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Sample records for monoclonal anti-frog parvalbumin

  1. Pike Parvalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Parvalbumins are found in the muscles, endocrine glands, skin cells, and some neurons of vertebrates, but the role they play for musculature is not yet understood. Researchers are exploring theories of a correlation between parvalbumin concentration levels and the relaxation speed of mammalian muscles after contraction. An ultra-high resolution structure was achieved from samples grown on STS-83 and in July 1997, during STS-94, PCAM produced the largest crystals of pike parvalbumin grown to date. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  2. Antibody reactivity to the major fish allergen parvalbumin is determined by isoforms and impact of thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saptarshi, Shruti R; Sharp, Michael F; Kamath, Sandip D; Lopata, Andreas L

    2014-04-01

    The EF-hand calcium binding protein, parvalbumin, is a major fish allergen. Detection of this allergen is often difficult due to its structural diversity among various fish species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cross-reactivity of parvalbumin in a comprehensive range of bony and cartilaginous fish, from the Asia-Pacific region, and conduct a molecular analysis of this highly allergenic protein. Using the monoclonal anti-parvalbumin antibody PARV-19, we demonstrated the presence of monomeric and oligomeric parvalbumin in all fish analysed, except for gummy shark a cartilaginous fish. Heat processing of this allergen greatly affected its antibody reactivity. While heating caused a reduction in antibody reactivity to multimeric forms of parvalbumins for most bony fish, a complete loss of reactivity was observed for cartilaginous fish. Molecular analysis demonstrated that parvalbumin cross-reactivity, among fish species, is due to the molecular phylogenetic association of this major fish allergen.

  3. Protective effect of parvalbumin on excitotoxic motor neuron death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, L.; Schwaller, B.; Vleminckx, V.

    2002-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin......Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, ALS, AMPA receptor, calcium-binding proteins, calcium buffering, excitotoxity, kainic acid, motor neuron, parvalbumin...

  4. The Effects of Dopamine and Estrogen upon Cortical Parvalbumin Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    positive interneurons because studies indicate that the parvalbumin containing subclass of GABAergic neurons are contacted by mesocortical dopamine fibers...that both dopamine and estrogen enhance the maturation of cortical interneurons that express the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin , in the developing... parvalbumin expression in the deep cortical layers in the in vivo model. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are located on parvalbumin containing interneurons

  5. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. I. General survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    Parvalbumins from coelacanth (Latimeria chalumnae) myogen have been isolated by gel filtration of Sephadex G-75 and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Disc electrophoresis and cellulose acetate electrophoresis showed the homogeneity of the three first major parvalbumin peaks (pI = 5.44, pI = 4.95 and pI = 4.52). The fourth component was partially resolved into two more parvalbumins (pI = 3.78 and pI = 3.50) by preparative gel electrophoresis. Amino acid analyses and tryptic peptide maps separated the five components in two major categories. The two less acidic components differ only in the presence or absence of an N-terminal blocking group. The three more acidic components constitute the second category; in spite of this heterogeneity, they share the same amino acid sequence.

  6. Parvalbumin--the major tropical fish allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dawn Li-Chern; Neo, Keng Hwee; Yi, Fong Cheng; Chua, Kaw Yan; Goh, Denise Li-Meng; Shek, Lynette Pei-Chi; Giam, Yoke Chin; Van Bever, Hugo P S; Lee, Bee Wah

    2008-08-01

    Fish allergy is common in countries where consumption is high. Asian nations are amongst the world's largest consumers of fish but the allergen profiles of tropical fish are unknown. This study sought to evaluate the allergenicity of four commonly consumed tropical fish, the threadfin (Polynemus indicus), Indian anchovy (Stolephorus indicus), pomfret (Pampus chinensis) and tengirri (Scomberomorus guttatus). Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity with parvalbumin of cod fish (Gad c 1), the major fish allergen, was also studied. Detection of tropical fish and cod specific-IgE was performed by UniCap assay, and skin prick tests were also carried out. The IgE-binding components of tropical fish were identified using IgE immunoblot techniques, and cross-reactivity with Gad c 1 was assessed by ELISA inhibition and IgE immunoblot inhibition. Clinically, nine of 10 patients studied were allergic to multiple fish. All patients exhibited detectable specific-IgE to cod fish (10 of 10 skin prick test positive, eight of 10 UniCap assay positive) despite lack of previous exposure. The major allergen of the four tropical fish was the 12-kDa parvalbumin. IgE cross-reactivity of these allergens to Gad c 1 was observed to be moderate to high in the tropical fish studied. Parvalbumins are the major allergens in commonly consumed tropical fish. They are cross-reactive with each other as well as with Gad c 1. Commercial tests for cod fish appear to be sufficient for the detection of tropical fish specific-IgE.

  7. Measuring parvalbumin levels in fish muscle tissue: relevance of muscle locations and storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Poi-Wah; Nordlee, Julie A; Koppelman, Stef J; Baumert, Joseph L; Taylor, Steve L

    2012-11-15

    Fish is an allergenic food capable of provoking severe anaphylactic reactions. Parvalbumin is the major allergen identified in fish and frog muscles. Antibodies against fish and frog parvalbumin have been used to quantify parvalbumin levels from fish. However, these antibodies react variably with parvalbumin from different fish species. Several factors might be responsible for this variation including instability of parvalbumin in fish muscle as a result of frozen storage and differential parvalbumin expression in muscles from various locations within the whole fish. We aimed to investigate whether these factors contribute to the previously observed variable immunoreactivity of the anti-parvalbumin antibodies. Results showed the detection of parvalbumin by these antibodies was unaffected by frozen storage of muscles for 112 days. However, the parvalbumin content decreased in fish muscles from anterior to posterior positions. This factor may partially explain for the inconsistent reactivity of anti-parvalbumin antibodies to different fish species. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Glutamate receptor subunit 3 (GluR3) immunoreactivity delineates a subpopulation of parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Diana E; Janssen, William G M; Vissavajjhala, Prabhakar; Czelusniak, Sharon M; Moran, Thomas M; Hof, Patrick R; Morrison, John H

    2003-07-14

    Rasmussen's encephalitis is a childhood disease resulting in intractable seizures associated with hippocampal and neocortical inflammation. An autoantibody against the GluR3 subunit of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors is implicated in the pathophysiology of Rasmussen's encephalitis. AMPA receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the brain and contain combinations of four subunits (GluR1-4). Although the distributions of GluR1, GluR2, and GluR4 are known in some detail, the cellular distribution of GluR3 in the mammalian brain remains to be described. We developed and characterized a GluR3-specific monoclonal antibody and quantified the cellular distribution of GluR3 in CA1 of the rat hippocampus. GluR3 immunoreactivity was detected in all pyramidal neurons and astrocytes and in most interneurons. We quantified the intensity of GluR3 immunoreactivity in interneuron subtypes defined by their calcium-binding protein content. GluR3 immunofluorescence, but not GluR1 or GluR2 immunofluorescence, was significantly elevated in somata of parvalbumin-containing interneurons compared to pyramidal somata. Strikingly, increased GluR3 immunofluorescence was not observed in calbindin- and calretinin-containing interneurons. Furthermore, 24% of parvalbumin-containing interneurons could be distinguished from surrounding neurons based on their intense GluR3 immunoreactivity. This subpopulation had significantly elevated GluR3 immunoreactivity compared to the rest of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. Electron microscopy revealed enriched GluR3 immunoreactivity in parvalbumin-containing perikarya at cytoplasmic and postsynaptic sites. Parvalbumin-containing interneurons, potent inhibitors of cortical pyramidal neurons, are vulnerable in the brains of epileptic patients. Our findings suggest that the somata of these interneurons are enriched in GluR3, which may render them vulnerable to pathological states such as epilepsy and

  9. Parvalbumin-positive CA1 interneurons are required for spatial working but not for reference memory

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Andrew J.; Sauer, Jonas-Frederic; Riedel, Gernot; McClure, Christina; Ansel, Laura; Cheyne, Lesley; Bartos, Marlene; Wisden, William; Wulff, Peer

    2011-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in cortical circuits are hypothesized to control cognitive function. To test this idea directly, we functionally removed parvalbumin-positive interneurons selectively from hippocampal CA1 in mice. We found that parvalbumin-positive interneurons are dispensable for spatial reference, but are essential for spatial working memory.

  10. Parvalbumin-positive CA1 interneurons are required for spatial working but not for reference memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew J; Sauer, Jonas-Frederic; Riedel, Gernot; McClure, Christina; Ansel, Laura; Cheyne, Lesley; Bartos, Marlene; Wisden, William; Wulff, Peer

    2011-03-01

    Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in cortical circuits are hypothesized to control cognitive function. To test this idea directly, we functionally removed parvalbumin-positive interneurons selectively from hippocampal CA1 in mice. We found that parvalbumin-positive interneurons are dispensable for spatial reference, but are essential for spatial working memory.

  11. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus.

    OpenAIRE

    Song, J; Sun, J.; Moss, J.; Z. Wen; G. J. Sun; D Hsu; Zhong, C.; Davoudi, H.; Christian, K.M.; Toni, N.; Ming, G.L.; Song, H.

    2013-01-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we found that proliferating adult mouse hippocampal neural precursors received immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress adult quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promoted newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our results suggest a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local ci...

  12. Influence of hydration and cation binding on parvalbumin dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, J.-M.; Parello, J.; Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.

    Due to structural characteristics, parvalbumin exerts a major role in intracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ concentration regulation during the muscular contraction-relieving cycle. This structure-function relationship being established, we are investigating the structure-dynamics-function relationship to take into account the protein dynamics. Because of the strong incoherent neutron scattering cross section of hydrogen and of the abundance of this element in proteins, incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is a unique probe to study vibrations and localised motions in biological macromolecules. We take advantage of the complementarities in energy or time resolution of various neutron spectrometers (time of flight, backscattering, spin-echo) to probe the parvalbumin dynamics from a fraction of a picosecond to a few nanoseconds. Influences of hydration and of the nature of the cation on parvalbumin dynamics are discussed.

  13. A method for triple fluorescence labeling with Vicia villosa agglutinin, an anti-parvalbumin antibody and an anti-G-protein-coupled receptor antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, S B

    1998-06-01

    The aim of the original study [S.B. Bausch, C. Chavkin, Vicia villosa agglutinin labels a subset of neurons coexpressing both the mu opioid receptor and parvalbumin in the developing rat subiculum, Dev. Brain Res., 97, 1996, 169-177] [3] was to develop a method for identifying a subset of mu opioid receptor-expressing interneurons in the rat subiculum for electrophysiological studies. Previous studies had shown that a subset of parvalbumin-positive neurons in the rat subiculum could be labeled with the lectin, Vicia villosa agglutinin (VVA) [C.T. Drake, K.A. Mulligan, T.L. Wimpey, A. Hendrickson, C. Chavkin, Characterization of Vicia villosa agglutinin-labeled GABAergic neurons in the hippocampal formation and in acutely dissociated hippocampus, Brain Res., 554, 1991, 176-185] [11], and that mu opioid receptor immunoreactivity (-IR) and parvalbumin-IR were colocalized in a subset of neurons in the hippocampus and dentate gyrus [S.B. Bausch, C. Chavkin, Colocalization of mu and delta opioid receptors with GABA, parvalbumin and a G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channel in the rodent brain, Analgesia, 1, 1995, 282-285] [2]. We hypothesized that a subset of mu opioid receptor-expressing neurons in the subiculum also would express the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin, and could be labeled with VVA. Labeling of live neurons with VVA [11] then could be used to identify these neurons. This protocol was designed to triple-label neurons expressing the mu opioid receptor, parvalbumin and the carbohydrate group, N-acetylgalactosamine (which binds VVA [S.E. Tollefsen, R. Kornfeld, The B4 lectin from Vicia villosa seeds interacts with N-acetylgalactosamine residues alpha-linked to serine or threonine residues in cell surface glycoproteins, J. Biol. Chem., 258, 1983, 5172-5176][M.P. Woodward, W.W. Young, R.A. Bloodgood, Detection of monoclonal antibodies specific for carbohydrate epitopes using periodate oxidation, J. Immunol. Methods, 78, 1985, 143-153] [25

  14. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  15. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  16. Parvalbumin-containing interneurons in rat hippocampus have an AMPA receptor profile suggestive of vulnerability to excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moga, Diana; Hof, Patrick R; Vissavajjhala, Prabhakar; Moran, Thomas M; Morrison, John H

    2002-05-01

    alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors mediate excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system, and contain combinations of four subunits (GluR1-4). We developed a GluR3-specific monoclonal antibody and quantified the cellular distribution of GluR3 in rat hippocampus. GluR3 immunoreactivity was detected in all pyramidal neurons and most interneurons. In addition, we found a subset of parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons in the hippocampus and neocortex that was notable for its intense GluR3 immunoreactivity and lack of GluR2 immunoreactivity. Such an expression pattern of AMPA receptor subunits is likely to make these interneurons selectively vulnerable to excitotoxicity.

  17. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Sun, Jiaqi; Moss, Jonathan; Wen, Zhexing; Sun, Gerald J; Hsu, Derek; Zhong, Chun; Davoudi, Heydar; Christian, Kimberly M; Toni, Nicolas; Ming, Guo-Li; Song, Hongjun

    2013-12-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we found that proliferating adult mouse hippocampal neural precursors received immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress adult quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promoted newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our results suggest a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local circuit activity to the diametric regulation of two critical early phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

  18. Co-expression of calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat facial nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiben Wang; Linfeng Zheng; Qinghong Huang; Yanbin Meng; Manyuan Kuang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calretinin and parvalbumin are members of the intracellular calcium binding protein family, which transform Ca2+ bioinformation into regulation of neuronal and neural network activities. OBJECTIVE: To observe expression and co-expression of calretinin and parvalbumin in rat facial nucleus neurons. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuronal morphology experiment was performed at the Research Laboratory of Applied Anatomy, Department Neurobiology and Anatomy, Xiangya Medical College of Central South University from August to October 2007. MATERIALS: Five healthy, adult Sprague Dawley rats were selected. Polyclonal rabbit-anti-parvalbumin and mouse-anti-calretinin were provided by Sigma, USA. METHODS: Rat brains were obtained and cut into coronal slices using a freezing microtome. Slices from the experimental group were immunofluorescent stained with polyclonal rabbit-anti-parvalbumin and mouse-anti-calretinin antibodies. The control group sections were stained with normal rabbit and mouse sera. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: lmmunofluorescent double-staining was used to detect calretinin and parvalbumin expression. Nissi staining was utilized for facial nucleus localization and neuronal morphology analysis. RESULTS: The majority of facial motor neurons was polygon-shaped, and expressed calretinin and parvalbumin. The calretinin-immunopositive neurons also exhibited parvalbumin immunoreactivity, that is, calretinin and parvalbumin were co-expressed in the same neuron. CONCLUSION: Calretinin and parvalbumin were expressed in facial nucleus neurons, with varied distribution.

  19. Loss of Parvalbumin in the Hippocampus of MAM Schizophrenia Model Rats Is Attenuated by Peripubertal Diazepam

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Yijuan; Grace, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of parvalbumin interneurons in the hippocampus is a robust finding in schizophrenia brains. Rats exposed during embryonic day 17 to methylazoxymethanol acetate exhibit characteristics consistent with an animal model of schizophrenia, including decreased parvalbumin interneurons in the ventral hippocampus. We reported previously that peripubertal administration of diazepam prevented the emergence of pathophysiology in adult methylazoxymethanol acetate rats. Methods: We used an...

  20. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  1. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  2. Parvalbumin: calcium and magnesium buffering in the distal nephron

    OpenAIRE

    Olinger, Eric; Schwaller, Beat; Loffing, Johannes; Gailly, Philippe; Devuyst, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a classical member of the EF-hand protein superfamily that has been described as a Ca²⁺ buffer and Ca²⁺ transporter/shuttle protein and may also play an additional role in Mg²⁺ handling. PV is exclusively expressed in the early part of the distal convoluted tubule in the human and mouse kidneys. Recent studies in Pvalb knockout mice revealed a role of PV in the distal handling of electrolytes: the lack of PV was associated with a mild salt-losing phenotype with secondary a...

  3. Nuclear factor-κB is involved in the phenotype loss of parvalbumin-interneurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xian; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Yang, Chun; Xu, Jianguo; Yang, Jianjun

    2011-04-20

    The phenotype loss of parvalbumin-containing interneurons, characterized by decreased parvalbumin expression, has been observed in schizophrenic patients. Overproduction of intraneuronal reactive oxygen species leads to such a phenotype loss. Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation is both a target and a regulator of intracellular oxidative stress response, suggesting its involvement in the parvalbumin regulation. This study was carried out to investigate the role of the NF-κB activation in the ketamine-induced phenotype loss of parvalbumin-interneurons in vitro. Ketamine was applied to primary neuronal cultures to successfully evoke the production of increased reactive oxygen species and decreased parvalbumin expression in parvalbumin-interneurons, which was invalid in the presence of a NF-κB inhibitor, SN50 or Bay11-7082. These results suggest potential links among NF-κB activation, oxidative stress, and parvalbumin-interneurons in vitro.

  4. Purification and characterization of parvalbumins, the major allergens in red stingray (Dasyatis akajei).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qiu-Feng; Liu, Guang-Ming; Li, Teng; Hara, Kenji; Wang, Xi-Chang; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2010-12-22

    Fish has received increasing attention because it induces IgE-mediated food allergy. Parvalbumin (PV) represents the major allergen of fish, and IgE cross-reactivity to PV in various teleost fish species has been shown, while little information is available about allergens in elasmobranch fish. In this study, two PV isoforms (named as PV-I and PV-II) from red stingray (Dasyatis akajei) were purified to homogeneity by a series of procedures including ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatographies of DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. Purified PVs revealed a single band on tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular masses of PV-I and PV-II were 12.29 and 11.95 kDa, respectively, as determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Western blot using antifrog PV monoclonal antibody (PARV-19) showed positive reactions to the two proteins, confirming that they were PVs, although their immunological reactivities were weaker than those of PV from silver carp. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of PV-I was determined, and comparison with PVs from other fish species showed low homology between teleost and elasmobranch fish. The isoelectric points of PV-I and PV-II were 5.4 and 5.0, respectively, as determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), suggesting that both isoforms belong to the α-group. IgE immunoblotting analysis showed that sera from fish-allergic patients reacted to both PV-I and PV-II from red stingray. Thermal stability revealed that PV-I easily formed oligomers than PV-II, which might contribute to the maintenance of its allerginicity during heat processing.

  5. Postnatal development of parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k immunoreactivities in the canine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, S P; Chung, Y Y; Chang, I Y; Kim, J J; Moon, J S; Kim, H S

    2000-07-01

    The calcium-binding proteins, parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k, are markers of different classes of GABAergic interneurons and display different functions. The present study was attempted to determine immunoreactivities and colocalization of the parvalbumin and calbindin D-28k in the developing canine hippocampus by immunohistochemistry. The calcium-binding protein-containing neurons showed different developmental patterns. The first appearance of parvalbumin immunoreactive nonpyramidal cells was observed at P7. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity was elicited by the sequence from CA3 to CA1 to reach an adult-like distribution pattern, which was reached at P60, while calbindin D-28k immunoreactivity appeared from P0, including pyramidal and nonpyramidal cells. The characteristic distribution of calbindin D-28k immunoreactive pyramidal cells was clarified by P28, and an adult-like distribution pattern was reached by the end of the second postnatal month. Double-labeled nonpyramidal cells were frequently seen in the subareas, CA3 of P14/CA1-CA2 of P28, where parvalbumin immunoreactive nonpyramidal cells were emerging. These data suggest that the colocalization of the two calcium-binding proteins during development is related closely to the area-specific maturation of parvalbumin expression, although either prenatal expression of calbindin D-28k or parvalbumin was not determined.

  6. Immunological cross-reactivity between four distant parvalbumins-Impact on allergen detection and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Michael F; Stephen, Juan N; Kraft, Lukas; Weiss, Thomas; Kamath, Sandip D; Lopata, Andreas L

    2015-02-01

    Fish are the largest and most diverse group of vertebrates. Fish are also a part of the eight food groups that cause the majority of IgE mediated food reactions. Detection tools for fish allergens are however limited due to the great diversity of fish species, despite fish allergy and its major allergen parvalbumin being well documented. The most commonly studied fish are frequently consumed in North America and Europe. However, much less is known about fish allergens in the Australasian region although fish is widely consumed in this region. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis was performed of known parvalbumin amino acid sequences to determine possible candidate antigens for new cross-reactive antibodies to be used to detect most fish parvalbumins. Polyclonal rabbit antibodies were raised against parvalbumins from frequently consumed barramundi (Lates calcarifer), basa (Pangasius bocourti), pilchard (Sardinops sagax) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). These were evaluated for cross-reactivity against a panel of 45 fish extracts (raw, heated and canned fish). Anti-barramundi parvalbumin proved to be the most cross-reactive antibody, detecting 87.5% of the 40 species analyzed, followed by anti-pilchard and anti-basa antibody. In contrast the anti-salmon antibody was very specific and only reacted to salmonidae and a few other fish. All analyzed fish species, except mahi mahi, swordfish, yellowfin tuna and all 5 canned fish had parvalbumin detected in raw extracts. However antibody reactivity to many fish was heat liable or susceptible to denaturation, demonstrating that some parvalbumins have most likely conformational epitopes, which lose antibody reactivity after heat treatment. We have demonstrated the generation of highly cross-reactive anti-parvalbumin antibodies that could be used for the detection of allergenic fish parvalbumin in contaminated food products. This cross-reactivity study thus shows processing of fish, especially canning, can have on impact

  7. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampal formation of Alzheimer's diseased brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, D R; Mufson, E J

    1997-10-01

    The number and topographic distribution of immunocytochemically stained parvalbumin interneurons was determined in the hippocampal formation of control and Alzheimer's diseased brain. In control hippocampus, parvalbumin interneurons were aspiny and pleomorphic, with extensive dendritic arbors. In dentate gyrus, parvalbumin cells, as well as a dense plexus of fibers and puncta, were associated with the granule cell layer. A few cells also occupied the molecular layer. In strata oriens and pyramidale of CA1-CA3 subfields, parvalbumin neurons gave rise to dendrites that extended into adjacent strata. Densely stained puncta and beaded fibers occupied stratum pyramidale, with less dense staining in adjacent strata oriens and radiatum. Virtually no parvalbumin profiles were observed in stratum lacunosum-moleculare or the alveus. Numerous polymorphic parvalbumin neurons and a dense plexus of fibers and puncta characterized the deep layer of the subiculum and the lamina principalis externa of the presubiculum. In Alzheimer's diseased hippocampus, there was an approximate 60% decrease in the number of parvalbumin interneurons in the dentate gyrus/CA4 subfield (Pparvalbumin neurons did not statistically decline in subfields CA3, subiculum or presubiculum in Alzheimer's diseased brains relative to controls. Concurrent staining with Thioflavin-S histochemistry did not reveal degenerative changes within parvalbumin-stained profiles. These findings reveal that parvalbumin interneurons within specific hippocampal subfields are selectively vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease. This vulnerability may be related to their differential connectivity, e.g., those regions connectionally related to the cerebral cortex (dentate gyrus and CA1) are more vulnerable than those regions connectionally related to subcortical loci (subiculum and presubiculum).

  8. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Gaza-Bulseco, Georgeen; Faldu, Dinesh; Chumsae, Chris; Sun, Joanne

    2008-07-01

    Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies is common due to the various modifications introduced over the lifespan of the molecules from the point of synthesis to the point of complete clearance from the subjects. The vast number of modifications presents great challenge to the thorough characterization of the molecules. This article reviews the current knowledge of enzymatic and nonenzymatic modifications of monoclonal antibodies including the common ones such as incomplete disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, N-terminal pyroglutamine cyclization, C-terminal lysine processing, deamidation, isomerization, and oxidation, and less common ones such as modification of the N-terminal amino acids by maleuric acid and amidation of the C-terminal amino acid. In addition, noncovalent associations with other molecules, conformational diversity and aggregation of monoclonal antibodies are also discussed. Through a complete understanding of the heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies, strategies can be employed to better identify the potential modifications and thoroughly characterize the molecules.

  9. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  10. Postnatal Developmental Expression of Calbindin, Calretinin and Parvalbumin in Mouse Main Olfactory Bulb

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Ping QIN; Shu-Ming YE; Ji-Zeng DU; Gong-Yu SHEN

    2005-01-01

    The distribution of calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin during the development of the mouse main olfactory bulb (MOB) was studied using immunohistochemistry techniques. The results are as follows:(1) caibindin-immunoreactive profiles were mainly located in the glomerular layer, and few large calbindinimmunoreactive cells were found in the subependymal layer of postnatal day 10 (P10) to postnatal day 40 (P40) mice; (2) no calbindin was detected in the mitral cell layer at any stage; (3) calretinin-immunoreactive profiles were present in all layers of the main olfactory bulb at all stages, especially in the olfactory nerve layer, glomerular layer and granule cell layer; (4) parvalbumin-immunoreactive profiles were mainly located in the external plexiform layer (except for P10 mice); (5) weakly stained parvalbumin-immunoreactive profiles were present in the glomerular layer at all stages; and (6) no parvalbumin was detected in the mitral cell layer at any stage.

  11. Development of a Hypoallergenic Recombinant Parvalbumin for First-in-Man Subcutaneous Immunotherapy of Fish Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Huber, Hans; Swoboda, Ines

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The FAST (food allergy-specific immunotherapy) project aims at developing safe and effective subcutaneous immunotherapy for fish allergy, using recombinant hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1. OBJECTIVES: Preclinical characterization and good manufacturing practice (GMP) producti...

  12. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons linearly control olfactory bulb output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Hiroyuki K; Gillet, Shea N; Peters, Andrew J; Isaacson, Jeffry S; Komiyama, Takaki

    2013-12-04

    In the olfactory bulb, odor representations by principal mitral cells are modulated by local inhibitory circuits. While dendrodendritic synapses between mitral and granule cells are typically thought to be a major source of this modulation, the contributions of other inhibitory neurons remain unclear. Here we demonstrate the functional properties of olfactory bulb parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV cells) and identify their important role in odor coding. Using paired recordings, we find that PV cells form reciprocal connections with the majority of nearby mitral cells, in contrast to the sparse connectivity between mitral and granule cells. In vivo calcium imaging in awake mice reveals that PV cells are broadly tuned to odors. Furthermore, selective PV cell inactivation enhances mitral cell responses in a linear fashion while maintaining mitral cell odor preferences. Thus, dense connections between mitral and PV cells underlie an inhibitory circuit poised to modulate the gain of olfactory bulb output.

  13. Regulation of Parvalbumin Basket cell plasticity in rule learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroni, Pico

    2015-04-24

    Local inhibitory Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks shift to one of two possible opposite configurations depending on whether behavioral learning involves acquisition of new information or consolidation of validated rules. This reflects the existence of PV Basket cell subpopulations with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, output target neurons and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons is recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons is recruited in new information acquisition. This involves regulation of early-born PV neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born PV neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation.

  14. Parvalbumin Interneurons of Hippocampus Tune Population Activity at Theta Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amilhon, Bénédicte; Huh, Carey Y L; Manseau, Frédéric; Ducharme, Guillaume; Nichol, Heather; Adamantidis, Antoine; Williams, Sylvain

    2015-06-03

    Hippocampal theta rhythm arises from a combination of recently described intrinsic theta oscillators and inputs from multiple brain areas. Interneurons expressing the markers parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) are leading candidates to participate in intrinsic rhythm generation and principal cell (PC) coordination in distal CA1 and subiculum. We tested their involvement by optogenetically activating and silencing PV or SOM interneurons in an intact hippocampus preparation that preserves intrinsic connections and oscillates spontaneously at theta frequencies. Despite evidence suggesting that SOM interneurons are crucial for theta, optogenetic manipulation of these interneurons modestly influenced theta rhythm. However, SOM interneurons were able to strongly modulate temporoammonic inputs. In contrast, activation of PV interneurons powerfully controlled PC network and rhythm generation optimally at 8 Hz, while continuously silencing them disrupted theta. Our results thus demonstrate a pivotal role of PV but not SOM interneurons for PC synchronization and the emergence of intrinsic hippocampal theta.

  15. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the human claustrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinova-Palova, D V; Edelstein, L; Landzhov, B V; Braak, E; Malinova, L G; Minkov, M; Paloff, A; Ovtscharoff, W

    2014-09-01

    The morphology and distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons (PV-ir) were studied in the human claustrum. PV-ir neurons were observed throughout the claustrum, with the highest numbers noted in the central (broadest) portion as compared with the dorsal and ventral aspects. Reaction product was evident in the neuronal perikarya, dendritic processes, and spines. In the majority of these labeled neurons, the cytoplasm was devoid of lipofuscin pigment. Cell bodies varied widely in both shape and size, ranging from oval and small, to multipolar and large. PV-ir neurons were classified into two groups, primarily based on dendritic morphology: spiny neurons with long and straight dendrites, and aspiny neurons with thin and curving dendritic processes. PV-ir fibers were seen throughout the neuropil, with many immuno-positive puncta noted.

  16. An immunohistochemical study of parvalbumin containing interneurons in the gerbil hippocampus after cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, T; Kato, H; Liu, X H; Kogure, K; Kato, K; Itoyama, Y

    1994-09-01

    We investigated postischemic changes of non-pyramidal neurons in the gerbil hippocampus 1 h - 7 days after 10 min of cerebral ischemia, with parvalbumin and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-immunohistochemistry. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus were unaffected up to 24 h after ischemia. A slight reduction of the immunoreactivity in neuronal processes was seen in the hippocampal CA1 sector 48 h after ischemia. Seven days after ischemia, a marked loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons was observed in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 sectors. Furthermore, reduced staining in the dentate granular and molecular layers was observed. MAP2-immunoreactive pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus were unchanged up to 48 h after ischemia. Seven days after ischemia, a severe loss of MAP2 immunoreactivity was found in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 neurons and dentate hilar neurons. However, scattered CA1 neurons, most likely interneurons, preserved MAP2 immunoreactivity. The results demonstrate that transient cerebral ischemia can cause a loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus. Furthermore, some interneurons seem to lose parvalbumin synthesis. Although dentate granule cells are resistant to ischemia, considerable reductions of afferent input was suggested by parvalbumin staining.

  17. A fundamental role for hippocampal parvalbumin in the dopamine hyperfunction associated with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boley, Angela M; Perez, Stephanie M; Lodge, Daniel J

    2014-08-01

    Postmortem studies in schizophrenia patients have demonstrated robust alterations in GABAergic markers throughout the neuraxis. It has been suggested that these alterations are restricted to subpopulations of interneurons, such as those containing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin. Indeed, a reduction in parvalbumin expression is a consistent observation in human postmortem studies, as well as, in a wide and diverse variety of animal models. However, it still remains to be determined whether this decrease in parvalbumin expression contributes to, or is a consequence of the disease. Here we utilize lentiviral delivered shRNA and demonstrate that a selective reduction in parvalbumin mRNA expression induces hyperactivity within the ventral hippocampus. In addition, we observe downstream increases in dopamine neuron population activity without changes in average firing rate or percent burst firing. These changes in dopamine neuron activity were associated with an enhanced locomotor response to amphetamine administration. These data therefore demonstrate that a reduction in ventral hippocampal parvalbumin expression is sufficient, in and of itself, to induce an augmented dopamine system function and behavioral hyper-responsivity to amphetamine, implicating a potential key role for parvalbumin in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  18. Differential expression of parvalbumin in neonatal phencyclidine-treated rats and socially isolated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaalund, Sanne S; Riise, Jesper; Broberg, Brian V; Fabricius, Katrine; Karlsen, Anna S; Secher, Thomas; Plath, Niels; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2013-02-01

    Decreased parvalbumin expression is a hallmark of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and has been associated with abnormal cognitive processing and decreased network specificity. It is not known whether this decrease is due to reduced expression of the parvalbumin protein or degeneration of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PV(+) interneurons). In this study, we examined PV(+) expression in two rat models of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia: the environmental social isolation (SI) and pharmacological neonatal phencyclidine (neoPCP) models. Using a stereological method, the optical fractionator, we counted neurons, PV(+) interneurons, and glial cells in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HPC). In addition, we quantified the mRNA level of parvalbumin in the mPFC. There was a statistically significant reduction in the number of PV(+) interneurons (p = 0.021) and glial cells (p = 0.024) in the mPFC of neonatal phencyclidine rats, but not in SI rats. We observed no alterations in the total number of neurons, hippocampal PV(+) interneurons, parvalbumin mRNA expression or volume of the mPFC or HPC in the two models. Thus, as the total number of neurons remains unchanged following phencyclidine (PCP) treatment, we suggest that the decreased number of counted PV(+) interneurons represents a reduced parvalbumin protein expression below immunohistochemical detection limit rather than a true cell loss. Furthermore, these results indicate that the effect of neonatal PCP treatment is not limited to neuronal populations.

  19. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  20. Fish allergens at a glance: variable allergenicity of parvalbumins, the major fish allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Annette; Swoboda, Ines; Arumugam, Karthik; Hilger, Christiane; Hentges, François

    2014-01-01

    Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand, some individuals have IgE antibodies directed against unique, species-specific parvalbumin epitopes, and these patients show clinical symptoms only with certain fish species. Furthermore, different parvalbumin isoforms and isoallergens are present in the same fish and might display variable allergenicity. This was shown for salmon homologs, where only a single parvalbumin (beta-1) isoform was identified as allergen in specific patients. In addition to the parvalbumins, several other fish proteins, enolases, aldolases, and fish gelatin, seem to be important allergens. New clinical and molecular insights advanced the knowledge and understanding of fish allergy in the last years. These findings were useful for the advancement of the IgE-based diagnosis and also for the management of fish allergies consisting of advice and treatment of fish-allergic patients.

  1. Fish allergens at a glance: Variable allergenicity of parvalbumins, the major fish allergens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette eKuehn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand, some individuals have IgE antibodies directed against unique, species-specific parvalbumin epitopes, and these patients show clinical symptoms only with certain fish species. Furthermore, different parvalbumin isoforms and isoallergens are present in the same fish and might display variable allergenicity. This was shown for salmon homologs, where only a single parvalbumin (beta-1 isoform was identified as allergen in specific patients. In addition to the parvalbumins, several other fish proteins, enolases, aldolases and fish gelatin, seem to be important allergens.New clinical and molecular insights advanced the knowledge and understanding of fish allergy in the last years. These findings will be useful for the advancement of the IgE-based diagnosis but also for the management of fish allergies consisting of advice and treatment of fish-allergic patients.

  2. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-02

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression.

  3. Parvalbumin: calcium and magnesium buffering in the distal nephron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinger, Eric; Schwaller, Beat; Loffing, Johannes; Gailly, Philippe; Devuyst, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a classical member of the EF-hand protein superfamily that has been described as a Ca(2+) buffer and Ca(2+) transporter/shuttle protein and may also play an additional role in Mg(2+) handling. PV is exclusively expressed in the early part of the distal convoluted tubule in the human and mouse kidneys. Recent studies in Pvalb knockout mice revealed a role of PV in the distal handling of electrolytes: the lack of PV was associated with a mild salt-losing phenotype with secondary aldosteronism, salt craving and stronger bones compared with controls. A link between the Ca(2+)-buffering capacity of PV and the expression of the thiazide-sensitive Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter was established, which could be relevant to the regulation of sodium transport in the distal nephron. Variants in the PVALB gene that encodes PV have been described, but their relevance to kidney function has not been established. PV is also considered a reliable marker of chromophobe carcinoma and oncocytoma, two neoplasms deriving from the distal nephron. The putative role of PV in tumour genesis remains to be investigated.

  4. Reduction in parvalbumin expression not loss of the parvalbumin-expressing GABA interneuron subpopulation in genetic parvalbumin and shank mouse models of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Federica; Vörckel, Karl Jakob; Sungur, Ayse Özge; Wöhr, Markus; Schwaller, Beat

    2016-01-27

    A reduction of the number of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (PV(+)) GABAergic interneurons or a decrease in PV immunoreactivity was reported in several mouse models of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). This includes Shank mutant mice, with SHANK being one of the most important gene families mutated in human ASD. Similar findings were obtained in heterozygous (PV+/-) mice for the Pvalb gene, which display a robust ASD-like phenotype. Here, we addressed the question whether the observed reduction in PV immunoreactivity was the result of a decrease in PV expression levels and/or loss of the PV-expressing GABA interneuron subpopulation hereafter called "Pvalb neurons". The two alternatives have important implications as they likely result in opposing effects on the excitation/inhibition balance, with decreased PV expression resulting in enhanced inhibition, but loss of the Pvalb neuron subpopulation in reduced inhibition. Stereology was used to determine the number of Pvalb neurons in ASD-associated brain regions including the medial prefrontal cortex, somatosensory cortex and striatum of PV-/-, PV+/-, Shank1-/- and Shank3B-/- mice. As a second marker for the identification of Pvalb neurons, we used Vicia Villosa Agglutinin (VVA), a lectin recognizing the specific extracellular matrix enwrapping Pvalb neurons. PV protein and Pvalb mRNA levels were determined quantitatively by Western blot analyses and qRT-PCR, respectively. Our analyses of total cell numbers in different brain regions indicated that the observed "reduction of PV(+) neurons" was in all cases, i.e., in PV+/-, Shank1-/- and Shank3B-/- mice, due to a reduction in Pvalb mRNA and PV protein, without any indication of neuronal cell decrease/loss of Pvalb neurons evidenced by the unaltered numbers of VVA(+) neurons. Our findings suggest that the PV system might represent a convergent downstream endpoint for some forms of ASD, with the excitation/inhibition balance shifted towards enhanced inhibition due to the

  5. Chemical basis of prey recognition in thamnophiine snakes: the unexpected new roles of parvalbumins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïté Smargiassi

    Full Text Available Detecting and locating prey are key to predatory success within trophic chains. Predators use various signals through specialized visual, olfactory, auditory or tactile sensory systems to pinpoint their prey. Snakes chemically sense their prey through a highly developed auxiliary olfactory sense organ, the vomeronasal organ (VNO. In natricine snakes that are able to feed on land and water, the VNO plays a critical role in predatory behavior by detecting cues, known as vomodors, which are produced by their potential prey. However, the chemical nature of these cues remains unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that specific proteins-parvalbumins-present in the cutaneous mucus of the common frog (Rana temporaria may be natural chemoattractive proteins for these snakes. Here, we show that parvalbumins and parvalbumin-like proteins, which are mainly intracellular, are physiologically present in the epidermal mucous cells and mucus of several frog and fish genera from both fresh and salt water. These proteins are located in many tissues and function as Ca(2+ buffers. In addition, we clarified the intrinsic role of parvalbumins present in the cutaneous mucus of amphibians and fishes. We demonstrate that these Ca(2+-binding proteins participate in innate bacterial defense mechanisms by means of calcium chelation. We show that these parvalbumins are chemoattractive for three different thamnophiine snakes, suggesting that these chemicals play a key role in their prey-recognition mechanism. Therefore, we suggest that recognition of parvalbumin-like proteins or other calcium-binding proteins by the VNO could be a generalized prey-recognition process in snakes. Detecting innate prey defense mechanism compounds may have driven the evolution of this predator-prey interaction.

  6. Chemical basis of prey recognition in thamnophiine snakes: the unexpected new roles of parvalbumins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smargiassi, Maïté; Daghfous, Gheylen; Leroy, Baptiste; Legreneur, Pierre; Toubeau, Gerard; Bels, Vincent; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2012-01-01

    Detecting and locating prey are key to predatory success within trophic chains. Predators use various signals through specialized visual, olfactory, auditory or tactile sensory systems to pinpoint their prey. Snakes chemically sense their prey through a highly developed auxiliary olfactory sense organ, the vomeronasal organ (VNO). In natricine snakes that are able to feed on land and water, the VNO plays a critical role in predatory behavior by detecting cues, known as vomodors, which are produced by their potential prey. However, the chemical nature of these cues remains unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that specific proteins-parvalbumins-present in the cutaneous mucus of the common frog (Rana temporaria) may be natural chemoattractive proteins for these snakes. Here, we show that parvalbumins and parvalbumin-like proteins, which are mainly intracellular, are physiologically present in the epidermal mucous cells and mucus of several frog and fish genera from both fresh and salt water. These proteins are located in many tissues and function as Ca(2+) buffers. In addition, we clarified the intrinsic role of parvalbumins present in the cutaneous mucus of amphibians and fishes. We demonstrate that these Ca(2+)-binding proteins participate in innate bacterial defense mechanisms by means of calcium chelation. We show that these parvalbumins are chemoattractive for three different thamnophiine snakes, suggesting that these chemicals play a key role in their prey-recognition mechanism. Therefore, we suggest that recognition of parvalbumin-like proteins or other calcium-binding proteins by the VNO could be a generalized prey-recognition process in snakes. Detecting innate prey defense mechanism compounds may have driven the evolution of this predator-prey interaction.

  7. A recombinant hypoallergenic parvalbumin mutant for immunotherapy of IgE-mediated fish allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swoboda, Ines; Bugajska-Schretter, Agnes; Linhart, Birgit; Verdino, Petra; Keller, Walter; Schulmeister, Ulrike; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter; Peltre, Gabriel; Quirce, Santiago; Douladiris, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Valenta, Rudolf; Spitzauer, Susanne

    2007-05-15

    IgE-mediated allergy to fish is a frequent cause of severe anaphylactic reactions. Parvalbumin, a small calcium-binding protein, is the major fish allergen. We have recently isolated a cDNA coding for carp parvalbumin, Cyp c 1, and expressed in Escherichia coli a recombinant Cyp c 1 molecule, which contained most IgE epitopes of saltwater and freshwater fish. In this study, we introduced mutations into the calcium-binding domains of carp parvalbumin by site-directed mutagenesis and produced in E. coli three parvalbumin mutants containing amino acid exchanges either in one (single mutants; Mut-CD and Mut-EF) or in both of the calcium-binding sites (double mutant; Mut-CD/EF). Circular dichroism analyses of the purified derivatives and the wild-type allergen showed that Mut-CD/EF exhibited the greatest reduction of overall protein fold. Dot blot assays and immunoblot inhibition experiments performed with sera from 21 fish-allergic patients showed that Mut-CD/EF had a 95% reduced IgE reactivity and represented the derivative with the least allergenic activity. The latter was confirmed by in vitro basophil histamine release assays and in vivo skin prick testing. The potential applicability for immunotherapy of Mut-CD/EF was demonstrated by the fact that mouse IgG Abs could be raised by immunization with the mutated molecule, which cross-reacted with parvalbumins from various fish species and inhibited the binding of fish-allergic patients' IgE to the wild-type allergen. Using the hypoallergenic carp parvalbumin mutant Mut-CD/EF, it may be possible to treat fish allergy by immunotherapy.

  8. Parvalbumins from coelacanth muscle. III. Amino acid sequence of the major component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui-Adell, J; Pechere, J F

    1978-09-26

    The primary structure of the major parvalbumin (pI = 4.52) from coelacanth muscle (Latimeria chalumnae) has been determined. Sequence analysis of the tryptic peptides, in some cases obtained with beta-trypsin, accounts for the total amino acid content of the protein. Chymotryptic peptides provide appropriate sequence overlaps, to complete the localization of the tryptic peptides. Examination of the amino acid sequence of this protein shows the typical structure of a beta-parvalbumin. Its position in the dendrogram of related calcium-binding proteins corresponds to that usually accepted for crossopterygians.

  9. Differential expression of parvalbumin interneurons in neonatal phencyclidine treated rats and socially isolated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaalund, Sanne Simone; Riise, Jesper; Broberg, Brian

    2013-01-01

    of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PV(+) interneurons). In this study we examined PV(+) expression in two rat models of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia, the environmental social isolation (SI) and pharmacological neonatal phencyclidine (neoPCP) models. Using a stereological method, the optical...... cells (p = 0.024) in the mPFC of neonatal phencyclidine rats. We observed no alterations in the total number of neurons, hippocampal PV(+) interneurons, parvalbumin mRNA expression or volume of the mPFC or HPC in the two models. Thus, as the total number of neurons remains unchanged following...

  10. [The internal cavities of pike alpha-parvalbumin probably contain water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tishchenko, V M

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of hydrogen exchange of pike a-parvalbumin was investigated using the method of infrared spectroscopy (sensitive to the amide hydrogen atoms in the peptide) and radioisotope method (sensitive to all labile hydrogen atoms). Ultraslow exchangeable hydrogen atoms were found to be substantially less in the first case than in the second one. Taking into account that the internal cavities in the parvalbumin are formed by hydrophobic amino acid residues, devoid of labile hydrogen atoms, it is possible to make the most appropriate assumption, namely, these cavities contain water molecules, hydrogen atoms of which are ultraslow exchangeable.

  11. Singing modulates parvalbumin interneurons throughout songbird forebrain vocal control circuitry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin-Toktas, Yildiz

    2017-01-01

    Across species, the performance of vocal signals can be modulated by the social environment. Zebra finches, for example, adjust their song performance when singing to females (‘female-directed’ or FD song) compared to when singing in isolation (‘undirected’ or UD song). These changes are salient, as females prefer the FD song over the UD song. Despite the importance of these performance changes, the neural mechanisms underlying this social modulation remain poorly understood. Previous work in finches has established that expression of the immediate early gene EGR1 is increased during singing and modulated by social context within the vocal control circuitry. Here, we examined whether particular neural subpopulations within those vocal control regions exhibit similar modulations of EGR1 expression. We compared EGR1 expression in neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV), a calcium buffer that modulates network plasticity and homeostasis, among males that performed FD song, males that produced UD song, or males that did not sing. We found that, overall, singing but not social context significantly affected EGR1 expression in PV neurons throughout the vocal control nuclei. We observed differences in EGR1 expression between two classes of PV interneurons in the basal ganglia nucleus Area X. Additionally, we found that singing altered the amount of PV expression in neurons in HVC and Area X and that distinct PV interneuron types in Area X exhibited different patterns of modulation by singing. These data indicate that throughout the vocal control circuitry the singing-related regulation of EGR1 expression in PV neurons may be less influenced by social context than in other neuron types and raise the possibility of cell-type specific differences in plasticity and calcium buffering. PMID:28235074

  12. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kyle, Robert A; Vincent Rajkumar, S

    2006-01-01

    Summary Significant advances have been made in our understanding of the natural history, pathogenesis, mechanisms of progression and prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS...

  13. Renal expression of parvalbumin is critical for NaCl handling and response to diuretics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belge, H.; Gailly, P.; Schwaller, B.; Loffing, J.; Debaix, H.; Riveira-Munoz, E.; Beauwens, R.; Devogelaer, J.P.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Devuyst, O.

    2007-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays an essential role in the reabsorption of NaCl by the kidney, a process that can be inhibited by thiazide diuretics. Parvalbumin (PV), a Ca(2+)-binding protein that plays a role in muscle fibers and neurons, is selectively expressed in the DCT, where its role

  14. Parvalbumin-Positive Neurons in Rat Dorsal Hippocampus Contain Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zee, E.A. van der; de Jong, Giena; Strosberg, A.D.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1991-01-01

    The present study describes the colocalization of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PARV) in nonpyramidal neurons of the rat dorsal hippocampus by means of dual-label immunocytochemistry. Fifty-two percent of all muscarinic cholinoceptive

  15. Distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the monkey temporal lobe: the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, A; Amaral, D G

    1993-05-01

    The distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the various fields of the hippocampal formation was studied in the macaque monkey. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons had aspiny or sparsely spiny dendrites that often had a beaded appearance; most resembled classically identified interneurons. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive fibers and terminals were confined to certain laminae in each field and generally had a pericellular distribution. In the dentate gyrus, there was a dense pericellular plexus of immunoreactive terminals in the granule cell layer. Except for a narrow supragranular zone, there was a marked paucity of terminals in the molecular and polymorphic cell layers. Immunoreactive neurons were mainly located immediately subjacent to the granule cell layer and comprised a variety of morphological cell types. The three fields of the hippocampus proper (CA3, CA2, and CA1) demonstrated differences in their parvalbumin staining characteristics. In CA3, there was a prominent pericellular terminal plexus in the pyramidal cell layer that was densest distally (closer to CA2). Immunoreactive cells were located either in the pyramidal cell layer, where many had a pyramidal shape and prominent apical and basal dendrites, or in stratum oriens. CA2 had a staining pattern similar to that in CA3, though both the number of labeled cells and the density of the pericellular terminal plexus were greater in CA2. In CA1, there was a markedly lower number of parvalbumin-labeled cells than in CA3 and CA2 and the cells tended to be located in the deep part of the pyramidal cell layer or in stratum oriens. The pyramidal cell layer of CA1 contained a pericellular terminal plexus that was substantially less dense than in CA3 and CA2. At the border between CA1 and the subiculum there was a marked increase in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The positive cells were scattered throughout the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and comprised a variety of

  16. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically, a more precise classification scheme is needed to better describe the fundamental biology and function of different GPe neuron classes. To this end, we generated a novel multicistronic BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenic mouse line under the regulatory elements of the Npas1 gene. Using a combinatorial transgenic and immunohistochemical approach, we discovered that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons in the GPe represent two nonoverlapping cell classes, amounting to 55% and 27% of the total GPe neuron population, respectively. These two genetically identified cell classes projected primarily to the subthalamic nucleus and to the striatum, respectively. Additionally, parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons were distinct in their autonomous and driven firing characteristics, their expression of intrinsic ion conductances, and their responsiveness to chronic 6-hydroxydopamine lesion. In summary, our data argue that parvalbumin-expressing neurons and Npas1-expressing neurons are two distinct functional classes of GPe neurons. This work revises our understanding of the GPe, and provides the foundation for future studies of its function and dysfunction. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Until recently, the heterogeneity of the constituent neurons within the external globus pallidus (GPe) was not fully appreciated. We addressed this knowledge gap by discovering two principal GPe neuron classes, which were identified by their nonoverlapping

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy and spurious hypophosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D; Chaudhuri, Anita; Blauth, Kathleen; DeRubertis, Frederick R

    2003-02-01

    Spuriously low levels of plasma phosphate have been reported previously in patients with multiple myeloma and polyclonal gammopathy. We report 2 cases of spurious hypophosphatemia in patients with elevated concentrations of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins, 1 of whom had monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and the other multiple myeloma. Plasma phosphate concentrations were measured using nondeproteinized and deproteinized plasma samples from patients with monoclonal gammopathies. In 2 patients with monoclonal gammopathy, the levels of plasma inorganic phosphate were reported as <1.0 mg/dL when the phosphate concentration was determined using an analyzer that employs nondeproteinized plasma. When the samples were reanalyzed using a laboratory method that removes serum proteins, normal or elevated concentrations of phosphate were found. Plasma levels of phosphate in 4 other patients with monoclonal gammopathy were normal by both methods. These data confirm previous reports that spurious hypophosphatemia occurs in some patients with increased levels of serum monoclonal immunoglobulins when laboratory methods using nondeproteinized samples are employed. The occurrence of unusually low plasma phosphate concentrations in patients without symptoms or clinically apparent causes of hypophosphatemia should alert physicians to search for monoclonal gammopathy.

  18. DEVELOPMENTAL HYPOTHYROIDISM REDUCES PARVALBUMIN EXPRESSION IN GABAERGIC NEURONS OF CORTEX AND HIPPOCAMPUS: IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL FINDINGS AND FUNCTIONAL CORRELATES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GABAergic interneurons comprise the bulk of local inhibitory neuronal circuitry in cortex and hippocampus and a subpopulation of these interneurons contain the calcium binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). A previous report indicated that severe hypothyroidism reduced PV immunoreact...

  19. Long-term alterations of striatal parvalbumin interneurons in a rat model of early exposure to alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    De Giorgio Andrea; Comparini Sara E; Intra Francesca; Granato Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Exposure to alcohol in utero is a known cause of mental retardation. Although a certain degree of motor impairment is always associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, little is known about the neurobiological basis of the defective motor control. We have studied the striatal interneurons containing parvalbumin in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Methods Newborn rats received ethanol by inhalation from postnatal day two through six and parvalbumin stri...

  20. Long-term alterations of striatal parvalbumin interneurons in a rat model of early exposure to alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    De Giorgio, Andrea; Comparini, Sara E; Intra, Francesca Sangiuliano; Granato, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to alcohol in utero is a known cause of mental retardation. Although a certain degree of motor impairment is always associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, little is known about the neurobiological basis of the defective motor control. We have studied the striatal interneurons containing parvalbumin in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Methods Newborn rats received ethanol by inhalation from postnatal day two through six and parvalbumin striatal neur...

  1. Long-term alterations of striatal parvalbumin interneurons in a rat model of early exposure to alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Giorgio Andrea

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to alcohol in utero is a known cause of mental retardation. Although a certain degree of motor impairment is always associated with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, little is known about the neurobiological basis of the defective motor control. We have studied the striatal interneurons containing parvalbumin in a rat model of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Methods Newborn rats received ethanol by inhalation from postnatal day two through six and parvalbumin striatal neurons were labeled by immunohistochemistry on postnatal day 60. The spatial distribution of parvalbumin interneurons was studied using Voronoi spatial tessellation and their dendritic trees were completely reconstructed. Results Parvalbumin interneurons of ethanol-treated animals showed a clustered spatial distribution similar to that observed in control animals. The dendritic tree of parvalbumin interneurons was significantly reduced in ethanol-treated animals, as compared with controls. Conclusions Striatal parvalbumin interneurons are crucial components of the brain network serving motor control. Therefore, the shrinkage of their dendrites could contribute to the motor and cognitive symptoms observed in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

  2. HDAC1 negatively regulates Bdnf and Pvalb required for parvalbumin interneuron maturation in an experience-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dawn X P; Sng, Judy C G

    2016-11-01

    During early postnatal development, neuronal circuits are sculpted by sensory experience provided by the external environment. This experience-dependent regulation of circuitry development consolidates the balance of excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) neurons in the brain. The cortical barrel-column that innervates a single principal whisker is used to provide a clear reference frame for studying the consolidation of E/I circuitry. Sensory deprivation of S1 at birth disrupts the consolidation of excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibitory transmission of parvalbumin interneurons. The molecular mechanisms underlying this decrease in inhibition are not completely understood. Our findings show that epigenetic mechanisms, in particular histone deacetylation by histone deacetylases, negatively regulate the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) and parvalbumin (Pvalb) genes during development, which are required for the maturation of parvalbumin interneurons. After whisker deprivation, increased histone deacetylase 1 expression and activity led to increased histone deacetylase 1 binding and decreased histone acetylation at Bdnf promoters I-IV and Pvalb promoter, resulting in the repression of Bdnf and Pvalb gene transcription. The decrease in Bdnf expression further affected parvalbumin interneuron maturation at layer II/III in S1, demonstrated by decreased parvalbumin expression, a marker for parvalbumin interneuron maturation. Knockdown of HDAC1 recovered Bdnf and Pvalb gene transcription and also prevented the decrease of inhibitory synapses accompanying whisker deprivation.

  3. The Number of Parvalbumin-Expressing Interneurons Is Decreased in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex in Autism.

    OpenAIRE

    E. Hashemi; Ariza, J.; Rogers, H.; Noctor, SC; Martínez-Cerdeño, V

    2016-01-01

    The cognitive phenotype of autism has been correlated with an altered balance of excitation to inhibition in the cerebral cortex, which could result from a change in the number, function, or morphology of GABA-expressing interneurons. The number of GABAergic interneuron subtypes has not been quantified in the autistic cerebral cortex. We classified interneurons into 3 subpopulations based on expression of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin. We quantified the nu...

  4. Corresponding decrease in neuronal markers signals progressive parvalbumin neuron loss in MAM schizophrenia model

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Kathryn M; Grace, Anthony A.

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in normal hippocampal (HPC) function attributed to reduced parvalbumin (PV) expression has been consistently reported in schizophrenia patients and in animal models of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether there is an overall loss of interneurons as opposed to a reduction in activity-dependent PV content. Co-expression of PV and the constitutively-expressed substance P (SP)-receptor protein has been utilized in other models to ascertain the degree of cell survival, as oppos...

  5. Identification of parvalbumin interneurons as cellular substrate of fear memory persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Caliskan, G.; Mueller, I.; Semtner, M.; Winkelmann, A.; Raza, A S; Hollnagel, J.O.; Roesler, A; Heinemann, U.; Stork, O.; Meier, J C

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic ga...

  6. DREADD in Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Dentate Gyrus Modulates Anxiety, Social Interaction and Memory Extinction

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, D.(Boston University, Boston, USA); Chen, L; Deng, D; Jiang, D.; Dong, F.; McSweeney, C.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Mao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in ...

  7. Mice lacking TrkB in parvalbumin-positive cells exhibit sexually dimorphic behavioral phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Jegarl, Anita; Clem, Roger L.

    2014-01-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) is required for cued fear memory consolidation and extinction. Although BDNF is primarily secreted from glutamatergic neurons, TrkB is expressed by other genetically defined cells whose contributions to the behavioral effects of BDNF remain poorly understood. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, which are highly enriched in TrkB, are emerging as key regulators of fear memory expr...

  8. Fish allergens at a glance: Variable allergenicity of parvalbumins, the major fish allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Annette eKuehn; Ines eSwoboda; Karthik eArumugam; Christiane eHilger; François eHentges

    2014-01-01

    Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand,...

  9. Fish Allergens at a Glance: Variable Allergenicity of Parvalbumins, the Major Fish Allergens

    OpenAIRE

    Kuehn, Annette; Swoboda, Ines; Arumugam, Karthik; Hilger, Christiane; Hentges, François

    2014-01-01

    Fish is a common trigger of severe, food-allergic reactions. Only a limited number of proteins induce specific IgE-mediated immune reactions. The major fish allergens are the parvalbumins. They are members of the calcium-binding EF-hand protein family characterized by a conserved protein structure. They represent highly cross-reactive allergens for patients with specific IgE to conserved epitopes. These patients might experience clinical reactions with various fish species. On the other hand,...

  10. Dlx5 and Dlx6 regulate the development of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Dye, Catherine A; Sohal, Vikaas; Long, Jason E; Estrada, Rosanne C; Roztocil, Tomas; Lufkin, Thomas; Deisseroth, Karl; Baraban, Scott C; Rubenstein, John L R

    2010-04-14

    Dlx5 and Dlx6 homeobox genes are expressed in developing and mature cortical interneurons. Simultaneous deletion of Dlx5 and 6 results in exencephaly of the anterior brain; despite this defect, prenatal basal ganglia differentiation appeared largely intact, while tangential migration of Lhx6(+) and Mafb(+) interneurons to the cortex was reduced and disordered. The migration deficits were associated with reduced CXCR4 expression. Transplantation of mutant immature interneurons into a wild-type brain demonstrated that loss of either Dlx5 or Dlx5&6 preferentially reduced the number of mature parvalbumin(+) interneurons; those parvalbumin(+) interneurons that were present had increased dendritic branching. Dlx5/6(+/-) mice, which appear normal histologically, show spontaneous electrographic seizures and reduced power of gamma oscillations. Thus, Dlx5&6 appeared to be required for development and function of somal innervating (parvalbumin(+)) neocortical interneurons. This contrasts with Dlx1, whose function is required for dendrite innervating (calretinin(+), somatostatin(+), and neuropeptide Y(+)) interneurons (Cobos et al., 2005).

  11. Postnatal development of calcium-binding proteins immunoreactivity (parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin) in the human entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grateron, L; Cebada-Sanchez, S; Marcos, P; Mohedano-Moriano, A; Insausti, A M; Muñoz, M; Arroyo-Jimenez, M M; Martinez-Marcos, A; Artacho-Perula, E; Blaizot, X; Insausti, R

    2003-12-01

    The entorhinal cortex is an essential component in the organization of the human hippocampal formation related to cortical activity. It transfers, neocortical information (ultimately distributed to the dentate gyrus and hippocampus) and receives most of the hippocampal output directed to neocortex. At birth, the human entorhinal cortex presents similar layer organization as in adults, although layer II (cell islands) and upper layer III have a protracted maturation. The presence of interneurons expressing calcium-binding proteins (parvalbumin, calbindin-D28K (calbindin) and calretinin) is well documented in the adult human entorhinal cortex. In many of them the calcium binding is co-localized with GABA. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers were virtually absent at birth, their presence increasing gradually in deep layer III, mostly in the lateral and caudal portions of the entorhinal cortex from the 5th month onwards. Calbindin immunoreactive cells and fibers were present at birth, mainly in layers II and upper III; mostly at rostral and lateral portions of the entorhinal cortex, increasing in number and extending to deep layers from the 5th month onwards. Calretinin immunoreactivity was present at birth, homogeneously distributed over layers I, II and upper V, throughout the entorhinal cortex. A substantial increase in the number of calretinin neurons in layer V was observed at the 5th month. The postnatal development of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin may have an important role in the functional maturation of the entorhinal cortex through the control of hippocampal, cortical and subcortical information.

  12. Two Cases of Occupational Contact Urticaria Caused by Percutaneous Sensitization to Parvalbumin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyo Sano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, it has been proposed that the primary mechanism for the development of food allergies is percutaneous sensitization. Since 2010, in Japan, the number of immediate-type wheat allergy due to hydrolyzed wheat protein has dramatically increased among those who have been using soap containing hydrolyzed wheat. This incidence supports the hypothesis that food allergens arise through percutaneous sensitization. Clinical Summary: A 25-year-old man (case 1 and an 18-year-old girl (case 2 with atopic dermatitis visited our Department because of food allergy and hand eczema. After starting their work with fish, severe itchy eczema appeared on their hands. They subsequently started to experience oral allergic symptoms, intraoral itchiness and dyspnea after eating fish. Specific IgE antibodies were detected for many fishes, and skin prick tests showed positive reactions for a variety of fishes in both cases. Furthermore, the fluorescence intensities of specific IgE antibodies against parvalbumin from various types of fish in microarray immunoassay analysis showed positive reactions. We diagnosed them as contact urticaria caused by percutaneous sensitization to parvalbumin through job-related physical contact with fish. Conclusion: The patients' histories and findings indicate the possibility of percutaneous sensitization through occupational exposure to parvalbumin, leading to food allergy.

