10 generation in CLL cells, which in turn promoted the inhibition of T-cell proliferation by CLL cells. However, CD40 activation of CLL cells, while exhibiting a similar ability to augment Treg frequency, did not either affect IL-10 generation or T-cell proliferation. In conclusion, CLL cells demonstrate a unique clonal quality of adopting Breg properties which promote modulation of T-cell characteristics. TLR9 appears to be a potent activator of regulatory abilities in CLL cells, possibly contributing to preferential immune escape of TLR9-responsive cells.

  7. Generation mechanism of RANKL(+) effector memory B cells: relevance to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Yuri; Niiro, Hiroaki; Ota, Shun-Ichiro; Ueki, Naoko; Tsuzuki, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Mishima, Koji; Higashioka, Kazuhiko; Jabbarzadeh-Tabrizi, Siamak; Mitoma, Hiroki; Akahoshi, Mitsuteru; Arinobu, Yojiro; Kukita, Akiko; Yamada, Hisakata; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Akashi, Koichi

    2016-03-16

    The efficacy of B cell-depleting therapies for rheumatoid arthritis underscores antibody-independent functions of effector B cells such as cognate T-B interactions and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is a key cytokine involved in bone destruction and is highly expressed in synovial fluid B cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In this study we sought to clarify the generation mechanism of RANKL(+) effector B cells and their impacts on osteoclast differentiation. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid B cells from healthy controls and patients with rheumatoid arthritis were isolated using cell sorter. mRNA expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and Blimp-1 was analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Levels of RANKL, CD80, CD86, and CXCR3 were analyzed using flow cytometry. Functional analysis of osteoclastogenesis was carried out in the co-culture system using macrophage RAW264 reporter cells. RANKL expression was accentuated in CD80(+)CD86(+) B cells, a highly activated B-cell subset more abundantly observed in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Upon activation via B-cell receptor and CD40, switched-memory B cells predominantly expressed RANKL, which was further augmented by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) but suppressed by interleukin-21. Strikingly, IFN-γ also enhanced TNF-α expression, while it strongly suppressed osteoprotegerin expression in B cells. IFN-γ increased the generation of CXCR3(+)RANKL(+) effector B cells, mimicking the synovial B cell phenotype in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Finally, RANKL(+) effector B cells in concert with TNF-α facilitated osteoclast differentiation in vitro. Our current findings have shed light on the generation mechanism of pathogenic RANKL(+) effector B cells that would be an ideal therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis in the future.

  8. B-Cell Dysregulation in Crohn's Disease Is Partially Restored with Infliximab Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelmina M C Timmermans

    Full Text Available B-cell depletion can improve a variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, but does not appear beneficial for patients with Crohn's disease.To elucidate the involvement of B cells in Crohn's disease, we here performed an 'in depth' analysis of intestinal and blood B-cells in this chronic inflammatory disease.Patients with Crohn's disease were recruited to study B-cell infiltrates in intestinal biopsies (n = 5, serum immunoglobulin levels and the phenotype and molecular characteristics of blood B-cell subsets (n = 21. The effects of infliximab treatment were studied in 9 patients.Granulomatous tissue showed infiltrates of B lymphocytes rather than Ig-secreting plasma cells. Circulating transitional B cells and CD21low B cells were elevated. IgM memory B cells were reduced and natural effector cells showed decreased replication histories and somatic hypermutation (SHM levels. In contrast, IgG and IgA memory B cells were normally present and their Ig gene transcripts carried increased SHM levels. The numbers of transitional and natural effector cells were normal in patients who responded clinically well to infliximab.B cells in patients with Crohn's disease showed signs of chronic stimulation with localization to granulomatous tissue and increased molecular maturation of IgA and IgG. Therapy with TNFα-blockers restored the defect in IgM memory B-cell generation and normalized transitional B-cell levels, making these subsets candidate markers for treatment monitoring. Together, these results suggest a chronic, aberrant B-cell response in patients with Crohn's disease, which could be targeted with new therapeutics that specifically regulate B-cell function.

  9. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  10. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-08

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process.

  11. Primary Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma of the Liver in a Patient with Sjogren Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Gorodetskiy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS has the highest incidence of malignant lymphoproliferative disorders transformation among autoimmune diseases. We present a case of extranodal high grade lymphoma of the liver in a 52-year-old patient with long history of SS. Lymphoma manifested with sharp significant pain in the right hypochondrium, weakness, and profuse night sweats. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan (CT-scan of the abdomen revealed multiple low density foci with homogeneous structure and clear contours in both lobes of the liver. Histologically, proliferation of medium sized lymphoma cells with round-oval and slightly irregular nuclei with fine chromatin was shown. Immunohistochemical and molecular features of the tumors allowed diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL. To exclude secondary liver lesion by non-Hodgkin lymphoma, chest and small pelvis CT-scan, endoscopy of upper and lower gastrointestinal tract and study of bone marrow were performed. After 8 cycles of R-CHOP chemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone, the complete remission was achieved, which persists after 45 months of follow-up. Primary hepatic lymphomas are extremely rare, and previously only low-grade hepatic lymphomas have been described in SS. To our knowledge, the patient described here represents the first reported case of DLBCL with primary liver involvement in SS.

