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Sample records for monochromatic probe light

  1. Study on paper moisture measurement method by monochromatic light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changtao; Du, Xin; He, Ping; Zhang, Lili; Li, Nan; Wang, Ming

    2010-10-01

    We design the emission and detection optical paths of three monochromatic infrared light sources with different wavelength. The three light sources are placed according to the different angles, so that the three kinds of monochromatic lights are converged on the same point of the sample. Using the method, we can detect the same point and improve the measurement accuracy. We choose the standard near-infrared monochromatic light source, so that we can save some equipments, such as tungsten- halogen lamp, filtered wheel, collimation focalizer, electric machine, and so on. In particular, we save the cumbersome cooling system, reduce the volume of the instrument greatly and reduce the cost. The three monochromatic light sources are supplied by the same pulse power source, to ensure their synchronous working.

  2. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Solovykh, N. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λmax = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length Lcoh and the correlation radius rcor are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 - 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent - incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size.

  3. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagovsky, A V; Solovykh, N V [I.V.Michurin All-Russian Recearch Institute of Fruit Crops Genetics and Breeding (Russian Federation); Budagovskaya, O N [I.V.Michurin All-Russia Research and Development Institute of Gardening, Michurinsk, Tambov region (Russian Federation); Budagovsky, I A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λ{sub max} = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length L{sub coh} and the correlation radius r{sub cor} are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 – 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent – incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size. (biophotonics)

  4. Sex and vision II: color appearance of monochromatic lights

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    Abramov Israel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because cerebral cortex has a very large number of testosterone receptors, we examined the possible sex differences in color appearance of monochromatic lights across the visible spectrum. There is a history of men and women perceiving color differently. However, all of these studies deal with higher cognitive functions which may be culture-biased. We study basic visual functions, such as color appearance, without reference to any objects. We present here a detailed analysis of sex differences in primary chromatic sensations. Methods We tested large groups of young adults with normal vision, including spatial and temporal resolution, and stereopsis. Based on standard color-screening and anomaloscope data, we excluded all color-deficient observers. Stimuli were equi-luminant monochromatic lights across the spectrum. They were foveally-viewed flashes presented against a dark background. The elicited sensations were measured using magnitude estimation of hue and saturation. When the only permitted hue terms are red (R yellow (Y, green (G, blue (B, alone or in combination, such hue descriptions are language-independent and the hue and saturation values can be used to derive a wide range of color-discrimination functions. Results There were relatively small but clear and significant, differences between males and females in the hue sensations elicited by almost the entire spectrum. Generally, males required a slightly longer wavelength to experience the same hue as did females. The spectral loci of the unique hues are not correlated with anomaloscope matches; these matches are directly determined by the spectral sensitivities of L- and M-cones (genes for these cones are on the X-chromosomes. Nor are there correlations between loci of pairs of unique hues (R, Y, G, B. Wavelength-discrimination functions derived from the scaling data show that males have a broader range of poorer discrimination in the middle of the spectrum. The

  5. Effect of a combination of green and blue monochromatic light on broiler immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziqiang; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2014-09-05

    Our previous study suggested that green light or blue light would enhance the broiler immune response; this study was conducted to evaluate whether a combination of green and blue monochromatic light would result in improved immune response. A total of 192 Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to white light, red light, green light, and blue light from 0 to 26 days. From 27 to 49 days, half of the broilers in green light and blue light were switched to blue light (G-B) and green light (B-G), respectively. The levels of anti-Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and anti-bovine serum albumin (BSA) IgG in G-B group were elevated by 11.9-40.3% and 17.4-48.7%, respectively, compared to single monochromatic lights (Plight groups. However, the serum TNF-α concentration in the G-B group was reduced by 3.64-40.5% compared to other groups, and no significant difference was found between the G-B and B-G groups in any type of detection index at the end of the experiment. These results suggested that the combination of G-B and B-G monochromatic light could effectively enhance the antibody titer, the proliferation index of lymphocytes and alleviate the stress response in broilers. Therefore, the combination of green and blue monochromatic light can improve the immune function of broilers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pustular Palmoplantar Psoriasis Successfully Treated with Nb-UVB Monochromatic Excimer Light: A Case-Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Gianfaldoni

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Barber’s palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP is a form of localised pustular psoriasis, affecting the palmar and plantar surfaces. It is a chronic disease, with a deep impact on the patients’ quality of life. The Authors discuss a case of Baber Psoriasis successfully treated with monochromatic excimer light.

  7. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  8. Melatonin modulates monochromatic light-induced GHRH expression in the hypothalamus and GH secretion in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-04-01

    To study the mechanism by which monochromatic lights affect the growth of broilers, a total of 192 newly hatched broilers, including the intact, sham-operated and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) using a light-emitting diode (LED) system for 2 weeks. The results showed that the GHRH-ir neurons were distributed in the infundibular nucleus (IN) of the chick hypothalamus. The mRNA and protein levels of GHRH in the hypothalamus and the plasma GH concentrations in the chicks exposed to GL were increased by 6.83-31.36%, 8.71-34.52% and 6.76-9.19% compared to those in the chicks exposed to WL (P=0.022-0.001), RL (P=0.002-0.000) and BL (P=0.290-0.017) in the intact group, respectively. The plasma melatonin concentrations showed a positive correlation with the expression of GHRH (r=0.960) and the plasma GH concentrations (r=0.993) after the various monochromatic light treatments. After pinealectomy, however, these parameters decreased and there were no significant differences between GL and the other monochromatic light treatments. These findings suggest that melatonin plays a critical role in GL illumination-enhanced GHRH expression in the hypothalamus and plasma GH concentrations in young broilers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. In-ovo monochromatic green light photostimulation enhances embryonic somatotropic axis activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon, L; Avital-Cohen, N; Malamud, D; Heiblum, R; Druyan, S; Porter, T E; Gumulka, M; Rozenboim, I

    2017-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that in ovo photostimulation with monochromatic green light increases body weight and accelerates muscle development in broilers. The mechanism in which in ovo photostimulation accelerates growth and muscle development is not clearly understood. The objective of the current study was to define development of the somatotropic axis in the broiler embryo associated with in ovo green light photostimulation. Two-hundred-forty fertile broiler eggs were divided into 2 groups. The first group was incubated under intermittent monochromatic green light using light-emitting diode (LED) lamps with an intensity of 0.1 W\\m2 at shell level, and the second group was incubated under dark conditions and served as control. In ovo green light photostimulation increased plasma growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL) levels, as well as hypothalamic growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH), liver growth hormone receptor (GHR), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) mRNA levels. The in ovo photostimulation did not, however, increase embryo's body weight, breast muscle weight, or liver weight. The results of this study suggest that stimulation with monochromatic green light during incubation increases somatotropic axis expression, as well as plasma prolactin levels, during embryonic development. © 2017 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  10. Mechanisms of interaction of monochromatic visible light with cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karu, Tiina I.

    1996-01-01

    Biological responses of cells to visible and near IR (laser) radiation occur due to physical and/or chemical changes in photoacceptor molecules, components of respiratory chains (cyt a/a3 in mitochondria). As a result of the photoexcitation of electronic states, the following physical and/or chemical changes can occur: alteration of redox properties and acceleration of electron transfer, changes in biochemical activity due to local transient heating of chromophores, one-electron auto-oxidation and O'2- production, and photodynamic action and 1O2 production. Different reaction channels can be activated to achieve the photobiological macroeffect. The primary physical and/or chemical changes induced by light in photoacceptor molecules are followed by a cascade of biochemical reactions in the cell that do not need further light activation and occur in the dark (photosignal transduction and amplification chains). These reactions are connected with changes in cellular homeostasis parameters. The crucial step here is thought to be an alteration of the cellular redox state: a shift towards oxidation is associated with stimulation of cellular vitality, and a shift towards reduction is linked to inhibition. Cells with a lower than normal pH, where the redox state is shifted in the reduced direction, are considered to be more sensitive to the stimulative action of light than those with the respective parameters being optimal or near optimal. This circumstance explains the possible variations in observed magnitudes of low- power laser effects. Light action on the redox state of a cell via the respiratory chain also explains the diversity of low-power laser effects. Besides explaining many controversies in the field of low-power laser effects (i.e., the diversity of effects, the variable magnitude or absence of effects in certain studies), the proposed redox-regulation mechanism may be a fundamental explanation for some clinical effects of irradiation, for example the positive

  11. Monochromatization of femtosecond XUV light pulses with the use of reflection zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metje, Jan; Borgwardt, Mario; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Kothe, Alexander; Engel, Nicholas; Wilke, Martin; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-05

    We report on a newly built laser-based tabletop setup which enables generation of femtosecond light pulses in the XUV range employing the process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a gas medium. The spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the XUV beam are presented. Monochromatization of XUV light with minimum temporal pulse distortion is the central issue of this work. Off-center reflection zone plates are shown to be advantageous when selection of a desired harmonic is carried out with the use of a single optical element. A cross correlation technique was applied to characterize the performance of the zone plates in the time domain. By using laser pulses of 25 fs length to pump the HHG process, a pulse duration of 45 fs for monochromatized harmonics was achieved in the present setup.

  12. Effects of monochromatic light on quality properties and antioxidation of meat in broilers.

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    Ke, Y Y; Liu, W J; Wang, Z X; Chen, Y X

    2011-11-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that blue monochromatic light was better to promote the growth and development of broilers than red light. However, consumer research suggests that the eating quality of the meat is more important. The present study was, therefore, designed to further evaluate the effects of various monochromatic lights on the muscle growth and quality properties and antioxidation of meat. A total of 288 newly hatched Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to blue light (BL), green light (GL), red light (RL), and white light (WL) by a light-emitting diode system for 49 d, respectively. Results showed that the broilers reared under BL significantly increased BW and carcass yield as compared with RL, WL, and GL (P 0.05). Compared with RL, the muscles of breast and thigh in GL and BL had higher pH, water-holding capacity, and protein content, whereas cooking loss, lightness value, shear value, and fat content were lower (P 0.05). These results suggest that BL better improves meat quality of Arbor Acre broilers by elevating antioxidative capacity than does RL.

  13. Monochromatic light-emitting diode (LED source in layers hens during the second production cycle

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    Rodrigo Borille

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTLight is an important environmental factor for birds, allowing not only their vision, but also influencing their physiological responses, such as behavioral and reproductive activity. The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the impact of different colors of monochromatic light (LED sources in laying hens production during the second laying cycle. The study was conducted in an experimental laying house during 70 days. A total of 300 laying hens Isa Brown® genetic strain, aged 95 weeks, in the second laying cycle were used in the study. The artificial light sources used were blue, yellow, green, red and white. The light regimen was continuous illumination of 17 h per day (12 h natural and 5 h artificial in a daily light regimen of 17L:5D (light: dark. The Latin Square design was adopted with five treatments (five colors divided into five periods, and five boxes, with six replicates of ten birds in each box. The production and egg quality were evaluated. The different colors of light source did not affect production parameters or egg quality (p > 0.05. The monochromatic light source may be considered as an alternative to artificial lighting in laying hens during the second production cycle.

  14. Human wavelength discrimination of monochromatic light explained by optimal wavelength decoding of light of unknown intensity.

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    Li Zhaoping

    Full Text Available We show that human ability to discriminate the wavelength of monochromatic light can be understood as maximum likelihood decoding of the cone absorptions, with a signal processing efficiency that is independent of the wavelength. This work is built on the framework of ideal observer analysis of visual discrimination used in many previous works. A distinctive aspect of our work is that we highlight a perceptual confound that observers should confuse a change in input light wavelength with a change in input intensity. Hence a simple ideal observer model which assumes that an observer has a full knowledge of input intensity should over-estimate human ability in discriminating wavelengths of two inputs of unequal intensity. This confound also makes it difficult to consistently measure human ability in wavelength discrimination by asking observers to distinguish two input colors while matching their brightness. We argue that the best experimental method for reliable measurement of discrimination thresholds is the one of Pokorny and Smith, in which observers only need to distinguish two inputs, regardless of whether they differ in hue or brightness. We mathematically formulate wavelength discrimination under this wavelength-intensity confound and show a good agreement between our theoretical prediction and the behavioral data. Our analysis explains why the discrimination threshold varies with the input wavelength, and shows how sensitively the threshold depends on the relative densities of the three types of cones in the retina (and in particular predict discriminations in dichromats. Our mathematical formulation and solution can be applied to general problems of sensory discrimination when there is a perceptual confound from other sensory feature dimensions.

  15. Response of vegetable organisms to quasi-monochromatic light of different duration, intensity and wavelength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagovsky, A V; Solovykh, N V [I.V.Michurin All-Russian Recearch Institute of Fruit Crops Genetics and Breeding (Russian Federation); Budagovskaya, O N [I.V.Michurin All-Russia Research and Development Institute of Gardening, Michurinsk, Tambov region (Russian Federation); Budagovsky, I A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    By the example of vegetable organisms differing in structure and functional properties it is shown that their response to the action of quasi-monochromatic light from laser sources does not obey the Bunsen – Roscoe dose law. The dependence of biological effect on the irradiation time has the multimodal (multiextremal) form with alternating maxima and minima of the stimulating effect. Such a property manifests itself in the spectral ranges, corresponding to photoinduced conversion of chromoproteins of photocontrol systems and is probably related to the cyclic variations of metabolic activity in vegetable cells. (biophotonics)

  16. Control of cell interaction using quasi-monochromatic light with varying spatiotemporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Maslova, M. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2017-02-01

    By the example of plants, fungi and bacteria, we consider the possibility of controlling the interaction of cells, being in competitive, antagonistic, or parasitic relations. For this aim we used short-time irradiation (a few seconds or minutes) with the red (633 nm) quasi-monochromatic light having different spatiotemporal coherence. It is shown that the functional activity is mostly increased in the cells whose size does not exceed the coherence length and the correlation radius of the light field. Thus, in the case of cells essentially differing in size, it is possible to increase the activity of smaller cells, avoiding the stimulation of larger ones. For example, the radiation having relatively low coherence (Lcoh, rcor plant cells by pathogen fungi, while the exposure to light with less statistical regularity (Lcoh = 4 μm, rcor = 5 μm) inhibits the growth of the Fusarium microcera fungus, infected by the bacterium of the Pseudomonas species. The quasi-monochromatic radiation with sufficiently high spatiotemporal coherence stimulated all interacting species (bacteria, fungi, plants). In the considered biocenosis, the equilibrium was shifted towards the favour of organisms having the highest rate of cell division or the ones better using their adaptation potential.

  17. A Photodegradation Study of Three Common Paint and Plaster Biocides under monochromatic UV Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minelgaite, Greta; Vollertsen, Jes; Nielsen, Asbjørn Haaning

    2014-01-01

    Photodegradation of the three common paint-and-plaster biocides (carbendazim, diuron and terbutryn) was investigated at controlled laboratory conditions. Samples prepared in two types of water (demineralized water and pond water) were subjected to 254 nm monochromatic UV light. Light intensity (W m......-2) in the experimental chamber was measured by a fiber optic spectrometer. The observed decline in biocide concentration was related with the light energy, accumulated during the time of degradation (kJ m-2), and 1st order photodegradation rate constants (m2 kJ-1) were determined. The obtained...... results demonstrated that diuron and terbutryn were readily degradable at the tested conditions, while carbendazim remained stable throughout the 28 – 34 hours of the experiments. Photodegradation rate constants of diuron and terbutryn were found to be slightly higher in demineralized water (0.0183 – 0...

  18. Does pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneault, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hébert, Marc; Teikari, Petteri; Mure, Ludovic S; Doyon, Julien; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M; Dumont, Marie; Carrier, Julie

    2012-06-01

    Many nonvisual functions are regulated by light through a photoreceptive system involving melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that are maximally sensitive to blue light. Several studies have suggested that the ability of light to modulate circadian entrainment and to induce acute effects on melatonin secretion, subjective alertness, and gene expression decreases during aging, particularly for blue light. This could contribute to the documented changes in sleep and circadian regulatory processes with aging. However, age-related modification in the impact of light on steady-state pupil constriction, which regulates the amount of light reaching the retina, is not demonstrated. We measured pupil size in 16 young (22.8±4 years) and 14 older (61±4.4 years) healthy subjects during 45-second exposures to blue (480 nm) and green (550 nm) monochromatic lights at low (7×10(12) photons/cm2/s), medium (3×10(13) photons/cm2/s), and high (10(14) photons/cm2/s) irradiance levels. Results showed that young subjects had consistently larger pupils than older subjects for dark adaptation and during all light exposures. Steady-state pupil constriction was greater under blue than green light exposure in both age groups and increased with increasing irradiance. Surprisingly, when expressed in relation to baseline pupil size, no significant age-related differences were observed in pupil constriction. The observed reduction in pupil size in older individuals, both in darkness and during light exposure, may reduce retinal illumination and consequently affect nonvisual responses to light. The absence of a significant difference between age groups for relative steady-state pupil constriction suggests that other factors such as tonic, sympathetic control of pupil dilation, rather than light sensitivity per se, account for the observed age difference in pupil size regulation. Compared to other nonvisual functions, the light sensitivity of steady-state pupil constriction appears to

  19. Does pupil constriction under blue and green monochromatic light exposure change with age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneault, Véronique; Vandewalle, Gilles; Hébert, Marc; Teikari, Petteri; Mure, Ludovic S.; Doyon, Julien; Gronfier, Claude; Cooper, Howard M.; Dumont, Marie; Carrier, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Many non-visual functions are regulated by light through a photoreceptive system involving melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells that are maximally sensitive to blue light. Several studies have suggested that the ability of light to modulate circadian entrainment and to induce acute effects on melatonin secretion, subjective alertness and gene expression, decreases during aging, particularly for blue light. This could contribute to the documented changes in sleep and circadian regulatory processes with aging. However, age-related modification in the impact of light on steady-state pupil constriction, which regulates the amount of light reaching the retina, is not demonstrated. We measured pupil size in 16 young (22.8±4y) and 14 older (61±4.4y) healthy subjects during 45s exposures to blue (480nm) and green (550nm) monochromatic lights at low (7×1012 photons/cm2/s), medium (3×1013 photons/cm2/s), and high (1014 photons/cm2/s) irradiance levels. Results showed that young subjects had consistently larger pupils than older subjects, for dark adaptation and during all light exposures. Steady-state pupil constriction was greater under blue than green light exposure in both age groups and increased with increasing irradiance. Surprisingly, when expressed in relation to baseline pupil size, no significant age-related differences were observed in pupil constriction. The observed reduction in pupil size in older individuals, both in darkness and during light exposure, may reduce retinal illumination and consequently affect non-visual responses to light. The absence of a significant difference between age groups for relative steady-state pupil constriction suggests that other factors such as tonic, sympathetic control of pupil dilation, rather than light sensitivity per se, account for the observed age difference in pupil size regulation. Compared to other nonvisual functions, the light sensitivity of steady-state pupil constriction appears to remain relatively

  20. Modulatory Effect of Monochromatic Blue Light on Heat Stress Response in Commercial Broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Safaa E.; Mahmoud, Shawky

    2017-01-01

    In a novel approach, monochromatic blue light was used to investigate its modulatory effect on heat stress biomarkers in two commercial broiler strains (Ross 308 and Cobb 500). At 21 days old, birds were divided into four groups including one group housed in white light, a second group exposed to blue light, a 3rd group exposed to white light + heat stress, and a 4th group exposed to blue light + heat stress. Heat treatment at 33°C lasted for five h for four successive days. Exposure to blue light during heat stress reduced MDA concentration and enhanced SOD and CAT enzyme activities as well as modulated their gene expression. Blue light also reduced the degenerative changes that occurred in the liver tissue as a result of heat stress. It regulated, though variably, liver HSP70, HSP90, HSF1, and HSF3 gene expression among Ross and Cobb chickens. Moreover, the Cobb strain showed better performance than Ross manifested by a significant reduction of rectal temperature in the case of H + B. Furthermore, a significant linear relationship was found between the lowered rectal temperature and the expression of all HSP genes. Generally, the performance of both strains by most assessed parameters under heat stress is improved when using blue light. PMID:28698764

  1. Brain responses to violet, blue, and green monochromatic light exposures in humans: prominent role of blue light and the brainstem.

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    Gilles Vandewalle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Relatively long duration retinal light exposure elicits nonvisual responses in humans, including modulation of alertness and cognition. These responses are thought to be mediated in part by melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells which are more sensitive to blue light than violet or green light. The contribution of the melanopsin system and the brain mechanisms involved in the establishment of such responses to light remain to be established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We exposed 15 participants to short duration (50 s monochromatic violet (430 nm, blue (473 nm, and green (527 nm light exposures of equal photon flux (10(13ph/cm(2/s while they were performing a working memory task in fMRI. At light onset, blue light, as compared to green light, increased activity in the left hippocampus, left thalamus, and right amygdala. During the task, blue light, as compared to violet light, increased activity in the left middle frontal gyrus, left thalamus and a bilateral area of the brainstem consistent with activation of the locus coeruleus. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support a prominent contribution of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells to brain responses to light within the very first seconds of an exposure. The results also demonstrate the implication of the brainstem in mediating these responses in humans and speak for a broad involvement of light in the regulation of brain function.