  13. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  14. Identification and quantification in single muscle fibers of four isoforms of parvalbumin in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonides, W S; van Hardeveld, C

    1989-10-05

    The major parvalbumins present in the iliofibularis muscle of Xenopus laevis were identified and the total parvalbumin content of different types of single fibers of this muscle was determined by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). The criteria used in the identification of proteins as parvalbumins were: a relative molecular mass (Mr) between 10,000 and 14,000, an isoelectric point (pI) between 4.0 and 5.0, and a Ca2+-dependent mobility when run on a polyacrylamide gel in the absence of SDS. Four proteins were thus identified as parvalbumins: PA1, Mr 14,000, pI 4.90; PA2, Mr 11,000, pI 4.90; PA3, Mr 11,000, pI 4.95; and PA4, Mr 11,000, pI 4.25. An ultraviolet absorbance spectrum characteristic of parvalbumins was recorded for a purified preparation of these four proteins. Because the apparent Mr of rabbit parvalbumin in the gel system used was 14,000, whereas the true value is 12,100, it is not excluded that the Mr of component PA1 of 14,000 is an overestimation. The total parvalbumin content of muscles and single muscle fibers was determined using the supernatant obtained after centrifugation of tissue homogenates. Analysis of the protein pattern after electrophoresis in the presence of SDS of this fraction indicated that the Mr 14,000 and 11,000 protein bands contained virtually only parvalbumin. Quantification of the total parvalbumin content of relatively fast (type 1) and slow (type 2) contracting and relaxing single muscle fibers, using laser densitometric analysis of minigels, yielded mean values (mg protein/g wet wt., +/- S.D.) of 5.2 +/- 0.8 for nine type 1 fibers, and 1.9 +/- 1.0 for five type 2 fibers. Both fiber types contained about 2.5-times as much of the Mr 14,000 isoform relative to the combined Mr 11,000 isoforms.

  15. Reversal of reduced parvalbumin neurons in hippocampus and amygdala of Angelman syndrome model mice by chronic treatment of fluoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, Swetha K; Sharma, Ankit; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2014-08-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by autism, intellectual disability and motor disturbances. The disease is primarily caused by the loss of function of maternally inherited UBE3A. Ube3a maternal-deficient mice recapitulates many essential feature of AS. These AS mice have been shown to be under chronic stress and exhibits anxiety-like behaviour because of defective glucocorticoid receptor signalling. Here, we demonstrate that chronic stress in these mice could lead to down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the hippocampus and basolateral amygdala from early post-natal days. Down-regulation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons number could be because of decrease in the expression of parvalbumin in these neurons. We also find that treatment with fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, results in restoration of impaired glucocorticoid signalling, elevated serum corticosterone level, parvalbumin-positive interneurons and anxiety-like behaviours. Our findings suggest that impaired glucocorticod signalling in hippocampus and amygdala of AS mice is critical for the decrease in parvalbumin interneurons number, emergence of anxiety and other behavioural deficits and highlights the importance of fluoxetine in the recovery of these abnormalities.

  16. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  17. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  18. Effects of vitamin A deficiency and opioids on parvalbumin + interneurons in the hippocampus of the HIV-1 transgenic rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Bryant, Joseph; Sultana, Shireen; Jones, Odell; Royal, Walter

    2012-07-01

    Opioid use in HIV infection has been associated with an increased frequency of neurological disease and cognitive impairment and vitamin A deficiency has been linked to progressive HIV disease in drug users. In this report the potential effects of these factors, alone and in combination, on gamma amino butyric acid (GABA)-expression interneurons in hippocampus in the HIV-1 transgenic rat (TG) model were studied. TG and wild-type (WT) F344 Fisher rats deficient in vitamin A from birth were implanted either with a 37.5 mg morphine tablet or with a matching placebo and total numbers of neurons and of parvalbumin+ neurons were quantitated and parvalbumin expression was quantitated in the CA1 hippocampal region of the rats. These studies showed that total neuronal numbers were decreased in the TG versus WT Fisher rats and that this decrease was enhanced by the vitamin A deficient diet and by treatment with morphine. In contrast, there was no significant change noted in numbers of parvalbumin+ neurons. However, levels of parvalbumin expression were decreased for vitamin A deficient and morphine-treated WT rats as compared to WT rats on the normal diet and placebo-treated WT rats. For TG rats, parvalbumin expression was higher for vitamin A deficient TG rats treated with either placebo or morphine than for WT vitamin A deficient rats treated with placebo, and placebo treated vitamin A deficient TG rats showed higher expression than morphine treated vitamin A deficient rats. Expression was also higher for vitamin A deficient morphine-treated rats than for the corresponding WT rat groups and for vitamin A deficient TG rats treated with placebo. For the remaining groups, parvalbumin was similar for the TG and WT rats. These findings suggest that in hippocampus vitamin A deficiency and morphine can increase parvalbumin expression, perhaps as a manifestation of a stress response. Parvalbumin-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons regulate the primary neuronal output from

  19. K(+) channel expression distinguishes subpopulations of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-containing neocortical interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, Alan; Erisir, A; Farb, C.; Nadal, M S; Ozaita Mintegui, Andrés, 1969-; Lau, David; Welker, E.; Rudy, Bernardo

    1999-01-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 K+ channel proteins form similar voltage-gated K+ channels with unusual properties, including fast activation at voltages positive to −10 mV and very fast deactivation rates. These properties are thought to facilitate sustained high-frequency firing. Kv3.1 subunits are specifically found in fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-containing cortical interneurons, and recent studies have provided support for a crucial role in the generation of the fast-spiking phenotype. Kv3.2 mRNAs are...

  20. Development and physiology of GABAergic feedback excitation in parvalbumin expressing interneurons of the mouse basolateral amygdala

    OpenAIRE

    Spampanato, Jay; Sullivan, Robert K. P.; Perumal, Madhusoothanan B.; Sah, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We have previously shown that in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), action potentials in one type of parvalbumin (PV)‐expressing GABAergic interneuron can evoke a disynaptic feedback excitatory postsynaptic potential (fbEPSP) onto the same presynaptic interneuron. Here, using whole‐cell recordings from PV‐expressing interneurons in acute brain slices we expand on this finding to show that this response is first detectable at 2‐week postnatal, and is most prevalent in animals beyond 3 we...

  1. Remodeling of the AB site of rat parvalbumin and oncomodulin into a canonical EF-hand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, J A; Durussel, I; Scott, D J;

    1999-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) and the homologous protein oncomodulin (OM) contain three EF-hand motifs, but the first site (AB) cannot bind Ca2+. Here we aimed to recreate the putative ancestral proteins [D19-28E]PV and [D19-28E]OM by replacing the 10-residue-long nonfunctional loop in the AB site by a 12...... of the AB site from a canonical to an abortive EF-hand may have been dictated by the need for stronger interaction with Mg2+ and Ca2+, and a high conformational stability of the metal-free forms....

  2. A Cross-Reactive Human Single-Chain Antibody for Detection of Major Fish Allergens, Parvalbumins, and Identification of a Major IgE-Binding Epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merima Bublin

    Full Text Available Fish allergy is associated with moderate to severe IgE-mediated reactions to the calcium binding parvalbumins present in fish muscle. Allergy to multiple fish species is caused by parvalbumin-specific cross-reactive IgE recognizing conserved epitopes. In this study, we aimed to produce cross-reactive single chain variable fragment (scFv antibodies for the detection of parvalbumins in fish extracts and the identification of IgE epitopes. Parvalbumin-specific phage clones were isolated from the human ETH-2 phage display library by three rounds of biopanning either against cod parvalbumin or by sequential biopanning against cod (Gad m 1, carp (Cyp c 1 and rainbow trout (Onc m 1 parvalbumins. While biopanning against Gad m 1 resulted in the selection of clones specific exclusively for Gad m 1, the second approach resulted in the selection of clones cross-reacting with all three parvalbumins. Two clones, scFv-gco9 recognizing all three parvalbumins, and scFv-goo8 recognizing only Gad m 1 were expressed in the E. coli non-suppressor strain HB2151 and purified from the periplasm. scFv-gco9 showed highly selective binding to parvalbumins in processed fish products such as breaded cod sticks, fried carp and smoked trout in Western blots. In addition, the scFv-gco9-AP produced as alkaline phosphatase fusion protein, allowed a single-step detection of the parvalbumins. In competitive ELISA, scFv-gco9 was able to inhibit binding of IgE from fish allergic patients' sera to all three β-parvalbumins by up to 80%, whereas inhibition by scFv-goo8 was up to 20%. 1H/15N HSQC NMR analysis of the rGad m 1:scFv-gco9 complex showed participation of amino acid residues conserved among these three parvalbumins explaining their cross-reactivity on a molecular level. In this study, we have demonstrated an approach for the selection of cross-reactive parvalbumin-specific antibodies that can be used for allergen detection and for mapping of conserved epitopes.

  3. Loss of dopamine D2 receptors increases parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Devon L; Durai, Heather H; Garden, Jamie D; Cohen, Evan L; Echevarria, Franklin D; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2015-02-18

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. Depression of excitatory synapses onto parvalbumin interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex in susceptibility to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perova, Zinaida; Delevich, Kristen; Li, Bo

    2015-02-18

    In response to extreme stress, individuals either show resilience or succumb to despair. The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is required for coping with stress, and PFC dysfunction has been implicated in stress-related mental disorders, including depression. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which the PFC participates in stress responses remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the medial PFC (mPFC) in shaping behavioral responses to stress induced by the learned helplessness procedure, in which animals are subjected to an unpredictable and inescapable stressor. PV interneurons in the mPFC were probed and manipulated in knock-in mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the endogenous parvalbumin promoter. Notably, we found that excitatory synaptic transmission onto these neurons was decreased in mice showing helplessness, a behavioral state that is thought to resemble features of human depression. Furthermore, selective suppression of PV interneurons in the mPFC using hM4Di, a DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug), promoted helplessness, indicating that activation of these neurons during stress promotes the establishment of resilient behavior. Our results reveal a cellular mechanism of mPFC dysfunction that may contribute to the emergence of maladaptive behavioral responses in the face of adverse life events.

  5. Parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons are increased in the dorsal hippocampus of the dystrophic mdx mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Tongo, Claudia; Carretta, Donatella; Fulgenzi, Gianluca; Catini, Claudio; Minciacchi, Diego

    2009-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is characterized by variable alterations of the dystrophin gene and by muscle weakness and cognitive impairment. We postulated an association between cognitive impairment and architectural changes of the hippocampal GABAergic system. We investigated a major subpopulation of GABAergic neurons, the parvalbumin-immunopositive (PV-I) cells, in the dorsal hippocampus of the mdx mouse, an acknowledged model of DMD. PV-I neurons were quantified and their distribution was compared in CA1, CA2, CA3, and dentate gyrus in wild-type and mdx mice. The cell morphology and topography of PV-I neurons were maintained. Conversely, the number of PV-I neurons was significantly increased in the mdx mouse. The percent increase of PV-I neurons was from 45% for CA2, up to 125% for the dentate gyrus. In addition, the increased parvalbumin content in the mdx hippocampus was confirmed by Western blot. A change in the hippocampus processing abilities is the expected functional counterpart of the modification displayed by PV-I GABAergic neurons. Altered hippocampal functionality can be responsible for part of the cognitive impairment in DMD.

  6. Identification of Parvalbumin Interneurons as Cellular Substrate of Fear Memory Persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çalışkan, Gürsel; Müller, Iris; Semtner, Marcus; Winkelmann, Aline; Raza, Ahsan S; Hollnagel, Jan O; Rösler, Anton; Heinemann, Uwe; Stork, Oliver; Meier, Jochen C

    2016-05-01

    Parvalbumin-positive (PV) basket cells provide perisomatic inhibition in the cortex and hippocampus and control generation of memory-related network activity patterns, such as sharp wave ripples (SPW-R). Deterioration of this class of fast-spiking interneurons has been observed in neuropsychiatric disorders and evidence from animal models suggests their involvement in the acquisition and extinction of fear memories. Here, we used mice with neuron type-targeted expression of the presynaptic gain-of-function glycine receptor RNA variant GlyR α3L(185L)to genetically enhance the network activity of PV interneurons. These mice showed reduced extinction of contextual fear memory but normal auditory cued fear memory. They furthermore displayed increase of SPW-R activity in area CA3 and CA1 and facilitated propagation of this particular network activity pattern, as determined in ventral hippocampal slice preparations. Individual freezing levels during extinction and SPW-R propagation were correlated across genotypes. The same was true for parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the ventral hippocampus, which was generally augmented in the GlyR mutant mice and correlated with individual freezing levels. Together, these results identify PV interneurons as critical cellular substrate of fear memory persistence and associated SPW-R activity in the hippocampus. Our findings may be relevant for the identification and characterization of physiological correlates for posttraumatic stress and anxiety disorders.

  7. Neuregulin 1 represses limbic epileptogenesis through ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guo-He; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Xiao-Ling; Yin, Dong-Min; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2011-12-11

    Epilepsy is a common and refractory neurological disorder, but the neuronal regulatory mechanisms of epileptogenesis remain largely unclear. Activity-dependent transcription of genes for neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to promote epileptogenesis; however, little is known about factors that may act as intrinsic, homeostatic or counterbalancing mechanisms. Using rodent models, here we show that limbic seizure activity upregulated NRG1-ErbB4 signaling and that epileptogenesis was inhibited by infusing NRG1 intracerebrally but exacerbated by neutralizing endogenous NRG1 with soluble ErbB4 extracellular domain, by inhibiting ErbB4 activation or by deleting the Erbb4 gene. Furthermore, specific depletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons abolished NRG1-mediated inhibition of epileptogenesis and promoted kindling progression, resulting in increased spontaneous seizures and exuberant mossy fiber sprouting. In contrast, depleting ErbB4 in CaMKIIα-positive pyramidal neurons had no effect. Thus, NRG1-induced activation of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons may serve as a critical endogenous negative-feedback mechanism to suppress limbic epileptogenesis.

  8. Sequence microheterogeneity of parvalbumin pI 5.0 of pike: a mass spectrometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Sergei E; Karnoup, Anton S; Bakunts, Anush G; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2009-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PA) is a muscle and neuronal calcium-binding protein, the major fish and frog allergen. Its characteristic feature is the presence of multiple isoforms with significantly different amino acid sequences. Here we show that the major isoform of northern pike muscle PA (pI 5.0, alpha-PA) exhibits microheterogeneity of amino acid sequence. ESI Q-TOF mass-spectrometry (MS) analysis of alpha-PA sample showed the presence of two components with mass difference of 71 Da. Analysis of tryptic and endoproteinase Asp-N digests of alpha-PA by MALDI-TOF MS revealed peptides, corresponding to two different amino acid sequences. The sequence differences between variant proteins are limited to AB-domain and include substitutions K27A and L31K, and an extra Leu residue between K11 and K12. Since the affected residues comprise a cluster on the surface of PA, an involvement of the identified region into target recognition is suggested. The substitutions at positions 27 and 31 are located in the region of previously identified epitopes of parvalbumin relevant for PA-specific IgE and IgG binding, which suggests different immunoactivities of the variants. The found microheterogeneity of PA is suggested to be of importance for physiological adaptation of the propulsive musculature to developmental and/or environmental requirements and may contribute to PA allergenicity.

  9. Severe IgE-mediated anaphylaxis following consumption of fried frog legs: definition of alpha-parvalbumin as the allergen in cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilger, C; Grigioni, F; Thill, L; Mertens, L; Hentges, F

    2002-11-01

    IgE-mediated allergic reactions to bullfrog and edible frog have been reported. The implicated allergens have not been defined so far. The frog material and the patient's serum from a case of severe food-induced anaphylaxis were used to define the implicated allergen at the protein and DNA level. Immunoblotting techniques and N-terminal protein microsequencing were used to define the allergen recognized by the patient's serum. Back translation from the identified protein sequence was used to design degenerated primers to amplify the allergen's cDNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We defined the nucleotide sequence of the allergen from the frog of Indonesian origin that was consumed by the patient, and the homologous cDNA from Rana esculenta. Protein microsequencing revealed that the implicated frog allergen belonged to the parvalbumin family. cDNAs coding for alpha- and beta-parvalbumin of R. esculenta and Rana species were cloned. Recombinant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. The patient's serum IgE antibodies recognized parvalbumin prepared from frog muscle and recombinant alpha-parvalbumin from R. species but not from R. esculenta. Recombinant beta-parvalbumin was not recognized by the IgE antibodies. This work defines at the protein and DNA levels alpha-parvalbumin as the allergen implicated in a case of IgE-mediated anaphylaxis to frog muscle. It also shows that a protein belonging to the parvalbumin family is implicated in type I allergies outside the fish species.

  10. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  11. Nimodipine Prevents Early Loss of Hippocampal CA1 Parvalbumin Immunoreactivity After Focal Cerebral Ischemia in the Rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benyó, Zoltán; de Jong, Giena; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion on hippocampal interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) was studied in rats. Four hours after the onset of ischemia, a reduced number of PV-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons was observed in the l

  12. Entorhinal cortical innervation of parvalbumin-containing neurons (Basket and Chandelier cells) in the rat Ammon's horn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, J; Buzsaki, G; Morrow, J S; Glantz, S B; Leranth, C

    1996-01-01

    Physiological data suggest that in the CA1-CA3 hippocampal areas of rats, entorhinal cortical efferents directly influence the activity of interneurons, in addition to pyramidal cells. To verify this hypothesis, the following experiments were performed: 1) light microscopic double-immunostaining for parvalbumin and the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris-leucoagglutinin injected into the entorhinal cortex; 2) light and electron microscopic analysis of cleaved spectrin-immunostained (i.e., degenerating axons and boutons) hippocampal sections following entorhinal cortex lesion; and 3) an electron microscopic study of parvalbumin-immunostained hippocampal sections after entorhinal cortex lesion. The results demonstrate that in the stratum lacunosum-moleculare of the CA1 and CA3 regions, entorhinal cortical axons form asymmetric synaptic contacts on parvalbumin-containing dendritic shafts. In the stratum lacunosum-moleculare, parvalbumin-immunoreactive dendrites represent processes of GABAergic, inhibitory basket and chandelier cells; these interneurons innervate the perisomatic area and axon initial segments of pyramidal cells, respectively. A feed-forward activation of these neurons by the entorhinal input may explain the strong, short-latency inhibition of pyramidal cells.

  13. The 5-HT1A serotonin receptor is located on calbindin- and parvalbumin-containing neurons in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, Susana; Qian, Zhaoxia; Shah, Reshma; Rahbek, Birgitte; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2003-01-03

    The 5-HT(1A) receptor is a well-characterized serotonin receptor playing a role in many central nervous functions and known to be involved in depression and other mental disorders. In situ hybridization, immunocytochemical, and binding studies have shown that the 5-HT(1A) receptor is widely distributed in the rat brain, with a particularly high density in the limbic system. The receptor's localization in the different neuronal subtypes, which may be of importance for understanding its role in neuronal circuitries, is, however, unknown. In this study we show by immunocytochemical double-labeling techniques, that the 5-HT(1A) receptor is present on both pyramidal and principal cells, and calbindin- and parvalbumin-containing neurons, which generally define two different subtypes of interneurons. Moreover, semiquantitative analysis showed that the receptor's distribution in the different neuronal types varies between brain areas. In cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and amygdala the receptor was located on both principal cells and calbindin- and parvalbumin-containing neurons. In septum and thalamus, the receptor was mostly present on calbindin- and parvalbumin-containing cells. Especially in the medial septum and thalamic reticular nucleus, the receptor highly colocalized with parvalbumin-positive neurons. These results suggest a diverse function of the 5-HT(1A) receptor in modulating neuronal circuitry in different brain areas, that may depend on the type of neuron the receptor is predominantly located on.

  14. Dense, unspecific connectivity of neocortical parvalbumin-positive interneurons: a canonical microcircuit for inhibition?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, Adam M; Yuste, Rafael

    2011-09-14

    GABAergic interneurons play a major role in the function of the mammalian neocortex, but their circuit connectivity is still poorly understood. We used two-photon RuBi-Glutamate uncaging to optically map how the largest population of cortical interneurons, the parvalbumin-positive cells (PV+), are connected to pyramidal cells (PCs) in mouse neocortex. We found locally dense connectivity from PV+ interneurons onto PCs across cortical areas and layers. In many experiments, all nearby PV+ cells were connected to every local PC sampled. In agreement with this, we found no evidence for connection specificity, as PV+ interneurons contacted PC pairs similarly regardless of whether they were synaptically connected or not. We conclude that the microcircuit architecture for PV+ interneurons, and probably neocortical inhibition in general, is an unspecific, densely homogenous matrix covering all nearby pyramidal cells.

  15. Local Integration Accounts for Weak Selectivity of Mouse Neocortical Parvalbumin Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Benjamin; Pattadkal, Jagruti J; Dilly, Geoffrey A; Priebe, Nicholas J; Zemelman, Boris V

    2015-07-15

    Dissecting the functional roles of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits is a fundamental goal in neuroscience. Of particular interest are their roles in emergent cortical computations such as binocular integration in primary visual cortex (V1). We measured the binocular response selectivity of genetically defined subpopulations of excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Parvalbumin (PV+) interneurons received strong inputs from both eyes but lacked selectivity for binocular disparity. Because broad selectivity could result from heterogeneous synaptic input from neighboring neurons, we examined how individual PV+ interneuron selectivity compared to that of the local neuronal network, which is primarily composed of excitatory neurons. PV+ neurons showed functional similarity to neighboring neuronal populations over spatial distances resembling measurements of synaptic connectivity. On the other hand, excitatory neurons expressing CaMKIIα displayed no such functional similarity with the neighboring population. Our findings suggest that broad selectivity of PV+ interneurons results from nonspecific integration within local networks. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  16. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the prefrontal cortex support working memory and cognitive flexibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Andrew J; Woloszynowska-Fraser, Marta U; Ansel-Bollepalli, Laura; Cole, Katy L H; Foggetti, Angelica; Crouch, Barry; Riedel, Gernot; Wulff, Peer

    2015-11-26

    Dysfunction of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVIs) within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) has been implicated in schizophrenia pathology. It is however unclear, how impaired signaling of these neurons may contribute to PFC dysfunction. To identify how PVIs contribute to PFC-dependent behaviors we inactivated PVIs in the PFC in mice using region- and cell-type-selective expression of tetanus toxin light chain (TeLC) and compared the functional consequences of this manipulation with non-cell-type-selective perturbations of the same circuitry. By sampling for behavioral alterations that map onto distinct symptom categories in schizophrenia, we show that dysfunction of PVI signaling in the PFC specifically produces deficits in the cognitive domain, but does not give rise to PFC-dependent correlates of negative or positive symptoms. Our results suggest that distinct aspects of the complex symptomatology of PFC dysfunction in schizophrenia can be attributed to specific prefrontal circuit elements.

  17. Dorsal Horn Parvalbumin Neurons Are Gate-Keepers of Touch-Evoked Pain after Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugues Petitjean

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is a chronic debilitating disease that results from nerve damage, persists long after the injury has subsided, and is characterized by spontaneous pain and mechanical hypersensitivity. Although loss of inhibitory tone in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord is a major contributor to neuropathic pain, the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying this disinhibition are unclear. Here, we combined pharmacogenetic activation and selective ablation approaches in mice to define the contribution of spinal cord parvalbumin (PV-expressing inhibitory interneurons in naive and neuropathic pain conditions. Ablating PV neurons in naive mice produce neuropathic pain-like mechanical allodynia via disinhibition of PKCγ excitatory interneurons. Conversely, activating PV neurons in nerve-injured mice alleviates mechanical hypersensitivity. These findings indicate that PV interneurons are modality-specific filters that gate mechanical but not thermal inputs to the dorsal horn and that increasing PV interneuron activity can ameliorate the mechanical hypersensitivity that develops following nerve injury.

  18. Control of response reliability by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yingjie; Qiao, Wenhui; Liu, Kefei; Zhong, Huiyuan; Yao, Haishan

    2015-04-14

    The responses of visual cortical neurons to natural stimuli are both reliable and sparse. These properties require inhibition, yet the contribution of specific types of inhibitory neurons is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that optogenetic suppression of parvalbumin (PV)- but not somatostatin (SOM)-expressing interneurons reduces response reliability in the primary visual cortex of anaesthetized and awake mice. PV suppression leads to increases in the low firing rates and decreases in the high firing rates of cortical neurons, resulting in an overall reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In contrast, SOM suppression generally increases the overall firing rate for most neurons, without affecting the SNR. Further analysis reveals that PV, but not SOM, suppression impairs neural discrimination of natural stimuli. Together, these results reveal a critical role for PV interneurons in the formation of reliable visual cortical representations of natural stimuli.

  19. Early- and late-born parvalbumin basket cell subpopulations exhibiting distinct regulation and roles in learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Flavio; Chowdhury, Ananya; Lahr, Maria; Caroni, Pico

    2015-02-18

    Brain networks can support learning by promoting acquisition of task-relevant information or by adhering to validated rules, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Upon learning, local inhibitory parvalbumin (PV)-expressing Basket cell networks can switch to opposite configurations that either favor or interfere with further learning, but how this opposite plasticity is induced and relates to distinct learning requirements has remained unclear. Here, we show that PV Basket cells consist of hitherto unrecognized subpopulations, with distinct schedules of neurogenesis, input connectivities, output target neurons, and roles in learning. Plasticity of hippocampal early-born PV neurons was recruited in rule consolidation, whereas plasticity of late-born PV neurons was recruited in new information acquisition. This involved regulation of early-born neuron plasticity specifically through excitation, and of late-born neuron plasticity specifically through inhibition. Therefore, opposite learning requirements are implemented by distinct local networks involving PV Basket cell subpopulations specifically regulated through inhibition or excitation.

  20. Transgenic labeling of parvalbumin-expressing neurons with tdTomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, T; Ting, J T; Monteiro, P; Feng, G

    2016-05-03

    Parvalbumin (PVALB)-expressing fast-spiking interneurons subserve important roles in many brain regions by modulating circuit function and dysfunction of these neurons is strongly implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and autism. To facilitate the study of PVALB neuron function we need to be able to identify PVALB neurons in vivo. We have generated a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse line expressing the red fluorophore tdTomato under the control of endogenous regulatory elements of the Pvalb gene locus (JAX # 027395). We show that the tdTomato transgene is faithfully expressed relative to endogenous PVALB expression throughout the brain. Furthermore, targeted patch clamp recordings confirm that the labeled populations in neocortex, striatum, and hippocampus are fast-spiking interneurons based on intrinsic properties. This new transgenic mouse line provides a useful tool to study PVALB neuron function in the normal brain as well as in mouse models of psychiatric disease.

  1. Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the proportion but not numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat

    OpenAIRE

    Lister, James P.; Blatt, Gene J.; Kemper, Thomas L.; Tonkiss, John; DeBassio, William A; GALLER, JANINA R.; Rosene, Douglas L.

    2011-01-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the structure and function of the adult rat hippocampal formation. The current study examines the effect of prenatal protein malnutrition on numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) GABAergic interneurons, which are important for perisomatic inhibition of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Brain sections from prenatally protein malnourished and normally nourished rats were stained for parvalbumin and PV-IR neurons were quantified using s...

  2. Differential GABAB-receptor-mediated effects in perisomatic- and dendrite-targeting parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Sam A; Gross, Anna; Althof, Daniel; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Bettler, Bernhard; Frotscher, Michael; Hearing, Matthew; Wickman, Kevin; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2013-05-01

    Inhibitory parvalbumin-containing interneurons (PVIs) control neuronal discharge and support the generation of theta- and gamma-frequency oscillations in cortical networks. Fast GABAergic input onto PVIs is crucial for their synchronization and oscillatory entrainment, but the role of metabotropic GABA(B) receptors (GABA(B)Rs) in mediating slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition remains unknown. In this study, we have combined high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy, whole-cell patch-clamp recording, and computational modeling to investigate the subcellular distribution and effects of GABA(B)Rs and their postsynaptic effector Kir3 channels in rat hippocampal PVIs. Pre-embedding immunogold labeling revealed that the receptors and channels localize at high levels to the extrasynaptic membrane of parvalbumin-immunoreactive dendrites. Immunoreactivity for GABA(B)Rs was also present at lower levels on PVI axon terminals. Whole-cell recordings further showed that synaptically released GABA in response to extracellular stimulation evokes large GABA(B)R-mediated slow IPSCs in perisomatic-targeting (PT) PVIs, but only small or no currents in dendrite-targeting (DT) PVIs. In contrast, paired recordings demonstrated that GABA(B)R activation results in presynaptic inhibition at the output synapses of both PT and DT PVIs, but more strongly in the latter. Finally, computational analysis indicated that GABA(B) IPSCs can phasically modulate the discharge of PT interneurons at theta frequencies. In summary, our results show that GABA(B)Rs differentially mediate slow presynaptic and postsynaptic inhibition in PVIs and can contribute to the dynamic modulation of their activity during oscillations. Furthermore, these data provide evidence for a compartment-specific molecular divergence of hippocampal PVI subtypes, suggesting that activation of GABA(B)Rs may shift the balance between perisomatic and dendritic inhibition.

  3. Embryonic and postnatal development of GABA, calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the mouse claustral complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila, José Carlos; Real, M Angeles; Olmos, Luis; Legaz, Isabel; Medina, Loreta; Guirado, Salvador

    2005-01-03

    We analyzed the development of immunoreactive expression patterns for the neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and the calcium-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the embryonic and postnatal mouse claustral complex. Each calcium-binding protein shows a different temporal and spatial pattern of development. Calbindin-positive cells start to be seen very early during embryogenesis and increase dramatically until birth, thus becoming the most abundant cell type during embryonic development, especially in the ventral pallial part of the claustrum. The distribution of calbindin neurons throughout the claustrum during embryonic development partly parallels that of GABA neurons, suggesting that at least part of the calbindin neurons of the claustral complex are GABAergic and originate in the subpallium. Parvalbumin cells, on the other hand, start to be seen only postnatally, and their number then increases while the density of calbindin neurons decreases. Based on calretinin expression in axons, the core/shell compartments of the dorsal claustrum start to be clearly seen at embryonic day 18.5 and may be related to the development of the thalamoclaustral input. Comparison with the expression of Cadherin 8, a marker of the developing dorsolateral claustrum, indicates that the core includes a central part of the dorsolateral claustrum, whereas the shell includes a peripheral area of the dorsolateral claustrum, plus the adjacent ventromedial claustrum. The present data on the spatiotemporal developmental patterns of several subtypes of GABAergic neurons in the claustral complex may help for future studies on temporal lobe epilepsies, which have been related to an alteration of the GABAergic activity.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  5. A loss of parvalbumin-containing interneurons is associated with diminished oscillatory activity in an animal model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Lodge, Daniel J.; Behrens, Margarita M.; Grace, Anthony A.

    2009-01-01

    Decreased GABAergic signaling is among the more robust pathologies observed post-mortem in schizophrenia; however, the functional consequences of this deficit are still largely unknown. Here we demonstrate, in a verified animal model of schizophrenia, that a reduced expression of parvalbumin- (PV) containing interneurons is correlated with a reduction in coordinated neuronal activity during task performance in freely moving rats. More specifically, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM)-treated ra...

  6. Region-specific upregulation of parvalbumin-, but not calretinin-positive cells in the ventral hippocampus during adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Adriana; Diah, Kimberly C.; Tseng, Kuei Y.

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies have highlighted the role of the ventral hippocampus-prefrontal cortex pathway in the acquisition of mature cortical function through refinement of GABAergic circuits during adolescence. Inhibitory GABAergic responses are mediated by highly specialized interneurons, which have distinct functional properties and are characterized by the expression of calcium binding proteins. Among these, we recently found that parvalbumin (PV)- and calretinin (CR)-positive interneurons in the p...

  7. TrkB signaling in parvalbumin-positive interneurons is critical for gamma-band network synchronization in hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Kang; An, Juan Ji; Yang, Feng; Xu, Weifeng; Xu, Zhi-Qing David; Wu, Jianyoung; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.; Fisahn, André; Xu, Baoji; Lu, Bai

    2011-01-01

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate circuit development and synaptic plasticity, its exact role in neuronal network activity remains elusive. Using mutant mice (TrkB-PV−/−) in which the gene for the BDNF receptor, tyrosine kinase B receptor (trkB), has been specifically deleted in parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking GABAergic (PV+) interneurons, we show that TrkB is structurally and functionally important for the integrity of the hippocampal network. The am...

  8. Production and Screening of Monoclonal Peptide Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Mortensen, Anne; Schiolborg, Annette; Friis, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Hybridoma technology is a remarkable and indispensable tool for generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies. Hybridoma-derived monoclonal antibodies not only serve as powerful research and diagnostic reagents, but have also emerged as the most rapidly expanding class of therapeutic biologicals. In this chapter, an overview of hybridoma technology and the laboratory procedures used routinely for hybridoma production and antibody screening are presented, including characterization of peptide antibodies.

  9. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin.

  10. Pharmacokinetics interactions of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Nicola; Bellosta, Stefano; Baldessin, Ludovico; Boccia, Donatella; Racagni, Giorgi; Corsini, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    The clearance of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) typically does not involve cytochrome P450 (CYP450)-mediated metabolism or interaction with cell membrane transporters, therefore the pharmacokinetics interactions of mAbs and small molecule drugs are limited. However, a drug may affect the clearance of mAbs through the modulation of immune response (e.g., methotrexate reduces the clearance of infliximab, adalimumab, and golimumab, possibly due to methotrexate's inhibitory effect on the formation of antibodies against the mAbs). In addition, mAbs that are cytokine modulators may modify the metabolism of drugs through their effects on P450 enzymes expression. For example, cytokine modulators such as tocilizumab (anti-IL-6 receptor antibody) may reverse the "inhibitory" effect of IL-6 on CYP substrates, resulting in a "normalization" of CYP activities. Finally, a drug may alter the clearance of mAbs by either increasing or reducing the levels of expression of targets of mAbs on the cell surface. For instance, statins and fibrates induce PCSK9 expression and therefore increase cellular uptake and clearance of alirocumab and evolocumab, anti-PCSK9 antibodies. In the present review, we will provide an overview on the pharmacokinetics properties of mAbs as related to the most relevant examples of mAbs-small molecule drug interaction.

  11. Parvalbumin interneurons and calretinin fibers arising from the thalamic nucleus reuniens degenerate in the subiculum after kainic acid-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexel, M; Preidt, A P; Kirchmair, E; Sperk, G

    2011-08-25

    The subiculum is the major output area of the hippocampus. It is closely interconnected with the entorhinal cortex and other parahippocampal areas. In animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in TLE patients it exerts increased network excitability and may crucially contribute to the propagation of limbic seizures. Using immunohistochemistry and in situ-hybridization we now investigated neuropathological changes affecting parvalbumin and calretinin containing neurons in the subiculum and other parahippocampal areas after kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. We observed prominent losses in parvalbumin containing interneurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex, and in the principal cell layers of the pre- and parasubiculum. Degeneration of parvalbumin-positive neurons was associated with significant precipitation of parvalbumin-immunoreactive debris 24 h after kainic acid injection. In the subiculum the superficial portion of the pyramidal cell layer was more severely affected than its deep part. In the entorhinal cortex, the deep layers were more severely affected than the superficial ones. The decrease in number of parvalbumin-positive neurons in the subiculum and entorhinal cortex correlated with the number of spontaneous seizures subsequently experienced by the rats. The loss of parvalbumin neurons thus may contribute to the development of spontaneous seizures. On the other hand, surviving parvalbumin neurons revealed markedly increased expression of parvalbumin mRNA notably in the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and in all layers of the entorhinal cortex. This indicates increased activity of these neurons aiming to compensate for the partial loss of this functionally important neuron population. Furthermore, calretinin-positive fibers terminating in the molecular layer of the subiculum, in sector CA1 of the hippocampus proper and in the entorhinal cortex degenerated together with their presumed perikarya in the thalamic nucleus reuniens. In

  12. Ischemia-induced degeneration of CA1 pyramidal cells decreases seizure severity in a subgroup of epileptic gerbils and affects parvalbumin immunoreactivity of CA1 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, D T; Scotti, A L; Nitsch, C

    2001-04-01

    Mongolian gerbils are epilepsy-prone animals. In adult gerbils two major groups can be differentiated according to their seizure behavior: Highly seizure-sensitive gerbils exhibit facial and forelimb clonus or generalized tonic-clonic seizures from the first test on, while kindled-like gerbils are seizure free for the first three to six consecutive tests, later develop forelimb myoclonus, and eventually progress to generalized tonic-clonic seizures. In the hippocampus, seizure history of the individual animal is mirrored in the intensity in which GABAergic neurons are immunostained for the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin: they lose parvalbumin with increasing seizure incidence. In a first step to clarify the influence of hippocampal projection neurons on spontaneous seizure behavior and related parvalbumin expression, we induced degeneration of the CA1 pyramidal cells by transient forebrain ischemia. This results in a decreased seizure sensitivity in highly seizure-sensitive gerbils. The kindling-like process, however, is not permanently blocked by the ischemic nerve cell loss, suggesting that an intact CA1 field is not a prerequisite for the development of seizure behavior. The seizure-induced loss of parvalbumin from the ischemia-resistant interneurons recovers after ischemia. Thus, changes in parvalbumin content brought about by repeated seizures are not permanent but can rather be modulated by novel stimuli.

  13. Downregulation of neuregulin 1-ErbB4 signaling in parvalbumin interneurons in the rat brain may contribute to the antidepressant properties of ketamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Zhang, Guang-Fen; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Sun, He-Liang; Wang, Xing-Ming; Qiu, Li-Li; Yang, Chun; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence underscores the strong, rapid, and sustained antidepressant properties of ketamine with a good tolerability profile in patients with depression; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a bipolar disorder susceptibility gene and a biomarker of major depressive disorder, which regulates pyramidal neuron activity via ErbB4 in parvalbumin interneurons. Moreover, NRG1-ErbB4 signaling is reported to play a key role in the modulation of synaptic plasticity through regulating the neurotransmission. We therefore hypothesized that hypofunction of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in parvalbumin interneurons is involved in the process of ketamine exerting rapid antidepressant actions in rats subjected to the forced swimming test (FST). The results showed that ketamine reduced the immobility time and latency to feed of rats receiving the FST, downregulated the levels of NRG1, phosphorylated ErbB4 (p-ErbB4), parvalbumin, 67-kDA isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and upregulated the levels of glutamate in the rat prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Pretreatment with NRG1 abolished both ketamine's antidepressant effects and ketamine-induced reduction in p-ErbB4, parvalbumin, GAD67, and GABA levels and increase in glutamate levels. These results suggest that the downregulation of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in parvalbumin interneurons in the rat brain may be a mechanism underlying ketamine's antidepressant properties.

  14. Cortical plasticity induced by transplantation of embryonic somatostatin or parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunshuo; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian

    2014-12-23

    GABAergic inhibition has been shown to play an important role in the opening of critical periods of brain plasticity. We recently have shown that transplantation of GABAergic precursors from the embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the source of neocortical parvalbumin- (PV(+)) and somatostatin-expressing (SST(+)) interneurons, can induce a new period of ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) after the endogenous period has closed. Among the diverse subtypes of GABAergic interneurons PV(+) cells have been thought to play the crucial role in ODP. Here we have used MGE transplantation carrying a conditional allele of diphtheria toxin alpha subunit and cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase to deplete PV(+) or SST(+) interneurons selectively and to investigate the contributions of each of these types of interneurons to ODP. As expected, robust plasticity was observed in transplants containing PV(+) cells but in which the majority of SST(+) interneurons were depleted. Surprisingly, transplants in which the majority of PV(+) cells were depleted induced plasticity as effectively as those containing PV(+) cells. In contrast, depleting both cell types blocked induction of plasticity. These findings reveal that PV(+) cells do not play an exclusive role in ODP; SST(+) interneurons also can drive cortical plasticity and contribute to the reshaping of neural networks. The ability of both PV(+) and SST(+) interneurons to induce de novo cortical plasticity could help develop new therapeutic approaches for brain repair.

  15. Development and physiology of GABAergic feedback excitation in parvalbumin expressing interneurons of the mouse basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampanato, Jay; Sullivan, Robert K P; Perumal, Madhusoothanan B; Sah, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that in the basolateral amygdala (BLA), action potentials in one type of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneuron can evoke a disynaptic feedback excitatory postsynaptic potential (fbEPSP) onto the same presynaptic interneuron. Here, using whole-cell recordings from PV-expressing interneurons in acute brain slices we expand on this finding to show that this response is first detectable at 2-week postnatal, and is most prevalent in animals beyond 3 weeks of age (>P21). This circuit has a very high fidelity, and single action potential evoked fbEPSPs display few failures. Reconstruction of filled neurons, and electron microscopy show that interneurons that receive feedback excitation make symmetrical synapses on both the axon initial segments (AIS), as well as the soma and proximal dendrites of local pyramidal neurons, suggesting fbEPSP interneurons are morphologically distinct from the highly specialized chandelier neurons that selectively target the axon initial segment of pyramidal neurons. Single PV interneurons could trigger very large (~ 1 nA) feedback excitatory postsynaptic currents (fbEPSCs) suggesting that these neurons are heavily reciprocally connected to local glutamatergic principal cells. We conclude that in the BLA, a subpopulation of PV interneurons forms a distinct neural circuit in which a single action potential can recruit multiple pyramidal neurons to discharge near simultaneously and feed back onto the presynaptic interneuron.

  16. Parvalbumin interneurons provide grid cell-driven recurrent inhibition in the medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buetfering, Christina; Allen, Kevin; Monyer, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) generate metric spatial representations. Recent attractor-network models suggest an essential role for GABAergic interneurons in the emergence of the grid-cell firing pattern through recurrent inhibition dependent on grid-cell phase. To test this hypothesis, we studied identified parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons that are the most likely candidate for providing this recurrent inhibition onto grid cells. Using optogenetics and tetrode recordings in mice, we found that PV(+) interneurons exhibited high firing rates, low spatial sparsity and no spatial periodicity. PV(+) interneurons inhibited all functionally defined cell types in the MEC and were in turn recruited preferentially by grid cells. To our surprise, we found that individual PV(+) interneurons received input from grid cells with various phases, which most likely accounts for the broadly tuned spatial firing activity of PV(+) interneurons. Our data argue against the notion that PV(+) interneurons provide phase-dependent recurrent inhibition and challenge recent attractor-network models of grid cells.

  17. Parvalbumin-Positive Inhibitory Interneurons Oppose Propagation But Favor Generation of Focal Epileptiform Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessolo, Michele; Marcon, Iacopo; Bovetti, Serena; Losi, Gabriele; Cammarota, Mario; Ratto, Gian Michele; Fellin, Tommaso; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2015-07-01

    Parvalbumin (Pv)-positive inhibitory interneurons effectively control network excitability, and their optogenetic activation has been reported to block epileptic seizures. An intense activity in GABAergic interneurons, including Pv interneurons, before seizures has been described in different experimental models of epilepsy, raising the hypothesis that an increased GABAergic inhibitory signal may, under certain conditions, initiate seizures. It is therefore unclear whether the activity of Pv interneurons enhances or opposes epileptiform activities. Here we use a mouse cortical slice model of focal epilepsy in which the epileptogenic focus can be identified and the role of Pv interneurons in the generation and propagation of seizure-like ictal events is accurately analyzed by a combination of optogenetic, electrophysiological, and imaging techniques. We found that a selective activation of Pv interneurons at the focus failed to block ictal generation and induced postinhibitory rebound spiking in pyramidal neurons, enhancing neuronal synchrony and promoting ictal generation. In contrast, a selective activation of Pv interneurons distant from the focus blocked ictal propagation and shortened ictal duration at the focus. We revealed that the reduced ictal duration was a direct consequence of the ictal propagation block, probably by preventing newly generated afterdischarges to travel backwards to the original focus of ictal initiation. Similar results were obtained upon individual Pv interneuron activation by intracellular depolarizing current pulses. The functional dichotomy of Pv interneurons here described opens new perspectives to our understanding of how local inhibitory circuits govern generation and spread of focal epileptiform activities.

  18. Activation of prefrontal cortical parvalbumin interneurons facilitates extinction of reward-seeking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparta, Dennis R; Hovelsø, Nanna; Mason, Alex O; Kantak, Pranish A; Ung, Randall L; Decot, Heather K; Stuber, Garret D

    2014-03-05

    Forming and breaking associations between emotionally salient environmental stimuli and rewarding or aversive outcomes is an essential component of learned adaptive behavior. Importantly, when cue-reward contingencies degrade, animals must exhibit behavioral flexibility to extinguish prior learned associations. Understanding the specific neural circuit mechanisms that operate during the formation and extinction of conditioned behaviors is critical because dysregulation of these neural processes is hypothesized to underlie many of the maladaptive and pathological behaviors observed in various neuropsychiatric disorders in humans. The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) participates in the behavioral adaptations seen in both appetitive and aversive-cue-mediated responding, but the precise cell types and circuit mechanisms sufficient for driving these complex behavioral states remain largely unspecified. Here, we recorded and manipulated the activity of parvalbumin-positive fast spiking interneurons (PV+ FSIs) in the prelimbic area (PrL) of the mPFC in mice. In vivo photostimulation of PV+ FSIs resulted in a net inhibition of PrL neurons, providing a circuit blueprint for behavioral manipulations. Photostimulation of mPFC PV+ cells did not alter anticipatory or consummatory licking behavior during reinforced training sessions. However, optical activation of these inhibitory interneurons to cues associated with reward significantly accelerated the extinction of behavior during non-reinforced test sessions. These data suggest that suppression of excitatory mPFC networks via increased activity of PV+ FSIs may enhance reward-related behavioral flexibility.

  19. Inhibition of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons results in complex behavioral changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J A; Ramikie, T S; Schmidt, M J; Báldi, R; Garbett, K; Everheart, M G; Warren, L E; Gellért, L; Horváth, S; Patel, S; Mirnics, Károly

    2015-12-01

    Reduced expression of the Gad1 gene-encoded 67-kDa protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) is a hallmark of schizophrenia. GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal sub-populations, including the parvalbumin-positive (PVALB+) cells. To investigate the role of the PV-positive GABAergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we knocked down the Gad1 transcript using a microRNA engineered to target specifically Gad1 mRNA under the control of Pvalb bacterial artificial chromosome. Verification of construct expression was performed by immunohistochemistry. Follow-up electrophysiological studies revealed a significant reduction in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release probability without alterations in postsynaptic membrane properties or changes in glutamatergic release probability in the prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic (Tg) mice uncovered that the Pvalb/Gad1 Tg mice have pronounced sensorimotor gating deficits, increased novelty-seeking and reduced fear extinction. Furthermore, NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) receptor antagonism by ketamine had an opposing dose-dependent effect, suggesting that the differential dosage of ketamine might have divergent effects on behavioral processes. All behavioral studies were validated using a second cohort of animals. Our results suggest that reduction of GABAergic transmission from PVALB+ interneurons primarily impacts behavioral domains related to fear and novelty seeking and that these alterations might be related to the behavioral phenotype observed in schizophrenia.

  20. Increased Serotonin Transporter Expression Reduces Fear and Recruitment of Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; Fucsina, Giulia; Oikonomidis, Lydia; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Genetic association studies suggest that variations in the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) transporter (5-HTT) gene are associated with susceptibility to psychiatric disorders such as anxiety or posttraumatic stress disorder. Individuals carrying high 5-HTT-expressing gene variants display low amygdala reactivity to fearful stimuli. Mice overexpressing the 5-HTT (5-HTTOE), an animal model of this human variation, show impaired fear, together with reduced fear-evoked theta oscillations in the basolateral amygdala (BLA). However, it is unclear how variation in 5-HTT gene expression impacts on the microcircuitry of the BLA to change behavior. We addressed this issue by investigating the activity of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons (PVINs), the biggest IN population in the basal amygdala (BA). We found that increased 5-HTT expression impairs the recruitment of PVINs (measured by their c-Fos immunoreactivity) during fear. Ex vivo patch-clamp recordings demonstrated that the depolarizing effect of 5-HT on PVINs was mediated by 5-HT2A receptor. In 5-HTTOE mice, 5-HT-evoked depolarization of PVINs and synaptic inhibition of principal cells, which provide the major output of the BA, were impaired. This deficit was because of reduced 5-HT2A function and not because of increased 5-HT uptake. Collectively, these findings provide novel cellular mechanisms that are likely to contribute to differences in emotional behaviors linked with genetic variations of the 5-HTT.

  1. Dissecting local circuits: parvalbumin interneurons underlie broad feedback control of olfactory bulb output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamichi, Kazunari; Shlomai-Fuchs, Yael; Shu, Marvin; Weissbourd, Brandon C; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2013-12-04

    In the mouse olfactory bulb, information from sensory neurons is extensively processed by local interneurons before being transmitted to the olfactory cortex by mitral and tufted (M/T) cells. The precise function of these local networks remains elusive because of the vast heterogeneity of interneurons, their diverse physiological properties, and their complex synaptic connectivity. Here we identified the parvalbumin interneurons (PVNs) as a prominent component of the M/T presynaptic landscape by using an improved rabies-based transsynaptic tracing method for local circuits. In vivo two-photon-targeted patch recording revealed that PVNs have exceptionally broad olfactory receptive fields and exhibit largely excitatory and persistent odor responses. Transsynaptic tracing indicated that PVNs receive direct input from widely distributed M/T cells. Both the anatomical and functional extent of this M/T→PVN→M/T circuit contrasts with the narrowly confined M/T→granule cell→M/T circuit, suggesting that olfactory information is processed by multiple local circuits operating at distinct spatial scales.

  2. Decreased number of parvalbumin and cholinergic interneurons in the striatum of individuals with Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Yuko; Kalanithi, Paul S A; Grantz, Heidi; Schwartz, Michael L; Saper, Clifford; Leckman, James F; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2010-02-01

    Corticobasal ganglia neuronal ensembles bring automatic motor skills into voluntary control and integrate them into ongoing motor behavior. A 5% decrease in caudate (Cd) nucleus volume is the most consistent structural finding in the brain of patients with Tourette syndrome (TS), but the cellular abnormalities that underlie this decrease in volume are unclear. In this study the density of different types of interneurons and medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the striatum was assessed in the postmortem brains of 5 TS subjects as compared with normal controls (NC) by unbiased stereological analyses. TS patients demonstrated a 50%-60% decrease of both parvalbumin (PV)+ and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)+ cholinergic interneurons in the Cd and the putamen (Pt). Cholinergic interneurons were decreased in TS patients in the associative and sensorimotor regions but not in the limbic regions of the striatum, such that the normal gradient in density of cholinergic cells (highest in associative regions, intermediate in sensorimotor and lowest in limbic regions) was abolished. No significant difference was present in the densities of medium-sized calretinin (CR)+ interneurons, MSNs, and total neurons. The selective deficit of PV+ and cholinergic striatal interneurons in TS subjects may result in an impaired cortico/thalamic control of striatal neuron firing in TS.

  3. A critical role for NMDA receptors in parvalbumin interneurons for gamma rhythm induction and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlén, M; Meletis, K; Siegle, J H; Cardin, J A; Futai, K; Vierling-Claassen, D; Rühlmann, C; Jones, S R; Deisseroth, K; Sheng, M; Moore, C I; Tsai, L-H

    2012-05-01

    Synchronous recruitment of fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin (PV) interneurons generates gamma oscillations, rhythms that emerge during performance of cognitive tasks. Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists alters gamma rhythms, and can induce cognitive as well as psychosis-like symptoms in humans. The disruption of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) signaling specifically in FS PV interneurons is therefore hypothesized to give rise to neural network dysfunction that could underlie these symptoms. To address the connection between NMDAR activity, FS PV interneurons, gamma oscillations and behavior, we generated mice lacking NMDAR neurotransmission only in PV cells (PV-Cre/NR1f/f mice). Here, we show that mutant mice exhibit enhanced baseline cortical gamma rhythms, impaired gamma rhythm induction after optogenetic drive of PV interneurons and reduced sensitivity to the effects of NMDAR antagonists on gamma oscillations and stereotypies. Mutant mice show largely normal behaviors except for selective cognitive impairments, including deficits in habituation, working memory and associative learning. Our results provide evidence for the critical role of NMDAR in PV interneurons for expression of normal gamma rhythms and specific cognitive behaviors.

  4. HDAC2 expression in parvalbumin interneurons regulates synaptic plasticity in the mouse visual cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexi Nott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An experience-dependent postnatal increase in GABAergic inhibition in the visual cortex is important for the closure of a critical period of enhanced synaptic plasticity. Although maturation of the subclass of parvalbumin (Pv–expressing GABAergic interneurons is known to contribute to critical period closure, the role of epigenetics on cortical inhibition and synaptic plasticity has not been explored. The transcription regulator, histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, has been shown to modulate synaptic plasticity and learning processes in hippocampal excitatory neurons. We found that genetic deletion of HDAC2 specifically from Pv interneurons reduces inhibitory input in the visual cortex of adult mice and coincides with enhanced long-term depression that is more typical of young mice. These findings show that HDAC2 loss in Pv interneurons leads to a delayed closure of the critical period in the visual cortex and supports the hypothesis that HDAC2 is a key negative regulator of synaptic plasticity in the adult brain.

  5. Target-specific suppression of GABA release from parvalbumin interneurons in the basolateral amygdala by dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hong-Yuan; Ito, Wataru; Li, Jiayang; Morozov, Alexei

    2012-10-17

    Dopamine (DA) in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) promotes fear learning by disinhibiting principal neurons (PNs) and enabling synaptic plasticity in their sensory inputs. While BLA interneurons (INs) are heterogeneous, it is unclear which interneuron subtypes decrease GABAergic input to PNs in the presence of DA. Here, using cell type-selective photostimulation by channelrhodopsin 2 in BLA slices from mouse brain, we examined the role of parvalbumin-positive INs (PV-INs), the major interneuronal subpopulation in BLA, in the disinhibitory effect of DA. We found that DA selectively suppressed GABAergic transmission from PV-INs to PNs by acting on presynaptic D(2) receptors, and this effect was mimicked by Rp-cAMP, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent signaling. In contrast, DA did not alter GABA release from PV-INs to INs. Furthermore, neither suppressing cAMP-dependent signaling by Rp-cAMP nor enhancing it by forskolin altered GABA release from PV-INs to BLA INs. Overall, DA disinhibits BLA, at least in part, by suppressing GABA release from PV-INs in the target cell-specific manner that results from differential control of this release by cAMP-dependent signaling.

  6. Parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons in auditory cortex are well-tuned for frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alexandra K; Wehr, Michael

    2013-08-21

    In the auditory cortex, synaptic inhibition is known to be involved in shaping receptive fields, enhancing temporal precision, and regulating gain. Cortical inhibition is provided by local GABAergic interneurons, which comprise 10-20% of the cortical population and can be separated into numerous subclasses. The morphological and physiological diversity of interneurons suggests that these different subclasses have unique roles in sound processing; however, these roles are yet unknown. Understanding the receptive field properties of distinct inhibitory cell types will be critical to elucidating their computational function in cortical circuits. Here we characterized the tuning and response properties of parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, the largest inhibitory subclass. We used channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) as an optogenetic tag to identify PV+ and PV- neurons in vivo in transgenic mice. In contrast to PV+ neurons in mouse visual cortex, which are broadly tuned for orientation, we found that auditory cortical PV+ neurons were well tuned for frequency, although very tightly tuned PV+ cells were uncommon. This suggests that PV+ neurons play a minor role in shaping frequency tuning, and is consistent with the idea that PV+ neurons nonselectively pool input from the local network. PV+ interneurons had shallower response gain and were less intensity-tuned than PV- neurons, suggesting that PV+ neurons provide dynamic gain control and shape intensity tuning in auditory cortex. PV+ neurons also had markedly faster response latencies than PV- neurons, consistent with a computational role in enhancing the temporal precision of cortical responses.

  7. Parvalbumin tunes spike-timing and efferent short-term plasticity in striatal fast spiking interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orduz, David; Bischop, Don Patrick; Schwaller, Beat; Schiffmann, Serge N; Gall, David

    2013-07-01

      Striatal fast spiking interneurons (FSIs) modulate output of the striatum by synchronizing medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). Recent studies have broadened our understanding of FSIs, showing that they are implicated in severe motor disorders such as parkinsonism, dystonia and Tourette syndrome. FSIs are the only striatal neurons to express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). This selective expression of PV raises questions about the functional role of this Ca(2+) buffer in controlling FSI Ca(2+) dynamics and, consequently, FSI spiking mode and neurotransmission. To study the functional involvement of FSIs in striatal microcircuit activity and the role of PV in FSI function, we performed perforated patch recordings on enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing FSIs in brain slices from control and PV-/- mice. Our results revealed that PV-/- FSIs fired more regularly and were more excitable than control FSIs by a mechanism in which Ca(2+) buffering is linked to spiking activity as a result of the activation of small conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels. A modelling approach of striatal FSIs supports our experimental results. Furthermore, PV deletion modified frequency-specific short-term plasticity at inhibitory FSI to MSN synapses. Our results therefore reinforce the hypothesis that in FSIs, PV is crucial for fine-tuning of the temporal responses of the FSI network and for the orchestration of MSN populations. This, in turn, may play a direct role in the generation and pathology-related worsening of motor rhythms.

  8. Pentraxins coordinate excitatory synapse maturation and circuit integration of parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkey, Kenneth A; Barksdale, Elizabeth; Craig, Michael T; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Sukumaran, Madhav; Vargish, Geoffrey A; Mitchell, Robert M; Wyeth, Megan S; Petralia, Ronald S; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Cameron, Heather A; Murata, Yasunobu; Colonnese, Matthew T; Worley, Paul F; McBain, Chris J

    2015-03-18

    Circuit computation requires precision in the timing, extent, and synchrony of principal cell (PC) firing that is largely enforced by parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking interneurons (PVFSIs). To reliably coordinate network activity, PVFSIs exhibit specialized synaptic and membrane properties that promote efficient afferent recruitment such as expression of high-conductance, rapidly gating, GluA4-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We found that PVFSIs upregulate GluA4 during the second postnatal week coincident with increases in the AMPAR clustering proteins NPTX2 and NPTXR. Moreover, GluA4 is dramatically reduced in NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice with consequent reductions in PVFSI AMPAR function. Early postnatal NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice exhibit delayed circuit maturation with a prolonged critical period permissive for giant depolarizing potentials. Juvenile NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice display reduced feedforward inhibition yielding a circuit deficient in rhythmogenesis and prone to epileptiform discharges. Our findings demonstrate an essential role for NPTXs in controlling network dynamics highlighting potential therapeutic targets for disorders with inhibition/excitation imbalances such as schizophrenia.

  9. Input-specific maturation of synaptic dynamics of parvalbumin interneurons in primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiangteng; Tucciarone, Jason; Lin, Ying; Huang, Z Josh

    2014-11-25

    Cortical networks consist of local recurrent circuits and long-range pathways from other brain areas. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVNs) regulate the dynamic operation of local ensembles as well as the temporal precision of afferent signals. The synaptic recruitment of PVNs that support these circuit operations is not well-understood. Here we demonstrate that the synaptic dynamics of PVN recruitment in mouse visual cortex are customized according to input source with distinct maturation profiles. Whereas the long-range inputs to PVNs show strong short-term depression throughout postnatal maturation, local inputs from nearby pyramidal neurons progressively lose such depression. This enhanced local recruitment depends on PVN-mediated reciprocal inhibition and results from both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, including calcium-permeable AMPA receptors at PVN postsynaptic sites. Although short-term depression of long-range inputs is well-suited for afferent signal detection, the robust dynamics of local inputs may facilitate rapid and proportional PVN recruitment in regulating local circuit operations.

  10. Subgroups of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in layers 2/3 of the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, Jessica; Akgul, Gulcan; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2013-03-01

    The input, processing, and output characteristics of inhibitory interneurons help shape information flow through layers 2/3 of the visual cortex. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons modulate and synchronize the gain and dynamic responsiveness of pyramidal neurons. To define the diversity of PV interneurons in layers 2/3 of the developing visual cortex, we characterized their passive and active membrane properties. Using Ward's and k-means multidimensional clustering, we identified four PV interneuron subgroups. The most notable difference between the subgroups was their firing patterns in response to moderate stimuli just above rheobase. Two subgroups showed regular and continuous firing at all stimulus intensities above rheobase. The difference between these two continuously firing subgroups was that one fired at much higher frequencies and transitioned into this high-frequency firing rate at or near rheobase. The two other subgroups showed irregular, stuttering firing patterns just above rheobase. Both of these subgroups typically transitioned to regular and continuous firing at intense stimulations, but one of these subgroups, the strongly stuttering subgroup, showed irregular firing across a wider range of stimulus intensities and firing frequencies. The four subgroups also differed in excitatory synaptic input, providing independent support for the classification of subgroups. The subgroups of PV interneurons identified here would respond differently to inputs of varying intensity and frequency, generating diverse patterns of PV inhibition in the developing neural circuit.

  11. Dissecting Local Circuits: Parvalbumin Interneurons Underlie Broad Feedback Control of Olfactory Bulb Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamichi, Kazunari; Shlomai-Fuchs, Yael; Shu, Marvin; Weissbourd, Brandon C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary In the mouse olfactory bulb, information from sensory neurons is extensively processed by local interneurons before being transmitted to the olfactory cortex by mitral and tufted (M/T) cells. The precise function of these local networks remains elusive because of the vast heterogeneity of interneurons, their diverse physiological properties, and their complex synaptic connectivity. Here we identified the parvalbumin interneurons (PVNs) as a prominent component of the M/T presynaptic landscape by using an improved rabies-based trans-synaptic tracing method for local circuits. In vivo two-photon targeted patch recording revealed that PVNs have exceptionally broad olfactory receptive fields, and exhibit largely excitatory and persistent odor responses. Trans-synaptic tracing indicated that PVNs receive direct input from widely distributed M/T cells. Both the anatomical and functional extent of this M/T→PVN→M/T circuit contrasts with the narrowly confined M/T→granule cell→M/T circuit, suggesting that olfactory information is processed by multiple local circuits operating at distinct spatial scales. PMID:24239125

  12. Input-specific maturation of synaptic dynamics of parvalbumin interneurons in primary visual cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiangteng; Tucciarone, Jason; Lin, Ying; Huang, Z. Josh

    2014-01-01

    Cortical networks consist of local recurrent circuits and long-range pathways from other brain areas. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVNs) regulate the dynamic operation of local ensembles as well as the temporal precision of afferent signals. The synaptic recruitment of PVNs that support these circuit operations is not well-understood. Here we demonstrate that the synaptic dynamics of PVN recruitment in mouse visual cortex are customized according to input source with distinct maturation profiles. Whereas the long-range inputs to PVNs show strong short-term depression throughout postnatal maturation, local inputs from nearby pyramidal neurons progressively lose such depression. This enhanced local recruitment depends on PVN-mediated reciprocal inhibition and results from both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, including calcium-permeable AMPA receptors at PVN postsynaptic sites. Although short-term depression of long-range inputs is well-suited for afferent signal detection, the robust dynamics of local inputs may facilitate rapid and proportional PVN recruitment in regulating local circuit operations. PMID:25385583

  13. Prolonged contraction-relaxation cycle of fast-twitch muscles in parvalbumin knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaller, B; Dick, J; Dhoot, G; Carroll, S; Vrbova, G; Nicotera, P; Pette, D; Wyss, A; Bluethmann, H; Hunziker, W; Celio, M R

    1999-02-01

    The calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) occurs at high concentrations in fast-contracting vertebrate muscle fibers. Its putative role in facilitating the rapid relaxation of mammalian fast-twitch muscle fibers by acting as a temporary buffer for Ca2+ is still controversial. We generated knockout mice for PV (PV -/-) and compared the Ca2+ transients and the dynamics of contraction of their muscles with those from heterozygous (PV +/-) and wild-type (WT) mice. In the muscles of PV-deficient mice, the decay of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) after 20-ms stimulation was slower compared with WT mice and led to a prolongation of the time required to attain peak twitch tension and to an extension of the half-relaxation time. The integral [Ca2+]i in muscle fibers of PV -/- mice was higher and consequently the force generated during a single twitch was approximately 40% greater than in PV +/- and WT animals. Acceleration of the contraction-relaxation cycle of fast-twitch muscle fibers by PV may confer an advantage in the performance of rapid, phasic movements.