  12. Radioimmunotherapy using 131I-rituximab in patients with advanced stage B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bienert, Maren; Reisinger, Ingrid; Humplik, Beatrice I.; Reim, Christel; Kroessin, Thomas; Avril, Norbert; Munz, Dieter L.; Srock, Stefanie; Pezzutto, Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, toxicity and therapeutic response of non-myeloablative radioimmunotherapy using 131 I-rituximab in previously heavily treated patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). Nine patients with relapsed, refractory or transformed B-NHL received ten radioimmunotherapies. Patients had a median of 5 (range 2-7) prior standard therapies. Four patients had received prior high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, and eight had received prior rituximab therapy. Histopathology consisted of four mantle cell, one follicular and four diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Rituximab, a monoclonal chimeric anti-CD20 antibody (IDEC-C2B8), was labelled with 131 I using the Iodogen method. The administered activity (2,200±600 MBq) was based on a dosimetrically calculated 45 cGy total-body radiation dose. All patients received an infusion of 2.5 mg/kg of rituximab prior to administration of the radiopharmaceutical. No acute adverse effects were observed after the administration of 131 I-rituximab. Radioimmunotherapy was safe in our patient group and achieved one complete response ongoing at 14 months and two partial responses progressing at 12 and 13 months after treatment. One partial responder was re-treated with radioimmunotherapy and achieved an additional progression-free interval of 7 months. Four non-responders with bulky disease died 4.8±2.0 months after therapy. Three patients had an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level prior to radioimmunotherapy and none of the patients responded. Of two patients who received radioimmunotherapy as an additional treatment after salvage chemotherapy, one continues to be disease-free at 9 months and one relapsed at 5 months' follow-up. Reversible grade 3 or 4 haematological toxicity occurred in seven of nine patients. Median nadirs were 35 days for platelets, 44 days for leucocytes and 57 days for erythrocytes. (orig.)

  13. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  14. Phase I study of obinutuzumab (GA101) in Japanese patients with relapsed or refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Michinori; Tobinai, Kensei; Hatake, Kiyohiko; Uchida, Toshiki; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Yukio; Mori, Masakazu; Terui, Yasuhito; Yokoyama, Masahiro; Hotta, Tomomitsu

    2013-01-01

    As CD20 has become an established target for treating B-cell malignancies, there is interest in developing anti-CD20 antibodies with different functional activity from rituximab that might translate into improved efficacy. Obinutuzumab (GA101) is a glycoengineered, humanized type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody that has demonstrated superior activity to type I antibodies in preclinical studies and is currently being investigated in phase III trials. In this phase I dose-escalating study in Japanese patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the primary endpoint was to characterize the safety of GA101; secondary endpoints were efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Patients received up to nine doses of GA101 with up to 52 weeks' follow up. Most adverse events were grade 1 or 2 infusion-related reactions, and 10 grade 3/4 adverse events occurred. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed and the maximum tolerated dose was not identified. Out of 12 patients, 7 responded (end-of-treatment response rate 58%), with 2 complete responses and 5 partial responses. Responses were observed from low to high doses, and no dose-efficacy relationship was observed. B-cell depletion occurred in all patients after the first infusion and was maintained for the duration of treatment. Serum levels of GA101 increased in a dose-dependent fashion, although there was inter-patient variability. This phase I study demonstrated that GA101 has an acceptable safety profile and offers encouraging activity to Japanese patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Identification of dendritic cells, B cell and T cell subsets in Tasmanian devil lymphoid tissue; evidence for poor immune cell infiltration into devil facial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Lauren J; Morris, Katrina M; Kobayashi, Takumi; Tovar, Cesar; Kreiss, Alexandre; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Corcoran, Lynn; Belov, Katherine; Woods, Gregory M

    2014-05-01

    The Tasmanian devil is under threat of extinction due to the transmissible devil facial tumor disease (DFTD). This fatal tumor is an allograft that does not induce an immune response, raising questions about the activity of Tasmanian devil immune cells. T and B cell analysis has been limited by a lack of antibodies, hence the need to produce such reagents. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed that CD4, CD8, IgM, and IgG were closely related to other marsupials. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against CD4, CD8, IgM, and IgG by generating bacterial fusion proteins. These, and commercial antibodies against CD1a and CD83, identified T cells, B cells and dendritic cells by immunohistochemistry. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were identified in pouch young thymus, adult lymph nodes, spleen, bronchus- and gut-associated lymphoid tissue. Their anatomical distribution was characteristic of mammalian lymphoid tissues with more CD4(+) than CD8(+) cells in lymph nodes and splenic white pulp. IgM(+) and IgG(+) B cells were identified in adult lymph nodes, spleen, bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue and gut-associated lymphoid tissue, with more IgM(+) than IgG(+) cells. Dendritic cells were identified in lymph node, spleen and skin. This distribution is consistent with eutherian mammals and other marsupials, indicating they have the immune cell subsets for an anti-tumor immunity. Devil facial tumor disease tumors contained more CD8(+) than CD4(+) cells, but in low numbers. There were also low numbers of CD1a(+) and MHC class II(+) cells, but no CD83(+) IgM(+) or IgG(+) B cells, consistent with poor immune cell infiltration. © 2014 The Authors. The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Maternal allergic disease does not affect the phenotype of T and B cells or the immune response to allergens in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindsjö, E; Joerink, M; Johansson, C; Bremme, K; Malmström, V; Scheynius, A

    2010-07-01

    It is hypothesized that the in utero environment in allergic mothers can affect the neonatal immune responses. The aim of this study was to analyse the effect of maternal allergic disease on cord blood mononuclear cell (CBMC) phenotype and proliferative responses upon allergen stimulation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 12 allergic and 14 nonallergic mothers and CBMC from their children were analysed. In the mothers, we determined cell proliferation, production of IL-4 and expression of FOXP3 in response to allergen stimulation. In the children, we evaluated cell proliferation and FOXP3 expression following allergen stimulation. Furthermore, expression of different homing markers on T cells and regulatory T cells and maturity of the T cells and B cell subsets were evaluated directly ex vivo. The timothy- and birch-allergic mothers responded with increased proliferation and/or IL-4 production towards timothy and birch extract, respectively, when compared to nonallergic mothers. This could not be explained by impairment of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells in the allergic mothers. CBMC proliferation and FOXP3 expression in response to allergens were not affected by the allergic status of the mother. Also, phenotype of T cells, FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and B cells was not affected by the allergic status of the mother. Our results suggest that maternal allergic disease has no effect on the neonatal response to allergens or the phenotype of neonatal lymphocytes. The factors studied here could, however, still affect later development of allergy.