  2. Effects of monochromatic light on mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers in the small intestine of broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, D; Li, J; Wang, Z X; Cao, J; Li, T T; Chen, J L; Chen, Y X

    2011-12-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that green and blue monochromatic lights were effective to stimulate immune response of the spleen in broilers. This study was designed to investigate the effects of monochromatic light on both gut mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers. A total of 120 Arbor Acre male broilers on post-hatching day (P) 0 were exposed to red light, green light (GL), blue light (BL), and white light (WL) for 49 d, respectively. As compared with broilers exposed to WL, the broilers exposed to GL showed that the villus height of small intestine was increased by 19.5% (P = 0.0205) and 38.8% (P = 0.0149), the crypt depth of small intestine was decreased by 15.1% (P = 0.0049) and 10.1% (P = 0.0005), and the ratios of villus height to crypt depth were increased by 39.3% (P < 0.0001) and 52.5% (P < 0.0001) at P7 and P21, respectively. Until P49, an increased villus height (33.6%, P = 0.0076), a decreased crypt depth (15.4%, P = 0.0201), and an increased villus height-to-crypt depth ratio (58.5%, P < 0.0001) were observed in the BL group as compared with the WL group. On the other hand, the numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (27.9%, P < 0.0001 and 37.0%, P < 0.0001), goblet cells (GC, 22.1%, P < 0.0001 and 18.1%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (14.8%, P = 0.0543 and 47.9%, P = 0.0377) in the small intestine were significantly increased in the GL group as compared with the WL group at P7 and P21, respectively. The numbers of intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (36.2%, P < 0.0001), GC (26.5%, P < 0.0001), and IgA(+) cells (68.0%, P = 0.0177) in the BL group were also higher than those in the WL group at P49. These results suggest that both mucosal mechanical and immunological barriers of the small intestine may be improved by rearing broilers under GL at an early age and under BL at an older age.

  3. Time-reversing a monochromatic subwavelength optical focus by optical phase conjugation of multiply-scattered light

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Jongchan; Lee, KyeoReh; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Due to its time-reversal nature, optical phase conjugation generates a monochromatic light wave which retraces its propagation paths. Here, we demonstrate the regeneration of a subwavelength optical focus by phase conjugation. Monochromatic light from a subwavelength source is scattered by random nanoparticles, and the scattered light is phase conjugated at the far-field region by coupling its wavefront into a single-mode optical reflector using a spatial light modulator. Then the conjugated beam retraces its propagation paths and forms a refocus on the source at the subwavelength scale. This is the first direct experimental realization of subwavelength focusing beyond the diffraction limit with far-field time reversal in the optical domain.

  4. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: increasing intensity of monochromatic light changes the nature of the response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischof Hans-Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Radical Pair model proposes that magnetoreception is a light-dependent process. Under low monochromatic light from the short-wavelength part of the visual spectrum, migratory birds show orientation in their migratory direction. Under monochromatic light of higher intensity, however, they showed unusual preferences for other directions or axial preferences. To determine whether or not these responses are still controlled by the respective light regimes, European robins, Erithacus rubecula, were tested under UV, Blue, Turquoise and Green light at increasing intensities, with orientation in migratory direction serving as a criterion whether or not magnetoreception works in the normal way. Results The birds were well oriented in their seasonally appropriate migratory direction under 424 nm Blue, 502 nm Turquoise and 565 nm Green light of low intensity with a quantal flux of 8·1015 quanta s-1 m-2, indicating unimpaired magnetoreception. Under 373 nm UV of the same quantal flux, they were not oriented in migratory direction, showing a preference for the east-west axis instead, but they were well oriented in migratory direction under UV of lower intensity. Intensities of above 36·1015 quanta s-1 m-2 of Blue, Turquoise and Green light elicited a variety of responses: disorientation, headings along the east-west axis, headings along the north-south axis or 'fixed' direction tendencies. These responses changed as the intensity was increased from 36·1015 quanta s-1 m-2 to 54 and 72·1015 quanta s-1 m-2. Conclusion The specific manifestation of responses in directions other than the migratory direction clearly depends on the ambient light regime. This implies that even when the mechanisms normally providing magnetic compass information seem disrupted, processes that are activated by light still control the behavior. It suggests complex interactions between different types of receptors, magnetic and visual. The nature of the

  5. Influence of monochromatic light on quality traits, nutritional, fatty acid, and amino acid profiles of broiler chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Parvin, R; Mushtaq, M M H; Hwangbo, J; Kim, J H; Na, J C; Kim, D W; Kang, H K; Kim, C D; Cho, K O; Yang, C B; Choi, H C

    2013-11-01

    The role of monochromatic lights was investigated on meat quality in 1-d-old straight-run broiler chicks (n = 360), divided into 6 light sources with 6 replicates having 10 chicks in each replicate. Six light sources were described as incandescent bulbs (IBL, as a control) and light-emitting diode (LED) light colors as white light (WL), blue light, red light (RL), green light, and yellow light. Among LED groups, the RL increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids (P light produced by LED responded similar to the IBL light in influencing nutrient contents of meat. Moreover, LED is not decisive in improving fatty acid composition of meat. However, the role of IBL in reducing n-6:n-3 ratio and enhancing n-3 cannot be neglected. Among LED, WL is helpful in improving essential and nonessential amino acid contents of broiler meat.

  6. Analysis of gas exchange, stomatal behaviour and micronutrients uncovers dynamic response and adaptation of tomato plants to monochromatic light treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carrigan, Andrew; Babla, Mohammad; Wang, Feifei; Liu, Xiaohui; Mak, Michelle; Thomas, Richard; Bellotti, Bill; Chen, Zhong-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Light spectrum affects the yield and quality of greenhouse tomato, especially over a prolonged period of monochromatic light treatments. Physiological and chemical analysis was employed to investigate the influence of light spectral (blue, green and red) changes on growth, photosynthesis, stomatal behaviour, leaf pigment, and micronutrient levels. We found that plants are less affected under blue light treatment, which was evident by the maintenance of higher A, gs, Tr, and stomatal parameters and significantly lower VPD and Tleaf as compared to those plants grown in green and red light treatments. Green and red light treatments led to significantly larger increase in the accumulation of Fe, B, Zn, and Cu than blue light. Moreover, guard cell length, width, and volume all showed highly significant positive correlations to gs, Tr and negative links to VPD. There was negative impact of monochromatic lights-induced accumulation of Mn, Cu, and Zn on photosynthesis, leaf pigments and plant growth. Furthermore, most of the light-induced significant changes of the physiological traits were partially recovered at the end of experiment. A high degree of morphological and physiological plasticity to blue, green and red light treatments suggested that tomato plants may have developed mechanisms to adapt to the light treatments. Thus, understanding the optimization of light spectrum for photosynthesis and growth is one of the key components for greenhouse tomato production.

  7. Effect of monochromatic and combined light colour on performance, blood parameters, ovarian morphology and reproductive hormones in laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Rakibul Hassan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the effect of monochromatic and combined light emitting diode (LED light colour on performance, ovarian morphology, and reproductive hormone and biochemical blood parameters in laying hens. A total of 600 Hy-line Brown pullets, 12 weeks of age, were divided (25×4×6 = birds × replications × treatments as follows: red (R, green (G, blue (B, and combinations of R→G and R→G→B treatments. Fluorescent white light (W was the control. The results showed that higher egg production was found under the monochromatic R and combination R→G treatments, and that heavier eggs were laid by the B and G treatments (P<0.05. Consequently, better feed conversion ratio was attained in the R→G treatment. Serum follicle stimulating hormone and 17β-estradiol levels were significantly higher in the R and R→G treatments. B treated birds came into production 15 days later than those treated with R light. Organ weight (ovary and stroma and ovarian follicle numbers (1-3 and 4-6 mm were significantly higher in R treated birds, as well as serum glucose and triglyceride contents. Serum IgG concentrations and the heterophil to lymphocyte ratio were not influenced by light colour. In these laying hens, 14 h R with 2 h G light in the later part of the day increased reproductive hormone levels, ovarian weight, and follicle number and hence increased egg production. Thus, these results suggest that a combination of R→G light may be comparable with monochromatic R light to enhance egg production in laying hens.

  8. Comparison of stray light in spectrometer systems using a low cost monochromatic light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorseth, Anders; Lindén, Johannes; Dam-Hansen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    We present an experimental setup that is under development for automated stray light characterization of spectrometers. The setup uses a tuneable monochromator which enables this characterization on relatively cost low equipment. We present the measured line spread functions for two spectrometers...

  9. Effects of monochromatic light sources on sex hormone levels in serum and on semen quality of ganders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen-Chang; Zhuang, Zi-Xuan; Lin, Min-Jung; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Yi; Jea, Yu-Shine; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Light is an essential external factor influencing various physiological processes, including reproductive performance, in birds. Although several attempts have been made to understand the effect of light on poultry production, the effect of light of a particular wavelength (color) on the reproductive function in geese remains unclear. This study evaluated the effect of various monochromatic light sources on the levels of sex hormone and on semen quality of ganders. Of 30 male White Roman geese in their third reproductive season (average age=3 years), 27 were divided into three groups receiving monochromatic white or red or blue lights. The birds were kept in an environmentally controlled house with a lighting photoperiod of 7L:17D for six weeks as the adaptation period. The photoperiod was subsequently changed to 9L:15D and maintained for 24 weeks. Three ganders at the beginning of the study and three from each group at the end of the adjusting period and the 20th and 30th week of the study period were sacrificed, and their testes and blood samples were collected for determining the sex hormone levels. Semen samples were collected for determining semen quality parameters, including the semen collection index, sperm concentration, semen volume, sperm motility, sperm viability, sperm morphology, and semen quality factor. The results showed that the testosterone and estradiol levels remained unchanged in all three groups at all time points. The ratio of testosterone to estradiol of ganders exposed to white light was significantly higher than that of ganders exposed to red light at the 30th week (Plight were significantly the lowest (Plight were the highest (Plight may maintain a better semen quality than that with red or blue lights in ganders.

  10. Role of monochromatic light on daily variation of clock gene expression in the pineal gland of chick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-11-01

    The avian pineal gland is a master clock that can receive external photic cues and translate them into output rhythms. To clarify whether a shift in light wavelength can influence the circadian expression in chick pineal gland, a total of 240 Arbor Acre male broilers were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) or blue light (BL). After 2weeks light illumination, circadian expressions of seven core clock genes in pineal gland and the level of melatonin in plasma were examined. The results showed after illumination with monochromatic light, 24h profiles of all clock gene mRNAs retained circadian oscillation, except that RL tended to disrupt the rhythm of cCry2. Compared to WL, BL advanced the acrophases of the negative elements (cCry1, cCry2, cPer2 and cPer3) by 0.1-1.5h and delayed those of positive elements (cClock, cBmal1 and cBmal2) by 0.2-0.8h. And, RL advanced all clock genes except cClock and cPer2 by 0.3-2.1h, while GL delayed all clock genes by 0.5-1.5h except cBmal2. Meanwhile, GL increased the amplitude and mesor of positive and reduced both parameters of negative clock genes, but RL showed the opposite pattern. Although the acrophase of plasma melatonin was advanced by both GL and RL, the melatonin level was significantly increased in GL and decreased in RL. This tendency was consistent with the variations in the positive clock gene mRNA levels under monochromatic light and contrasted with those of negative clock genes. Therefore, we speculate that GL may enhance positive clock genes expression, leading to melatonin synthesis, whereas RL may enhance negative genes expression, suppressing melatonin synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Monochromatic Light on Expression of Estrogen Receptor (ER) and Progesterone Receptor (PR) in Ovarian Follicles of Chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingbin; Li, Diyan; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Xiao, Qihai; Zhao, Xiaoling; Wang, Yan; Yin, Huadong; Zhu, Qing

    2015-01-01

    Artificial illumination is widely used in modern poultry houses and different wavelengths of light affect poultry production and behaviour. In this study, we measure mRNA and protein abundance of estrogen receptors (ERs) and progesterone receptors (PRs) in order to investigate the effect of monochromatic light on egg production traits and gonadal hormone function in chicken ovarian follicles. Five hundred and fifty-two 19-wk-old laying hens were exposed to three monochromatic lights: red (RL; 660 nm), green (GL; 560 nm), blue (BL; 480 nm) and control cool white (400-760 nm) light with an LED (light-emitting diode). There were 4 identical light-controlled rooms (n = 138) each containing 3 replicate pens (46 birds per pen). Water was supplied ad libitum and daily rations were determined according to the nutrient suggestions for poultry. Results showed that under BL conditions there was an increase in the total number of eggs at 300 days of age and egg-laying rate during the peak laying period. The BL and GL extended the duration of the peak laying period. Plasma melatonin was lowest in birds reared under BL. Plasma estradiol was elevated in the GL-exposed laying hens, and GL and BL increased progesterone at 28 wk of age. In the granulosa layers of the fifth largest preovulatory follicle (F5), the third largest preovulatory follicle (F3) and the largest preovulatory follicle (F1), ERα mRNA was increased by BL and GL. Treatment with BL increased ERβ mRNA in granulosa layers of F5, F3 and F1, while GL increased ERβ mRNA in F5 and F3. There was a corresponding increase in abundance of the proteins in the granulosa layers of F5, with an increase in PR-B, generated via an alternative splice site, relative to PR-A. Treatment with BL also increased expression of PR mRNA in all of the granulosa layers of follicles, while treatment with GL increased expression of PR mRNA in granulosa layers of SYF(small yellow follicle), F5 and F1. These results indicate that blue and green

  12. Effect of Monochromatic Light on Expression of Estrogen Receptor (ER and Progesterone Receptor (PR in Ovarian Follicles of Chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingbin Liu

    Full Text Available Artificial illumination is widely used in modern poultry houses and different wavelengths of light affect poultry production and behaviour. In this study, we measure mRNA and protein abundance of estrogen receptors (ERs and progesterone receptors (PRs in order to investigate the effect of monochromatic light on egg production traits and gonadal hormone function in chicken ovarian follicles. Five hundred and fifty-two 19-wk-old laying hens were exposed to three monochromatic lights: red (RL; 660 nm, green (GL; 560 nm, blue (BL; 480 nm and control cool white (400-760 nm light with an LED (light-emitting diode. There were 4 identical light-controlled rooms (n = 138 each containing 3 replicate pens (46 birds per pen. Water was supplied ad libitum and daily rations were determined according to the nutrient suggestions for poultry. Results showed that under BL conditions there was an increase in the total number of eggs at 300 days of age and egg-laying rate during the peak laying period. The BL and GL extended the duration of the peak laying period. Plasma melatonin was lowest in birds reared under BL. Plasma estradiol was elevated in the GL-exposed laying hens, and GL and BL increased progesterone at 28 wk of age. In the granulosa layers of the fifth largest preovulatory follicle (F5, the third largest preovulatory follicle (F3 and the largest preovulatory follicle (F1, ERα mRNA was increased by BL and GL. Treatment with BL increased ERβ mRNA in granulosa layers of F5, F3 and F1, while GL increased ERβ mRNA in F5 and F3. There was a corresponding increase in abundance of the proteins in the granulosa layers of F5, with an increase in PR-B, generated via an alternative splice site, relative to PR-A. Treatment with BL also increased expression of PR mRNA in all of the granulosa layers of follicles, while treatment with GL increased expression of PR mRNA in granulosa layers of SYF(small yellow follicle, F5 and F1. These results indicate that blue

  13. Effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on muscular growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of breast muscle in male broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H J; Qiao, X; Yue, H Y; Wu, S G; Yao, J H; Qi, G H

    2012-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis on breast muscle growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of male broilers. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres; n = 1,320) were preweighed and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups in 3 modified incubators: 1) control group (in dark condition), 2) monochromatic green light group (560 nm), and 3) monochromatic blue light group (480 nm). The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps and were equalized at the intensity of 15 lx at eggshell level. After hatch, 120 male chicks from each group were placed in 6 replicates with 20 birds each. All of the birds were housed under white light (30 lx at bird-head level) with a light schedule of 23L:1D. At 21, 35, and 42 d of age, BW and breast muscle weight in the green light group were significantly increased compared with birds in the blue or dark groups (P dark condition or blue group at 42 d of market age (P dark condition (P 0.05). Green light stimuli tended to increase cooking loss (P = 0.08) and L* value of 24-h meat color (P = 0.09). These results suggest that green light stimuli during embryogenesis enhanced the posthatch BW of male broilers, increased breast muscle growth, and improved the feed conversion ratio, but it did not cause any noticeable changes in breast chemical composition or overall meat quality characteristics.

  14. Comprehensive Analysis of Photosynthetic Characteristics and Quality Improvement of Purple Cabbage under Different Combinations of Monochromatic Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Biyun; Zhou, Xiangzhu; Xu, Ru; Wang, Jin; Lin, Yizhang; Pang, Jie; Wu, Shuang; Zhong, Fenglin

    2016-01-01

    Light is essential for plant growth. Light intensity, photoperiod, and light quality all affect plant morphology and physiology. Compared to light intensity, photoperiod, little is known about the effects of different monochromatic lights on crop species. To investigate how different lighting conditions influence crops with heterogeneous colors in leaves, we examined photosynthetic characteristics and quality (regarding edibility and nutrition) of purple cabbage under different combinations of lights. Eight different treatments were applied including monochromic red (R), monochromic blue (B), monochromic yellow (Y), monochromic green (G), and the combination of red and blue (3/1, RB), red/blue/yellow (3/1/1, RBY), red/blue/green (3/1/1,RBG), and white light as the control. Our results indicate that RBY (3/1/1) treatment promotes the PSII activity of purple cabbage, resulting in improved light energy utilization. By contrast, both G and Y lights alone have inhibitory effect on the PSII activity of purple cabbage. In addition, RBY (3/1/1) significantly boosts the anthocyanin and flavonoids content compared with other treatments. Although we detected highest soluble protein and vitamin C content under B treatment (increased by 30.0 and 14.3% compared with the control, respectively), RBY (3/1/1) appeared to be the second-best lighting condition (with soluble protein and vitamin C content increased by 8.6 and 4.1%, respectively compared with the control). Thus we prove that the addition of yellow light to the traditional combination of red/blue lighting conditions is beneficial to synthesizing photosynthetic pigments and enables superior outcome of purple cabbage growth. Our results indicate that the growth and nutritional quality of purple cabbage are greatly enhanced under RBY (3/1/1) light, and suggest that strategical management of lighting conditions holds promise in maximizing the economic efficiency of plant production and food quality of vegetables grown in

  15. Probing Light Stops with Stoponium

    CERN Document Server

    Batell, Brian

    2015-01-01

    We derive new limits on light stops from diboson resonance searches in the $\\gamma\\gamma$, $Z \\gamma$, $ZZ$, $WW$ and $hh$ channels from the first run of the LHC. If the two-body decays of the light stop are mildly suppressed or kinematically forbidden, stoponium bound states will form in $pp$ collisions and subsequently decay via the pair annihilation of the constituent stops to diboson final states, yielding striking resonance signatures. Remarkably, we find that stoponium searches are highly complementary to direct collider searches and indirect probes of light stops such as Higgs coupling measurements. Using an empirical quarkonia potential model and including the first two $S$-wave stoponium states, we find that in the decoupling limit $m_{\\widetilde t_1} \\lesssim 130$ GeV is excluded for any value of the stop mixing angle and heavy stop mass by the combination of the latest resonance searches and the indirect constraints. The $\\gamma \\gamma$ searches are the most complementary to the indirect constraint...

  16. Impact of different monochromatic LED light colours and bird age on the behavioural output and fear response in ducks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabiha Sultana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to observe the effect of monochromatic light emitting diode (LED light colour and bird age on the behaviour and fear response of ducks. A total of 200 1-day-old ducklings were used in the experiment (two replications, 25 ducklings/pen, and lighting was set up as follows: white (W, control, 400-770 nm, yellow (Y, 600 nm, green (G, 520 nm and blue (B, 460 nm LED lights. Ducks were subjected to 23L: 1D h lighting with 0.1 Watt/m2 light intensity. Video was recorded twice per day (2 h in the morning and 2 h in the afternoon and observed five consecutive days per week. Duration of feeding, drinking, sitting, walking, standing, preening, wing flapping, wing stretching, tail wagging, head shaking, body shaking, ground pecking, peck object, and social interaction behaviour were recorded. At 3 and 6 weeks of age, 10 birds per treatment were subjected to the tonic immobility (TI test (three times/duck. Ducks reared in Y and W light were more active, as expressed by more walking, ground pecking, drinking and social interaction activities than those of ducks under the B light treatment (P<0.05. Ducks showed more time sitting, standing, and preening under B light (P<0.05. Feeding, sitting, standing and drinking behaviours increased, and walking and social interaction behaviours decreased with age of the ducks (P<0.05. Differences in behaviours among different light colours were observed. In addition, the TI test results indicated that B and G light reduced the fear response of the ducks.

  17. LIGHT PRESSURE: Theoretical study of the light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle of an arbitrary size in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzatov, D. V.; Gaida, L. S.; Afanas'ev, Anatolii A.

    2008-12-01

    The light pressure force acting on a spherical dielectric particle in the interference field of two plane monochromatic electromagnetic waves is studied in detail for different particle radii and angles of incidence of waves.

  18. Effect of melatonin on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuju; Reheman, Aikebaier; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Zhang, Yuxian; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-08-01

    A total of 360 post-hatching day 0 (P0) Arbor Acre male broilers, including intact, sham operation and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) from a light-emitting diode (LED) system until for P14. We studied the effects of melatonin and its receptors on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of broilers. The density of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) cells and the proliferation of T-lymphocytes in response to Concanavalin A (ConA) in GL significantly increased both in vivo and in vitro (from 9.57% to 32.03% and from 34.30% to 50.53%, respectively) compared with other lights (plights (p<0.005). However, exogenous melatonin (10(-9)M) significantly increased the proliferative activity of T-lymphocyte by 9.64% (p=0.002). In addition, GL significantly increased mRNA expression levels of Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c receptors from 21.09% to 32.57%, and protein expression levels from 24.43% to 42.92% compared with RL (p<0.05). However, these effects were blocked after pinealectomy. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT (a selective Mel1b antagonist) and prazosin (a selective Mel1c antagonist) attenuated GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to ConA (p=0.000). Luzindole (a nonselective Mel1a/Mel1b antagonist), however, did not induce these effects (p=0.334). These results suggest that melatonin may mediate GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation via the Mel1b and Mel1c receptors but not via the Mel1a receptor.