  14. Maternal Immune Activation Leads to Selective Functional Deficits in Offspring Parvalbumin Interneurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetta, Sarah; Bolkan, Scott; Padilla-Coreano, Nancy; Song, LouJin; Sahn, Ryan; Harrison, Neil; Gordon, Joshua A.; Brown, Alan; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Summary Abnormalities in prefrontal GABAergic transmission, particularly in fast-spiking interneurons that express parvalbumin (PV), are hypothesized to contribute to the pathophysiology of multiple psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, anxiety disorders and depression. While primarily histological abnormalities have been observed in patients and in animal models of psychiatric disease, evidence for abnormalities in functional neurotransmission at the level of specific interneuron populations has been lacking in animal models and is difficult to establish in human patients. Using an animal model of a psychiatric disease risk factor, prenatal maternal immune activation (MIA), we found reduced functional GABAergic transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of adult MIA offspring. Decreased transmission was selective for interneurons expressing PV, and was not observed in calretinin-expressing neurons. This deficit in PV function in MIA offspring was associated with increased anxiety-like behavior and impairments in attentional set shifting, but did not affect working memory. Furthermore, cell-type specific optogenetic inhibition of mPFC PV interneurons was sufficient to impair attentional set shifting and enhance anxiety levels. Finally, we found that in vivo mPFC gamma oscillations, which are supported by PV interneuron function, were linearly correlated with the degree of anxiety displayed in adult mice, and that this correlation was disrupted in MIA offspring. These results demonstrate a selective functional vulnerability of PV interneurons to maternal immune activation, leading to affective and cognitive symptoms that have high relevance for schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26830140

  15. Parvalbumin-expressing interneurons coordinate hippocampal network dynamics required for memory consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ognjanovski, Nicolette; Schaeffer, Samantha; Wu, Jiaxing; Mofakham, Sima; Maruyama, Daniel; Zochowski, Michal; Aton, Sara J.

    2017-04-01

    Activity in hippocampal area CA1 is essential for consolidating episodic memories, but it is unclear how CA1 activity patterns drive memory formation. We find that in the hours following single-trial contextual fear conditioning (CFC), fast-spiking interneurons (which typically express parvalbumin (PV)) show greater firing coherence with CA1 network oscillations. Post-CFC inhibition of PV+ interneurons blocks fear memory consolidation. This effect is associated with loss of two network changes associated with normal consolidation: (1) augmented sleep-associated delta (0.5-4 Hz), theta (4-12 Hz) and ripple (150-250 Hz) oscillations; and (2) stabilization of CA1 neurons' functional connectivity patterns. Rhythmic activation of PV+ interneurons increases CA1 network coherence and leads to a sustained increase in the strength and stability of functional connections between neurons. Our results suggest that immediately following learning, PV+ interneurons drive CA1 oscillations and reactivation of CA1 ensembles, which directly promotes network plasticity and long-term memory formation.

  16. Contribution of Innate Cortical Mechanisms to the Maturation of Orientation Selectivity in Parvalbumin Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa Velez, Dario X; Ellefsen, Kyle L; Hathaway, Ethan R; Carathedathu, Mathew C; Gandhi, Sunil P

    2017-01-25

    The maturation of cortical parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons depends on the interaction of innate and experience-dependent factors. Dark-rearing experiments suggest that visual experience determines when broad orientation selectivity emerges in visual cortical PV interneurons. Here, using neural transplantation and in vivo calcium imaging of mouse visual cortex, we investigated whether innate mechanisms contribute to the maturation of orientation selectivity in PV interneurons. First, we confirmed earlier findings showing that broad orientation selectivity emerges in PV interneurons by 2 weeks after vision onset, ∼35 d after these cells are born. Next, we assessed the functional development of transplanted PV (tPV) interneurons. Surprisingly, 25 d after transplantation (DAT) and >2 weeks after vision onset, we found that tPV interneurons have not developed broad orientation selectivity. By 35 DAT, however, broad orientation selectivity emerges in tPV interneurons. Transplantation does not alter orientation selectivity in host interneurons, suggesting that the maturation of tPV interneurons occurs independently from their endogenous counterparts. Together, these results challenge the notion that the onset of vision solely determines when PV interneurons become broadly tuned. Our results reveal that an innate cortical mechanism contributes to the emergence of broad orientation selectivity in PV interneurons.

  17. GFR alpha-1 is expressed in parvalbumin GABAergic neurons in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabi, A; Hoffer, B J; Olson, L; Morales, M

    2000-09-22

    Glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is a potent survival factor for several types of neurons. GDNF binds with high affinity to GDNF-family receptor alpha-1 (GFR alpha-1). This receptor is expressed in different areas of the brain, including the hippocampus and dentate gyrus. By using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, we found that 19% to 37% of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) expressing neurons co-expressed GFR alpha-1 in the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/GAD co-expression was found mainly in the stratum (s) pyramidale (29-37%) and s. oriens (20-25%). Further characterization of GFR alpha-1 expressing interneurons, based on their calcium-binding protein immunoreactivity, demonstrated that many parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive neurons express GFR alpha-1 in the s. pyramidale of CA1 (72%), CA2 (70%) and CA3 (70%) subfields of the hippocampus. GFR alpha-1/PV double labeled neurons were also detected in the s. oriens of CA1 (52%), CA2 (27%) and CA3 (36%) subfields. The expression of GFR alpha-1 in principal neurons and in a specific sub-population of GABAergic neurons (PV-containing neurons) suggest that GDNF might modulate, in a selective manner, functions of the entire adult hippocampus.

  18. Disproportionate loss of CA4 parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in patients with Ammon's horn sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z Q; Armstrong, D L; Hamilton, W J; Grossman, R G

    1997-09-01

    We studied differences in the number and morphology of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons in 43 hippocampal specimens from patients with classical Ammon's horn sclerosis (AHS) who underwent anterior temporal lobectomy, as compared with 14 autopsy and non-AHS surgical control specimens. PV-IR neuronal loss in the AHS specimens varied significantly from that expected based on overall AHS-associated pyramidal and granule neuron loss. Most striking was the loss of PV-IR interneurons in CA4 of the AHS specimens, which was 12 times greater than AHS-associated pyramidal neuron loss, and significantly exceeded the PV-IR interneuron loss observed in the other sectors of the hippocampus. In addition, the PV-IR interneurons in the AHS specimens had markedly smaller and less defined cell bodies and shortened and simplified dendritic arbors compared with the PV-IR interneurons in the control specimens. Other differences noted in the AHS specimens included prominent dendritic varicosities; the loss or interruption of a band formed by PV-IR terminals in the dentate gyrus; and the virtual absence of a small, intensely staining PV-IR interneuron with a short, exuberant dendritic arbor that was readily identified in the autopsy specimens. We discuss these findings in relationship to the development of classical AHS and complex partial seizures (CPS).

  19. Shank1 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission in mouse hippocampal parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wenjie; Watanabe, Takuya; Cho, Sukhee; Frost, Jeffrey L; Truong, Tina; Zhao, Xiaohu; Futai, Kensuke

    2015-04-01

    The Shank genes (SHANK1, 2, 3) encode scaffold proteins highly enriched in postsynaptic densities where they regulate synaptic structure in spiny neurons. Mutations in human Shank genes are linked to autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. Shank1 mutant mice exhibit intriguing cognitive phenotypes reminiscent of individuals with autism spectrum disorder. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to the human pathophysiological phenotypes and mouse behaviors have not been elucidated. In this study it is shown that Shank1 protein is highly localized in parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons in the hippocampus. Importantly, a lack of Shank1 in hippocampal CA1 PV+ neurons reduced excitatory synaptic inputs and inhibitory synaptic outputs to pyramidal neurons. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in Shank1 mutant mice exhibit a shift in the excitatory and inhibitory balance (E-I balance), a pathophysiological hallmark of autism spectrum disorder. The mutant mice also exhibit lower expression of gephyrin (a scaffold component of inhibitory synapses), supporting the dysregulation of E-I balance in the hippocampus. These results suggest that Shank1 scaffold in PV+ interneurons regulates excitatory synaptic strength and participates in the maintenance of E-I balance in excitatory neurons.

  20. Dendritic spikes induce ripples in parvalbumin interneurons during hippocampal sharp waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiovini, Balázs; Turi, Gergely F; Katona, Gergely; Kaszás, Attila; Pálfi, Dénes; Maák, Pál; Szalay, Gergely; Szabó, Mátyás Forián; Szabó, Gábor; Szadai, Zoltán; Káli, Szabolcs; Rózsa, Balázs

    2014-05-21

    Sharp-wave ripples are transient oscillatory events in the hippocampus that are associated with the reactivation of neuronal ensembles within specific circuits during memory formation. Fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (FS-PV INs) are thought to provide fast integration in these oscillatory circuits by suppressing regenerative activity in their dendrites. Here, using fast 3D two-photon imaging and a caged glutamate, we challenge this classical view by demonstrating that FS-PV IN dendrites can generate propagating Ca(2+) spikes during sharp-wave ripples. The spikes originate from dendritic hot spots and are mediated dominantly by L-type Ca(2+) channels. Notably, Ca(2+) spikes were associated with intrinsically generated membrane potential oscillations. These oscillations required the activation of voltage-gated Na(+) channels, had the same frequency as the field potential oscillations associated with sharp-wave ripples, and controlled the phase of action potentials. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that the smallest functional unit that can generate ripple-frequency oscillations is a segment of a dendrite.

  1. Deficits in parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus of isolation reared rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harte, M K; Powell, S B; Swerdlow, N R; Geyer, M A; Reynolds, G P

    2007-07-01

    Post-mortem studies have provided evidence for abnormalities of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in schizophrenia. The calcium-binding proteins (CBPs), parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) can be used as markers for specific subpopulations of GABAergic neurons in the brain. Isolation rearing of rats is a non-pharmacological, non-lesion manipulation that leads to deficits in prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex (PPI) and other behavioural and neurochemical alterations reminiscent of schizophrenia. Female rats were reared in social housing (groups of three) or singly for 11 weeks post weaning and PPI was measured. Brains were removed and hippocampal CBP- containing neurons determined following immunocytochemical staining. Compared to socially housed rats, isolated rats exhibited PPI deficits and reductions in PV and CB-immunoreactive cells in the hippocampus, with no significant change in CR. These findings demonstrate selective abnormalities of sub-populations of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus of isolation reared rats, which resemble the neuronal deficits seen in this region in schizophrenia.

  2. Local circuitry involving parvalbumin-positive basket cells in the CA2 region of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Audrey; Eastlake, Karen; Trigg, Hayley L; Thomson, Alex M

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing recognition that the CA2 region of the hippocampus has its own distinctive properties, inputs, and pathologies. The dendritic and axonal patterns of some interneurons in this region are also strikingly different from those described previously in CA1 and CA3. The local circuitry in this region, however, had yet to be studied in detail. Accordingly, using dual intracellular recordings and biocytin-filling, excitatory and inhibitory connections involving CA2 parvalbumin-positive basket cells were characterized for the first time. CA2 basket cells targeted neighboring pyramidal cells and received excitatory inputs from them. CA2 basket cells that resembled those in CA1 with a fast spiking behavior and dendritic tree confined to the region of origin received depressing excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs). In contrast, unlike CA1 basket cells but like CA1 Oriens-Lacunosum Moleculare (OLM) cells, the majority of CA2 basket cells had horizontally oriented dendrites in Stratum Oriens (SO), which extended into all three CA subfields, had an adapting firing pattern, presented a "sag" in their voltage responses to hyperpolarizing current injection, and received facilitating EPSPs. The expression of I(h) did not influence the EPSP time courses and paired pulse ratios (PPR). Estimates of the probability of release (p) for the depressing and facilitating EPSPs were correlated with the PPR. Connections with low probabilities of release had higher PPR. Quantal amplitude (q) for the facilitating connections was larger than q at depressing inputs onto fast spiking basket cells.

  3. Recruitment of parvalbumin-positive interneurons determines hippocampal function and associated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Elke C; Zivkovic, Aleksandar R; Cunningham, Mark O; Middleton, Steven; Lebeau, Fiona E N; Bannerman, David M; Rozov, Andrei; Whittington, Miles A; Traub, Roger D; Rawlins, J Nicholas P; Monyer, Hannah

    2007-02-15

    Perisomatic inhibition provided by a subgroup of GABAergic interneurons plays a critical role in timing the output of pyramidal cells. To test their contribution at the network and the behavioral level, we generated genetically modified mice in which the excitatory drive was selectively reduced either by the knockout of the GluR-D or by conditional ablation of the GluR-A subunit in parvalbumin-positive cells. Comparable cell type-specific reductions of AMPA-mediated currents were obtained. Kainate-induced gamma oscillations exhibited reduced power in hippocampal slices from GluR-D-/- and GluR-A(PVCre-/-) mice. Experimental and modeling data indicated that this alteration could be accounted for by imprecise spike timing of fast-spiking cells (FS) caused by smaller interneuronal EPSPs. GluR-D-/- and GluR-A(PVCre-/-) mice exhibited similar impairments in hippocampus-dependent tasks. These findings directly show the effects of insufficient recruitment of fast-spiking cells at the network and behavioral level and demonstrate the role of this subpopulation for working and episodic-like memory.

  4. Chronic ketamine produces altered distribution of parvalbumin-positive cells in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Langhardt, Michael; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2013-08-29

    The underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia pathogenesis are not well understood. Increasing evidence supports the glutamatergic hypothesis that posits a hypofunction of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on specific gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons may be responsible for the disorder. Alterations in the GABAergic system have been observed in schizophrenia, most notably a change in the expression of parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex and hippocampus. Several reports also suggest abnormal neuronal migration may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. The current study examined the positioning and distribution of PV-positive cells in the hippocampus following chronic treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. A robust increase was found in the number of PV-positive interneurons located outside the stratum oriens (SO), the layer where most of these cells are normally localized, as well as an overall numerical increase in CA3 PV cells. These results suggest ketamine leads to an abnormal distribution of PV-positive cells, which may be indicative of aberrant migratory activity and possibly related to the Morris water maze deficits observed. These findings may also be relevant to alterations observed in schizophrenia populations.

  5. Synaptic cross talk between perisomatic-targeting interneuron classes expressing cholecystokinin and parvalbumin in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karson, Miranda A; Tang, Ai-Hui; Milner, Teresa A; Alger, Bradley E

    2009-04-01

    Cholescystokinin (CCK)- or parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons are the major perisomatic-targeting interneurons in the cerebral cortex, including hippocampus, and are thought to form mutually exclusive networks. We used several techniques to test the alternative hypothesis that CCK and PV cells are coupled by chemical synapses. Triple immunofluorescence confocal microscopy revealed numerous axosomatic, axodendritic, and axoaxonic contacts stained for CCK, PV, and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. The existence of mutual CCK and PV synapses was supported by dual EM immunolabeling. Paired whole-cell recordings detected unitary GABA(A)ergic synaptic transmission between identified CCK and PV cells, and single CCK cells could transiently inhibit action potential firing of synaptically coupled PV cells. We conclude that the major hippocampal perisomatic-targeting interneurons communicate synaptically. This communication should affect neuronal network activity, including neuronal oscillations, in which the CCK and PV cells have well established roles. The prevalence of CCK and PV networks in other brain regions suggests that internetwork interactions could be generally important.

  6. Mice lacking TrkB in parvalbumin-positive cells exhibit sexually dimorphic behavioral phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Jegarl, Anita; Clem, Roger L

    2014-11-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) is required for cued fear memory consolidation and extinction. Although BDNF is primarily secreted from glutamatergic neurons, TrkB is expressed by other genetically defined cells whose contributions to the behavioral effects of BDNF remain poorly understood. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, which are highly enriched in TrkB, are emerging as key regulators of fear memory expression. We therefore hypothesized that activity-dependent BDNF signaling in PV-interneurons may modulate emotional learning. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the LoxP/Cre system for conditional deletion of TrkB in PV-positive cells to examine the impact of cell-autonomous BDNF signaling on Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. However, behavioral abnormalities indicative of vestibular dysfunction precluded the use of homozygous conditional knockouts in tests of higher cognitive functioning. While vestibular dysfunction was apparent in both sexes, female conditional knockouts exhibited an exacerbated phenotype, including extreme motor hyperactivity and circling behavior, compared to their male littermates. Heterozygous conditional knockouts were spared of vestibular dysfunction. While fear memory consolidation was unaffected in heterozygotes of both sexes, males exhibited impaired extinction consolidation compared to their littermate controls. Our findings complement evidence from human and rodent studies suggesting that BDNF signaling promotes consolidation of extinction and point to PV-positive neurons as a discrete population that mediates these effects in a sex-specific manner.

  7. Oxidative stress-driven parvalbumin interneuron impairment as a common mechanism in models of schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steullet, P; Cabungcal, J-H; Coyle, J; Didriksen, M; Gill, K; Grace, A A; Hensch, T K; LaMantia, A-S; Lindemann, L; Maynard, T M; Meyer, U; Morishita, H; O'Donnell, P; Puhl, M; Cuenod, M; Do, K Q

    2017-01-01

    Parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons (PVIs) are crucial for maintaining proper excitatory/inhibitory balance and high-frequency neuronal synchronization. Their activity supports critical developmental trajectories, sensory and cognitive processing, and social behavior. Despite heterogeneity in the etiology across schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder, PVI circuits are altered in these psychiatric disorders. Identifying mechanism(s) underlying PVI deficits is essential to establish treatments targeting in particular cognition. On the basis of published and new data, we propose oxidative stress as a common pathological mechanism leading to PVI impairment in schizophrenia and some forms of autism. A series of animal models carrying genetic and/or environmental risks relevant to diverse etiological aspects of these disorders show PVI deficits to be all accompanied by oxidative stress in the anterior cingulate cortex. Specifically, oxidative stress is negatively correlated with the integrity of PVIs and the extracellular perineuronal net enwrapping these interneurons. Oxidative stress may result from dysregulation of systems typically affected in schizophrenia, including glutamatergic, dopaminergic, immune and antioxidant signaling. As convergent end point, redox dysregulation has successfully been targeted to protect PVIs with antioxidants/redox regulators across several animal models. This opens up new perspectives for the use of antioxidant treatments to be applied to at-risk individuals, in close temporal proximity to environmental impacts known to induce oxidative stress. PMID:28322275

  8. Loss of parvalbumin-positive neurons from the globus pallidus in animal models of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Suárez, Diana; Celorrio, Marta; Lanciego, Jose L; Franco, Rafael; Aymerich, María S

    2012-11-01

    The external segment of the globus pallidus (GPe) in humans and the equivalent structure in rodents, the globus pallidus (GP), influence signal processing in the basal ganglia under normal and pathological conditions. Parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity defines 2 main neuronal subpopulations in the GP/GPe: PV-immunopositive cells that project mainly to the subthalamic nucleus and the internal segment of the GP and PV-negative cells that mainly project to the striatum. We evaluated the number of neurons in the GP/GPe in animal models of Parkinson disease. In rats, dopaminergic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) provoked a significant decrease in the number of GP neurons (12% ± 4%, p loss in the basal ganglia of 6-OHDA-lesioned rats and suggest that a similar loss may occur in the MPTP monkey. These data suggest that in patients with Parkinson disease, the loss of GABAergic neurons projecting to the subthalamic nucleus may contribute to the hyperactivity of this nucleus despite the absence of gross alterations in GAD mRNA expression.

  9. Differential expression of cytoskeletal proteins in the dendrites of parvalbumin-positive interneurons versus granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas Ratzliff, A; Soltesz, I

    2000-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive interneurons and granule cells of the dentate gyrus exhibit characteristic differences in morphological, cytochemical, physiological, and pathophysiological properties. Several of these defining features, including dendritic morphology, spine density, and sensitivity to insults, are likely to be influenced by the neuronal cytoskeleton. The data in this paper demonstrate striking differences in the expression levels of all three neurofilament triplet proteins, as well as alpha-internexin and beta-tubulin III, between the parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dentate granule cells. Therefore, the molecular composition of intermediate filaments and microtubules in the dendritic domain of parvalbumin-positive dentate interneurons is distinct from the cytoskeleton of neighboring granule cells, indicating the existence of highly cell type-specific cytoskeletal architecture within the dentate gyrus.

  10. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive, fast-spiking neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band complex of the rat: intracellular recordings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N P; Harris, S J; Henderson, Z

    1999-01-01

    The medial septum/diagonal band complex is composed predominantly of cholinergic and GABAergic neurons, and it projects to the hippocampal formation. A proportion of the GABAergic neurons contain parvalbumin, a calcium-binding protein that has previously been localized in fast-spiking, non-accommodating GABAergic neurons in the cerebral cortex and neostriatum. The aim of the present study was to determine whether parvalbumin is localized preferentially in a similar electrophysiological class of neuron in the medial septum/diagonal band complex. The study was carried out using in vitro intracellular recording, intracellular biocytin filling and parvalbumin immunocytochemistry. Three main classes of neurons were identified according to standard criteria: burst-firing, slow-firing and fast-firing neuronal populations. The fast-firing neurons were subdivided into two subpopulations based on whether or not they displayed accommodation. The fast-spiking, non-accommodating cells were furthermore found to be spontaneously active at resting potentials, and to possess action potentials of significantly (P studies showing parvalbumin to be localized solely in GABAergic neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band complex. In conclusion, these findings suggest the presence of a previously uncharacterized population of neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band complex that generate high-frequency, non-adaptive discharge. This property correlates with the localization of parvalbumin in these neurons, which suggests that parvalbumin fulfils the same role in the medial septum/diagonal band complex that it does in other parts of the brain. The fast-spiking neurons in the medial septum/diagonal band complex may play an essential role in the GABAergic influence of the septum on the hippocampal formation.

  11. A role for L-type calcium channels in the maturation of parvalbumin-containing hippocampal interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M; Swann, J W

    2005-01-01

    While inhibitory interneurons are well recognized to play critical roles in the brain, relatively little is know about the molecular events that regulate their growth and differentiation. Calcium ions are thought to be important in neuronal development and L-type voltage gated Ca(+2) channels have been implicated in activity-dependent mechanisms of early-life. However, few studies have examined the role of these channels in the maturation of interneurons. The studies reported here were conducted in hippocampal slice cultures and indicate that the L-type Ca(+2) channel agonists and antagonists accelerate and suppress respectively the growth of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. The effects of channel blockade were reversible suggesting they are not the result of interneuronal cell death. Results from immunoblotting showed that these drugs have similar effects on the expression of the GABA synthetic enzymes, glutamic acid decarboxylase65, glutamic acid decarboxylase67 and the vesicular GABA transporter. This suggests that L-type Ca(+2) channels regulate not only parvalbumin expression but also interneuron development. These effects are likely mediated by actions on the interneurons themselves since the alpha subunits of L-type channels, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 were found to be highly expressed in neonatal mouse hippocampus and co-localized with parvalbumin in interneurons. Results also showed that while these interneurons can contain either subunit, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 was more widely expressed. Taken together results suggest that an important subset of developing interneurons expresses L-type Ca(+2) channels alpha subunits, voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.2 and especially voltage-gated calcium channel subunit 1.3 and that these channels likely regulate the development of these interneurons in an activity-dependent manner.

  12. Developmental expression of the Ca2+-binding proteins calretinin and parvalbumin at the calyx of Held of rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmy, Felix; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2004-09-01

    Ca(2+)-binding proteins of the EF-hand family are widely expressed in the CNS, and contribute to intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in neurons. In nerve terminals, Ca(2+)-binding proteins are likely to regulate transmitter release probability and synaptic short-term-plasticity. Here, we investigated the developmental expression pattern of calretinin and parvalbumin at a large excitatory synapse, the calyx of Held in the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) of rats and mice. We used two-colour immunofluorescence imaging with primary antibodies detecting one of the Ca(2+)-binding proteins, and a presynaptic marker protein, Rab-3A. Calretinin was found in nerve terminals of the calyx of Held, but not in postsynaptic principal cells. The presynaptic density of Calretinin staining, and the degree of colocalization with Rab-3A increased during postnatal development (P6-P31). Surprisingly, not all calyces of Held expressed calretinin. In rats, calretinin-containing calyces were irregularly interspersed with calretinin-negative calyces, whereas in mice, calretinin-positive calyces were preferentially located in the lateral portion of the MNTB. The percentage of calretinin-positive calyces increased during development, to about 75% and 20% at P30 in rats and in mice, respectively. Parvalbumin was present in the presynaptic calyces of Held and in the nerve fibres entering the MNTB, as well as in the somata of the MNTB principal neurons. An up-regulation of calretinin and parvalbumin in calyces of Held probably increases the presynaptic Ca(2+) buffering strength during postnatal development, but the unexpected heterogeneity of calretinin expression might cause differences in Ca(2+) signalling and transmitter release probability between calyces of Held.

  13. K(+) channel expression distinguishes subpopulations of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-containing neocortical interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, A; Erisir, A; Farb, C; Nadal, M S; Ozaita, A; Lau, D; Welker, E; Rudy, B

    1999-11-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 K(+) channel proteins form similar voltage-gated K(+) channels with unusual properties, including fast activation at voltages positive to -10 mV and very fast deactivation rates. These properties are thought to facilitate sustained high-frequency firing. Kv3.1 subunits are specifically found in fast-spiking, parvalbumin (PV)-containing cortical interneurons, and recent studies have provided support for a crucial role in the generation of the fast-spiking phenotype. Kv3.2 mRNAs are also found in a small subset of neocortical neurons, although the distribution of these neurons is different. We raised antibodies directed against Kv3.2 proteins and used dual-labeling methods to identify the neocortical neurons expressing Kv3.2 proteins and to determine their subcellular localization. Kv3.2 proteins are prominently expressed in patches in somatic and proximal dendritic membrane as well as in axons and presynaptic terminals of GABAergic interneurons. Kv3.2 subunits are found in all PV-containing neurons in deep cortical layers where they probably form heteromultimeric channels with Kv3.1 subunits. In contrast, in superficial layer PV-positive neurons Kv3.2 immunoreactivity is low, but Kv3.1 is still prominently expressed. Because Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels are differentially modulated by protein kinases, these results raise the possibility that the fast-spiking properties of superficial- and deep-layer PV neurons are differentially regulated by neuromodulators. Interestingly, Kv3. 2 but not Kv3.1 proteins are also prominent in a subset of seemingly non-fast-spiking, somatostatin- and calbindin-containing interneurons, suggesting that the Kv3.1-Kv3.2 current type can have functions other than facilitating high-frequency firing.

  14. Convergent differential regulation of parvalbumin in the brains of vocal learners.

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    Erina Hara

    Full Text Available Spoken language and learned song are complex communication behaviors found in only a few species, including humans and three groups of distantly related birds--songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds. Despite their large phylogenetic distances, these vocal learners show convergent behaviors and associated brain pathways for vocal communication. However, it is not clear whether this behavioral and anatomical convergence is associated with molecular convergence. Here we used oligo microarrays to screen for genes differentially regulated in brain nuclei necessary for producing learned vocalizations relative to adjacent brain areas that control other behaviors in avian vocal learners versus vocal non-learners. A top candidate gene in our screen was a calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV. In situ hybridization verification revealed that PV was expressed significantly higher throughout the song motor pathway, including brainstem vocal motor neurons relative to the surrounding brain regions of all distantly related avian vocal learners. This differential expression was specific to PV and vocal learners, as it was not found in avian vocal non-learners nor for control genes in learners and non-learners. Similar to the vocal learning birds, higher PV up-regulation was found in the brainstem tongue motor neurons used for speech production in humans relative to a non-human primate, macaques. These results suggest repeated convergent evolution of differential PV up-regulation in the brains of vocal learners separated by more than 65-300 million years from a common ancestor and that the specialized behaviors of learned song and speech may require extra calcium buffering and signaling.

  15. Characterization of parvalbumin and polcalcin divalent ion binding by isothermal titration calorimetry.

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    Henzl, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    The elucidation of structure-affinity relationships in EF-hand proteins requires a reliable assay of divalent ion affinity. In principle, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) should be capable of furnishing estimates for Ca2+- and Mg2+-binding constants in these systems. And because the method yields the binding enthalpy directly, ITC can provide a more detailed view of binding energetics than methods that rely on 45Ca2+ or fluorescent indicators. For several reasons, however, it is generally not possible to extract reliable binding parameters from single ITC experiments. Ca2+ affinity is often too high, and Mg2+ affinity is invariably too low. Moreover, least-squares minimization of multisite systems may not afford a unique fit because of strong parameter correlations. This chapter outlines a strategy for analyzing two-site systems that overcomes these obstacles. The method--which involves simultaneous, or global, least-squares analysis of direct and competitive ITC data--yields binding parameters for both Ca2+ and Mg2+. Application of the method is demonstrated for two systems. The S55D/E59D variant of rat alpha-parvalbumin, noteworthy for its elevated metal ion affinity, binds divalent ions noncooperatively and is amenable to analysis using an independent two-site model. On the other hand, Phl p 7, a pollen-specific EF-hand protein from timothy grass, binds Ca2+ with positive cooperativity. Divalent ion-binding data for the protein must be analyzed using a two-site Adair model.

  16. Excitatory effects of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons maintain hippocampal epileptiform activity via synchronous afterdischarges.

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    Ellender, Tommas J; Raimondo, Joseph V; Irkle, Agnese; Lamsa, Karri P; Akerman, Colin J

    2014-11-12

    Epileptic seizures are characterized by periods of hypersynchronous, hyperexcitability within brain networks. Most seizures involve two stages: an initial tonic phase, followed by a longer clonic phase that is characterized by rhythmic bouts of synchronized network activity called afterdischarges (ADs). Here we investigate the cellular and network mechanisms underlying hippocampal ADs in an effort to understand how they maintain seizure activity. Using in vitro hippocampal slice models from rats and mice, we performed electrophysiological recordings from CA3 pyramidal neurons to monitor network activity and changes in GABAergic signaling during epileptiform activity. First, we show that the highest synchrony occurs during clonic ADs, consistent with the idea that specific circuit dynamics underlie this phase of the epileptiform activity. We then show that ADs require intact GABAergic synaptic transmission, which becomes excitatory as a result of a transient collapse in the chloride (Cl(-)) reversal potential. The depolarizing effects of GABA are strongest at the soma of pyramidal neurons, which implicates somatic-targeting interneurons in AD activity. To test this, we used optogenetic techniques to selectively control the activity of somatic-targeting parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+)) interneurons. Channelrhodopsin-2-mediated activation of PV(+) interneurons during the clonic phase generated excitatory GABAergic responses in pyramidal neurons, which were sufficient to elicit and entrain synchronous AD activity across the network. Finally, archaerhodopsin-mediated selective silencing of PV(+) interneurons reduced the occurrence of ADs during the clonic phase. Therefore, we propose that activity-dependent Cl(-) accumulation subverts the actions of PV(+) interneurons to perpetuate rather than terminate pathological network hyperexcitability during the clonic phase of seizures.

  17. Knockout of NMDA receptors in parvalbumin interneurons recreates autism-like phenotypes.

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    Saunders, John A; Tatard-Leitman, Valerie M; Suh, Jimmy; Billingslea, Eddie N; Roberts, Timothy P; Siegel, Steven J

    2013-04-01

    Autism is a disabling neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by social deficits, language impairment, and repetitive behaviors with few effective treatments. New evidence suggests that autism has reliable electrophysiological endophenotypes and that these measures may be caused by n-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) disruption on parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons. These findings could be used to create new translational biomarkers. Recent developments have allowed for cell-type selective knockout of NMDARs in order to examine the perturbations caused by disrupting specific circuits. This study examines several electrophysiological and behavioral measures disrupted in autism using a PV-selective reduction in NMDA R1 subunit. Mouse electroencephalograph (EEG) was recorded in response to auditory stimuli. Event-related potential (ERP) component amplitude and latency analysis, social testing, and premating ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) recordings were performed. Correlations were examined between the ERP latency and behavioral measures. The N1 ERP latency was delayed, sociability was reduced, and mating USVs were impaired in PV-selective NMDA Receptor 1 Knockout (NR1 KO) as compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant correlation between N1 latency and sociability but not between N1 latency and premating USV power or T-maze performance. The increases in N1 latency, impaired sociability, and reduced vocalizations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice mimic similar changes found in autism. Electrophysiological changes correlate to reduced sociability, indicating that the local circuit mechanisms controlling N1 latency may be utilized in social function. Therefore, we propose that behavioral and electrophysiological alterations in PV-selective NR1 KO mice may serve as a useful model for therapeutic development in autism. Autism Res 2013, 6: 69-77. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. PGC-1α provides a transcriptional framework for synchronous neurotransmitter release from parvalbumin-positive interneurons.

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    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Dougherty, Sarah E; McMeekin, Laura J; Reid, Courtney S; Dobrunz, Lynn E; West, Andrew B; Hablitz, John J; Cowell, Rita M

    2014-10-22

    Accumulating evidence strongly implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in the pathophysiology of multiple neurological disorders, but the downstream gene targets of PGC-1α in the brain have remained enigmatic. Previous data demonstrate that PGC-1α is primarily concentrated in inhibitory neurons and that PGC-1α is required for the expression of the interneuron-specific Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) throughout the cortex. To identify other possible transcriptional targets of PGC-1α in neural tissue, we conducted a microarray on neuroblastoma cells overexpressing PGC-1α, mined results for genes with physiological relevance to interneurons, and measured cortical gene and protein expression of these genes in mice with underexpression and overexpression of PGC-1α. We observed bidirectional regulation of novel PGC-1α-dependent transcripts spanning synaptic [synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) and complexin 1 (Cplx1)], structural [neurofilament heavy chain (Nefh)], and metabolic [neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1 (Nceh1), adenylate kinase 1 (Ak1), inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase J (Inpp5j), ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 complex O subunit (Atp5o), phytanol-CoA-2hydroxylase (Phyh), and ATP synthase mitrochondrial F1 complex α subunit 1 (Atp5a1)] functions. The neuron-specific genes Syt2, Cplx1, and Nefh were developmentally upregulated in an expression pattern consistent with that of PGC-1α and were expressed in cortical interneurons. Conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons significantly decreased cortical transcript expression of these genes, promoted asynchronous GABA release, and impaired long-term memory. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGC-1α is required for normal PV-positive interneuron function and that loss of PGC-1α in this interneuron subpopulation could contribute to cortical dysfunction in disease states.

  19. Differential regulation of parvalbumin and calretinin interneurons in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence.

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    Caballero, Adriana; Flores-Barrera, Eden; Cass, Daryn K; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2014-01-01

    Determining the normal developmental trajectory of individual GABAergic components in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) during the adolescent transition period is critical because local GABAergic interneurons are thought to play an important role in the functional maturation of cognitive control that occurs in this developmental window. Based on the expression of calcium-binding proteins, three distinctive subtypes of interneurons have been identified in the PFC: parvalbumin (PV)-, calretinin (CR)-, and calbindin (CB)-positive cells. Using biochemical and histochemical measures, we found that the protein level of PV is lowest in juveniles [postnatal days (PD) 25-35] and increases during adolescence (PD 45-55) to levels similar to those observed in adulthood (PD 65-75). In contrast, the protein expression of CR is reduced in adults compared to juvenile and adolescent animals, whereas CB levels remain mostly unchanged across the developmental window studied here. Semi-quantitative immunostaining analyses revealed that the periadolescent upregulation of PV and the loss of the CR signal appear to be attributable to changes in PV- and CR-positive innervation, which are dissociable from the trajectory of PV- and CR-positive cell number. At the synaptic level, our electrophysiological data revealed that a developmental facilitation of spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic inputs onto PV-positive/fast-spiking interneurons parallels the increase in prefrontal PV signal during the periadolescent transition. In contrast, no age-dependent changes in glutamatergic transmission were observed in PV-negative/non fast-spiking interneurons. Together, these findings emphasize that GABAergic inhibitory interneurons in the PFC undergo a dynamic, cell type-specific remodeling during adolescence and provide a developmental framework for understanding alterations in GABAergic circuits that occur in psychiatric disorders.

  20. Glutamatergic deficits and parvalbumin-containing inhibitory neurons in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia

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    Kelley JF

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that the expression of the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA for the NR2A subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA class of glutamate receptor was decreased in a subset of inhibitory interneurons in the cerebral cortex in schizophrenia. In this study, we sought to determine whether a deficit in the expression of NR2A mRNA was present in the subset of interneurons that contain the calcium buffer parvalbumin (PV and whether this deficit was associated with a reduction in glutamatergic inputs in the prefrontal cortex (PFC in schizophrenia. Methods We examined the expression of NR2A mRNA, labeled with a 35S-tagged riboprobe, in neurons that expressed PV mRNA, visualized with a digoxigenin-labeled riboprobe via an immunoperoxidase reaction, in twenty schizophrenia and twenty matched normal control subjects. We also immunohistochemically labeled the glutamatergic axon terminals with an antibody against vGluT1. Results The density of the PV neurons that expressed NR2A mRNA was significantly decreased by 48-50% in layers 3 and 4 in the subjects with schizophrenia, but the cellular expression of NR2A mRNA in the PV neurons that exhibited a detectable level of this transcript was unchanged. In addition, the density of vGluT1-immunoreactive boutons was significantly decreased by 79% in layer 3, but was unchanged in layer 5 of the PFC in schizophrenia. Conclusion These findings suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission via NR2A-containing NMDA receptors on PV neurons in the PFC may be deficient in schizophrenia. This may disinhibit the postsynaptic excitatory circuits, contributing to neuronal injury, aberrant information flow and PFC functional deficits in schizophrenia.

  1. Synaptotagmin-2 is a reliable marker for parvalbumin positive inhibitory boutons in the mouse visual cortex.

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    Jean-Pierre Sommeijer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inhibitory innervation by parvalbumin (PV expressing interneurons has been implicated in the onset of the sensitive period of visual plasticity. Immunohistochemical analysis of the development and plasticity of these inhibitory inputs is difficult because PV expression is low in young animals and strongly influenced by neuronal activity. Moreover, the synaptic boutons that PV neurons form onto each other cannot be distinguished from the innervated cell bodies by immunostaining for this protein because it is present throughout the cells. These problems call for the availability of a synaptic, activity-independent marker for PV+ inhibitory boutons that is expressed before sensitive period onset. We investigated whether synaptotagmin-2 (Syt2 fulfills these properties in the visual cortex. Syt2 is a synaptic vesicle protein involved in fast Ca(2+ dependent neurotransmitter release. Its mRNA expression follows a pattern similar to that of PV throughout the brain and is present in 30-40% of hippocampal PV expressing basket cells. Up to now, no quantitative analyses of Syt2 expression in the visual cortex have been carried out. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used immunohistochemistry to analyze colocalization of Syt2 with multiple interneuron markers including vesicular GABA transporter VGAT, calbindin, calretinin, somatostatin and PV in the primary visual cortex of mice during development and after dark-rearing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show that in the adult visual cortex Syt2 is only found in inhibitory, VGAT positive boutons. Practically all Syt2 positive boutons also contain PV and vice versa. During development, Syt2 expression can be detected in synaptic boutons prior to PV and in contrast to PV expression, Syt2 is not down-regulated by dark-rearing. These properties of Syt2 make it an excellent marker for analyzing the development and plasticity of perisomatic inhibitory innervations onto both excitatory and inhibitory

  2. Input-specific learning rules at excitatory synapses onto hippocampal parvalbumin-expressing interneurons

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    Le Roux, Nicolas; Cabezas, Carolina; Böhm, Urs Lucas; Poncer, Jean Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal parvalbumin-expressing interneurons (PV INs) provide fast and reliable GABAergic signalling to principal cells and orchestrate hippocampal ensemble activities. Precise coordination of principal cell activity by PV INs relies in part on the efficacy of excitatory afferents that recruit them in the hippocampal network. Feed-forward (FF) inputs in particular from Schaffer collaterals influence spike timing precision in CA1 principal cells whereas local feedback (FB) inputs may contribute to pacemaker activities. Although PV INs have been shown to undergo activity-dependent long term plasticity, how both inputs are modulated during principal cell firing is unknown. Here we show that FF and FB synapses onto PV INs are endowed with distinct postsynaptic glutamate receptors which set opposing long-term plasticity rules. Inward-rectifying AMPA receptors (AMPARs) expressed at both FF and FB inputs mediate a form of anti-Hebbian long term potentiation (LTP), relying on coincident membrane hyperpolarization and synaptic activation. In contrast, FF inputs are largely devoid of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) which are more abundant at FB afferents and confer on them an additional form of LTP with Hebbian properties. Both forms of LTP are expressed with no apparent change in presynaptic function. The specific endowment of FF and FB inputs with distinct coincidence detectors allow them to be differentially tuned upon high frequency afferent activity. Thus, high frequency (>20 Hz) stimulation specifically potentiates FB, but not FF afferents. We propose that these differential, input-specific learning rules may allow PV INs to adapt to changes in hippocampal activity while preserving their precisely timed, clockwork operation. PMID:23339172

  3. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity is enhanced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in organotypic cultures of rat retina.

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    Rickman, D W

    1999-11-15

    The rodent retina undergoes considerable postnatal neurogenesis and phenotypic differentiation, and it is likely that diffusible neurotrophic factors contribute to this development and to the subsequent formation of functional retinal circuitry. Accordingly, perturbation of specific neurotrophin ligand-receptor interactions has provided valuable information as to the fundamental processes underlying this development. In the present studies we have built upon our previous observation that suppression of expression of trk(B), the high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), in the postnatal rat retina results in the alteration of a specific interneuron in the rod pathway-the parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive AII amacrine cell. Here, we isolated retinas from newborn rats and maintained them in organotypic culture for up to 14 days (approximating the time of eye opening, in vivo) in the presence of individual neurotrophins [BDNF or nerve growth factor (NGF)]. We then examined histological sections of cultures for PV immunoreactivity. In control cultures, only sparse PV-immunostained cells were observed. In cultures supplemented with NGF, numerous lightly immunostained somata were present in the inner nuclear layer (INL) at the border of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). Many of these cells had rudimentary dendritic arborizations in the IPL. Cultures supplemented with BDNF displayed numerous well-immunostained somata at the INL/IPL border that gave rise to elaborate dendritic arborizations that approximated the morphology of mature AII amacrine cells in vivo. These observations indicate that neurotrophins have specific effects upon the neurochemical and, perhaps, morphological differentiation of an important interneuron in a specific functional retinal circuit.

  4. Convergent differential regulation of parvalbumin in the brains of vocal learners.

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    Hara, Erina; Rivas, Miriam V; Ward, James M; Okanoya, Kazuo; Jarvis, Erich D

    2012-01-01

    Spoken language and learned song are complex communication behaviors found in only a few species, including humans and three groups of distantly related birds--songbirds, parrots, and hummingbirds. Despite their large phylogenetic distances, these vocal learners show convergent behaviors and associated brain pathways for vocal communication. However, it is not clear whether this behavioral and anatomical convergence is associated with molecular convergence. Here we used oligo microarrays to screen for genes differentially regulated in brain nuclei necessary for producing learned vocalizations relative to adjacent brain areas that control other behaviors in avian vocal learners versus vocal non-learners. A top candidate gene in our screen was a calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). In situ hybridization verification revealed that PV was expressed significantly higher throughout the song motor pathway, including brainstem vocal motor neurons relative to the surrounding brain regions of all distantly related avian vocal learners. This differential expression was specific to PV and vocal learners, as it was not found in avian vocal non-learners nor for control genes in learners and non-learners. Similar to the vocal learning birds, higher PV up-regulation was found in the brainstem tongue motor neurons used for speech production in humans relative to a non-human primate, macaques. These results suggest repeated convergent evolution of differential PV up-regulation in the brains of vocal learners separated by more than 65-300 million years from a common ancestor and that the specialized behaviors of learned song and speech may require extra calcium buffering and signaling.

  5. Preferential inactivation of Scn1a in parvalbumin interneurons increases seizure susceptibility

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    Dutton, Stacey B.; Makinson, Christopher D.; Papale, Ligia A.; Shankar, Anupama; Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nakazawa, Kazu; Escayg, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Dominant mutations in SCN1A, which encodes the Nav1.1 VGSC α-subunit, underlie several forms of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome (DS) and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Electrophysiological analyses of DS and GEFS+ mouse models have led to the hypothesis that SCN1A mutations reduce the excitability of inhibitory cortical and hippocampal interneurons. To more directly examine the relative contribution of inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells to SCN1A-derived epilepsy, we first compared the expression of Nav1.1 in inhibitory parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and excitatory neurons from P22 mice using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In the hippocampus and neocortex, 69% of Nav1.1 immunoreactive neurons were also positive for PV. In contrast, 13% and 5% of Nav1.1 positive cells in the hippocampus and neocortex, respectively, were found to co-localize with excitatory cells identified by CaMK2α immunoreactivity. Next, we reduced the expression of Scn1a in either a subset of interneurons (mainly PV interneurons) or excitatory cells by crossing mice heterozygous for a floxed Scn1a allele to either the Ppp1r2-Cre or EMX1-Cre transgenic lines, respectively. The inactivation of one Scn1a allele in interneurons of the neocortex and hippocampus was sufficient to reduce thresholds to flurothyl- and hyperthermia-induced seizures, whereas thresholds were unaltered following inactivation in excitatory cells. Reduced interneuron Scn1a expression also resulted in the generation of spontaneous seizures. These findings provide direct evidence for an important role of PV interneurons in the pathogenesis of Scn1a-derived epilepsies. PMID:22926190

  6. Corresponding decrease in neuronal markers signals progressive parvalbumin neuron loss in MAM schizophrenia model.

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    Gill, Kathryn M; Grace, Anthony A

    2014-10-01

    Alteration in normal hippocampal (HPC) function attributed to reduced parvalbumin (PV) expression has been consistently reported in schizophrenia patients and in animal models of schizophrenia. However, it is unclear whether there is an overall loss of interneurons as opposed to a reduction in activity-dependent PV content. Co-expression of PV and the constitutively expressed substance P (SP)-receptor protein has been utilized in other models to ascertain the degree of cell survival, as opposed to reduction in activity-dependent PV content, in the HPC. The present study measured the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors in the dentate and dorsal and ventral CA3 subregions of the HPC in the methylazoymethanol acetate (MAM) rat neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. In addition, these changes were compared at the post-natal day 27 (PND27) and post-natal day 240 (PND > 240) time points. Brains from PND27 and PND > 240 MAM (n = 8) and saline (SAL, n = 8) treated offspring were immunohistochemically processed for the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors. The dorsal dentate, dorsal CA3 and ventral CA3 subregions of PND27 and PND > 240 MAM rats demonstrated significant reductions in PV but not SP-receptor expression, signifying a loss of PV-content. In contrast, in the ventral dentate the co-expression of PV and SP-receptors was significantly reduced only in PND > 240 MAM animals, suggesting a reduction in cell number. While MAM-induced reduction of PV content occurs in CA3 of dorsal and ventral HPC, the most substantial loss of interneuron number is localized to the ventral dentate of PND > 240 animals. The disparate loss of PV in HPC subregions likely impacts intra-HPC network activity in MAM rats.

  7. Adenosine Inhibits the Excitatory Synaptic Inputs to Basal Forebrain Cholinergic, GABAergic and Parvalbumin Neurons in mice

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    Chun eYang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee and tea contain the stimulants caffeine and theophylline. These compounds act as antagonists of adenosine receptors. Adenosine promotes sleep and its extracellular concentration rises in association with prolonged wakefulness, particularly in the basal forebrain (BF region involved in activating the cerebral cortex. However, the effect of adenosine on identified BF neurons, especially non-cholinergic neurons, is incompletely understood. Here we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices prepared from two validated transgenic mouse lines with fluorescent proteins expressed in GABAergic or parvalbumin (PV neurons to determine the effect of adenosine. Whole-cell recordings were made BF cholinergic neurons and from BF GABAergic & PV neurons with the size (>20 µm and intrinsic membrane properties (prominent H-currents corresponding to cortically projecting neurons. A brief (2 min bath application of adenosine (100 μM decreased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents in all groups of BF cholinergic, GABAergic and PV neurons we recorded. In addition, adenosine decreased the frequency of miniature EPSCs in BF cholinergic neurons. Adenosine had no effect on the frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in cholinergic neurons or GABAergic neurons with large H-currents but reduced them in a group of GABAergic neurons with smaller H-currents. All effects of adenosine were blocked by a selective, adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT, 1 μM. Adenosine had no postsynaptic effects. Taken together, our work suggests that adenosine promotes sleep by an A1-receptor mediated inhibition of glutamatergic inputs to cortically-projecting cholinergic and GABA/PV neurons. Conversely, caffeine and theophylline promote attentive wakefulness by inhibiting these A1 receptors in BF thereby promoting the high-frequency oscillations in the cortex required for

  8. Renal expression of parvalbumin is critical for NaCl handling and response to diuretics

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    Belge, Hendrica; Gailly, Philippe; Schwaller, Beat; Loffing, Johannes; Debaix, Huguette; Riveira-Munoz, Eva; Beauwens, Renaud; Devogelaer, Jean-Pierre; Hoenderop, Joost G.; Bindels, René J.; Devuyst, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    The distal convoluted tubule (DCT) plays an essential role in the reabsorption of NaCl by the kidney, a process that can be inhibited by thiazide diuretics. Parvalbumin (PV), a Ca2+-binding protein that plays a role in muscle fibers and neurons, is selectively expressed in the DCT, where its role remains unknown. We therefore investigated the renal phenotype of PV knockout mice (Pvalb−/−) vs. wild-type (Pvalb+/+) littermates. PV colocalized with the thiazide-sensitive Na+-Cl− cotransporter (NCC) in the early DCT. The Pvalb−/− mice showed increased diuresis and kaliuresis at baseline with higher aldosterone levels and lower lithium clearance. Acute furosemide administration increased diuresis and natriuresis/kaliuresis, but, surprisingly, did not increase calciuria in Pvalb−/− mice. NaCl supplementation of Pvalb−/− mice increased calciuria at baseline and after furosemide. The Pvalb−/− mice showed no significant diuretic response to hydrochlorothiazide, but an accentuated hypocalciuria. A decreased expression of NCC was detected in the early DCT of Pvalb−/− kidneys in the absence of ultrastructural and apoptotic changes. The PV-deficient mice had a positive Ca2+ balance and increased bone mineral density. Studies in mouse DCT cells showed that endogenous NCC expression is Ca2+-dependent and can be modulated by the levels of PV expression. These results suggest that PV regulates the expression of NCC by modulating intracellular Ca2+ signaling in response to ATP in DCT cells. They also provide insights into the Ca2+-sparing action of thiazides and the pathophysiology of distal tubulopathies. PMID:17804801

  9. Parvalbumin-deficiency facilitates repetitive IPSCs and gamma oscillations in the hippocampus.

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    Vreugdenhil, Martin; Jefferys, John G R; Celio, Marco R; Schwaller, Beat

    2003-03-01

    In the hippocampus, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) is expressed in interneurons that innervate perisomatic regions. PV in GABAergic synaptic terminals was proposed to limit repetitive GABA release by buffering of "residual calcium." We assessed the role of presynaptic PV in Ca(2+)-dependent GABA release in the hippocampus of PV-deficient (PV-/-) mice and wild-type (PV+/+) littermates. Pharmacologically isolated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) were evoked by low-intensity stimulation of the stratum pyramidale and recorded from voltage-clamped CA1 pyramidal neurons. The amplitude and decay time constant of single IPSCs were similar for both genotypes. Under our experimental conditions of reduced release probability and minimal presynaptic suppression, paired-pulse facilitation of IPSCs occurred at intervals from 2 to 50 ms, irrespective of the presence of PV. The facilitation of IPSCs induced by trains of 10 stimuli at frequencies >20 Hz was enhanced in cells from PV-/- mice, the largest difference between PV-/- and PV+/+ animals (220%) being observed at 33 Hz. The effect of IPSC facilitation at sustained gamma frequencies was assessed on kainate-induced rhythmic IPSC-paced neuronal oscillations at gamma frequencies, recorded with dual field potential recordings in area CA3. The maximum power of the oscillation was 138 microV(2) at 36 Hz in slices from PV+/+ mice and was trebled in slices from PV-/- mice. PV deficiency caused a similar increase in gamma power under conditions used to study IPSC facilitation and can be explained by an increased facilitation of GABA release at sustained high frequencies. The dominant frequency and coherence were not affected by PV deficiency. These observations suggest that PV deficiency, due to an increased short-term facilitation of GABA release, enhances inhibition by high-frequency burst-firing PV-expressing interneurons and may affect the higher cognitive functions associated with gamma oscillations.

  10. Developmental expression of parvalbumin mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of the rat.

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    de Lecea, L; del Río, J A; Soriano, E

    1995-08-01

    Parvalbumin (PARV) belongs to the family of calcium-binding proteins bearing the EF hand domain. Immunocytochemical studies in the cerebral cortex have demonstrated that neurons containing PARV include two types of GABAergic interneurons, namely, basket and axo-axonic chandelier cells. The present study examines the onset and pattern of PARV mRNA expression during the development of rat neocortex and hippocampus by means of 'in situ' hybridization with an oligonucleotide probe corresponding to rat PARV cDNA. In animals aged P0-P6 no signal was detected above background in neocortex or hippocampus. At P8, a few cortical cells displayed a number of silver grains just above background levels. By P10 PARV mRNA-expressing cells in the neocortex were detected almost exclusively in layer V of somatosensory, frontal and cingulate cortices. At P12 PARV mRNA was mainly detected in layers IV, V and VIa. By P14 there was a marked overall increase in the entire neocortex, including layer II-III, both in the number of cells and in their intensity of labelling. Further maturation in the pattern of PARV mRNA concentration was observed between P16 and P21. In the hippocampus low hybridization was observed at P10-P12. In subsequent stages both the number of positive cells and the intensity of labelling increased steadily. No clear-cut radial gradients for the expression of PARV mRNA were observed in the hippocampal region. Our results show that the developmental radial gradient followed by PARV mRNA expression in the neocortex does not follow an 'inside-out' gradient, consistent with previous immunocytochemical findings. Taken together, these data indicate that the developmental sequence followed by the PARV protein directly reflects mRNA abundance and suggest that PARV mRNA expression correlates with the functional maturation of cortical interneurons.

  11. Diversity and overlap of parvalbumin and somatostatin expressing interneurons in mouse presubiculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mérie; Simonnet, Jean; Lofredi, Roxanne; Cohen, Ivan; Savary, Etienne; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Miles, Richard; Fricker, Desdemona

    2015-01-01

    The presubiculum, located between hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, plays a fundamental role in representing spatial information, notably head direction. Little is known about GABAergic interneurons of this region. Here, we used three transgenic mouse lines, Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98, to examine distinct interneurons labeled with tdTomato or green fluorescent protein. The distribution of interneurons in presubicular lamina for each animal line was compared to that in the GAD67-GFP knock-in animal line. Labeling was specific in the Pvalb-Cre line with 87% of labeled interneurons immunopositive for parvalbumin (PV). Immunostaining for somatostatin (SOM) revealed good specificity in the X98 line with 89% of fluorescent cells, but a lesser specificity in Sst-Cre animals where only 71% of labeled cells were immunopositive. A minority of ∼6% of interneurons co-expressed PV and SOM in the presubiculum of Sst-Cre animals. The electrophysiological and morphological properties of fluorescent interneurons from Pvalb-Cre, Sst-Cre, and X98 mice differed. Distinct physiological groups of presubicular interneurons were resolved by unsupervised cluster analysis of parameters describing passive properties, firing patterns and AP shapes. One group consisted of SOM-positive, Martinotti type neurons with a low firing threshold (cluster 1). Fast spiking basket cells, mainly from the Pvalb-Cre line, formed a distinct group (cluster 3). Another group (cluster 2) contained interneurons of intermediate electrical properties and basket-cell like morphologies. These labeled neurons were recorded from both Sst-Cre and Pvalb-Cre animals. Thus, our results reveal a wide variation in anatomical and physiological properties for these interneurons, a real overlap of interneurons immuno-positive for both PV and SOM as well as an off-target recombination in the Sst-Cre line, possibly linked to maternal cre inheritance.

  12. Preferential inactivation of Scn1a in parvalbumin interneurons increases seizure susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Stacey B; Makinson, Christopher D; Papale, Ligia A; Shankar, Anupama; Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nakazawa, Kazu; Escayg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Dominant mutations in SCN1A, which encodes the Nav1.1 VGSC α-subunit, underlie several forms of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome (DS) and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Electrophysiological analyses of DS and GEFS+ mouse models have led to the hypothesis that SCN1A mutations reduce the excitability of inhibitory cortical and hippocampal interneurons. To more directly examine the relative contribution of inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells to SCN1A-derived epilepsy, we first compared the expression of Nav1.1 in inhibitory parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and excitatory neurons from P22 mice using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In the hippocampus and neocortex, 69% of Nav1.1 immunoreactive neurons were also positive for PV. In contrast, 13% and 5% of Nav1.1 positive cells in the hippocampus and neocortex, respectively, were found to co-localize with excitatory cells identified by CaMK2α immunoreactivity. Next, we reduced the expression of Scn1a in either a subset of interneurons (mainly PV interneurons) or excitatory cells by crossing mice heterozygous for a floxed Scn1a allele to either the Ppp1r2-Cre or EMX1-Cre transgenic lines, respectively. The inactivation of one Scn1a allele in interneurons of the neocortex and hippocampus was sufficient to reduce thresholds to flurothyl- and hyperthermia-induced seizures, whereas thresholds were unaltered following inactivation in excitatory cells. Reduced interneuron Scn1a expression also resulted in the generation of spontaneous seizures. These findings provide direct evidence for an important role of PV interneurons in the pathogenesis of Scn1a-derived epilepsies.

  13. Partial loss of parvalbumin-containing hippocampal interneurons in dementia with Lewy bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Johnson, Mary; Perry, Robert H; LeBeau, Fiona E N; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bogerts, Bernhard; Perry, Elaine K

    2011-02-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia. Among many other neuropathological changes in DLB, brain region-specific cellular deficits have been reported. They include decreases in motor neuron and pyramidal cell densities, while neocortical parvalbumin (parv)-containing neurons are thought to be free of Lewy bodies and spared in DLB. However, elevated parv levels are found in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients suffering from dementia with Lewy bodies. We performed an immunohistochemical analysis of hippocampal parv-immunoreactive neurons in well-characterised DLB cases and from controls using a specific antibody against the calcium binding protein. In addition, an analysis of the regional and cellular distribution of alpha-synuclein was carried out. Subfield and laminar distribution of parv-immunoreactive (ir) neurons on the hippocampus in subjects with DLB and controls were present exclusively as non-granule cells of the dentate gyrus (DG)/hilus and non-pyramidal cells of CA1, CA2, CA3 and CA4 areas of the hippocampus. The distribution patterns did not differ qualitatively between DLB and controls. Quantitative estimation of parv-ir neuron density revealed significant decreases in the dentate (DG)/hilus region as well as in the CA1 subfield. Double immunolabelling experiments showed that only 2% of parv expressing interneurons were laden with alpha-synuclein immunoreactive material. No significant changes were found for the total neuron densities in DLB cases. Our results show a partial loss of parv-expressing hippocampal interneurons in DLB, which might be the result of long-lasting calcium overload in combination with a proposed impaired mitochondrial function. It remains to be elucidated if the numerical decrease of this particular subset of hippocampal interneurons has consequences for the gamma (20-80 Hz) frequency activity in DLB patients.

  14. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity in the auditory cortex of a mouse model of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin del Campo, H N; Measor, K R; Razak, K A

    2012-12-01

    Age-related hearing loss (presbycusis) affects ∼35% of humans older than sixty-five years. Symptoms of presbycusis include impaired discrimination of sounds with fast temporal features, such as those present in speech. Such symptoms likely arise because of central auditory system plasticity, but the underlying components are incompletely characterized. The rapid spiking inhibitory interneurons that co-express the calcium binding protein Parvalbumin (PV) are involved in shaping neural responses to fast spectrotemporal modulations. Here, we examined cortical PV expression in the C57bl/6 (C57) mouse, a strain commonly studied as a presbycusis model. We examined if PV expression showed auditory cortical field- and layer-specific susceptibilities with age. The percentage of PV-expressing cells relative to Nissl-stained cells was counted in the anterior auditory field (AAF) and primary auditory cortex (A1) in three age groups: young (1-2 months), middle-aged (6-8 months) and old (14-20 months). There were significant declines in the percentage of cells expressing PV at a detectable level in layers I-IV of both A1 and AAF in the old mice compared to young mice. In layers V-VI, there was an increase in the percentage of PV-expressing cells in the AAF of the old group. There were no changes in percentage of PV-expressing cells in layers V-VI of A1. These data suggest cortical layer(s)- and field-specific susceptibility of PV+ cells with presbycusis. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that a decline in inhibitory neurotransmission, particularly in the superficial cortical layers, occurs with presbycusis.

  15. DREADD in parvalbumin interneurons of the dentate gyrus modulates anxiety, social interaction and memory extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D; Chen, L; Deng, D; Jiang, D; Dong, F; McSweeney, C; Zhou, Y; Liu, L; Chen, G; Wu, Y; Mao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PVpositive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3DGq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus.