  17. Alterations on peripheral B cell subsets following an acute uncomplicated clinical malaria infection in children

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    Ng'ang'a Zipporah W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of Plasmodium falciparum on B-cell homeostasis have not been well characterized. This study investigated whether an episode of acute malaria in young children results in changes in the peripheral B cell phenotype. Methods Using flow-cytofluorimetric analysis, the B cell phenotypes found in the peripheral blood of children aged 2–5 years were characterized during an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria and four weeks post-recovery and in healthy age-matched controls. Results There was a significant decrease in CD19+ B lymphocytes during acute malaria. Characterization of the CD19+ B cell subsets in the peripheral blood based on expression of IgD and CD38 revealed a significant decrease in the numbers of naive 1 CD38-IgD+ B cells while there was an increase in CD38+IgD- memory 3 B cells during acute malaria. Further analysis of the peripheral B cell phenotype also identified an expansion of transitional CD10+CD19+ B cells in children following an episode of acute malaria with up to 25% of total CD19+ B cell pool residing in this subset. Conclusion Children experiencing an episode of acute uncomplicated clinical malaria experienced profound disturbances in B cell homeostasis.

  18. SAP modulates B cell functions in a genetic background-dependent manner.

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    Detre, Cynthia; Yigit, Burcu; Keszei, Marton; Castro, Wilson; Magelky, Erica M; Terhorst, Cox

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the SLAM-associated protein (SAP) are responsible for the X-linked lympho-proliferative syndrome (XLP), a severe primary immunodeficiency syndrome with disease manifestations that include fatal mononucleosis, B cell lymphoma and dysgammaglobulinemia. It is well accepted that insufficient help by SAP-/- CD4+ T cells, in particular during the germinal center reaction, is a component of dysgammaglobulinemia in XLP patients and SAP-/- animals. It is however not well understood whether in XLP patients and SAP-/- mice B cell functions are affected, even though B cells themselves do not express SAP. Here we report that B cell intrinsic responses to haptenated protein antigens are impaired in SAP-/- mice and in Rag-/- mice into which B cells derived from SAP-/- mice together with wt CD4+ T cells had been transferred. This impaired B cells functions are in part depending on the genetic background of the SAP-/- mouse, which affects B cell homeostasis. Surprisingly, stimulation with an agonistic anti-CD40 causes strong in vivo and in vitro B cell responses in SAP-/- mice. Taken together, the data demonstrate that genetic factors play an important role in the SAP-related B cell functions. The finding that anti-CD40 can in part restore impaired B cell responses in SAP-/- mice, suggests potentially novel therapeutic interventions in subsets of XLP patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. IL-4Rα-associated antigen processing by B cells promotes immunity in Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infection.

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    William G C Horsnell

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, B cell function in protective T(H2 immunity against N. brasiliensis infection was investigated. Protection against secondary infection depended on IL-4Rα and IL-13; but not IL-4. Protection did not associate with parasite specific antibody responses. Re-infection of B cell-specific IL-4Rα⁻/⁻ mice resulted in increased worm burdens compared to control mice, despite their equivalent capacity to control primary infection. Impaired protection correlated with reduced lymphocyte IL-13 production and B cell MHC class II and CD86 surface expression. Adoptive transfer of in vivo N. brasiliensis primed IL-4Rα expressing B cells into naïve BALB/c mice, but not IL-4Rα or IL-13 deficient B cells, conferred protection against primary N. brasiliensis infection. This protection required MHC class II compatibility on B cells suggesting cognate interactions by B cells with CD4⁺ T cells were important to co-ordinate immunity. Furthermore, the rapid nature of these protective effects by B cells suggested non-BCR mediated mechanisms, such as via Toll Like Receptors, was involved, and this was supported by transfer experiments using antigen pulsed Myd88⁻/⁻ B cells. These data suggest TLR dependent antigen processing by IL-4Rα-responsive B cells producing IL-13 contribute significantly to CD4⁺ T cell-mediated protective immunity against N. brasiliensis infection.

  20. Selective induction of DNA repair pathways in human B cells activated by CD4+ T cells.

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    Xiaosheng Wu

    Full Text Available Greater than 75% of all hematologic malignancies derive from germinal center (GC or post-GC B cells, suggesting that the GC reaction predisposes B cells to tumorigenesis. Because GC B cells acquire expression of the highly mutagenic enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, GC B cells may require additional DNA repair capacity. The goal of this study was to investigate whether normal human B cells acquire enhanced expression of DNA repair factors upon AID induction. We first demonstrated that several DNA mismatch repair, homologous recombination, base excision repair, and ATR signaling genes were overexpressed in GC B cells relative to naïve and memory B cells, reflecting activation of a process we have termed somatic hyperrepair (SHR. Using an in vitro system, we next characterized activation signals required to induce AID expression and SHR. Although AID expression was induced by a variety of polyclonal activators, SHR induction strictly required signals provided by contact with activated CD4+ T cells, and B cells activated in this manner displayed reduced levels of DNA damage-induced apoptosis. We further show the induction of SHR is independent of AID expression, as GC B cells from AID-/-mice retained heightened expression of SHR proteins. In consideration of the critical role that CD4+ T cells play in inducing the SHR process, our data suggest a novel role for CD4+ T cells in the tumor suppression of GC/post-GC B cells.