  19. Monochromatic light stimuli during embryogenesis enhance embryo development and posthatch growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenboim, I; Piestun, Y; Mobarkey, N; Barak, M; Hoyzman, A; Halevy, O

    2004-08-01

    Photostimulation with green light accelerated BW and muscle development of broilers. In experiment 1, temperature sensors were inserted into 50 broiler eggs. The eggs were placed under 5 green light-emitting diode (LED) lamps at an intensity of 0.1 W/m2 at eggshell level for 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 min (n = 10). Egg temperatures were recorded continuously. A high correlation was found between lighting period and egg temperature elevation, and an intermittent light regimen of 15 min on and 15 min off was found to eliminate light-induced egg overheating. In experiment 2, the effect of in ovo green light photostimulation on embryonic development was studied. Five hundred fertile eggs were divided into 2 groups: the first was photostimulated with green light from 5 d of incubation until hatch (0.1 W/m2 intensity) and the second was incubated in the dark. In ovo green light photostimulation caused a significant elevation in BW and breast muscle weight during embryo development and posthatch until 6 d of age. In experiment 3, 240 fertile broiler eggs were divided into 2 groups as described in experiment 2. At hatch, chicks from each in ovo light treatment were divided into 2 subgroups: the first was reared under green light and the second under white light. In ovo photostimulation with green light enhanced BW and breast muscle weight. However, rearing under green light did not have any synergistic effect on BW. Collectively, the results suggest that stimulation with green light enhances development and growth in chicks and that the best effect is achieved when this stimulus is provided during incubation.

  20. Stimulation with monochromatic green light during incubation alters satellite cell mitotic activity and gene expression in relation to embryonic and posthatch muscle growth of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Zhang, H J; Wang, J; Wu, S G; Qiao, X; Yue, H Y; Yao, J H; Qi, G H

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that monochromatic green light stimuli during embryogenesis accelerated posthatch body weight (BW) and pectoral muscle growth of broilers. In this experiment, we further investigated the morphological and molecular basis of this phenomenon. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres, n=880) were pre-weighed and randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 incubation treatment groups: (1) dark condition (control group), and (2) monochromatic green light group (560 nm). The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps and were equalized at the intensity of 15 lx at eggshell level. The dark condition was set as a commercial control from day 1 until hatching. After hatch, 120 male 1-day-old chicks from each group were housed under incandescent white light with an intensity of 30 lx at bird-head level. No effects of light stimuli during embryogenesis on hatching time, hatchability, hatching weight and bird mortality during the feeding trial period were observed in the present study. Compared with the dark condition, the BW, pectoral muscle weight and myofiber cross-sectional areas were significantly greater on 7-day-old chicks incubated under green light. Green light also increased the satellite cell mitotic activity of pectoral muscle on 1- and 3-day-old birds. In addition, green light upregulated MyoD, myogenin and myostatin mRNA expression in late embryos and/ or newly hatched chicks. These data suggest that stimulation with monochromatic green light during incubation promote muscle growth by enhancing proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in late embryonic and newly hatched stages. Higher expression of myostatin may ultimately help prevent excessive proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in birds incubated under green light.

  1. Characterization of four-color multi-package white light-emitting diodes combined with various green monochromatic phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Keyong Nam; Do, Young Rag

    2012-03-01

    In this study, several combinations of multi-package white light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which combine an InGaN blue LED with green, amber, and red phosphor-converted LEDs (pc-LEDs), were characterized by changing the peak wavelength of green pc-LEDs between 515nm and 560nm (515, 521, 530, 540, 550, 560nm) in color temperature of 6,500K and 3,500K. Various green monochromatic pc-LEDs were fabricated by capping a long-wave pass-filter (LWPF) on top of pc-LEDs to improve luminous efficacy and color purity. LWPF-capped green monochromatic pc-LED can address the drawback of green semiconductor-type III-V LED, such as low luminous efficacy in the region of green gap wavelength. Luminous efficacy and color rendering index (CRI) of multi-package white LEDs are compared with changing the driving current of individual LED in various multi-package white LEDs. This study provides a best combination of four-color multi-package white LEDs which has high luminous efficacy and good CRI.

  2. Successful treatment with 308-nm monochromatic excimer light and subsequent tacrolimus 0.03% ointment in refractory plasma cell cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Shunji; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Ohata, Chika; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that presents with erythema, erosions, ulcers and occasional nodules within the mucosa, including the lips. It is histopathologically characterized by dense plasma cell infiltration in the lamina propria of the mucous membranes. Several treatments for plasma cell cheilitis have been reported, including topical steroids, topical antibiotics or topical tacrolimus. However, 308-nm monochromatic excimer light (MEL) has never been reported as a treatment option, while it was reported to be very effective in treating erosive oral lichen planus. We report a 62-year-old man who had chronic plasma cell cheilitis on the lower lip, which was refractory to topical and systemic corticosteroid. The lesion and severe pain were significantly improved by the treatment with nine sessions of 308-nm MEL twice per week with a total dose of 1120 mJ/cm(2). However, the lesion gradually worsened after treatment frequency was reduced to once per month. Subsequent tacrolimus 0.03% ointment cleared the lesion completely in a month and no recurrence was observed a year later. Refractory plasma cell cheilitis and concomitant severe pain quickly responded to 308-nm MEL when administrated twice per week. Because the long interval between each MEL treatment seemed ineffective to improve the lesion, appropriate frequency and adequate total dose of MEL treatment may be necessary for a successful treatment.

  3. Interactions of monochromatic visible light and near-IR radiation with cells: currently discussed mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karu, Tiina I.

    1995-05-01

    Biological responses of cells to visible and near IR (laser) radiation occur due to physical and/or chemical changes in photoacceptor molecules, components of respiratory chains (cyt a/a3 in mitochondria, and cyt d in E. coli). As a result of the photoexcitation of electronic states, the following physical and/or chemical changes can occur: alteration of redox properties and acceleration of electron transfer, changes in biochemical activity due to local transient heating of chromophores, one-electron auto-oxidation and O2- production, and photodynamic action and 1O2 production. Different reaction channels can be activated to achieve the photobiological macroeffect. The primary physical and/or chemical changes induced by light in photoacceptor molecules are followed by a cascade of biochemical reactions in the cell that do not need further light activation and occur in the dark (photosignal transduction and amplification chains). These reactions are connected with changes in cellular homeostasis parameters. The crucial step here is thought to be an alteration of the cellular redox state: a shift towards oxidation is associated with stimulation of cellular vitality, and a shift towards reduction is linked to inhibition. Cells with a lower than normal pH, where the redox state is shifted in the reduced direction, are considered to be more sensitive to the stimulative action of light than those with the respective parameters being optimal or near optimal. This circumstance explains the possible variations in observed magnitudes of low-power laser effects. Light action on the redox state of a cell via the respiratory chain also explains the diversity of low-power laser effects. Beside explaining many controversies in the field of low-power laser effects (i.e., the diversity of effects, the variable magnitude or absence of effects in certain studies), the proposed redox-regulation mechanism may be a fundamental explanation of some clinical effects of irradiation, for

  4. Changes of plasma growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, thyroid hormones, and testosterone concentrations in embryos and broiler chickens incubated under monochromatic green light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that monochromatic green light stimuli during embryogenesis accelerated posthatch body weight and pectoral muscle growth of broilers. In this experiment, we further investigated whether the regulation of broiler embryonic or posthatch growth by green light stimulus during incubation is associated with the changes of some important hormones at different ages of embryos and broiler chickens. Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres, n=880 were pre-weighed and randomly assigned 1 of 2 incubation treatment groups: i dark condition (control group, and ii monochromatic green light group (560 nm. The monochromatic lighting systems sourced from light-emitting diode lamps were equalised at the intensity of 15 lux (lx at eggshell level. The dark condition was set as a commercial control from day one until hatching. After hatch, 120 day-old male chicks from each group were housed under white light with an intensity of 30 lx at bird-head level. Compared with the dark condition, chicks incubated under the green light showed significantly higher growth hormone (GH levels from 19 d of embryogenesis (E19 to 5 d of posthatch (H5, and higher plasma insulinlike growth factor (IGF-I levels from both E17 to E19 and H3 to H35. No significant differences were found in plasma thyroxine, triiodothyronine, and testosterone in embryos or hatched birds between the 2 groups. These results indicate that somatotropic axis hormones (GH and IGF-I may be the most important contributor to chicken growth promoted by green light stimuli during embryogenesis.

  5. Effects of monochromatic light stimuli on the development and Muc2 expression of goblet cells in broiler small intestines during embryogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y; Wang, Z; Cao, J; Dong, Y; Wang, T; Chen, Y

    2014-07-01

    The effects of monochromatic light on the ontogeny, differentiation, and Muc2 expression level in goblet cells were studied in the small intestines of late-stage broiler embryos. The embryos were exposed to blue light (B group), green light (G group), red light (R group), or darkness (D group) throughout the incubation period. On d 15 of incubation (E15), a few acidic goblet cells (only the sulfated subtype) were observed, and Muc2 mRNA expression was detected. On E18, however, neutral, acidic, and intermediate types, as well as the sulfated subtype, were observed in the small intestine, and a decreasing gradient of goblet cell density was found along the duodenum to ileum axis. Up to E21, 3 types of goblet cells and 3 acidic cell subtypes were found in all the small intestines. The goblet cell density increased along the duodenum to ileum axis. Monochromatic light stimulation resulted in no significant differences in the density and types of goblet cells between the different treatment groups on E15 and E18, but an increased Muc2 mRNA expression level was detected on E18 in the G group compared with the other treatment groups. On E21, the goblet cell density, proportion of acidic goblet cells, and Muc2 mRNA expression level increased in the G group compared with other treatment groups. These results suggest that the ontogeny and differentiation of goblet cells in broiler embryos display temporal and spatial differences. Green monochromatic light may have the potential to promote the proliferation and maturation of as well as the expression of Muc2 mRNA in goblet cells of broiler embryos.

  6. Inactivation and potential reactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple juice following ultraviolet light exposure at three monochromatic wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fugui; Zhu, Yan; Koutchma, Tatiana; Gong, Joshua

    2015-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation at 254 nm is considered as a novel non-thermal method for decontamination of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. However, lower penetration depth of UV light at 254 nm in apple juice resulted in higher UV dose consumption during apple juice decontamination. In addition, no studies are available on the reactivation of pathogens following exposure to UV light in drinks and beverages. Two novel monochromatic UV light sources (λ = 222 and 282 nm) have been developed for bacterial disinfection. However, the inactivation of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 following exposure to these UV wavelengths is still unclear. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the inactivation and reactivation potential of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice following exposure to UV light at three monochromatic wavelengths: Far UV (λ = 222 nm), Far UV+ (λ = 282 nm) and UVC light (λ = 254 nm). The results showed that E. coli O157:H7 is acid-resistant, and up to 99.50% of cells survived in apple juice when incubated at 20 °C for 24 h. Inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to Far UV light (2.81 Log reduction) was higher (P exposure to UV light as determined by the regular plating method. In addition, the exposure to Far UV light at 222 nm followed by incubating at 37 °C significantly decreased (P < 0.05) the survival of E. coli O157:H7 during dark incubation phase compared to that of UVC and Far UV+ light.

  7. Photosynthesis-dependent and -independent responses of stomata to blue, red and green monochromatic light: differences between the normally oriented and inverted leaves of sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yin; Noguchi, Ko; Terashima, Ichiro

    2011-03-01

    The effects of growth light environment on stomatal light responses were analyzed. We inverted leaves of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) for 2 weeks until their full expansion, and measured gas exchange properties of the adaxial and abaxial sides separately. The sensitivity to light assessed as the increase in stomatal conductance was generally higher in the abaxial stomata than in the adaxial stomata, and these differences could not be completely changed by the inversion treatment. We also treated the leaves with DCMU to inhibit photosynthesis and evaluated the photosynthesis-dependent and -independent components of stomatal light responses. The red light response of stomata in both normally oriented and inverted leaves relied only on the photosynthesis-dependent component. The blue light response involved both the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, and the relative contributions of the two components differed between the normally oriented and inverted leaves. A green light response was observed only in the abaxial stomata, which also involved the photosynthesis-dependent and photosynthesis-independent components, strongly suggesting the existence of a green light receptor in sunflower leaves. Moreover, acclimation of the abaxial stomata to strong direct light eliminated the photosynthesis-independent component in the green light response. The results showed that stomatal responses to monochromatic light change considerably in response to growth light environment, although some of these responses appear to be determined inherently. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  8. Monochromatic excimer light versus combination of topical steroid with vitamin D3 analogue in the treatment of nonsegmental vitiligo: a randomized blinded comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Latif, Azmy Ahmed; Ibrahim, Shady Mahmoud Attia

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is a difficult disease to treat, socially stigmatizing its patients. Monochromatic excimer light (MEL) was developed for use in dermatology and adapted for the treatment of vitiligo. Comparing the efficacy of MEL versus topical combination therapy of vitamin D3 analogue and steroid in the treatment of nonsegmental vitiligo. Forty-four patients with localized and stable nonsegmental vitiligo participated in the present study. In each patient, two lesions were selected and divided randomly into two groups, group A was treated with daily topical combination of calcipotriol and betamethasone and group B was treated with biweekly sessions of MEL for 3 months. Efficacy based on repigmentation percentages were blindly evaluated by two independent physicians and patient's satisfaction. There was significant improvement in both treatment modalities at the end of the study, but without significant differences in both groups. There was a significant difference between both groups regarding the onset of repigmentation (p-value vitiligo.

  9. Dr. Harry Whelan With the Light Emitting Diode Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The red light from the Light Emitting Diode (LED) probe shines through the fingers of Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Dr. Whelan uses the long waves of light from the LED surgical probe to activate special drugs that kill brain tumors. Laser light previously has been used for this type of surgery, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of tumors that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. Also, it can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The probe was developed for photodynamic cancer therapy under a NASA Small Business Innovative Research Program grant. The program is part of NASA's Technology Transfer Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center.

  10. Photoinitiation and Inhibition under Monochromatic Green Light for Storage of Colored 3D Images in Holographic Polymer-Dispersed Liquid Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guannan; Ni, Mingli; Peng, Haiyan; Huang, Feihong; Liao, Yonggui; Wang, Mingkui; Zhu, Jintao; Roy, V A L; Xie, Xiaolin

    2017-01-18

    Holographic photopolymer composites have garnered a great deal of interest in recent decades, not only because of their advantageous light sensitivity but also due to their attractive capabilities of realizing high capacity three-dimensional (3D) data storage that is long-term stable within two-dimensional (2D) thin films. For achieving high performance holographic photopolymer composites, it is of critical importance to implement precisely spatiotemporal control over the photopolymerization kinetics and gelation during holographic recording. Though a monochromatic blue light photoinitibitor has been demonstrated to be useful for improving the holographic performance, it is impractical to be employed for constructing holograms under green light due to the severe restriction of the First Law of Photochemistry, while holography under green light is highly desirable considering the relatively low cost of laser source and high tolerance to ambient vibration for image reconstruction. Herein, we disclose the concurrent photoinitiation and inhibition functions of the rose bengal (RB)/N-phenylglycine (NPG) system upon green light illumination, which result in significant enhancement of the diffraction efficiency of holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (HPDLC) gratings from zero up to 87.6 ± 1.3%, with an augmentation of the RB concentration from 0.06 × 10(-3) to 9.41 × 10(-3) mol L(-1). Interestingly, no detectable variation of the ϕ(1/2)kp/kt(1/2), which reflects the initiation efficiency and kinetic constants, is given when increasing the RB concentration. The radical inhibition by RBH(•) is believed to account for the greatly improved phase separation and enhanced diffraction efficiency, through shortening the weight-average polymer chain length and subsequently delaying the photopolymerization gelation. The reconstructed colored 3D images that are easily identifiable to the naked eye under white light demonstrate great potential to be applied for advanced

  11. Physiological crosstalk between the AC/PKA and PLC/PKC pathways modulates melatonin-mediated, monochromatic-light-induced proliferation of T-lymphocytes in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qingyun; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-06-28

    Previous study has demonstrated that melatonin plays a critical role in monochromatic-light-induced lymphocyte proliferation in response to T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA). However, its intracellular mechanism is still unclear. In this study, we investigate the intracellular signal pathways of melatonin receptor-mediated T-lymphocyte proliferation in the spleens of chicks exposed to different light wavelengths. Results showed that green light enhanced T-lymphocyte proliferation by 2.46-6.83% and increased splenic mRNA and protein expressions of melatonin receptor subtypes (Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c) by 16.05-40.43% compared with the white, red and blue light groups. However, pinealectomy resulted in a decrease in T-lymphocyte proliferation and melatonin receptor expression with no statistically significant differences between the different light groups. In vitro experiments showed that the Mel1b selective antagonist 4P-PDOT, the Mel1c selective antagonist prazosin and the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 (MEK-1) inhibitor PD98059 suppressed both melatonin-induced lymphocyte proliferation in response to ConA and melatonin- and ConA-stimulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity but that the Mel1a/Mel1b non-selective antagonist luzindole did not. In addition, pretreatment with forskolin (FSK, the adenylyl cyclase activator), H89 (the PKA inhibitor), U73122 (the PLC inhibitor) or Go6983 (the broad spectrum PKC inhibitor) markedly attenuated melatonin- and ConA-stimulated T-lymphocyte proliferation and ERK1/2 activity. These results demonstrate that melatonin mediates green-light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation via the Mel1b and Mel1c receptors by triggering crosstalk between the cAMP/PKA and PLC/PKC signal pathways followed by ERK1/2 activation.

  12. A new technique to study transient conductivity under pulsed monochromatic light in Cr-doped GaAs using acoustoelectric voltage measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1991-01-01

    The transient conductivity of high-resistivity Bridgman-grown Cr-doped GaAs under pulsed monochromatic light is monitored using transverse acoustoelectric voltage (TAV) at 83 K. Keeping the photon flux constant, the height and transient time constant at the TAV are used to calculate the energy dependence of the trap density and its cross section, respectively. Two prominent trap profiles with peak trap densities of approximately 10 to the 17th/cu cm eV near the valence and the conduction bands are detected. These traps have very small capture cross sections in the range of 10 to the -23 to 10 to the -21st cm sq. A phenomenon similar to the persistent photoconductivity with transient time constants in excess of a few seconds in high-resistivity GaAs at T = 83 K is also detected using this technique. These long relaxation times are readily explained by the spatial separation of the photo-excited electron-hole pairs and the small capture cross section and large density of trap distribution near the conduction band.

  13. Monochromatic excimer light (308 nm) for the treatment of skin diseases%308 nm准分子光治疗皮肤病进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丛林; 杨蓉娅

    2015-01-01

    308 nm准分子光是一种单频中波紫外光,为治疗白癜风的首选疗法之一.308 nm准分子光和308 nm准分子激光治疗白癜风的疗效无明显差异.研究表明,308 nm准分子光还可作为银屑病、掌跖脓疱病、斑秃等慢性皮肤病新的治疗选择.目前已有308 nm准分子光治疗无色素痣、蕈样肉芽肿、CD30+淋巴瘤样丘疹病、硬化性苔癣、结节性痒疹、局限性硬皮病、环状肉芽肿及浆细胞唇炎的个案报道,与传统光疗相比,308 nm准分子光累积照射剂量少,发生皮肤癌的风险极低,其不良反应主要为暂时性红斑.308 nm准分子光的治疗机制尚不明确.%As a kind of monochromatic ultraviolet B,308-nm monochromatic excimer light (MEL) is one of the first choice treatments for vitiligo.There is no significant difference in the therapeutic effect on vitiligo between 308-nm MEL and 308-nm excimer laser.Recent studies have shown that 308-nm MEL can also serve as the treatment of choice for some other chronic skin diseases,such as psoriasis,palmoplantaris pustulosis and alopecia areata.Furthermore,there have been case reports on the use of 308-nm MEL for the treatment of achromic naevus,mycosis fungoides,CD30+ lymphomatoid papulosis,lichen sclerosus,prurigo nodularis,localized scleroderma,granuloma annulare and plasma cell cheilitis.Compared with conventional phototherapy,308-nm MEL has the advantages of less cumulative radiation dose and lower risks of skin cancers.The main adverse reaction to 308-nm MEL is transient erythema.The therapeutic mechanism of 308-nm MEL is still unclear.

  14. Spatially Varying Image Based Lighting by Light Probe Sequences, Capture, Processing and Rendering

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Jonas; Gustavson, Stefan; Ynnerman, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel technique for capturing spatially or temporally resolved light probe sequences, and using them for image based lighting. For this purpose we have designed and built a real-time light probe, a catadioptric imaging system that can capture the full dynamic range of the lighting incident at each point in space at video frame rates, while being moved through a scene. The real-time light probe uses a digital imaging system which we have programmed to capture high quality, photome...

  15. Probing halo molecules with nonresonant light

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2009-01-01

    We show that halo molecules can be probed by "shaking" in a pulsed nonresonant laser field. The field introduces a centrifugal term which expels the highest vibrational level from the potential that binds it. Our numerical simulations as well as an analytic model applied to the Rb$_2$ and KRb Feshbach molecules indicate that shaking by feasible laser pulses can be used to accurately recover the square of the vibrational wavefunction and, by inversion, also the molecular potential.