  16. DREADD in Parvalbumin Interneurons of the Dentate Gyrus Modulates Anxiety, Social Interaction and Memory Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, D.; Chen, L.; Deng, D.; Jiang, D.; Dong, F.; McSweeney, C.; Zhou, Y.; Liu, L.; Chen, G.; Wu, Y.; Mao, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in the hippocampus play a critical role in animal memory, such as spatial working memory. However, how PV-positive interneurons in the subregions of the hippocampus affect animal behaviors remains poorly defined. Here, we achieved specific and reversible activation of PV-positive interneurons using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADD) technology. Inducible DREADD expression was demonstrated in vitro in cultured neurons, in which co-transfection of the hM3D-Gq-mCherry vector with a Cre plasmid resulted in a cellular response to hM3Dq ligand clozapine-N-oxide (CNO) stimulation. In addition, the dentate gyrus (DG) of PV-Cre mice received bilateral injection of control lentivirus or lentivirus expressing double floxed hM3D-Gq-mCherry. Selective activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG did not affect locomotor activity or depression-related behavior in mice. Interestingly, stimulation of PV-positive interneurons induced an anxiolytic effect. Activation of PV-positive interneurons appears to impair social interaction to novelty, but has no effect on social motivation. However, this defect is likely due to the anxiolytic effect as the exploratory behavior of mice expressing hM3D-Gq is significantly increased. Mice expressing hM3D-Gq did not affect novel object recognition. Activation of PV-positive interneurons in the DG maintains intact cued and contextual fear memory but facilitates fear extinction. Collectively, our results demonstrated that proper control of PV interneurons activity in the DG is critical for regulation of the anxiety, social interaction and fear extinction. These results improve our fundamental understanding of the physiological role of PV-positive interneurons in the hippocampus. PMID:26733123

  17. Human Monoclonal Antibodies as a Countermeasure Against Botulinum Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    REPORT Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: In this report, we...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Aug-2012 Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins Report Title ABSTRACT In this report...DTRA Final Report: Human monoclonal antibodies as a countermeasure against Botulinum toxins   Page 1 of 22 DTRA Final Report: Human monoclonal

  18. The densities of calbindin and parvalbumin, but not calretinin neurons, are sexually dimorphic in the amygdala of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Równiak, Maciej; Bogus-Nowakowska, Krystyna; Robak, Anna

    2015-04-16

    In the amygdala, the calcium-binding proteins (calbindin, parvalbumin or calretinin) are useful markers of specific subpopulations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) containing neurons. In the rat and monkey they together mark the vast majority of GABA-containing neurons in this brain region. As GABA involvement in the control of various behaviors in a sex-specific manner and sexual dimorphism of the GABAergic system itself were recently proven, the question is how much dimorphic may be various subpopulations of this system. Thus, the present study investigates for the first time the presence/absence of sexual dimorphism among neurons expressing calbindin (CB), parvalbumin (PV) and calretinin (CR) which form in the amygdala main subsets of GABAergic system. The results show that in the amygdala of the guinea pig the densities of CB and/or PV expressing neurons are sexually dimorphic with the female>male pattern of sex differences in the basolateral amygdala. In the medial and cortical amygdala respectively CB and PV values are also sexually dimorphic, favoring males. The densities of CR expressing neurons are in the amygdala of the guinea pig sexually isomorphic. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide an evidence that in the amygdala of the guinea pig the densities of neurons expressing CB and/or PV are sexually dimorphic what supports the idea that GABA participates in the mediation of sexually dimorphic functions, controlled by this brain area.

  19. Parvalbumin, somatostatin and cholecystokinin as chemical markers for specific GABAergic interneuron types in the rat frontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kondo, Satoru

    2002-01-01

    It remains to be clarified how many classes of GABAergic nonpyramidal cells exist in the cortical circuit. We have divided GABA cells in the rat frontal cortex into 3 groups, based on their firing characteristics: fast-spiking (FS) cells, late-spiking (LS) cells, and non-FS cells. Expression of calcium-binding proteins and peptides could be shown in separate groups of GABA cells in layers II/III and V of the frontal cortex: (1) parvalbumin cells, (2) somatostatin cells, (3) calretinin and/or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) cells [partially positive for cholecystokinin (CCK)] and (4) large CCK cells (almost negative for VIP/calretinin). Combining the physiological and chemical properties of morphologically diverse nonpyramidal cells allows division into several groups, including FS basket cells containing parvalbumin, non-FS somatostatin Martinotti cells with ascending axonal arbors, and non-FS large basket cells positive for CCK. These subtypes show characteristic spatial distributions of axon collaterals and the innervation tendency of postsynaptic elements. With synchronized activity induced by cortical excitatory or inhibitory circuits, firing patterns were also found to differ. Subtype-selective occurrence of electrical coupling, finding for potassium channel Kv3.1 proteins, and cholinergic and serotonergic modulation supports our tentative classification. To clarify the functional architecture in the frontal cortex, it is important to reveal the connectional characteristics of GABA cell subtypes and determine whether they are similar to those in other cortical regions.

  20. Response features of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons suggest precise roles for subtypes of inhibition in visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyan, Caroline A; Schummers, James; Van Wart, Audra; Kuhlman, Sandra J; Wilson, Nathan R; Huang, Z Josh; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-09-09

    Inhibitory interneurons in the cerebral cortex include a vast array of subtypes, varying in their molecular signatures, electrophysiological properties, and connectivity patterns. This diversity suggests that individual inhibitory classes have unique roles in cortical circuits; however, their characterization to date has been limited to broad classifications including many subtypes. We used the Cre/LoxP system, specifically labeling parvalbumin(PV)-expressing interneurons in visual cortex of PV-Cre mice with red fluorescent protein (RFP), followed by targeted loose-patch recordings and two-photon imaging of calcium responses in vivo to characterize the visual receptive field properties of these cells. Despite their relative molecular and morphological homogeneity, we find that PV+ neurons have a diversity of feature-specific visual responses that include sharp orientation and direction-selectivity, small receptive fields, and band-pass spatial frequency tuning. These results suggest that subsets of parvalbumin interneurons are components of specific cortical networks and that perisomatic inhibition contributes to the generation of precise response properties.

  1. Parvalbumin-positive projection neurons characterise the vocal premotor pathway in male, but not female, zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, J M; Williams, M N; Suthers, R A

    2001-11-02

    Parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB) immunoreactivities were assessed in nucleus robustus archistriatalis (RA) of male and female zebra finches, together with retrograde labelling of RA neurons. The results of double and triple labelling experiments suggested that, in males, moderately and faintly PV-positive neurons were projection neurons, but that all intensely PV-positive cells were not. The latter, which are presumably interneurons, were also intensely CB-positive, and may correspond to the GABAergic inhibitory interneurons identified by others. In addition, the complete RA pathway and its terminal fields in the respiratory-vocal nuclei of the brainstem were strongly PV-positive. In female zebra finches, which do not sing, no evidence was found that PV-positive RA cells were projection neurons, yet the pattern of projections of RA neurons, as determined by anterograde transport of biotinylated dextran amine, was very similar to that of RA in males. Moreover, in females, RA neurons retrogradely labelled from injections of cholera toxin B-chain into the tracheosyringeal nucleus (XIIts) were abundant and included, in the lateral part of the nucleus, a population of cells that were as large as those in the male RA. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity was also present in RA and its projections in males of several other songbird species (northern cardinal, brown headed cowbird, canary) and in the female cardinal, which sings to some extent, but the labelling was not as intense as that in male zebra finches.

  2. A loss of parvalbumin-containing interneurons is associated with diminished oscillatory activity in an animal model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodge, Daniel J; Behrens, Margarita M; Grace, Anthony A

    2009-02-25

    Decreased GABAergic signaling is among the more robust pathologies observed postmortem in schizophrenia; however, the functional consequences of this deficit are still largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate, in a verified animal model of schizophrenia, that a reduced expression of parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons is correlated with a reduction in coordinated neuronal activity during task performance in freely moving rats. More specifically, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM)-treated rats display a decreased density of parvalbumin-positive interneurons throughout the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and ventral (but not dorsal) subiculum of the hippocampus. Furthermore, the reduction in interneuron functionality is correlated with a significantly reduced gamma-band response to a conditioned tone during a latent inhibition paradigm. Finally, deficits in mPFC and ventral hippocampal oscillatory activity are associated with an impaired behavioral expression of latent inhibition in MAM-treated rats. Thus, we propose that a decrease in intrinsic GABAergic signaling may be responsible, at least in part, for the prefrontal and hippocampal hypofunctionality observed during task performance, which is consistently observed in animal models as well as in schizophrenia in humans. In addition, a deficit in intrinsic GABAergic signaling may be the origin of the hippocampal hyperactivity purported to underlie the dopamine dysfunction in psychosis. Such information is central to gaining a better understanding of the disease pathophysiology and alternate pharmacotherapeutic approaches.

  3. Tin chloride enhances parvalbumin-positive interneuron survival by modulating heme metabolism in a model of cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Volti, Giovanni; Zappalà, Agata; Leggio, Gian Marco; Mazzola, Carmen; Drago, Filippo; La Delia, Francesco; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pellitteri, Rosalia; Giannone, Ignazio; Spatuzza, Michela; Cicirata, Valentina; Cicirata, Federico

    2011-03-29

    SnCl(2) has been reported to increase the expression of heme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a major antioxidant enzyme, and to decrease ischemic injury, in non-nervous tissues. This study examined the neuroprotective effect of SnCl(2) in the hippocampus of rats submitted to cerebral ischemia. SnCl(2) was administered 18 h before bilateral carotids obstruction. Changes in HO-1 expression and activity, heme content, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and parvalbumin positive interneuron survival were studied. Thereafter both behavior and memory recovery were tested. The administration of SnCl(2) increased the expression of HO-1 protein and HO activity in the hippocampus and concomitantly decreased heme content at both mitochondrial and nuclear level. Furthermore, ischemized animals showed a strong increase in iNOS expression in the hippocampus, where a loss of parvalbumin positive interneurons also occurred. Pre-treatment with SnCl(2), decreased both iNOS expression in ischemized rats and increased cell survival. The beneficial effects of SnCl(2) were prevented by concomitant treatment with SnMP, a strong inhibitor of HO activity. SnCl(2) also caused an improvement in short term memory recovery. Our results showed that following SnCl(2) administration, HO-1 is strongly induced in the hippocampus and modulate iNOS expression, resulting in a strong neuroprotective effect.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  5. Monoclonal antibody technologies and rapid detection assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel methodologies and screening strategies will be outlined on the use of hybridoma technology for the selection of antigen specific monoclonal antibodies. The development of immunoassays used for diagnostic detection of prions and bacterial toxins will be discussed and examples provided demonstr...

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  8. Deactivation of the parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the hippocampus after fear-like behaviour following electrical stimulation of the dorsolateral periaqueductal gray of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Yasin; Blokland, Arjan; Lim, Lee Wei

    2012-08-01

    The majority of patients with panic disorder express a fearful sensation when encountered with panic-related cues. A subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons in the hippocampus has been demonstrated in the regulation of behavioural learning, especially during the contextual fear-conditioning. Here, we examined the influence of panic/fear response induced by deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the periaqueductal gray on these hippocampal parvalbumin-positive interneurons. We found that fear-like behaviour did not change the number of c-Fos immunoreactive and parvalbumin-positive cells. However, a remarkable decrease of c-Fos and parvalbumin co-localization was shown in the hippocampal regions when compared to non-stimulated sham animals. In line with previous studies, our results support the hypothesis that GABAergic regulation resulted in enhanced behavioural reactivity to fear conditioning. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the inhibition of this subpopulation of hippocampal parvalbumin-positive interneurons induced a long lasting anxiety- or fear-like behaviour.

  9. Immunocytochemical localization of calcium-binding proteins, calbindin D28K-, calretinin-, and parvalbumin-containing neurons in the dog visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Song-Hee; Lee, Jea-Young; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2011-09-01

    Although the dog is widely used to analyze the function of the brain, it is not known whether the distribution of calcium-binding proteins reflects a specific pattern in the visual cortex. The distribution of neurons containing calcium-binding proteins, calbindin D28K, calretinin, and parvalbumin in adult dog visual cortex were studied using immunocytochemistry. We also compared this labeling to that of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Calbindin D28K-immunoreactive (IR) neurons were predominantly located in layer II/III. Calretinin- and parvalbumin-IR neurons were located throughout the layers with the highest density in layers II/III and IV. The large majority of calbindin D28K-IR neurons were multipolar stellate cells. The majority of the calretinin-IR neurons were vertical fusiform cells with long processes traveling perpendicular to the pial surface. And the large majority of parvalbumin-IR neurons were multipolar stellate and round/oval cells. More than 90% of the calretinin- and parvalbumin-IR neurons were double-labeled with GABA, while approximately 66% of the calbindin D28K-IR neurons contained GABA. This study elucidates the neurochemical structure of calcium-binding proteins. These data will be informative in appreciating the functional significance of different laminar distributions of calcium-binding proteins between species and the differential vulnerability of calcium-binding proteins-containing neurons, with regard to calcium-dependent excitotoxic procedures.

  10. Fgfr1 inactivation in the mouse telencephalon results in impaired maturation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen Müller; Maragnoli, Maria Elisabetta; Phull, Pooja M; Tran, Kathy May; Choubey, Lisha; Vaccarino, Flora M

    2014-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs) and their receptors (Fgfr) are expressed in the developing and adult CNS. Previous studies demonstrated a decrease in cortical interneurons and locomotor hyperactivity in mice with a conditional Fgfr1 deletion generated in radial glial cells during midneurogenesis (Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+). Here, we report earlier and more extensive inactivation of Fgfr1 in neuroepithelial cells of the CNS (Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+). Similar to findings in Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+ mice, parvalbumin positive (PV+) cortical interneurons are also decreased in the neocortex of Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ mice when compared to control littermates (Fgfr1(f/f)). Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ embryos do not differ from controls in the initial specification of GABAergic cells in the ganglionic eminence (GE) as assessed by in situ hybridization for Dlx2, Mash1 and Nkx2. Equal numbers of GABAergic neuron precursors genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were observed at P0 in Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+;Gad1-GFP mutant mice. However, fewer GFP+ and GFP+/PV+ interneurons were observed in these mutants at adulthood, indicating that a decrease in cortical interneuron markers is occurring postnatally. Fgfr1 is expressed in cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain. To test whether the astrocytes of mice lacking Fgfr1 are less capable of supporting interneurons, we co-cultured wild type Gad1-GFP+ interneuron precursors isolated from the medial GE (MGE) with astrocytes from Fgfr1(f/f) control or Fgfr1(f/f);hGfapCre+ mice. Interneurons grown on Fgfr1 deficient astrocytes had small soma size and fewer neurites per cell, but no differences in cell survival. Decreased soma size of Gad67 immunopositive interneurons was also observed in the cortex of adult Fgfr1(f/f);NesCre+ mice. Our data indicate that astrocytes from Fgfr1 mutants are impaired in supporting the maturation of cortical GABAergic neurons in the postnatal period. This model may elucidate potential mechanisms of impaired PV

  11. Multiple anxiogenic drugs recruit a parvalbumin-containing subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Matthew W; Johnson, Philip L; Westerman, Alex M; Abrams, Jolane K; Shekhar, Anantha; Lowry, Christopher A

    2010-10-01

    The basolateral amygdala is a nodal structure within a distributed and interconnected network that regulates anxiety states and anxiety-related behavior. Administration of multiple anxiogenic drugs increases cellular responses (i.e., increases c-Fos expression) in a subregion of the basolateral amygdala, but the neurochemical phenotypes of these cells are not known. The basolateral amygdala contains glutamatergic projection neurons and several populations of γ-aminobutyric acid-synthesizing (GABAergic) interneurons, including a population of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABAergic interneurons that co-express the excitatory 5-HT(2A) receptor. The role for these PV-expressing GABAergic interneurons in anxiety-states is unclear. In this experiment we examined the effects of multiple anxiogenic drugs including the 5-HT(2C/2A) receptor agonist m-chlorophenyl piperazine (mCPP), the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, the α(2)-adrenoreceptor antagonist yohimbine and the partial inverse agonist at the benzodiazepine allosteric site on the GABA(A) receptor, N-methyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxamide (FG-7142), on c-Fos expression in PV-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons in subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala. All drugs with the exception of mCPP increased c-Fos expression in PV-ir neurons in the basolateral amygdaloid nucleus, anterior part (BLA). The numbers of c-Fos-immunoreactive (c-Fos-ir)/PV-ir GABAergic interneurons in the BLA were positively correlated with the numbers of c-Fos-ir serotonergic neurons in the mid-rostrocaudal dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and with a measure of anxiety-related behavior. All four drugs increased c-Fos expression in non-PV-ir cells in most of the subdivisions of the basolateral amygdala that were sampled, compared with vehicle-injected controls. Together, these data suggest that the PV/5-HT(2A) receptor expressing GABAergic interneurons in the basolateral amygdala are part of a DR-basolateral amygdala neuronal circuit modulating

  12. Antagonistic Regulation of Parvalbumin Expression and Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Capacity in Renal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Henzi

    Full Text Available Parvalbumin (PV is a cytosolic Ca2+-binding protein acting as a slow-onset Ca2+ buffer modulating the shape of Ca2+ transients in fast-twitch muscles and a subpopulation of neurons. PV is also expressed in non-excitable cells including distal convoluted tubule (DCT cells of the kidney, where it might act as an intracellular Ca2+ shuttle facilitating transcellular Ca2+ resorption. In excitable cells, upregulation of mitochondria in "PV-ergic" cells in PV-/- mice appears to be a general hallmark, evidenced in fast-twitch muscles and cerebellar Purkinje cells. Using Gene Chip Arrays and qRT-PCR, we identified differentially expressed genes in the DCT of PV-/- mice. With a focus on genes implicated in mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and membrane potential, uncoupling protein 2 (Ucp2, mitocalcin (Efhd1, mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (Micu1, mitochondrial calcium uniporter (Mcu, mitochondrial calcium uniporter regulator 1 (Mcur1, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COX1, and ATP synthase subunit β (Atp5b were found to be up-upregulated. At the protein level, COX1 was increased by 31 ± 7%, while ATP-synthase subunit β was unchanged. This suggested that these mitochondria were better suited to uphold the electrochemical potential across the mitochondrial membrane, necessary for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Ectopic expression of PV in PV-negative Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells decreased COX1 and concomitantly mitochondrial volume, while ATP synthase subunit β levels remained unaffected. Suppression of PV by shRNA in PV-expressing MDCK cells led subsequently to an increase in COX1 expression. The collapsing of the mitochondrial membrane potential by the uncoupler CCCP occurred at lower concentrations in PV-expressing MDCK cells than in control cells. In support, a reduction of the relative mitochondrial mass was observed in PV-expressing MDCK cells. Deregulation of the cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffer PV in kidney cells was counterbalanced in vivo and in vitro

  13. Parvalbumin-expressing basket-cell network plasticity induced by experience regulates adult learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, Flavio; Rompani, Santiago Belluco; Caroni, Pico

    2013-12-12

    Learning and memory processes can be influenced by recent experience, but the mechanisms involved are poorly understood. Enhanced plasticity during critical periods of early life is linked to differentiating parvalbumin (PV)-interneuron networks, suggesting that recent experience may modulate learning by targeting the differentiation state of PV neurons in the adult. Here we show that environmental enrichment and Pavlovian contextual fear conditioning induce opposite, sustained and reversible hippocampal PV-network configurations in adult mice. Specifically, enrichment promotes the emergence of large fractions of low-differentiation (low PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with low excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios, whereas fear conditioning leads to large fractions of high-differentiation (high PV and GAD67 expression) basket cells with high excitatory-to-inhibitory synaptic-density ratios. Pharmacogenetic inhibition or activation of PV neurons was sufficient to induce such opposite low-PV-network or high-PV-network configurations, respectively. The low-PV-network configuration enhanced structural synaptic plasticity, and memory consolidation and retrieval, whereas these were reduced by the high-PV-network configuration. We then show that maze navigation learning induces a hippocampal low-PV-network configuration paralleled by enhanced memory and structural synaptic plasticity throughout training, followed by a shift to a high-PV-network configuration after learning completion. The shift to a low-PV-network configuration specifically involved increased vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP)-positive GABAergic boutons and synaptic transmission onto PV neurons. Closely comparable low- and high-PV-network configurations involving VIP boutons were specifically induced in primary motor cortex upon rotarod motor learning. These results uncover a network plasticity mechanism induced after learning through VIP-PV microcircuit modulation, and involving

  14. Fgfr1 inactivation in the mouse telencephalon results in impaired maturation of interneurons expressing parvalbumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Müller Smith

    Full Text Available Fibroblast growth factors (Fgfs and their receptors (Fgfr are expressed in the developing and adult CNS. Previous studies demonstrated a decrease in cortical interneurons and locomotor hyperactivity in mice with a conditional Fgfr1 deletion generated in radial glial cells during midneurogenesis (Fgfr1(f/f;hGfapCre+. Here, we report earlier and more extensive inactivation of Fgfr1 in neuroepithelial cells of the CNS (Fgfr1(f/f;NesCre+. Similar to findings in Fgfr1(f/f;hGfapCre+ mice, parvalbumin positive (PV+ cortical interneurons are also decreased in the neocortex of Fgfr1(f/f;NesCre+ mice when compared to control littermates (Fgfr1(f/f. Fgfr1(f/f;NesCre+ embryos do not differ from controls in the initial specification of GABAergic cells in the ganglionic eminence (GE as assessed by in situ hybridization for Dlx2, Mash1 and Nkx2. Equal numbers of GABAergic neuron precursors genetically labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP were observed at P0 in Fgfr1(f/f;hGfapCre+;Gad1-GFP mutant mice. However, fewer GFP+ and GFP+/PV+ interneurons were observed in these mutants at adulthood, indicating that a decrease in cortical interneuron markers is occurring postnatally. Fgfr1 is expressed in cortical astrocytes in the postnatal brain. To test whether the astrocytes of mice lacking Fgfr1 are less capable of supporting interneurons, we co-cultured wild type Gad1-GFP+ interneuron precursors isolated from the medial GE (MGE with astrocytes from Fgfr1(f/f control or Fgfr1(f/f;hGfapCre+ mice. Interneurons grown on Fgfr1 deficient astrocytes had small soma size and fewer neurites per cell, but no differences in cell survival. Decreased soma size of Gad67 immunopositive interneurons was also observed in the cortex of adult Fgfr1(f/f;NesCre+ mice. Our data indicate that astrocytes from Fgfr1 mutants are impaired in supporting the maturation of cortical GABAergic neurons in the postnatal period. This model may elucidate potential mechanisms of impaired PV

  15. Altered dendritic distribution of dopamine D2 receptors and reduction in mitochondrial number in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor knockout mice

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) is a brain region integral to complex behaviors that are highly influenced by cannabinoids and by dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated regulation of fast-firing parvalbumin-containing interneurons. We have recently shown that constitutive deletion of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) greatly reduces parvalbumin levels in these neurons. The effects of CB1R deletion on PL parvalbumin interneurons may be ascribed to loss of CB1R-mediated retrograde signaling...

  16. Relationships among parvalbumin-immunoreactive neuron density, phase-locked gamma oscillations, and autistic/schizophrenic symptoms in PDGFR-β knock-out and control mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Nakamura

    Full Text Available Cognitive deficits and negative symptoms are important therapeutic targets for schizophrenia and autism disorders. Although reduction of phase-locked gamma oscillation has been suggested to be a result of reduced parvalbumin-immunoreactive (putatively, GABAergic neurons, no direct correlations between these have been established in these disorders. In the present study, we investigated such relationships during pharmacological treatment with a newly synthesized drug, T-817MA, which displays neuroprotective and neurotrophic effects. In this study, we used platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β gene knockout (PDGFR-β KO mice as an animal model of schizophrenia and autism. These mutant mice display a reduction in social behaviors; deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI; reduced levels of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the medical prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, and superior colliculus; and a deficit in of auditory phase-locked gamma oscillations. We found that oral administration of T-817MA ameliorated all these symptoms in the PDGFR-β KO mice. Furthermore, phase-locked gamma oscillations were significantly correlated with the density of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons, which was, in turn, correlated with PPI and behavioral parameters. These findings suggest that recovery of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons by pharmacological intervention relieved the reduction of phase-locked gamma oscillations and, consequently, ameliorated PPI and social behavioral deficits. Thus, our findings suggest that phase-locked gamma oscillations could be a useful physiological biomarker for abnormality of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons that may induce cognitive deficits and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and autism, as well as of effective pharmacological interventions in both humans and experimental animals.

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies to Plant Growth Regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Joachim; Arnscheidt, Angelika; Klix, Dieter; Weiler, Elmar W.

    1986-01-01

    Four high affinity monoclonal antibodies, which recognize two plant growth regulators from the cytokinin group, namely trans-zeatin riboside and dihydrozeatin riboside and their derivatives are reported. Six hybridomas were produced from three independent fusions of Balb/c spleen cells with P3-NS1-Ag 4-1 (abbreviated NS1) or X63-Ag 8.653 (X63) myeloma cells. The mice had been hyperimmunized with zeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate or dihydrozeatin riboside-bovine serum albumin conjugate for 3 months. The hybridomas secrete antibodies of the IgG 1 or IgG 2b subclass and allow the detection of femtomole amounts of the free cytokinins, their ribosides, and ribotides in plant extracts. The use of these monoclonals in radio- and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is also discussed. PMID:16664848

  18. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  19. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignments and second structure information of Gad m 1: a β-parvalbumin allergen from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, A H; Ackerbauer, D; Kostadinova, M; Bublin, M; Ferreira, F; Almeida, F C L; Breiteneder, H; Valente, A P

    2013-10-01

    Gad m 1 is the major allergen from Atlantic cod. It belongs to β-parvalbumin protein family and is characterized by the presence of two calcium-binding sites so called EF-hand motifs. β-Parvalbumins such as Gad m 1 are the most important fish allergens and their high cross-reactivity is the cause of the observed polysensitization to various fish species in allergic patients. Despite extensive efforts, the complete elucidation of β-parvalbumin-IgE complexes has not been achieved yet. Allergen structural studies are essential for the development of novel immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives and chimeric molecules. Here, we report for the first time the NMR study of a β-parvalbumin: Gad m 1. This report includes: (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of Gad m 1 as well as the second structure information based on the (13)C chemical shifts.

  20. Loss of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 from parvalbumin interneurons leads to hyperinhibition, decreased anxiety, and memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenko, Andrii; Seo, Jinsoo; Hu, Ji; Su, Susan C; de Anda, Froylan Calderon; Durak, Omer; Ericsson, Maria; Carlén, Marie; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2015-02-11

    Perturbations in fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) interneurons are hypothesized to be a major component of various neuropsychiatric disorders; however, the mechanisms regulating PV interneurons remain mostly unknown. Recently, cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been shown to function as a major regulator of synaptic plasticity. Here, we demonstrate that genetic ablation of Cdk5 in PV interneurons in mouse brain leads to an increase in GABAergic neurotransmission and impaired synaptic plasticity. PVCre;fCdk5 mice display a range of behavioral abnormalities, including decreased anxiety and memory impairment. Our results reveal a central role of Cdk5 expressed in PV interneurons in gating inhibitory neurotransmission and underscore the importance of such regulation during behavioral tasks. Our findings suggest that Cdk5 can be considered a promising therapeutic target in a variety of conditions attributed to inhibitory interneuronal dysfunction, such as epilepsy, anxiety disorders, and schizophrenia.

  1. The Parvalbumin/Somatostatin Ratio Is Increased in Pten Mutant Mice and by Human PTEN ASD Alleles

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    Daniel Vogt

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the phosphatase PTEN are strongly implicated in autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Here, we investigate the function of Pten in cortical GABAergic neurons using conditional mutagenesis in mice. Loss of Pten results in a preferential loss of SST+ interneurons, which increases the ratio of parvalbumin/somatostatin (PV/SST interneurons, ectopic PV+ projections in layer I, and inhibition onto glutamatergic cortical neurons. Pten mutant mice exhibit deficits in social behavior and changes in electroencephalogram (EEG power. Using medial ganglionic eminence (MGE transplantation, we test for cell-autonomous functional differences between human PTEN wild-type (WT and ASD alleles. The PTEN ASD alleles are hypomorphic in regulating cell size and the PV/SST ratio in comparison to WT PTEN. This MGE transplantation/complementation assay is efficient and is generally applicable for functional testing of ASD alleles in vivo.

  2. Detection of parvalbumin, a common fish allergen gene in food, by real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Liang, Chengzhu; Gao, Hongwei; Lin, Chao; Deng, Mingjun

    2009-01-01

    Fish, as one of the most common causes of IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity, has recently received increasing attention from the food industry and legislative and regulatory agencies. A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay based on TaqMan-MGB probe technology was developed for the detection of parvalbumin, a major fish allergen gene. The assay had a sensitivity up to 5 pg purified fish DNA and had no cross-reaction with other species, such as cattle, sheep, swine, chicken, shrimp, lobster, crab, squid, clam, rice, soybean, maize, and potato. The coefficient of variation for both intra- and interexperimental variability demonstrated high reproducibility and accuracy. The assay proved to be a potential tool for the detection and label management of fish allergens in food.

  3. Nimodipine prevents early loss of hippocampal CA1 parvalbumin immunoreactivity after focal cerebral ischemia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyó, Z; De Jong, G I; Luiten, P G

    1995-01-01

    The effect of focal cerebral ischemia induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion on hippocampal interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) was studied in rats. Four hours after the onset of ischemia, a reduced number of PV-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons was observed in the lateral part of the CA1 region, while PV-ir was not altered in the CA2 and CA3 areas. Pretreatment with the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nimodipine prevented the ischemia-induced loss of PV-ir in the CA1, suggesting a role for L-type voltage sensitive calcium channels in the mechanism of early neuronal alterations in the hippocampus CA1 region after focal cerebral ischemia.

  4. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  5. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity and expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the thalamus after experimental TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusko, N; Pitkänen, A

    2014-05-16

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes 10-20% of acquired epilepsy in humans, resulting in an ictogenic region that is often located in the cerebral cortex. The thalamus provides heavy projections to the cortex and the activity of thalamocortical pathways is controlled by GABAergic afferents from the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RT). As rats with TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury (FPI) undergo epileptogenesis, we hypothesized that damage to the parvalbumin (PARV)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the RT is associated with seizure susceptibility after lateral FPI. To address this hypothesis, adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n=13) were injured with lateral FPI. At 6months post-TBI, each animal underwent a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure susceptibility test and 2weeks of continuous video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring for detection of the occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Thereafter, the brain was processed for PARV immunohistochemistry. We (a) estimated the total number of PARV-ir neurons in the RT using unbiased stereology, (b) measured the volume of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) and ventroposterolateral (VPL) nuclei of the thalamus, which receive PARV-ir inputs from the RT and project to the perilesional cortex, (c) quantified the density of PARV-ir terminals in the VPM-VPL, and (d) studied the expression of GABAA receptor subunits in a separate group of rats using laser-dissection of the thalamus followed by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) array studies. At 6months post-TBI, only 64% of PARV-ir neurons were remaining in the RT ipsilaterally (p0.05). Also, the volume of the VPM-VPL was only 51% of that in controls ipsilaterally (p<0.001) and 91% contralaterally (p<0.05). The density of PARV-ir axonal labeling was remarkably increased in the lateral aspects of the VPM and VPL (both p<0.001). Expression of the ε- and θ-subunits of the GABAA receptor was down-regulated (0.152, p<0.01 and 0.302, p<0.05, respectively), which could relate

  6. Altered dendritic distribution of dopamine D2 receptors and reduction in mitochondrial number in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Megan L; Chan, June; Mackie, Kenneth; Lupica, Carl R; Pickel, Virginia M

    2012-12-01

    The prelimbic prefrontal cortex (PL) is a brain region integral to complex behaviors that are highly influenced by cannabinoids and by dopamine D2 receptor (D2R)-mediated regulation of fast-firing parvalbumin-containing interneurons. We have recently shown that constitutive deletion of the cannabinoid-1 receptor (CB1R) greatly reduces parvalbumin levels in these neurons. The effects of CB1R deletion on PL parvalbumin interneurons may be ascribed to loss of CB1R-mediated retrograde signaling on mesocortical dopamine transmission, and, in turn, altered expression and/or subcellular distribution of D2R in the PL. Furthermore, diminished parvalbumin expression could indicate metabolic changes in fast-firing interneurons that may be reflected in changes in mitochondrial density in this population. We therefore comparatively examined electron microscopic dual labeling of D2R and parvalbumin in CB1 (-/-) and CB1 (+/+) mice to test the hypothesis that absence of CB1R produces changes in D2R localization and mitochondrial distribution in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the PL. CB1 (-/-) mice had a significantly lower density of cytoplasmic D2R-immunogold particles in medium parvalbumin-labeled dendrites and a concomitant increase in the density of these particles in small dendrites. These dendrites received both excitatory and inhibitory-type synapses from unlabeled terminals and contained many mitochondria, whose numbers were significantly reduced in CB1 (-/-) mice. Non-parvalbumin dendrites showed no between-group differences in either D2R distribution or mitochondrial number. These results suggest that cannabinoid signaling provides an important determinant of dendritic D2 receptor distribution and mitochondrial availability in fast-spiking interneurons.

  7. A Novel Modulator of Kv3 Potassium Channels Regulates the Firing of Parvalbumin-Positive Cortical Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato-Siri, Marcelo D; Zambello, Erika; Mutinelli, Chiara; Garbati, Nicoletta; Benedetti, Roberto; Aldegheri, Laura; Graziani, Francesca; Virginio, Caterina; Alvaro, Giuseppe; Large, Charles H

    2015-09-01

    Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 high voltage-activated potassium channels, which display fast activation and deactivation kinetics, are known to make a crucial contribution to the fast-spiking phenotype of certain neurons. Pharmacological experiments show that the blockade of native Kv3 currents with low concentrations of tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine impairs the expression of this firing phenotype. In particular, Kv3 channels are highly expressed by fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive interneurons in corticolimbic brain circuits, which modulate the synchronization of cortical circuits and the generation of brain rhythms. Here, we describe a novel small molecule, (5R)-5-ethyl-3-(6-{[4-methyl-3-(methyloxy)phenyl]oxy}-3-pyridinyl)-2,4-imidazolidinedione (AUT1), which modulates Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 channels in human recombinant and rodent native neurons. AUT1 increased whole currents mediated by human Kv3.1b and Kv3.2a channels, with a concomitant leftward shift in the voltage dependence of activation. A less potent effect was observed on hKv3.3 currents. In mouse somatosensory cortex slices in vitro, AUT1 rescued the fast-spiking phenotype of parvalbumin-positive-fast-spiking interneurons following an impairment of their firing capacity by blocking a proportion of Kv3 channels with a low concentration of tetraethylammonium. Notably, AUT1 had no effect on interneuron firing when applied alone. Together, these data confirm the role played by Kv3 channels in the regulation of the firing phenotype of somatosensory interneurons and suggest that AUT1 and other Kv3 modulators could represent a new and promising therapeutic approach to the treatment of disorders associated with dysfunction of inhibitory feedback in corticolimbic circuits, such as schizophrenia.

  8. Impaired excitability of somatostatin- and parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons in a mouse model of Dravet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chao; Abe, Yasuyuki; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2014-07-29

    Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable developmental epilepsy syndrome with seizure onset in the first year of life. Specific heterozygous deletion of NaV1.1 in forebrain GABAergic-inhibitory neurons is sufficient to cause all the manifestations of Dravet syndrome in mice, but the physiological roles of specific subtypes of GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex in this disease are unknown. Voltage-clamp studies of dissociated interneurons from cerebral cortex did not detect a significant effect of the Dravet syndrome mutation on sodium currents in cell bodies. However, current-clamp recordings of intact interneurons in layer V of neocortical slices from mice with haploinsufficiency in the gene encoding the NaV1.1 sodium channel, Scn1a, revealed substantial reduction of excitability in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-expressing interneurons and somatostatin-expressing interneurons. The threshold and rheobase for action potential generation were increased, the frequency of action potentials within trains was decreased, and action-potential firing within trains failed more frequently. Furthermore, the deficit in excitability of somatostatin-expressing interneurons caused significant reduction in frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition between neighboring layer V pyramidal neurons mediated by somatostatin-expressing Martinotti cells, which would lead to substantial disinhibition of the output of cortical circuits. In contrast to these deficits in interneurons, pyramidal cells showed no differences in excitability. These results reveal that the two major subtypes of interneurons in layer V of the neocortex, parvalbumin-expressing and somatostatin-expressing, both have impaired excitability, resulting in disinhibition of the cortical network. These major functional deficits are likely to contribute synergistically to the pathophysiology of Dravet syndrome.

  9. Deletion of selenoprotein P results in impaired function of parvalbumin interneurons and alterations in fear learning and sensorimotor gating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, M W; Raman, A V; Hashimoto, A C; Todorovic, C; Nichols, R A; Berry, M J

    2012-04-19

    One of the primary lines of defense against oxidative stress is the selenoprotein family, a class of proteins that contain selenium in the form of the 21st amino acid, selenocysteine. Within this class of proteins, selenoprotein P (Sepp1) is unique, as it contains multiple selenocysteine residues and is postulated to act in selenium transport. Recent findings have demonstrated that neuronal selenoprotein synthesis is required for the development of parvalbumin (PV)-interneurons, a class of GABAergic neurons involved in the synchronization of neural activity. To investigate the potential influence of Sepp1 on PV-interneurons, we first mapped the distribution of the Sepp1 receptor, ApoER2, and parvalbumin in the mouse brain. Our results indicate that ApoER2 is highly expressed on PV-interneurons in multiple brain regions. Next, to determine whether PV-interneuron populations are affected by Sepp1 deletion, we performed stereology on several brain regions in which we observed ApoER2 expression on PV-interneurons, comparing wild-type and Sepp1(-/-) mice. We observed reduced numbers of PV-interneurons in the inferior colliculus of Sepp1(-/-) mice, which corresponded with a regional increase in oxidative stress. Finally, as impaired PV-interneuron function has been implicated in several neuropsychiatric conditions, we performed multiple behavioral tests on Sepp1(-/-) mice. Our behavioral results indicate that Sepp1(-/-) mice have impairments in contextual fear extinction, latent inhibition, and sensorimotor gating. In sum, these findings demonstrate the important supporting role of Sepp1 on ApoER2-expressing PV-interneurons.

  10. Removal of GABA(A receptor γ2 subunits from parvalbumin neurons causes wide-ranging behavioral alterations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elli Leppä

    Full Text Available We investigated the behavioral significance of fast synaptic inhibition by αβγ2-type GABA(A receptors on parvalbumin (Pv cells. The GABA(A receptor γ2 subunit gene was selectively inactivated in Pv-positive neurons by Cre/loxP recombination. The resulting Pv-Δγ2 mice were relatively healthy in the first postnatal weeks; but then as Cre started to be expressed, the mice progressively developed wide-ranging phenotypic alterations including low body weight, motor deficits and tremor, decreased anxiety levels, decreased pain sensitivity and deficient prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex and impaired spatial learning. Nevertheless, the deletion was not lethal, and mice did not show increased mortality even after one year. Autoradiography with t-butylbicyclophosphoro[(35S]thionate suggested an increased amount of GABA(A receptors with only α and β subunits in central nervous system regions that contained high levels of parvalbumin neurons. Using BAC-transgenesis, we reduced some of the Pv-Δγ2 phenotype by selectively re-expressing the wild-type γ2 subunit back into some Pv cells (reticular thalamic neurons and cerebellar Pv-positive neurons. This produced less severe impairments of motor skills and spatial learning compared with Pv-Δγ2 mice, but all other deficits remained. Our results reveal the widespread significance of fast GABAergic inhibition onto Pv-positive neurons for diverse behavioral modalities, such as motor coordination, sensorimotor integration, emotional behavior and nociception.

  11. [Effect of rabies virus infection on the expression of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin in mouse cerebral cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Fernández, Orlando; Yepes, Gloria E; Gómez, Javier E; Pimienta, Hernán J

    2004-03-01

    Some clinical features of rabies and experimental evidence from cell culture and laboratory animals suggest impairment of gabaergic neurotransmission. Several types of gabaergic neurons occur in the cerebral cortex. They can be identified by three neuronal markers: the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR). Rabies virus spreads throughout the cerebral cortex; however, rabies cytopathic effects on gabaergic neurons are unknown. The expression of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) was studied in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of gabaergic neurons was evaluated immunohistochemically. The distribution patterns of CaBPs in normal mice and in mice infected with 'fixed' or 'street' rabies virus were compared. PV was found in multipolar neurons located in all cortical layers except layer I, and in pericellular clusters of terminal knobs surrounding the soma of pyramidal neurons. CB-immunoreactivity was distributed in two cortical bands. One was composed of round neurons enclosed by a heavily labeled neuropil; this band corresponds to supragranular layers II and III. The other was a weakly stained band of neuropil which contained scattered multipolar CB-ir neurons; this corresponds to infragranular layers V and VI. The CR-ir neurons were bipolar fusiform cells located in all layers of cortex, but concentrated in layers II and III. A feature common to samples infected with both types of viruses was a more intense immunoreactivity to PV in contrast to normal samples. The infection with 'street' virus did not cause additional changes in the expression of CaBPs. However, the infection with 'fixed' virus produced a remarkable reduction of CB-immunoreactivity demonstrated by the loss of CB-ir neurons and low neuropil stain in the frontal cortex. In addition, the size of CR-ir neurons in the cingulate cortex was decreased.

  12. Distribution of neurofilament protein and calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin in the canine hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hof, P R; Rosenthal, R E; Fiskum, G

    1996-07-01

    Neurofilament protein and calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin are present in morphologically distinct neuronal subpopulations in the mammalian cerebral cortex. Immunohistochemical studies of the hippocampal formation and neocortex have demonstrated that while neurofilament protein and calbindin are localized in subsets of pyramidal neurons, the three calcium-binding proteins are useful markers to differentiate non-overlapping populations of interneurons. To date, most studies have been performed in rodents and primates. In the present analysis, we analyzed the distribution of these proteins in the canine hippocampus. Neurofilament protein was present in large multipolar neurons in the hilus and in pyramidal neurons in the CA3 field, whereas pyramidal neurons in the CA1 field and subiculum were less intensely immunoreactive. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity was observed in large multipolar neurons in the hilus and throughout the CA3-CA1 fields, in a few pyramidal-shaped neurons in the CA1 field and subiculum, and had a distinct neuropil staining pattern in the granule cell layer and stratum pyramidale of the Ammon's horn. Calbindin immunoreactivity displayed a strong labeling of the granule cells and mossy fibers and was also observed in a population of moderately immunoreactive neurons in the CA1 field and subiculum. Calretinin immunoreactivity was relatively weaker overall. The inner molecular layer in the dentate gyrus had a distinct band of labeling, the stratum lacunosum/moleculare contained a punctate neuropil staining, and there were a few small multipolar neurons in the hilus, CA3-CA1 fields, and subiculum. Comparison of the staining patterns observed in the dog hippocampus with those in human, macaque monkeys and rats revealed that although there are some subregional differences among these taxa, the dog may constitute a valuable large animal model for the study of certain neurological conditions that affect humans, in spite of the

  13. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  14. Survival of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the gerbil hippocampus following transient forebrain ischemia does not depend on HSP-70 protein induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, I; Soriano, M A; Vidal, A; Planas, A M

    1995-09-18

    HSP-70 was induced in the gerbil following 20 min of forebrain ischemia. The induction, as revealed with immunohistochemistry, is stronger and longer-lasting in CA3 and dentate gyrus than in CA1. Most neurons in this region, except GABAergic interneurons containing the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin, eventually cease to live as a result of delayed cell death. Double-labeling of inducible HSP-70 and parvalbumin has shown that no co-localization occurs in the hippocampus and neocortex of the gerbil in this model of transient forebrain ischemia. These results show that different thresholds of sensitivity and vulnerability exist for different subpopulations of neurons in the ischemic hippocampus, and suggest that HSP-70 protein induction is probably not essential for the survival of particular neuronal subpopulations subjected to transient ischemia.

  15. ON THE NOTION OF SYNERGY OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AS DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sela

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available History of developing synergy between monoclonal antibodies, anti-tumor activity of monoclonal antibodies against tyrosine-kinases receptors EGFR/ErbB-1 and HER2/ErbB-2 as well as growth factor VEGF in various combinations are considered in the article. There were proposed hypotheses about potential molecular mechanisms underlay synergy between monoclonal antibodies (for homo- and hetero combinations of antibodies appropriately specific for antigenic determinants on the same or different receptors. Future trends in researches necessary to deeper understanding causes of this phenomenon and perspectives for practical application of monoclonal antibodies acted synergistically as immunotherapeutic drugs for human tumors treatment are reviewed.

  16. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  17. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Cherry

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML. As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  18. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurodegenerative and morphogenic changes in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy do not depend on the expression of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, or calretinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouilleret, V; Schwaller, B; Schurmans, S; Celio, M R; Fritschy, J M

    2000-01-01

    The functional role of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calretinin, and calbindin D-28k for epileptogenesis and long-term seizure-related alterations of the hippocampal formation was assessed in single- and double-knockout mice, using a kainate model of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. The effects of a unilateral intrahippocampal injection of kainic acid were assessed at one day, 30 days, and four months post-injection, using various markers of GABAergic interneurons (GABA-transporter type 1, GABA(A)-receptor alpha1 subunit, calretinin, calbindin D-28k, somatostatin, and neuropeptide Y). Parvalbumin-deficient, parvalbumin/calbindin-deficient, and parvalbumin/calretinin-deficient mice exhibited no difference in cytoarchitecture of the hippocampal formation and in the number, distribution, or morphology of interneurons compared to wild-type mice. Likewise, mutant mice were not more vulnerable to acute kainate-induced excitotoxicity or to long-term effects of recurrent focal seizures, and exhibited the same pattern of neurochemical alterations (e.g., bilateral induction of neuropeptide Y in granule cells) and morphogenic changes (enlargement and dispersion of dentate gyrus granule cells) as wild-type animals. Quantification of interneurons revealed no significant difference in neuronal vulnerability among the genotypes.These results indicate that the calcium-binding proteins investigated here are not essential for determining the neurochemical phenotype of interneurons. Furthermore, they are not protective against kainate-induced excitotoxicity in this model, and do not appear to modulate the overall level of excitability of the hippocampus. Finally, seizure-induced changes in gene expression in granule cells, which normally express high levels of calcium-binding proteins, apparently were not affected by the gene deletions analysed.

  20. Complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell in the rat hippocampus, and its relationship with postsynaptic parvalbumin-containing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sik, A; Tamamaki, N; Freund, T F

    1993-12-01

    The complete axon arborization of a single CA3 pyramidal cell has been reconstructed from 32 (60 microns thick) sections from the rat hippocampus following in vivo intracellular injection of neurobiotin. The same sections were double-immunostained for parvalbumin--a calcium-binding protein selectively present in two types of GABAergic interneurons, the basket and chandelier cells--in order to map boutons of the pyramidal cell in contact with dendrites and somata of these specific subsets of interneurons visualized in a Golgi-like manner. The axon of the pyramidal cell formed 15,295 boutons, 63.8% of which were in stratum oriens, 15.4% in stratum pyramidale and 20.8% in stratum radiatum. Only 2.1% of the axon terminals contacted parvalbumin-positive neurons. Most of these were single contacts (84.7%), but double or triple contacts (15.3%) were also found. The majority of the boutons terminated on dendrites (84.1%) of parvalbumin-positive cells, less frequently on cell bodies (15.9%). In order to estimate the proportion of contacts representing synapses, 16 light microscopically identified contacts between boutons of the filled pyramidal cell axon and the parvalbumin-positive targets were examined by correlated electron microscopy. Thirteen of them were found to be asymmetrical synapses, and in the remaining three cases synapses between the labelled profiles could not be confirmed. We conclude that the physiologically effective excitatory connections between single pyramidal cells and postsynaptic inhibitory neurons are mediated by a small number of contacts, mostly by a single synapse. This results in a high degree of convergence and divergence in hippocampal networks.

  1. Age-related changes of NGF, BDNF, parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Natsumi; Abe, Manami; Eto, Risa; Kato, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the age-related alterations in nerve growth factor (NGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), parvalbumin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity of the mouse hippocampal CA1 sector. NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from 2 to 50-59 weeks of birth. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector from 40-42 to 50-59 weeks of birth. On the other hand, the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. Our results indicate that NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was unaltered in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons during aging processes. In contrast, a significant increase in the NGF and BDNF immunoreactivity was observed in glial cells of the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. The present study also shows that the number of parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons was unchanged in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes, except for a significant decrease of nNOS-positive interneurons 2 weeks of birth. These results demonstrate that the expression of glial NGF and BDNF may play a key role for helping survival and maintenance of pyramidal neurons and neuronal functions in the hippocampal CA1 sector during aging processes. Furthermore, our findings suggest that parvalbumin- and nNOS-positive interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 sector are resistant to aging processes. Moreover, our findings suggest that nitric oxide synthesized by the nNOS may play some role for neuronal growth during postnatal development.

  2. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2017-05-04

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays.

  4. Monoclonal Idiotope Vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Mary K.; Ward, Ronald E.; Kohler, Heinz

    1984-12-01

    A monoclonal anti-idiotope antibody coupled to a carrier protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice against a lethal Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Vaccinated mice developed a high titer of antibody to phosphorylcholine, which is known to protect against infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Measurement of the median lethal dose of the bacteria indicated that anti-idiotope immunization significantly increased the resistance of BALB/c mice to the bacterial challenge. Antibody to an idiotope can thus be used as an antigen substitute for the induction of protective immunity.

  5. Anaphylaxis to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Mariana C

    2015-05-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions are increasingly prevalent, although underrecognized and underreported. Platins induce immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization; taxenes and some monoclonal antibodies can induce reactions at first exposure. Severe hypersensitivity can preclude first-line therapy. Tryptase level at the time of a reaction is a useful diagnostic tool. Skin testing provides a specific diagnosis. Newer tests are promising diagnostic tools to help identify patients at risk before first exposure. Safe management includes rapid drug desensitization. This review provides information regarding the scope of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions induced by chemotherapy and biological drugs, as well as diagnosis, management, and treatment options.

  6. Bipolar disorder type 1 and schizophrenia are accompanied by decreased density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alice Y; Lohmann, Kathryn M; Yang, C Kevin; Zimmerman, Eric I; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Herring, Nicole; Berretta, Sabina; Heckers, Stephan; Konradi, Christine

    2011-11-01

    GABAergic interneurons synchronize network activities and monitor information flow. Post-mortem studies have reported decreased densities of cortical interneurons in schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD). The entorhinal cortex (EC) and the adjacent subicular regions are a hub for integration of hippocampal and cortical information, a process that is disrupted in SZ. Here we contrast and compare the density of interneuron populations in the caudal EC and subicular regions in BPD type I (BPD-I), SZ, and normal control (NC) subjects. Post-mortem human parahippocampal specimens of 13 BPD-I, 11 SZ and 17 NC subjects were used to examine the numerical density of parvalbumin-, somatostatin- or calbindin-positive interneurons. We observed a reduction in the numerical density of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the caudal EC and parasubiculum in BPD-I and SZ, but no change in the subiculum. Calbindin-positive interneuron densities were normal in all brain areas examined. The profile of decreased density was strikingly similar in BPD-I and SZ. Our results demonstrate a specific reduction of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-positive interneurons in the parahippocampal region in BPD-I and SZ, likely disrupting synchronization and integration of cortico-hippocampal circuits.

  7. 15N NMR relaxation studies of calcium-loaded parvalbumin show tight dynamics compared to those of other EF-hand proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldellon, C; Alattia, J R; Strub, M P;

    1998-01-01

    for the rat alpha-parvalbumin calcium-loaded form are (1) the extreme rigidity of the helix-loop-helix EF-hand motifs and the linker segment connecting them, (2) the N and C termini of the protein being restricted in their mobility, (3) a conformational exchange occurring at the kink of helix D, and (4......) the residue at relative position 2 in the Ca2+-binding sites having an enhanced mobility. Comparison of the Ca2+-binding EF-hand domains of alpha-parvalbumin-Ca2+, calbindin-Ca2+, and calmodulin-Ca2+ shows that parvalbumin is probably the most rigid of the EF-hand proteins. It also illustrates the dynamical...... properties which are conserved in the EF-hand domains from different members of this superfamily: (1) a tendency toward higher mobility of NH vectors at relative position 2 in the Ca2+-binding loop, (2) a restricted mobility for the other residues in the binding loop, and (3) an overall rigidity...

  8. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  9. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Understanding Ion Binding Affinity and Selectivity in β-Parvalbumin Using Molecular Dynamics and Mean Spherical Approximation Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharski, Amir N; Scott, Caitlin E; Davis, Jonathan P; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M

    2016-08-25

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a globular calcium (Ca(2+))-selective protein expressed in a variety of biological tissues. Our computational studies of the rat β-parvalbumin (β-PV) isoform seek to elucidate the molecular thermodynamics of Ca(2+) versus magnesium (Mg(2+)) binding at the protein's two EF-hand motifs. Specifically, we have utilized molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and a mean-field electrolyte model (mean spherical approximation (MSA) theory) to delineate how the EF-hand scaffold controls the "local" thermodynamics of Ca(2+) binding selectivity over Mg(2+). Our MD simulations provide the probability density of metal-chelating oxygens within the EF-hand scaffolds for both Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), as well the conformational strain induced by Mg(2+) relative to Ca(2+) binding. MSA theory utilizes the binding domain oxygen and charge distributions to predict the chemical potential of ion binding, as well as their corresponding concentrations within the binding domain. We find that the electrostatic and steric contributions toward ion binding were similar for Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), yet the latter was 5.5 kcal/mol lower in enthalpy when internal strain within the EF hand was considered. We therefore speculate that beyond differences in dehydration energies for the Ca(2+) versus Mg(2+), strain induced in the β-PV EF hand by cation binding significantly contributes to the nearly 10,000-fold difference in binding affinity reported in the literature. We further complemented our analyses of local factors governing cation binding selectivity with whole-protein (global) contributions, such as interhelical residue-residue contacts and solvent exposure of hydrophobic surface. These contributions were found to be comparable for both Ca(2+)- and Mg(2+)-bound β-PV, which may implicate local factors, EF-hand strain, and dehydration, in providing the primary means of selectivity. We anticipate these methods could be used to estimate metal binding thermodynamics across a broad range of

  11. Immunochemical Characterization of Anti-Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    formation. This conformation was first proposed using studies with monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide mimicking the sequence of the...distinct antigenic determinants on dengue -2 virus using monoclonal antibodies, Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg., 31 (1982) 548-555. 7 D. De la Hoz, B.P. Doctor

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Hippurate Hydrolase of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Marina; Gyles, Carlton; Chan, Voon Loong; Odumeru, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant Campylobacter jejuni hippurate hydrolase were tested for binding to lysates from 19 C. jejuni strains, 12 other Campylobacter strains, and 21 non-Campylobacter strains. Several monoclonal antibodies bound to C. jejuni but not to other Campylobacter species and may be useful in a species-specific immunoassay.

  13. Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy, cause and consequence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eurelings, Marijke

    2005-01-01

    The relation between monoclonal antibodies and polyneuropathy is best supported for polyneuropathy associated with IgM monoclonal anti-myelin associated glycoprotein (anti-MAG) antibodies. These anti-MAG antibodies are reactive against peripheral nerve autoantigen, thereby causing an autoimmune medi

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy with both nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Lei, Lin; Chen, Hai; Di, Li; Pang, Mi; Lu, Yan; Lu, Lu; Shen, Xin-Ming; Da, Yuwei

    2017-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies due to plasma cell dyscrasias can induce diverse rare neuromuscular disorders. Deposition of monoclonal antibody light chains in skeletal muscle causes amyloid myopathy. Monoclonal gammopathy is occasionally associated with sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy. Here we report a monoclonal gammopathy patient with both sporadic late-onset nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy. The diagnoses were based on immunofixation electrophoresis of urine, and serum for free light chain assay, Congo red staining and Thioflavin S staining of muscle biopsies, as well as immunohistochemical staining and electron-microscopic observation. Nemaline myopathy and amyloid myopathy can present in the same patient with monoclonal gammopathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Treatment with anti-interferon-δ monoclonal antibodies modifies experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in interferon-δ receptor knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espejo, C.; Penkowa, Milena; Saez-Torres, I.

    2001-01-01

    Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis......Neuroinflammation, neuronal degeneration, regeneration, monoclonal antibodies, multiple schlerosis...

  16. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these an

  17. 5-HT3a Receptors Modulate Hippocampal Gamma Oscillations by Regulating Synchrony of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Yoon, Kristopher; Ko, Ho; Jiao, Song; Ito, Wataru; Wu, Jian-Young; Yung, Wing-Ho; Lu, Bai; Morozov, Alexei

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-frequency oscillatory activity plays an important role in information integration across brain areas. Disruption in gamma oscillations is implicated in cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders, and 5-HT3 receptors (5-HT3Rs) are suggested as therapeutic targets for cognitive dysfunction in psychiatric disorders. Using a 5-HT3aR-EGFP transgenic mouse line and inducing gamma oscillations by carbachol in hippocampal slices, we show that activation of 5-HT3aRs, which are exclusively expressed in cholecystokinin (CCK)-containing interneurons, selectively suppressed and desynchronized firings in these interneurons by enhancing spike-frequency accommodation in a small conductance potassium (SK)-channel-dependent manner. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons therefore received diminished inhibitory input leading to increased but desynchronized firings of PV cells. As a consequence, the firing of pyramidal neurons was desynchronized and gamma oscillations were impaired. These effects were independent of 5-HT3aR-mediated CCK release. Our results therefore revealed an important role of 5-HT3aRs in gamma oscillations and identified a novel crosstalk among different types of interneurons for regulation of network oscillations. The functional link between 5-HT3aR and gamma oscillations may have implications for understanding the cognitive impairments in psychiatric disorders.

  18. Selective activation of parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons triggers epileptic seizurelike activity in mouse medial entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yekhlef, Latefa; Breschi, Gian Luca; Lagostena, Laura; Russo, Giovanni; Taverna, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are thought to play a critical role in eliciting interictal spikes (IICs) and triggering ictal discharges in temporal lobe epilepsy, yet the contribution of different interneuronal subtypes to seizure initiation is still largely unknown. Here we took advantage of optogenetic techniques combined with patch-clamp and field recordings to selectively stimulate parvalbumin (PV)- or somatostatin (SOM)-positive interneurons expressing channelrhodopsin-2 (CHR-2) in layers II-III of adult mouse medial entorhinal cortical slices during extracellular perfusion with the proconvulsive compound 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 100-200 μM). In control conditions, blue laser photostimulation selectively activated action potential firing in either PV or SOM interneurons and, in both cases, caused a robust GABAA-receptor-mediated inhibition in pyramidal cells (PCs). During perfusion with 4-AP, brief photostimuli (300 ms) activating either PV or SOM interneurons induced patterns of epileptiform activity that closely replicated spontaneously occurring IICs and tonic-clonic ictal discharges. Laser-induced synchronous firing in both interneuronal types elicited large compound GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) correlating with IICs and preictal spikes. In addition, spontaneous and laser-induced epileptic events were similarly initiated in concurrence with a large increase in extracellular potassium concentration. Finally, interneuron activation was unable to stop or significantly shorten the progression of seizurelike episodes. These results suggest that entorhinal PV and SOM interneurons are nearly equally effective in triggering interictal and ictal discharges that closely resemble human temporal lobe epileptic activity.

  19. Parvalbumin-Expressing GABAergic Neurons in Mouse Barrel Cortex Contribute to Gating a Goal-Directed Sensorimotor Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Sachidhanandam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing in neocortex is primarily driven by glutamatergic excitation, which is counterbalanced by GABAergic inhibition, mediated by a diversity of largely local inhibitory interneurons. Here, we trained mice to lick a reward spout in response to whisker deflection, and we recorded from genetically defined GABAergic inhibitory neurons in layer 2/3 of the primary somatosensory barrel cortex. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV, vasoactive intestinal peptide-expressing (VIP, and somatostatin-expressing (SST neurons displayed distinct action potential firing dynamics during task performance. Whereas SST neurons fired at low rates, both PV and VIP neurons fired at high rates both spontaneously and in response to whisker stimulation. After an initial outcome-invariant early sensory response, PV neurons had lower firing rates in hit trials compared to miss trials. Optogenetic inhibition of PV neurons during this time period enhanced behavioral performance. Hence, PV neuron activity might contribute causally to gating the sensorimotor transformation of a whisker sensory stimulus into licking motor output.

  20. Disruption of mGluR5 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons induces core features of neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, S A; Pinto-Duarte, A; Kappe, A; Zembrzycki, A; Metzler, A; Mukamel, E A; Lucero, J; Wang, X; Sejnowski, T J; Markou, A; Behrens, M M

    2015-10-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic transmission onto developing GABAergic systems, in particular onto parvalbumin-positive (Pv(+)) fast-spiking interneurons, have been proposed as underlying causes of several neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. Excitatory glutamatergic transmission, through ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, is necessary for the correct postnatal development of the Pv(+) GABAergic network. We generated mutant mice in which the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) was specifically ablated from Pv(+) interneurons postnatally, and investigated the consequences of such a manipulation at the cellular, network and systems levels. Deletion of mGluR5 from Pv(+) interneurons resulted in reduced numbers of Pv(+) neurons and decreased inhibitory currents, as well as alterations in event-related potentials and brain oscillatory activity. These cellular and sensory changes translated into domain-specific memory deficits and increased compulsive-like behaviors, abnormal sensorimotor gating and altered responsiveness to stimulant agents. Our findings suggest a fundamental role for mGluR5 in the development of Pv(+) neurons and show that alterations in this system can produce broad-spectrum alterations in brain network activity and behavior that are relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Reduction in parvalbumin-positive interneurons and inhibitory input in the cortex of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Anna; Pennucci, Roberta; Brambilla, Elena; de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-07-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), inflammation leads to damage of central nervous system myelin and axons. Previous studies have postulated impaired GABA transmission in MS, and recent postmortem analysis has shown that GABAergic parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons are decreased in the primary motor cortex (M1) of patients with MS. In this report, we present evidence for the loss of a specific population of GABAergic interneurons in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis mouse model of MS. Using experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we evaluated the distribution of both PV-positive interneurons and of the inhibitory presynaptic input in the M1 of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and control mice. Our results demonstrate a specific decrease in the number of PV-positive interneurons in the M1 of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. We detected a significant reduction in the number of PV-positive interneurons in the layers II and III of the M1 of diseased mice, while there was no difference in the number of calretinin (CR)-positive cells between animals with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and control animals. Moreover, we observed a significant reduction in the inhibitory presynaptic input in the M1 of treated mice. These changes were specific for the mice with elevated clinical score, while they were not detectable in the mice with low clinical score. Our results support the hypothesis that reinforcing the action of the GABAergic network may represent a therapeutic alternative to limit the progression of the neuronal damage in MS patients.

  2. Reduced densities of parvalbumin- and somatostatin-expressing interneurons in experimental cortical dysplasia and heterotopia in early postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akakin, Dilek; Martinez-Diaz, Hildabelis; Chen, Huan-Xin; Roper, Steven N

    2013-05-01

    Cortical dysplasia (CD) is strongly associated with intractable epilepsy, probably due to hyperexcitability of neuronal networks. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. GABAergic interneurons provide major inhibitory function in the CNS and have different subtypes, but it is not clear how each subtype is affected in CD during early post-natal development. We have examined the developmental alterations of the densities of two major subtypes of interneurons, parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SS)-expressing interneurons in an animal model of CD, in utero irradiation, using immunocytochemistry. We found that the density of PV- and SS-positive interneurons increases significantly in CD and controls during the first three weeks of postnatal life. However, compared to controls, the densities of both subtypes are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia at all age groups although the time of onset for both PV and SS expression remained unchanged. Our results indicate that the densities of both PV- and SS-positive interneurons are significantly decreased in CD and heterotopia, which may be one important mechanism leading to hyperexcitability of CD.