  1. A two-scale model for correlation between B cell VDJ usage in zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals for study of immunology. The dynamics of the adaptive immune system in zebrafish is similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a two-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in primary and secondary immune reactions in zebrafish and to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in distinct zebrafish. The first scale of the model consists of a generalized NK model to simulate the B cell maturation process in the 10-day primary immune response. The second scale uses a delay ordinary differential equation system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of zebrafish. The generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen mostly possess a single VDJ recombination. The probability that mature B cells in two zebrafish have the same VDJ recombination increases with the B cell population size or the B cell selection intensity and decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The ODE model shows a distribution of correlation in the VDJ usage of the B cell repertoires in two six-month-old zebrafish that is highly similar to that from experiment. This work presents a simple theory to explain the experimentally observed correlation in VDJ usage of distinct zebrafish B cell repertoires after an immune response.

  2. CD19 CAR-targeted T cells induce long-term remission and B Cell Aplasia in an immunocompetent mouse model of B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

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    Marco L Davila

    Full Text Available Although many adults with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL are induced into remission, most will relapse, underscoring the dire need for novel therapies for this disease. We developed murine CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs and an immunocompetent mouse model of B-ALL that recapitulates the disease at genetic, cellular, and pathologic levels. Mouse T cells transduced with an all-murine CD3ζ/CD28-based CAR that is equivalent to the one being used in our clinical trials, eradicate B-ALL in mice and mediate long-term B cell aplasias. In this model, we find that increasing conditioning chemotherapy increases tumor eradication, B cell aplasia, and CAR-modified T cell persistence. Quantification of recipient B lineage cells allowed us to estimate an in vivo effector to endogenous target ratio for B cell aplasia maintenance. In mice exhibiting a dramatic B cell reduction we identified a small population of progenitor B cells in the bone marrow that may serve as a reservoir for long-term CAR-modified T cell stimulation. Lastly, we determine that infusion of CD8+ CAR-modified T cells alone is sufficient to maintain long-term B cell eradication. The mouse model we report here should prove valuable for investigating CAR-based and other therapies for adult B-ALL.

  3. Splenectomy associated changes in IgM memory B cells in an adult spleen registry cohort.

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    Paul U Cameron

    Full Text Available Asplenic patients have a lifelong risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and have been reported to have low numbers of peripheral blood IgM memory B cells. The clinical value of quantitation of memory B cells as an indicator of splenic abnormality or risk of infection has been unclear. To assess changes in B cell sub-populations after splenectomy we studied patients recruited to a spleen registry (n = 591. A subset of 209 adult asplenic or hyposplenic subjects, and normal controls (n = 140 were tested for IgM memory B cells. We also determined a changes in IgM memory B cells with time after splenectomy using the cross-sectional data from patients on the registry and b the kinetics of changes in haematological markers associated with splenectomy(n = 45. Total B cells in splenectomy patients did not differ from controls, but memory B cells, IgM memory B cells and switched B cells were significantly (p<0.001 reduced. The reduction was similar for different indications for splenectomy. Changes of asplenia in routine blood films including presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB, occurred early (median 25 days and splenectomy associated thrombocytosis and lymphocytosis peaked by 50 days. There was a more gradual decrease in IgM memory B cells reaching a stable level within 6 months after splenectomy. IgM memory B cells as proportion of B cells was the best discriminator between splenectomized patients and normal controls and at the optimal cut-off of 4.53, showed a true positive rate of 95% and false positive rate of 20%. In a survey of 152 registry patients stratified by IgM memory B cells around this cut-off there was no association with minor infections and no registry patients experienced OPSI during the study. Despite significant changes after splenectomy, conventional measures of IgM memory cells have limited clinical utility in this population.

  4. Prevalence of polyreactive innate clones among graft--infiltrating B cells in human cardiac allograft vasculopathy.

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    Chatterjee, Debanjana; Moore, Carolina; Gao, Baoshan; Clerkin, Kevin J; See, Sarah B; Shaked, David; Rogers, Kortney; Nunez, Sarah; Veras, Yokarla; Addonizio, Linda; Givertz, Michael M; Naka, Yoshifumi; Mancini, Donna; Vasilescu, Rodica; Marboe, Charles; Restaino, Susan; Madsen, Joren C; Zorn, Emmanuel

    2018-03-01

    Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) has been associated with graft-infiltrating B cells, although their characteristics are still unclear. In this study we examined the frequency, localization and reactivity profile of graft-infiltrating B cells to determine their contribution to the pathophysiology of CAV. B cells, plasma cells and macrophages were examined by immunohistochemistry in 56 allografts with CAV, 49 native failed hearts and 25 autopsy specimens. A total of 102 B-cell clones were immortalized directly from the infiltrates of 3 fresh cardiac samples with CAV. Their secreted antibodies were assessed using enzyme-linked immunoassay and flow cytometry. B-cell infiltration was observed around coronary arteries in 93% of allograft explants with CAV. Comparatively, intragraft B cells were less frequent and less dense in the intraventricular myocardium from where routine biopsies are obtained. Plasma cells and macrophages were also detected in 85% and 95% of explants, respectively. Remarkably, B-cell infiltrates were not associated with circulating donor-specific antibodies (DSA) or prior episodes of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR). Among all B-cell clones generated from 3 explants with CAV, a majority secreted natural antibodies reactive to multiple autoantigens and apoptotic cells, a characteristic of innate B cells. Our study reveals a high frequency of infiltrating B cells around the coronary arteries of allografts with CAV, independent of DSA or AMR. These cells are enriched for innate B cells with a polyreactive profile. The findings shift the focus from conventional DSA-producing B cells to the potentially pathogenic polyreactive B cells in the development of clinical CAV. Copyright © 2018 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Splenectomy Associated Changes in IgM Memory B Cells in an Adult Spleen Registry Cohort