  16. Probing Chiral Interactions in Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogga, A; Barrett, B R; Meissner, U; Witala, H; Epelbaum, E; Kamada, H; Navratil, P; Glockle, W; Vary, J P

    2004-01-08

    Chiral two- and three-nucleon interactions are studied in a few-nucleon systems. We investigate the cut-off dependence and convergence with respect to the chiral expansion. It is pointed out that the spectra of light nuclei are sensitive to the three-nucleon force structure. As an example, we present calculations of the 1{sup +} and 3{sup +} states of {sup 6}Li using the no-core shell model approach. The results show contributions of the next-to-next-to-leading order terms to the spectra, which are not correlated to the three-nucleon binding energy prediction.

  17. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  18. White Light Pump-Probe Photothermal Mirror Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaing, May; Marcano, Aristides

    2016-05-01

    We develop a new kind of spectrophotometer based on the photothermal mirror effect. The absorption of a focused tunable pump light by first atomic layers of the sample's surface generates a nanometric surface distortion or bump of thermal origin. A probe beam of light of fixed wavelength and with spot dimensions much larger than the pump beam's spot is used to test this thermal distortion. Changes in the wave-front of the reflected probe beam yields changes of the diffraction pattern of the reflected beam at the far field which can be used to produce a signal proportional to the amount of released heat. Tuning of the wavelength of the pump field generates a photothermal mirror spectrum. As tunable pump source we use the light from a Xenon arc-lamp filtered using a series of interference filter. This way we generate tunable pump light in the spectral region of 370-730 nm with a HWHM of 5 nm and power density of the order of tens of microwatts per nanometer. We obtain photothermal mirror spectra of metallic surfaces and other non-transparent samples. We show that these spectra are fundamentally different from the usual reflectance spectra which measure the percentage of the total of the total energy reflected by the surface.

  19. Stray light evaluation for the astrometric gravitation probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landini, Federico; Riva, Alberto; Gai, Mario; Baccani, Cristian; Focardi, Mauro; Pancrazzi, Maurizio

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of the Astrometric Gravitation Probe mission is the verification of General Relativity and competing gravitation theories by precise astrometric determination of light deflection, and of orbital parameters of selected Solar System objects. The key element is the coherent combination of a set of 92 circular entrance apertures, each feeding an elementary inverted occulter similar to the one developed for Solar Orbiter/METIS.1 This provides coronagraphic functions over a relevant field of view, in which all stars are observed for astrometric purposes with the full resolution of a 1 m diameter telescope. The telescope primary mirror acts as a beam combiner, feeding the 92 pupils, through the internal optics, toward a single focal plane. The primary mirror is characterized by 92 output apertures, sized according to the entrance pupil and telescope geometry, in order to dump the solar disk light beyond the instrument. The astronomical objects are much fainter than the solar disk, which is angularly close to the inner field of view of the telescope. The stray light as generated by the diffraction of the solar disk at the edges of the 92 apertures defines the limiting magnitude of observable stars. In particular, the stray light due to the diffraction from the pupil apertures is scattered by the telescope optics and follows the same optical path of the astronomical objects; it is a contribution that cannot be eliminated and must therefore be carefully evaluated. This paper describes the preliminary evaluation of this stray light contribution.

  20. Visible light laser voltage probing on thinned substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutler, Joshua; Clement, John Joseph; Miller, Mary A.; Stevens, Jeffrey; Cole, Jr., Edward I.

    2017-03-21

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing visible light in conjunction with a thinned structure to enable characterization of operation of one or more features included in an integrated circuit (IC). Short wavelength illumination (e.g., visible light) is applied to thinned samples (e.g., ultra-thinned samples) to achieve a spatial resolution for laser voltage probing (LVP) analysis to be performed on smaller technology node silicon-on-insulator (SOI) and bulk devices. Thinning of a semiconductor material included in the IC (e.g., backside material) can be controlled such that the thinned semiconductor material has sufficient thickness to enable operation of one or more features comprising the IC during LVP investigation.

  1. Probing the diamagnetic term in light-matter interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, Matteo A C; Paris, Matteo G A; Genoni, Marco G; Adesso, Gerardo; Tufarelli, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Should the Dicke model of light-matter interaction include a diamagnetic term? This question has generated intense debate in the literature, and is particularly relevant in the modern contexts of cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. We design an appropriate probing strategy to address the issue experimentally. Applying the tools of quantum estimation theory to a general Dicke model, we quantify how much information about the diamagnetic term (or lack thereof) is contained in the ground state of the coupled system. We demonstrate that feasible measurements, such as homodyne detection or photon counting, give access to a significant fraction of such information. These measurements could be performed by suddenly switching off the light-matter coupling, and collecting the radiation that naturally leaks out of the system. We further show that, should the model admit a critical point, both measurements would become asymptotically optimal in its vicinity. We finally discuss binary discrimination strategies be...

  2. Using neutral beams as a light ion beam probe (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xi, E-mail: chenxi@fusion.gat.com [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Van Zeeland, M. A.; Pace, D. C.; Petty, C. C.; Fisher, R. K. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kramer, G. J.; Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Austin, M. E. [University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Hanson, J. M. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Zeng, L. [University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    By arranging the particle first banana orbits to pass near a distant detector, the light ion beam probe (LIBP) utilizes orbital deflection to probe internal fields and field fluctuations. The LIBP technique takes advantage of (1) the in situ, known source of fast ions created by beam-injected neutral particles that naturally ionize near the plasma edge and (2) various commonly available diagnostics as its detector. These born trapped particles can traverse the plasma core on their inner banana leg before returning to the plasma edge. Orbital displacements (the forces on fast ions) caused by internal instabilities or edge perturbing fields appear as modulated signal at an edge detector. Adjustments in the q-profile and plasma shape that determine the first orbit, as well as the relative position of the source and detector, enable studies under a wide variety of plasma conditions. This diagnostic technique can be used to probe the impact on fast ions of various instabilities, e.g., Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and neoclassical tearing modes, and of externally imposed 3D fields, e.g., magnetic perturbations. To date, displacements by AEs and by externally applied resonant magnetic perturbation fields have been measured using a fast ion loss detector. Comparisons with simulations are shown. In addition, nonlinear interactions between fast ions and independent AE waves are revealed by this technique.

  3. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A L; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations \\Delta c(\\theta)/c < 3 10^{-12}, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  4. Probing new light force-mediators by isotope shift spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berengut, Julian C. [New South Wales Univ., Sydney, NSW (Australia). School of Physics; Budker, Dmitry [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Helmholtz-Inst. Mainz; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Physics Dept.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States). Nuclear Science Div.; Delaunay, Cedric [Savoie Mont Blanc Univ., Annecy-le-Vieux (France). Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique LAPTh; and others

    2017-04-15

    In this Letter we explore the potential of probing new light force-carriers, with spin-independent couplings to the electron and the neutron, using precision isotope shift spectroscopy. We develop a formalism to interpret linear King plots as bounds on new physics with minimal theory inputs. We focus only on bounding the new physics contributions that can be calculated independently of the Standard Model nuclear effects. We apply our method to existing Ca{sup +} data and project its sensitivity to possibly existing new bosons using narrow transitions in other atoms and ions (specifically, Sr and Yb). Future measurements are expected to improve the relative precision by five orders of magnitude, and can potentially lead to an unprecedented sensitivity for bosons within the 10 keV to 10 MeV mass range.

  5. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatio-temporal control. Here, we present a novel and generalizable approach, referred to as ‘Chemo-Optical Modulation of Epigenetically-regulated Transcription’ (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may translate into novel therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required. PMID:26974814

  6. The Research on the Non-monochromatic Lighting on Visibility of Michelson Interference Based on Matlab%基于MATLAB方法的非单色光迈克尔逊干涉研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳菊

    2012-01-01

    从光的干涉理论出发,分析了光源的非单色性对迈克尔逊等倾干涉条纹可见度的影响,并利用Matlab对等倾干涉条纹可见度进行了数值模拟和实验模拟,用直观的可视化图像将抽象的时间相干性理论形象化,同时对迈克尔逊干涉仪的理论教学和实践应用都有一定的指导意义.%According to the basic theory of optical interference,the changes of visibility of Michelson interferometer fringe was analyzed because of non-monochromatic light,which can realize the simulation of Michelson interferometer experiment.These computer pictures make the Abstract concept of temporal coherence of light visual.It also makes up for the drawback that theoretical teaching is divorced from practice.

  7. Light adaptation of the unicellular red alga, Cyanidioschyzon merolae, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshifumi; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko; Akimoto, Seiji

    2015-08-01

    Photosynthetic organisms change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes and the interactions among these complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed light adaptation of the unicellular red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, whose pigment composition is similar to that of cyanobacteria because its phycobilisomes (PBS) lack phycoerythrin. C. merolae were grown under different light qualities, and their responses were measured by steady-state absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Cells were cultivated under four monochromatic light-emitting diodes (blue, green, yellow, and red), and changes in pigment composition and energy transfer were observed. Cells grown under blue and green light increased their relative phycocyanin levels compared with cells cultured under white light. Energy-transfer processes to photosystem I (PSI) were sensitive to yellow and red light. The contribution of direct energy transfer from PBS to PSI increased only under yellow light, while red light induced a reduction in energy transfer from photosystem II to PSI and an increase in energy transfer from light-harvesting chlorophyll protein complex I to PSI. Differences in pigment composition, growth, and energy transfer under different light qualities are discussed.

  8. Ptychography by changing the area of probe light and scaled ptychography

    CERN Document Server

    Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Okada, Naohisa; Endo, Yutaka; Hirayama, Ryuji; Hiyama, Daisuke; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Ptychography is a promising phase retrieval technique for visible light, X-ray and electron beams. Conventional ptychography reconstructs the amplitude and phase of an object light from a set of the diffraction intensity patterns obtained by the X-Y moving of the probe light. The X-Y moving of the probe light requires two control parameters and accuracy of the locations. We propose ptychography by changing the area of the probe light using only one control parameter, instead of the X-Y moving of the probe light. The proposed method has faster convergence speed. In addition, we propose scaled ptychography using scaled diffraction calculation in order to magnify retrieved object lights clearly.

  9. Probing light emission at the nanoscale with cathodoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.J.M. Brenny

    2016-01-01

    Nanophotonics, the study of light at the nanoscale, is a vibrant field of research with a wide variety of applications. To mold and control light at the nanoscale, it is essential to measure and characterize nanostructures and their interaction with light at this subwavelength scale. This thesis des

  10. Probing biological light-harvesting phenomena by optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Filippo; Solano, Enrique; Huelga, Susana F; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Plenio, Martin B

    2011-01-01

    We propose a driven optical cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) set up aimed at directly probing energy transport dynamics in photosynthetic biomolecules. We show that detailed information concerning energy transfer paths and delocalization of exciton states can be inferred (and exciton energies estimated) from the statistical properties of the emitted photons. This approach provides us with a novel spectroscopic tool for the interrogation of biological systems in terms of quantum optical phenomena which have been usually studied for atomic or solid-state systems, e.g. trapped atoms and semiconductor quantum dots.

  11. Probing light emission from quantum wells within a single nanorod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckbauer, Jochen; Edwards, Paul R.; Bai, Jie; Wang, Tao; Martin, Robert W.

    2013-09-01

    Significant improvements in the efficiency of optoelectronic devices can result from the exploitation of nanostructures. These require optimal nanocharacterization techniques to fully understand and improve their performance. In this study we employ room temperature cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging to probe single GaN-based nanorods containing multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with a simultaneous combination of very high spatial and spectral resolution. We have investigated the strain state and carrier transport in the vicinity of the MQWs, demonstrating the high efficiencies resulting from reduced electric fields. Power-dependent photoluminescence spectroscopy of arrays of these nanorods confirms that their fabrication results in partial strain relaxation in the MQWs. Our technique allows us to interrogate the structures on a sufficiently small length scale to be able to extract the important information.

  12. Probing light polarization with the quantum Chernoff bound

    CERN Document Server

    Ghiu, Iulia; Marian, Paulina; Marian, Tudor A

    2010-01-01

    We recall the framework of a consistent quantum description of polarization of light. Accordingly, the degree of polarization of a two-mode state $\\hat \\rho$ of the quantum radiation field can be defined as a distance of a related state ${\\hat \\rho}_b$ to the convex set of all SU(2) invariant two-mode states. We explore a distance-type polarization measure in terms of the quantum Chernoff bound and derive its explicit expression. A comparison between the Chernoff and Bures degrees of polarization leads to interesting conclusions for some particular states chosen as illustrative examples.

  13. Neutrino Oscillations as a Probe of Light Scalar Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Berlin, Asher

    2016-01-01

    We consider a class of models involving interactions between ultra-light scalar dark matter and Standard Model neutrinos. Such couplings modify the neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles to include additional components that vary in time periodically with a frequency and amplitude set by the mass and energy density of the dark matter. Null results from recent searches for anomalous periodicities in the solar neutrino flux strongly constrain the dark matter-neutrino coupling to be orders of magnitude below current and projected limits derived from observations of the cosmic microwave background.

  14. Probing the Universe with Mirrors That Trick Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A

    2005-09-20

    For astrophysicists, stargazing may be different than for most people, who are content to admire a star's beauty or possibly make a wish. More than a few astrophysicists wish they could be closer to the stars--or to at least have more sophisticated probing instruments--to understand more about the universe. Astrophysicists study x-rays originating from our Sun, stars, and supernova remnants to understand the extreme physical processes occurring there. In recent years, Livermore researchers have developed optics for astrophysical applications that can focus hard x-rays (that is, x-rays with energy levels above 20 kiloelectronvolts) emanating from celestial objects, such as supernovae. In addition to astrophysics, hard x-ray optics have a variety of possible applications, including medical imaging, laser target characterization, and radiation detection. Livermore researchers have long contributed to advancements in supernova astrophysics because studying thermonuclear processes is a central part of the Laboratory's national security mission, and the physical processes involved in a nuclear weapon and an exploding star are similar. Livermore physicists Bill Craig, who is involved in several projects using x-ray optics, says, ''We can do a better job of detecting illicit radioactive sources because of what we have learned from our developments in astrophysics. Whether the radiation source is from a black hole in space or nuclear material in a dirty bomb, detecting the source involves the same challenge, which is to pick up faint signals (high-energy photons) amidst background radiation.''

  15. Probing the diamagnetic term in light-matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Matteo A. C.; Bina, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.; Genoni, Marco G.; Adesso, Gerardo; Tufarelli, Tommaso

    2017-03-01

    We address the quantum estimation of the diamagnetic, or A 2, term in an effective model of light-matter interaction featuring two coupled oscillators. First, we calculate the quantum Fisher information of the diamagnetic parameter in the interacting ground state. Then, we find that typical measurements on the transverse radiation field, such as homodyne detection or photon counting, permit to estimate the diamagnetic coupling constant with near-optimal efficiency in a wide range of model parameters. Should the model admit a critical point, we also find that both measurements would become asymptotically optimal in its vicinity. Finally, we discuss binary discrimination strategies between the two most debated hypotheses involving the diamagnetic term in circuit QED. While we adopt a terminology appropriate to the Coulomb gauge, our results are also relevant for the electric dipole gauge. In that case, our calculations would describe the estimation of the so-called transverse P 2 term. The derived metrological benchmarks are general and relevant to any implementation of the model, cavity and circuit QED being two relevant examples.

  16. Monochromatic gamma emitter for low energy quanta

    CERN Document Server

    Tomova, Z R; Mironova, S A

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of creating of a monochromatic gamma emitter of low energy quanta is analyzed. The idea is based on Daning's scheme. Except for purely scientific problems the monochromator is actual for therapy of wide range of diseases.

  17. Using Light Charged Particles to Probe the Asymmetry Dependence of the Nuclear Caloric Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, Alan B; Kohley, Zachary; Cammarata, Paul J; Hagel, Kris; Heilborn, Lauren; Mabiala, Justin; May, Larry W; Marini, Paola; Raphelt, Andrew; Souliotis, George A; Wuenschel, Sara; Zarrella, Andrew; Yennello, Sherry J

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we observed a clear dependence of the nuclear caloric curve on neutron-proton asymmetry $\\frac{N-Z}{A}$ through examination of fully reconstructed equilibrated quasi-projectile sources produced in heavy ion collisions at E/A = 35 MeV. In the present work, we extend our analysis using multiple light charged particle probes of the temperature. Temperatures are extracted with five distinct probes using a kinetic thermometer approach. Additionally, temperatures are extracted using two probes within a chemical thermometer approach (Albergo method). All seven measurements show a significant linear dependence of the source temperature on the source asymmetry. For the kinetic thermometer, the strength of the asymmetry dependence varies with the probe particle species in a way which is consistent with an average emission-time ordering.

  18. All-Fiber Raman Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunetti, Anna Chiara

    The design and development of an all-in-fiber probe for Raman spectroscopy are presented in this Thesis. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique able to probe a sample based on the inelastic scattering of monochromatic light. Due to its high specificity and reliability and to the possibility...... to perform real-time measurements with little or no sample preparation, Raman spectroscopy is now considered an invaluable analytical tool, finding application in several fields including medicine, defense and process control. When combined with fiber optics technology, Raman spectroscopy allows...... for the realization of flexible and minimally-invasive devices, able to reach remote or hardly accessible samples, and to perform in-situ analyses in hazardous environments. The work behind this Thesis focuses on the proof-of-principle demonstration of a truly in-fiber Raman probe, where all parts are realized...

  19. Elliptical polarization of near-resonant linearly polarized probe light in optically pumped alkali metal vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingying; Wang, Zhiguo; Jin, Shilong; Yuan, Jie; Luo, Hui

    2017-02-20

    Optically pumped alkali metal atoms currently provide a sensitive solution for magnetic microscopic measurements. As the most practicable plan, Faraday rotation of linearly polarized light is extensively used in spin polarization measurements of alkali metal atoms. In some cases, near-resonant Faraday rotation is applied to improve the sensitivity. However, the near-resonant linearly polarized probe light is elliptically polarized after passing through optically pumped alkali metal vapor. The ellipticity of transmitted near-resonant probe light is numerically calculated and experimentally measured. In addition, we also analyze the negative impact of elliptical polarization on Faraday rotation measurements. From our theoretical estimate and experimental results, the elliptical polarization forms an inevitable error in spin polarization measurements.

  20. Dispersion-free monochromatization method for selecting a single-order harmonic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Eiji J; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to monochromatize multiple orders of high harmonics by using a proper designed multilayer mirror. Multilayer mirrors designed by our concept realize the perfect extraction of a single-order harmonic from multiple-order harmonic beam, and exhibit broadband tenability and high reflectivity in the soft-x-ray region. Furthermore, the proposed monochromatization method can preserve the femtosecond to attosecond pulse duration for the reflected beam. This device is very useful for ultrafast soft x-ray experiments that require high-order harmonic beams, such as femtosecond/attosecond, time-resolved, pump-probe spectroscopy.

  1. Femtosecond probing of light-speed plasma wakefields by using a relativistic electron bunch

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Wan, Y; Guo, B; Wu, Y P; Pai, C -H; Li, F; Chu, H -H; Gu, Y Q; Xu, X L; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Wang, J; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic wakes produced by intense laser or particle beams propagating through plasmas are being considered as accelerators for next generation of colliders and coherent light sources. Such wakes have been shown to accelerate electrons and positrons to several gigaelectronvolts (GeV), with a few percent energy spread and a high wake-to-beam energy transfer efficiency. However, complete mapping of electric field structure of the wakes has proven elusive. Here we show that a high-energy electron bunch can be used to probe the fields of such light-speed wakes with femtosecond resolution. The highly transient, microscopic wakefield is reconstructed from the density modulated ultra-short probe bunch after it has traversed the wake. This technique enables visualization of linear wakefields in low-density plasmas that can accelerate electrons and positrons beams. It also allows characterization of wakes in plasma density ramps critical for maintaining the beam emittance, improving the energy transfer efficiency ...

  2. Numerical simulation of a gradient-index fibre probe and its properties of light propagation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Chi; Mao You-Xin; Tang Zhi; Fang Chen; Yu Ying-Jie; Qi Bo

    2011-01-01

    In order to verify the properties of the light propagating through a gradient-index (GRIN) fibre probe for optical coherence tomography (OCT),numerical simulation using the optical software GLAD is carried out.Firstly,the model of the GRIN fibre probe is presented,which is consisted of a single mode fibre (SMF),a no-core fibre (NCF),a GRIN fibre lens and an air path.Then,the software GLAD is adopted to numerically investigate how the lengths of the NCF and the GRIN fibre lens influence the performance of the Gaussian beam focusing through the GRIN fibre probe.The simulation results are well consistent with the experimental ones,showing that the GLAD based numerical simulation technique is an intuitive and effective tool for the verification of the properties of the light propagation.In this paper,we find that on the conditions of a constant GRIN fibre lens length of 0.1 mm and an NCF length of 0.36 mm,the working distance of the probe will be 0.75 mm and the focus spot size is 32 μm.

  3. Dodging the cosmic curvature to probe the constancy of the speed of light

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Rong-Gen; Yang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    We develop a new model-independent method to probe the constancy of the speed of light $c$. In our method, the degeneracy between the cosmic curvature and the speed of light can be eliminated, which makes the test more natural and general. Combining the independent observations of Hubble parameter $H(z)$ and luminosity distance $d_L(z)$, we use the model-independent smoothing technique, Gaussian processes, to reconstruct them and then detect variation of the speed of light. We find no signal of deviation from the present value of the speed of light $c_0$. Moreover, to demonstrate the improvement in probing the constancy of the speed of light from future experiments, we produce a series of simulated data. The Dark Energy Survey will be able to detect $\\Delta c /c_0 \\sim 4\\%$ at $2\\sigma$ confidence level. If the errors are reduced to one-tenth of the expected DES ones, it is easy to detect a $\\Delta c /c_0 \\sim 0.1\\%$ variation at $2\\sigma$ confidence level.