  3. Prolonged protein deprivation differentially affects calretinin- and parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hipólito-Reis, José; Pereira, Pedro Alberto; Andrade, José Paulo; Cardoso, Armando

    2013-10-25

    Protein deprivation is a detrimental nutritional state that induces several deleterious changes in the rat hippocampal formation. In this study, we compared the effects of protein deprivation in the number of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive and calretinin (CR)-immunoreactive interneurons of the dentate gyrus, which are involved in the control of calcium homeostasis and fine tuning of the hippocampal circuits. Two month-old rats were randomly assigned to control and low-protein diet groups. The rats of the latter group were fed with a low-protein diet (8% casein) for 6 months. All animals were perfused at 8 months of age. The number of neurons expressing CR in the molecular layer and in the hilus of dentate gyrus was reduced in protein-deprived rats. Conversely, protein deprivation increased the number of PV-containing interneurons in the dentate granule cell layer and hilus. These results support the view that protein deprivation may disturb calcium homeostasis, leading to neuronal death including GABAergic interneurons expressing CR. In the other hand, the up-regulation of PV cells may reflect a protective mechanism to counteract the calcium overload and protect the remaining neurons of the dentate gyrus.

  4. The transcription factor Sp8 is required for the production of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaosu; Sun, Chifei; Lin, Chao; Ma, Tong; Madhavan, Mayur C; Campbell, Kenneth; Yang, Zhengang

    2011-06-08

    Interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) represent a heterogeneous population, which are first produced at embryonic stages and persisting into adulthood. Using the BrdU birthdating method combined with immunostaining for several different neuronal markers, we provide the integrated temporal patterns of distinct mouse OB interneuron production from embryonic day 14 to postnatal day 365. We show that although the majority of OB interneuron subtypes continue to be generated throughout life, most subtypes show a similar "bell-like" temporal production pattern with a peak around birth. Tyrosine hydroxylase and calretinin-expressing interneurons are produced at a relatively low rate in the adult OB, while parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneuron production is confined to later embryonic and early postnatal stages. We also show that Dlx5/6-expressing progenitors contribute to PV+ interneurons in the OB. Interestingly, all PV+ interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL) express the transcription factor Sp8. Genetic ablation of Sp8 by cre/loxP-based recombination severely reduces the number of PV+ interneurons in the EPL of the OB. Our results suggest that Sp8 is required for the normal production of PV+ interneurons in the EPL of the OB. These data expand our understanding of the temporal and molecular regulation of OB interneuron neurogenesis.

  5. Alterations in slow-twitch muscle phenotype in transgenic mice overexpressing the Ca2+ buffering protein parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Eva R; Grange, Robert W; Viau, Francois; Simard, Alain R; Humphries, Caroline; Shelton, John; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Williams, R Sanders; Michel, Robin N

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether induced expression of the Ca2+ buffering protein parvalbumin (PV) in slow-twitch fibres would lead to alterations in physiological, biochemical and molecular properties reflective of a fast fibre phenotype. Transgenic (TG) mice were generated that overexpressed PV in slow (type I) muscle fibres. In soleus muscle (SOL; 58 % type I fibres) total PV expression was 2- to 6-fold higher in TG compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Maximum twitch and tetanic tensions were similar in WT and TG but force at subtetanic frequencies (30 and 50 Hz) was reduced in TG SOL. Twitch time-to-peak tension and half-relaxation time were significantly decreased in TG SOL (time-to-peak tension: 39.3 +/- 2.6 vs. 55.1 +/- 4.7 ms; half-relaxation time: 42.1 +/- 3.5 vs. 68.1 +/- 9.6 ms, P single fibre glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was decreased in a subset of type IIa fibres. These differences were associated with a 64 % reduction in calcineurin activity in TG SOL. These data show that overexpression of PV, resulting in decreased calcineurin activity, can alter the functional and metabolic profile of muscle and influence the expression of key marker genes in a predominantly slow-twitch muscle with minimal effects on the expression of muscle contractile proteins.

  6. Prenatal cocaine exposure decreases parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Deirdre M; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2012-01-01

    Cocaine abuse during pregnancy produces harmful effects not only on the mother but also on the unborn child. The neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin are known as the principal targets of the action of cocaine in the fetal and postnatal brain. However, recent evidence suggests that cocaine can impair cerebral cortical GABA neuron development and function. We sought to analyze the effects of prenatal cocaine exposure on the number and distribution of GABA and projection neurons (inhibitory interneurons and excitatory output neurons, respectively) in the mouse cerebral cortex. We found that the prenatal cocaine exposure decreased GABA neuron numbers and GABA-to-projection neuron ratio in the medial prefrontal cortex of 60-day-old mice. The neighboring prefrontal cortex did not show significant changes in either of these measures. However, there was a significant increase in projection neuron numbers in the prefrontal cortex but not in the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, the effects of cocaine on GABA and projection neurons appear to be cortical region specific. The population of parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABA neurons was decreased in the medial prefrontal cortex following the prenatal cocaine exposure. The cocaine exposure also delayed the developmental decline in the volume of the medial prefrontal cortex. Thus, prenatal cocaine exposure produced persisting and region-specific effects on cortical cytoarchitecture and impaired the physiological balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission. These structural changes may underlie the electrophysiological and behavioral effects of prenatal cocaine exposure observed in animal models and human subjects.

  7. Nox-2-mediated phenotype loss of hippocampal parvalbumin interneurons might contribute to postoperative cognitive decline in aging mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    lili qiu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative cognitive decline (POCD is a common complication following anesthesia and surgery, especially in elderly patients; however, the precise mechanisms of POCD remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase mediated-abnormalities in parvalbumin (PV interneurons play an important role in the pathophysiology of POCD. The animal model was established using isoflurane anesthesia and exploratory laparotomy in sixteen-month-old male C57BL/6 mice. For interventional experiments, mice were chronically treated with the NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin (APO. Open field and fear conditioning behavioral tests were performed on day 6 and 7 post-surgery, respectively. In a separate experiment, brain tissue was harvested and subjected to biochemical analysis. Primary hippocampal neurons challenged with lipopolysaccharide in vitro were used to investigate the mechanisms underlying the oxidative stress-induced abnormalities in PV interneurons. Our results showed that anesthesia and surgery induced significant hippocampus-dependent memory impairment, which was accompanied by PV interneuron phenotype loss and increased expression of interleukin-1β, markers of oxidative stress, and NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2 in the hippocampus. In addition, lipopolysaccharide exposure increased Nox2 level and decreased the expression of PV and the number of excitatory synapses onto PV interneurons in the primary hippocampal neurons. Notably, treatment with APO reversed these abnormalities. Our study suggests that Nox2-derived ROS production triggers, at least in part, anesthesia- and surgery-induced hippocampal PV interneuron phenotype loss and consequent cognitive impairment in aging mice.

  8. TrkB signaling in parvalbumin-positive interneurons is critical for gamma-band network synchronization in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kang; An, Juan Ji; Yang, Feng; Xu, Weifeng; Xu, Zhi-Qing David; Wu, Jianyoung; Hökfelt, Tomas G M; Fisahn, André; Xu, Baoji; Lu, Bai

    2011-10-11

    Although brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate circuit development and synaptic plasticity, its exact role in neuronal network activity remains elusive. Using mutant mice (TrkB-PV(-/-)) in which the gene for the BDNF receptor, tyrosine kinase B receptor (trkB), has been specifically deleted in parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking GABAergic (PV+) interneurons, we show that TrkB is structurally and functionally important for the integrity of the hippocampal network. The amplitude of glutamatergic inputs to PV+ interneurons and the frequency of GABAergic inputs to excitatory pyramidal cells were reduced in the TrkB-PV(-/-) mice. Functionally, rhythmic network activity in the gamma-frequency band (30-80 Hz) was significantly decreased in hippocampal area CA1. This decrease was caused by a desynchronization and overall reduction in frequency of action potentials generated in PV+ interneurons of TrkB-PV(-/-) mice. Our results show that the integration of PV+ interneurons into the hippocampal microcircuit is impaired in TrkB-PV(-/-) mice, resulting in decreased rhythmic network activity in the gamma-frequency band.

  9. Redox dysregulation affects the ventral but not dorsal hippocampus: impairment of parvalbumin neurons, gamma oscillations, and related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steullet, Pascal; Cabungcal, Jan-Harry; Kulak, Anita; Kraftsik, Rudolf; Chen, Ying; Dalton, Timothy P; Cuenod, Michel; Do, Kim Q

    2010-02-17

    Elevated oxidative stress and alteration in antioxidant systems, including glutathione (GSH) decrease, are observed in schizophrenia. Genetic and functional data indicate that impaired GSH synthesis represents a susceptibility factor for the disorder. Here, we show that a genetically compromised GSH synthesis affects the morphological and functional integrity of hippocampal parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons, known to be affected in schizophrenia. A GSH deficit causes a selective decrease of PV-IR interneurons in CA3 and dendate gyrus (DG) of the ventral but not dorsal hippocampus and a concomitant reduction of beta/gamma oscillations. Impairment of PV-IR interneurons emerges at the end of adolescence/early adulthood as oxidative stress increases or cumulates selectively in CA3 and DG of the ventral hippocampus. Such redox dysregulation alters stress and emotion-related behaviors but leaves spatial abilities intact, indicating functional disruption of the ventral but not dorsal hippocampus. Thus, a GSH deficit affects PV-IR interneuron's integrity and neuronal synchrony in a region- and time-specific manner, leading to behavioral phenotypes related to psychiatric disorders.

  10. Delta-opioid receptors mediate unique plasticity onto parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in area CA2 of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskorowski, Rebecca A; Chevaleyre, Vivien

    2013-09-04

    Inhibition is critical for controlling information transfer in the brain. However, the understanding of the plasticity and particular function of different interneuron subtypes is just emerging. Using acute hippocampal slices prepared from adult mice, we report that in area CA2 of the hippocampus, a powerful inhibitory transmission is acting as a gate to prevent CA3 inputs from driving CA2 neurons. Furthermore, this inhibition is highly plastic, and undergoes a long-term depression following high-frequency 10 Hz or theta-burst induction protocols. We describe a novel form of long-term depression at parvalbumin-expressing (PV+) interneuron synapses that is dependent on delta-opioid receptor (DOR) activation. Additionally, PV+ interneuron transmission is persistently depressed by DOR activation in area CA2 but only transiently depressed in area CA1. These results provide evidence for a differential temporal modulation of PV+ synapses between two adjacent cortical circuits, and highlight a new function of PV+ cells in controlling information transfer.

  11. Hippocampal theta rhythm and its coupling with gamma oscillations require fast inhibition onto parvalbumin-positive interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Peer; Ponomarenko, Alexey A; Bartos, Marlene; Korotkova, Tatiana M; Fuchs, Elke C; Bähner, Florian; Both, Martin; Tort, Adriano B L; Kopell, Nancy J; Wisden, William; Monyer, Hannah

    2009-03-03

    Hippocampal theta (5-10 Hz) and gamma (35-85 Hz) oscillations depend on an inhibitory network of GABAergic interneurons. However, the lack of methods for direct and cell-type-specific interference with inhibition has prevented better insights that help link synaptic and cellular properties with network function. Here, we generated genetically modified mice (PV-Deltagamma(2)) in which synaptic inhibition was ablated in parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons. Hippocampal local field potential and unit recordings in the CA1 area of freely behaving mice revealed that theta rhythm was strongly reduced in these mice. The characteristic coupling of theta and gamma oscillations was strongly altered in PV-Deltagamma(2) mice more than could be accounted for by the reduction in theta rhythm only. Surprisingly, gamma oscillations were not altered. These data indicate that synaptic inhibition onto PV+ interneurons is indispensable for theta- and its coupling to gamma oscillations but not for rhythmic gamma-activity in the hippocampus. Similar alterations in rhythmic activity were obtained in a computational hippocampal network model mimicking the genetic modification, suggesting that intrahippocampal networks might contribute to these effects.

  12. Region-specific upregulation of parvalbumin-, but not calretinin-positive cells in the ventral hippocampus during adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Adriana; Diah, Kimberly C; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2013-12-01

    Animal studies have highlighted the role of the ventral hippocampus-prefrontal cortex pathway in the acquisition of mature cortical function through refinement of GABAergic circuits during adolescence. Inhibitory GABAergic responses are mediated by highly specialized interneurons, which have distinct functional properties and are characterized by the expression of calcium binding proteins. Among these, we recently found that parvalbumin (PV)- and calretinin (CR)-positive interneurons in the prefrontal cortex follow opposite developmental trajectories during the periadolescent transition period. In the present study, we asked whether interneurons expressing PV and CR in the ventral hippocampus follow similar periadolescent trajectories as seen in the prefrontal cortex. By measuring the relative abundance of these interneurons in three age groups (postnatal days (PD) 25-40, 45-55, and 60-85), we found that regions within the dorso-ventral axis of the ventral hippocampus undergo distinct developmental trajectories in PV expression during the periadolescent transition. Specifically, the ventral subiculum displayed a dramatic increase in PV-positive interneurons from PD25-40 to PD45-55 with an increasing rostro-caudal gradient, whereas negligible changes were found in the dorsal and middle regions. In contrast, the number of CR-positive interneurons in the ventral hippocampus remained unchanged across the three age groups studied. Together, these results describe for the first time that GABAergic circuits in the ventral hippocampus undergo protracted development during adolescence, in particular the PV-positive cell population circumscribed to the ventral region of the ventral hippocampus.

  13. Impaired hippocampal-dependent memory and reduced parvalbumin-positive interneurons in a ketamine mouse model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Ming Teng; Shao, Yi; Sherwood, Andrew; Smith, Dani R

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampus of patients with schizophrenia displays aberrant excess neuronal activity which affects cognitive function. Animal models of the illness have recapitulated the overactivity in the hippocampus, with a corresponding regionally localized reduction of inhibitory interneurons, consistent with that observed in patients. To better understand whether cognitive function is similarly affected in these models of hippocampal overactivity, we tested a ketamine mouse model of schizophrenia for cognitive performance in hippocampal- and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-dependent tasks. We found that adult mice exposed to ketamine during adolescence were impaired on a trace fear conditioning protocol that relies on the integrity of the hippocampus. Conversely, the performance of the mice was normal on a delayed response task that is sensitive to mPFC damage. We confirmed that ketamine-exposed mice had reduced parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the hippocampus, specifically in the CA1, but not in the mPFC in keeping with the behavioral findings. These results strengthened the utility of the ketamine model for preclinical investigations of hippocampal overactivity in schizophrenia.

  14. Simultaneous effects on parvalbumin-positive interneuron and dopaminergic system development in a transgenic rat model for sporadic schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, Hannah; Trossbach, Svenja V.; Bader, Verian; Chwiesko, Caroline; Kipar, Anja; Sauvage, Magdalena; Crum, William R.; Vernon, Anthony C.; Bidmon, Hans J.; Korth, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    To date, unequivocal neuroanatomical features have been demonstrated neither for sporadic nor for familial schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the neuroanatomical changes in a transgenic rat model for a subset of sporadic chronic mental illness (CMI), which modestly overexpresses human full-length, non-mutant Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), and for which aberrant dopamine homeostasis consistent with some schizophrenia phenotypes has previously been reported. Neuroanatomical analysis revealed a reduced density of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and reduced dopaminergic fibres in the striatum. Parvalbumin-positive interneuron occurrence in the somatosensory cortex was shifted from layers II/III to V/VI, and the number of calbindin-positive interneurons was slightly decreased. Reduced corpus callosum thickness confirmed trend-level observations from in vivo MRI and voxel-wise tensor based morphometry. These neuroanatomical changes help explain functional phenotypes of this animal model, some of which resemble changes observed in human schizophrenia post mortem brain tissues. Our findings also demonstrate how a single molecular factor, DISC1 overexpression or misassembly, can account for a variety of seemingly unrelated morphological phenotypes and thus provides a possible unifying explanation for similar findings observed in sporadic schizophrenia patients. Our anatomical investigation of a defined model for sporadic mental illness enables a clearer definition of neuroanatomical changes associated with subsets of human sporadic schizophrenia. PMID:27721451

  15. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To provide a general overview of the current biological treatments and discuss their potential anti-asthmatic effects. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed articles in PubMed found using the search words "Asthma/therapy AND antibodies, monoclonal/therapeutic use AND cytokines." STUDY SELECTIONS: Only...... articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. RESULTS: Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8...... TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. CONCLUSION: Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other...

  16. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeis AM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea M Eisenbeis, Stefan J GrauDepartment of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: Advances in biotechnology, better understanding of pathophysiological processes, as well as the identification of an increasing number of molecular markers have facilitated the use of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments in various fields in medicine. In this context, a rapidly growing number of these substances have also emerged in the field of oncology. This review will summarize the currently approved monoclonal antibodies used for the treatment of solid tumors with a focus on their clinical application, biological background, and currently ongoing trials.Keywords: targeted therapy, monoclonal antibodies, cancer, biological therapy

  18. Multiplexed identification of different fish species by detection of parvalbumin, a common fish allergen gene: a DNA application of multi-analyte profiling (xMAP) technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2010-07-01

    Fish are a common cause of allergic reactions associated with food consumption, with parvalbumin being the major allergenic protein. Some fish-hypersensitive patients tolerate some fish species while being allergic to others. Reliable detection methods for allergenic fish species in foods are necessary to ensure compliance with food allergen labeling guidelines to protect fish-allergic consumers. The objective of this project was to develop a multi-analyte detection method for the presence of fish in food. Therefore, conserved parvalbumin exon sequences were utilized for the design of universal PCR primers amplifying intron DNA and small regions of exons flanking the enclosed intron from even very distantly related fish species. An assay for the identification of eight fish species was developed using xMAP technology with probes targeting species-specific parvalbumin intron regions. Additionally, a universal fish probe was designed targeting a highly conserved exon region located between the intron and the reverse primer region. The universal fish assay showed no cross-reactivity with other species, such as beef, pork, lamb, chicken, turkey, and shrimp. Importantly, with the exception of one notable case with fish in the same subfamily, species-specific detection showed no cross-reactivity with other fish species. Limits of detection for these eight species were experimentally estimated to range from 0.01% to 0.04%, with potential to increase the detection sensitivity. This report introduces a newly developed method for the multiplex identification of at least eight allergenic fish species in food, which could conceivably be extended to detect up to 100 species simultaneously in one sample.

  19. Chronic stress decreases the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus: prevention by treatment with a substance P receptor (NK1) antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeh, Boldizsár; Simon, Mária; van der Hart, Marieke Gc; Schmelting, Barthel; Hesselink, Mayke B; Fuchs, Eberhard

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that stress may affect the hippocampal GABAergic system. Here, we examined whether long-term psychosocial stress influenced the number of parvalbumin-containing GABAergic cells, known to provide the most powerful inhibitory input to the perisomatic region of principal cells. Adult male tree shrews were submitted to 5 weeks of stress, after which immunocytochemical and quantitative stereological techniques were used to estimate the total number of hippocampal parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) neurons. Stress significantly decreased the number of PV-IR cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) (-33%), CA2 (-28%), and CA3 (-29%), whereas the CA1 was not affected. Additionally, we examined whether antidepressant treatment offered protection from this stress-induced effect. We administered fluoxetine (15 mg/kg per day) and SLV-323 (20 mg/kg per day), a novel neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonist, because the NK1R has been proposed as a possible target for novel antidepressant therapies. Animals were subjected to a 7-day period of psychosocial stress before the onset of daily oral administration of the drugs, with stress continued throughout the 28-day treatment period. NK1R antagonist administration completely prevented the stress-induced reduction of the number of PV-IR interneurons, whereas fluoxetine attenuated this decrement in the DG, without affecting the CA2 and CA3. The effect of stress on interneuron numbers may reflect real cell loss; alternatively, parvalbumin concentration is diminished in the neurons, which might indicate a compensatory attempt. In either case, antidepressant treatment offered protection from the effect of stress and appears to modulate the hippocampal GABAergic system. Furthermore, the NK1R antagonist SLV-323 showed neurobiological efficacy similar to that of fluoxetine.

  20. Parvalbumin is a mobile presynaptic Ca2+ buffer in the calyx of Held that accelerates the decay of Ca2+ and short-term facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martin; Felmy, Felix; Schwaller, Beat; Schneggenburger, Ralf

    2007-02-28

    Presynaptic Ca2+ signaling plays a crucial role in short-term plasticity of synaptic transmission. Here, we studied the role of mobile endogenous presynaptic Ca2+ buffer(s) in modulating paired-pulse facilitation at a large excitatory nerve terminal in the auditory brainstem, the calyx of Held. To do so, we assessed the effect of presynaptic whole-cell recording, which should lead to the diffusional loss of endogenous mobile Ca2+ buffers, on paired-pulse facilitation and on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients evoked by action potentials. In unperturbed calyces briefly preloaded with the Ca2+ indicator fura-6F, the [Ca2+]i transient decayed surprisingly fast (tau(fast), approximately 30 ms). Presynaptic whole-cell recordings made without additional Ca2+ buffers slowed the decay kinetics of [Ca2+]i and paired-pulse facilitation (twofold to threefold), but the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient was changed only marginally. The fast [Ca2+]i decay was restored by adding the slow Ca2+ buffer EGTA (50-100 microM) or parvalbumin (100 microM), a Ca2+-binding protein with slow Ca2+-binding kinetics, to the presynaptic pipette solution. In contrast, the fast Ca2+ buffer fura-2 strongly reduced the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i transient and slowed its decay, suggesting that the mobile endogenous buffer in calyces of Held has slow, rather than fast, binding kinetics. In parvalbumin knock-out mice, the decay of [Ca2+]i and facilitation was slowed approximately twofold compared with wild-type mice, similar to what is observed during whole-cell recordings in rat calyces of Held. Thus, in young calyces of Held, a mobile Ca2+ buffer with slow binding kinetics, primarily represented by parvalbumin, accelerates the decay of spatially averaged [Ca2+]i and paired-pulse facilitation.

  1. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  2. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malanchuk O. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A. Methods. Hybridoma technique. KLH carrier protein conjugated with CoA was used for immunization. Screening of positive clones was performed with BSA conjugated to CoA. Results. Monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes CoA and CoA derivatives, but not its precursors ATP and cysteine has been generated. Conclusion. In this study, we describe for the first time the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against CoA. The monoclonal antibody 1F10 was shown to recognize specifically CoA in Western blotting, ELISA and immunoprecipitation. These properties make this antiboby a particularly valuable reagent for elucidating CoA function in health and disease.

  3. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to native active human glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik;

    2013-01-01

    using monoclonal antibodies therefore provides an excellent strategy to analyze the glycosylation process in cells. A major drawback has been difficulties in generating antibodies to glycosyltransferases and validating their specificities. Here we describe a simple strategy for generating...

  4. Calretinin and parvalbumin immunoreactive interneurons in the retrosplenial cortex of the rat brain: Qualitative and quantitative analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaj, Martin; Druga, Rastislav; Cerman, Jiří; Kubová, Hana; Barinka, Filip

    2015-11-19

    The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) is a mesocortical region broadly involved with memory and navigation. It shares many characteristics with the perirhinal cortex (PRC), both of which appear to be significantly involved in the spreading of epileptic activity. We hypothesized that RSC possesses an interneuronal composition similar to that of PRC. To prove the hypothesis we studied the general pattern of calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in the RSC of the rat brain, its optical density as well as the morphological features and density of CR- and PV-immunoreactive (CR+ and PV+) interneurons. We also analyzed the overall neuronal density on Nissl-stained sections in RSC. Finally, we compared our results with our earlier analysis of PRC (Barinka et al., 2012). Compared to PRC, RSC was observed to have a higher intensity of PV staining and lower intensity of CR staining of neuropil. Vertically-oriented bipolar neurons were the most common morphological type among CR+ neurons. The staining pattern did not allow for a similarly detailed analysis of somatodendritic morphology of PV+ neurons. RSC possessed lower absolute (i.e., neurons/mm(3)) and relative (i.e., percentage of the overall neuronal population) densities of CR+ neurons and similar absolute and lower relative densities of PV+ neurons relative to PRC. CR: PV neuronal ratio in RSC (1:2 in area 29 and 1:2.2 in area 30) differed from PRC (1:1.2 in area 35 and 1:1.7 in area 36). In conclusion, RSC, although similar in many aspects to PRC, differs strikingly in the interneuronal composition relative to PRC.

  5. Prolonged protein deprivation, but not food restriction, affects parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the dentate gyrus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Armando; Castro, João Paulo; Pereira, Pedro Alberto; Andrade, José Paulo

    2013-07-19

    Several studies have demonstrated the vulnerability of the hippocampal formation to malnutrition. In this study, we compared the effects of food restriction and protein malnutrition in the total number of neurons of the dentate gyrus and in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons, which are related to the control of calcium homeostasis and fine tuning of the hippocampal circuits. Two month-old rats were randomly assigned to control, food-restricted and low-protein diet groups. After 6 months, 10 rats from the low-protein diet group were selected at random and fed with a normal protein diet for 2 months. The total number of granule and hilar cells was reduced in protein-deprived rats and the nutritional reestablishment with a normal protein diet did not recover neuron numbers. Protein deprivation increased the number of PV-IR interneurons in the granule cell layer and hilus, but their number returned to values similar to controls after nutritional rehabilitation. Food restriction did not affect the total number of neurons or the density of PV-IR interneurons in the dentate gyrus. These results support the view that protein deprivation may disturb calcium homeostasis, leading to neuronal death. The up-regulation of PV-IR cells may reflect a protective mechanism to counteract the calcium overload and protect the remaining neurons of the dentate gyrus. This imbalance in cell-ratio favoring GABAergic interneurons may justify some learning and memory impairments described in protein-deprived animals. This contrast between the results of food restriction and protein deprivation should be further analyzed in future studies.

  6. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABA(A) receptors on parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferando, Isabella; Mody, Istvan

    2013-01-01

    Gamma (γ) oscillations (30-120 Hz), an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs) and the principal (pyramidal) cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs (δ-GABA(A)Rs) and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS), such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO), modulate the expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABA(A)Rs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs) express δ-GABA(A)Rs, expression of δ-GABA(A)Rs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 h postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy) may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABA(A)Rs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABA(A)R expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  7. Synapse-associated protein 97 regulates the membrane properties of fast-spiking parvalbumin interneurons in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgul, Gulcan; Wollmuth, Lonnie P

    2013-07-31

    Fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in layers 2/3 of the visual cortex regulate gain control and tuning of visual processing. Synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP97) belongs to a family of proteins that have been implicated in regulating glutamatergic synaptic transmission at pyramidal-to-pyramidal connections in the nervous system. For PV interneurons in mouse visual cortex, the expression of SAP97 is developmentally regulated, being expressed in almost all juvenile but only a fraction, ~40%, of adult PV interneurons. Using whole-cell patch-clamping, single-cell RT-PCR to assay endogenous expression of SAP97 and exogenous expression of SAP97, we investigated the functional significance of SAP97 in PV interneurons in layers 2/3 of the visual cortex. PV interneurons expressing SAP97, either endogenously or via exogenous expression, showed distinct membrane properties from those not expressing SAP97. This included an overall decrease in membrane excitability, as indexed by a decrease in membrane resistance and an increase in the stimulus threshold for the first action potential firing. Additionally, SAP97-expressing PV interneurons fired action potentials more frequently and, at moderate stimulus intensities, showed irregular or stuttering firing patterns. Furthermore, SAP97-expressing PV interneurons showed increased glutamatergic input and more extensive dendritic branching when compared with non-expressing PV interneurons. These differences in membrane and synaptic properties would significantly alter how PV interneurons expressing SAP97 compared with those not expressing SAP97 would function in local networks. Thus, our results indicate that the scaffolding protein SAP97 is a critical molecular factor regulating the input-output relationships of cortical PV interneurons.

  8. Parvalbumin-producing cortical interneurons receive inhibitory inputs on proximal portions and cortical excitatory inputs on distal dendrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kameda, Hiroshi; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Yasuyo H; Tanaka, Takuma; Sohn, Jaerin; Sonomura, Takahiro; Furuta, Takahiro; Fujiyama, Fumino; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2012-03-01

    To examine inputs to parvalbumin (PV)-producing interneurons, we generated transgenic mice expressing somatodendritic membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein specifically in the interneurons, and completely visualized their dendrites and somata. Using immunolabeling for vesicular glutamate transporter (VGluT)1, VGluT2, and vesicular GABA transporter, we found that VGluT1-positive terminals made contacts 4- and 3.1-fold more frequently with PV-producing interneurons than VGluT2-positive and GABAergic terminals, respectively, in the primary somatosensory cortex. Even in layer 4, where VGluT2-positive terminals were most densely distributed, VGluT1-positive inputs to PV-producing interneurons were 2.4-fold more frequent than VGluT2-positive inputs. Furthermore, although GABAergic inputs to PV-producing interneurons were as numerous as VGluT2-positive inputs in most cortical layers, GABAergic inputs clearly preferred the proximal dendrites and somata of the interneurons, indicating that the sites of GABAergic inputs were more optimized than those of VGluT2-positive inputs. Simulation analysis with a PV-producing interneuron model compatible with the present morphological data revealed a plausible reason for this observation, by showing that GABAergic and glutamatergic postsynaptic potentials evoked by inputs to distal dendrites were attenuated to 60 and 87%, respectively, of those evoked by somatic inputs. As VGluT1-positive and VGluT2-positive axon terminals were presumed to be cortical and thalamic glutamatergic inputs, respectively, cortical excitatory inputs to PV-producing interneurons outnumbered the thalamic excitatory and intrinsic inhibitory inputs more than two-fold in any cortical layer. Although thalamic inputs are known to evoke about two-fold larger unitary excitatory postsynaptic potentials than cortical ones, the present results suggest that cortical inputs control PV-producing interneurons at least as strongly as thalamic inputs.

  9. Knockout of NMDA-receptors from parvalbumin interneurons sensitizes to schizophrenia-related deficits induced by MK-801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygrave, A M; Masiulis, S; Nicholson, E; Berkemann, M; Barkus, C; Sprengel, R; Harrison, P J; Kullmann, D M; Bannerman, D M; Kätzel, D

    2016-04-12

    It has been suggested that a functional deficit in NMDA-receptors (NMDARs) on parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons (PV-NMDARs) is central to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Supportive evidence come from examination of genetically modified mice where the obligatory NMDAR-subunit GluN1 (also known as NR1) has been deleted from PV interneurons by Cre-mediated knockout of the corresponding gene Grin1 (Grin1(ΔPV) mice). Notably, such PV-specific GluN1 ablation has been reported to blunt the induction of hyperlocomotion (a surrogate for psychosis) by pharmacological NMDAR blockade with the non-competitive antagonist MK-801. This suggests PV-NMDARs as the site of the psychosis-inducing action of MK-801. In contrast to this hypothesis, we show here that Grin1(ΔPV) mice are not protected against the effects of MK-801, but are in fact sensitized to many of them. Compared with control animals, Grin1(ΔPV)mice injected with MK-801 show increased stereotypy and pronounced catalepsy, which confound the locomotor readout. Furthermore, in Grin1(ΔPV)mice, MK-801 induced medial-prefrontal delta (4 Hz) oscillations, and impaired performance on tests of motor coordination, working memory and sucrose preference, even at lower doses than in wild-type controls. We also found that untreated Grin1(ΔPV)mice are largely normal across a wide range of cognitive functions, including attention, cognitive flexibility and various forms of short-term memory. Taken together these results argue against PV-specific NMDAR hypofunction as a key starting point of schizophrenia pathophysiology, but support a model where NMDAR hypofunction in multiple cell types contribute to the disease.

  10. Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Parvalbumin-Immunoreactive Interneurons Loss and Neurobehavioral Impairment is Mediated by NADPH-Oxidase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang; Wu, Jing; Liu, Jiang; Li, Guowei; Liang, Dong

    2015-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea usually contribute to psychiatric diseases and cognitive impairments in adults. Loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive interneurons (PV-IN) in the brain cortex is an important feature of psychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. Here we investigate the causal contribution of oxidative stress in the brain cortex to neuropathological alterations in a mouse model of sleep apnea. Wild-type (WT) and the NADPH-oxidase-2 (gp91-phox/NOX2) knock-out adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to intermittent hypoxia (IH) or standard room air in the same chamber. In vivo we determined the impact (1) of IH exposures on NOX2 expression, (2) of genetic gp91-phox/NOX2 knock-out and (3) of pharmacological NOX2 inhibition on IH-induced neuropathological alterations in adult mice. Endpoints were oxidative stress, PV-IN and neurobehavioral alterations. The results showed IH exposures increased NOX2 expression in the prefrontal cortex of WT mice, which was accompanied with elevations of indirect markers of oxidative stress (HNE, HIF-1α, 8-OHDG). WT mice showed loss of PV-IN in the prefrontal cortex and increased locomotion activity and anxiety levels after exposed to IH, while no change emerged in NOX2 knock-out mice. Treatment of WT mice with the antioxidant/NOX inhibitor apocynin prevented the neuropathological and neurobehavioral alterations induced by IH exposures. Our data suggest that NOX2-derived oxidative stress is involved in the loss of PV-IN in the prefrontal cortex and development of neurobehavioral alterations for adult mice exposed to IH. These results provide a molecular mechanism for the coupling between sleep apnea and brain oxidative stress as well as potential new therapeutic avenues.

  11. Parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y expressing hippocampal GABA-ergic inhibitory interneuron numbers decline in a model of Gulf War illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahed, Tarick; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf War illness (GWI). Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide (PB), pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 (PGW-1) are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR) chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA)-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for 4 weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV), the neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS) in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for 4 weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI.

  12. DISTRIBUTION OF PARVALBUMIN, CALBINDIN-D28 AND CALRETININ IMMUNOREACTIVE NEURO NS AND FIBERS IN THE MONKEY BASAL GANGLIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘健; 张巧俊

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cellular localization of parvalbumin (PV), calbindin-D28k (CB) and calretinin (CR) in the monkey basal ganglia.Methods Immunocytochemica l technique was used to detect PV,CB and CR immunoreactivity in the basal gangl ia. Results In the striatum, CB labeled medium-sized spin y projection neurons whereas PV and CR marked two separate classes of aspiny int erneurons. The striatal matrix compartment was markedly enriched with CB while s triatal patches displayed a CR-rich neuropil. In the pallidum, virtually all ne u rons contained PV but none express CB. CR occured only in a small subpopulation of large and small pallidal neurons. In the subthalamic nucleus, there existed a multitude of PV-positive cells and fibers but the number of CR and CB-positiv e neuronal elements was small. In the substantia nigra / ventral tegmental area co mplex, CB and CR occured principally in dopaminergic neurons of the dorsal tier of the pars compacta and in those of the ventral tegmental area. PV was strickly confined to the GABAergic neurons of the pars reticular and lateralis. CB-rich fibers abounded in the pars reticular and lateralis, while CR-positive axons we re confined to the pars compacta. Conclusion CB and PV were di stributed accordin g to a strikingly complementary pattern in primate basal ganglia, and the use of CB and PV immunocytochemistry may be considered as an excellent tool to define dist inct chemoarchitectonic and functional domains within the complex organization o f the basal ganglia. CR was less ubiquitous but occured in small basal ganglia c omponents where it labeled distinct subsets of neurons. Such highly specific pat terns of distribution indicate that CB, PV and CR may work in synery within prim ate basal ganglia.

  13. Single and combined effects of prenatal immune activation and peripubertal stress on parvalbumin and reelin expression in the hippocampal formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanoli, Sandra; Weber, Liz; Meyer, Urs

    2014-08-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection and traumatizing experiences in peripubertal life are two environmental risk factors for developmental neuropsychiatric disorders. Modeling the cumulative neuronal impact of these factors in a translational animal model has led to the recent identification of pathological interactions between these environmental adversities in the development of adult brain dysfunctions. The present study explored the consequences of combined prenatal immune challenge and peripubertal stress on discrete cellular abnormalities in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system of the hippocampus. Pregnant mice were treated with the viral mimetic poly(I:C) (=polyriboinosinic-polyribocytidilic acid) or control solution, and offspring born to poly(I:C)-exposed or control mothers were then left undisturbed or subjected to unpredictable sub-chronic stress during peripubertal development. Stereological estimations of parvalbumin-expressing cells revealed a significant reduction of these GABAergic interneurons in the ventral dentate gyrus of adult offspring exposed to combined immune activation and stress. Single exposure to either environmental factor was insufficient to cause similar neuropathology. We further found that peripubertal stress exerted opposite effects on reelin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsal cornu ammonis (CA) region of the hippocampus, with stress increasing and decreasing reelin expression in control offspring and prenatally immune challenged animals, respectively. The present data suggest that the combination of two environmental risk factors, which have each been implicated in the etiology of major neuropsychiatric disease, induces significant but restricted neuropathological effects on hippocampal GABAergic cell populations known to be affected in brain disorders with neurodevelopmental components. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Altered gamma oscillations during pregnancy through loss of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors on parvalbumin interneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella eFerando

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Gamma (γ oscillations (30-120 Hz, an emergent property of neuronal networks, correlate with memory, cognition and encoding. In the hippocampal CA3 region, locally generated γ oscillations emerge through feedback between inhibitory parvalbumin-positive basket cells (PV+BCs and the principal (pyramidal cells. PV+BCs express δ-subunit-containing GABAARs (-GABAARs and NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs that balance the frequency of γ oscillations. Neuroactive steroids (NS, such as the progesterone-derived (3α,5α-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (allopregnanolone; ALLO, modulate the expression of δ-GABAARs and the tonic conductance they mediate. Pregnancy produces large increases in ALLO and brain-region-specific homeostatic changes in δ-GABAARs expression. Here we show that in CA3, where most PV+ interneurons (INs express δ-GABAARs, expression of δ-GABAARs on INs diminishes during pregnancy, but reverts to control levels within 48 hours postpartum. These anatomical findings were corroborated by a pregnancy-related increase in the frequency of kainate-induced CA3 γ oscillations in vitro that could be countered by the NMDA-R antagonists D-AP5 and PPDA. Mimicking the typical hormonal conditions during pregnancy by supplementing 100 nM ALLO lowered the γ frequencies to levels found in virgin or postpartum mice. Our findings show that states of altered NS levels (e.g., pregnancy may provoke perturbations in γ oscillatory activity through direct effects on the GABAergic system, and underscore the importance of δ-GABAARs homeostatic plasticity in maintaining constant network output despite large hormonal changes. Inaccurate coupling of NS levels to δ-GABAAR expression may facilitate abnormal neurological and psychiatric conditions such as epilepsy, post-partum depression, and post-partum psychosis, thus providing insights into potential new treatments.

  15. Role of neuropsin in parvalbumin immunoreactivity changes in hippocampal basket terminals of mice reared in various environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harumitsu eSuzuki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In vitro approaches have suggested that neuropsin (or kallikrein 8/KLK8, which controls gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurotransmission through neuregulin-1 and its receptor (ErbB4, is involved in neural plasticity (Tamura et al., 2012, 2013. In the present study, we examined whether parvalbumin (PV-positive neuronal networks, the majority of which are ErbB4-positive GABAergic interneurons, are controlled by neuropsin in tranquil and stimulated voluntarily behaving mice.PV-immunoreactive fibers surrounding hippocampal pyramidal and granular neurons in mice reared in their home cage were decreased in neuropsin-deficient mice, suggesting that neuropsin controls PV immunoreactivity. One- or two-week exposures of wild mice to novel environments, in which they could behave freely and run voluntarily in a wheel resulted in a marked upregulation of both neuropsin mRNA and protein in the hippocampus. To elucidate the functional relevance of the increase in neuropsin during exposure to a rich environment, the intensities of PV-immunoreactive fibers were compared between neuropsin-deficient and wild-type mice under environmental stimuli. When mice were transferred into novel cages (large cages with toys, the intensity of PV-immunoreactive fibers increased in wild-type mice and neuropsin-deficient mice. Therefore, behavioral stimuli control a neuropsin-independent form of PV immunoreactivity. However, the neuropsin-dependent part of the change in PV-immunoreactive fibers may occur in the stimulated hippocampus because increased levels of neuropsin continued during these enriched conditions.

  16. Differential susceptibility of interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y or parvalbumin in the aged hippocampus to acute seizure activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar Kuruba

    Full Text Available Acute seizure (AS activity in old age has an increased predisposition for evolving into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Furthermore, spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction after AS activity are often intense in the aged population than in young adults. This could be due to an increased vulnerability of inhibitory interneurons in the aged hippocampus to AS activity. We investigated this issue by comparing the survival of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons that contain the neuropeptide Y (NPY or the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV between young adult (5-months old and aged (22-months old F344 rats at 12 days after three-hours of AS activity. Graded intraperitoneal injections of the kainic acid (KA induced AS activity and a diazepam injection at 3 hours after the onset terminated AS-activity. Measurement of interneuron numbers in different hippocampal subfields revealed that NPY+ interneurons were relatively resistant to AS activity in the aged hippocampus in comparison to the young adult hippocampus. Whereas, PV+ interneurons were highly susceptible to AS activity in both age groups. However, as aging alone substantially depleted these populations, the aged hippocampus after three-hours of AS activity exhibited 48% reductions in NPY+ interneurons and 70% reductions in PV+ interneurons, in comparison to the young hippocampus after similar AS activity. Thus, AS activity-induced TLE in old age is associated with far fewer hippocampal NPY+ and PV+ interneuron numbers than AS-induced TLE in the young adult age. This discrepancy likely underlies the severe spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction observed in the aged people after AS activity.

  17. AMPA receptor subunits are differentially expressed in parvalbumin- and calretinin-positive neurons of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catania, M V; Bellomo, M; Giuffrida, R; Giuffrida, R; Stella, A M; Albanese, V

    1998-11-01

    Recent studies suggest a functional diversity of native alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate-type glutamate receptor channels (AMPARs). In several types of interneurons, AMPARs are characterized by higher Ca2+ permeability and faster kinetics than AMPARs in principal cells. We studied the expression profile of AMPAR subunits in the hippocampal parvalbumin (PV)- and calretinin (CR)-positive cells, which represent different populations of non-principal cells. To this end, non-radioactive in situ hybridization with AMPAR subunit specific cRNAs was combined with immunocytochemistry for PV or CR. Double-immunolabelling using antibodies against AMPAR subunits and PV or CR was also performed. PV-containing neurons represent a fairly homogeneous population of cells expressing high levels of GluR-A and GluR-D mRNAs, moderate levels of GluR-C and low levels of GluR-B mRNAs in all the examined regions of hippocampus. The vast majority of CR-containing cells have a much lower expression of GluR-A, -C and -D mRNA than PV-positive neurons, although similarly featuring low levels of GluR-B mRNA. Only a subpopulation of CR-containing cells, the spiny neurons of the dentate gyrus and CA3 region of the hippocampus were characterized by a strong expression of GluR-A and -D subunit mRNAs. The differential pattern found for the AMPAR subunit mRNA expression was confirmed by immunocytochemistry at protein level. Despite the common feature of low GluR-B subunit expression, PV- and CR-containing interneurons differ with respect to the density and combination of their expressed AMPAR subunits. The different combination of subunits might subserve different properties of the AMPA channels featured by these cell types, with implications for the functioning of the hippocampal network.

  18. Parvalbumin and Neuropeptide Y Expressing Hippocampal GABA-ergic Inhibitory Interneuron Numbers Decline in a Model of Gulf War illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarick eMegahed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive dysfunction is amongst the most conspicuous symptoms in Gulf war illness (GWI. Combined exposure to the nerve gas antidote pyridostigmine bromide, pesticides and stress during the Persian Gulf War-1 are presumed to be among the major causes of GWI. Indeed, our recent studies in rat models have shown that exposure to GWI-related (GWIR chemicals and mild stress for four weeks engenders cognitive impairments accompanied with several detrimental changes in the hippocampus. In this study, we tested whether reduced numbers of hippocampal gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA-ergic interneurons are among the pathological changes induced by GWIR-chemicals and stress. Animals were exposed to low doses of GWIR-chemicals and mild stress for four weeks. Three months after this exposure, subpopulations of GABA-ergic interneurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV, the neuropeptide Y (NPY and somatostatin (SS in the hippocampus were stereologically quantified. Animals exposed to GWIR-chemicals and stress for four weeks displayed reduced numbers of PV-expressing GABA-ergic interneurons in the dentate gyrus and NPY-expressing interneurons in the CA1 and CA3 subfields. However, no changes in SS+ interneuron population were observed in the hippocampus. Furthermore, GABA-ergic interneuron deficiency in these animals was associated with greatly diminished hippocampus neurogenesis. Because PV+ and NPY+ interneurons play roles in maintaining normal cognitive function and neurogenesis, and controlling the activity of excitatory neurons in the hippocampus, reduced numbers of these interneurons may be one of the major causes of cognitive dysfunction and reduced neurogenesis observed in GWI. Hence, strategies that improve inhibitory neurotransmission in the hippocampus may prove beneficial for reversing cognitive dysfunction in GWI.

  19. Soybean isoflavones alter parvalbumin in hippocampus of mid-aged normal female, ovariectomized female, and normal male rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    In Koo HWANG; Moo Ho WON; Yoon-bok LEE; Ki-yeon YOO; Tae-cheon KANG; Soon Sung LIM; Sang Moo KIM; Heon-soo SOHN; Woo-jung KIM; Hyun Kyung SHIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the long-term effect of soybean isoflavones on changes in parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in the hippocampus in normal female, ovariectomized (OVX) female and normal male rats. Methods: Ten-month-old rats were assigned to one of 9 groups (n=7 in each group) based on body weight using arandomized complete-block design. The groups were: control diet-treated females,OVX females, and males; 0.3 g/kg isoflavone-treated females, OVX females, and males; and 1.2 g/kg isoflavone-treated females, OVX females, and males. The PV immunostaining was conducted by using the standard avidin-biotin complex method. Results: PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in all the groups after isoflavone treatment were significantly changed in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus, but not in the hippocampal CA2/3 region. PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in the control diet OVX females were similar to those in the control diet, and were greater than those in the control diet normal females. PV immunoreactivity and the number of PV-immunoreactive neurons in all the isoflavone-treated groups decreased dose-dependently after isoflavone treatment. Conclusion: Long-term administration of isoflavones may induce a reduction of PV in interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus. The reduction of PV in these regions suggests that the long-term administration of isoflavones may cause a change in calcium homeostasis in the hippocampal CA1 region and in the dentate gyrus.

  20. Selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons in the cerebral cortex of maternally stressed Gad1-heterozygous mouse offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, T; Furukawa, T; Iwata, S; Yanagawa, Y; Fukuda, A

    2014-03-11

    Exposure to maternal stress (MS) and mutations in GAD1, which encodes the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesizing enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) 67, are both risk factors for psychiatric disorders. However, the relationship between these risk factors remains unclear. Interestingly, the critical period of MS for psychiatric disorders in offspring corresponds to the period of GABAergic neuron neurogenesis and migration in the fetal brain, that is, in the late stage of gestation. Indeed, decrement of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hippocampus (HIP) has often been observed in schizophrenia patients. In the present study, we used GAD67-green fluorescent protein (GFP) knock-in mice (that is, mice in which the Gad1 gene is heterozygously deleted; GAD67(+/GFP)) that underwent prenatal stress from embryonic day 15.0 to 17.5 and monitored PV-positive GABAergic neurons to address the interaction between Gad1 disruption and stress. Administration of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine revealed that neurogenesis of GFP-positive GABAergic neurons, but not cortical plate cells, was significantly diminished in fetal brains during MS. Differential expression of glucocorticoid receptors by different progenitor cell types may underlie this differential outcome. Postnatally, the density of PV-positive, but not PV-negative, GABAergic neurons was significantly decreased in the mPFC, HIP and somatosensory cortex but not in the motor cortex of GAD67(+/GFP) mice. By contrast, these findings were not observed in wild-type (GAD67(+/+)) offspring. These results suggest that prenatal stress, in addition to heterozygous deletion of Gad1, could specifically disturb the proliferation of neurons destined to be PV-positive GABAergic interneurons.

  1. Differential susceptibility of interneurons expressing neuropeptide Y or parvalbumin in the aged hippocampus to acute seizure activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruba, Ramkumar; Hattiangady, Bharathi; Parihar, Vipan K; Shuai, Bing; Shetty, Ashok K

    2011-01-01

    Acute seizure (AS) activity in old age has an increased predisposition for evolving into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Furthermore, spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction after AS activity are often intense in the aged population than in young adults. This could be due to an increased vulnerability of inhibitory interneurons in the aged hippocampus to AS activity. We investigated this issue by comparing the survival of hippocampal GABA-ergic interneurons that contain the neuropeptide Y (NPY) or the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV) between young adult (5-months old) and aged (22-months old) F344 rats at 12 days after three-hours of AS activity. Graded intraperitoneal injections of the kainic acid (KA) induced AS activity and a diazepam injection at 3 hours after the onset terminated AS-activity. Measurement of interneuron numbers in different hippocampal subfields revealed that NPY+ interneurons were relatively resistant to AS activity in the aged hippocampus in comparison to the young adult hippocampus. Whereas, PV+ interneurons were highly susceptible to AS activity in both age groups. However, as aging alone substantially depleted these populations, the aged hippocampus after three-hours of AS activity exhibited 48% reductions in NPY+ interneurons and 70% reductions in PV+ interneurons, in comparison to the young hippocampus after similar AS activity. Thus, AS activity-induced TLE in old age is associated with far fewer hippocampal NPY+ and PV+ interneuron numbers than AS-induced TLE in the young adult age. This discrepancy likely underlies the severe spontaneous seizures and cognitive dysfunction observed in the aged people after AS activity.

  2. ErbB4 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons is critical for neuregulin 1 regulation of long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Yin, Dong-Min; Wen, Lei; Ting, Annie; Wang, Pu; Lu, Yi-Sheng; Zhu, Xin-Hong; Li, Shu-Ji; Wu, Cui-Ying; Wang, Xue-Ming; Lai, Cary; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin; Gao, Tian-Ming

    2010-12-14

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) is a trophic factor that acts by stimulating ErbB receptor tyrosine kinases and has been implicated in neural development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we investigated mechanisms of its suppression of long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. We found that NRG1 did not alter glutamatergic transmission at SC-CA1 synapses but increased the GABA(A) receptor-mediated synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells via a presynaptic mechanism. Inhibition of GABA(A) receptors blocked the suppressing effect of NRG1 on LTP and prevented ecto-ErbB4 from enhancing LTP, implicating a role of GABAergic transmission. To test this hypothesis further, we generated parvalbumin (PV)-Cre;ErbB4(-/-) mice in which ErbB4, an NRG1 receptor in the brain, is ablated specifically in PV-positive interneurons. NRG1 was no longer able to increase inhibitory postsynaptic currents and to suppress LTP in PV-Cre;ErbB4(-/-) hippocampus. Accordingly, contextual fear conditioning, a hippocampus-dependent test, was impaired in PV-Cre;ErbB4(-/-) mice. In contrast, ablation of ErbB4 in pyramidal neurons had no effect on NRG1 regulation of hippocampal LTP or contextual fear conditioning. These results demonstrate a critical role of ErbB4 in PV-positive interneurons but not in pyramidal neurons in synaptic plasticity and support a working model that NRG1 suppresses LTP by enhancing GABA release. Considering that NRG1 and ErbB4 are susceptibility genes of schizophrenia, these observations contribute to a better understanding of how abnormal NRG1/ErbB4 signaling may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  3. In vitro gamma oscillations following partial and complete ablation of δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors from parvalbumin interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferando, Isabella; Mody, Istvan

    2015-01-01

    Perisynaptic and extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABAA receptors (δ-GABAARs) mediate tonic conductances in many neurons. On principal cells of the neocortex and hippocampus they comprise α4 subunits, whereas they usually contain α1 on various interneurons. Specific characteristics of δ-GABAARs are their pharmacology and high plasticity. In particular δ-GABAARs are sensitive to low concentrations of neurosteroids (NS) and during times of altered NS production (stress, puberty, ovarian cycle and pregnancy) δ-GABAARs expression varies in many neurons regardless of the α subunits they contain, with direct consequences for neuronal excitability and network synchrony. For example δ-GABAARs plasticity on INs underlies modifications in hippocampal γ oscillations during pregnancy or over the ovarian cycle. Most δ-GABAAR-expressing INs in CA3 stratum pyramidale (SP) are parvalbumin (PV) + INs, whose fundamental role in γ oscillations generation and control has been extensively investigated. In this study we reduced or deleted δ-subunits in PV + INs, with the use of a PV/Cre-Gabrd/floxed genetic system. We find that in vitro CA3 γ oscillations of both PV-Gabrd(+/-)and PV-Gabrd(-/-) mice are characterized by higher frequencies than WT controls. The increased frequencies could be lowered to control levels in PV-Gabrd(+/-) by the NS allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone, 100 nM) but not the synthetic δ-GABAAR positive allosteric modulator 4-Chloro-N-[2-(2-thienyl)imidazo[1,2-a]pyridin-3-yl] benzamide (DS-2, 10 μM). This is consistent with the idea that DS-2, in contrast to ALLO, selectively targets α4/δ-GABAARs but not the α1/δ-GABAARs found on INs. Therefore, development of drugs selective for IN-specific α1/δ-GABAARs may be useful in neurological and psychiatric conditions correlated with altered PV + IN function and aberrant γ oscillations.

  4. Parvalbumin and GAD65 interneuron inhibition in the ventral hippocampus induces distinct behavioral deficits relevant to schizophrenia.

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    Nguyen, Robin; Morrissey, Mark D; Mahadevan, Vivek; Cajanding, Janine D; Woodin, Melanie A; Yeomans, John S; Takehara-Nishiuchi, Kaori; Kim, Jun Chul

    2014-11-05

    Hyperactivity within the ventral hippocampus (vHPC) has been linked to both psychosis in humans and behavioral deficits in animal models of schizophrenia. A local decrease in GABA-mediated inhibition, particularly involving parvalbumin (PV)-expressing GABA neurons, has been proposed as a key mechanism underlying this hyperactive state. However, direct evidence is lacking for a causal role of vHPC GABA neurons in behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Here, we probed the behavioral function of two different but overlapping populations of vHPC GABA neurons that express either PV or GAD65 by selectively inhibiting these neurons with the pharmacogenetic neuromodulator hM4D. We show that acute inhibition of vHPC GABA neurons in adult mice results in behavioral changes relevant to schizophrenia. Inhibiting either PV or GAD65 neurons produced distinct behavioral deficits. Inhibition of PV neurons, affecting ∼80% of the PV neuron population, robustly impaired prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (PPI), startle reactivity, and spontaneous alternation, but did not affect locomotor activity. In contrast, inhibiting a heterogeneous population of GAD65 neurons, affecting ∼40% of PV neurons and 65% of cholecystokinin neurons, increased spontaneous and amphetamine-induced locomotor activity and reduced spontaneous alternation, but did not alter PPI. Inhibition of PV or GAD65 neurons also produced distinct changes in network oscillatory activity in the vHPC in vivo. Together, these findings establish a causal role for vHPC GABA neurons in controlling behaviors relevant to schizophrenia and suggest a functional dissociation between the GABAergic mechanisms involved in hippocampal modulation of sensorimotor processes.

  5. Sex differences in diazepam effects and parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons in trait anxiety Long Evans rats.

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    Ravenelle, Rebecca; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Niedzielak, Timothy; Donaldson, S Tiffany

    2014-08-15

    In clinical populations, prevalence rates for a number of anxiety disorders differ between males and females and gonadal hormones are thought to contribute to these differences. While these hormones have been shown to modulate the anxiolytic effects of the benzodiazepine agonist diazepam in some models, findings are inconsistent. Here, we tested for sex differences in response to anxiogenic stimuli following a 30-min diazepam (1.0mg/kg) pre-treatment in male and female rats showing high (HAn) and low (LAn) anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze. Acute diazepam administration resulted in decreased anxiety-like behavior only in HAn males as demonstrated by a significant increase in percent open arm time in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Immunohistochemical analysis for parvalbumin (PV; a calcium-binding protein that selectively stains GABAergic neurons) in central amygdala (CeA), caudate putamen (CPu) and the hippocampus indicated the number of GABAergic interneurons in these areas differed across sex and anxiety trait. In the CPu, females had significantly more PV-immunoreactive (IR) cells than males, and LAn females had greater PV-IR neurons than HAn females. In the CeA, males displayed an increased number of PV-IR neurons compared to females, with no differences found between LAn and HAn. Further, trait differences were evident in the CA2 region of the hippocampus, regardless of sex. Taken together, these data suggest that gonadal hormones and trait anxiety may influence the sensitivity to the anti-anxiety effects of diazepam and these differences may be due in part to the distribution of GABA-containing interneurons.

  6. BDNF Depresses Excitability of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons through an M-Like Current in Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Luis Nieto-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available In addition to their classical roles in neuronal growth, survival and differentiation, neurotrophins are also rapid regulators of excitability, synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We have recently shown that mature BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor, but not proBDNF, modulates the excitability of interneurons in dentate gyrus within minutes. Here, we used brain slice patch-clamp recordings to study the mechanisms through which BDNF modulates the firing of interneurons in rat dentate gyrus by binding to TrkB receptors. Bath application of BDNF (15 ng/ml under current-clamp decreased the firing frequency (by 80% and input resistance, blocking the delayed firing observed at near-threshold voltage ranges, with no changes in resting membrane potential or action potential waveform. Using TEA (tetraethylammonium, or XE991(a Kv7/KCNQ channel antagonist, the effect of BDNF was abolished, whereas application of retigabine (a Kv7/KCNQ channel opener mimicked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that the M-current could be implicated in the modulation of the firing. In voltage-clamp experiments, BDNF increased the M-like current amplitude with no change in holding current. This effect was again blocked by XE991 and mimicked by retigabine, the latter accompanied with a change in holding current. In agreement with the electrophysiology, parvalbumin-positive interneurons co-expressed TrkB receptors and Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channels. In conclusion, BDNF depresses the excitability of interneurons by activating an M-like current and possibly blocking Kv1 channels, thereby controlling interneuron resting membrane potential and excitability.

  7. BDNF Depresses Excitability of Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons through an M-Like Current in Rat Dentate Gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto-Gonzalez, Jose Luis; Jensen, Kimmo

    2013-01-01

    In addition to their classical roles in neuronal growth, survival and differentiation, neurotrophins are also rapid regulators of excitability, synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We have recently shown that mature BDNF (Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor), but not proBDNF, modulates the excitability of interneurons in dentate gyrus within minutes. Here, we used brain slice patch-clamp recordings to study the mechanisms through which BDNF modulates the firing of interneurons in rat dentate gyrus by binding to TrkB receptors. Bath application of BDNF (15 ng/ml) under current-clamp decreased the firing frequency (by 80%) and input resistance, blocking the delayed firing observed at near-threshold voltage ranges, with no changes in resting membrane potential or action potential waveform. Using TEA (tetraethylammonium), or XE991(a Kv7/KCNQ channel antagonist), the effect of BDNF was abolished, whereas application of retigabine (a Kv7/KCNQ channel opener) mimicked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that the M-current could be implicated in the modulation of the firing. In voltage-clamp experiments, BDNF increased the M-like current amplitude with no change in holding current. This effect was again blocked by XE991 and mimicked by retigabine, the latter accompanied with a change in holding current. In agreement with the electrophysiology, parvalbumin-positive interneurons co-expressed TrkB receptors and Kv7.2/KCNQ2 channels. In conclusion, BDNF depresses the excitability of interneurons by activating an M-like current and possibly blocking Kv1 channels, thereby controlling interneuron resting membrane potential and excitability.

  8. Differential surface density and modulatory effects of presynaptic GABAB receptors in hippocampal cholecystokinin and parvalbumin basket cells.

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    Booker, Sam A; Althof, Daniel; Degro, Claudius E; Watanabe, Masahiko; Kulik, Ákos; Vida, Imre

    2017-05-02

    The perisomatic domain of cortical neurons is under the control of two major GABAergic inhibitory interneuron types: regular-spiking cholecystokinin (CCK) basket cells (BCs) and fast-spiking parvalbumin (PV) BCs. CCK and PV BCs are different not only in their intrinsic physiological, anatomical and molecular characteristics, but also in their presynaptic modulation of their synaptic output. Most GABAergic terminals are known to contain GABAB receptors (GABABR), but their role in presynaptic inhibition and surface expression have not been comparatively characterized in the two BC types. To address this, we performed whole-cell recordings from CCK and PV BCs and postsynaptic pyramidal cells (PCs), as well as freeze-fracture replica-based quantitative immunogold electron microscopy of their synapses in the rat hippocampal CA1 area. Our results demonstrate that while both CCK and PV BCs contain functional presynaptic GABABRs, their modulatory effects and relative abundance are markedly different at these two synapses: GABA release is dramatically inhibited by the agonist baclofen at CCK BC synapses, whereas a moderate reduction in inhibitory transmission is observed at PV BC synapses. Furthermore, GABABR activation has divergent effects on synaptic dynamics: paired-pulse depression (PPD) is enhanced at CCK BC synapses, but abolished at PV BC synapses. Consistent with the quantitative differences in presynaptic inhibition, virtually all CCK BC terminals were found to contain GABABRs at high densities, but only 40% of PV BC axon terminals contain GABABRs at detectable levels. These findings add to an increasing list of differences between these two interneuron types, with implications for their network functions.

  9. Dynamic patterns of colocalization of calbindin, parvalbumin and GABA in subpopulations of mouse basolateral amygdalar cells during development.

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    Dávila, José Carlos; Olmos, Luis; Legaz, Isabel; Medina, Loreta; Guirado, Salvador; Real, Maria Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Calbindin cells represent a major interneuron subtype of the cortical/pallial regions, such as the basolateral amygdala, which are often analyzed in studies of tangential migration of interneurons from the subpallial ganglionic eminences to the pallium/cortex. However, previous evidence suggests that during development the calbindin cells may include more than one of the interneuron subtypes found in the adult pallium/cortex. Furthermore, in the adult basolateral amygdala, calbindin cells include a subpopulation of non-GABAergic (non-interneuron) cells. To better characterize these cells throughout development, in the present study we investigated the colocalization of calbindin, parvalbumin and GABA in cells of the mouse basolateral amygdala during late embryonic (E16.5) and several postnatal ages from birth until 4 weeks after birth (P0, P10 and P28). Our results indicate that CB, PV and GABA show a dynamic pattern of colocalization in cells of the mouse basolateral amygdalar nucleus throughout development. From E16.5 through P28, the majority of CB+ neurons and virtually all PV+ neurons are GABAergic. However, after P10, the percentage of GABAergic CB+ cells decline from 96% to 70%. Furthermore, while only 9% of CB+ neurons are PV+ at P10, this percentage raises to 42% at P28. At all postnatal ages studied, the majority of the PV+ cells are CB+, suggesting that PV+ interneurons develop postnatally mainly as a subpopulation within the CB+ cells of the basolateral amygdalar nucleus. These results are important for interpreting data from interneuron migration.

  10. Late postnatal shifts of parvalbumin and nitric oxide synthase expression within the GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes of inferior colliculus neurons.