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    Cameron, Paul U.; Jones, Penelope; Gorniak, Malgorzata; Dunster, Kate; Paul, Eldho; Lewin, Sharon; Woolley, Ian; Spelman, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Asplenic patients have a lifelong risk of overwhelming post-splenectomy infection and have been reported to have low numbers of peripheral blood IgM memory B cells. The clinical value of quantitation of memory B cells as an indicator of splenic abnormality or risk of infection has been unclear. To assess changes in B cell sub-populations after splenectomy we studied patients recruited to a spleen registry (n = 591). A subset of 209 adult asplenic or hyposplenic subjects, and normal controls (n = 140) were tested for IgM memory B cells. We also determined a) changes in IgM memory B cells with time after splenectomy using the cross-sectional data from patients on the registry and b) the kinetics of changes in haematological markers associated with splenectomy(n = 45). Total B cells in splenectomy patients did not differ from controls, but memory B cells, IgM memory B cells and switched B cells were significantly (psplenectomy. Changes of asplenia in routine blood films including presence of Howell-Jolly bodies (HJB), occurred early (median 25 days) and splenectomy associated thrombocytosis and lymphocytosis peaked by 50 days. There was a more gradual decrease in IgM memory B cells reaching a stable level within 6 months after splenectomy. IgM memory B cells as proportion of B cells was the best discriminator between splenectomized patients and normal controls and at the optimal cut-off of 4.53, showed a true positive rate of 95% and false positive rate of 20%. In a survey of 152 registry patients stratified by IgM memory B cells around this cut-off there was no association with minor infections and no registry patients experienced OPSI during the study. Despite significant changes after splenectomy, conventional measures of IgM memory cells have limited clinical utility in this population. PMID:21829713

  6. Translocation of the B cell receptor to lipid rafts is inhibited in B cells from BLV-infected, persistent lymphocytosis cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Valerie T.; Stone, Diana M.; Cantor, Glenn H.

    2003-01-01

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection causes a significant polyclonal expansion of CD5 + , IgM+ B lymphocytes known as persistent lymphocytosis (PL) in approximately 30% of infected cattle. There is evidence that this expanded B cell population has altered signaling, and resistance to apoptosis has been proposed as one mechanism of B cell expansion. In human and murine B cells, antigen binding initiates movement of the B cell receptor (BCR) into membrane microdomains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed lipid rafts. Lipid rafts include members of the Src-family kinases and exclude certain phosphatases. Inclusion of the BCR into lipid rafts plays an important role in regulation of early signaling events and subsequent antigen internalization. Viral proteins may also influence signaling events in lipid rafts. Here we demonstrate that the largely CD5 + B cell population in PL cattle has different mobilization and internalization of the BCR when compared to the largely CD5-negative B cells in BLV-negative cattle. Unlike B cells from BLV-negative cattle, the BCR in B cells of BLV-infected, PL cattle resists movement into lipid rafts upon stimulation and is only weakly internalized. Expression of viral proteins as determined by detection of the BLV transmembrane (TM) envelope glycoprotein gp30 did not alter these events in cells from PL cattle. This exclusion of the BCR from lipid rafts may, in part, explain signaling differences seen between B cells of BLV-infected, PL, and BLV-negative cattle and the resistance to apoptosis speculated to contribute to persistent lymphocytosis

  7. Evaluation of CD307a expression patterns during normal B-cell maturation and in B-cell malignancies by flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auat, Mariangeles; Cardoso, Chandra Chiappin; Santos-Pirath, Iris Mattos; Rudolf-Oliveira, Renata Cristina Messores; Matiollo, Camila; Lange, Bárbara Gil; da Silva, Jessica Pires; Dametto, Gisele Cristina; Pirolli, Mayara Marin; Colombo, Maria Daniela Holthausen Perico; Santos-Silva, Maria Claudia

    2018-02-24

    Flow cytometric immunophenotyping is deemed a fundamental tool for the diagnosis of B-cell neoplasms. Currently, the investigation of novel immunophenotypic markers has gained importance, as they can assist in the precise subclassification of B-cell malignancies by flow cytometry. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of CD307a during normal B-cell maturation and in B-cell malignancies as well as to investigate its potential role in the differential diagnosis of these entities. CD307a expression was assessed by flow cytometry in normal precursor and mature B cells and in 115 samples collected from patients diagnosed with precursor and mature B-cell neoplasms. CD307a expression was compared between neoplastic and normal B cells. B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exhibited minimal expression of CD307a, displaying a similar expression pattern to that of normal B-cell precursors. Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cases showed the lowest levels of CD307a among mature B-cell neoplasms. CD307a expression was statistically lower in MCL cases than in chronic B lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) cases. No statistical differences were observed between CD307a expression in neoplastic and normal plasma cells. These results indicate that the assessment of CD307a expression by flow cytometry could be helpful to distinguish CLL from MCL, and the latter from MZL. Although these results are not entirely conclusive, they provide a basis for further studies in a larger cohort of patients. © 2018 International Clinical Cytometry Society. © 2018 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  8. Physiology of B cells in mice with X-linked immunodeficiency (xid). III. Disappearance of xid B cells in double bone marrow chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprent, J.; Bruce, J.