  4. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Daniel Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  5. Probing liquid surface waves, liquid properties and liquid films with light diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Barik, T K; Kar, S; Roy, A; Barik, Tarun Kr.; Chaudhuri, Partha Roy; Kar, Sayan; Roy, Anushree

    2005-01-01

    Surface waves on liquids act as a dynamical phase grating for incident light. In this article, we revisit the classical method of probing such waves (wavelengths of the order of mm) as well as inherent properties of liquids and liquid films on liquids, using optical diffraction. A combination of simulation and experiment is proposed to trace out the surface wave profiles in various situations (\\emph{eg.} for one or more vertical, slightly immersed, electrically driven exciters). Subsequently, the surface tension and the spatial damping coefficient (related to viscosity) of a variety of liquids are measured carefully in order to gauge the efficiency of measuring liquid properties using this optical probe. The final set of results deal with liquid films where dispersion relations, surface and interface modes, interfacial tension and related issues are investigated in some detail, both theoretically and experimentally. On the whole, our observations and analyses seem to support the claim that this simple, low--c...

  6. On-line Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation With Light Probe Nucleus 19F

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Minamisono; K.Matsuta; M.Fukuda; M.Mihara; WANGZhi-qiang; K.Sato; H.Akai

    2001-01-01

    1 IntroductionThe time differential perturbed angular correlation(TDPAC) has been known for about 50 years. So far, no on-line TDPAC(TDPACOL) has been performed because of mother nuclei all having a rather long lifetime. In addition, almost all TDPAC experiments have been conducted using probe nuclei with a mass heavier than 40.The present work is motivated to develop a TDPACOL technique with light probe nuclei. The key point for it is to have short-lived mother nuclei with a lifetime of, say, several ten seconds. We have found a suitable mother nucleus 19O having a half-life of 26.9 s and decaying to the daughter nucleus

  7. Resonance light scattering determination of metallothioneins using levofloxacin-palladium complex as a light scattering probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jin-Hua; Qian, Qiu-Mei; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Meng, Xia-Ling; Liu, Lu

    2013-02-01

    A novel method of resonance light scattering (RLS) was developed for the analysis of trace metallothioneins (MTs) in human urine. In a CH3COOH-CH3COONa buffer solution of pH 4.5, the formation of a complex between levofloxacin (LEV)-Pd and MTs led to enhance the RLS intensity of the system, and the enhanced RLS intensity at 468 nm was proportional to the concentration of MTs in the range of 0.059-22.4 μg mL-1. The linear regression equation was ΔI = 127.5 ρ (μg mL-1)-88.02 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9992, and the detection limit of 17.8 ng mL-1. The relative standard deviation and the average recovery were 3.8-5.4% (n = 11) and 92.15%, respectively. The proposed method is convenient, reliable and sensitive, and has been used successfully for the determination of trace MTs in human urine samples.

  8. Information Storage and Retrieval for Probe Storage using Optical Diffraction Patterns

    CERN Document Server

    van Honschoten, Joost; Koelmans, Wabe W; Parnell, Thomas P; Zaboronski, Oleg V

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for fast information retrieval from a probe storage device is considered. It is shown that information can be stored and retrieved using the optical diffraction patterns obtained by the illumination of a large array of cantilevers by a monochromatic light source. In thermo-mechanical probe storage, the information is stored as a sequence of indentations on the polymer medium. To retrieve the information, the array of probes is actuated by applying a bending force to the cantilevers. Probes positioned over indentations experience deflection by the depth of the indentation, probes over the flat media remain un-deflected. Thus the array of actuated probes can be viewed as an irregular optical grating, which creates a data-dependent diffraction pattern when illuminated by laser light. We develop a low complexity modulation scheme, which allows the extraction of information stored in the pattern of indentations on the media from Fourier coefficients of the intensity of the diffraction pattern. We th...

  9. Polar structure of disclination loops in nematic liquid crystals probed by second-harmonic-light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardaev, Shokir A; Williams, J C; Twieg, R J; Jakli, A; Gleeson, J T; Ellman, B; Sprunt, S

    2015-03-01

    Angle-resolved, second-harmonic-light scattering (SHLS) measurements are reported for three different classes of thermotropic nematic liquid crystals (NLCs): polar and nonpolar rodlike compounds and a bent-core compound. Results revealing well-defined scattering peaks are interpreted in terms of the electric polarization induced by distortions of the nematic orientational field ("flexopolarity") associated with inversion wall defects, nonsingular disclinations, analogous to Neel walls in ferromagnets, that often exhibit a closed loop morphology in NLCs. Analysis of the SHLS patterns based on this model provides a "proof-of-concept" for a potentially useful method to probe the flexopolar properties of NLCs.

  10. Optical fibre probes in the measurement of scattered light: Application for sensing turbidity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Sheno

    2014-01-01

    Optical fibre probes or optrodes often form the heart of multimode fibre-based measurements and sensors. An optrode usually comprises a bundle of multimode fibres, out of which one or more fibres are used for irradiating the sample, and the remaining fibres are used to collect the light reflected/scattered/fluoresced from the sample containing the measurand(s). The so-collected light carries the characteristic signature of the measurand. Here we present our work on the design and realization of optrodes for the measurement of scattered light from liquid samples. Optical properties of a solution are usually characterized by the parameters absorption coefficient $_a$, scattering coefficient $_s$, and anisotropy factor . We have developed a simple method to determine $_a$, $_s$, and , of a turbid medium, and a Monte–Carlo model was used to simulate the light scattering from the turbid medium. As an application, we describe the development of a turbidity sensor that has been designed and realized by employing an optrode in conjunction with a concave mirror. The estimation of turbidity is done on the basis of total interaction, by considering scattering and absorption of light from the sample solution. Details of the experiments and results are presented here.

  11. Probing the energy flow in Bessel light beams using atomic photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhykov, A.; Seipt, D.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-09-01

    The growing interest in twisted light beams also requires a better understanding of their complex internal structure. Particular attention is currently being given to the energy circulation in these beams as usually described by the Poynting vector field. In the present study we propose to use the photoionization of alkali-metal atoms as a probe process to measure (and visualize) the energy flow in twisted light fields. Such measurements are possible since the angular distribution of photoelectrons, emitted from a small atomic target, appears sensitive to and is determined by the local direction of the Poynting vector. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, detailed calculations were performed for the ionization of sodium atoms by nondiffractive Bessel beams.

  12. Trace chemical characterization using monochromatic X-ray undulator radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eba; Numako; Iihara; Sakurai

    2000-06-01

    An efficient Johansson-type X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has been developed for advanced X-ray spectroscopic analysis with third-generation synchrotron radiation. Kalpha and Kbeta X-ray fluorescence spectra for trace metals have been collected by a Ge(220) analyzing crystal with a Rowland radius of 150 mm, under monochromatic X-ray excitation at the undulator beamline at the SPring-8. The energy resolution is approximately 10 eV for most of the K lines for 3d transition metals. In light of the greatly improved efficiency, as well as the excellent signal-to-background ratio, the relative and absolute detection limits achieved are 1 ppm and 1.2 ng of copper in a carbon matrix, respectively. The energy resolution of the present spectrometer permits the observation of some chemical effects in Kbeta spectra. It has been demonstrated that the changes in Kbeta5 and Kbeta'' intensity for iron and cobalt compounds can be used for the analysis of chemical states. Resonant X-ray fluorescent spectra are another important application of monochromatic excitation. In view of trace chemical characterization, the present spectrometer can be a good alternative to a conventional Si(Li) detector system when combined with highly brilliant X-rays.

  13. All-silicon Michelson instrument on chip: Distance and surface profile measurement and prospects for visible light spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malak, M.; Marty, F.; Nouira, H.; Vailleau, G.; Bourouina, T.

    2013-04-01

    A miniature Michelson interferometer is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The fabricated micro-interferometer is incorporated at the tip of a monolithic silicon probe to achieve contactless distance measurements and surface profilometry. For infrared operation, two approaches are studied, based on the use of monochromatic light and wavelength sweep, respectively. A theoretical model is devised to depict the system characteristics taking into account Gaussian beam divergence and light spot size. Furthermore, preliminary results using visible light demonstrate operation of the probe as a visible light spectrometer, despite silicon absorbance, thanks to the micrometer thickness involved in the beam splitter.

  14. All-silicon Michelson instrument on chip: Distance and surface profile measurement and prospects for visible light spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malak, M.; Marty, F.; Bourouina, T. [Universite Paris-Est, Laboratoire ESYCOM, ESIEE Paris, Cite Descartes, 2 Boulevard Blaise Pascal, 93162 Noisy-le-Grand Cedex (France); Nouira, H.; Vailleau, G. [Laboratoire National de Metrologie et d' Essais, 1 rue Gaston Boissier, 75724 Paris Cedex 15 (France)

    2013-04-08

    A miniature Michelson interferometer is analyzed theoretically and experimentally. The fabricated micro-interferometer is incorporated at the tip of a monolithic silicon probe to achieve contactless distance measurements and surface profilometry. For infrared operation, two approaches are studied, based on the use of monochromatic light and wavelength sweep, respectively. A theoretical model is devised to depict the system characteristics taking into account Gaussian beam divergence and light spot size. Furthermore, preliminary results using visible light demonstrate operation of the probe as a visible light spectrometer, despite silicon absorbance, thanks to the micrometer thickness involved in the beam splitter.

  15. Effect of Intermittently Monochromatic Light Stimuli During the Embryogenesis on Breast Muscular Growth and Meat Quality in Male Broiler Chicks%单色光间歇性刺激胚蛋对肉仔鸡胸肉生长及肉品质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张林; 张海军; 武书庚; 岳洪源; 姚军虎; 齐广海

    2012-01-01

    [目的]采用LED (light emitting diodes)灯作为光源,探讨孵化期间歇性单色光刺激对肉仔鸡出雏后生产性能、胸肉化学成分及肉品质的影响.[方法]1 480枚爱拔益加(AA)鸡商品代受精蛋(蛋重65-70 g,平均重68 g)被随机分配到绿光组(560 nm,490枚)、蓝光组(480 nm,490枚)和黑暗组(对照组,500枚)3种不同处理的孵化器中,采用间歇光照(15 min开灯,15 min关灯),光照强度为15 lx.肉仔鸡出壳后,从每个处理组各选取120只公雏分配到3个处理中,每个处理6个重复,每个重复20只鸡.自由采食和饮水,统一采用30 lx日光灯补光,光照时间23L∶1D.[结果]各处理组种蛋孵化率、肉仔鸡初生重及平均采食量均无显著差异(P>0.05).与黑暗组和蓝光组相比,胚胎期绿光刺激可显著增加肉仔鸡21和42d体重(P<0.05).42 d时,绿光组肉仔鸡的胸肌重和胸肌率均最高,分别较黑暗组提高了38.3g和0.67%,较蓝光组提高了44.6 g和0.78%.整个生长期绿光组饲料转化率为1.81,显著优于黑暗组(1.88)和蓝光组(1.92,P<0.05).各组肉仔鸡42 d胸肌化学成分无显著差异(P<0.05).蓝光组胸肌24 h肉色b*值显著高于黑暗组和绿光组(P=0.05),而绿光处理组胸肌滴水损失(P=0.10)和蒸煮损失(P=0.07)均较黑暗组和蓝光组有升高的趋势.[结论]孵化期15 lx间歇绿光刺激可促进肉仔鸡肌肉生长,提高胸肌产量并改善饲料转化率,对胸肌化学成分无显著影响(P>0.05),但绿光组肉仔鸡胸肌系水力有降低的趋势.%[Objective] LED (light emitting diodes) as light sources was used in this study to investigate the effect of intermittently monochromatic light stimuli during the embryogenesis on breast muscle growth, chemical composition, and meat quality of male broiler chicks: [ Method ] Fertile broiler eggs (Arbor Acres, n= 1 480) were preweighed and randomly assigned into one of the three treatment groups in 3 modified incubators: 1

  16. Light-controlled modulation of gene expression by chemical optoepigenetic probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Surya A; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J Adam; Szantai-Kis, D Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecules is often insufficient to manipulate epigenetic processes with high spatiotemporal control. Here we present a generalizable approach, referred to as 'chemo-optical modulation of epigenetically regulated transcription' (COMET), enabling high-resolution, optical control of epigenetic mechanisms based on photochromic inhibitors of human histone deacetylases using visible light. COMET probes may be translated into new therapeutic strategies for diseases where conditional and selective epigenome modulation is required.

  17. Rotation and deformation of human red blood cells with light from tapered fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Jianbin; Li, Yuchao; Zhang, Yao; Li, Baojun

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic rotation and deformation of human red blood cells (RBCs) are extremely important to investigate the survival and mechanical features of cells, which will be of great physiological and pathological significance. Here, we report an optical approach that is capable of both rotating and deforming RBCs with light from two tapered fiber probes (TFPs). With laser beams at the wavelength of 980 nm injected into the TFPs, a single RBC was rotated around different axes while single or multiple RBCs were stretched by adjusting the points of action and magnitude of the optical forces from the TFPs. The biological safety of the approach was also discussed by taking the laser power required into account.

  18. Probe light-shift elimination in generalized hyper-Ramsey quantum clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; de Clercq, E.; Arimondo, E.

    2016-04-01

    We present an interrogation scheme for the next generation of quantum clocks to suppress frequency shifts induced by laser probing fields that are themselves based on generalized hyper-Ramsey resonances. Sequences of composite laser pulses with a specific selection of phases, frequency detunings, and durations are combined to generate a very efficient and robust frequency locking signal with an almost perfect elimination of the light shift from off-resonant states and to decouple the unperturbed frequency measurement from the laser's intensity. The frequency lock point generated from synthesized error signals using either π /4 or 3 π /4 laser phase steps during the intermediate pulse is tightly protected against large laser-pulse area variations and errors in potentially applied frequency shift compensations. Quantum clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden optical transitions in atoms, ions, molecules, and nuclei will benefit from these hyperstable laser frequency stabilization schemes to reach relative accuracies below the 10-18 level.

  19. Light as a probe of the structure of space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Angelo

    2016-05-01

    Light is an intrinsically relativistic probe and when used in an adequately sized array of ring lasers it is sensible to the curvature and to the chirality of space-time. On this basis the GINGER experiment is being implemented at the underground National Laboratories at Gran Sasso. The experiment, whose objective is the measurement of the terrestrial frame dragging effect or deviations from it, will be presented and discussed in its foundation. Furthermore, at a bigger scale, the possibilities given by the under way GAIA mission and the proposed AGP, will be analyzed with a special attention paied to the possibility of extracting information concerning the angular momenta of the sun and the main bodies of the solar system.

  20. Probing BoNT/A protease exosites: implications for inhibitor design and light chain longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Song; Javor, Sacha; Hixon, Mark S; Janda, Kim D

    2014-11-04

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) is one of the most lethal toxins known. Its extreme toxicity is due to its light chain (LC), a zinc protease that cleaves SNAP-25, a synaptosome-associated protein, leading to the inhibition of neuronal activity. Studies on BoNT/A LC have revealed that two regions, termed exosites, can play an important role in BoNT catalytic activity. A clear understanding of how these exosites influence neurotoxin catalytic activity would provide a critical framework for deciphering the mechanism of SNAP-25 cleavage and the design of inhibitors. Herein, based on the crystallographic structure of BoNT/A LC complexed with its substrate, we designed an α-exosite binding probe. Experiments with this unique probe demonstrated that α-exosite binding enhanced both catalytic activity and stability of the LC. These data help delineate why α-exosite binding is needed for SNAP-25 cleavage and also provide new insights into the extended lifetime observed for BoNT/A LC in vivo.

  1. Nanoscale thermal, acoustic, and magnetic dynamics probed with soft x-ray light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemens, Mark E.

    This thesis discusses the application of coherent, ultrafast beams of soft x-ray light from high-order harmonic generation (HHG) to study thermal, acoustic, and magnetic processes in nanostructures. This short-wavelength light is a uniquely powerful probe of surface dynamics since it has both a very short wavelength and duration. First, this thesis reports the first observation and quantitative measurements of the transition from diffusive to ballistic thermal transport for the case of heat flow away from a heated nanostructure into a bulk substrate. This measurement provides insight into the fundamentals of thermal energy transport away from nanoscale hot spots, and demonstrates a fundamental limit to the energy dissipation capability of nanostructures. Further, we propose a straightforward correction to the Fourier law for heat diffusion, necessary for thermal management in nanoelectronics, nano-enabled energy systems, nanomanufacturing, and nanomedicine. Second, this work discusses dynamic measurements of ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAW) and the first SAW dispersion measurement in a nanostructured system. These results are directly applicable to adhesion and thickness diagnostics of very thin films. Finally, this thesis reports the first use of light from HHG to study magnetic orientation. Using the transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect and soft x-ray light near the M-absorption edges of Fe, Co, and Ni, magnetic asymmetries up to 8% are observed from thin Permalloy (Ni80Fe20) films. This signal is 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than that observed using optical methods, showing great promise for dynamic imaging of domain flipping at the 100 nm level.

  2. Probing interactions and phase separations of proteins, colloids, and polymers with light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Avanish Singh

    solutions at high salt concentration, over a wide range of pH values and temperatures for the common tracer particle polystyrene flocculates. We applied dynamic light scattering to measure the viscoelastic responses of polystyrene probe particles embedded in solutions and gels of two different polymers: polyacrylamide (PAAm) and poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (poly-NiPAAm).

  3. Probing the Near-Field of Second-Harmonic Light around Plasmonic Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Bernd; Hentschel, Mario; Giessen, Harald

    2017-03-08

    We introduce a new concept that enables subwavelength polarization-resolved probing of the second-harmonic near-field distribution of plasmonic nanostructures. As a local sensor, this method utilizes aluminum nanoantennas, which are resonant to the second-harmonic wavelength and which allow to efficiently scatter the local second-harmonic light to the far-field. We place these sensors into the second-harmonic near-field generated by plasmonic nanostructures and carefully vary their position and orientation. Observing the second-harmonic light resonantly scattered by the aluminum nanoantennas provides polarization-resolved information about the local second-harmonic near-field distribution. We then investigate the polarization-resolved second-harmonic near-field of inversion symmetric gold dipole nanoantennas. Interestingly, we find strong evidence that the second-harmonic dipole is predominantly oriented perpendicular to the gold nanoantenna long axis, although the excitation laser is polarized parallel to the nanoantennas. We believe that our investigations will help to disentangle the highly debated origin of the second-harmonic response of inversion symmetric plasmonic structures. Furthermore, we believe that our new method, which enables the measurement of local nonlinear electric fields, will find widespread implementation and applications in nonlinear near-field optical microscopy.

  4. Co-doping of Ag into Mn:ZnSe Quantum Dots: Giving Optical Filtering effect with Improved Monochromaticity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhiyang Hu; Shuhong Xu; Xiaojing Xu; Zhaochong Wang; Zhuyuan Wang; Chunlei Wang; Yiping Cui

    2015-01-01

    In optics, when polychromatic light is filtered by an optical filter, the monochromaticity of the light can be improved. In this work, we reported that Ag dopant atoms could be used as an optical filter for nanosized Mn:ZnSe quantum dots (QDs). If no Ag doping, aqueous Mn:ZnSe QDs have low monochromaticity due to coexisting of strong ZnSe band gap emission, ZnSe trap emission, and Mn dopant emission. After doping of Ag into QDs, ZnSe band gap and ZnSe trap emissions can be filtered, leaving o...

  5. Comparison of the Noise Properties of Squeezed Probe Light in Optically Thick and Thin Quantum Coherence Media for Weak and Strong Coupling Lights

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhong-Hua; LI Yuan; DOU Ya-Fang; GAO Jiang-Rui; ZHANG Jun-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    The output amplitude noises of one squeezed probe light which is at resonance throughout different optical depths media in strong- and weak-coupling-Seld regimes are investigated theoretically. By comparing the output quantum noises for different Rabi frequencies of coupling field and also for different optical depths, it is found that the optimal squeezing preservation of the probe light occurs in an optically thin medium with strong-coupling-field, where we can obtain the output squeezing ciose to the input one at nonzero detection frequency.%The output amplitude noises of one squeezed probe light which is at resonance throughout different optical depths media in strong- and weak-coupling-field regimes are investigated theoretically.By comparing the output quantum noises for different Rabi frequencies of coupling field and also for different optical depths,it is found that the optimal squeezing preservation of the probe light occurs in an optically thin medium with strong-coupling-field,where we can obtain the output squeezing close to the input one at nonzero detection frequency.

  6. Femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy for the study of energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes from extractions of spinach leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. van Rensburg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of ultrafast transient processes, of temporal durations in the picosecond and femtosecond regime, are made possible by femtosecond pump probe transient absorption spectroscopy. Such an ultrafast pump probe transient absorption setup has been implemented at the CSIR National Laser Centre and has been applied to investigate energy transfer processes in different parts of photosynthetic systems. In this paper we report on our first results obtained with Malachite green as a benchmark. Malachite green was chosen because the lifetime of its excited state is well known. We also present experimental results of the ultrafast energy transfer of light-harvesting complexes in samples prepared from spinach leaves. Various pump wavelengths in the range 600–680 nm were used; the probe was a white light continuum spanning 420–700 nm. The experimental setup is described in detail in this paper. Results obtained with these samples are consistent with those expected and achieved by other researchers in this field.

  7. Status report on the tunable monochromatic gamma—ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bertschy; W.Mondelaers; 等

    1996-01-01

    The tunable monochromatic gamma-ray source at the Ghent 15MeV linac is described.The characteristics of the monochromatic beam are given,and some applications,as the detection of heavy elements in other materials,are presented.