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    Fujimoto, Hisataka; Konno, Kotaro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Jinno, Shozo

    2017-03-01

    The inferior colliculus (IC) is partitioned into three subdivisions: the dorsal and lateral cortices (DC and LC) and the central nucleus (ICC), and serves as an integration center of auditory information. Recent studies indicate that a certain population of IC neurons may represent the non-GABAergic phenotype, while they express well-established cortical/hippocampal GABAergic neuron markers. In this study we used the optical disector to investigate the phenotype of IC neurons expressing parvalbumin (PV) and/or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) in C57BL/6J mice during the late postnatal period. Four major types of IC neurons were defined by the presence (+) or absence (-) of PV, NOS, and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67): PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(+) , PV(+) /NOS(+) /GAD67(+) , PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(-) , and PV(-) /NOS(+) /GAD67(-) . Fluorescent in situ hybridization for vesicular glutamate transporter 2 mRNA indicated that almost all GAD67(-) IC neurons represented the glutamatergic phenotype. The numerical densities (NDs) of total GAD67(+) IC neurons remained unchanged in all subdivisions. The NDs of PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(+) neurons and PV(-) /NOS(+) /GAD67(-) neurons were reduced with age in the ICC, while they remained unchanged in the DC and LC. By contrast, the NDs of PV(+) /NOS(+) /GAD67(+) neurons and PV(+) /NOS(-) /GAD67(-) neurons were increased with age in the ICC, although there were no changes in the DC and LC. The cell body size of GAD67(+) IC neurons did not vary according to the expression of PV with or without NOS. The present findings indicate that the expression of PV and NOS may shift with age within the GABAergic and glutamatergic phenotypes of IC neurons during the late postnatal period. J. Comp. Neurol. 525:868-884, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  12. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs.

  13. A monoclonal antibody against human MUDENG protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagley, Yadav; Choi, Jun-Ha; Wickramanayake, Dimuthu Dhammika; Choi, Geun-Yeol; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Tae-Hyoung; Oh, Jae-Wook

    2013-08-01

    MUDENG (mu-2-related death-inducing gene, MuD) encodes a predicted ∼54-kDa protein in humans, considered to be involved in trafficking proteins from endosomes toward other membranous compartments as well as in inducing cell death. Here we report on the generation of a mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) against the middle domain of human (h) MuD. This IgG sub 1 MAb, named M3H9, recognizes residues 244-326 in the middle domain of the MuD protein. Thus, the MuD proteins expressed in an astroglioma cell line and primary astrocytes can be detected by the M3H9 MAb. We showed that M3H9 MAb can be useful in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunoblot experiments. In addition, M3H9 MAb can detect the expression of the MuD protein in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded mouse ovary and uterus tissues. These results indicate that the MuD MAb M3H9 could be useful as a new biomarker of hereditary spastic paraplegia and other related diseases.

  14. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

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    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics.

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Against Xenopus Greatwall Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling; Fisher, Laura A.; Wahl, James K.

    2011-01-01

    Mitosis is known to be regulated by protein kinases, including MPF, Plk1, Aurora kinases, and so on, which become active in M-phase and phosphorylate a wide range of substrates to control multiple aspects of mitotic entry, progression, and exit. Mechanistic investigations of these kinases not only provide key insights into cell cycle regulation, but also hold great promise for cancer therapy. Recent studies, largely in Xenopus, characterized a new mitotic kinase named Greatwall (Gwl) that plays essential roles in both mitotic entry and maintenance. In this study, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Xenopus Gwl and characterized these antibodies for their utility in immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation, and immunodepletion in Xenopus egg extracts. Importantly, we generated an MAb that is capable of neutralizing endogenous Gwl. The addition of this antibody into M-phase extracts results in loss of mitotic phosphorylation of Gwl, Plk1, and Cdk1 substrates. These results illustrate a new tool to study loss-of-function of Gwl, and support its essential role in mitosis. Finally, we demonstrated the usefulness of the MAb against human Gwl/MASTL. PMID:22008075

  16. Development of syngeneic monoclonal anti-idiotype antibodies to mouse monoclonal anti-asialoglycoprotein receptor antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirai M

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Anti-idiotype antibodies (Ab2 play an important role in the homeostasis of immune responses and are related to the development and the disease activity of certain autoimmune diseases. The asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is considered one of the target antigens in the pathogenesis of autoimmune chronic active hepatitis (AIH. We previously developed a mouse monoclonal antibody (clone 8D7 which recognizes rat and human ASGPR. In this study, to help investigate the anti-ASGPR antibody-anti-idiotype antibody network in patients with AIH, we developed a syngeneic mouse monoclonal Ab2 to the 8D7 anti-ASGPR antibody (Ab1. One clone, designated as 3C8, tested positive for specific reactivity to 8D7-Ab1 and did not bind to other irrelevant immunoglobulins. By competitive inhibition assays, the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to liver membrane extracts, i.e., the crude antigen preparation, was inhibited by 3C8-Ab2 in a dose-dependent manner, and the binding of 8D7-Ab1 to 3C8-Ab2 was inhibited by the liver membrane extracts. In the immunohistochemical analysis, 3C8-Ab2 blocked the specific staining of sinusoidal margins of rat hepatocytes by 8D7-Ab1. These results suggest that 3C8 anti-idiotype antibody recognizes the specific idiotypic determinants within the antigen-binding site of 8D7-Ab1.

  17. Diffuse plane xanthomatosis associated with monoclonal gammopathy Xantomatose plana difusa associada a gamopatia monoclonal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristóteles Rosmaninho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse plane normolipemic xanthomatosis (DPNX is a rare, non-inherited disease that is often associated with systemic diseases, mainly malignant hematological (especially multiple myeloma or lymph proliferative disorders. The DPNX can precede the appearance of such conditions by several years, so careful follow-up and periodic laboratory examinations are recommended even for patients that seemed to have no underlying disease. We describe a case associated with monoclonal gammopathy. This case shows that dermatological lesions can be the first manifestation of important hematological diseases and so physicians should be familiarized with this entityA xantomatose plana difusa normolipêmica (XPDN é uma dermatose adquirida rara, muitas vezes associada a doenças sistêmicas, nomeadamente neoplasias hematológicas(sobretudo o mieloma múltiplo ou a processos linfoproliferativos. A XPDN pode preceder o aparecimento dessas doenças em vários anos, sendo por isso recomendada uma vigilância clínica e laboratorial periódica, mesmo para os doentes que aparentemente não apresentam uma doença associada. Descrevemos um caso associado à gamopatia monoclonal. Este caso demonstra a importância das manifestações cutâneas como primeira manifestação de doenças hematológicas importantes e por isso os clínicos devem estar familiarizados com esta entidade

  18. Early life stress disrupts social behavior and prefrontal cortex parvalbumin interneurons at an earlier time-point in females than in males.

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    Holland, Freedom H; Ganguly, Prabarna; Potter, David N; Chartoff, Elena H; Brenhouse, Heather C

    2014-04-30

    Early life stress exposure (ELS) yields risk for psychiatric disorders that might occur though a population-specific mechanism that impacts prefrontal cortical development. Sex differences in ELS effects are largely unknown and are also essential to understand social and cognitive development. ELS can cause dysfunction within parvalbumin (PVB)-containing inhibitory interneurons in the prefrontal cortex and in several prefrontal cortex-mediated behaviors including social interaction. Social behavior deficits are often the earliest observed changes in psychiatric disorders, therefore the time-course and causation of social interaction deficits after ELS are important to determine. PVB interneuron dysfunction can disrupt social behavior, and has been correlated in males with elevated markers of oxidative stress and inflammation, such as cyclooxygenase-2 after ELS. Here, we measured the effects of maternal separation ELS on social interaction behaviors in males and females. Prefrontal cortex PVB and cyclooxygenase-2 were also measured in juveniles and adolescents using Western blots. ELS led to social interaction alterations earlier in females than males. Sexually dimorphic behavioral changes were consistent with prefrontal cortex PVB loss after ELS. PVB levels were decreased in ELS-exposed juvenile females, while males exposed to ELS do not display parvalbumin decreases until adolescence. Early behavioral and PVB changes in females did not appear to be mediated through cyclooxygenase-2, since levels were not affected in ELS females. Therefore, these data suggest that ELS affects males and females differently and with distinct developmental profiles.

  19. Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the proportion but not numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons in the hippocampus of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lister, James P; Blatt, Gene J; Kemper, Thomas L; Tonkiss, John; DeBassio, William A; Galler, Janina R; Rosene, Douglas L

    2011-07-01

    Prenatal protein malnutrition alters the structure and function of the adult rat hippocampal formation. The current study examines the effect of prenatal protein malnutrition on numbers of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) GABAergic interneurons, which are important for perisomatic inhibition of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Brain sections from prenatally protein malnourished and normally nourished rats were stained for parvalbumin and PV-IR neurons were quantified using stereology in the dentate gyrus, CA3/2 and CA1 subfields, and the subiculum for both cerebral hemispheres. Results demonstrated that prenatal malnutrition did not affect the number of PV-IR interneurons in the hippocampus. Since prenatal protein malnutrition reduces total neuron numbers in the CA1 subfield (1), this results in an altered ratio of PV-IR interneurons to total neuronal numbers (from 1:22.9 in controls to 1:20.5 in malnourished rats). Additionally, there was no hemispheric asymmetry of either PV-IR neuron numbers or ratio of PV-IR:total neuron numbers.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against naturally occurring bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoyama, Y; Tanaka, H; Fukuda, N

    1999-09-01

    The ratio of hapten to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in an antigen conjugate was determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) tof mass spectrometry. A hybridoma secreting monoclonal antibody (MAb) was produced by fusing splenocytes immunized with an antigen-BSA conjugate with HAT-sensitive mouse myeloma cells. The cross-reaction of anti-forskolin antibodies with 7-deacetyl forskolin was 5.6%. A very small cross-reaction appeared with other derivatives. The full measuring range of the assay extends from 5 ng to 5 mug/ml of forskolin. Immunoaffinity column chromatography using anti-forskolin MAbs appears to be far superior to previously published separation methods. The capacity of the immunoaffinity column as determined by ELISA is 9 mug/ml. Forskolin has been isolated directly from the crude extracts of tuberous roots and the callus culture of Coleus forskohlii. A MAb against tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCA) was produced. The cross-reaction of anti-THCA antibody against other cannabinoids was very wide. Many cannabinoids and a spiro-compound were reactive, but did not react with other phenolics. It became evident that this ELISA was able to be applied to the biotransformation experiments of cannabinoids in plant tissue culture system. Anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAbs were produced. New western blotting method of determination for ginsenosides was established. Ginsenosides separated by silica gel TLC were transferred to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane. The membrane was treated with NaIO(4) solution followed by BSA, resulting in a ginsenoside-BSA conjugate. Immunostaining of ginsenosides was more sensitive compared to other staining. Immunostaining of ginsenosides in the fresh ginseng root was succeeded using anti-ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1) MAb after blotting to PVDF membrane.

  1. Prenatal Valproate Exposure Differentially Affects Parvalbumin-Expressing Neurons and Related Circuits in the Cortex and Striatum of Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Emanuel; Filice, Federica; Schwaller, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) comprise a number of heterogeneous neurodevelopmental diseases characterized by core behavioral symptoms in the domains of social interaction, language/communication and repetitive or stereotyped patterns of behavior. In utero exposure to valproic acid (VPA) has evolved as a highly recognized rodent ASD model due to the robust behavioral phenotype observed in the offspring and the proven construct-, face- and predictive validity of the model. The number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV+) GABAergic interneurons has been consistently reported to be decreased in human ASD subjects and in ASD animal models. The presumed loss of this neuron subpopulation hereafter termed Pvalb neurons and/or PV deficits were proposed to result in an excitation/inhibition imbalance often observed in ASD. Importantly, loss of Pvalb neurons and decreased/absent PV protein levels have two fundamentally different consequences. Thus, Pvalb neurons were investigated in in utero VPA-exposed male (“VPA”) mice in the striatum, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and somatosensory cortex (SSC), three ASD-associated brain regions. Unbiased stereology of PV+ neurons and Vicia Villosa Agglutinin-positive (VVA+) perineuronal nets, which specifically enwrap Pvalb neurons, was carried out. Analyses of PV protein expression and mRNA levels for Pvalb, Gad67, Kcnc1, Kcnc2, Kcns3, Hcn1, Hcn2, and Hcn4 were performed. We found a ∼15% reduction in the number of PV+ cells and decreased Pvalb mRNA and PV protein levels in the striatum of VPA mice compared to controls, while the number of VVA+ cells was unchanged, indicating that Pvalb neurons were affected at the level of the transcriptome. In selected cortical regions (mPFC, SSC) of VPA mice, no quantitative loss/decrease of PV+ cells was observed. However, expression of Kcnc1, coding for the voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.1 specifically expressed in Pvalb neurons, was decreased by ∼40% in forebrain lysates of VPA mice

  2. Distribution of parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the hippocampus of the gerbil--a qualitative and quantitative statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch, C; Scotti, A L; Nitsch, F M

    1995-08-01

    In the gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) hippocampal formation, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) shows a unique species-specific distribution: it is present in the perforant path from the entorhinal cortex to the stratum molecular of the dentate are and cornu ammonis. A possible relation of this to the seizure-sensitivity of gerbils has been suggested. In addition, as in other species, PV is contained in a subpopulation of GABAergic nerve cells of the gerbil hippocampus. The characteristics of these PV-containing neurons are here described. Distribution and shape of the PV-positive neurons in general agreed with the features described for rat hippocampus with two notable exceptions: in CA2 PV-containing perikarya were densely crowded and gave rise to an intense immunoreactive plexus around the pyramidal cells and, in CA1, the number of stained neurons was variable, often much lower than in rats and occasionally not a single PV-positive neuron was present. In parasagittal brain sections of the lateralities 1.0, 1.6 and 2.2 mm from the midline, obtained from 27 male gerbils, the number of PV-containing neurons was determined. The data set obtained in CA3 and dentate area resembled unimodal distributions, while in CA1 a bimodal frequency distribution was present. Since parametric and non-parametric correlation tests rely on a unimodal distribution of the data set, they gave falsely significant values in CA1. The bimodal distribution suggests that, with respect to the PV-containing interneurons in CA1, two different populations of gerbils were included in our sample, those with many positive neurons and those with only a few. Since the nerve terminal staining is preserved also in those gerbils with only a few positive perikarya in CA1, it seems possible that an unknown factor influenced PV expression and storage in the soma. Sex, age, seasonal or circadian rhythm or quality of immunocytochemical staining did not influence the outcome of the quantitative

  3. Preparation and Identification of Anti-rabies Virus Monoclonal Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-juan Wang; Xiong Li; Li-hua Wang; Hu Shan; Lei Cao; Peng-cheng Yu; Qing Tang; Guo-dong Liang

    2012-01-01

    To provide a foundation for the development of rapid and specific methods for the diagnosis of rabies virus infection,anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies were prepared and rabies virus nucleoprotein and human rabies virus vaccine strain (PV strain) were used as immunogens to immunize 6-8 week old female BALB/c mice.Spleen cells and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused according to conventional methods:the monoclonal cell strains obtained were selected using the indirect immunofluorescence test; this was followed by preparation of monoclonal antibody ascitic fluid; and finally,systematic identification of subclass,specificity and sensitivity was carried out.Two high potency and specific monoclonal antibodies against rabies virus were obtained and named 3B12 and 4A12,with ascitic fluid titers of 1∶8000 and 1∶10000,respectively.Both belonged to the IgG2a subclass.These strains secrete potent,stable and specific anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies,which makes them well suited for the development of rabies diagnosis reagents.

  4. A Strategy for Screening Monoclonal Antibodies for Arabidopsis Flowers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qian; Zhou, Lian; Wang, Yingxiang; Ma, Hong

    2017-01-01

    The flower is one of the most complex structures of angiosperms and is essential for sexual reproduction. Current studies using molecular genetic tools have made great advances in understanding flower development. Due to the lack of available antibodies, studies investigating the localization of proteins required for flower development have been restricted to use commercial antibodies against known antigens such as GFP, YFP, and FLAG. Thus, knowledge about cellular structures in the floral organs is limited due to the scarcity of antibodies that can label cellular components. To generate monoclonal antibodies that can facilitate molecular studies of the flower, we constructed a library of monoclonal antibodies against antigenic proteins from Arabidopsis inflorescences and identified 61 monoclonal antibodies. Twenty-four of these monoclonal antibodies displayed a unique band in a western blot assay in at least one of the examined tissues. Distinct cellular distribution patterns of epitopes were detected by these 24 antibodies by immunofluorescence microscopy in a flower section. Subsequently, a combination of immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry analysis identified potential targets for three of these antibodies. These results provide evidence for the generation of an antibody library using the total plant proteins as antigens. Using this method, the present study identified 61 monoclonal antibodies and 24 of them were efficiently detecting epitopes in both western blot experiments and immunofluorescence microscopy. These antibodies can be applied as informative cellular markers to study the biological mechanisms underlying floral development in plants. PMID:28293248

  5. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia R. Balderman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease. In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  6. Immunoblotting with monoclonal antibodies: importance of the blocking solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauri, H P; Bucher, K

    1986-12-01

    Four commonly used blocking agents, i.e., fetal calf serum, mammalian gelatin-Nonidet-P40, fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40, and defatted powdered milk were compared with respect to their efficiency to block the nonspecific background and to promote maximal immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human intestinal sucrase-isomaltase during immunoblotting. Two of five monoclonal antibodies were found to react with the electroblotted enzyme. However, one of the reacting antibodies gave optimal results with fish gelatin-Nonidet-P40 and the other with defatted powdered milk, while fetal calf serum lead to unacceptably high backgrounds. The results suggest that some of the difficulties encountered with monoclonal antibodies in immunoblotting may be due to inappropriate blocking conditions.

  7. ELISA Detection of Francisella tularensis using Polyclonaland Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Pohanka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The mouse monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were produced for the detection of intracellular pathogenand potential warfare agent Francisella tularensis. Antibody titers obtained were 1:640 for polyclonal antibodiesand 1:320 for monoclonal antibodies. Both antibodies were used in the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbentassay (ELISA found to detect F. tularensis whole cells. The limit of detection was 5.4×106 CFU/ml for polyclonalantibodies and 6.9×106 CFU/ml for monoclonal antibodies. The value sample could  be distinguished from anyconcentration of another gram-negative bacterium: Escherichia coli.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(5, pp.698-702, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1693

  8. The Case for Adjunctive Monoclonal Antibody Immunotherapy in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brian J; Buckley, Peter F

    2016-06-01

    This article presents the case in favor of clinical trials of adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in schizophrenia. Evidence for prenatal and premorbid immune risk factors for the development of schizophrenia in the offspring is highlighted. Then key evidence for immune dysfunction in patients with schizophrenia is considered. Next, previous trials of adjunctive anti-inflammatory or other immunotherapy in schizophrenia are discussed. Then evidence for psychosis as a side effect of immunotherapy for other disorders is discussed. Also presented is preliminary evidence for adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in psychiatric disorders. Finally, important considerations in the design and implementation of clinical trials of adjunctive monoclonal antibody immunotherapy in schizophrenia are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies in human breast milk: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Elle; Robinson, Steven E; Amato, Carol; McMillan, Colette; Westcott, Jay; Wolf, Tiffany; Robinson, William A

    2014-04-01

    Recently, therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have been introduced for the treatment of advanced melanoma and other diseases. It remains unclear whether these drugs can be safely administered to women who are breast feeding because of the potential hazardous side effects for nursing infants. One such therapy for metastatic melanoma is ipilimumab, a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-antigen-4, and is the preferred treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma when other molecular therapies are not viable. This study measured ipilimumab levels in the breast milk of a patient undergoing treatment that were enough to raise concerns for a nursing infant exposed to ipilimumab.

  10. Monoclonal gammopathy in hereditary spherocytosis: Possible pathogenetic relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, A.I. (Univ. of Chicago); Miller, J.B.; Lester, E.P.; Bowers, T.K.; Jacob, H.S.

    1978-01-01

    Two cases of monoclonal gammopathy in patients with hereditary spherocytosis led us to consider the possible pathogenetic relation between these two disorders. Twelve adult patients with hereditary spherocytosis had significant hypergammaglobulinemia in comparison to normal subjects. Retrospective analysis of previous illness in 140 patients with multiple myeloma showed a significant association between IgA myeloma and previous gallbladder disease. We propose that the chronic reticuloendothelial stimulation due to extravascular hemolysis, possibly potentiated by the inflammation associated with cholelithiasis and cholecystitis, may foster neoplastic transformation of immunocytes in patients with hereditary spherocytosis, ultimately leading to the development of monoclonal gammopathy.

  11. ERBB oncogene proteins as targets for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polanovski, O L; Lebedenko, E N; Deyev, S M

    2012-03-01

    General properties of the family of tyrosine kinase ERBB receptors are considered in connection with their role in the generation of cascades of signal transduction in normal and tumor cells. Causes of acquisition of oncogene features by genes encoding these receptors and their role in tumorigenesis are analyzed. Anti-ERBB monoclonal antibodies approved for therapy are described in detail, and mechanisms of their antitumor activity and development of resistance to them are reviewed. The existing and the most promising strategies for creating and using monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives for therapy of cancer are discussed.

  12. Quantitative analysis of monoclonal antibodies by cation-exchange chromatofocusing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkova, Anna

    2009-08-07

    A robust cation-exchange chromatofocusing method was developed for the routine analysis of a recombinant humanized monoclonal IgG antibody. We compare the chromatofocusing method to the conventional cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) employing a salt gradient and show clear advantages of chromatofocusing over CEX. We demonstrate the suitability of the present chromatofocusing method for its intended purpose by testing the validation characteristics. To our knowledge, this is the first chromatofocusing method developed for the routine analysis of monoclonal antibody charge species.

  13. Purification of Murine Monoclonal IgM Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the purification of a monoclonal IgM antibody against human tumor associated antigen Lewis-Y by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to identify purified IgM antibody.In flow cytometry analysis, the purified IgM antibody recognizes human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 which expresses Lewis-Y antigen.This work presents a new way for the purification of murine monoclonal IgM antibody.

  14. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.;

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification....... Monoclonal antibodies were raised to different targets in single batch runs of 6-10 wk using multiplexed immunisations, automated fusion and cell-culture, and a novel antigen-coated microarray-screening assay. In a large-scale experiment, where eight mice were immunized with ten antigens each, we generated...

  15. SUBFIELD AND LAYER-SPECIFIC DEPLETION IN CALBINDIN-D28K, CALRETININ AND PARVALBUMIN IMMUNOREACTIVITY IN THE DENTATE GYRUS OF APP/PS1 TRANSGENIC MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovi, Miroljub; Caballero-Bleda, María; Kadish, Inga; van Groen, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The depletion of neuronal calcium binding proteins deprives neurons of the capacity to buffer high levels of intracellular Ca2+ and this leaves them vulnerable to pathological processes, such as those present in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the expression of the calcium binding proteins, calbindin-D28K, calretinin and parvalbumin in the dentate gyrus (DG) of APP/PS1 transgenic mice and their non-Tg littermates, as well as the relation with the deposition of human Aβ. We measured the expression of these three proteins at seven different rostro-caudal levels, and in the molecular, granular and polymorphic layers of the DG. We found that, except in the most caudal part of the DG, there is a substantial loss of calbindin-D28K immunoreactivity in all three layers of the DG in APP/PS1 mice compared to the non-Tg mice. Significant loss of calretinin immunoreactivity is present in most of the polymorphic layer of the DG of APP/PS1 mice compared to the non-Tg mice, as well as in the rostral and intermediate part of the inner molecular layer. Compared to the non-Tg mice parvalbumin immunoreactivity is significantly reduced throughout the whole polymorphic layer as well as in the rostral and intermediate part of the granular layer of DG in APP/PS1 mice. The relatively preservation of calbindin immunoreactivity in the caudal part of molecular and granular layers as well as calretinin immunoreactivity in the caudal part of polymorphic layer of the DG is likely related to the lower Aβ expression in those parts of DG. The present data suggest an involvement of calcium-dependent pathways in the pathogenesis of AD and indicate that there exists a subfield and layer-specific decrease in immunoreactivity which is related to the type of calcium-binding protein in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, it seems that APP expression affects more the calbindin expression then parvalbumin and calretinin expression in the DG of APP/PS1 transgenic mice. PMID

  16. Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies for therapy decision making in inflammatory diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, G.; Signore, A.; Lagana, B.; Dierckx, R. A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation with clinical implications for several chronic inflammatory disorders for diagnosis, therapy decision making and follow up. In the last decades, a number of novel monoclonal antibo

  17. Expression changes of parvalbumin and microtubule-associated protein 2 induced by chronic constriction injury in rat dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Ming-hui; JI Feng-tao; LIU Ling; LI Feng

    2011-01-01

    Background Parvalbumin (PV), as a mobile endogenous calcium buffer, plays an important role in affecting temporospatial characteristics of calcium transients and in modulating calcium homeostasis. PV is expressed in neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal dorsal horn and may be involved in synaptic transmission through regulating cytoplasm calcium concentrations. But the exact role of PV in peripheral sensory neurons remains unknown.Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), belonging to structural microtubule-associated protein family, is especially vulnerable to acute central nervous system (CNS) injury, and there will be rapid loss of MAP-2 at the injury site. The present study investigated the changes of PV expressing neurons and the MAP-2 neurons in the DRG after an operation for chronic constriction injury to the unilateral sciatic nerve (CCI-SN), in order to demonstrate the possible roles of PV and MAP-2 in transmission and modulation of peripheral nociceptive information.Methods Seventy-two adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, weighing 180-220 g, were randomly divided into two groups (36 rats in each group), the sham operation group and chronic constriction injury (CCI) group. Six rats in each group were randomly selected to receive mechanical and thermal sensitivity tests at one day before operation and 1,3, 5,7, and 14 days after surgery. After pain behavioral test, ipsilateral lumbar fifth DRGs were removed and double immunofluorescence staining was performed to assess the expression changes of PV and of MAP2 expressing neurons in the L5 DRG before or after surgery.Results The animals with CCI-SN showed obvious mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia (P<0.05). Both the thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia decreased to their lowest degree at 7 days after surgery compared to the baseline before surgery (P<0.01). In normal rats before surgery, a large number of neurons were MAP-2 single labeled cells, and just a small number of PV

  18. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production; their use in diagnostics and passive immunization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal

  19. Age-dependent loss of parvalbumin-expressing hippocampal interneurons in mice deficient in CHL1, a mental retardation and schizophrenia susceptibility gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalbach, Barbara; Lepsveridze, Eka; Djogo, Nevena; Papashvili, Giorgi; Kuang, Fang; Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir; Nikonenko, Alexander G; Dityatev, Alexander; Jakovcevski, Igor; Schachner, Melitta

    2015-11-01

    In humans, deletions/mutations in the CHL1/CALL gene are associated with mental retardation and schizophrenia. Juvenile CHL1-deficient (CHL1(-/-) ) mice have been shown to display abnormally high numbers of parvalbumin-expressing (PV(+) ) hippocampal interneurons and, as adults, display behavioral traits observed in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we addressed the question whether inhibitory interneurons and synaptic plasticity in the CHL1(-/-) mouse are affected during brain maturation and in adulthood. We found that hippocampal, but not neocortical, PV(+) interneurons were reduced with age in CHL1(-/-) mice, from a surplus of +27% at 1 month to a deficit of -20% in adulthood compared with wild-type littermates. This loss occurred during brain maturation, correlating with microgliosis and enhanced interleukin-6 expression. In parallel with the loss of PV(+) interneurons, the inhibitory input to adult CA1 pyramidal cells was reduced and a deficit in short- and long-term potentiation developed at CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses between 2 and 9 months of age in CHL1(-/-) mice. This deficit could be abrogated by a GABAA receptor agonist. We propose that region-specific aberrant GABAergic synaptic connectivity resulting from the mutation and a subsequently enhanced synaptic elimination during brain maturation lead to microgliosis, increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine levels, loss of interneurons, and impaired synaptic plasticity. Close homolog of L1-deficient (CHL1(-/-) ) mice have abnormally high numbers of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing hippocampal interneurons in juvenile animals, but in adult animals a loss of these cells is observed. This loss correlates with an increased density of microglia (M), enhanced interleukin-6 (IL6) production and a deficit in short- and long-term potentiation at CA3-CA1 excitatory synapses. Furthermore, adult CHL1(-/-) mice display behavioral traits similar to those observed in neuropsychiatric disorders of humans.

  20. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-containing neurons in the immature rat hippocampal formation: light and electron microscopic features and colocalization with glutamate decarboxylase and parvalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X X; Toth, Z; Schultz, L; Ribak, C E; Baram, T Z

    1998-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) excites hippocampal neurons and induces death of selected CA3 pyramidal cells in immature rats. These actions of CRH require activation of specific receptors that are abundant in CA3 during early postnatal development. Given the dramatic effects of CRH on hippocampal neurons and the absence of CRH-containing afferents to this region, we hypothesized that a significant population of CRHergic neurons exists in developing rat hippocampus. This study defined and characterized hippocampal CRH-containing cells by using immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural examination, and colocalization with gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-synthesizing enzyme and calcium-binding proteins. Numerous, large CRH-immunoreactive (ir) neurons were demonstrated in CA3 strata pyramidale and oriens, fewer were observed in the corresponding layers of CA1, and smaller CRH-ir cells were found in stratum lacunosum-moleculare of Ammon's horn. In the dentate gyrus, CRH-ir somata resided in the granule cell layer and hilus. Ultrastructurally, CRH-ir neurons had aspiny dendrites and were postsynaptic to both asymmetric and symmetric synapses. CRH-ir axon terminals formed axosomatic and axodendritic symmetric synapses with pyramidal and granule cells. Other CRH-ir terminals synapsed on axon initial segments of principal neurons. Most CRH-ir neurons were coimmunolabeled for glutamate decarboxylase (GAD)-65 and GAD-67 and the majority also contained parvalbumin, but none were labeled for calbindin. These results confirm the identity of hippocampal CRH-ir cells as GABAergic interneurons. Further, a subpopulation of neurons immunoreactive for both CRH and parvalbumin and located within and adjacent to the principal cell layers consists of basket and chandelier cells. Thus, axon terminals of CRH-ir interneurons are strategically positioned to influence the excitability of the principal hippocampal neurons via release of both CRH and GABA.

  1. Estrogen receptor-beta colocalizes extensively with parvalbumin-labeled inhibitory neurons in the cortex, amygdala, basal forebrain, and hippocampal formation of intact and ovariectomized adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blurton-Jones, Mathew; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2002-10-21

    Estrogen has been reported to regulate the activity of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons within the hippocampus, basal forebrain, and hypothalamus of adult rodents. Although estrogen receptor-alpha bearing GABAergic interneurons have been identified previously, the neurotransmitter phenotype of cells that express the more recently characterized estrogen receptor-beta (ER-beta) has not been examined in vivo. We, therefore, have used fluorescent immunohistochemistry to further characterize the phenotype of ER-beta-bearing cells by double labeling for the GABAergic-associated calcium-binding protein, parvalbumin (PV). We find that a large proportion of ER-beta-immunoreactive cells within the cortex, amygdala, basal forebrain, and hippocampal formation of intact and ovariectomized (ovx) adult rats are PV-immunoreactive. Within the infralimbic, agranular insular, primary motor, parietal association, perirhinal, and lateral entorhinal cortices, an average of 95.6% +/- 0.8% (intact) and 94.5% +/- 1.4% (ovx) of all ER-beta-immunoreactive cells coexpress parvalbumin, and this proportion is strikingly similar across these diverse cortical regions. ER-beta/PV double-labeled cells represent 23.3% +/- 1.6% (intact) and 25.8% +/- 2.0% (ovx) of all PV-labeled cells within these regions. ER-beta/PV double-labeled cells are also observed within the lateral, accessory basal, and posterior cortical nuclei of the amygdala, and periamygdaloid cortex. Within the basal forebrain, 31.0% +/- 3.1% (intact) and 26.0% +/- 5.2 % (ovx) of ER-beta-immunoreactive cells coexpress PV. Almost all ER-beta-immunoreactive cells within the subiculum, a major output region of the hippocampal formation, double label for PV (intact = 97.2% +/- 2.8%; ovx = 100% +/- 0.0%). Thus, ER-beta exhibits extensive colocalization with a subclass of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a potential mechanism whereby estrogen can regulate neuronal excitability in diverse and broad brain regions by modulating

  2. Losses of immunoreactive parvalbumin amacrine and immunoreactive alphaprotein kinase C bipolar cells caused by methylmercury chloride intoxication in the retina of the tropical fish Hoplias malabaricus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M.O. Bonci

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the effects of methylmercury (MeHg on amacrine and on ON-bipolar cells in the retina, experiments were performed in MeHg-exposed groups of adult trahiras (Hoplias malabaricus at two dose levels (2 and 6 µg/g, ip. The retinas of test and control groups were processed by mouse anti-parvalbumin and rabbit anti-alphaprotein kinase C (alphaPKC immunocytochemistry. Morphology and soma location in the inner nuclear layer were used to identify immunoreactive parvalbumin (PV-IR and alphaPKC (alphaPKC-IR in wholemount preparations. Cell density, topography and isodensity maps were estimated using confocal images. PV-IR was detected in amacrine cells in the inner nuclear layer and in displaced amacrine cells from the ganglion cell layer, and alphaPKC-IR was detected in ON-bipolar cells. The MeHg-treated group (6 µg/g showed significant reduction of the ON-bipolar alphaPKC-IR cell density (mean density = 1306 ± 393 cells/mm² compared to control (1886 ± 892 cells/mm²; P < 0.001. The mean densities found for amacrine PV-IR cells in MeHg-treated retinas were 1040 ± 56 cells/mm² (2 µg/g and 845 ± 82 cells/mm² (6 µg/g, also lower than control (1312 ± 31 cells/mm²; P < 0.05, differently from the data observed in displaced PV-IR amacrine cells. These results show that MeHg changed the PV-IR amacrine cell density in a dose-dependent way, and reduced the density of alphaKC-IR bipolar cells at the dose of 6 µg/g. Further studies are needed to identify the physiological impact of these findings on visual function.

  3. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics...

  4. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  5. Production and potential use of monoclonal antibodies against polio viruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; G. van Steenis (Bert); A.G. Hazendonk

    1982-01-01

    textabstractLymphocyte hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies against different strains of polio virus type 1, 2, or 3 have been produced. For this purpose Balb/C mice were immunized with purified and inactivated virus suspensions and their splenocytes were fused with P3X63Ag8 mouse myeloma cell

  6. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Rhizopus arrhizus (Rhizopus oryzae) were produced in vitro by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. Supernatants reacting only with h...... for the in situ diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis....

  7. Medullary carcinomas of the thyroid: a monoclonal origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, A R; Catarino, A L; Moniz, S; Cavaco, B; Roque, L; Sobrinho, L; Leite, V

    2001-12-01

    We studied the clonality of medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC) from 16 female patients by determining X chromosome inactivation by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a CAG repeat in exon 1 of the human androgen-receptor gene. One patient with sporadic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) was homozygous for this microsatellite and was not considered for the assessment of clonality. Sixteen tumor samples from the informative 15 patients were studied: 11 were from sporadic cases and 5 were from familial cases (3 cases of multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A [MEN 2A]; 1 case of familial medullary thyroid carcinoma [FMTC]). Fourteen tumor samples (10/11 sporadic, 3/4 MEN 2A and 1/1 FMTC) were clearly monoclonal with allelic cleavage ratios between 2.5 and 49.1. Sixty-four percent of these cases (9/14) had the preferential amplification of the shorter allele while 36 percent (5/14) had the preferential amplification of the longer allele. Two frozen tumor samples (1 sporadic and 1 MEN 2A) were polyclonal. However, the corresponding tumor embedded in paraffin from the sporadic case was monoclonal. The other polyclonal tumor was found in the right thyroid lobe of a patient with MEN 2A who had a monoclonal tumor in the left lobe. Our results clearly demonstrate that MTC have a monoclonal origin in the majority of the cases.

  8. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  9. Development of monoclonal antibodies that recognize Treponema pallidum.

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, J M; Folds, J D

    1983-01-01

    We developed a panel of monoclonal antibodies to Treponema pallidum (Nichols) antigens, some of which recognize treponemal antigens on T. pallidum (Nichols), T. pallidum strain 14, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter. The antibodies were detected by either an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or a radioimmunoassay.

  10. Monoclonal antibodies for the control of influenza virus vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J.M. van de Donk; M.F. van Olderen; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); J.C. de Jong (Jan)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractHybridomas producing haemagglutination inhibiting monoclonal antibodies against influenza A/Texas/1/77 H3N2 were developed. One hybridoma producing antibodies reacting with Victoria/3/75, Texas/1/77 Bangkok/1/79 and England/496/80 was selected to determine the potency of influenza virusv

  11. Prevention of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2009-09-15

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common premalignant plasma cell proliferative disorder with a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma. Because myeloma is an incurable malignancy, strategies to delay or prevent progression in high-risk patients are of considerable importance.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine mAb-produci...

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Marta Feldmesser, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Albert Einstein College of...Monoclonal Antibodies to Prevent Use of Mycotoxins as Biological Weapons 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0085 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  14. Prevention of Progression in Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Summary Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common premalignant plasma cell proliferative disorder with a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma. Since myeloma is an incurable malignancy, strategies to delay or prevent progression in high-risk patients are of considerable importance. PMID:19737944

  15. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the organophosphate pesticide azinphos-methyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Jones, SD; Ryan, GB; Wynberg, H; TenHoeve, W; Reynolds, PHS

    1995-01-01

    2-(2-Mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl,2-sulphide) methoxyacetic acid has been synthesized and used to prepare an azinphos hapten and protein conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies of high affinity against the pesticide azinphos-methyl were prepared from mice immunized with the

  16. Generation and Characterization of Novel Human IRAS Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoline receptors were first proposed by Bousquet et al., when they studied antihypertensive effect of clonidine. A strong candidate for I1R, known as imidazoline receptor antisera-selected protein (IRAS, has been cloned from human hippocampus. We reported that IRAS mediated agmatine-induced inhibition of opioid dependence in morphine-dependent cells. To elucidate the functional and structure properties of I1R, we developed the newly monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal hIRAS region including the PX domain (10–120aa through immunization of BALB/c mice with the NusA-IRAS fusion protein containing an IRAS N-terminal (10–120aa. Stable hybridoma cell lines were established and monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized full-length IRAS proteins in their native state by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies stained in a predominantly punctate cytoplasmic pattern when applied to IRAS-transfected HEK293 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assays and demonstrated excellent reactivity in flow immunocytometry. These monoclonal antibodies will provide powerful reagents for the further investigation of hIRAS protein functions.

  17. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  18. Serological comparison of tospovirus isolates using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, G.; Peters, D.; Goldbach, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    A test was conducted to compare tospovirus isolates using different poly- and monoclonal antibodies. All isolates and antibodies were compared under identical conditions. From 130 tospovirus isolates, which were obtained from all over the world and included well-characterized isolates from all four

  19. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance Disguised as Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique A Hartley-Brown

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension who was otherwise asymptomatic but continued showing elevated neutrophil levels sought a second opinion at our facility. Serum protein immunoelectrophoresis with immunofixation revealed an immunoglobulin A (IgA-κ monoclonal gammopathy concentration of 1305 mg/dL (normal 80-350 mg/dL but relatively normal concentrations of IgG of 840 mg/dL (620-1400 mg/dL and IgM of 36 mg/dL (45-250 mg/dL. Clonal analysis revealed a polyclonal expression pattern in all cell types analyzed. We concluded that our patient’s neutrophilia may have been due to the underlying monoclonal gammopathy. This is the first case in the literature of a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance presenting with neutrophilia, suggestive of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL.  Patients with CNL have a poor prognosis; therefore, it is important to distinguish diagnostically between CNL and the less severe prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

  20. Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance Disguised as Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique A Hartley-Brown

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old woman with a medical history of diabetes mellitus, osteoporosis, peripheral vascular disease, and hypertension who was otherwise asymptomatic but continued showing elevated neutrophil levels sought a second opinion at our facility. Serum protein immunoelectrophoresis with immunofixation revealed an immunoglobulin A (IgA-κ monoclonal gammopathy concentration of 1305 mg/dL (normal 80-350 mg/dL but relatively normal concentrations of IgG of 840 mg/dL (620-1400 mg/dL and IgM of 36 mg/dL (45-250 mg/dL. Clonal analysis revealed a polyclonal expression pattern in all cell types analyzed. We concluded that our patient’s neutrophilia may have been due to the underlying monoclonal gammopathy. This is the first case in the literature of a patient with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance presenting with neutrophilia, suggestive of chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL.  Patients with CNL have a poor prognosis; therefore, it is important to distinguish diagnostically between CNL and the less severe prognosis of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

  1. Serological comparison of tospovirus isolates using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adam, G.; Peters, D.; Goldbach, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    A test was conducted to compare tospovirus isolates using different poly- and monoclonal antibodies. All isolates and antibodies were compared under identical conditions. From 130 tospovirus isolates, which were obtained from all over the world and included well-characterized isolates from all four

  2. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the organophosphate pesticide azinphos-methyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Jones, SD; Ryan, GB; Wynberg, H; TenHoeve, W; Reynolds, PHS

    1995-01-01

    2-(2-Mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl,2-sulphide) methoxyacetic acid has been synthesized and used to prepare an azinphos hapten and protein conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies of high affinity against the pesticide azinphos-methyl were prepared from mice immunized with the hapten-ovalbu

  3. Syngeneic anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibodies to an anti-NeuGc-containing ganglioside monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, A M; Pérez, A; Hernández, A M; Macías, A; Alfonso, M; Bombino, G; Pérez, R

    1998-12-01

    An IgM monoclonal antibody (MAb), named P3, has the characteristic to react specifically with a broad battery of N-glycolyl containing-gangliosides and with antigens expressed on breast tumors. When this MAb was administered alone in syngeneic mice, an specific IgG anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab2) response was induced, this Ab2 response was increased when P3 MAb was injected coupled to a carrier protein and in the presence of Freund's adjuvant. Spleen cells from these mice were used in somatic-cell hybridization experiments, using the murine myeloma cell line P3-X63-Ag8.653 as fusion partner. Five Ab2 MAbs specific to P3 MAb were selected. These IgG1 Ab2 MAbs were able to block the binding of P3 MAb to GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside and to a human breast carcinoma cell line. Cross-blocking experiments demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are recognizing the same or very close sites on the Abl MAb. The five Ab2 MAbs were injected into syngeneic mice and four of them produced strong anti-anti-idiotypic antibody (Ab3) response. While these Ab2 MAbs were unable to generate Ab3 antibodies with the same antigenic specificity than P3 MAb, three of them induced antibodies bearing P3 MAb idiotopes (Ag-Id+ Ab3). These results demonstrated that these Ab2 MAbs are not "internal image" antibodies, but they could define "regulatory idiotopes."

  4. A selective reduction in the relative density of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus in schizophrenia patients%精神分裂症患者海马parvalbumin-免疫反应神经元密度选择性减低

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    目的以钙结合蛋白-parvalbumin和calretinin为标记,确定海马本体γ-氨基丁酸能神经元亚群,并定量分析精神分裂症海马γ-氨基丁酸能中间神经元相对密度的改变及其在发病机理中的作用.方法用免疫组化法结合抗parvalbumin 和抗calretinin 抗体,测定这些钙结合蛋白免疫反应阳性细胞在精神分裂症和相匹配的正常对照(每组15例)海马齿状回和CA1-CA4区的分布、胞体大小、相对密度及海马亚区面积.结果与正常对照相比,精神分裂症患者calretinin-免疫反应中间神经元相对密度无显著性差异;而parvalbumin-免疫反应中间神经元密度于海马各亚区均严重缺失,以男性患者为著,且与抗精神病药物治疗、年龄、疾病持续时间无显著相关.结论精神分裂症患者海马区含parvalbumin 的γ-氨基丁酸能抑制性中间神经元亚群选择性丢失,并可能与精神分裂症早期神经发育异常的病因假说相一致.%Objectives To determine the relative densities of the GABAergic subpopulation defined by calcium-binding proteins and to further study the importance of changes in GABAergic interneurons on neuropathology in the hippocampus in schizophrenia cases. Methods The relative densities and neuronal body size of cells immunoreactive for the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin and calretinin as well as the area size of the hippocampal sub-fields were determined from the hippocampal tissue sections taken from schizophrenic patients and well-matched control subjects (15 per group). Results No significant difference in the density of calretinin-immunoreactive neurons and the neuronal body size of calretinin-positive neurons was found between subject groups. Relative to normal controls, schizophrenic patients showed a significant and profound deficit in the relative densities of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons in all hippocampal sub-fields. These reductions were more apparent in male schizophrenic

  5. Regulation of interneuronal voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1b and Kv3.2 and the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin in the rat visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Grabert, Jochen

    2005-01-01

    Fast-spiking Interneurone sind die Arbeitstaktgeber für informationsverarbeitende Pyramidalzellen in Neocortex der Ratte. Um diesen Phänotyp zu etablieren, müssen die Kaliumkanäle Kv3.1b und Kv3.2, sowie das Protein Parvalbumin exprimiert werden. Ziel der Arbeit ist es zu analysieren, welche Umweltfaktoren die Expression dieser drei funktionellen Marker steuern. An organotypischen Hirnschnittkulturen des visuellen Cortex wird der Einfluss der neuronalen Aktivität, tropher Faktoren...

  6. Neuroinflammation-Induced Downregulation of Hippocampacal Neuregulin 1-ErbB4 Signaling in the Parvalbumin Interneurons Might Contribute to Cognitive Impairment in a Mouse Model of Sepsis-Associated Encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Rong; Ji, Mu-Huo; Gao, Da-Peng; Yang, Run-Hua; Zhang, Shao-Gang; Yang, Jian-Jun; Shen, Jin-Chun

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE) is a common complication associated with poor prognosis in septic patients, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We hypothesized that disturbed neuregulin 1 (NRG1)-ErbB4 signaling in the parvalbumin interneurons was involved in sepsis-induced cognitive impairment in a mouse model of SAE. The SAE model was induced by cecal ligation/perforation (CLP). Animals were randomly divided into the following six groups: sham + vehicle group, sham + NRG1 group, CLP + vehicle group, CLP + NRG1 group, CLP + NRG1 + AG1478 (ErbB4 inhibitor) group, and CLP + minocycline group. Behavioral tests and in vivo electrophysiology were performed at the indicated time points. The brain tissues were harvested to determine the levels of hippocampcal cytokines, IBA1-positive cells, NRG1, ErbB4, and parvalbumin. In the present study, sepsis induced the anxiety-like behavior and hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, as reflected by significantly increased distance spent in the open field test and decreased freezing time to context in the fear conditioning test. The abnormal behavioral changes co-occurred with significant increases in hippocampal IBA1-positive cells, IL-1β and IL-6 levels, and decreased NRG1, ErbB4, parvalbumin expressions, and evoked gamma activity. NRG1 treatment attenuated the sepsis-induced cognitive impairment and the associated biochemical markers, which were abolished by AG1478 administration. Notably, minocycline treatment attenuated neuroinflammation and mimicked the beneficial effects of NRG1 treatment. In summary, we provided additional evidence that the disruption of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in the parvalbumin interneurons mediated by neuroinflammation might lead to abnormal gamma oscillations and thus contribute to cognitive impairment in a mouse model of SAE.

  7. Localization of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the 2-AG synthesizing (DAGLα) and degrading (MAGL, FAAH) enzymes in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Cifuentes, Manuel; Grondona, Jesús M.; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rubio, Leticia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J.; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The retrograde suppression of the synaptic transmission by the endocannabinoid sn-2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors and requires the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and the activation of specific 2-AG synthesizing (i.e., DAGLα) enzymes. However, the anatomical organization of the neuronal substrates that express 2-AG/CB1 signaling system-related molecules associated with selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs) is still unknown. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the expression of the 2-AG/CB1 signaling system (CB1 receptor, DAGLα, MAGL, and FAAH) and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. CB1, DAGLα, and MAGL labeling was mainly localized in fibers and neuropil, which were differentially organized depending on the hippocampal CaBPs-expressing cells. CB+1 fiber terminals localized in all hippocampal principal cell layers were tightly attached to calbindin+ cells (granular and pyramidal neurons), and calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons. DAGLα neuropil labeling was selectively found surrounding calbindin+ principal cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1, and in the calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons in the pyramidal cell layers of the CA1/3 fields. MAGL+ terminals were only observed around CA1 calbindin+ pyramidal cells, CA1/3 calretinin+ interneurons and CA3 parvalbumin+ interneurons localized in the pyramidal cell layers. Interestingly, calbindin+ pyramidal cells expressed FAAH specifically in the CA1 field. The identification of anatomically related-neuronal substrates that expressed 2-AG/CB1 signaling system and selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the cannabinoid signaling associated with hippocampal functions. PMID:25018703

  8. Localization of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the 2-AG synthesizing (DAGLα) and degrading (MAGL, FAAH) enzymes in cells expressing the Ca(2+)-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Patricia; Arrabal, Sergio; Cifuentes, Manuel; Grondona, Jesús M; Pérez-Martín, Margarita; Rubio, Leticia; Vargas, Antonio; Serrano, Antonia; Pavón, Francisco J; Suárez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The retrograde suppression of the synaptic transmission by the endocannabinoid sn-2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors and requires the elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and the activation of specific 2-AG synthesizing (i.e., DAGLα) enzymes. However, the anatomical organization of the neuronal substrates that express 2-AG/CB1 signaling system-related molecules associated with selective Ca(2+)-binding proteins (CaBPs) is still unknown. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the expression of the 2-AG/CB1 signaling system (CB1 receptor, DAGLα, MAGL, and FAAH) and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin, and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. CB1, DAGLα, and MAGL labeling was mainly localized in fibers and neuropil, which were differentially organized depending on the hippocampal CaBPs-expressing cells. CB(+) 1 fiber terminals localized in all hippocampal principal cell layers were tightly attached to calbindin(+) cells (granular and pyramidal neurons), and calretinin(+) and parvalbumin(+) interneurons. DAGLα neuropil labeling was selectively found surrounding calbindin(+) principal cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1, and in the calretinin(+) and parvalbumin(+) interneurons in the pyramidal cell layers of the CA1/3 fields. MAGL(+) terminals were only observed around CA1 calbindin(+) pyramidal cells, CA1/3 calretinin(+) interneurons and CA3 parvalbumin(+) interneurons localized in the pyramidal cell layers. Interestingly, calbindin(+) pyramidal cells expressed FAAH specifically in the CA1 field. The identification of anatomically related-neuronal substrates that expressed 2-AG/CB1 signaling system and selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the cannabinoid signaling associated with hippocampal functions.

  9. Localization of the cannabinoid CB1 receptor and the 2-AG synthesizing (DAGLα and degrading (MAGL, FAAH enzymes in cells expressing the Ca2+-binding proteins calbindin, calretinin and parvalbumin in the adult rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia eRivera

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrograde suppression of the synaptic transmission by the endocannabinoid sn-2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG is mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors and requires the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and the activation of specific 2-AG synthesizing (i.e. DAGLα enzymes. However, the anatomical organization of the neuronal substrates that express 2-AG/CB1 signaling system-related molecules associated with selective Ca2+-binding proteins (CaBPs is still unknown. For this purpose, we used double-label immunofluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopy for the characterization of the expression of the 2-AG/CB1 signaling system (CB1 receptor, DAGLα, MAGL and FAAH and the CaBPs calbindin D28k, calretinin and parvalbumin in the rat hippocampus. CB1, DAGLα and MAGL labeling was mainly localized in fibers and neuropil, which were differentially organized depending on the hippocampal CaBPs-expressing cells. CB1+ fiber terminals localized in all hippocampal principal cell layers were tightly attached to calbindin+ cells (granular and pyramidal neurons, and calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons. DAGLα neuropil labeling was selectively found surrounding calbindin+ principal cells in the dentate gyrus and CA1, and in the calretinin+ and parvalbumin+ interneurons in the pyramidal cell layers of the CA1/3 fields. MAGL+ terminals were only observed around CA1 calbindin+ pyramidal cells, CA1/3 calretinin+ interneurons and CA3 parvalbumin+ interneurons localized in the pyramidal cell layers. Interestingly, calbindin+ pyramidal cells expressed FAAH specifically in the CA1 field. The identification of anatomically related-neuronal substrates that expressed 2-AG/CB1 signaling system and selective CaBPs should be considered when analyzing the cannabinoid signaling associated with hippocampal functions.

  10. Coarse grained modeling of transport properties in monoclonal antibody solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, James; Wang, Gang

    Monoclonal antibodies and their derivatives represent the fastest growing segment of the bio pharmaceutical industry. For many applications such as novel cancer therapies, high concentration, sub-cutaneous injections of these protein solutions are desired. However, depending on the peptide sequence within the antibody, such high concentration formulations can be too viscous to inject via human derived force alone. Understanding how heterogenous charge distribution and hydrophobicity within the antibodies leads to high viscosities is crucial to their future application. In this talk, we explore a coarse grained computational model of therapeutically relevant monoclonal antibodies that accounts for electrostatic, dispersion and hydrodynamic interactions between suspended antibodies to predict assembly and transport properties in concentrated antibody solutions. We explain the high viscosities observed in many experimental studies of the same biologics.

  11. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  12. Strategies for Treating Autoimmune Disease With Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Wofsy, David

    1985-01-01

    There is no safe and reliable therapy for most serious autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus. Severe cases usually require treatment with corticosteroids or cytotoxic drugs or both, which frequently provide inadequate disease control and can cause serious complications. These therapies are not restricted in their effects to cells of the immune system, but rather have a broad range of toxic effects on cells throughout the body. The development of monoclonal antibodies has l...

  13. Quantification of Moraxella bovis haemagglutinating adhesins with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Turnes, C; Aleixo, J A

    1991-08-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Moraxella bovis GF 9 were used to quantify haemagglutinating adhesins of 16 strains of this organism. The amount of each MAb necessary to inhibit one haemagglutinating unit of each strain varied between 4 and 0.007 times that required by strain GF 9. Five strains reacted with six MAbs, one with five, two with four, one with three, two with two and three with none. The procedures used enabled to detect dominant strains candidates for vaccines.

  14. Monoclonal antibody to native P39 protein from Borrelia burgdorferi.

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, T J; Hechemy, K E; Harris, H L; Rudofsky, U H; Samsonoff, W A; Peterson, A J; Evans, B. D.; Balaban, S L

    1994-01-01

    We have produced, by using a sonicate of Borrelia burgdorferi, a monoclonal antibody (MAb), NYSP39H, that is specific for the P39 protein band. This MAb reacted with 13 isolates of B. burgdorferi but not with eight different spirochetes (four borrelias, two leptospiras, and two treponemas). Surface labeling of B. burgdorferi with biotin and subsequent treatment with Nonidet P-40 showed that P39 was not biotinylated but was extracted with Nonidet P-40, indicating that it is present within the ...

  15. A monoclonal antibody for G protein-coupled receptor crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Peter W; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Parnot, Charles; Fung, Juan José; Masood, Asna; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Yao, Xiao-Jie; Choi, Hee-Jung; Weis, William I; Rohrer, Daniel K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2007-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of signaling proteins in mammals, mediating responses to hormones, neurotransmitters, and senses of sight, smell and taste. Mechanistic insight into GPCR signal transduction is limited by a paucity of high-resolution structural information. We describe the generation of a monoclonal antibody that recognizes the third intracellular loop (IL3) of the native human beta(2) adrenergic (beta(2)AR) receptor; this antibody was critical for acquiring diffraction-quality crystals.

  16. Super-Genotype: Global Monoclonality Defies the Odds of Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Johannes J Le Roux; Wieczorek, Ania M.; Wright, Mark G.; Carol T Tran

    2007-01-01

    The ability to respond to natural selection under novel conditions is critical for the establishment and persistence of introduced alien species and their ability to become invasive. Here we correlated neutral and quantitative genetic diversity of the weed Pennisetum setaceum Forsk. Chiov. (Poaceae) with differing global (North American and African) patterns of invasiveness and compared this diversity to native range populations. Numerous molecular markers indicate complete monoclonality with...

  17. Recent Progress toward Engineering HIV-1-Specific Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Sun; Yue Li; Huiwen Zheng; Yiming Shao

    2016-01-01

    The recent discoveries of broadly potent neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies represent a new generation of antiretrovirals for the treatment and prophylaxis. Antibodies are generally considered more effective and safer and have been proved to provide passive protection against mucosal challenge in humanized mice and macaques. Several neutralizing Abs could protect animals against HIV-1 but are not effective when used in an established infected model for therapy. In order to overcome the ...

  18. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  19. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  20. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanaboonyongcharoen, Phandee; Nakorn, Thanyaphong Na; Rojnuckarin, Ponlapat; Lawasut, Panisinee; Intragumtornchai, Tanin

    2012-02-01

    Individuals with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) develop multiple myeloma and related malignancies at the rate of 1% per year. Given differences in ethnicity, data on prevalence and risk factors of MGUS in Thai population will be helpful in understanding the pathogenesis of plasma cell disorders and designing an early cancer detection strategy. Subjects of 50 years or older were included. Demographic data and suspected risk factors were collected. Monoclonal proteins were detected using serum protein electrophoresis. Serum was obtained from 3,260 participants; 1,104 males (33.9%) and 2,156 females (66.1%). The median age was 57 years (range 50-93 years). Monoclonal proteins were detectable in 2.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.8-2.8). M spikes were found in gamma- and beta-globulin regions in 50 (1.5%) and 25 (0.8%) subjects, respectively. The prevalence of MGUS in subjects 50-59, 60-69, and 70 years or older was 2.0% (41/1,975), 2.6% (22/851), and 2.8% (12/434), respectively. By multivariate analysis, MGUS was associated with living outside Bangkok (odds ratio 2.25, 95% CI 1.11-4.58). The overall prevalence of MGUS in the Thai population was 2.3%, which was lower than that in Western countries, but comparable to that in Japan.

  1. Heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies revealed by charge-sensitive methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, J; Ionescu, R

    2008-12-01

    The expanding field of monoclonal antibody-based pharmaceuticals has triggered increased interest in analytical characterization of these large proteins and in understanding of their heterogeneity and degradation pathways. As a result, a large number of enzymatic modifications as well as chemical and physical degradations have been reported in monoclonal antibodies in recent years. Most heterogeneity is related to changes in the surface charge of the antibody, either directly, as a change in the number of charged residues, or indirectly as a chemical or physical alteration that changes surface-charge distribution. This review presents an overview of the sources of charge-related heterogeneity in monoclonal antibodies and the methods used for their detection. A detailed section is dedicated to deamidation of asparagine and isomerization of aspartic acid residues, two ubiquitous degradation pathways detected in antibodies and other proteins as well. Finally, kinetic modeling of the accumulation of antibody variants is presented as a tool to determine the expected fraction of molecules that have undergone one or more degradation reactions.

  2. [Single B cell monoclonal antibody technologies and applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2012-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contribute a lot to the development of numerous fields in life science as a pivotal tool in modern biological research. Development of the PCR methods and maturation of antibody production have made it possible to generate mAbs from single human B cells by single cell RT-PCR with successional cloning and expression in vitro. Compared to traditional monoclonal antibody technologies, single B cell technologies require relatively fewer cells, which are highly efficient in obtaining specific mAbs in a rapid way with preservation of the natural heavy and light chain pairing. With so many advantages, single B cell technologies have been proved to be an attractive approach for retrieval of naive and antigen-experienced antibody repertoires generated in vivo, design of rationale structure-based vaccine, evaluation and development of basic B cell biology concepts in health and autoimmunity, and prevention of infectious diseases by passive immunization and therapy for disorders. Accordingly, this review introduced recent progresses in the single B cell technologies for generating monoclonal antibodies and applications.

  3. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behar, M.; Katz, A.; Silverman, M.

    1986-03-01

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A/sub 1/, C/sub 7/, D/sub 3/, D/sub 7/ and H/sub 4/. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D/sub 3/ exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK/sub 1/ cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells.

  4. Developmental expression and functional characterization of the potassium-channel subunit Kv3.1b in parvalbumin-containing interneurons of the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, J; Zhang, L; Weiser, M; Rudy, B; McBain, C J

    1996-01-15

    The expression of the voltage-gated K(+)-channel subunit Kv3.1b in the developing hippocampus was determined by immunoblot and immunohistochemical techniques. Kv3.1b protein was detected first at postnatal day (P) 8. The Kv3.1b-immunopositive cell number per tissue section reached a maximum at P14 and was maintained through P40. In contrast, the Kv3.1b protein content of isolated membrane vesicles in immunoblots progressively increased through P40, suggesting an increase in Kv3.1b content per cell throughout this time period. Kv3.1b protein was expressed selectively in the somata, proximal dendrites, and axons of cells lying within or near the pyramidal cell layer, consistent with their being GABAergic inhibitory interneurons. Kv3.1b was present in approximately 80% of parvalbumin-positive interneurons. The developmental onset of Kv3.1b and parvalbumin immunoreactivity was identical. In contrast, Kv3.1b was mostly absent from the subset of somatostatin-positive inhibitory interneurons. Electrophysiological recordings were made from stratum pyramidale interneurons in which morphology and Kv3.1b-positive immunoreactivity were confirmed post hoc. Outward currents had voltage-dependent and biophysical properties resembling those of channels formed by Kv3.1b. The current blocked by low concentrations of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) showed marked inactivation, suggesting that Kv3.1b may coassemble with other members of the Kv3 subfamily. In current-clamp recordings, concentrations of 4-AP that blocked the current through Kv3.1b channels allowed us tentatively to assign a role to Kv3.1b-containing channels in action-potential repolarization. These data demonstrate that Kv3.1b is regulated developmentally in a specific subpopulation of hippocampal interneurons and that channels containing this subunit may be a major determinant in imparting "fast-spiking" characteristics to these and other cells throughout the central nervous system containing the Kv3.1b subunit.