    1984-01-01

    Evidence is presented that B cells from mice with X-linked immunodeficiency (xid) differentiate at a slower rate than normal B cells. This conclusion stems from studies in which (B6 X CBA/J)F1 mice were heavily irradiated (1,000 rads) and reconstituted with a mixture of T-depleted marrow cells taken from (a) nondefective B6 mice (H-2b) and (b) xid CBA/N or nondefective CBA/Ca mice (both H-2k). With transfer of CBA/Ca plus B6 marrow cells, the irradiated recipients become repopulated with B cells derived from both parental marrow sources; except for an early imbalance (probably reflecting Hh resistance), the degree of chimerism remained relatively stable over a period of more than 6 months. Very different results occurred with transfer of a mixture of xid CBA/N and normal B6 marrow. Within the first 2 months after marrow reconstitution, a low but significant proportion of the B cells in both spleen and lymph nodes were of CBA/N origin. Thereafter the proportion of these cells fell progressively, and by 6-9 months virtually all of the B cells were of B6 origin. This gradual decline in CBA/N-derived cells did not apply to other cell types, i.e., T cells or pluripotential stem cells. Analogous results were obtained with transfer of CBA/N vs. CBA/Ca marrow cells into sublethally irradiated (750 rads) (CBA/N X DBA/2)F1 male vs. female mice. For example, CBA/N-marrow derived B cells differentiated effectively and survived for long periods in F1 male mice (xid----xid) but not in F1 female mice (xid----normal). The finding that xid B cells eventually disappear in the presence of normal B cells strengthens the view that xid B cells are an abnormal population not represented in normal mice

  9. Diverse phosphorylation patterns of B cell receptor-associated signaling in naïve and memory human B cells revealed by phosphoflow, a powerful technique to study signaling at the single cell level

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    Franklin R Toapanta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Following interaction with cognate antigens, B cells undergo cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. Ligation of the B cell receptor (BCR leads to the phosphorylation of BCR-associated signaling proteins within minutes of antigen binding, a process with profound consequences for the fate of the cells and development of effector immunity. Phosphoflow allows a rapid evaluation of various signaling pathways in complex heterogenous cell subsets. This novel technique was used in combination with multi-chromatic flow cytometry and fluorescent-cell barcoding to study phosphorylation of BCR-associated signaling pathways in naïve and memory human B cell subsets. Proteins of the initiation (Syk, propagation (Btk, Akt and integration (p38MAPK and Erk1/2 signaling units were studied. Switched memory (Sm CD27+ and Sm CD27- phosphorylation patterns were similar when stimulated with anti-IgA or -IgG. In contrast, naïve and unswitched memory (Um cells showed significant differences following IgM stimulation. Enhanced phosphorylation of Syk was observed in Um cells, suggesting a lower activation threshold. This is likely the result of higher amounts of IgM on the cell surface, higher pan-Syk levels and enhanced susceptibility to phosphatase inhibition. All other signaling proteins evaluated also showed some degree of enhanced phosphorylation in Um cells. Furthermore, both the PLC-γ2 and PI3K pathways were activated in Um cells, while only the PI3K pathway was activated on naïve cells. Um cells were the only ones that activated signaling pathways when stimulated with fluorescently-labeled S. Typhi and S. pneumoniae. Finally, simultaneous evaluation of signaling proteins at the single cell level (multi-phosphorylated cells revealed that interaction with gram positive and negative bacteria resulted in complex and diverse signaling patterns. Phosphoflow holds great potential to accelerate vaccine development by identifying signaling profiles in good

  10. Multifocal Extranodal Involvement of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

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    Devrim Cabuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endobronchial involvement of extrapulmonary malignant tumors is uncommon and mostly associated with breast, kidney, colon, and rectum carcinomas. A 68-year-old male with a prior diagnosis of colon non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL was admitted to the hospital with a complaint of cough, sputum, and dyspnea. The chest radiograph showed right hilar enlargement and opacity at the right middle zone suggestive of a mass lesion. Computed tomography of thorax revealed a right-sided mass lesion extending to thoracic wall with the destruction of the third and the fourth ribs and a right hilar mass lesion. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in order to evaluate endobronchial involvement and showed stenosis with mucosal tumor infiltration in right upper lobe bronchus. The pathological examination of bronchoscopic biopsy specimen reported diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and the patient was accepted as the endobronchial recurrence of sigmoid colon NHL. The patient is still under treatment of R-ICE (rituximab-ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide chemotherapy and partial regression of pulmonary lesions was noted after 3 courses of treatment.

  11. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Indolent B-Cell Lymphomas

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    Luca Arcaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is an indolent lymphoma with long median survival. Many studies have been performed to build up prognostic scores potentially useful to identify patients with poorer outcome. In 2004, an international consortium coordinated by the International Follicular Lymphoma Prognostic Factor project was established and a new prognostic study was launched (FLIPI2 using progression-free survival (PFS as main endpoint and integrating all the modern parameters prospectively collected. Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphomas were once considered as a heterogenous group of lymphomas characterized by an indolent clinical course. Each entity is characterized by unique clinicobiologic features. Some studies have been focused on prognostic factors in single lymphoma subtypes, with the development of specific-entity scores based on retrospective series, for instance splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL. A widely accepted prognostic tool for clinical usage for indolent non-follicular B-cell lymphomas is largely awaited. In this paper we summarized the current evidence regarding prognostic assessment of indolent follicular and non-follicular lymphomas.

  12. B Cell Intrinsic Mechanisms Constraining IgE Memory

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    Brice Laffleur

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Memory B cells and long-lived plasma cells are key elements of adaptive humoral immunity. Regardless of the immunoglobulin class produced, these cells can ensure long-lasting protection but also long-lasting immunopathology, thus requiring tight regulation of their generation and survival. Among all antibody classes, this is especially true for IgE, which stands as the most potent, and can trigger dramatic inflammatory reactions even when present in minute amounts. IgE responses and memory crucially protect against parasites and toxic components of venoms, conferring selective advantages and explaining their conservation in all mammalian species despite a parallel broad spectrum of IgE-mediated immunopathology. Long-term memory of sensitization and anaphylactic responses to allergens constitute the dark side of IgE responses, which can trigger multiple acute or chronic pathologic manifestations, some punctuated with life-threatening events. This Janus face of the IgE response and memory, both necessary and potentially dangerous, thus obviously deserves the most elaborated self-control schemes.