  8. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  9. Optical Tweezers Array and Nimble Tweezers Probe Generated by Spatial- Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Jassemnejad, Baha; Seibel, Robin E.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    2003-01-01

    An optical tweezers is being developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center as a visiblelight interface between ubiquitous laser technologies and the interrogation, visualization, manufacture, control, and energization of nanostructures such as silicon carbide (SiC) nanotubes. The tweezers uses one or more focused laser beams to hold micrometer-sized particles called tools (sometimes called tips in atomic-force-microscope terminology). A strongly focused laser beam has an associated light-pressure gradient that is strong enough to pull small particles to the focus, in spite of the oppositely directed scattering force; "optical tweezers" is the common term for this effect. The objective is to use the tools to create carefully shaped secondary traps to hold and assemble nanostructures that may contain from tens to hundreds of atoms. The interaction between a tool and the nanostructures is to be monitored optically as is done with scanning probe microscopes. One of the initial efforts has been to create, shape, and control multiple tweezers beams. To this end, a programmable spatial-light modulator (SLM) has been used to modify the phase of a laser beam at up to 480 by 480 points. One program creates multiple, independently controllable tweezer beams whose shapes can be tailored by making the SLM an adaptive mirror in an interferometer (ref. 1). The beams leave the SLM at different angles, and an optical Fourier transform maps these beams to different positions in the focal plane of a microscope objective. The following figure shows two arrays of multiple beams created in this manner. The patterns displayed above the beam array control the intensity-to-phase transformation required in programming the SLM. Three of the seven beams displayed can be used as independently controllable beams.

  10. Probing the interaction of nanoparticles with mucin for drug delivery applications using dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Peter Charles; Cattoz, Beatrice; Ibrahim, Mervat Shafik; Anuonye, Josephine Chibuzor

    2015-11-01

    Drug delivery via the eye, nose, gastrointestinal tract and lung is of great interest as they represent patient-compliant and facile methods to administer drugs. However, for a drug to reach the systemic circulation it must penetrate the "mucus barrier". An understanding of the characteristics of the mucus barrier is therefore important in the design of mucus penetrating drug delivery vehicles e.g. nanoparticles. Here, a range of nanoparticles - silica, aluminium coated silica, poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and PEGylated PLGA - each with known but different physicochemical characteristics were examined in the presence of mucin to identify those characteristics that engender nanoparticle/mucin interactions and thus, to define "design rules" for mucus penetrating (nano)particles (MPP), at least in terms of the surface characteristics of charge and hydrophilicity. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and rheology have been used to assess the interaction between such nanoparticles and mucin. It was found that negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticles do not exhibit an interaction with mucin whereas positively charged and hydrophobic nanoparticles show a strong interaction. Surface grafted poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains significantly reduced this interaction. This study clearly demonstrates that the established colloid science techniques of DLS and rheology are very powerful screening tools to probe nanoparticle/mucin interactions.

  11. Probing Photocatalytic Characteristics of Sb-Doped TiO2 under Visible Light Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjing Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sb-doped TiO2 nanoparticle with varied dopant concentrations was synthesized using titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4 and antimony chloride (SbCl3 as the precursors. The properties of Sb-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, fluorescence spectrophotometer, and Uv-vis spectrophotometer. The absorption edge of TiO2 nanoparticles could be extended to visible region after doping with antimony, in contrast to the UV absorption of pure TiO2. The results showed that the photocatalytic activity of Sb-doped TiO2 nanoparticles was much more active than pure TiO2. The 0.1% Sb-doped TiO2 nanoparticles demonstrated the best photocatalytic activity which was better than that of the Degussa P25 under visible light irradiation using terephthalic acid as fluorescent probe. The effects of Sb dopant on the photocatalytic activity and the involved mechanism were extensively investigated in this work as well.

  12. Probing a light CP-odd scalar in di-top-associated production at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Farooque, Trisha [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Juste, Aurelio [Institut de Fisica d' Altes Energies (IFAE), Barcelona, Bellaterra (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Liu, Tao [The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Department of Physics, Hong Kong S.A.R. (China); Spannowsky, Michael [Durham University, Department of Physics, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    CP-odd scalars are an integral part of many extensions of the Standard Model. Recently, electroweak-scale pseudoscalars have received increased attention in explaining the diffuse gamma-ray excess from the Galactic Centre. Elusive due to absence of direct couplings to gauge bosons, these particles receive only weak constraints from direct searches at LEP or searches performed during the first LHC runs. We investigate the LHC's sensitivity in probing a CP-odd scalar in the mass range 20 ≤ m{sub A} ≤ 100 GeV via di-top-associated production using jet-substructure-based reconstruction techniques. We parameterise the scalar's interactions using a simplified model approach and relate the obtained upper limits to couplings within type-I and type-II 2HDMs as well as the NMSSM. We find that in di-top-associated production, experiments at the LHC can set tight limits on CP-odd scalars that fit the Galactic Centre excess. However, direct sensitivity to light CP-odd scalars from the NMSSM remains challenging. (orig.)

  13. Nonlocal response of metallic nanospheres probed by light, electrons, and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie-Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For selected metals, we predict hydrodynamic multipolar plasmons to be measurable on single nanospheres.

  14. All-oxide Raman-active traps for light and matter: probing redox homeostasis model reactions in aqueous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandri, Ivano; Depero, L E

    2014-04-09

    Core-shell colloidal crystals can act as very efficient traps for light and analytes. Here it is shown that Raman-active probes can be achieved using SiO2-TiO2 core-shell beads. These systems are successfully tested in monitoring of glutathione redox cycle at physiological concentration in aqueous environment, without need of any interfering enhancers. These materials represent a promising alternative to conventional, metal-based SERS probes for investigating chemical and biochemical reactions under real working conditions. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Adaptation of light-harvesting systems of Arthrospira platensis to light conditions, probed by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Seiji; Yokono, Makio; Hamada, Fumiya; Teshigahara, Ayaka; Aikawa, Shimpei; Kondo, Akihiko

    2012-08-01

    Cyanobacteria change the quantity and/or quality of their pigment-protein complexes in response to light conditions. In the present study, we analyzed excitation relaxation dynamics in the cyanobacterium, Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis, grown under lights exhibiting different spectral profiles, by means of steady-state absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. It was found that F760, which is the PSI red-chlorophyll characteristic of A. platensis, contributes to slower energy-transfer phase in the PSI of A. platensis. Excitation energy transfers in phycobilisome and those from PSII to PSI were modified depending on the light quality. Existence of quencher was suggested in PSI of the blue-light grown cells. Phycobilisomes in the green-light grown cells and the far-red-light grown cells transferred excitation energy from phycobilisome to chlorophyll without loss of energy. In these cells, excitation energy was shared between two photosystems. Fast energy transfer was established in phycobilisome under the yellow-light condition where only the phycobilisome can absorb the cultivation light. Differences in light-harvesting and energy-transfer processes under different cultivation-light conditions are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability: from Natural to Artificial.

  16. Probing entrainment of Ostreococcus tauri circadian clock by green and blue light through a mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thommen, Quentin; Pfeuty, Benjamin; Schatt, Philippe; Bijoux, Amandine; Bouget, François-Yves; Lefranc, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Most organisms anticipate daily environmental variations and orchestrate cellular functions thanks to a circadian clock which entrains robustly to the day/night cycle, despite fluctuations in light intensity due to weather or seasonal variations. Marine organisms are also subjected to fluctuations in light spectral composition as their depth varies, due to differential absorption of different wavelengths by sea water. Studying how light input pathways contribute to circadian clock robustness is therefore important. Ostreococcus tauri, a unicellular picoplanktonic marine green alga with low genomic complexity and simple cellular organization, has become a promising model organism for systems biology. Functional and modeling approaches have shown that a core circadian oscillator based on orthologs of Arabidopsis TOC1 and CCA1 clock genes accounts for most experimental data acquired under a wide range of conditions. Some evidence points at putative light input pathway(s) consisting of a two-component signaling system (TCS) controlled by the only two histidine kinases (HK) of O. tauri. LOV-HK is a blue light photoreceptor under circadian control, that is required for circadian clock function. An involvement of Rhodopsin-HK (Rhod-HK) is also conceivable since rhodopsin photoreceptors mediate blue to green light input in animal circadian clocks. Here, we probe the role of LOV-HK and Rhod-HK in mediating light input to the TOC1-CCA1 oscillator using a mathematical model incorporating the TCS hypothesis. This model agrees with clock gene expression time series representative of multiple environmental conditions in blue or green light, characterizing entrainment by light/dark cycles, free-running in constant light, and resetting. Experimental and theoretical results indicate that both blue and green light can reset O. tauri circadian clock. Moreover, our mathematical analysis suggests that Rhod-HK is a blue-green light receptor and drives the clock together with LOV-HK.

  17. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Werts, Martinus H. V.; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R. G.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three...

  18. Relief Restoration of Complicated form Objects by Monochromatic Microwave Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmenko Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article demonstrates possibility of monochromatic radiation usage for relief restoration. There is a problem with restoration when scanned object is not flat and it is not parallel to the scanning plane. It was discovered that two-dimensional phase distribution could be applied for distance determination. It is reliable way to solve problems listed above. In conclusion offered methods allow monochromatic microwave radiation usage for screening system development.

  19. Surface sensitivity of four-probe STM resistivity measurements of bulk ZnO correlated to XPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Alex M.; Evans, Jonathan E.; Barnett, Chris J.; Allen, Martin W.; Barron, Andrew R.; Wilks, Steve P.

    2017-09-01

    Multi-probe instruments based on scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) are becoming increasingly common for their ability to perform nano- to atomic-scale investigations of nanostructures, surfaces and in situ reactions. A common configuration is the four-probe STM often coupled with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that allows precise positioning of the probes onto surfaces and nanostructures enabling electrical and scanning experiments to be performed on highly localised regions of the sample. In this paper, we assess the sensitivity of four-probe STM for in-line resistivity measurements of the bulk ZnO surface. The measurements allow comparisons to established models that are used to relate light plasma treatments (O and H) of the surfaces to the resistivity measurements. The results are correlated to x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and show that four-probe STM can detect changes in surface and bulk conduction mechanisms that are beyond conventional monochromatic XPS.

  20. Low luminance/eyes closed and monochromatic stimulations reduce variability of flash visual evoked potential latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Subramanian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Visual evoked potentials are useful in investigating the physiology and pathophysiology of the human visual system. Flash visual evoked potential (FVEP, though technically easier, has less clinical utility because it shows great variations in both latency and amplitude for normal subjects. Aim: To study the effect of eye closure, low luminance, and monochromatic stimulation on the variability of FVEPs. Subjects and Methods: Subjects in self-reported good health in the age group of 18-30 years were divided into three groups. All participants underwent FVEP recording with eyes open and with white light at 0.6 J luminance (standard technique. Next recording was done in group 1 with closed eyes, group 2 with 1.2 and 20 J luminance, and group 3 with red and blue lights, while keeping all the other parameters constant. Two trials were given for each eye, for each technique. The same procedure was repeated at the same clock time on the following day. Statistical Analysis: Variation in FVEP latencies between the individuals (interindividual variability and the variations within the same individual for four trials (intraindividual variability were assessed using coefficient of variance (COV. The technique with lower COV was considered the better method. Results: Recording done with closed eyes, 0.6 J luminance, and monochromatic light (blue > red showed lower interindividual and intraindividual variability in P2 and N2 as compared to standard techniques. Conclusions: Low luminance flash stimulations and monochromatic light will reduce FVEP latency variability and may be clinically useful modifications of FVEP recording technique.

  1. A priori checking of the light-response and data quality before extended data collection in pump–probe photocrystallography experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Makal, Anna [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Fournier, Bertrand [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Jarzembska, Katarzyna N. [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kamiński, Radosław [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Basuroy, Krishnayan [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Trzop, Elzbieta [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2017-01-23

    In picosecond and slower pump–probe diffraction experiments, collection of response–ratio correlation sets prior to full data collection provides an invaluable confirmation of the existence of a light-induced signal prior to full data collection. If a response to light exposure is observed, the quality of the data being collected can be assessed. We present a number of such correlation plots both for synchrotron and in-house pump–probe data collection.

  2. Chirped seeded free-electron lasers: self-standing light sources for two-colour pump-probe experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, Giovanni; Mahieu, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility to run a single-pass free-electron laser in a new dynamical regime, which can be exploited to perform two-colour pump-probe experiments in the VUV/X-ray domain, using the free-electron laser emission both as a pump and as a probe. The studied regime is induced by triggering the free-electron laser process with a powerful laser pulse, carrying a significant and adjustable frequency chirp. As a result, the emitted light is eventually split in two sub-pulses, whose spectral and temporal separations can be independently controlled. We provide a theoretical description of this phenomenon, which is found in good agreement with experiments performed on the FERMI@Elettra free-electron laser.

  3. Photoemission of Bi_{2}Se_{3} with Circularly Polarized Light: Probe of Spin Polarization or Means for Spin Manipulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sánchez-Barriga

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Topological insulators are characterized by Dirac-cone surface states with electron spins locked perpendicular to their linear momenta. Recent theoretical and experimental work implied that this specific spin texture should enable control of photoelectron spins by circularly polarized light. However, these reports questioned the so far accepted interpretation of spin-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. We solve this puzzle and show that vacuum ultraviolet photons (50–70 eV with linear or circular polarization indeed probe the initial-state spin texture of Bi_{2}Se_{3} while circularly polarized 6-eV low-energy photons flip the electron spins out of plane and reverse their spin polarization, with its sign determined by the light helicity. Our photoemission calculations, taking into account the interplay between the varying probing depth, dipole-selection rules, and spin-dependent scattering effects involving initial and final states, explain these findings and reveal proper conditions for light-induced spin manipulation. Our results pave the way for future applications of topological insulators in optospintronic devices.

  4. Light-driven nano-robotics for sub-diffraction probing and sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin

    On the macro-scale robotics typically uses light for carrying information for machine vision for and feedback in artificially intelligent guidance systems and monitoring. Using the miniscule momentum of light shrinking robots down to the micro- and even nano-scale regime creates opportunities...... for exploiting optical forces and sensing in micro-robotic actuation and control. Advancing light-driven micro-robotics requires the optimization of optical forces and torques that, in turn, requires optimization of the underlying light-matter interaction. The requirement of having tightly focused beams...

  5. Are there good probes for the di-neutron correlation in light neutron-rich nuclei?

    CERN Document Server

    Hagino, K

    2015-01-01

    The di-neutron correlation is a spatial correlation with which two valence neutrons are located at a similar position inside a nucleus. We discuss possible experimental probes for the di-neutron correlation. This includes the Coulomb breakup and the pair transfer reactions of neutron-rich nuclei, and the direct two-neutron decays of nuclei beyond the neutron drip-line.

  6. Display of the complex degree of coherence due to quasi-monochromatic spatially incoherent sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalski, M; Sicre, E E; Rabal, H J

    1985-12-01

    A method for displaying the complex degree of coherence (CDC) of a quasi-monochromatic spatially incoherent source is proposed. The phase of the CDC is encoded in a method similar to that used in interferometric imaging with incoherent light. The method is based on Fourier analysis of the speckle pattern that appears when a diffuser is illuminated with the partially coherent field whose CDC is to be displayed. In addition, an intensity pattern that resembles the spatial distribution of the incoherent source can also be obtained.

  7. Nine New Fluorescent Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsung-I.; Jovanovic, Misa V.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1989-06-01

    Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic studies are reported here for nine new fluorescent probes recently synthesized in our laboratories: four pyrene derivatives with substituents of (i) 1,3-diacetoxy-6,8-dichlorosulfonyl, (ii) 1,3-dihydroxy-6,8-disodiumsulfonate, (iii) 1,3-disodiumsulfonate, and (iv) l-ethoxy-3,6,8-trisodiumsulfonate groups, and five [7-julolidino] coumarin derivatives with substituents of (v) 3-carboxylate-4-methyl, (vi) 3- methylcarboxylate, (vii) 3-acetate-4-methyl, (viii) 3-propionate-4-methyl, and (ix) 3-sulfonate-4-methyl groups. Pyrene compounds i and ii and coumarin compounds v and vi exhibit interesting absorbance and fluorescence properties: their absorption maxima are red shifted compared to the parent compound to the blue-green region, and the band width broadens considerably. All four blue-absorbing dyes fluoresce intensely in the green region, and the two pyrene compounds emit at such long wavelengths without formation of excimers. The fluorescence properties of these compounds are quite environment-sensitive: considerable spectral shifts and fluorescence intensity changes have been observed in the pH range from 3 to 10 and in a wide variety of polar and hydrophobic solvents with vastly different dielectric constants. The high extinction and fluorescence quantum yield of these probes make them ideal fluorescent labeling reagents for proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, and cellular organelles. The pH and hydrophobicity-dependent fluorescence changes can be utilized as optical pH and/or hydrophobicity indicators for mapping environmental difference in various cellular components in a single cell. Since all nine probes absorb in the UV, but emit at different wavelengths in the visible, these two groups of compounds offer an advantage of utilizing a single monochromatic light source (e.g., a nitrogen laser) to achieve multi-wavelength detection for flow cytometry application. As a first step to explore potential application in

  8. Broadband, monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic x-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian S.; Lim, Sara N.; Nahar, Sultana N.; Chowdhury, Enam; Pradhan, Anil K.

    2017-08-01

    With the advent of monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic x-ray sources, we explore their potential with computational and experimental studies on propagation through a combination of low and high-Z (atomic number) media for applications to imaging and detection. The multi-purpose code GEANT4 and a new code PHOTX are employed in numerical simulations, and a variety of x-ray sources are considered: conventional broadband devices with well-known spectra, quasi-monochromatic laser driven sources, and monochromatic synchrotron x-rays. Phantom samples consisting of layers of low-Z and high-Z material are utilized, with atomic-molecular species ranging from H2O to gold. Differential and total attenuation of x-ray fluxes from the different x-ray sources are illustrated through simulated x-ray images. Main conclusions of this study are: I. It is shown that a 65 keV Gaussian quasi-monochromatic source is capable of better contrast with less radiation exposure than a common 120 kV broadband simulator. II. A quantitative measure is defined and computed as a metric to compare the efficacy of any two x-ray sources, as a function of concentration of high-Z moieties in predominantly low-Z environment and depth of penetration. III. Characteristic spectral features of \

  9. Assembling the Infrared Extragalactic Background Light with CIBER-2: Probing Inter-Halo Light and the Epoch of Reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    We propose to carry out a program of observations with the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER-2). CIBER-2 is a near-infrared sounding rocket experiment designed to measure spatial fluctuations in the extragalactic background light. CIBER-2 scientifically follows on the detection of fluctuations with the CIBER-1 imaging instrument, and will use measurement techniques developed and successfully demonstrated by CIBER-1. With high-sensitivity, multi-band imaging measurements, CIBER-2 will elucidate the history of interhalo light (IHL) production and carry out a deep search for extragalactic background fluctuations associated with the epoch of reionization (EOR). CIBER-1 has made high-quality detections of large-scale fluctuations over 4 sounding rocket flights. CIBER-1 measured the amplitude and spatial power spectrum of fluctuations, and observed an electromagnetic spectrum that is close to Rayleigh-Jeans, but with a statistically significant turnover at 1.1 um. The fluctuations cross-correlate with Spitzer images and are significantly bluer than the spectrum of the integrated background derived from galaxy counts. We interpret the CIBER-1 fluctuations as arising from IHL, low-mass stars tidally stripped from their parent galaxies during galaxy mergers. The first generation of stars and their remnants are likely responsible for the for the reionization of the intergalactic medium, observed to be ionized out to the most distant quasars at a redshift of 6. The total luminosity produced by first stars is uncertain, but a lower limit can be placed assuming a minimal number of photons to produce and sustain reionization. This 'minimal' extragalactic background component associated with reionization is detectable in fluctuations at the design sensitivity of CIBER-2. The CIBER-2 instrument is optimized for sensitivity to surface brightness in a short sounding rocket flight. The instrument consists of a 28 cm wide-field telescope operating in 6 spectral bands

  10. Reconstruction of quasi-monochromatic images from a multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic for inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izumi, N; Turner, R; Barbee, T; Koch, J; Welser, L; Mansini, R

    2004-04-15

    We have developed a software package for image reconstruction of a multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostics (MMI) for diagnostic of inertial conferment fusion capsules. The MMI consists of a pinhole array, a multi-layer Bragg mirror, and a charge injection device image detector (CID). The pinhole array projects {approx}500 sub-images onto the CID after reflection off the multi-layer Bragg mirror. The obtained raw images have continuum spectral dispersion on its vertical axis. For systematic analysis, a computer-aided reconstruction of the quasi-monochromatic image is essential.

  11. Probing and Manipulating Fermionic and Bosonic Quantum Gases with Quantum Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Elliott

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We study the atom-light interaction in the fully quantum regime, with the focus on off-resonant light scattering into a cavity from ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. The detection of photons allows the quantum nondemolition (QND measurement of quantum correlations of the atomic ensemble, distinguishing between different quantum states. We analyse the entanglement between light and matter and show how it can be exploited for realising multimode macroscopic quantum superpositions, such as Schrödinger cat states, for both bosons and fermions. We provide examples utilising different measurement schemes and study their robustness to decoherence. Finally, we address the regime where the optical lattice potential is a quantum dynamical variable and is modified by the atomic state, leading to novel quantum phases and significantly altering the phase diagram of the atomic system.