  5. ProNGF Drives Localized and Cell Selective Parvalbumin Interneuron and Perineuronal Net Depletion in the Dentate Gyrus of Transgenic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasulo, Luisa; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; La Regina, Federico; Berretta, Nicola; Capsoni, Simona; D'Onofrio, Mara; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    ProNGF, the precursor of mature Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), is the most abundant NGF form in the brain and increases markedly in the cortex in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), relative to mature NGF. A large body of evidence shows that the actions of ProNGF and mature NGF are often conflicting, depending on the receptors expressed in target cells. TgproNGF#3 mice, expressing furin-cleavage resistant proNGF in CNS neurons, directly reveal consequences of increased proNGF levels on brain homeostasis. Their phenotype clearly indicates that proNGF can be a driver of neurodegeneration, including severe learning and memory behavioral deficits, cholinergic deficits, and diffuse immunoreactivity for A-beta and A-beta-oligomers. In aged TgproNGF#3 mice spontaneous epileptic-like events are detected in entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slices, suggesting occurrence of excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance. In this paper, we investigate the molecular events linking increased proNGF levels to the epileptiform activity detected in hippocampal slices. The occurrence of spontaneous epileptiform discharges in the hippocampal network in TgproNGF#3 mice suggests an impaired inhibitory interneuron homeostasis. In the present study, we detect the onset of hippocampal epileptiform events at 1-month of age. Later, we observe a regional- and cellular-selective Parvalbumin interneuron and perineuronal net (PNN) depletion in the dentate gyrus (DG), but not in other hippocampal regions of TgproNGF#3 mice. These results demonstrate that, in the hippocampus, the DG is selectively vulnerable to altered proNGF/NGF signaling. Parvalbumin interneuron depletion is also observed in the amygdala, a region strongly connected to the hippocampus and likewise receiving cholinergic afferences. Transcriptome analysis of TgproNGF#3 hippocampus reveals a proNGF signature with broad down-regulation of transcription. The most affected mRNAs modulated at early times belong to synaptic transmission and plasticity and

  6. Early-life iron deficiency anemia alters the development and long-term expression of parvalbumin and perineuronal nets in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Liam S N; Thibert, Kathryn A; Wobken, Jane D; Georgieff, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Early-life iron deficiency anemia (IDA) alters the expression of critical genes involved in neuronal dendritic structural plasticity of the hippocampus, thus contributing to delayed maturation of electrophysiology, and learning and memory behavior in rats. Structural maturity in multiple cortical regions is characterized by the appearance of parvalbumin-positive (PV(+)) GABAergic interneurons and perineuronal nets (PNNs). Appearance of PV(+) interneurons and PNNs can serve as cellular markers for the beginning and end of a critical developmental period, respectively. During this period, the system progresses from an immature yet highly plastic condition, to a more mature and efficient state that is however less flexible and may exhibit poorer potential for recovery from injury. To test if fetal-neonatal IDA alters parvalbumin (PV) mRNA expression, protein levels, and the number of PV(+) interneurons and PNNs in the male rat hippocampus, pregnant dams were given an iron-deficient (ID) diet (3 mg iron/kg chow) from gestational day 2 to postnatal day (P) 7 and then placed on an iron-sufficient (IS) diet (198 mg/kg) for the remainder of the experiment. On this regimen, formerly ID animals become fully iron-replete by P56. Minimal levels of PV (mRNA and protein), PV(+) interneurons, and PNNs were found in IS and ID P7 rats. By P15, and continuing through P30 and P65, ID rats had reduced PV mRNA expression and protein levels compared to IS controls. While there were no differences in the number of PV(+) neurons at either P30 or P65, the percentage of PV(+) cells surrounded by PNNs was slightly greater in ID rats as compared to IS controls. The lower levels of these acknowledged critical period biomarkers in the ID group are consistent with studies that demonstrate later maturation of the acutely ID hippocampus and lower plasticity in the adult formerly ID hippocampus. The findings provide additional potential cellular bases for previously described electrophysiologic and

  7. ProNGF Drives Localized and Cell Selective Parvalbumin Interneuron and Perineuronal Net Depletion in the Dentate Gyrus of Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasulo, Luisa; Brandi, Rossella; Arisi, Ivan; La Regina, Federico; Berretta, Nicola; Capsoni, Simona; D'Onofrio, Mara; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2017-01-01

    ProNGF, the precursor of mature Nerve Growth Factor (NGF), is the most abundant NGF form in the brain and increases markedly in the cortex in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), relative to mature NGF. A large body of evidence shows that the actions of ProNGF and mature NGF are often conflicting, depending on the receptors expressed in target cells. TgproNGF#3 mice, expressing furin-cleavage resistant proNGF in CNS neurons, directly reveal consequences of increased proNGF levels on brain homeostasis. Their phenotype clearly indicates that proNGF can be a driver of neurodegeneration, including severe learning and memory behavioral deficits, cholinergic deficits, and diffuse immunoreactivity for A-beta and A-beta-oligomers. In aged TgproNGF#3 mice spontaneous epileptic-like events are detected in entorhinal cortex-hippocampal slices, suggesting occurrence of excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance. In this paper, we investigate the molecular events linking increased proNGF levels to the epileptiform activity detected in hippocampal slices. The occurrence of spontaneous epileptiform discharges in the hippocampal network in TgproNGF#3 mice suggests an impaired inhibitory interneuron homeostasis. In the present study, we detect the onset of hippocampal epileptiform events at 1-month of age. Later, we observe a regional- and cellular-selective Parvalbumin interneuron and perineuronal net (PNN) depletion in the dentate gyrus (DG), but not in other hippocampal regions of TgproNGF#3 mice. These results demonstrate that, in the hippocampus, the DG is selectively vulnerable to altered proNGF/NGF signaling. Parvalbumin interneuron depletion is also observed in the amygdala, a region strongly connected to the hippocampus and likewise receiving cholinergic afferences. Transcriptome analysis of TgproNGF#3 hippocampus reveals a proNGF signature with broad down-regulation of transcription. The most affected mRNAs modulated at early times belong to synaptic transmission and plasticity and

  8. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; light-chain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain multiple...... myeloma; and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and other lymphoproliferative disorders. Clonal burden, as determined by bone marrow plasma cell percentage or M-protein level, as well as biological characteristics, including heavy chain isotype...... and light chain production, are helpful in predicting risk of progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to symptomatic disease. Furthermore, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients result in an increased risk...

  9. Improved detection of Pneumocystis carinii by an immunofluorescence technique using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Holten-Andersen, W; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether a recently developed indirect immunofluorescent stain using monoclonal antibodies was more sensitive in detecting Pneumocystis carinii than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate stains which has routinely been used in the laboratory, 88 lavage fluid specimens...... and 34 induced sputum specimens were examined. All specimens were stained by five techniques: immunofluorescence using a combination of three monoclonal antibodies (from the National Institutes of Health, USA), immunofluorescence using a single monoclonal antibody (from Dakopatts), Giemsa, methenamine...

  10. High-efficiency screening of monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Lim

    Full Text Available Determination of crystal structures of membrane proteins is often limited by difficulties obtaining crystals diffracting to high resolution. Co-crystallization with Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies has been reported to improve diffraction of membrane proteins crystals. However, it is not simple to generate useful monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography. In this report, we present an optimized process for efficient screening from immunization to final validation of monoclonal antibody for membrane protein crystallography.

  11. Laboratory guidelines for the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo García-Morato, M; Padilla-Merlano, B; Nozal, P; Espiño, M; Juárez, C; Villar, L M; López-Trascasa, M

    2016-04-01

    We present guidelines from the Immunochemistry group of the Spanish Society for Immunology that are designed to provide a practical tool for the diagnosis and follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies. We review the clinical and analytical features of various monoclonal gammopathies, international consensus guidelines and techniques used to detect and follow-up monoclonal components. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. MDMA-induced loss of parvalbumin interneurons within the dentate gyrus is mediated by 5HT2A and NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Stuart A; Gudelsky, Gary A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2015-08-15

    MDMA is a widely abused psychostimulant which causes a rapid and robust release of the monoaminergic neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin. Recently, it was shown that MDMA increases extracellular glutamate concentrations in the dorsal hippocampus, which is dependent on serotonin release and 5HT2A/2C receptor activation. The increased extracellular glutamate concentration coincides with a loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) interneurons of the dentate gyrus region. Given the known susceptibility of PV interneurons to excitotoxicity, we examined whether MDMA-induced increases in extracellular glutamate in the dentate gyrus are necessary for the loss of PV cells in rats. Extracellular glutamate concentrations increased in the dentate gyrus during systemic and local administration of MDMA. Administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, during systemic injections of MDMA, prevented the loss of PV-IR interneurons seen 10 days after MDMA exposure. Local administration of MDL100907, a selective 5HT2A receptor antagonist, prevented the increases in glutamate caused by reverse dialysis of MDMA directly into the dentate gyrus and prevented the reduction of PV-IR. These findings provide evidence that MDMA causes decreases in PV within the dentate gyrus through a 5HT2A receptor-mediated increase in glutamate and subsequent NMDA receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Cell type-specific long-term plasticity at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal interneurons expressing either parvalbumin or CB1 cannabinoid receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Wiebke; Szabo, Andras; Somogyi, Jozsef; Somogyi, Peter; Lamsa, Karri P

    2010-01-27

    Different GABAergic interneuron types have specific roles in hippocampal function, and anatomical as well as physiological features vary greatly between interneuron classes. Long-term plasticity of interneurons has mostly been studied in unidentified GABAergic cells and is known to be very heterogeneous. Here we tested whether cell type-specific plasticity properties in distinct GABAergic interneuron types might underlie this heterogeneity. We show that long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD), two common forms of synaptic plasticity, are expressed in a highly cell type-specific manner at glutamatergic synapses onto hippocampal GABAergic neurons. Both LTP and LTD are generated in interneurons expressing parvalbumin (PV+), whereas interneurons with similar axon distributions but expressing cannabinoid receptor-1 show no lasting plasticity in response to the same protocol. In addition, LTP or LTD occurs in PV+ interneurons with different efferent target domains. Perisomatic-targeting PV+ basket and axo-axonic interneurons express LTP, whereas glutamatergic synapses onto PV+ bistratified cells display LTD. Both LTP and LTD are pathway specific, independent of NMDA receptors, and occur at synapses with calcium-permeable (CP) AMPA receptors. Plasticity in interneurons with CP-AMPA receptors strongly modulates disynaptic GABAergic transmission onto CA1 pyramidal cells. We propose that long-term plasticity adjusts the synaptic strength between pyramidal cells and interneurons in a cell type-specific manner and, in the defined CA1 interneurons, shifts the spatial pattern of inhibitory weight from pyramidal cell dendrites to the perisomatic region.

  14. Changes in Otx2 and Parvalbumin Immunoreactivity in the Superior Colliculus in the Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor-β Knockout Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjuan Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The superior colliculus (SC, a relay nucleus in the subcortical visual pathways, is implicated in socioemotional behaviors. Homeoprotein Otx2 and β subunit of receptors of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFR-β have been suggested to play an important role in development of the visual system and development and maturation of GABAergic neurons. Although PDGFR-β-knockout (KO mice displayed socio-emotional deficits associated with parvalbumin (PV-immunoreactive (IR neurons, their anatomical bases in the SC were unknown. In the present study, Otx2 and PV-immunolabeling in the adult mouse SC were investigated in the PDGFR-β KO mice. Although there were no differences in distribution patterns of Otx2 and PV-IR cells between the wild type and PDGFR-β KO mice, the mean numbers of both of the Otx2- and PV-IR cells were significantly reduced in the PDGFR-β KO mice. Furthermore, average diameters of Otx2- and PV-IR cells were significantly reduced in the PDGFR-β KO mice. These findings suggest that PDGFR-β plays a critical role in the functional development of the SC through its effects on Otx2- and PV-IR cells, provided specific roles of Otx2 protein and PV-IR cells in the development of SC neurons and visual information processing, respectively.

  15. Attenuated Sensory Deprivation-induced Changes of Parvalbumin Neuron Density in the Barrel Cortex of FcγRllB-deficient Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe,Makiko

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of immune molecules in the development of neuronal circuitry and synaptic plasticity. We have detected the presence of FcγRllB protein in parvalbumin- containing inhibitory interneurons (PV neurons. In the present study, we examined the appearance of PV neurons in the barrel cortex and the effect of sensory deprivation in FcγRllB-deficient mice (FcγRllB-/- and wild-type mice. There was no substantial difference in the appearance of PV neurons in the developing barrel cortex between FcγRllB-/- and wild-type mice. Sensory deprivation from immediately after birth (P0 or P7 to P12-P14 induced an increase in PV neurons. In contrast, sensory deprivation from P7 or P14 to P28, but not from P21 to P28, decreased PV neurons in wild-type mice. However, sensory deprivation from P0 or P7 to P12-P14 did not increase PV neurons and sensory deprivation from P7 or P14 to P28 did not decrease or only modestly decreased PV neurons in FcγRllB-/- mice. The results indicate that expression of PV is regulated by sensory experience and the second and third postnatal weeks are a sensitive period for sensory deprivation, and suggest that FcγRllB contributes to sensory experience-regulated expression of PV.

  16. Reduced responsiveness to long-term monocular deprivation of parvalbumin neurons assessed by c-Fos staining in rat visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Mainardi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is generally assumed that visual cortical cells homogeneously shift their ocular dominance (OD in response to monocular deprivation (MD, however little experimental evidence directly supports this notion. By using immunohistochemistry for the activity-dependent markers c-Fos and Arc, coupled with staining for markers of inhibitory cortical sub-populations, we studied whether long-term MD initiated at P21 differentially affects visual response of inhibitory neurons in rat binocular primary visual cortex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The inhibitory markers GAD67, parvalbumin (PV, calbindin (CB and calretinin (CR were used. Visually activated Arc did not colocalize with PV and was discarded from further studies. MD decreased visually induced c-Fos activation in GAD67 and CR positive neurons. The CB population responded to MD with a decrease of CB expression, while PV cells did not show any effect of MD on c-Fos expression. The persistence of c-Fos expression induced by deprived eye stimulation in PV cells is not likely to be due to a particularly low threshold for activity-dependent c-Fos induction. Indeed, c-Fos induction by increasing concentrations of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin in visual cortical slices was similar between PV cells and the other cortical neurons. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that PV cells are particularly refractory to MD, suggesting that different cortical subpopulation may show different response to MD.

  17. Loss of MeCP2 in Parvalbumin-and Somatostatin-Expressing Neurons in Mice Leads to Distinct Rett Syndrome-like Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito-Ishida, Aya; Ure, Kerstin; Chen, Hongmei; Swann, John W; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2015-11-18

    Inhibitory neurons are critical for proper brain function, and their dysfunction is implicated in several disorders, including autism, schizophrenia, and Rett syndrome. These neurons are heterogeneous, and it is unclear which subtypes contribute to specific neurological phenotypes. We deleted Mecp2, the mouse homolog of the gene that causes Rett syndrome, from the two most populous subtypes, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) and somatostatin-positive (SOM+) neurons. Loss of MeCP2 partially impairs the affected neuron, allowing us to assess the function of each subtype without profound disruption of neuronal circuitry. We found that mice lacking MeCP2 in either PV+ or SOM+ neurons have distinct, non-overlapping neurological features: mice lacking MeCP2 in PV+ neurons developed motor, sensory, memory, and social deficits, whereas those lacking MeCP2 in SOM+ neurons exhibited seizures and stereotypies. Our findings indicate that PV+ and SOM+ neurons contribute complementary aspects of the Rett phenotype and may have modular roles in regulating specific behaviors.

  18. Calretinin, parvalbumin and calbindin immunoreactive interneurons in perirhinal cortex and temporal area Te3V of the rat brain: qualitative and quantitative analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinka, Filip; Salaj, Martin; Rybář, Jan; Krajčovičová, Eva; Kubová, Hana; Druga, Rastislav

    2012-02-03

    The perirhinal cortex (PRC) composed of areas 35 and 36 forms an important route for activity transfer between the hippocampus-entorhinal cortex and neocortex. Its function in memory formation and consolidation as well as in the initiation and spreading of epileptic activity was already partially elucidated. We studied the general pattern of calretinin (CR), parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin (CB) immunoreactivity and its corrected relative optical density (cROD) as well as morphological features and density of CR and PV immunoreactive (CR+, PV+) interneurons in the rat PRC. Neighboring neocortical association area Te3V was analyzed as well. The PRC differed from the Te3V in higher CR and lower PV overall immunoreactivity level. On CR immunostained sections, the difference between high cROD value in area 35 and low cROD value in area Te3V reached statistical significance (pinterneurons was expressed as a percentage of the total neurons counts. The percentage of CR+ interneurons was higher in area 35 by comparison with area Te3 (pinterneurons did not significantly differ among the examined areas. In conclusion, the PRC possesses specific interneuronal equipment with unusually high proportion of CR+ interneurons, what might be of importance for the presumed gating function of PRC in normal and diseased states.

  19. Parvalbumin expression in visual cortical interneurons depends on neuronal activity and TrkB ligands during an Early period of postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patz, Silke; Grabert, Jochen; Gorba, Thorsten; Wirth, Marcus J; Wahle, Petra

    2004-03-01

    The differentiation of cortical interneurons is controlled by environmental factors. Here, we describe the role of activity and neurotrophins in regulating parvalbumin (PARV) expression using organotypic cultures (OTC) of rat visual cortex as model system. In OTC, PARV expression was dramatically delayed. The organotypic proportion of approximately 6% PARV neurons was not established before 50-70 DIV, whereas in vivo all neurons are present until P20. Thalamic afferents increased cortical PARV mRNA in OTC, but not to the age-matched in vivo level. During the first 10 DIV, BDNF and NT-4 accelerated PARV mRNA expression in a Trk receptor and MEK2 dependent manner. The BDNF action required PI3 kinase signalling. PARV expression required activity. The proportion of neurons which managed to up-regulate PARV was inversely related to the duration of early transient periods of activity deprivation. Long-term activity-deprived OTC completely failed to up-regulate PARV mRNA. Both TrkB ligands failed to promote PARV expression in activity-deprived OTC. However, a few basket and chandelier neurons were observed, suggesting that the development of class-specific morphological features is activity-independent. Once established, PARV expression became resistant to late-onset activity deprivation. In conclusion, PARV expression depended on activity and TrkB ligands which appear to prime the PARV expression already before its developmental onset.

  20. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor selectively regulates dendritogenesis of parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the main olfactory bulb through the PLCgamma pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghuis, Paul; Agerman, Karin; Dobszay, Marton B; Minichiello, Liliana; Harkany, Tibor; Ernfors, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms of neurotrophin signaling on dendrite development and dynamics are only partly understood. To address the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the morphogenesis of GABAergic neurons of the main olfactory bulb, we analyzed mice lacking BDNF, mice carrying neurotrophin-3 (NT3) in the place of BDNF, and TrkB signaling mutant mice with a receptor that can activate phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma) but is unable to recruit the adaptors Shc/Frs2. BDNF deletion yielded a compressed olfactory bulb with a significant loss of parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity in GABAergic interneurons of the external plexiform layer. Dendrite development of PV-positive interneurons was selectively attenuated by BDNF since other Ca2+ -binding protein-containing neuron populations appeared unaffected. The deficit in PV-positive neurons could be rescued by the NT3/NT3 alleles. The degree of PV immunoreactivity was dependent on BDNF and TrkB recruitment of the adaptor proteins Shc/Frs2. In contrast, PLCgamma signaling from the TrkB receptor was sufficient for dendrite growth in vivo and consistently, blocking PLCgamma prevented BDNF-dependent dendrite development in vitro. Collectively, our results provide genetic evidence that BDNF and TrkB signaling selectively regulate PV expression and dendrite growth in a subset of neurochemically-defined GABAergic interneurons via activation of the PLCgamma pathway.

  1. NOX2 Mediated-Parvalbumin Interneuron Loss Might Contribute to Anxiety-Like and Enhanced Fear Learning Behavior in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Lin-Dong; Sun, Xiao-Ru; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Wei; Wang, Xing-Ming; Yang, Jian-Jun; Ji, Mu-Huo; Yuan, Hong-Mei

    2016-12-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric disease following exposure to a severe traumatic event or physiological stress, yet the precise mechanisms underlying PTSD remains largely to be determined. Using an animal model of PTSD induced by a single prolonged stress (SPS), we assessed the role of hippocampal nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase 2 (NOX2) and parvalbumin (PV) interneurons in the development of PTSD symptoms. In the present study, behavioral tests were performed by the open field (day 13 after SPS) and fear conditioning tests (days 13 and 14 after SPS). For the interventional study, rats were chronically treated with a NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin either by early or delayed administration. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase, NOX2, 4-hydroxynonenal, and PV in the hippocampus were measured at the indicated time points. In the present study, we showed that SPS rats displayed anxiety-like and enhanced fear learning behavior, which was accompanied by the increased expressions of malondialdehyde, IL-6, NOX2, 4-hydroxynonenal, and decreased PV expression. Notably, early but not delayed treatment with apocynin reversed all these abnormalities after SPS. In conclusion, our results provided evidence that NOX2 activation in the hippocampus, at least in part, contributes to oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, which further results in PV interneuron loss and consequent PTSD symptoms in a rat model of PTSD induced by SPS.

  2. Attenuated sensory deprivation-induced changes of parvalbumin neuron density in the barrel cortex of FcγRllB-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Makiko; Ueno, Hiroshi; Suemitsu, Shunsuke; Yokobayashi, Eriko; Matsumoto, Yosuke; Usui, Shinichi; Sujiura, Hiroko; Okamoto, Motoi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the important role of immune molecules in the development of neuronal circuitry and synaptic plasticity. We have detected the presence of FcγRllB protein in parvalbumin-containing inhibitory interneurons (PV neurons). In the present study, we examined the appearance of PV neurons in the barrel cortex and the effect of sensory deprivation in FcγRllB-deficient mice (FcγRllB-/-) and wild-type mice. There was no substantial difference in the appearance of PV neurons in the developing barrel cortex between FcγRllB-/- and wild-type mice. Sensory deprivation from immediately after birth (P0) or P7 to P12-P14 induced an increase in PV neurons. In contrast, sensory deprivation from P7 or P14 to P28, but not from P21 to P28, decreased PV neurons in wild-type mice. However, sensory deprivation from P0 or P7 to P12-P14 did not increase PV neurons and sensory deprivation from P7 or P14 to P28 did not decrease or only modestly decreased PV neurons in FcγRllB-/- mice. The results indicate that expression of PV is regulated by sensory experience and the second and third postnatal weeks are a sensitive period for sensory deprivation, and suggest that FcγRllB contributes to sensory experience-regulated expression of PV.

  3. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies of Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Envelope Protein VP28

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-gang GU; Jun-fa YUAN; Ge-lin XU; Li-juan LI; Ni LIU; Cong ZHANG; Jian-hong ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with purified White spot syndrome virus (WSSV).Six monoclonal antibody cell lines were selected by ELISA with VP28 protein expressed in E.coll in vitro neutralization experiments showed that 4 of them could inhibit the virus infection in crayfish.Westernblot suggested that all these monoclonal antibodies were against the conformational structure of VP28.The monoclonal antibody 7B4 was labeled with colloidal gold particles and used to locate the VP28 on virus envelope by immunogold labeling.These monoclonal antibodies could be used to develop immunological diagnosis methods for WSSV infection.

  4. Monitoring monoclonal antibody delivery in oncology: the example of bevacizumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Nugue

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies paves the way for new strategies in oncology using targeted therapy which should improve specificity. However, due to a lack of biomarkers, a personalized therapy scheme cannot always be applied with monoclonal antibodies. As a consequence, the efficacy or side effects associated with this type of treatment often appear to be sporadic. Bevacizumab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. It is used to limit tumor vascularization. No prognosis or response biomarker is associated with this antibody, we therefore assessed whether the administration protocol could be a possible cause of heterogeneous responses (or variable efficacy. To do this, we developed a bevacizumab assay with a broad sensitivity range to measure blood bevacizumab concentrations. We then analyzed bevacizumab concentrations in 17 patients throughout the first quarter of treatment. In line with previously published data, average blood concentrations were 88+/-27 mg/L following the first dose administered, and 213+/-105 mg/L after the last (6(th dose administered. However, the individual values were scattered, with a mean 4-fold difference between the lowest and the highest concentration for each dose administered. We demonstrated that the bevacizumab administration schedule results in a high inter-individual variability in terms of blood concentrations. Comparison of assay data with clinical data indicates that blood concentrations above the median are associated with side effects, whereas values below the median favor inefficacy. In conclusion, bevacizumab-based therapy could benefit from a personalized administration schedule including follow-up and adjustment of circulating bevacizumab concentrations.

  5. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Ertekin

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2, aflatoxin G1 (AFG1, aflatoxin G2 (AFG2 and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1. The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31. The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort.

  6. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future.

  7. Corneal Densitometry for Quantification of Corneal Deposits in Monoclonal Gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enders, Philip; Holtick, Udo; Schaub, Friederike; Tuchscherer, Armin; Hermann, Manuel M; Scheid, Christoph; Cursiefen, Claus; Bachmann, Björn O

    2017-04-01

    To assess the capability of Scheimpflug-based densitometry of the cornea to quantify light chain deposits in patients with active monoclonal gammopathies. This is a case-control study in which data from a leading tertiary university center in myeloma care were analyzed. Ten eyes of 5 patients with monoclonal gammopathy and 26 eyes of 13 healthy controls undergoing clinical evaluation and Scheimpflug-based measurements were included in the study. The main outcome measures were densitometry data of the 4 corneal layers-anterior layer (AL), central layer (CL), posterior layer, and total layer (TL)-in 4 different annuli (central annular zone 0-2 mm, intermediate annular zone 2-6 mm, peripheral annular zone 6-10 mm, and total annular zone 0-12 mm). In 8 eyes of 4 patients with IgG-based gammopathy, corneal light backscatter was highest in the AL and decreased with increasing corneal depth. The peripheral annular zone showed a higher densitometry value compared with the corneal center. Compared with healthy controls, the AL (P < 0.001), the CL (P < 0.001), and the TL (P < 0.001) had significantly higher corneal light backscatter in patients with gammopathy in the total and the peripheral annular zones. In one patient with predominantly IgA-based disease, corneal light backscatter was not elevated. Scheimpflug-based densitometry of the cornea is able to quantify opacification by immunoglobulin G light chain deposits in monoclonal gammopathies. This noninvasive technique can complement presently used in vivo confocal microscopy and corneal photography to objectivize corneal changes. Densitometry might allow monitoring of corneal immunoglobulin deposits in follow-up examinations.

  8. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  9. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-05-12

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort.

  10. Prevalence of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhera, Rishi K.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant plasma cell disorder that is associated with a lifelong risk of multiple myeloma. We conducted a systematic review of all studies investigating the prevalence and incidence of MGUS in the online database PubMed. The review was conducted from January 6, 2009, through January 15, 2010. The following MeSH search headings were used: monoclonal gammopathy, benign and prevalence; monoclonal gammopathy, benign and incidence; paraproteinemia and prevalence; and paraproteinemia and incidence. Articles were limited to those written in English and published by January 2009. Fourteen studies that met prespecified criteria were included and systematically assessed to identify the most accurate prevalence estimates of MGUS based on age, sex, and race. On the basis of our systematic review, we estimate that the crude prevalence of MGUS in those older than 50 years is 3.2% in a predominantly white population. Studies in white and Japanese populations demonstrate a clear increase in prevalence with age. The prevalence is also affected by sex: 3.7% and 2.9% in white men and women, respectively; and 2.8% and 1.6% in Japanese men and women, respectively. Additionally, MGUS is significantly more prevalent in black people (5.9%-8.4%) than in white people (3.0%-3.6%). We conclude that MGUS is a common premalignant plasma cell disorder in the general population of those older than 50 years. The prevalence increases with age and is affected by race, sex, family history, immunosuppression, and pesticide exposure. These results are important for counseling, clinical care, and the design of clinical studies in high-risk populations. PMID:20713974

  11. Alemtuzumab and Natalizumab: The Monoclonal Antibody Story Continues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BL Johnston

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the July/August 2006 issue of this journal, the infectious complications associated with the use of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab were reviewed (1. These represent only three of the many monoclonal antibodies either licensed or in clinical trials for therapeutic use in cancer and autoimmune disease or to prevent rejection in both solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. While most of these agents have not been associated with increased infection rates, alemtuzumab and natalizumab have gained particular attention related to either the frequency or type of infection seen in some individuals who have received them.

  12. Monoclonal gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Caprariis, Donato; Sasanelli, Mariateresa; Paradies, Paola; Otranto, Domenico; Lia, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old, intact female, mixed Yorkshire terrier was evaluated for syncopal episodes, weakness, decreased appetite, and weight loss. Heartworm disease was diagnosed based on evidence of circulating microfilariae of Dirofilaria immitis on direct examination of blood smears and a positive SNAP heartworm antigen test. An immunoglobulin G (IgG) gammopathy, demonstrated by serum protein electrophoresis, was associated with heartworm disease in this dog. Response to treatment with both an adulticide and the microfilaricide ivermectin included remission of clinical signs and a decrease in the monoclonal gammopathy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an IgG gammopathy associated with heartworm disease in the dog.

  13. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma associated with a benign monoclonal gammopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, Anne E; Sanchez, Jany; Elgart, George W

    2003-07-01

    Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) is a disorder characterized by indurated, yellow-red nodules or plaques, primarily involving the face and, less frequently, the trunk and extremities. NXG may be associated with paraproteinemia, multiple myeloma, and hypertension. Histologically, xanthogranulomatous features with hyaline necrosis or necrobiosis are present. No first-line treatment has been established. This disease is a chronic process, and a patient's prognosis depends on the degree of extracutaneous involvement and the presence of visceral malignancies. We describe a patient with typical cutaneous and histologic findings of NXG with an associated monoclonal gammopathy.

  14. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible ...

  15. [Polyneuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moth Henriksen, Marie; Kolmos, Eva Brøsted; Abildgaard, Niels; Schrøder, Henrik Daa; Sindrup, Søren

    2012-10-22

    The prevalence of polyneuropathy in patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) has been reported to be 10-50%. The majority of patients have a chronic, slowly progressive, distal, symmetric and predominantly sensory polyneuropathy. A caused relationship between polyneuropathy and immunoglobulin (Ig)M MGUS is better established than the relationship between polyneuropathy and IgG/IgA MGUS because of the observed binding of IgM to myelin sheaths and widening of myelin lamellae. In randomized controlled trials plasma exchange, immunosuppressive, rituximab and intravenous Ig have been found to have a clinical meaningful effect.

  16. Rapid analysis of small samples containing forskolin using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagihara, H; Sakata, R; Shoyama, Y; Murakami, H

    1996-04-01

    The effective range of the competitive ELISA test for detection of forskolin content in clonally propagated plant organs of Coleus forskohlii using monoclonal antibodies extends from 5ng to 5 micrograms. A correlation between the forskolin accumulation and the growth rate was investigated using the clonally propagated shoots. An increase of forskolin content was noted, beginning at week 6. Flowers, rachises, leaves, stems, tuberous roots, and roots were analyzed. Tuberous roots and the stem base contained higher amounts of forskolin than other organs. The forskolin content in the stem decreased gradually towards the top of the shoot.

  17. Fluorescence polarization immunoassay for salinomycin based on monoclonal antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A fluorescence polarization immunoassay(FPIA) for the determination of salinomycin(SAL) was developed by using anti-SAL monoclonal antibodies(mAb).Fluorescein labeled SAL(tracer) was synthesized by the N-hydroxysuccinimide active ester method and purified using thin layer chromatography(TLC).The developed FPIA for SAL had a dynamic range from 0.60 to 2193 ng/mL with an IC50 value of 33.2 ng/mL and a detection limit(LOD) of 0.08 ng/mL.No significant cross-reactivities were observed with other drugs but 67.6% with narasin.

  18. Monoclonal antibody therapy in the treatment of Reye's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treon, S P; Broitman, S A

    1992-11-01

    A role for lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins, LPS) in 7 the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome (RS) has previously been suggested. Impairment of hepatic LPS clearance can lead to systemic endotoxemia as previous studies by this and other laboratories have suggested for several hepatic disorders including RS. Systemic LPS may mediate many of the clinical findings associated with RS by eliciting monokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, and interleukin-8. Monoclonal antibody therapy directed at LPS, and monokines may represent a novel approach to the treatment of RS.

  19. Large-scale production of monoclonal antibodies in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, M P; Metzger, L S; Slaber, P L; Nevitt, K L; Boder, G B

    1988-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being manufactured for clinical trials in suspension culture at the 1300-L scale. Suspension culture offers some advantages relative to high-density mammalian cell culture methods; in particular, the ability to closely monitor the behavior of cells in a homogeneous environment. Computer control and on-line mass spectrography of exit gases provide instantaneous information about the culture metabolic activity. Air sparging and agitation by marine impeller provide aeration sufficient to maintain a constant dissolved oxygen tension at cell concentrations up to 5.0 x 10(6) cells/mL without causing apparent cell damage.

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies as Prophylactic and Therapeutic Agents Against Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, April M

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that is responsible for considerable epidemics worldwide and recently emerged in the Americas in 2013. CHIKV may cause long-lasting arthralgia after acute infection. With currently no licensed vaccines or antivirals, the design of effective therapies to prevent or treat CHIKV infection is of utmost importance and will be facilitated by increased understanding of the dynamics of chikungunya. In this article, monoclonal antibodies against CHIKV as viable prophylactic and therapeutic agents will be discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Membrane adsorbers as purification tools for monoclonal antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Cristiana

    2007-03-15

    Downstream purification processes for monoclonal antibody production typically involve multiple steps; some of them are conventionally performed by bead-based column chromatography. Affinity chromatography with Protein A is the most selective method for protein purification and is conventionally used for the initial capturing step to facilitate rapid volume reduction as well as separation of the antibody. However, conventional affinity chromatography has some limitations that are inherent with the method, it exhibits slow intraparticle diffusion and high pressure drop within the column. Membrane-based separation processes can be used in order to overcome these mass transfer limitations. The ligand is immobilized in the membrane pores and the convective flow brings the solute molecules very close to the ligand and hence minimizes the diffusional limitations associated with the beads. Nonetheless, the adoption of this technology has been slow because membrane chromatography has been limited by a lower binding capacity than that of conventional columns, even though the high flux advantages provided by membrane adsorbers would lead to higher productivity. This review considers the use of membrane adsorbers as an alternative technology for capture and polishing steps for the purification of monoclonal antibodies. Promising industrial applications as well as new trends in research will be addressed.

  2. Ofatumumab: a novel monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Lin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas S LinGlaxoSmithKline Oncology R&D, Collegeville, PA, USAAbstract: Ofatumumab, a novel humanized monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of fludarabine and alemtuzumab refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Ofatumumab effectively induces complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC in vitro, and recent studies demonstrated that ofatumumab also effectively mediates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that increased exposure to the antibody correlated with improved clinical outcome in CLL. Thus, pharmacogenomics may be important in identifying which patients are more likely to respond to ofatumumab therapy, although such studies have not yet been performed. Patients with the high-affinity FCGR3a 158 V/V polymorphism may be more likely to respond to therapy, if ADCC is the primary in vivo mechanism of action of ofatumumab. Patients with increased expression of the complement defense proteins CD55 and CD59 may be less likely to respond if ofatumumab works in vivo primarily via CDC. Patients with increased metabolism and clearance of ofatumumab may have lower exposure and be less likely to respond clinically. Thus, pharmacogenomics may determine the responsiveness of patients to ofatumumab therapy.Keywords: monoclonal antibody, CD20, CLL, NHL, lymphoma

  3. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Renal Transplantation: Focus on Adverse Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zaza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are commonly utilized in renal transplantation as induction therapy (a period of intense immunosuppression immediately before and following the implant of the allograft, to treat steroid-resistant acute rejections, to decrease the incidence and mitigate effects of delayed graft function, and to allow immunosuppressive minimization. Additionally, in the last few years, their use has been proposed for the treatment of chronic antibody-mediated rejection, a major cause of late renal allograft loss. Although the exact mechanism of immunosuppression and allograft tolerance with any of the currently used induction agents is not completely defined, the majority of these medications are targeted against specific CD proteins on the T or B cells surface (e.g., CD3, CD25, CD52. Moreover, some of them have different mechanisms of action. In particular, eculizumab, interrupting the complement pathway, is a new promising treatment tool for acute graft complications and for post-transplant hemolytic uremic syndrome. While it is clear their utility in renal transplantation, it is also unquestionable that by using these highly potent immunosuppressive agents, the body loses much of its innate ability to mount an adequate immune response, thereby increasing the risk of severe adverse effects (e.g., infections, malignancies, haematological complications. Therefore, it is extremely important for clinicians involved in renal transplantation to know the potential side effects of monoclonal antibodies in order to plan a correct therapeutic strategy minimizing/avoiding the onset and development of severe clinical complications.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies directed to fucoidan preparations from brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torode, Thomas A; Marcus, Susan E; Jam, Murielle; Tonon, Thierry; Blackburn, Richard S; Hervé, Cécile; Knox, J Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies directed to fucoidan preparations from brown algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Torode

    Full Text Available Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance.

  6. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  7. Fingerprinting of Natural Product by Eastern Blotting Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We succeeded in developing the fingerprint of natural product by eastern blotting using monoclonal antibodies. After developing and separating them on a TLC plate, solasodine glycosides are oxidized by NaIO4 and reacted with a protein to give conjugates which are recognized with anti-solamargine monoclonal antibody (MAb. Anti-solamargine MAb having wide cross-reactivity can stain and detect all solasodine glycosides by fingerprint. Different sensitivity between solamargine and solasonine was observed. The detection limit was 1.6 ng of solasonine. The hydrolysed products of solamargine were determined by fingerprint of eastern blotting compared to their Rf values depending on the sugar number. Fingerprint by eastern blotting using anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb distinguished the formula containing ginseng prescribed in traditional Chinese medicine. By double-staining of ginsenosides it is possible to suggest that the staining color shows the pharmacological activity, such as the purple bands indicate ginsenosides having stimulation activity, and the blue color indicated compound like ginsenosides possessed the depression affect for the central nervous system (CNS, respectively.

  8. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes; Souza, J.E.Q. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica; Frier, Malcolm [University Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-11-01

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with {sup 99m} Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L{sub 2}) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the {sup 99m} Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with {sup 99m} Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the {sup 99m} Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author) 4 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Monoclonal Antibody-Based Therapeutics for Melioidosis and Glanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Yong Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Burkholderia Pseudomallei (BP and B. Mallei (BM were two closely related pathogenic gram-negative bacteria. They were the causative agents of melioidosis and glanders, respectively and are recognized by CDC as category B select agents. Significant efforts had been devoted to developing the diagnostic and therapeutic measures against these two pathogens. Monoclonal antibody-based therapeutic was a promising targeted therapy to fight against melioidosis and glanders. Valuable findings have been reported by different groups in their attempt to identify vaccine targets against these two pathogens. Approach: Our group has generated neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies (MAbs against BP and BM and characterized them by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. We present an overview of the MAb-based therapeutic approaches against BP and BM and demonstrate some of our efforts for developing chimeric and fully human MAbs using antibody engineering. Results: Throughout conventional mouse hybridoma technique and antibody engineering (chimerization and in vitro antibody library techniques, we generated 10 chimeric MAbs (3 stable MAbs and 7 transient MAbs and one fully human MAb against BP and BM. In addition, we present the reactive antigen profiles of these MAbs. Our approaches had potentials to accelerate the development of therapeutics for melioidosis and glanders in humans. Conclusion: Our experience and findings presented here will be valuable for choosing the best antigenic targets and ultimately for the production of effective vaccines for these two pathogens.

  10. Are neurological complications of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance underestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Normann; Schwärzler, Angelika; Göbel, Georg; Löscher, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignancy preceding multiple myeloma (MM) or related disorders. Neurological symptoms caused by the monoclonal immunoglobulins or free light-chains are often associated with a high morbidity. We analyzed the prevalence of neuropathy, clinical features and the long-term outcome in 223 patients (pts.) with MGUS. Patients and Methods Between 1/2005 and 3/2015, 223 adult pts. with MGUS were identified in our database. Results In36/223 pts. (16%) a neuropathy was diagnosed (MGUS associated neuropathy, MGUS-N). 20 pts. (55%) had a distal symmetric axonal neuropathy, 10 pts. (28%) had a chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy and 6 pts (17%) a distal acquired demyelinating symmetric polyneuropathy. In MGUS-NN (without neuropathy) and in MGUS-N, progression to smoldering MM, MM or Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM) occurred in 17% of the pts. The Immunoglobulin subtype was predominantly IgG in MGUS-NN and IgM in MGUS-N and ≥5.5% plasma cells in the bone-marrow predicted progression to MM and AL-amyloidosis in MGUS-NN and to WM in MGUS-N (p<0.05). Conclusion Due to the substantial prevalence of neuropathies, MGUS pts. should be monitored carefully and referred to a specialized center if neurological symptoms occur. PMID:27974705

  11. Prediction and Reduction of the Aggregation of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kant, Rob; Karow-Zwick, Anne R; Van Durme, Joost; Blech, Michaela; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Seeliger, Daniel; Aßfalg, Kerstin; Baatsen, Pieter; Compernolle, Griet; Gils, Ann; Studts, Joey M; Schulz, Patrick; Garidel, Patrick; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-04-21

    Protein aggregation remains a major area of focus in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Improving the intrinsic properties of antibodies can improve manufacturability, attrition rates, safety, formulation, titers, immunogenicity, and solubility. Here, we explore the potential of predicting and reducing the aggregation propensity of monoclonal antibodies, based on the identification of aggregation-prone regions and their contribution to the thermodynamic stability of the protein. Although aggregation-prone regions are thought to occur in the antigen binding region to drive hydrophobic binding with antigen, we were able to rationally design variants that display a marked decrease in aggregation propensity while retaining antigen binding through the introduction of artificial aggregation gatekeeper residues. The reduction in aggregation propensity was accompanied by an increase in expression titer, showing that reducing protein aggregation is beneficial throughout the development process. The data presented show that this approach can significantly reduce liabilities in novel therapeutic antibodies and proteins, leading to a more efficient path to clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  13. [Obtaining monoclonal antibodies against outer membrane glycoproteins of Entamoeba histolytica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agundis, C; Isibasi, A; Ortíz, V; Reyes, J L; Paniagua, J; Ramírez, A; Kumate, J

    1990-01-01

    The goal of this paper was the production of monoclonal antibodies capable of detecting relevant antigens from the surface of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites, with the purpose of using them as a diagnostic test. The cellular fusion for obtaining the monoclonal antibodies (mAb) was done with spleen cells from BALB/c mice, previously immunized with glycoproteins from the membrane, as well as Sp2/0 cells. The hybridoma supernatants were tested with ELISA, using glycoproteins and lipopeptide phosphoglycans (LPPG) as antigens. Seven hybridomas producing mAb against the glycoproteins were found. Among these, three recognize LPPG. The ability of reacting with the mAb against two molecules disappeared for all the LPPG positive ones when were treated with meta-periodate, and only three reacted against the glycoproteins. All of the mAb were of the Ig M isotypes. They were characterized by Dot blot and Western blot assays. From the results, one may deduce that some mAb recognize as epitopes the polysaccharide portion, and thus infer that they are directed of against the surface and therefore, in the future, could be used with a diagnostic purpose.

  14. Immunotherapy of hepatoma with a monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Hong Tan; Feng-Ying Huang; Hua Wang; Yong-Hao Huang; Ying-Ying Lin; Yue-Nan Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the capability of a monoclonal antibody(mAb) against murine endoglin to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and suppression of hepatoma growth in murine models.METHODS: A monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin was purified by affinity chromatography and passively transfused through tail veins in two murine hepatoma models. Tumor volume and survival time were observed at three-day intervals for 48 d. Microvessels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry against CD31, and angiogenesis in vivo was determined by alginate encapsulated assay. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy with anti-endoglin mAb could effectively suppress tumor growth, and prolonged the survival time of hepatoma-bearing mice.Angiogenesis was apparently inhibited within the tumor tissues, and the vascularization of alginate beads was also reduced in the mice passively transfused with antiendoglin mAb. In addition, increased apoptotic cells were observed within the tumor tissues from the mice passively transfused with anti-endoglin mAb.CONCLUSION: Passive immunotherapy with antiendoglin mAb effectively inhibits tumor growth via inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing tumor cell apoptosis, which may be highly correlated with the blockage of endoglin-related signal pathway induced by anti-endoglin mAb.

  15. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibody development is one of the fastest growing areas of the pharmaceutical industry. Generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies against a given therapeutic target is very crucial for the success of the drug development. However, due to immune tolerance, some proteins that are highly conserved between mice and humans are not very immunogenic in mice, making it difficult to generate antibodies using a conventional approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, the impaired immune tolerance of NZB/W mice was exploited to generate monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved or self-antigens. Using two highly conserved human antigens (MIF and HMGB1 and one mouse self-antigen (TNF-alpha as examples, we demonstrate here that multiple clones of high affinity, highly specific antibodies with desired biological activities can be generated, using the NZB/W mouse as the immunization host and a T cell-specific tag fused to a recombinant antigen to stimulate the immune system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed an efficient and universal method for generating surrogate or therapeutic antibodies against "difficult antigens" to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies.

  16. Characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Stella, Cinzia; Wang, Weiru; Schöneich, Christian; Gennaro, Lynn

    2014-05-20

    In the biotechnology industry, oxidative carbonylation as a post-translational modification of protein pharmaceuticals has not been studied in detail. Using Quality by Design (QbD) principles, understanding the impact of oxidative carbonylation on product quality of protein pharmaceuticals, particularly from a site-specific perspective, is critical. However, comprehensive identification of carbonylation sites has so far remained a very difficult analytical challenge for the industry. In this paper, we report for the first time the identification of specific carbonylation sites on recombinant monoclonal antibodies with a new analytical approach via derivatization with Girard's Reagent T (GRT) and subsequent peptide mapping with high-resolution mass spectrometry. Enhanced ionization efficiency and high quality MS(2) data resulted from GRT derivatization were observed as key benefits of this approach, which enabled direct identification of carbonylation sites without any fractionation or affinity enrichment steps. A simple data filtering process was also incorporated to significantly reduce false positive assignments. Sensitivity and efficiency of this approach were demonstrated by identification of carbonylation sites on both unstressed and oxidized antibody bulk drug substances. The applicability of this approach was further demonstrated by identification of 14 common carbonylation sites on three highly similar IgG1s. Our approach represents a significant improvement to the existing analytical methodologies and facilitates extended characterization of oxidative carbonylation on recombinant monoclonal antibodies and potentially other protein pharmaceuticals in the biotechnology industry.

  17. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  18. Efficient generation of human IgA monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorin, Valérie; Mouquet, Hugo

    2015-07-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the most abundant antibody isotype produced in humans. IgA antibodies primarily ensure immune protection of mucosal surfaces against invading pathogens, but also circulate and are present in large quantities in blood. IgAs are heterogeneous at a molecular level, with two IgA subtypes and the capacity to form multimers by interacting with the joining (J) chain. Here, we have developed an efficient strategy to rapidly generate human IgA1 and IgA2 monoclonal antibodies in their monomeric and dimeric forms. Recombinant monomeric and dimeric IgA1/IgA2 counterparts of a prototypical IgG1 monoclonal antibody, 10-1074, targeting the HIV-1 envelope protein, were produced in large amounts after expression cloning and transient transfection of 293-F cells. 10-1074 IgAs were FPLC-purified using a novel affinity-based resin engrafted with anti-IgA chimeric Fabs, followed by a monomers/multimers separation using size exclusion-based FPLC. ELISA binding experiments confirmed that the artificial IgA class switching of 10-1074 did not alter its antigen recognition. In summary, our technical approach allows the very efficient production of various forms of purified recombinant human IgA molecules, which are precious tools in dissecting IgA B-cell responses in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, and studying the biology, function and therapeutic potential of IgAs.

  19. Cloning and prokaryotic expression of parvalbumin from silver carp (Hypophthalmichthy molitrix) skeletal muscle%鲢小清蛋白的cDNA克隆及在大肠杆菌中的原核表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慈; 曹敏杰; 郑晓江; 詹春兰; 刘光明; 蔡秋凤

    2014-01-01

    Parvalbumin (PV) is a major fish allergen that is involved in IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity. Sensitized individuals can develop some clinical symptoms including urticaria, angioedema, asthma, and even fatal anaphylaxis after ingestion of trace quantitiesof fish. As the largest producer and consumer of fresh water fish in the world, a high number of Chinese people suffer from allergies associated with consumption of fresh water fish. Despite this, little is known about the allergens in freshwater fish products that are available in China. We extracted total RNA from silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) skeletal muscle, and synthesized first-strand cDNA by reverse transcriptase with an oligo (dT)18 primer. Some specific primers were designed based on the sequences of silver carp PV mRNA (GenBank nos. FJ216937 and FJ216938). Using these primers and the synthesized cDNA, two PV isoform genes (PVI and PVII) were cloned. The full-length coding region of both PVs was 330 bp, which encoded a protein of 109 amino acid resi-dues. The PCR products were cloned into a pMD18-T vector for sequencing. Both the positive plasmid and the plasmid pET28a were digested by Nde I and BamH I.The target genes were subcloned into pET28a for expression in [E.coli BL21 (DE3)] by 1 mmol/LIPTG induction at 37℃ for 4 h. The two target protein bands were~13 kD, which was con-sistent with the predicted size. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the recombinant PVI and PVII both existed in the soluble fraction of the proteins. The recombinant PVI and PVII were further purified by Ni-NTA agarose affinity chromatography, and the target proteins were eluted by 100 mmol/L imidazol. Both purified proteins yielded a single band on SDS-PAGE. Similar to the native PV, the recombinant proteins reacted strongly with anti-silver carp PV monoclonal antibody in the western blot analysis, suggesting that the recombinant PVI and PVII have strong IgG binding activity. Thus, we obtained two isoforms of

  20. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  1. Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinaa, L; Wulff, A M; Saermark, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide (aa 138-152) from HIV-1 Nef protein were produced and characterized. Three hybridoma lines producing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the synthetic peptide were generated by fusion between P3-X63 Ag8.653 myeloma cells and BALB/c splenocytes fr...

  2. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation—specific anti—calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiGuoLI; ChaoQI; 等

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  3. Preparation of Europium Induced Conformation-specific anti-calmodulin Monoclonal Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody technique was employed to detect the conformational difference of CaM induced by metal ions. A trivalent europium ion induced conformation-specific anti-calmodulin monoclonal antibody was successfully prepared with europium-saturated calmodulin as antigen.

  4. Utility of testing for monoclonal bands in serum of patients with suspected osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, B.; Andersen, Ivan; Christensen, Susanne S.

    2005-01-01

    of multiple myeloma diagnosed. All patients with multiple myeloma had a history of fragility fractures. If lymphoma was included as a target condition, the specificity increased to 95.3% and the positive predictive value increased to 23.5%. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance was diagnosed...... or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance....

  5. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  6. Magnetic resonance appearance of monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. The GRI Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, L; Laredo, J D; Lioté, F; Koeger, A C; Hamze, B; Ziza, J M; Pertuiset, E; Bardin, T; Tubiana, J M

    1997-11-01

    A prospective multicenter study. To evaluate the use of magnetic resonance imaging, in the differentiation between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. Although multiple myeloma has been studied extensively with magnetic resonance imaging, to the authors' knowledge, no study has evaluated the clinical interest of magnetic resonance imaging in the differentiation between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma. The magnetic resonance examinations of the thoracolumbar spine in 24 patients with newly diagnosed monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance were compared with those performed in 44 patients with newly diagnosed nontreated multiple myeloma. All findings on magnetic resonance examination performed in patients with monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance were normal, whereas findings on 38 (86%) of the 44 magnetic resonance examinations performed in patients with multiple myeloma were abnormal. Magnetic resonance imaging can be considered as an additional diagnostic tool in differentiating between monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance and multiple myeloma, which may be helpful when routine criteria are not sufficient. An abnormal finding on magnetic resonance examination in a patient with monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance should suggest the diagnosis of multiple myeloma after other causes of marrow signal abnormalities are excluded. Magnetic resonance imaging also may be proposed in the long-term follow-up of monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance when a new biologic or clinical event suggests the diagnosis of malignant monoclonal gammopathy.

  7. Immune defects in the risk of infection and response to vaccination in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tete, Sarah M.; Bijl, Marc; Sahota, Surinder S.; Bos, Nicolaas

    2014-01-01

    The plasma cell proliferative disorders monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and malignant multiple myeloma (MM) are characterized by an accumulation of transformed clonal plasma cells in the bone marrow and production of monoclonal immunoglobulin. They typically affect an older

  8. [Follow-up of serum monoclonal gammopathy at Guadalajara Health Area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuecas Mohedano, M; Carballo Alvarez, F; García Menéndez, L

    2006-12-01

    To study the clinical course of patients with a serum monoclonal protein at Guadalajara Health Area. Prospective study of 186 patients with a newly diagnosed monoclonal component. They have been collected during the years 1999 and 2000. The cumulative transformation probability at 43 months was 4.99% for those patients whose monoclonal gammopathy was overlooked, and 2% at 23 months for patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. The cumulative probability of survival for patients with multiple myeloma was 66.7% at 21 months. The conditional mortality rate (patients/months) at 4 years due to haematological disease was 4.48 x 10(-4) for overlooked patients, 0 for diagnosed of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and 1.388 x 10(-2) for multiple myeloma diagnosed. A non malignant M component must be followed up due to it could increase patients survival rate in relation with transformation in malignant disease.

  9. Feline lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis associated with monoclonal gammopathy and Bence-Jones proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, K F

    1994-03-01

    Lymphoplasmacytic stomatitis and gingivitis was diagnosed in an 8-year old female domestic shorthair. The cat had evidence of severe generalized inflammation of the oral cavity. Biopsy samples were evaluated and displayed a lichenoid, interface stomatitis which was predominantly lymphoplasmacytic. Serum protein electrophoresis confirmed a monoclonal gammopathy. Urine protein electrophoresis confirmed Bence-Jones proteinuria. Protein electrophoresis was used to diagnose monoclonal gammopathy (the production of a monoclonal immunoglobulin, or paraprotein, which is associated with a characteristic "M" protein spike on serum electrophoresis). Diseases associated with monoclonal gammopathy are similar in the dog and cat. Alkylating agent chemotherapy is used to rapidly reduce paraprotein concentrations in multiple myeloma. Multiple myeloma is the most common disorder associated with monoclonal gammopathy. This condition is less common in the cat, compared to the dog. This report examines the diagnosis and treatment of multiple myeloma in a cat presenting with severe stomatitis.

  10. Use of commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies for immunofluorescence double staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bzorek, M.; Stamp, I.M.; Frederiksen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry, that is, the use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to detect cell and tissue antigens at a microscopical level is a powerful tool for both research and diagnostic purposes. Especially in the field of hematologic disease, there is often a need to detect several antigens...... synchronously, and we report here a fast and easy technique for demonstrating more than 1 antigen in 1 slide using immunofluorescence. We have used commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies (Cyclin D1, CD3, CD5, CD23, etc.) paired with mouse monoclonal antibodies (CD7, CD20, CD79a, Pax-5, etc.......) for double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies in combination with mouse monoclonal antibodies proved useful in double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue, and all combinations used yielded excellent results...

  11. Morphological, neurochemical and electrophysiological features of parvalbumin-expressing cells: a likely source of axo-axonic inputs in the mouse spinal dorsal horn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D I; Sikander, S; Kinnon, C M; Boyle, K A; Watanabe, M; Callister, R J; Graham, B A

    2012-01-01

    Axo-axonic synapses on the central terminals of primary afferent fibres modulate sensory input and are the anatomical correlate of presynaptic inhibition. Although several classes of primary afferents are under such inhibitory control, the origin of these presynaptic inputs in the dorsal horn is unknown. Here, we characterize the neurochemical, anatomical and electrophysiological properties of parvalbumin (PV)-expressing cells in wild-type and transgenic mice where enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) is expressed under the PV promoter. We show that most PV cells have either islet or central cell-like morphology, receive inputs from myelinated primary afferent fibres and are concentrated in laminae II inner and III. We also show that inhibitory PV terminals in lamina II inner selectively target the central terminals of myelinated afferents (∼80% of 935 PVeGFP boutons) and form axo-axonic synapses (∼75% of 71 synapses from PV boutons). Targeted whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from PVeGFP positive cells in laminae II and III showed action potential discharge was restricted to the tonic firing and initial bursting patterns (67% and 33% respectively; n = 18), and virtually all express Ih subthreshold voltage-gated currents (94%; n = 18). These neurons show higher rheobase current than non-eGFP cells but respond with high frequency action potential discharge upon activation. Together, our findings show that PV neurons in laminae II and III are a likely source of inhibitory presynaptic input on to myelinated primary afferents. Consequently PV cells are ideally placed to play an important role in the development of central sensitization and tactile allodynia. PMID:22674718

  12. Dizocilpine (MK-801) induces distinct changes of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunits in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Dong; Zhang, Wentong; Wang, Huai-Xing; Stradtman, George G; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-11-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction has long been implicated in schizophrenia and NMDARs on gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic interneurons are proposed to play an essential role in the pathogenesis. However, controversial results have been reported regarding the regulation of NMDAR expression, and direct evidence of how NMDAR antagonists act on specific subpopulations of prefrontal interneurons is missing. We investigated the effects of the NMDAR antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) on the expression of NMDAR subtypes in the identified interneurons in young adult rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) by using laser microdissection and real-time polymerase chain reaction, combined with Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining. We found that MK-801 induced distinct changes of NMDAR subunits in the parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-ir) interneurons vs. pyramidal neurons in the PFC circuitry. The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of all NMDAR subtypes, including NR1 and NR2A to 2D, exhibited inverted-U dose-dependent changes in response to MK-801 treatment in the PFC. In contrast, subunit mRNAs of NMDARs in PV-ir interneurons were significantly down-regulated at low doses, unaltered at medium doses, and significantly decreased again at high doses, suggesting a biphasic dose response to MK-801. The differential effects of MK-801 in mRNA expression of NMDAR subunits were consistent with the protein expression of NR2A and NR2B subunits revealed with Western blotting and double immunofluorescent staining. These results suggest that PV-containing interneurons in the PFC exhibit a distinct responsiveness to NMDAR antagonism and that NMDA antagonist can differentially and dose-dependently regulate the functions of pyramidal neurons and GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortical circuitry.

  13. Loss of phenotype of parvalbumin interneurons in rat prefrontal cortex is involved in antidepressant- and propsychotic-like behaviors following acute and repeated ketamine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, ZhiQiang; Zhang, GuangFen; Li, XiaoMin; Liu, XiaoYu; Wang, Nan; Qiu, LiLi; Liu, WenXue; Zuo, ZhiYi; Yang, JianJun

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that single subanesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant-like effects. Nevertheless, repeated subanesthetic doses of ketamine produce psychosis-like effects with dysfunction of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons. We hypothesized that PV interneurons play an important role in the antidepressant-like actions of ketamine, and different changes in PV interneurons occur with the antidepressant-like and propsychotic-like effects of ketamine. To test this hypothesis, ketamine's antidepressant-like effects were evaluated by the forced swimming test. Ketamine-induced stereotyped behaviors and hyperactivity actions and the function of PV interneurons were also assessed. We demonstrated that an acute dose of 10 mg/kg ketamine induced significant antidepressant-like effects and reduced the levels of PV and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing enzyme GAD67 in the rat prefrontal cortex. Moreover, inhibition of ketamine-induced loss of PV by apocynin blocked these antidepressant-like effects. Repeated administration of 30 mg/kg ketamine elicited stereotyped behaviors and hyperactivity actions as well as a longer duration of PV and GAD67 loss, higher brain glutamate levels, and lower brain GABA levels than acute single dose of ketamine. Our results reveal that the loss of phenotype of PV interneurons in the prefrontal cortex contributes to the antidepressant-like actions and is also involved in the propsychotic-like behaviors following acute and repeated ketamine administration, which may be partially mediated by the disinhibition of glutamate signaling. The different degrees and durations of the actions on PV interneurons produced by the two regimens of ketamine may partly underline the behavioral variance between the antidepressant- and propsychotic-like effects.

  14. Early-life lead exposure recapitulates the selective loss of parvalbumin-positive GABAergic interneurons and subcortical dopamine system hyperactivity present in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, K H; Ruby, K N; Soares, B D; McGlothan, J L; Liu, X; Guilarte, T R

    2015-03-10

    Environmental factors have been associated with psychiatric disorders and recent epidemiological studies suggest an association between prenatal lead (Pb(2+)) exposure and schizophrenia (SZ). Pb(2+) is a potent antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and converging evidence indicates that NMDAR hypofunction has a key role in the pathophysiology of SZ. The glutamatergic hypothesis of SZ posits that NMDAR hypofunction results in the loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons (PVGI) in the brain. Loss of PVGI inhibitory control to pyramidal cells alters the excitatory drive to midbrain dopamine neurons increasing subcortical dopaminergic activity. We hypothesized that if Pb(2+) exposure in early life is an environmental risk factor for SZ, it should recapitulate the loss of PVGI and reproduce subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. We report that on postnatal day 50 (PN50), adolescence rats chronically exposed to Pb(2+) from gestation through adolescence exhibit loss of PVGI in SZ-relevant brain regions. PV and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) protein were significantly decreased in Pb(2+) exposed rats with no apparent change in calretinin or calbindin protein levels suggesting a selective effect on the PV phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We also show that Pb(2+) animals exhibit a heightened locomotor response to cocaine and express significantly higher levels of dopamine metabolites and D2-dopamine receptors relative to controls indicative of subcortical dopaminergic hyperactivity. Our results show that developmental Pb(2+) exposure reproduces specific neuropathology and functional dopamine system changes present in SZ. We propose that exposure to environmental toxins that produce NMDAR hypofunction during critical periods of brain development may contribute significantly to the etiology of mental disorders.

  15. Mice lacking NMDA receptors in parvalbumin neurons display normal depression-related behavior and response to antidepressant action of NMDAR antagonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Pozzi

    Full Text Available The underlying circuit imbalance in major depression remains unknown and current therapies remain inadequate for a large group of patients. Discovery of the rapid antidepressant effects of ketamine--an NMDA receptor (NMDAR antagonist--has linked the glutamatergic system to depression. Interestingly, dysfunction in the inhibitory GABAergic system has also been proposed to underlie depression and deficits linked to GABAergic neurons have been found with human imaging and in post-mortem material from depressed patients. Parvalbumin-expressing (PV GABAergic interneurons regulate local circuit function through perisomatic inhibition and their activity is NMDAR-dependent, providing a possible link between NMDAR and the inhibitory system in the antidepressant effect of ketamine. We have therefore investigated the role of the NMDAR-dependent activity of PV interneurons for the development of depression-like behavior as well as for the response to rapid antidepressant effects of NMDAR antagonists. We used mutant mice lacking NMDA neurotransmission specifically in PV neurons (PV-Cre+/NR1f/f and analyzed depression-like behavior and anhedonia. To study the acute and sustained effects of a single NMDAR antagonist administration, we established a behavioral paradigm of repeated exposure to forced swimming test (FST. We did not observe altered behavioral responses in the repeated FST or in a sucrose preference test in mutant mice. In addition, the behavioral response to administration of NMDAR antagonists was not significantly altered in mutant PV-Cre+/NR1f/f mice. Our results show that NMDA-dependent neurotransmission in PV neurons is not necessary to regulate depression-like behaviors, and in addition that NMDARs on PV neurons are not a direct target for the NMDAR-induced antidepressant effects of ketamine and MK801.