  13. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: Chromatin Modifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Lydia; Nersisyan, Lilit; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Arakelyan, Arsen; Binder, Hans

    2015-01-01

    We systematically studied the expression of more than fifty histone and DNA (de)methylating enzymes in lymphoma and healthy controls. As a main result, we found that the expression levels of nearly all enzymes become markedly disturbed in lymphoma, suggesting deregulation of large parts of the epigenetic machinery. We discuss the effect of DNA promoter methylation and of transcriptional activity in the context of mutated epigenetic modifiers such as EZH2 and MLL2. As another mechanism, we studied the coupling between the energy metabolism and epigenetics via metabolites that act as cofactors of JmjC-type demethylases. Our study results suggest that Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma differ by an imbalance of repressive and poised promoters, which is governed predominantly by the activity of methyltransferases and the underrepresentation of demethylases in this regulation. The data further suggest that coupling of epigenetics with the energy metabolism can also be an important factor in lymphomagenesis in the absence of direct mutations of genes in metabolic pathways. Understanding of epigenetic deregulation in lymphoma and possibly in cancers in general must go beyond simple schemes using only a few modes of regulation. PMID:26506391

  14. Epigenetic Heterogeneity of B-Cell Lymphoma: Chromatin Modifiers

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    Lydia Hopp

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We systematically studied the expression of more than fifty histone and DNA (demethylating enzymes in lymphoma and healthy controls. As a main result, we found that the expression levels of nearly all enzymes become markedly disturbed in lymphoma, suggesting deregulation of large parts of the epigenetic machinery. We discuss the effect of DNA promoter methylation and of transcriptional activity in the context of mutated epigenetic modifiers such as EZH2 and MLL2. As another mechanism, we studied the coupling between the energy metabolism and epigenetics via metabolites that act as cofactors of JmjC-type demethylases. Our study results suggest that Burkitt’s lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell Lymphoma differ by an imbalance of repressive and poised promoters, which is governed predominantly by the activity of methyltransferases and the underrepresentation of demethylases in this regulation. The data further suggest that coupling of epigenetics with the energy metabolism can also be an important factor in lymphomagenesis in the absence of direct mutations of genes in metabolic pathways. Understanding of epigenetic deregulation in lymphoma and possibly in cancers in general must go beyond simple schemes using only a few modes of regulation.

  15. Antibody and B cell responses to Plasmodium sporozoites

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    Johanna N Dups

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies are capable of blocking infection of the liver by Plasmodium sporozoites. Accordingly the induction of anti-sporozoite antibodies is a major aim of various vaccine approaches to malaria. In recent years our knowledge of the specificity and quantities of antibodies required for protection has been greatly expanded by clinical trials of various whole sporozoite and subunit vaccines. Moreover, the development of humanized mouse models and transgenic parasites have also aided our ability to assess the specificity of antibodies and their ability to block infection. Nonetheless, considerable gaps remain in our knowledge - in particular in understanding what antigens are recognized by infection blocking antibodies and in knowing how we can induce robust, long-lived antibody responses. Maintaining high levels of circulating antibodies is likely to be of primary importance, as antibodies must block infection in the short time it takes for sporozoites to reach the liver from the skin. It is clear that a better understanding of the development of protective B cell-mediated immunity will aid the development and refinement of malaria vaccines.

  16. Activation of TAK1 by MYD88 L265P drives malignant B-cell Growth in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansell, S M; Hodge, L S; Secreto, F J; Manske, M; Braggio, E; Price-Troska, T; Ziesmer, S; Li, Y; Johnson, S H; Hart, S N; Kocher, J-P A; Vasmatzis, G; Chanan-Kahn, A; Gertz, M; Fonseca, R; Dogan, A; Cerhan, J R; Novak, A J

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel sequencing analyses have revealed a common mutation within the MYD88 gene (MYD88 L265P ) occurring at high frequencies in many non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) including the rare lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, Waldenström's macroglobulinemia (WM). Using whole-exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing and allele-specific PCR, we validate the initial studies and detect the MYD88 L265P mutation in the tumor genome of 97% of WM patients analyzed (n=39). Due to the high frequency of MYD88 mutation in WM and other NHL, and its known effects on malignant B-cell survival, therapeutic targeting of MYD88 signaling pathways may be clinically useful. However, we are lacking a thorough characterization of the role of intermediary signaling proteins on the biology of MYD88 L265P -expressing B cells. We report here that MYD88 L265P signaling is constitutively active in both WM and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma cells leading to heightened MYD88 L265P , IRAK and TRAF6 oligomerization and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, we have identified the signaling protein, TAK1, to be an essential mediator of MYD88 L265P -driven signaling, cellular proliferation and cytokine secretion in malignant B cells. Our studies highlight the biological significance of MYD88 L265P in NHL and reveal TAK1 inhibition to be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of WM and other diseases characterized by MYD88 L265P

  17. Chronic Exposure to Malaria Is Associated with Inhibitory and Activation Markers on Atypical Memory B Cells and Marginal Zone-Like B Cells