  12. The structure of SN 1987A's outer circumstellar envelope as probed by light echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crotts, Arlin; Sugerman, Ben; Lawrence, Stephen; Kunkel, William

    2001-05-01

    We present ground-based and HST images processed by image subtraction to highlight transient reflection nebulae or ``light echoes'' of the maximum light pulse of the explosion of SN 1987A from surrounding material. Along with numerous structures already discussed elsewhere, we have found (in multiple epochs of data) a new feature opposite the SN from the mysterious ``Napoleon's Hat'' which indicates a symmetric structure due to shocks internal to the SN's red supergiant wind and probably caused by the pile-up of gas due to differential velocities within the outflow. We also show how echoes betray the ram pressure distribution of the progenitor mass loss flow. .

  13. A Bloch equation approach to intensity dependent optical spectra of light harvesting complex II: excitation dependence of light harvesting complex II pump-probe spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Marten; Renger, Thomas; Knorr, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of the recent progress in the resolution of the structure of the antenna light harvesting complex II (LHC II) of the photosystem II, we propose a microscopically motivated theory to predict excitation intensity-dependent spectra. We show that optical Bloch equations provide the means to include all 2( N ) excited states of an oligomer complex of N coupled two-level systems and analyze the effects of Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation on pump-probe spectra. We use LHC Bloch equations for 14 Coulomb coupled two-level systems, which describe the S (0) and S (1) level of every chlorophyll molecule. All parameter introduced into the Hamiltonian are based on microscopic structure and a quantum chemical model. The derived Bloch equations describe not only linear absorption but also the intensity dependence of optical spectra in a regime where the interplay of Pauli Blocking effects as well as exciton-exciton annihilation effects are important. As an example, pump-probe spectra are discussed. The observed saturation of the spectra for high intensities can be viewed as a relaxation channel blockade on short time scales due to Pauli blocking. The theoretical investigation is useful for the interpretation of the experimental data, if the experimental conditions exceed the low intensity pump limit and effects like strong Pauli Blocking and exciton-exciton annihilation need to be considered. These effects become important when multiple excitations are generated by the pump pulse in the complex.

  14. On monochromatic arm exponents for 2D critical percolation

    CERN Document Server

    Beffara, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the so-called monochromatic arm exponents for critical percolation in two dimensions. These exponents, describing the probability of observing j disjoint macroscopic paths, are shown to exist and to form a different family from the (now well-understood) polychromatic exponents.

  15. Kernels by Monochromatic Paths and Color-Perfect Digraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galeana-Śanchez Hortensia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For a digraph D, V (D and A(D will denote the sets of vertices and arcs of D respectively. In an arc-colored digraph, a subset K of V(D is said to be kernel by monochromatic paths (mp-kernel if (1 for any two different vertices x, y in N there is no monochromatic directed path between them (N is mp-independent and (2 for each vertex u in V (D \\ N there exists v ∈ N such that there is a monochromatic directed path from u to v in D (N is mp-absorbent. If every arc in D has a different color, then a kernel by monochromatic paths is said to be a kernel. Two associated digraphs to an arc-colored digraph are the closure and the color-class digraph CC(D. In this paper we will approach an mp-kernel via the closure of induced subdigraphs of D which have the property of having few colors in their arcs with respect to D. We will introduce the concept of color-perfect digraph and we are going to prove that if D is an arc-colored digraph such that D is a quasi color-perfect digraph and CC(D is not strong, then D has an mp-kernel. Previous interesting results are generalized, as for example Richardson′s Theorem.

  16. Classical stabilization of the hydrogen atom in a monochromatic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuto, F.; Casati, G. (Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Via Castelnuovo 7, 22100 Como (Italy)); Shepelyansky, D.L. (Laboratoire de Physique Quantique, Universite Paul Sabatier, 31062, Toulouse (France))

    1993-02-01

    We report the results of analytical and numerical investigations on the ionization of a classical atom in a strong, linearly polarized, monochromatic field. We show that the ionization probability decreases with increasing field intensity at field amplitudes much larger than the classical chaos border. This effect should be observable in real laboratory experiments.

  17. Temporal frequency probing for 5D transient analysis of global light transport

    KAUST Repository

    O'Toole, Matthew

    2014-07-27

    We analyze light propagation in an unknown scene using projectors and cameras that operate at transient timescales. In this new photography regime, the projector emits a spatio-temporal 3D signal and the camera receives a transformed version of it, determined by the set of all light transport paths through the scene and the time delays they induce. The underlying 3D-to-3D transformation encodes scene geometry and global transport in great detail, but individual transport components (e.g., direct reflections, inter-reflections, caustics, etc.) are coupled nontrivially in both space and time. To overcome this complexity, we observe that transient light transport is always separable in the temporal frequency domain. This makes it possible to analyze transient transport one temporal frequency at a time by trivially adapting techniques from conventional projector-to-camera transport. We use this idea in a prototype that offers three never-seen-before abilities: (1) acquiring time-of-flight depth images that are robust to general indirect transport, such as interreflections and caustics; (2) distinguishing between direct views of objects and their mirror reflection; and (3) using a photonic mixer device to capture sharp, evolving wavefronts of "light-in-flight".

  18. Light as a trigger and a probe of the internal dynamics of living organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, Rajendra; Brizhik, Larissa; Del Giudice, Emilio; Finelli, Filomena; Popp, Fritz-Albert; Schlebusch, Klauss-Peter

    2010-12-01

    It has been reported that the colors perceived behind closed eyes provide an indication of the psychophysical state of a subject. We discuss this phenomenon in the light of recently developed approaches to living organisms, based on the interplay between matter organization, biochemistry and electrodynamics. "When there is no energy, there is no color, no shape, no life." Caravaggio (1571-1610).

  19. Light, Molecules, Action: Using Ultrafast Uv-Visible and X-Ray Spectroscopy to Probe Excited State Dynamics in Photoactive Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sension, R. J.

    2017-06-01

    Light provides a versatile energy source capable of precise manipulation of material systems on size scales ranging from molecular to macroscopic. Photochemistry provides the means for transforming light energy from photon to process via movement of charge, a change in shape, a change in size, or the cleavage of a bond. Photochemistry produces action. In the work to be presented here ultrafast UV-Visible pump-probe, and pump-repump-probe methods have been used to probe the excited state dynamics of stilbene-based molecular motors, cyclohexadiene-based switches, and polyene-based photoacids. Both ultrafast UV-Visible and X-ray absorption spectroscopies have been applied to the study of cobalamin (vitamin B_{12}) based compounds. Optical measurements provide precise characterization of spectroscopic signatures of the intermediate species on the S_{1} surface, while time-resolved XANES spectra at the Co K-edge probe the structural changes that accompany these transformations.

  20. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Gopal Rayavarapu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed.

  1. Quantum squeezed light for probing mitochondrial membranes and study of neuroprotectants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, Paul Lee; Copeland, Robert Guild; McDonald, Anthony Eugene; Hendricks, Judy K.; Naviaux, Robert K. (University of California, San Diego, CA)

    2005-01-01

    We report a new nanolaser technique for measuring characteristics of human mitochondria. Because mitochondria are so small, it has been difficult to study large populations using standard light microscope or flow cytometry techniques. We recently discovered a nano-optical transduction method for high-speed analysis of submicron organelles that is well suited to mitochondrial studies. This ultrasensitive detection technique uses nano-squeezing of light into photon modes imposed by the ultrasmall organelle dimensions in a semiconductor biocavity laser. In this paper, we use the method to study the lasing spectra of normal and diseased mitochondria. We find that the diseased mitochondria exhibit larger physical diameter and standard deviation. This morphological differences are also revealed in the lasing spectra. The diseased specimens have a larger spectral linewidth than the normal, and have more variability in their statistical distributions.

  2. Dark excited states of carotenoid in light harvesting complex probing with femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakai S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational dynamics of dark excited states in carotenoids have been investigated using tunable Raman pump pulses. The S1 state has same vibrational dynamics in light-harvesting complex (LH1 and solution. The S* state in LH1 has similar vibrational modes with the triplet state of carotenoid. However, the so-called S* state in solution does not have the modes and is concluded to be different from the S* state in LH1.

  3. Single-Tube Mutation Scanning of The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Gene Using Multiplex LATE-PCR and Lights-On/Lights-Off Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetrault, Shana M.; Rice, John E.; Wangh, Lawrence J.; Sanchez, J. Aquiles

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous mutations in exons 18-21 of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene determine the response of many patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) to anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). This paper describes a single closed-tube assay for simultaneous mutational scanning of EGFR exons 18-21. Methods The assay first co-amplifies all four exons as separate single-stranded DNA products using Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR. The amplicons are then interrogated at endpoint along their length using sets of Lights-On/Lights-Off probes of a different color for each exon. The four resulting fluorescent signatures are unique for each underlying DNA sequence. Every mutation in a target potentially alters its unique fluorescent signature thereby revealing the presence of the mutation. Results The assay readily detects mutations which cause sensitivity or resistance to TKIs and can distinguish these clinically important genetic changes from silent mutations which have no impact on protein function. The assay identifies as little as 5% mutant sequences in mixtures of normal DNA and mutant DNA prepared from cancer cell lines. Proof-of-principle experiments demonstrate mutation identification in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded NSCLC biopsies. Conclusion The LATE-PCR EGFR assay described here represents a new type of highly informative, single-tube diagnostic test for mutational scanning of multiple gene coding regions and/or multiple gene targets for personalized cancer therapies. PMID:25411647

  4. Probing Millisecond Pulsar Emission Geometry Using Light Curves From the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, Christo; Harding, Alice; Guillemot, L.

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of 13-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), slot gap (SG), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by SG and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We also find exclusive differentiation of the current gamma-ray MSP population into two MSP sub-classes: light curve shapes and lags across wavebands impose either pair-starved PC (PSPC) or SG / OG-type geometries. In the first case, the radio pulse has a small lag with respect to the single gamma-ray pulse, while the (first) gamma-ray peak usually trails the radio by a large phase offset in the latter case. Finally, we find that the flux correction factor as a function of magnetic inclination and observer angles is typically of order unity for all models. Our calculation of light curves and flux correction factor f(_, _, P) for the case of MSPs is therefore complementary to the "ATLAS paper" of Watters et al. for younger pulsars.

  5. Magic frequencies in atom-light interaction for precision probing of the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Givon, Menachem; Waxman, Amir; David, Tal; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2013-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally the existence of a {\\it magic frequency} for which the absorption of a linearly polarized light beam by vapor alkali atoms is independent of the population distribution among the Zeeman sub-levels and the angle between the beam and a magnetic field. The phenomenon originates from a peculiar cancelation of the contributions of higher moments of the atomic density matrix, and is described using the Wigner-Eckart theorem and inherent properties of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. One important application is the robust measurement of the hyperfine population.

  6. Optical dating in a new light: A direct, non-destructive probe of trapped electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Poolton, Nigel R J; Kook, Myungho; Jain, Mayank

    2017-09-26

    Optical dating has revolutionized our understanding of Global climate change, Earth surface processes, and human evolution and dispersal over the last ~500 ka. Optical dating is based on an anti-Stokes photon emission generated by electron-hole recombination within quartz or feldspar; it relies, by default, on destructive read-out of the stored chronometric information. We present here a fundamentally new method of optical read-out of the trapped electron population in feldspar. The new signal termed as Infra-Red Photo-Luminescence (IRPL) is a Stokes emission (~1.30 eV) derived from NIR excitation (~1.40 eV) on samples previously exposed to ionizing radiation. Low temperature (7-295 K) spectroscopic and time-resolved investigations suggest that IRPL is generated from excited-to-ground state relaxation within the principal (dosimetry) trap. Since IRPL can be induced even in traps remote from recombination centers, it is likely to contain a stable (non-fading), steady-state component. While IRPL is a powerful tool to understand details of the electron-trapping center, it provides a novel, alternative approach to trapped-charge dating based on direct, non-destructive probing of chronometric information. The possibility of repeated readout of IRPL from individual traps will open opportunities for dating at sub-micron spatial resolution, thus, marking a step change in the optical dating technology.

  7. Design and expected performance of a fast neutron attenuation probe for light element density measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweany, M.; Marleau, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present the design and expected performance of a proof-of-concept 32 channel material identification system. Our system is based on the energy-dependent attenuation of fast neutrons for four elements: hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. We describe a new approach to obtaining a broad range of neutron energies to probe a sample, as well as our technique for reconstructing the molar densities within a sample. The system's performance as a function of time-of-flight energy resolution is explored using a Geant4-based Monte Carlo. Our results indicate that, with the expected detector response of our system, we will be able to determine the molar density of all four elements to within a 20-30% accuracy in a two hour scan time. In many cases this error is systematically low, thus the ratio between elements is more accurate. This degree of accuracy is enough to distinguish, for example, a sample of water from a sample of pure hydrogen peroxide: the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen is reconstructed to within 8±0.5% of the true value. Finally, with future algorithm development that accounts for backgrounds caused by scattering within the sample itself, the accuracy of molar densities, not ratios, may improve to the 5-10% level for a two hour scan time.

  8. Probing Light Thermal Dark-Matter With a Higgs Portal Mediator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krnjaic, Gordan [Fermilab

    2015-12-13

    We systematically study light (< few GeV) Dark Matter (DM) models that thermalize with visible matter through the Higgs portal and identify the remaining gaps in the viable parameter space. Such models require a comparably light scalar mediator that mixes with the Higgs to avoid DM overproduction and can be classified according to whether this mediator decays (in)visibly. In a representative benchmark model with Dirac fermion DM, we find that, even with conservative assumptions about the DM-mediator coupling and mass ratio, the regime in which the mediator is heavier than the DM is fully ruled out by a combination of collider, rare meson decay, and direct detection limits; future and planned experiments including NA62 can further improve sensitivity to scenarios in which the Higgs portal interaction does not determine the DM abundance. The opposite, regime in which the mediator is lighter than the DM and the latter annihilates to pairs of visibly-decaying mediators is still viable, but much of the parameter space is covered by rare meson decay, supernova cooling, beam dump, and direct detection constraints. Nearly all of these conclusions apply broadly to the simplest variations (e.g. scalar or asymmetric DM). Future experiments including SHiP, NEWS, and Super-CDMS SNOLAB can greatly improve coverage to this class of models.

  9. Nanosqueezed light for probing mitochondria and calcium-induced membrane swelling for study of neuroprotectants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Chen, P.; Copeland, R. G.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Keep, M. E.; Karlsson, J. R.

    2004-01-01

    We report a new bioMEMs nanolaser technique for measuring characteristics of small organelles. We have initially applied the method to study mitochondria, a very small (500nm to 1um) organelle containing the respiration apparatus for animal cells. Because the mitochondria are so tiny, it has been difficult to study them using standard light microscope or flow cytometry techniques. We employ a recently discovered a nano-optical transduction method for high-speed analysis of submicron organelles. This ultrasensitive detection of submicron particles uses nano-squeezing of light into photon modes imposed by the ultrasmall organelle dimensions in a submicron laser cavity. In this paper, we report measurements of mitochondria spectra under normal conditions and under high calcium ion gradient conditions that upset membrane homeostasis and lead to organelle swelling and lysis, similar to that observed in the diseased state. The measured spectra are compared with our calculations of the electromagnetic modes in normal and distended mitochondria using multiphysics finite element methods.

  10. Trapped-ion probing of light-induced charging effects on dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlander, M; Brownnutt, M; Haensel, W; Blatt, R, E-mail: max.harlander@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    We use a string of confined {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions to measure perturbations to a trapping potential which are caused by the light-induced charging of an antireflection-coated window and of insulating patches on the ion-trap electrodes. The electric fields induced at the ions' position are characterized as a function of distance to the dielectric and as a function of the incident optical power and wavelength. The measurement of the ion-string position is sensitive to as few as 40 elementary charges per {radical}(Hz) on the dielectric at distances of the order of millimetres, and perturbations are observed for illuminations with light of wavelengths as large as 729 nm. This has important implications for the future of miniaturized ion-trap experiments, notably with regard to the choice of electrode material and the optics that must be integrated in the vicinity of the ion. The method presented here can be readily applied to the investigation of charging effects beyond the context of ion-trap experiments.

  11. Probing Light Thermal Dark-Matter With a Higgs Portal Mediator

    CERN Document Server

    Krnjaic, Gordan

    2015-01-01

    We systematically study light (< few GeV) Dark Matter (DM) models that thermalize with visible matter through the Higgs portal and identify the remaining gaps in the viable parameter space. Such models require a comparably light scalar mediator that mixes with the Higgs to avoid DM overproduction and can be classified according to whether this mediator decays (in)visibly. In a representative benchmark model with Dirac fermion DM, we find that, even with conservative assumptions about the DM-mediator coupling and mass ratio, the regime in which the mediator is heavier than the DM is fully ruled out by a combination of collider, rare meson decay, and direct detection limits; future and planned experiments including NA62 can further improve sensitivity to scenarios in which the Higgs portal interaction does not determine the DM abundance. The opposite, regime in which the mediator is lighter than the DM and the latter annihilates to pairs of visibly-decaying mediators is still viable, but much of the paramete...

  12. The effect of pupil size on stimulation of the melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells, as evaluated by monochromatic pupillometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Claus Jeppe; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of the size of the light exposed pupil in one eye on the pupillary light reflex of the other eye. Method: Using a monochromatic pupillometer, the left eye in each of 10 healthy subjects was exposed to 20¿s of monochromatic light of luminance 300¿cd/m(2), first red...... (660¿nm) and in a following session, blue (470¿nm) light. The consensual pupillary diameter in the right eye was continuously measured before, during, and after light exposure. Subsequently, Tropicamide 1% or Pilocarpine 2% was instilled into the left eye and when the pupil was either maximally dilated...... or contracted, the entire sequence of red and blue light exposure repeated. After at least 3¿days, when the effect of the eye drop had subsided, the entire experiment was repeated, this time employing the other substance. Results: Prior dilatation of the left pupil augmented the post light contraction to blue...

  13. Co-doping of Ag into Mn:ZnSe Quantum Dots: Giving Optical Filtering effect with Improved Monochromaticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhiyang; Xu, Shuhong; Xu, Xiaojing; Wang, Zhaochong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Wang, Chunlei; Cui, Yiping

    2015-10-08

    In optics, when polychromatic light is filtered by an optical filter, the monochromaticity of the light can be improved. In this work, we reported that Ag dopant atoms could be used as an optical filter for nanosized Mn:ZnSe quantum dots (QDs). If no Ag doping, aqueous Mn:ZnSe QDs have low monochromaticity due to coexisting of strong ZnSe band gap emission, ZnSe trap emission, and Mn dopant emission. After doping of Ag into QDs, ZnSe band gap and ZnSe trap emissions can be filtered, leaving only Mn dopant emission with improved monochromaticity. The mechanism for the optical filtering effect of Ag was investigated. The results indicate that the doping of Ag will introduce a new faster deactivation process from ZnSe conduction band to Ag energy level, leading to less electrons deactived via ZnSe band gap emission and ZnSe trap emission. As a result, only Mn dopant emission is left.

  14. Photoelectric probing of the interfacial trap density-of-states in ZnO nanowire field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Young Tack; Chang, Youn-Gyoung; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Kim, Jae Hoon; Ha, Ryong; Choi, Heon-Jin; Im, Seongil

    2013-02-28

    We have fabricated transparent top-gate ZnO nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FETs) on glass and measured their trap density-of-states (DOS) at the dielectric/ZnO NW interface with monochromatic photon beams during their operation. Our photon-probe method showed clear signatures of charge trap DOS at the interface, located near 2.3, 2.7, and 2.9 eV below the conduction band edge. The DOS information was utilized for the photo-detecting application of our transparent NW-FETs, which demonstrated fast and sensitive photo-detection of visible lights.

  15. Analysis of IgG kinetic stability by differential scanning calorimetry, probe fluorescence and light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemergut, Michal; Žoldák, Gabriel; Schaefer, Jonas V; Kast, Florian; Miškovský, Pavol; Plückthun, Andreas; Sedlák, Erik

    2017-08-19

    Monoclonal antibodies of the immunoglobulin G (IgG) type have become mainstream therapeutics for the treatment of many life-threatening diseases. For their successful application in the clinic and a favorable cost-benefit ratio, the design and formulation of these therapeutic molecules must guarantee long-term stability for an extended period of time. Accelerated stability studies, e.g., by employing thermal denaturation, have the great potential for enabling high-throughput screening campaigns to find optimal molecular variants and formulations in a short time. Surprisingly, no validated quantitative analysis of these accelerated studies has been performed yet, which clearly limits their application for predicting IgG stability. Therefore, we have established a quantitative approach for the assessment of the kinetic stability over a broad range of temperatures. To this end, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments were performed with a model IgG, testing chaotropic formulations and an extended temperature range, and they were subsequently analyzed by our recently developed three-step sequential model of IgG denaturation, consisting of one reversible and two irreversible steps. A critical comparison of the predictions from this model with data obtained by an orthogonal fluorescence probe method, based on 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate binding to partially unfolded states, resulted in very good agreement. In summary, our study highlights the validity of this easy-to-perform analysis for reliably assessing the kinetic stability of IgGs, which can support accelerated formulation development of monoclonal antibodies by ranking different formulations as well as by improving colloidal stability models. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  16. Ellipsometric light scattering to probe the interface of colloids - current applications and future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigel R.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, ellipsometric light scattering (ELS has been developed into a technique which can be used to characterise the interface between spherical colloidal particles and their surrounding medium. Here, we give an overview over previous successful applications of the technique, and its current limits. The successful applications include the characterisation of temperature-dependent swelling of a thermo-sensitive polymer coating on a latex particle, the measurement of birefringence and molecular orientation in a vescile shell, and the characterisation of the ion distribution around electrostatically stabilised latex particles. As a result of the characterisation of the ion distribution, disagreement with the Poisson-Boltzmann description has been reported before. Here, a few more experimental results on latex particles in the presence of CsBr are discussed.