  16. Parvalbumin Interneurons of Central Amygdala Regulate the Negative Affective States and the Expression of Corticotrophin-Releasing Hormone During Morphine Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Shen, Minjie; Jiang, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Background: The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is a crucial component of the neuronal circuitry mediating aversive emotion. Its role in the negative affective states during drug withdrawal includes changes in opioidergic, GABAergic, and corticotropin-releasing factor neurotransmission. However, the modulation of the neurobiological interconnectivity in the CeA and its effects in the negative reinforcement of drug dependents are poorly understood. Method: We performed electrophysiological recordings to assess the membrane excitability of parvalbumin (PV)+ interneurons in the CeA during chronic morphine withdrawal. We tested the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive (assessed by conditioned place aversion), anxiety (assessed by elevated plus maze), and anhedonic-like (assessed by saccharin preference test) behaviors, as well as the mRNA level of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) via optogenetic inhibition or activation of PV+ interneurons in the CeA. Result: Chronic morphine withdrawal increased the firing rate of CeA PV+ interneurons. Optogenetic inhibition of the activity of CeA PV+ interneurons attenuated the morphine withdrawal–induced negative affective states, such as the aversive, anxiety, and anhedonic-like behaviors, while direct activation of CeA PV+ interneurons could trigger those negative affective-like behaviors. Optogenetic inhibition of the CeA PV+ interneurons during the morphine withdrawal significantly attenuated the elevated CRH mRNA level in the CeA. Conclusion: The activity of PV+ interneurons in the CeA was up-regulated during chronic morphine withdrawal. The activation of PV+ interneurons during morphine withdrawal was crucial for the induction of the negative emotion and the up-regulation of CRH mRNA levels in the CeA. PMID:27385383

  17. Experimentally constrained CA1 fast-firing parvalbumin-positive interneuron network models exhibit sharp transitions into coherent high frequency rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie A Ferguson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The coupling of high frequency oscillations (HFOs; >100 Hz and theta oscillations (3-12 Hz in the CA1 region of rats increases during REM sleep, indicating that it may play a role in memory processing. However, it is unclear whether the CA1 region itself is capable of providing major contributions to the generation of HFOs, or if they are strictly driven through input projections. Parvalbumin-positive (PV+ interneurons may play an essential role in these oscillations due to their extensive connections with neighbouring pyramidal cells, and their characteristic fast-spiking. Thus, we created mathematical network models to investigate the conditions under which networks of CA1 fast-spiking PV+ interneurons are capable of producing high frequency population rhythms.We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings of fast-spiking, PV+ cells in the CA1 region of an intact hippocampal preparation in vitro to derive cellular properties, from which we constrained an Izhikevich-type model. Novel, biologically constrained network models were constructed with these individual cell models, and we investigated networks across a range of experimentally determined excitatory inputs and inhibitory synaptic strengths. For each network, we determined network frequency and coherence.Network simulations produce coherent firing at high frequencies (> 90 Hz for parameter ranges in which PV-PV inhibitory synaptic conductances are necessarily small and external excitatory inputs are relatively large. Interestingly, our networks produce sharp transitions between random and coherent firing, and this sharpness is lost when connectivity is increased beyond biological estimates. Our work suggests that CA1 networks may be designed with mechanisms for quickly gating in and out of high frequency coherent population rhythms, which may be essential in the generation of nested theta/high frequency rhythms.

  18. Parvalbumin disappears from GABAergic CA1 neurons of the gerbil hippocampus with seizure onset while its presence persists in the perforant path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, A L; Kalt, G; Bollag, O; Nitsch, C

    1997-06-20

    Mongolian gerbils are epilepsy prone animals, a trait observable at the behavioural level during the 2nd month of life. As a unique species difference, gerbils express the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) in the perforant path from the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampus. In this study, we determined the time of appearance of PV in the layer II neurons of the entorhinal cortex and the perforant path terminals in gerbils between post-natal days 30 and 50. Signs of low grade seizures were observed in few animals from P40 onward. PV stain in the entorhinal cortex and perforant path terminals was already detectable at P30, well before the onset of behavioural seizures and did not change with age. It is suggested that the presence of PV in this pathway may be related to the generation early in life of an epileptogenic focus in the limbic forebrain. Altered inhibitory hippocampal circuits have also been suggested as a cause of seizures in the gerbil. Therefore, we quantitated hippocampal GABA-immunoreactive neurons and the PV-immunoreactive subpopulation. A group of gerbils with a high density of stained pyramidal interneurons in CA1 and one lacking PV-stained perikarya could be distinguished at P40 and P50. The density of GABA-immunoreactive nerve cells however, remained the same in both groups and through the ages studied. Thus, perikaryal PV is lost from intact GABAergic nerve cells at the same time as behavioural seizures are observed. The loss of PV from GABAergic neurons may affect their functional properties and be instrumental for the maintainance of behavioural seizures.

  19. Progressive loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase, parvalbumin, and calbindin D28K immunoreactive neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of adult rat with experimental hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Y; Chakrabortty, S; Drake, J M; Hattori, T

    1997-02-01

    The authors investigated functional neuronal changes in experimental hydrocephalus using immunohistochemical techniques for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and two neuronal calcium-binding proteins: parvalbumin (PV) and calbindin D28K (CaBP). Hydrocephalus was induced in 16 adult Wistar rats by intracisternal injection of a kaolin solution, which was confirmed microscopically via atlantooccipital dural puncture. Four control rats received the same volume of sterile saline. Immunohistochemical staining for GAD, PV, and CaBP, and Nissl staining were performed at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after the injection. Hydrocephalus occurred in 90% of kaolin-injected animals with various degrees of ventricular dilation. In the cerebral cortex, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-immunoreactive (IR) interneurons initially lost their stained processes together with a concomitant loss of homogeneous neuropil staining, followed by the reduction of their total number. With progressive ventricular dilation, GAD- and PV-IR axon terminals on the cortical pyramidal cells disappeared, whereas the number of CaBP-IR pyramidal cells decreased, and ultimately in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus, GAD, PV, and CaBP immunoreactivity were almost entirely diminished. In the hippocampus, GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR interneurons demonstrated a reduction of their processes and terminals surrounding the pyramidal cells, with secondary reduction of CaBP-IR pyramidal and granular cells. On the other hand, Nissl staining revealed almost no morphological changes induced by ischemia or neuronal degeneration even in the most severe cases of hydrocephalus. Hydrocephalus results in the progressive functional impairment of GAD-, PV-, and CaBP-IR neuronal systems in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, often before there is evidence of morphological injury. The initial injury of cortical and hippocampal interneurons suggests that the functional deafferentation from intrinsic projection fibers may be the initial neuronal event

  20. Direct excitation of parvalbumin-positive interneurons by M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors: roles in cellular excitability, inhibitory transmission and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Feng; Ball, Jackson; Stoll, Kurt E; Satpute, Vaishali C; Mitchell, Samantha M; Pauli, Jordan L; Holloway, Benjamin B; Johnston, April D; Nathanson, Neil M; Deisseroth, Karl; Gerber, David J; Tonegawa, Susumu; Lawrence, J Josh

    2014-08-15

    Parvalbumin-containing (PV) neurons, a major class of GABAergic interneurons, are essential circuit elements of learning networks. As levels of acetylcholine rise during active learning tasks, PV neurons become increasingly engaged in network dynamics. Conversely, impairment of either cholinergic or PV interneuron function induces learning deficits. Here, we examined PV interneurons in hippocampus (HC) and prefrontal cortex (PFC) and their modulation by muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs). HC PV cells, visualized by crossing PV-CRE mice with Rosa26YFP mice, were anatomically identified as basket cells and PV bistratified cells in the stratum pyramidale; in stratum oriens, HC PV cells were electrophysiologically distinct from somatostatin-containing cells. With glutamatergic transmission pharmacologically blocked, mAChR activation enhanced PV cell excitability in both CA1 HC and PFC; however, CA1 HC PV cells exhibited a stronger postsynaptic depolarization than PFC PV cells. To delete M1 mAChRs genetically from PV interneurons, we created PV-M1 knockout mice by crossing PV-CRE and floxed M1 mice. The elimination of M1 mAChRs from PV cells diminished M1 mAChR immunoreactivity and muscarinic excitation of HC PV cells. Selective cholinergic activation of HC PV interneurons using Designer Receptors Exclusively Activated by Designer Drugs technology enhanced the frequency and amplitude of inhibitory synaptic currents in CA1 pyramidal cells. Finally, relative to wild-type controls, PV-M1 knockout mice exhibited impaired novel object recognition and, to a lesser extent, impaired spatial working memory, but reference memory remained intact. Therefore, the direct activation of M1 mAChRs on PV cells contributes to some forms of learning and memory.

  1. Stress differentially alters mu opioid receptor density and trafficking in parvalbumin-containing interneurons in the female and male rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Teresa A; Burstein, Suzanne R; Marrone, Gina F; Khalid, Sana; Gonzalez, Andreina D; Williams, Tanya J; Schierberl, Kathryn C; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Gonzales, Keith L; McEwen, Bruce S; Waters, Elizabeth M

    2013-11-01

    Stress differentially affects hippocampal-dependent learning relevant to addiction and morphology in male and female rats. Mu opioid receptors (MORs), which are located in parvalbumin (PARV)-containing GABAergic interneurons and are trafficked in response to changes in the hormonal environment, play a critical role in promoting principal cell excitability and long-term potentiation. Here, we compared the effects of acute and chronic immobilization stress (AIS and CIS) on MOR trafficking in PARV-containing neurons in the hilus of the dentate gyrus in female and male rats using dual label immunoelectron microscopy. Following AIS, the density of MOR silver-intensified gold particles (SIGs) in the cytoplasm of PARV-labeled dendrites was significantly reduced in females (estrus stage). Conversely, AIS significantly increased the proportion of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs in PARV-labeled dendrites in male rats. CIS significantly reduced the number of PARV-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus of males but not females. However, MOR/PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals were significantly smaller in CIS females, but not males, compared with controls. Following CIS, the density of cytoplasmic MOR SIGs increased in PARV-labeled dendrites and terminals in females. Moreover, the proportion of near-plasmalemmal MOR SIGs relative to total decreased in large PARV-labeled dendrites in females. After CIS, no changes in the density or trafficking of MOR SIGs were seen in PARV-labeled dendrites or terminals in males. These data show that AIS and CIS differentially affect available MOR pools in PARV-containing interneurons in female and male rats. Furthermore, they suggest that CIS could affect principal cell excitability in a manner that maintains learning processes in females but not males.

  2. Somatosensory and visual deprivation each decrease the density of parvalbumin neurons and their synapse terminals in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiroshi; Shoshi, Chikafumi; Suemitsu, Shunsuke; Usui, Shinichi; Sujiura, Hiroko; Okamoto, Motoi

    2013-01-01

    In the phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity, the loss of one sensory system is followed by improved functioning of other intact sensory systems. MRI and functional MRI studies suggested a role of the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobe in cross-modal plasticity. We used a mouse model to examine the effects of sensory deprivation achieved by whisker trimming and visual deprivation achieved by dark rearing in neonatal mice on the appearance of parvalbumin (PV) neurons and the formation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67)-positive puncta around pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Whisker trimming, but not dark rearing, decreased the density of PV neurons in the hippocampus at postnatal day 28 (P28). In the prefrontal cortex, whisker trimming and dark rearing decreased the density of PV neurons in layer 5/6 (L5/6) at P28 and in L2/3 at P56, respectively, whereas dark rearing increased the density of PV neurons in L5/6 at P56. Whisker trimming decreased the density of GAD67-positive puncta in CA1 of the hippocampus at both P28 and P56 and in L5/6 of the prefrontal cortex at P28. Dark rearing decreased the density of GAD67-positive puncta in CA1 of the hippocampus and in both L2/3 and L5/6 of the prefrontal cortex at P28, and in L2/3 of the prefrontal cortex at P56. These results demonstrate that somatosensory or visual deprivation causes changes in the PV-interneuronal network in the mouse prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The results also suggest that the alteration of the PV-interneuronal network, especially in the prefrontal cortex, may contribute to cross-modal plasticity.

  3. The parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the mouse dentate gyrus express GABAA receptor subunits α1, β2, and δ along their extrasynaptic cell membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, I; Vasiljevic, M; Maurer, D; Höger, H; Klausberger, T; Sieghart, W

    2013-12-19

    Neuronal circuitries in the hippocampus are involved in navigation and memory and are controlled by major networks of GABAergic interneurons. Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons in the dentate gyrus (DG) are identified as fast-spiking cells, playing a crucial role in network oscillation and synchrony. The inhibitory modulation of these interneurons is thought to be mediated mainly through GABAA receptors, the major inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain. Here we show that all PV-positive interneurons in the granular/subgranular layer (GL/SGL) of the mouse DG express high levels of the GABAA receptor δ subunit. PV-containing interneurons in the hilus and the molecular layer, however, express the δ subunit to a lower extent. Only 8% of the somatostatin-containing interneurons express the δ subunit, whereas calbindin- or calretinin-containing interneurons in the DG seem not to express the GABAA receptor δ subunit at all. Hence, these cells receive a GABAergic control different from that of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL. Experiments investigating a possible co-expression of GABAA receptor α1, α2, α3, α4, α5, β1, β2, β3, or γ2 subunits with PV and δ subunits indicated that α1 and β2 subunits are co-expressed with δ subunits along the extrasynaptic membranes of PV-interneurons. These results suggest a robust tonic GABAergic control of PV-containing interneurons in the GL/SGL of the DG via δ subunit-containing receptors. Our data are important for better understanding of the neuronal circuitries in the DG and the role of specific cell types under pathological conditions.

  4. MDMA increases glutamate release and reduces parvalbumin-positive GABAergic cells in the dorsal hippocampus of the rat: role of cyclooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneken, John H; Cunningham, Jacobi I; Collins, Stuart A; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Gudelsky, Gary A

    2013-03-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; Ecstasy) is a popular drug of abuse with well-documented acute effects on serotonergic, dopaminergic, and cholinergic transmitter systems, as well as evidence of long-term disruption of serotoninergic systems in the rat brain. Recently, it was demonstrated that MDMA evokes a delayed and sustained increase in glutamate release in the hippocampus. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of inflammatory mediators in the MDMA-induced increase in glutamate release, as well as the contribution of inflammatory pathways in the persistent neurochemical toxicity associated with repeated MDMA treatment. Treatment with the non-selective cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor ketoprofen and the COX-2 selective inhibitor nimesulide attenuated the increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus evoked by repeated MDMA exposure (10 mg/kg, i.p., every 2 h); no attenuation was observed in rats treated with the COX-1 selective inhibitor piroxicam. Reverse dialysis of a major product of COX activity, prostaglandin E2, also resulted in a significant increase in extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus . Repeated exposure to MDMA diminished the number of parvalbumin-positive GABA interneurons in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, an effect that was attenuated by ketoprofen treatment. However, COX inhibition with ketoprofen did not prevent the long-term depletion of 5-HT in the hippocampus evoked by MDMA treatment. These data are supportive of the view that cyclooxygenase activity contributes to the mechanism underlying both the increased release of glutamate and decreased number of GABA interneurons in the rat hippocampus produced by repeated MDMA exposure.

  5. Somatosensory and Visual Deprivation Each Decrease the Density of Parvalbumin Neurons and Their Synapse Terminals in the Prefrontal Cortex and Hippocampus of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujiura,Hiroko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the phenomenon known as cross-modal plasticity, the loss of one sensory system is followed by improved functioning of other intact sensory systems. MRI and functional MRI studies suggested a role of the prefrontal cortex and the temporal lobe in cross-modal plasticity. We used a mouse model to examine the effects of sensory deprivation achieved by whisker trimming and visual deprivation achieved by dark rearing in neonatal mice on the appearance of parvalbumin (PV neurons and the formation of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67-positive puncta around pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Whisker trimming, but not dark rearing, decreased the density of PV neurons in the hippocampus at postnatal day 28 (P28. In the prefrontal cortex, whisker trimming and dark rearing decreased the density of PV neurons in layer 5/6 (L5/6 at P28 and in L2/3 at P56, respectively, whereas dark rearing increased the density of PV neurons in L5/6 at P56. Whisker trimming decreased the density of GAD67-positive puncta in CA1 of the hippocampus at both P28 and P56 and in L5/6 of the prefrontal cortex at P28. Dark rearing decreased the density of GAD67-positive puncta in CA1 of the hippocampus and in both L2/3 and L5/6 of the prefrontal cortex at P28, and in L2/3 of the prefrontal cortex at P56. These results demonstrate that somatosensory or visual deprivation causes changes in the PV-interneuronal network in the mouse prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. The results also suggest that the alteration of the PV-interneuronal network, especially in the prefrontal cortex, may contribute to cross-modal plasticity.

  6. Reduction in cortical parvalbumin expression due to intermittent theta-burst stimulation correlates with maturation of the perineuronal nets in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, Annika; Hoppenrath, Kathrin; Funke, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    We recently showed that intermittent theta-burst stimulation (iTBS) using transcranial magnetic stimulation strongly reduces the number of rat neocortical interneurons expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 kDa (GAD67) and parvalbumin (PV), indicating changed activity of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. In advance of in vitro studies intended to characterize changes in electrical properties of FS interneurons under these conditions, we tested whether the iTBS effect is age-dependent. Conscious Sprague-Dawley rats aged between 28 and 90 days received three blocks of iTBS at 15 min intervals. We found that iTBS-related reduction in PV+ cells was absent up to an age of 32 days, then gradually increased, and approached a maximum of about 40% reduction at an age of about 40 days. The relative number of cells expressing PV (PV+, 8-9%) did not change with age in sham-controls and also the increase in cortical c-Fos expression induced by iTBS was not principally age-dependent. However, a prominent growth of the perineuronal nets, typically surrounding the PV+ cells, exactly paralleled the increase in the iTBS effect. Based on these findings, we conclude that the functional development of the inhibitory network of PV+ interneurons with regard to intracortical synaptic connectivity is not sufficiently matured in rats younger than 35 d to enable activity-dependent modifications during iTBS. Outgrowth of the perineuronal nets and associated maturation of excitatory cortical inputs, as is characteristic for the critical cortical period, may take place before PV+ interneurons can be sufficiently activated via repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, allowing plastic changes of molecular phenotype and likely also synaptic plasticity.

  7. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders: Recommendations from the European Myeloma Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.C.J. van de Donk (Niels); A. Palumbo (Antonio); H.E. Johnsen (Hans); M. Engelhardt (Monika); F. Gay (Francesca); P.K. Gregersen (Peter ); R. Hajek (Roman); M. Kleber (Martina); H. Ludwig (Heinz); G. Morgan (Gareth); P. Musto (Pellegrino); T. Plesner (Torben); O. Sezer; E. Terpos (Evangelos); A. Waage (Anders); S. Zweegman (Sonja); H. Einsele (Hermann); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); H.M. Lokhorst (Henk)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; lightchain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain

  8. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders: Recommendations from the European Myeloma Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.W.C.J. van de Donk (Niels); A. Palumbo (Antonio); H.E. Johnsen (Hans); M. Engelhardt (Monika); F. Gay (Francesca); P.K. Gregersen (Peter ); R. Hajek (Roman); M. Kleber (Martina); H. Ludwig (Heinz); G. Morgan (Gareth); P. Musto (Pellegrino); T. Plesner (Torben); O. Sezer; E. Terpos (Evangelos); A. Waage (Anders); S. Zweegman (Sonja); H. Einsele (Hermann); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); H.M. Lokhorst (Henk)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; lightchain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain

  9. Challenges and opportunities for monoclonal antibody therapy in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirão, Breno C B; Raposo, Teresa; Jain, Saurabh; Hupp, Ted; Argyle, David J

    2016-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have come to dominate the biologics market in human cancer therapy. Nevertheless, in veterinary medicine, very few clinical trials have been initiated using this form of therapy. Some of the advantages of mAb therapeutics over conventional drugs are high specificity, precise mode of action and long half-life, which favour infrequent dosing of the antibody. Further advancement in the field of biomedical sciences has led to the production of different forms of antibodies, such as single chain antibody fragment, Fab, bi-specific antibodies and drug conjugates for use in diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. This review describes the potential for mAbs in veterinary oncology in supporting both diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The technical and financial hurdles to facilitate clinical acceptance of mAbs are explored and insights into novel technologies and targets that could support more rapid clinical development are offered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of polyol sugars on the stabilization of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Cohrs, Nicholas; Arosio, Paolo; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the impact of sugars and polyols on the heat-induced aggregation of a model monoclonal antibody whose monomer depletion is rate-limited by protein unfolding. We follow the kinetics of monomer consumption by size exclusion chromatography, and we interpret the results in the frame of two mechanistic schemes describing the enhanced protein stability in the presence of polyols. It is found that the stabilization effect increases with increasing polyol concentration with a comparable trend for all of the tested polyols. However, the stabilization effect at a given polyol concentration is polyol specific. In particular, the stabilization effect increases as a function of polyol size until a plateau is reached above a critical polyol size corresponding to six carbon atoms. Our results show that the stabilization by polyols does not depend solely on the volume fraction filled by the polyol molecules, but is also affected by the polyol chemistry.

  11. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYan-Fei; WangWei; 等

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies(McAbs) against infections bursal disease virus(IBDV) were obtained by using hydridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA),virus neutralization test(VNT) and Western-blotting assay (WBA).The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class.No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV),infectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV).All of McAbs were positively specific reactive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity.Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  12. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained by using hybridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,en- zyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), virus neutralization test (VNT) and Western- blotting assay (WBA). The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class. No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV) ,in- fectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV). All of McAbs were positively specific reac- tive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity. Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  13. Preparation and Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Vibrio anguillarum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shiyong(陈师勇); Zhang Peijun; Mo Zhaolan; Zhang Zhendong; Zou Yuxia; Xu Yongli

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against V.anguillarum strain M3 are prepared, and their isotypes are also characterized. Among them, C1C5 is the only Mab which does not crossreact with other eleven non-V.anguillarum strains. The proteinase K digestion test shows that the epitopes recognized by C1C5, C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs contained protein. The periodate oxidation test showed that the epitopes recognized by Mabs except C1C5 are glycosylated. In addition, results of additivity test indicate that the epitopes recognized by C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs are similar, and quite different from those recognized by Mab C1C5.

  14. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and immunogenicity comparability assessment strategies for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Wendy S; Prabhu, Saileta; Zheng, Yanan; Subramanyam, Meena; Wang, Yow-Ming C

    2010-10-01

    Regulatory guidance stipulates that comparability assessment is required to support manufacturing process changes during the development of a biological product or post-approval. However, strategies for assessing the comparability of pre- and post-change materials are still evolving. A hierarchical risk-based approach is recommended, starting with analytical testing to ensure quality, followed by biological characterization and, if needed, in vivo pharmacokinetic (PK), PK-pharmacodynamic (PD), safety and/or efficacy studies. The need for an in vivo study and the type of study required depend on the magnitude and the potential impact of the changes and the timing in the development process. This review discusses factors affecting the PK, PD and immunogenicity of monoclonal antibodies, and provides guidance for determining non-clinical and clinical comparability assessment strategies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Moving through three-dimensional phase diagrams of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakel, Natalie; Baum, Miriam; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Protein phase behavior characterization is a multivariate problem due to the high amount of influencing parameters and the diversity of the proteins. Single influences on the protein are not understood and fundamental knowledge remains to be obtained. For this purpose, a systematic screening method was developed to characterize the influence of fluid phase conditions on the phase behavior of proteins in three-dimensional phase diagrams. This approach was applied to three monoclonal antibodies to investigate influences of pH, protein and salt concentrations, with five different salts being tested. Although differences exist between the antibodies, this extensive study confirmed the general applicability of the Hofmeister series over the broad parameter range analyzed. The influence of the different salts on the aggregation (crystallization and precipitation) probability was described qualitatively using this Hofmeister series, with a differentiation between crystallization and precipitation being impossible, however.

  17. PCSK9 Inhibition With Monoclonal Antibodies: Modern Management of Hypercholesterolemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Matthew K; Santos, Raul D

    2017-01-01

    Current guidelines for hypercholesterolemia treatment emphasize lifestyle modification and lipid-modifying therapy to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease. Statins are the primary class of agents used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Although statins are effective for many patients, they fail to achieve optimal reduction in lipids for some patients, including those who have or are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. The PCSK9 gene was identified in the past decade as a potential therapeutic target for the management of patients with hypercholesterolemia. Pharmacologic interventions to decrease PCSK9 levels are in development, with the most promising approach using monoclonal antibodies that bind to PCSK9 in the plasma. Two monoclonal antibodies, alirocumab and evolocumab, have recently been approved for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, and a third one, bococizumab, is in phase 3 clinical development. All 3 agents achieve significant reductions in levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, as well as reductions in non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a). Long-term outcome trials are under way to determine the sustained efficacy, safety, and tolerability of PCSK9 inhibitors and whether this novel class of agents decreases the risk for major cardiovascular events in patients on lipid-modifying therapy. Available data suggest that PCSK9 inhibitors provide a robust reduction in atherogenic cholesterol levels with a good safety profile, especially for patients who fail to obtain an optimal clinical response to statin therapy, those who are statin intolerant or have contraindications to statin therapy, and those with familial hypercholesterolemia. © 2016, The Authors. The Journal of Clinical Pharmacology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  18. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: a new proposal of workup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiacavalli, Silvia; Cocito, Federica; Pochintesta, Lara; Pascutto, Cristiana; Ferretti, Virginia; Varettoni, Marzia; Zappasodi, Patrizia; Pompa, Alessandra; Landini, Benedetta; Cazzola, Mario; Corso, Alessandro

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic criteria for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) require quantification of bone marrow plasma cells (BMPCs) and skeletal survey to discriminate between MGUS and multiple myeloma (MM). By contrast, recent published guidelines suggest that these procedures could be avoided in the presence of serum monoclonal spike (M-spike) of small amount (≤1.5 g/dL). Aim of this study is to better quantify the risk of missing a diagnosis of MM, not performing bone marrow aspirate and skeletal survey in patients with M-spike ≤ 1.5 g/dL asymptomatic for bone pain. We reviewed data of 2282 patients consecutively observed from January 1974 to December 2010 in our single hematology department. We considered eligible for this study 1271 patients with grade <2 NCI bone pain, confirmed to have an MGUS or an MM after extensive standardized diagnostic workup including bone marrow biopsy, skeletal bone survey and laboratory tests. The risk of finding a BMPC infiltration ≥10% in patients with an M-spike ≤ 1.5 g/dL was very low (7.3%), although significantly different according to IgH isotype (4.7% for IgG vs. 20.5% for IgA). The risk of finding bone lesions with M-spike ≤ 1.5 g/dL was negligible (2.5%), regardless of IgH isotype. In asymptomatic patients with M-spike of small amount (≤1.5 g/dL): (i) BMPC evaluation may be reasonably avoided in patients with IgG M-spike, while should always be part of diagnostic workup in the presence of IgA M-spike and (ii) skeletal survey, less predictive for MM, should not be routinely indicated irrespective of IgH isotype. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Detection of experimental myocarditis by monoclonal antimyosin antibody, Fab fragment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezkalla, S.; Kloner, R.A.; Khaw, B.A.; Haber, E.; Fallon, J.T.; Smith, F.E.; Khatib, R.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether monoclonal antimyosin Fab (antigen binding fragment) was capable of labeling hearts with experimental coxsackievirus myocarditis, and to determine whether Fab could be used for detecting myocardial damage in either early or chronic phases of the disease. Sixty-five, 3-week-old cesarean-derived 1 (CD 1) mice were divided into two groups: group I (noninfected animals) and group II (infected with coxsackievirus B3). Mice from each group were killed on days 7, 17, 30, or 90 of infection. Forty-eight hours before killing, mice were injected with monoclonal I-125 antimyosin, Fab (25 microCi/injection) and radioactivity was counted in the heart. Selected heart sections were also examined by autoradiography. Heart radioactivity, count/m/mg (m +/- SEM) on days 7, 17, 30, and 90 of infection was 10.8 +/- 1.7, 21.3 +/- 1.1, 11.2 +/- 3.4, and 12.4 +/- 1.5 for group I, versus 36.7 +/- 8.0 (p less than 0.01), 50.0 +/- 4.5 (p less than 0.001), 33.4 +/- 16.1 (p = NS), and 40.6 +/- 8.5 (p less than 0.01) for group II, respectively. Autoradiography revealed focal uptake within areas of necrotic myocardium. We conclude that I125 Fab may be useful in detecting myocardial damage in the experimental model of murine myocarditis up to day 90 of infection.

  20. [Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) in Mexican mestizos: one institution's experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Gómez Rangel, J David

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is defined as presence of serum monoclonal protein at a concentration of 3 g per deciliter or less, no monoclonal protein or only moderate amounts of monoclonal light chains in urine, absence of lytic bone lesions, anemia, hypercalemia, and renal insufficiency related with monoclonal protein, and with a proportion of plasma cells in bone marrow of 10% or less. In Caucasian population, MGUS affects about 3% of individuals > 70 years of age, whereas in Mexican mestizos this figure is substantially lower (0.7%); on the other hand, MGUS represents in Mexico only 2.4% of all monoclonal gammopathies. In a total of 9081 individuals studied prospectively at the Centro de Hematología y Medicina Interna de Puebla throughout a 20-year period, 11 patients with MGUS were identified. Median age was 70 years (range 43-83 years). Patients have been followed in periods ranging from 6 to 3270 days (median, 308 days). Two patients evolved into overt multiple myeloma at 308 and 1687 days after diagnosis of MGUS. Overall median survival (SV) of the group has not been reached, whereas 3270 days overall SV is 91%. After discussing underreporting, biasing, and other confounding factors, it would seem that MGUS, like other monoclonal gammopathies, is less frequent in Mexican mestizos than in Caucasians. Routine screening studies to identify the condition should result in increased numbers of patients.

  1. Occurrence of Double Monoclonal Bands on Protein Electrophoresis: An Unusual Finding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Vishrut K; Bhagat, Priyanka; Bansal, Frainey; Chhabra, Seema

    2016-06-01

    Various techniques of protein electrophoresis are used for detection of monoclonal proteins/paraproteins in serum and/or urine of patients with monoclonal gammopathies. These are detected as the so-called 'M' bands (monoclonal bands) on serum protein electrophoresis and/or immunofixation electrophoresis. In most cases, a single M-band is detected. However, more than one M-band can be detected in the samples of a minor proportion of patients. This condition is termed as 'double gammopathy' or 'biclonal gammopathy'. A knowledge of such an unusual occurrence is essential for recognition and appropriate interpretation of this entity.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies neutralizing the haemolytic activity of box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri) tentacle extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S P; Comis, A; Marshall, M; Hartwick, R F; Howden, M E

    1993-09-01

    1. Three monoclonal antibodies have been produced which neutralize in vitro the haemolytic activity present in tentacle extracts of the box jellyfish (Chironex fleckeri). 2. Two of these monoclonal antibodies bound specifically to a component of relative molecular mass 50,000 in tentacle extract on Western blots. 3. This binding only occurred when the extracts were electrophoresed under non-reducing conditions. 4. The third monoclonal antibody did not display binding to Western blots of tentacle extract under any of our experimental conditions.

  3. Physiological and morphological diversity of immunocytochemically defined parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-positive interneurones in CA1 of the adult rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelzik, Hannelore; Hughes, David I; Thomson, Alex M

    2002-02-18

    To investigate the electrophysiological properties, synaptic connections, and anatomy of individual parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) and cholecystokinin-immunoreactive (CCK-IR) interneurones in CA1, dual intracellular recordings using biocytin-filled microelectrodes in slices of adult rat hippocampus were combined with fluorescence labelling of PV- and CCK-containing cells. Of 36 PV-IR cells, 29 were basket cells, with most of their axonal arbours in the stratum pyramidale (SP). Six were bistratified cells with axons ramifying throughout stratum oriens (SO) and stratum radiatum (SR). One was a putative axo-axonic cell with an axonal arbour confined to half of the SP and a narrow adjacent region of the SO. Of 27 CCK-IR neurones, 13 were basket cells, with most of their axonal arbours in the SP, and included basket cells with somata in the SP (6), SO (3), and SR (2) and at the border between the stratum lacunosum-moleculare (SLM) and the SR (2). In addition, several dendrite-targeting cell classes expressed CCK-IR: 4 of 9 bistratified cells with axons ramifying in the SO and SR; all five Schaffer-associated cells whose axons ramified extensively in the SR; both cells classified as quadrilaminar because their axons ramified in the SO, SP, SR, and SLM; one SO-SO cell whose dendritic and axonal arbours were contained within the SO; and one perforant path-associated cell with axonal and dendritic arbours within the distal SR and SLM. The majority (31 of 36) of PV-IR neurones recorded were fast-spiking, and most fast-spiking cells tested (25 of 29 basket, 1 axo-axonic, and 5 of 6 bistratified cells) were PV-IR. However, 1 of 6 regular-spiking basket, 1 of 4 regular-spiking bistratified, and 3 of 5 burst-firing basket cells were also PV-IR. In contrast, the majority (17 of 27) of the CCK-IR neurones recorded were regular-spiking, 3 were burst-firing, and 7 were fast-spiking. These data confirm that the majority of PV-IR and CCK-IR axon terminals innervate proximal

  4. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed.

  5. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  6. THE MECHANISM OF ANTI-IMPLANTATION EFFECT OF PROGESTERONE MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES IN MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGMin-Yi; HEZhi-Ying; WANGHan-Zheng

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the mechanism by which antiprogcsterone monoclonal antibodies block early pregnancy in mice. The mechanism of passive immunization is a complex issue as indicated below:

  7. Immunolocation of antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 and corresponding antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高绍荣; 胡国俊; 段崇文; 刘辉; 韩之明; 宋祥芬; 陈大元

    1999-01-01

    An antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 was produced by hybridoma technique of the isotype IgG. The monoclonal antibody was purified by means of ammonium sulfate precipitation and protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B affinity chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate the purity of the antibody. Evaluation of the sperm acrosomal status was determined by chlortetracycline (CTC) staining. It was found that monoclonal antibody 6B10 can inhibit the sperm acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. The corresponding antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody 6B10 was located on the plasma membrane of the sperm acrosome by indirect immunofluorescent microscopy and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Sperm protein was extracted by 1% Triton X-100. The molecular weight of the antigen is 50 ku, detected by Western blot. The antigen is a key protein in the sperm acrosome reaction and may be the receptor of progesterone on the sperm acrosome. It may either be developed as a candidate contraceptive vaccine

  8. Purification of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae adhesin by monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography.

    OpenAIRE

    Leith, D K; Baseman, J B

    1984-01-01

    A 165,000-dalton surface protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, designated protein P1, appears to be the major attachment ligand of the pathogen. We employed monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography to obtain purified protein P1.

  9. The role of radiolabeled anti-TNFα monoclonal antibodies for diagnostic purposes and therapy evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaudemans, A. W.J.M.; Dierckx, R. A.J.O.; Kallenberg, C. G.M.; Anzola Fuentes, K. L.

    2010-01-01

    Radiolabelled cytokines and monoclonal antibodies are an emerging class of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation. These radiopharmaceuticals bind to their targets with high affinity and specificity and therefore have excellent diagnostic potential for imaging of patients with chronic inflamm

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOTH PIG AND RABBIT ZONA PELLUCIDA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OURU-QIANG

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against both pig and rabbit zona pellucida with a dual immunization protocol employing heat soluble pig zona (HSPZ) and heat soluble rabbit zona (HSRZ), Of the 140 wells screencd, 12 wells were positive to

  11. Immunoglobulin heavy chain/light chain pairs (HLC, Hevylite™) assays for diagnosing and monitoring monoclonal gammopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraj, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Immunofixation (IFE) is a standard method for detecting monoclonal immunoglobulins and characterizing its isotype. Recently clonality can also be determined by using immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain/light chain immunoassays - HLC, HevyliteTM. HLC separately measures in pairs light chain types of each intact Ig class generating ratios of monoclonal Ig/uninvolved polyclonal Ig concentrations. Studies have shown that HLC and IFE are complementary methods. HLC assays quantify monoclonal proteins and identify monoclonality. It is possible to predict prognosis in multiple myeloma and to monitor response to treatment using HLC ratio. HLC ratio may serve as a parameter for myeloma induced immunoparesis and serve as a new marker for validating remission depth and relapse probabilities.

  12. Use of AN Eosinophil Specific Monoclonal Antibody in Assessing Eosinophil Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkoff, Marjorie Sue

    A monoclonal antibody to an eosinophil specific determinant is very important in assessing eosinophil function during helminthic infection. Eosinophils induced by Schistosoma mansoni infection in BALB/c mice were used to induce C57B1/6 immunocytes for production of hybridomas secreting eosinophil monoclonal antibodies. These antibodies were shown to react with an eosinophil surface epitope but not with neutrophils or macrophages as determined by ELISA, immunodiffusion, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot assay. Affinity chromatography with eosinophil chemotactic factor-sepharose consistently selected out a { rm M_ R} 67,000 protein from solubilized eosinophil membrane antigens but not from neutrophil and macrophage antigens. In vitro studies showed that the eosinophil-specific monoclonal antibodies abrogated antibody-dependent eosinophil -mediated killing of S. mansoni schistosomula using mouse, rat or human eosinophils. Neutrophil and macrophage killing activities were unaffected. The monoclonal antibodies effected complement-dependent lysis of mouse and rat eosinophils but not of human eosinophils. ECF-treated eosinophils showed enhanced killing of schistosomula which was blocked by the monoclonal antibody. Murine and human eosinophils preincubated with monoclonal antibody exhibited decreased chemotaxis to ECF at optimal chemotactic concentrations. The monoclonal antibody also blocked eosinophil binding to ECF- sepharose beads. In vivo induction of peripheral blood eosinophilia by injection of S. mansoni eggs was suppressed by injections of monoclonal antibodies 2CD13 and 2QD45 in mouse and rat experimental models. Eosinophilia induced by keyhole limpet hemocyanin- cyclophosphamide treatment was also suppressed by monoclonal antibody in both murine and rat systems. Pulmonary granulomas in mice given egg injection and monoclonal antibody were smaller and contained fewer eosinophils than those granulomas from mice given eggs only. In immuno-biochemical studies, the

  13. Identification of Haemophilus influenzae type b by a monoclonal antibody coagglutination assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Hamel, J.; Brodeur, B R; Belmaaza, A; Montplaisir, S; Musser, J M; Selander, R K

    1987-01-01

    A coagglutination assay using monoclonal antibody is described for the identification of Haemophilus influenzae type b. An immunoglobulin G2a monoclonal antibody, Hb-2, directed against a serotype-specific outer membrane protein of H. influenzae type b was adsorbed to Staphylococcus aureus Cowan 1 cells. In a dot enzyme immunoassay, Hb-2 reacted with 453 of 455 H. influenzae type b isolates and did not react with H. influenzae of other serotypes, untypeable H. influenzae strains, or other bac...

  14. Preparation and Biological Evaluation of 188Re Labeled Monoclonal Antibody TGLA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN; Kai; ZHANG; Jun-li; CHEN; Bao-jun; CUI; Hai-ping

    2012-01-01

    <正>Monoclonal antibody TGLA is a specific targeting CD20 chimeric antibody. It can kill tumor cells and inhibit tumor cells’ growth effectively, which has been applied to clinical therapy of lymphoma cell B. 188 Re is easy to get, and emits both β and γ rays. 188Re labeled monoclonal antibody TGLA can be used for the study of lymphoma therapy and imaging. This work got the product 188Re-TGLA by direct labeling

  15. Efecto de un anticuerpo monoclonal anti CD20 (Rituximab) en trombocitopenia inmune.

    OpenAIRE

    Untama, José; Médico, Departamento de Hematología, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins – EsSalud. Lima.; Del Carpio, Daniel; Médico, Departamento de Hematología, Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins – EsSalud. Lima.

    2012-01-01

    Objetivo: Describir la respuesta terapéutica con un anticuerpo monoclonal anti CD20 (Rituximab), en pacientes con Trombocitopenia Inmune (PTI). Material y métodos: Estudio retrospectivo, descriptivo y observacional tipo serie de casos. Se revisaron las historias clínicas de pacientes adultos con PTI que recibieron el anticuerpo monoclonal anti CD20 (Rituximab), desde diciembre 2005 hasta diciembre 2010. Se definió respuesta: conteo plaquetario >30 mil, por lo menos duplicar el conteo plaqu...

  16. Characterization and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies developed for typing influenza A and influenza B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Walls, H H; Harmon, M W; Slagle, J J; Stocksdale, C; Kendal, A P

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that are broadly reactive with influenza A or influenza B viruses were produced as stable reagents for typing influenza viruses. Monoclonal antibodies to influenza A were specific for either matrix protein or nucleoprotein. The antibodies to influenza B were specific for nucleoprotein or hemagglutinin protein. In an enzyme immunoassay procedure, influenza A antibodies detected H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza A virus strains collected between 1934 and 1984. Each of the inf...

  17. Laboratory Characterizations on 2007 Cases of Monoclonal Gammopathies in East China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hao Wang; Chunfang Gao; Lingling Xu; Zaixing Yang; Wenjing Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies are characterized by the presence of monoclonal immunoglobulin in patients with or without evidence of multiple myeloma (MM), macroglobulinemia, amyloidosis (AL), or a related plasma cell proliferative disorder. This study aims to evaluate laboratory diagnostic characters of monoclonal gammopathies and investigates the correlation between monoclonal gammopathies and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1). Immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE), serum protein electrophoresis (SPE), nephelometry and urine light chain ELISA were used for laboratory identification of monoclonal immunoglobulins. Plasma TGFβ1 was detected with double-antibodies ELISA. Lightcycler was used for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis. Totally 2,007 cases of monoclonai immunogiobulin (M protein) were identified in 10,682 samples. The isotypes of M protein were IgG type 47.1%, IgA 23.0%, IgM 8.7%, IgD 5.3%, free light chain κ 6.1%, λ 9.8%. In reference to IFE, the coherency of diagnosis was serum light chain ratio (κ/λ) 94.4%, quantitation of lgs 83%, light chain quantitation 80.9%, and urine light chain ratio (κ/λ) 58.0%. Plasma TGFβ1 was elevated significantly compared to normal control. The allelic frequency of codon 10 (C > T) was neither associated with the existence of the M protein nor with the M protein isotype. Monoclonal gammopathies can be identified with the combination of IFE, SPE, Igs quantitaion and urine light chain determination. Although TGFβ1, an important cytokine in immune regulation, was elevated in monoclonal gammopathies, the SNPs in coding region of TGFβ1 gene did not confer susceptibility to the development of monoclonal gammopathies in this study. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(4): 293-298.

  18. Does My Patient with a Serum Monoclonal Spike have Multiple Myeloma?

    OpenAIRE

    Bianchi, Giada; Ghobrial, Irene M.

    2012-01-01

    A monoclonal spike (M spike or paraprotein) on serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP) is a frequent finding in the general population and typically is pathognomonic of an asymptomatic, premalignant condition called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). MGUS occurs in around 3% of people older than 50 and is associated with a lifelong, low, yet non negligible, risk of progression to multiple myeloma (MM) or a related plasma cell dyscrasia. It is generally an incidental diagn...

  19. Inhibition of lipoxygenase activity in lentil protoplasts by monoclonal antibodies introduced into the cells via electroporation

    OpenAIRE

    J. F. G. Vliegenthart; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The isolation of lentil protoplasts and the transfer of anti-lipoxygenase monoclonal antibodies into plant protoplasts by electroporation is reported. The dependence of the efficiency of monoclonal antibody incorporation on the field strength is shown as well. The transferred immunoglobulins retained their functional and structural integrity and were able to inhibit the intracellular target enzyme, with a linear relationship between inhibition of lipoxygenase activity and amount of incorporat...

  20. New monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin. Powerful tools for the investigation of the renin system.

    OpenAIRE

    Galen, F X; Devaux, C.; Atlas, S; Guyenne, T; Menard, J; Corvol, P; Simon, D.; Cazaubon, C; Richer, P; Badouaille, G

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human renin were obtained by the fusing of myeloma cells with spleen cells from Balb/c or high-responder Biozzi mice injected with pure tumoral or highly purified renal renin. These procedures resulted in the production of seven stable monoclonal antibodies to human renin. Antibodies in the hybridoma culture medium were screened by binding to pure iodinated renin or insolubilized renin in a solid phase assay. The concentration of purified antibodies that...

  1. [ICO-10 monoclonal antibodies to the Thy-1 antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotkova, O V; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Tupitsyn, N N; Chimishkian, K L; Kostrykina, V N

    1989-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAB) ICO-10 to Thy-1 antigen were obtained. MAB ICO-10 reacted in indirect immunofluorescence test with 5.7 +/- 0.8% human thymocytes. Antibodies did not react with granulocytes, monocytes, T- and non-T cells from peripheral blood, and with marrow cells of healthy donors. MAB ICO-10 reacted with blast cells from 25 of 53 patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), from 2 of 5 patients with B-cell ALL. This antigen was absent on blood and marrow cells from some patients with ALL, 80 patients with chronic lymphoid leukemia, 54 patients with chronic granulocytic leukemia at the stage of blastic crisis, 128 patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. Antibodies are specifically bound to thymocytes and spleen cells of Thy 1.1 and Thy 1.2 mice. MAB ICO-10 detect Thy-1 antigen expressed on human hematopoietic cells. MAB ICO-10 may be applied for human leukemia and lymphoma immune diagnosis.

  2. [ICO-166 monoclonal antibodies against the CD45RA antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, E A; Baryshnikov, A Iu; Novikov, V V; Syrkin, A B

    1993-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCA) ICO-166 against CD45RA antigen were generated and characterized. In the indirect IFA, MCA ICO-166 reacted with 54.1 +/- 1.9% lymphocytes of human peripheral blood and 15.2 +/- 2.3% monocytes but not with granulocytes or thrombocytes. The method of double labelling of cells demonstrated that MCA ICO-166 detected all B-lymphocytes, all NK-cells and 31% of mature T-lymphocytes but only 55% of CD8 suppressor cells and only 21% of CDA helper cells carried this antigen on the surface. Experiments were carried out to block binding of FITC-labeled MCA ALB11 against CD45RA antigen with human lymphocytes by pretreatment of cells with different concentrations of MCA ICO-166. Treatment of cells with MCA ALB11 blocked binding of MCA ALB11-FITC by 85% on the average. MCA ICO-166 blocked binding of MCA ALB11-FITC by 66% on the average. When different dilutions of MCA ICO-166 were used, the dose-dependent effect of blocking of MCA ALB11-FITC binding was observed. MCA ICO-166 immunoprecipitated a protein band of molecular weight 220 kDa from lysates of mononuclear cells of the human peripheral blood.

  3. Profiling formulated monoclonal antibodies by (1)H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Leszek; Jordan, John B; Lawson, Ken; Jerums, Matthew; Apostol, Izydor; Schnier, Paul D

    2013-10-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is arguably the most direct methodology for characterizing the higher-order structure of proteins in solution. Structural characterization of proteins by NMR typically utilizes heteronuclear experiments. However, for formulated monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics, the use of these approaches is not currently tenable due to the requirements of isotope labeling, the large size of the proteins, and the restraints imposed by various formulations. Here, we present a new strategy to characterize formulated mAbs using (1)H NMR. This method, based on the pulsed field gradient stimulated echo (PGSTE) experiment, facilitates the use of (1)H NMR to generate highly resolved spectra of intact mAbs in their formulation buffers. This method of data acquisition, along with postacquisition signal processing, allows the generation of structural and hydrodynamic profiles of antibodies. We demonstrate how variation of the PGSTE pulse sequence parameters allows proton relaxation rates and relative diffusion coefficients to be obtained in a simple fashion. This new methodology can be used as a robust way to compare and characterize mAb therapeutics.

  4. Role of cosolutes in the aggregation kinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Sozo, Margaux; Arosio, Paolo; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-10-16

    We propose a general strategy based on kinetic analysis to investigate how cosolutes affect the aggregation behavior of therapeutic proteins. We apply this approach to study the impact of NaCl and sorbitol on the aggregation kinetics of two monoclonal antibodies, an IgG1 and an IgG2. By using a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques, we study the impact of the cosolutes on the monomer depletion, as well as on the formation of dimers, trimers, and larger aggregates. We analyze these macroscopic effects in the frame of a kinetic model based on Smoluchowski's population balance equations modified to account for nucleation events. By comparing experimental data with model simulations, we discriminate the effect of cosolutes on the elementary steps which contribute to the global aggregation process. In the case of the IgG1, it is found that NaCl accelerates the kinetics of aggregation by promoting specifically aggregation events, while sorbitol delays the kinetics of aggregation by specifically inhibiting protein unfolding. In the case of the IgG2, whose monomer depletion kinetics is limited by dimer formation, NaCl and sorbitol are found respectively to accelerate and inhibit conformational changes and aggregation events to the same extent.

  5. Kinetics of Monoclonal Antibody Aggregation from Dilute toward Concentrated Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Jagielski, Jakub; Pfister, David; Lazzari, Stefano; Massant, Jan; Lattuada, Marco; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-04-07

    Gaining understanding on the aggregation behavior of proteins under concentrated conditions is of both fundamental and industrial relevance. Here, we study the aggregation kinetics of a model monoclonal antibody (mAb) under thermal stress over a wide range of protein concentrations in various buffer solutions. We follow experimentally the monomer depletion and the aggregate growth by size exclusion chromatography with inline light scattering. We describe the experimental results in the frame of a kinetic model based on population balance equations, which allows one to discriminate the contributions of the conformational and of the colloidal stabilities to the global aggregation rate. Finally, we propose an expression for the aggregation rate constant, which accounts for solution viscosity, protein-protein interactions, as well as aggregate compactness. All these effects can be quantified by light scattering techniques. It is found that the model describes well the experimental data under dilute conditions. Under concentrated conditions, good model predictions are obtained when the solution pH is far below the isoelectric point (pI) of the mAb. However, peculiar effects arise when the solution pH is increased toward the mAb pI, and possible explanations are discussed.

  6. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  7. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-04-06

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail.

  8. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  9. Desmoids in familial adenomatous polyposis are monoclonal proliferations.

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    Middleton, S B; Frayling, I M; Phillips, R K

    2000-02-01

    Desmoids are poorly-understood, locally aggressive, non-metastasizing fibromatoses that occur with disproportionate frequency in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Their nature is controversial with arguments for and against a neoplastic origin. Neoplastic proliferations are by definition monoclonal, whereas reactive processes originate from a polyclonal background. We examined clonality of 25 samples of desmoid tissue from 11 female FAP patients by assessing patterns of X-chromosome inactivation to calculate a clonality ratio. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a polymorphic CAG short tandem repeat (STR) sequence adjacent to a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme site within the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) gene using fluorescent-labelled primers enabled analysis of PCR products by Applied Biosystems Genescan II software. Twenty-one samples from nine patients were informative for the assay. Samples from all informative cases comprised a median of 66% (range 0-75%) clonal cells but from the six patients with a clonality ratio < or =0.5 comprised a median of 71% (65-75%) clonal cells. FAP-associated desmoid tumours are true neoplasms. This may have implications in the development of improved treatment protocols for patients with these aggressive tumours.

  10. Modulation of desmin intermediate filament assembly by a monoclonal antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    We have used a monoclonal antibody against desmin to examine the assembly of intermediate filaments (IF) from their building blocks, the tetrameric protofilaments. The antibody, designated D76, does not cross react with any other IF proteins (Danto, S.I., and D.A. Fischman. 1984. J. Cell Biol. 98:2179-2191). It binds to a region amino-terminal to cys- 324 of avian desmin that is resistant to chymotrypsin and trypsin digestion, and in the electron microscope appears to bind to the ends of tetrameric protofilaments. In combination, these findings suggest that the epitope of the antibody resides at the amino-terminal end of the alpha-helical rod domain. Preincubation of desmin protofilaments with an excess of D76 antibodies blocks their subsequent assembly into IF. In the presence of sub-stoichiometric amounts of antibodies, IF are assembled from protofilaments but they are morphologically aberrant in that (a) they are capped by IgG molecules at one or both ends; (b) they are unraveled to varying degree, revealing a characteristic right- handed helical arrangement of sub-filamentous strands of different diameters. The antibody binds only to the ends but not along the length of desmin IF. The most straightforward explanation for this is that the epitope resides in a part of the desmin molecule that becomes buried within the core of the filament upon polymerization and is therefore inaccessible to the antibody. PMID:2450097

  11. Monoclonal antibody-based candidate therapeutics against HIV type 1.

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    Chen, Weizao; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-05-01

    Treatment of HIV-1 infection has been highly successful with small molecule drugs. However, resistance still develops. In addition, long-term use can lead to toxicity with unpredictable effects on health. Finally, current drugs do not lead to HIV-1 eradication. The presence of the virus leads to chronic inflammation, which can result in increased morbidity and mortality after prolonged periods of infection. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been highly successful during the past two decades for therapy of many diseases, primarily cancers and immune disorders. They are relatively safe, especially human mAbs that have evolved in humans at high concentrations to fight diseases and long-term use may not lead to toxicities. Several broadly neutralizing mAbs (bnmAbs) against HIV-1 can protect animals but are not effective when used for therapy of an established infection. We have hypothesized that HIV-1 has evolved strategies to effectively escape neutralization by full-size antibodies in natural infections but not by smaller antibody fragments. Therefore, a promising direction of research is to discover and exploit antibody fragments as potential candidate therapeutics against HIV-1. Here we review several bnmAbs and engineered antibody domains (eAds), their in vitro and in vivo antiviral efficacy, mechanisms used by HIV-1 to escape them, and strategies that could be effective to develop more powerful mAb-based HIV-1 therapeutics.

  12. Development and Evaluation of Monoclonal Antibodies for Paxilline

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    Chris M. Maragos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paxilline (PAX is a tremorgenic mycotoxin that has been found in perennial ryegrass infected with Acremonium lolii. To facilitate screening for this toxin, four murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were developed. In competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (CI-ELISAs the concentrations of PAX required to inhibit signal development by 50% (IC50s ranged from 1.2 to 2.5 ng/mL. One mAb (2-9 was applied to the detection of PAX in maize silage. The assay was sensitive to the effects of solvents, with 5% acetonitrile or 20% methanol causing a two-fold or greater increase in IC50. For analysis of silage samples, extracts were cleaned up by adsorbing potential matrix interferences onto a solid phase extraction column. The non-retained extract was then diluted with buffer to reduce solvent content prior to assay. Using this method, the limit of detection for PAX in dried silage was 15 µg/kg and the limit of quantification was 90 µg/kg. Recovery from samples spiked over the range of 100 to 1000 µg/kg averaged 106% ± 18%. The assay was applied to 86 maize silage samples, with many having detectable, but none having quantifiable, levels of PAX. The results suggest the CI-ELISA can be applied as a sensitive technique for the screening of PAX in maize silage.

  13. Monoclonal antibody probe for assessing beer foam stabilizing proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, A; Proudlove, M O; Dickie, K; Mills, E N; Kauffman, J A; Morgan, M R

    1999-08-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab; IFRN 1625) has been produced, which is specific for the most hydrophobic polypeptides responsible for foam stabilization. The binding characteristics of the Mab suggest that it is the conformation of certain hydrophobic polypeptides which is important for foam stabilization. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for assessing the foam-positive form of the foam-stabilizing polypeptides in beer was developed using IFRN 1625. A good correlation was obtained between ELISA determination of foam-stabilizing polypeptides and an empirical means of determining foaming, that is, the Rudin head retention values, for a collection of beers of various foam qualities. Application of the ELISA to different stages of the brewing process showed that the amounts of foam-positive polypeptides increased during barley germination. During the brewing process the proportion of foam-positive polypeptides present after fermentation increased slightly, although a large amount was lost along with other beer proteins during subsequent steps, such as filtering. The present study demonstrates that the amounts of beer polypeptide present in a foam-positive form have a direct relationship with the foaming potential of beer, that their levels are altered by processing, and that there is potential for greater quality control.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zheng; Tian, Wei; Yu, Tianfei; Li, Li; Ma, Bo; Wang, Junwei

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against NS1 protein of Goose parvovirus (GPV) were generated. The secreted MAbs were obtained by fusing mouse myeloma cells and spleen cells of BALB/c mice, which were immunized with the plasmid pcDNA3.1-GPV-NS1 and recombinant protein of GPV-NS1. With indirect ELISA, six hybridoma cell lines against GPV-NS1 were screened. The subtypes of the two MAbs were IgG2a; the others were IgM. The light chain was κ. Western blot analysis showed that six MAbs reacted with recombinant protein GPV-NS1. GPV-NS1 was dissected into 15 overlapping epitopes, which were used to react with MAbs in Western blot. Results showed that six MAbs recognized NS1 protein linear B-cell epitopes located at the C-terminus 453-514 aa, 485-542 aa, and 533-598 aa.

  15. Immunomodulatory Monoclonal Antibodies in Combined Immunotherapy Trials for Cutaneous Melanoma

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    Mariana Aris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, there has been a twist in cancer treatment toward immunotherapy thanks to the impressive results seen in advanced patients from several tumor pathologies. Cutaneous melanoma is a highly mutated and immunogenic tumor that has been a test field for the development of immunotherapy. However, there is still a way on the road to achieving complete and long-lasting responses in most patients. It is desirable that immunotherapeutic strategies induce diverse immune reactivity specific to tumor antigens, including the so-called neoantigens, as well as the blockade of immunosuppressive mechanisms. In this review, we will go through the role of promising monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy with immunomodulatory function, especially blocking of the inhibitory immune checkpoints CTLA-4 and PD-1, in combination with different immunotherapeutic strategies such as vaccines. We will discuss the rational basis for these combinatorial approaches as well as different schemes currently under study for cutaneous melanoma in the clinical trials arena. In this way, the combination of “push and release” immunomodulatory therapies can contribute to achieving a more robust and durable antitumor immune response in patients.

  16. Molecular mechanisms of resistance to the EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab.

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    Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Wheeler, Deric L

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a receptor tyrosine kinase belonging to the HER family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Receptor activation upon ligand binding leads to down stream activation of the PI3K/AKT, RAS/RAF/MEK/ERK and PLCγ/PKC pathways that influence cell proliferation, survival and the metastatic potential of tumor cells. Increased activation by gene amplification, protein overexpression or mutations of the EGFR has been identified as an etiological factor in a number of human epithelial cancers (e.g., NSCLC, CRC, glioblastoma and breast cancer). Therefore, targeting the EGFR has been intensely pursued as a cancer treatment strategy over the last two decades. To date, five EGFR inhibitors, including three small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and two monoclonal antibodies have gained FDA approval for use in oncology. Both approaches to targeting the EGFR have shown clinical promise and the anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab is used to treat HNSCC and CRC. Despite clinical gains arising from use of cetuximab, both intrinsic resistance and the development of acquired resistance are now well recognized. In this review we focus on the biology of the EGFR, the role of EGFR in human cancer, the development of antibody-based anti-EGFR therapies and a summary of their clinical successes. Further, we provide an in depth discussion of described molecular mechanisms of resistance to cetuximab and potential strategies to circumvent this resistance.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies: pharmacokinetics as a basis for new dosage regimens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azanza, J-R; Sádaba, B; Gómez-Guiu, A

    2015-10-01

    Complete monoclonal IgG antibodies which are in use in clinical practice share some pharmacological properties resulting in high concentrations in plasma. This fact is reflected in their low volumes of distribution, which can also be correlated with a high molecular weight and water solubility. This feature allows a novel approach to be applied to the dosing schedule for this group of drugs with fixed doses being used instead of the initially developed weight- or body surface-adjusted dosing schedules. In addition, the development of a new formulation containing hyaluronidase allows a subcutaneous route of administration to be used, because hyaluronidase creates a space in the subcutaneous tissue that helps antibody absorption. This method requires higher doses, but has allowed testing the feasibility of administering a fixed dose, with no individual dose adjustments based on weight or body surface. Moreover, loading doses are not needed, because the first dose results, within 3 weeks, in minimum concentrations that are higher than effective concentrations.

  18. An update on newer monoclonal antibodies in lymphoma therapy

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    Subhashini Archana Kadavakolan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, an estimated 9.4% of all new cancers in the US were accounted to hematological cancers. Most of these cancers have a B-cell origin and on the cell surface express antigen CD20-known to restrict B-cells. Considering the intrinsic immune status of the patients receiving chemotherapy, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs are designed to provide active or passive immunotherapy. Clinical success of rituximab-anti-CD20 mAb in the treatment of lymphoma has led to the development of newer generations of mAb to increase the anti-tumor activity. Hence, recent advances in lymphoma therapy are being built on the conventional prototype of anti-CD20 mAb-rituximab. Our review is an update on the advances in lymphoma therapy using mAb against CD20 including the second generation-ofatumumab, veltuzumab, ocrelizumab, and the third-generation mAbs-ocaratuzumab and obinutuzumab.

  19. Plasmid copy number noise in monoclonal populations of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong Ng, Jérôme; Chatenay, Didier; Robert, Jérôme; Poirier, Michael Guy

    2010-01-01

    Plasmids are extra chromosomal DNA that can confer to their hosts’ supplementary characteristics such as antibiotic resistance. Plasmids code for their copy number through their own replication frequency. Even though the biochemical networks underlying the plasmid copy number (PCN) regulation processes have been studied and modeled, no measurement of the heterogeneity in PCN within a whole population has been done. We have developed a fluorescent-based measurement system, which enables determination of the mean and noise in PCN within a monoclonal population of bacteria. Two different fluorescent protein reporters were inserted: one on the chromosome and the other on the plasmid. The fluorescence of these bacteria was measured with a microfluidic flow cytometry device. We show that our measurements are consistent with known plasmid characteristics. We find that the partitioning system lowers the PCN mean and standard deviation. Finally, bacterial populations were allowed to grow without selective pressure. In this case, we were able to determine the plasmid loss rate and growth inhibition effect.

  20. Establishment of a novel monoclonal antibody against LGR5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yuka; Kosaka, Hiromichi; Usami, Katsuaki; Toki, Hiroe; Kawai, Hironori; Shiraishi, Norihiko; Ota, Toshio; Nakamura, Kazuyasu; Furuya, Akiko; Satoh, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Kazumasa; Masuda, Kazuhiro

    2010-04-09

    LGR5 is an orphan G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is expressed on the cell surface membrane. LGR5 is reported to be overexpressed in colon, liver, and ovary tumor compared to normal tissue. However, a specific ligand for LGR5 has not yet been determined, and the function is still not clear. An LGR5-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) is needed as a tool for detection and analysis of LGR5 biological function and cancer therapy. To date, no mAb against LGR5 that retains high affinity and specificity has been reported. Here, we report successful establishment and characterization of a mAb (KM4056) that specifically recognizes the extracellular N-terminal domain of human LGR5, but not LGR4 or LGR6. This mAb has potent complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) activity in vitro and shows strong anti-tumor activity in vivo against xenograft model by transplanting LGR5 expressing CHO transfectants into SCID mice. Thus, KM4056 can be a useful tool for detection of LGR5 positive cells and analysis of LGR5 biological function.