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    Itziar Ubillos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In persistent infections that are accompanied by chronic immune activation, such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and malaria, there is an increased frequency of a phenotypically distinct subset of memory B cells lacking the classic memory marker CD27 and showing a reduced capacity to produce antibodies. However, critical knowledge gaps remain on specific B cell changes and immune adaptation in chronic infections. We hypothesized that expansion of atypical memory B cells (aMBCs and reduction of activated peripheral marginal zone (MZ-like B cells in constantly exposed individuals might be accompanied by phenotypic changes that would confer a tolerogenic profile, helping to establish tolerance to infections. To better understand malaria-associated phenotypic abnormalities on B cells, we analyzed peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 55 pregnant women living in a malaria-endemic area of Papua Nueva Guinea and 9 Spanish malaria-naïve individuals using four 11-color flow cytometry panels. We assessed the expression of markers of B cell specificity (IgG and IgM, activation (CD40, CD80, CD86, b220, TACI, and CD150, inhibition (PD1, CD95, and CD71, and migration (CCR3, CXCR3, and CD62l. We found higher frequencies of active and resting aMBC and marked reduction of MZ-like B cells, although changes in absolute cell counts could not be assessed. Highly exposed women had higher PD1+-, CD95+-, CD40+-, CD71+-, and CD80+-activated aMBC frequencies than non-exposed subjects. Malaria exposure increased frequencies of b220 and proapoptotic markers PD1 and CD95, and decreased expression of the activation marker TACI on MZ-like B cells. The increased frequencies of inhibitory and apoptotic markers on activated aMBCs and MZ-like B cells in malaria-exposed adults suggest an immune-homeostatic mechanism for maintaining B cell development and function while simultaneously downregulating hyperreactive B cells. This mechanism would keep the B cell

  18. Changes in B Cell Populations and Merozoite Surface Protein-1-Specific Memory B Cell Responses after Prolonged Absence of Detectable P. falciparum Infection.

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    Cyrus Ayieko

    Full Text Available Clinical immunity to malaria declines in the absence of repeated parasite exposure. However, little is known about how B cell populations and antigen-specific memory B cells change in the absence of P. falciparum infection. A successful indoor residual insecticide spraying campaign in a highland area of western Kenya, led to an absence of blood-stage P. falciparum infection between March 2007 and April 2008. We assessed memory B cell responses in 45 adults at the beginning (April 2008 and end (April 2009 of a subsequent 12-month period during which none of the adults had evidence of asymptomatic parasitemia or clinical disease. Antibodies and memory B cells to the 42-kDa portion of the merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-142 were measured using ELISA and ELISPOT assays, respectively. B cell populations were characterized by flow cytometry. From 2008 to 2009, the prevalence of MSP-142-specific memory B cells (45% vs. 55%, respectively, P = 0.32 or antibodies (91% vs. 82%, respectively, P = 0.32 did not differ significantly, although specific individuals did change from positive to negative and vice versa, particularly for memory B cells, suggesting possible low-level undetected parasitemia may have occurred in some individuals. The magnitude of MSP-142-specific memory B cells and levels of antibodies to MSP-142 also did not differ from 2008 to 2009 (P>0.10 for both. However, from 2008 to 2009 the proportions of both class-switched atypical (CD19+IgD-CD27-CD21-IgM- and class-switched activated (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21-IgM- memory B cells decreased (both P<0.001. In contrast, class-switched resting classical memory B cells (CD19+IgD-CD27+CD21+IgM- increased (P<0.001. In this area of seasonal malaria transmission, a one- year absence of detectable P. falciparum infection was not associated with changes in the prevalence or level of MSP-142 specific memory B cells, but was associated with major changes in overall memory B cell subsets.

  19. Neutralizing and non-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against dengue virus E protein derived from a naturally infected patient

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    Isern Sharon

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibodies produced in response to infection with any of the four serotypes of dengue virus generally provide homotypic immunity. However, prior infection or circulating maternal antibodies can also mediate a non-protective antibody response that can enhance the course of disease in a subsequent heterotypic infection. Naturally occurring human monoclonal antibodies can help us understand the protective and pathogenic roles of the humoral immune system in dengue virus infection. Results Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV transformation of B cells isolated from the peripheral blood of a human subject with previous dengue infection was performed. B cell cultures were screened by ELISA for antibodies to dengue (DENV envelope (E protein. ELISA positive cultures were cloned by limiting dilution. Three IgG1 human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs were purified and their binding specificity to E protein was verified by ELISA and biolayer interferometry. Neutralization and enhancement assays were conducted in epithelial and macrophage-like cell lines, respectively. All three HMAbs bound to E from at least two of the four DENV serotypes, one of the HMAbs was neutralizing, and all were able to enhance DENV infection. Conclusions HMAbs against DENV can be successfully generated by EBV transformation of B cells from patients at least two years after naturally acquired DENV infections. These antibodies show different patterns of cross-reactivity, neutralizing, and enhancement activity.

  20. Activity of the novel BCR kinase inhibitor IQS019 in preclinical models of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

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    P. Balsas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological inhibition of B cell receptor (BCR signaling has recently emerged as an effective approach in a wide range of B lymphoid neoplasms. However, despite promising clinical activity of the first Bruton’s kinase (Btk and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk inhibitors, a small fraction of patients tend to develop progressive disease after initial response to these agents. Methods We evaluated the antitumor activity of IQS019, a new BCR kinase inhibitor with increased affinity for Btk, Syk, and Lck/Yes novel tyrosine kinase (Lyn, in a set of 34 B lymphoid cell lines and primary cultures, including samples with acquired resistance to the first-in-class Btk inhibitor ibrutinib. Safety and efficacy of the compound were then evaluated in two xenograft mouse models of B cell lymphoma. Results IQS019 simultaneously engaged a rapid and dose-dependent de-phosphorylation of both constitutive and IgM-activated Syk, Lyn, and Btk, leading to impaired cell proliferation, reduced CXCL12-dependent cell migration, and induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis. Accordingly, B cell lymphoma-bearing mice receiving IQS019 presented a reduced tumor outgrowth characterized by a decreased mitotic index and a lower infiltration of malignant cells in the spleen, in tight correlation with downregulation of phospho-Syk, phospho-Lyn, and phospho-Btk. More interestingly, IQS019 showed improved efficacy in vitro and in vivo when compared to the first-in-class Btk inhibitor ibrutinib, and was active in cells with acquired resistance to this latest. Conclusions These results define IQS019 as a potential drug candidate for a variety of B lymphoid neoplasms, including cases with acquired resistance to current BCR-targeting therapies.