  17. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie......–Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single...

  18. Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER): A Probe of Extragalactic Background Light from Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Cooray, Asantha; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hee; Levenson, Louis; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) is a rocket-borne absolute photometry imaging and spectroscopy experiment optimized to detect signatures of first-light galaxies present during reionization in the unresolved IR background. CIBER-I consists of a wide-field two-color camera for fluctuation measurements, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer for absolute EBL measurements, and a narrow-band imaging spectrometer to measure and correct scattered emission from the foreground zodiacal cloud. CIBER-I was successfully flown on February 25th, 2009 and has one more planned flight in early 2010. We propose, after several additional flights of CIBER-I, an improved CIBER-II camera consisting of a wide-field 30 cm imager operating in 4 bands between 0.5 and 2.1 microns. It is designed for a high significance detection of unresolved IR background fluctuations at the minimum level necessary for reionization. With a FOV 50 to 2000 times largerthan existing IR instruments on satellites, CIBER-II will carry out ...

  19. Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER): A probe of Extragalactic Background Light from reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooray, Asantha; Bock, Jamie; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Keating, Brian; Lange, Andrew; Lee, Dae-Hee; Levenson, Louis; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Renbarger, Tom; Sullivan, Ian; Tsumura, Kohji; Wada, Takehiko; Zemcov, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The Cosmic Infrared Background ExpeRiment (CIBER) is a rocket-borne absolute photometry imaging and spectroscopy experiment optimized to detect signatures of first-light galaxies present during reionization in the unresolved IR background. CIBER-I consists of a wide-field two-color camera for fluctuation measurements, a low-resolution absolute spectrometer for absolute EBL measurements, and a narrow-band imaging spectrometer to measure and correct scattered emission from the foreground zodiacal cloud. CIBER-I was successfully flown in February 2009 and July 2010 and four more flights are planned by 2014, including an upgrade (CIBER-II). We propose, after several additional flights of CIBER-I, an improved CIBER-II camera consisting of a wide-field 30 cm imager operating in 4 bands between 0.5 and 2.1 microns. It is designed for a high significance detection of unresolved IR background fluctuations at the minimum level necessary for reionization. With a FOV 50 to 2000 times larger than existing IR instruments on satellites, CIBER-II will carry out the definitive study to establish the surface density of sources responsible for reionization.

  20. Probing the peak of the star formation rate density with the extragalactic background light

    CERN Document Server

    Raue, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL), i.e., the diffuse meta-galactic photon field in the ultraviolet to infrared, is dominated by the emission from stars in galaxies. It is, therefore, intimately connected with the integrated star formation rate density (SFRD). In this paper, the SFRD is constrained using recent limits on the EBL density derived from observations of distant sources of high and very-high energy gamma-rays. The stellar EBL contribution is modeled utilizing simple stellar population spectra including dust attenuation and emission. A wide range of values for the different model parameters (SFRD(z), metallicity, dust absorption) is investigated and their impact on the resulting EBL is studied. The calculated EBL densities are compared with the specific EBL density limits and constraints on the SFRD are derived. For the fiducial model, adopting a Chabrier initial mass function (IMF), the SFRD is constrained to ~< 0.1 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 and < 0.2 M_solar yr^-1 Mpc^-3 for a redshift of z...

  1. A sensitive resveratrol assay with a simple probe methylene blue by resonance light scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Haiyan; Dai, Kaijin; Luo, Qizhi; Duan, Wenjun; Xie, Yang

    2011-01-01

    A novel resonance light scattering (RLS) method was developed for the determination of resveratrol based on the interaction between resveratrol and methylene blue (MB). It was found that at pH 8.69, the weak RLS intensity of MB was remarkably enhanced by the addition of trace amount of resveratrol with the maximum peak located at 385.0 nm. Under the optimum conditions, a good linear relationship between the enhanced RLS intensities and the concentrations of resveratrol was obtained over the range of 2.0-14.0 μg ml -1 with the detection limit (3 σ) of 0.63 μg ml -1. The results of the analysis of resveratrol in synthetic samples and human urine are satisfactory, which showed it may provide a more sensitive, convenient, rapid and reproducible method for the detection of resveratrol, especially in biological and pharmaceutical field. In this work, the characteristics of RLS, absorption and fluorescence spectra of the resveratrol-MB system, the influencing factors and the optimum conditions of the reaction were investigated.

  2. Probing millisecond pulsar emission geometry using light curves from the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Venter, C; Guillemot, L

    2009-01-01

    An interesting new high-energy pulsar sub-population is emerging following early discoveries of gamma-ray millisecond pulsars (MSPs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). We present results from 3D emission modeling, including the Special Relativistic effects of aberration and time-of-flight delays and also rotational sweepback of B-field lines, in the geometric context of polar cap (PC), outer gap (OG), and two-pole caustic (TPC) pulsar models. In contrast to the general belief that these very old, rapidly-rotating neutron stars (NSs) should have largely pair-starved magnetospheres due to the absence of significant pair production, we find that most of the light curves are best fit by TPC and OG models, which indicates the presence of narrow accelerating gaps limited by robust pair production -- even in these pulsars with very low spin-down luminosities. The gamma-ray pulse shapes and relative phase lags with respect to the radio pulses point to high-altitude emission being dominant for all geometries. We...

  3. Inelastic light scattering to probe strongly correlated bosons in optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fort, Chiara; Fabbri, Nicole; Fallani, Leonardo; Clement, David; Inguscio, Massimo, E-mail: fort@lens.unifi.it [European Laboratory for Nonlinear Spectroscopy (LENS), via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2011-01-10

    We have used inelastic light scattering to study correlated phases of an array of one-dimensional interacting Bose gases. In the linear response regime, the observed spectra are proportional to the dynamic structure factor. In particular we have investigated the superfluid to Mott insulator crossover loading the one-dimensional gases in an optical lattice and monitoring the appearance of an energy gap due to finite particle-hole excitation energy. We attribute the low frequency side of the spectra to the presence of some superfluid and normal phase fraction between the Mott insulator regions with different fillings produced in the inhomogeneous systems. In the Mott phase we also investigated excitations to higher excited bands of the optical lattice, the spectra obtained in this case being connected to the single particle spectral function. In one-dimensional systems the effect of thermal fluctuations and interactions is enhanced by the reduced dimensionality showing up in the dynamic structure factor. We measured the dynamic structure factor of an array of one-dimensional bosonic gases pointing out the effect of temperature-induced phase fluctuations in reducing the coherence length of the system.

  4. 赣南地区166例正常人308 nm单频准分子光最小红斑量的测定与分析%Determination of minimal erythema dose of normal skin to 308 nm Monochromatic excimer light in south of Jiangxi Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许传勤; 闫毅银; 卢建华

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the minimal erythema dose (MED) of 308 nm monochromatic excimer light (308 nm MEL) in healthy person of south of Jiangxi Province. Methods 166 cases of healthy volunteers were exposed to 308 nm MEL therapeutic equipment and the MED was measured in our hospital from March 2013 to February 2014,and to ob-serve its relationship to skin type,sex,age,residence time of outdoors and the parts of the body. Results The average MED value of all subjects was (907.14±96.37) mJ/cm2.The MED value in skin typeⅢwas significantly lower than those in typeⅣ(P0.05).In male group,the MED value in subjects aged from 40 to 49 was significantly higher than the others age group (P0.05).There was significant difference of the MED value between different parts of the body,in male group,the MED value in forearm was signifi-cantly higher than the others parts of the body group (P<0.05);in females group,the MED value in forearm and crus were significantly higher than the others parts of the body group (P<0.05). Conclusion The 308 nm MEL MED value of the subjects in south of Jiangxi Province is different from other cities of China.%目的:研究并分析赣南地区正常人308 nm单频准分子光最小红斑量的范围。方法以308 nm单频准分子光治疗仪为测试光源,测定来我院就诊的2013年3月~2014年2月166例健康志愿者的308 nm单频准分子最小红斑量,并研究其与不同皮肤光反应类型、性别、年龄、户外停留时间及部位的关系。结果166例健康志愿者308 nm单频准分子光的最小红斑量(MED)均值为(907.14±96.37)mJ/cm2。芋型皮肤MED值显著低于郁型皮肤(P<0.05);男性MED均值为(943.58±71.27)mJ/cm2,女性MED均值为(952.91±52.72)mJ/cm2,两者间差异无统计学意义(P跃0.05);不同年龄组患者MED值存在差异,男性组40~49岁组测试者MED值明显大于其他年龄组MED值(P<0.05),女性组40~49岁组及30~39岁组测试者MED值明

  5. Visualizing viral protein structures in cells using genetic probes for correlated light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Horng D; Deerinck, Thomas J; Bushong, Eric; Ellisman, Mark H; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2015-11-15

    Structural studies of viral proteins most often use high-resolution techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance, single particle negative stain, or cryo-electron microscopy (EM) to reveal atomic interactions of soluble, homogeneous viral proteins or viral protein complexes. Once viral proteins or complexes are separated from their host's cellular environment, their natural in situ structure and details of how they interact with other cellular components may be lost. EM has been an invaluable tool in virology since its introduction in the late 1940's and subsequent application to cells in the 1950's. EM studies have expanded our knowledge of viral entry, viral replication, alteration of cellular components, and viral lysis. Most of these early studies were focused on conspicuous morphological cellular changes, because classic EM metal stains were designed to highlight classes of cellular structures rather than specific molecular structures. Much later, to identify viral proteins inducing specific structural configurations at the cellular level, immunostaining with a primary antibody followed by colloidal gold secondary antibody was employed to mark the location of specific viral proteins. This technique can suffer from artifacts in cellular ultrastructure due to compromises required to provide access to the immuno-reagents. Immunolocalization methods also require the generation of highly specific antibodies, which may not be available for every viral protein. Here we discuss new methods to visualize viral proteins and structures at high resolutions in situ using correlated light and electron microscopy (CLEM). We discuss the use of genetically encoded protein fusions that oxidize diaminobenzidine (DAB) into an osmiophilic polymer that can be visualized by EM. Detailed protocols for applying the genetically encoded photo-oxidizing protein MiniSOG to a viral protein, photo-oxidation of the fusion protein to yield DAB polymer staining, and

  6. Multiple detection of single nucleotide polymorphism by microarray-based resonance light scattering assay with enlarged gold nanoparticle probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiaxue; Ma, Lan; Lei, Zhen; Wang, Zhenxin

    2016-03-01

    The mapping of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients' genome is a critical process for the development of personalized therapy. In this work, a DNA microarray-based resonance light scattering (RLS) assay has been developed for multiplexed detection of breast cancer related SNPs with high sensitivity and selectivity. After hybridization of the desired target single-stranded DNAs (ssDNAs) with the ssDNA probes on a microarray, the polyvalent ssDNA modified 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are employed to label the hybridization reaction through the formation of a three-stranded DNA system. The H2O2-mediated enlargement of GNPs is then used to enhance the RLS signal. The microarray-based RLS assay provides a detection limit of 10 pM (S/N = 3) for the target ssDNA and determines an allele frequency as low as 1.0% in the target ssDNA cocktail. Combined with an asymmetric PCR technique, the proposed assay shows good accuracy and sensitivity in profiling 4 SNPs related to breast cancer of three selected cell lines.

  7. A compact design for monochromatic OSL measurements in the wavelength range 380-1020 nm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boetter-Jensen, L.; Poolton, N.R.J.; Willumsen, F.; Christiansen, H. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1994-04-01

    The development and performance of a compact module is described that allows for the monochromatic illumination of samples in the wavelength range 380-1020 nm, enabling the measurement of energy-resolved optically stimulated luminescence. The unit is designed to couple directly to the existing automated Risoe TL/OSL dating apparatus, thus allowing for either routine scanning or more detailed thermo-optical investigations. The high throughput efficiency of the unit means that the existing 75 W tungsten-halogen lamp can be directly used for such measurements on both quartz and feldspar samples. The design allows for rapid spectral scanning with a choice of resolution of anywhere between 10 and 80 nm: stray light levels are less than 0.01%. The unit can equally be used for recording wavelength-resolved emission spectra, whether photo-excited or thermally stimulated; the capabilities of the system are demonstrated in the article. (author).

  8. 四发射单接收光学非接触测头%A New Optical Noncontact Probe with Four Incidence Lights and a Receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国雄; 那永林; 郭敬滨; 樊玉铭; 裘祖荣; 杜颖; 解则晓

    2006-01-01

    研究开发了一种具有4个发射光源和1个CCD摄像机作为接收装置的光学非接触测头.测头可以用来测量包括具有强反射表面的曲面.测头基于三角法工作原理.在恰当设计的情况下,至多只有1路从工件表面反射回来的光,能够进入CCD摄像机.通过将相应通道切断,很容易消除镜面反射光的影响.这时测头就相当于1个三发射单接收光学非接触测头.测头可以同时用来测量表面的位置和方向.对于具有很大倾斜的表面具测头仍能正常工作.采用干涉滤光片消除了环境光的影响.提出了一种系统的标定方法.通过对量块的测量证实了系统工作的正确性和有效性并给出了实验结果.%An optical noncontact probe with four incident lights and a receptor in form of a CCD camera has been developed. This probe can be used for measuring sculptured surfaces including high-reflective ones. The probe works on triangulation principle. By proper design under any situation only no more than one reflecting light from the workpiece goes to the CCD camera and it is easy to eliminate the effect of specular reflection by switching the corresponding channel off and the probe works as a probe with three light sources and a receptor. This probe can be used for measuring both the position and inclination of the surface. It allows measuring parts with very large inclination. An interference filter is introduced to the probe to eliminate the influences of the environment light. A method for system calibration is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed system has been tested by measuring gage blocks. Experimental results are presented.

  9. Kinetic adsorption profile and conformation evolution at the DNA-gold nanoparticle interface probed by dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Ding, XiaoFan; He, Miao; Wang, Jing; Lou, Xinhui

    2014-10-21

    The kinetic adsorption profile at the DNA-gold nanoparticle (AuNP) interface is probed by following the binding and organization of thiolated linear DNA and aptamers of varying chain lengths (15, 30, 44, and 51 mer) to the surface of AuNPs (13.0 ± 1.0 nm diameter). A systematic investigation utilizing dynamic light scattering has been performed to directly measure the changes in particle size during the course of a typical aging-salting thiolated DNA/AuNP preparation procedure. We discuss the effect of DNA chain length, composition, salt concentration, and secondary structure on the kinetics and conformation at the DNA-AuNP interface. The adsorption kinetics are chain-length dependent, composition independent, and not diffusion rate limited for the conditions we report here. The kinetic data support a mechanism of stepwise adsorption of thiols to the surface of AuNPs and reorganization of the thiols at the interface. Very interestingly, the kinetic increases of the particle sizes are modeled accurately by the pseudo-second-order rate model, suggesting that DNA could possess the statistically well-defined conformational evolution. Together with other experimental evidence, we propose a dynamic inner-layer and outer-tail (DILOT) model to describe the evolution of the DNA conformation after the initial adsorption of a single oligonucleotide layer. According to this model, the length of the tails that extend from the surface of AuNPs, capable for hybridization or molecular recognition, can be conveniently calculated. Considering the wide applications of DNA/AuNPs, the results should have important implications in sensing and DNA-directed nanoparticle assembly.

  10. Magnetoelectric Effects in Local Light-Matter Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2013-01-01

    We study the generic interaction of a monochromatic electromagnetic field with bi-isotropic nanoparticles. Such an interaction is described by dipole-coupling terms associated with the breaking of dual, P- and T-symmetries, including the chirality and the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect. We calculate absorption rates, radiation forces, and radiation torques for the nanoparticles and introduce novel characteristics of the field quantifying the transfer of energy, momentum, and angular-momentum in these interactions. In particular, we put forward the concept of 'magnetoelectric energy density', quantifying the local PT-symmetry of the field. Akin to the 'super-chiral' light suggested recently for sensitive local probing of molecular chirality [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 163901 (2010); Science 332, 333 (2011)], here we describe a complex field for sensitive probing of the nonreciprocal magnetoelectric effect in nanoparticles or molecules.

  11. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  12. Low Illumination Light (LIL) Solar Cells: Indoor and Monochromatic Light Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    instrumentation , and sensors handbook Second Edition: Spatial, mechanical, thermal, and radiation measurement , Boca Raton (FL). CRC Press Taylor...Phosphor Components Used in Report 37 iv Appendix C. Quantum Efficiency Measurements of Single-Junction Solar Cells 41 Appendix D...575, and 600 nm. All have the same relative intensities between 470 to 500 nm. ...........39 Fig. C-1 QE measurements of single-junction PV solar

  13. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  14. On the detectability of Galactic dark matter annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐志成; 袁强; 毕效军; 陈国明

    2011-01-01

    Monochromatic y-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic y-rays is usually suppressed by virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with

  15. Contrast imaging with a monochromatic x-ray scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Donald J.; Popovic, Kosta; Williams, Mark B.

    2008-03-01

    We are currently developing a monochromatic x-ray source for small animal tomographic imaging. This source consists of a conventional cone beam microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten target coupled to a filter that uses Bragg diffraction to transmit only x-rays within a narrow energy range (~3 keV FWHM). A tissue-equivalent mouse phantom was used to a) evaluate how clearly CT imaging using the quasi-monoenergetic beam is able to differentiate tissue types compared to conventional polyenergetic CT, and b) to test the ability of the source and Bragg filter combination to perform dual energy, iodine contrast enhanced imaging. Single slice CT scans of the phantom were obtained both with polyenergetic (1.8 mm Al filtration) and quasi-monoenergetic beams. Region of interest analysis showed that pixel value variance was signifcantly reduced in the quasi-monochromatic case compared to the polyenergetic case, suggesting a reduction in the variance of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissue equivalent materials due to the narrower energy spectrum. To test dual energy iodine K-edge imaging, vials containing solutions with a range of iodine contrasts were added to the phantom. Single-slice CT scans were obtained using spectra with maximum values at 30 and 35 keV, respectively. Analysis of the resulting difference images (35 keV image - 30 keV image) shows that the magnitude of the difference signal produced by iodine exceeds that of bone for iodine concentrations above ~20 mg/ml, and that of muscle and fat tissues for iodine concentrations above ~5 mg/ml.

  16. On the detectability of Galactic dark matter annihilation into monochromatic gamma-rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Zhi-Cheng; YUAN Qiang; BI Xiao-Jun; CHEN Guo-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Monochromatic γ-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic γ-rays is usually suppressed by virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with γ-rays directly. In this work, we study the detection strategy of the monochromatic γ-rays in a future space-based detector. The flux of monochromatic γ-rays between 50 GeV and several TeV is calculated by assuming the supersymmetric neutralino as a typical dark matter candidate. The detection both by focusing on the Galactic center and in a scan mode that detects γ-rays from the whole Galactic halo are compared. The detector performance for the purpose of monochromatic γ-ray detection, with different energy and angular resolution, field of view, and background rejection efficiencies, is carefully studied with both analytical and fast Monte-Carlo methods.

  17. On the Detectability of Galactic Dark Matter Annihilation into Monochromatic Gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Zhi-Cheng; Bi, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Guo-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic gamma-rays are thought to be the smoking gun signal for identifying the dark matter annihilation. However, the flux of monochromatic gamma-rays is usually suppressed by the virtual quantum effects since dark matter should be neutral and does not couple with gamma-rays directly. In the work we study the detection strategy of the monochromatic gamma-rays in a future space-based detector. The monochromatic gamma-ray flux is calculated by assuming supersymmetric neutralino as a typical dark matter candidate. We discuss both the detection focusing on the Galactic center and in a scan mode which detects gamma-rays from the whole Galactic halo are compared. The detector performance for the purpose of monochromatic gamma-rays detection, with different energy and angular resolution, field of view, background rejection efficiencies, is carefully studied with both analytical and fast Monte-Carlo method.

  18. 线结构光扫描测头结构参数优化设计%Structure Parameter Optimization of Line Structured Light Scanning Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海燕; 于连栋; 郑文兴; 董钊

    2014-01-01

    线结构光扫描测头在逆向工程中应用广泛,其测量精度对3D 重建可靠性有重要影响。本文建立了基于光学三角法的线结构光扫描测头数学模型,由坐标转换和透视成像原理实现二维像素坐标与三维世界坐标间转换。分析了线结构光扫描测头结构参数对测量精度的影响,推导出测量误差模型。分析了漫反射光强度变化对结构参数的影响,结合实际设计需要给出边界约束条件,并仿真实现结构参数优化设计,误差低于0.02mm。%Line structured light scanning probe is widely used in reverse engineering,its measurement precision and reliability have an important influence on 3D reconstruction.This paper establishes mathematical model of line structured light scanning probe based on optical triangulation method.The transformation between imaging pixel coordinates and three-dimensional world coordinate is achieved by coordinate transformation and perspective imaging principle.The influence on measurement accuracy of structured light scanning probe structure parameters is analyzed and the measurement error model is derived.The effect of diffuse light intensity on structural parameters is analyzed and boundary conditions are de-termined by actual design needs.Simulation on optimization design of structural parameters displays an error less than 0. 02mm.

  19. Far-red/near-infrared fluorescence light-up probes for specific in vitro and in vivo imaging of a tumour-related protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Hua, Yongquan; Hu, Yawen; Fang, Yuan; Ji, Shenglu; Yang, Zhimou; Ou, Caiwen; Kong, Deling; Ding, Dan

    2016-03-01

    As lysosomal protein transmembrane 4 beta (LAPTM4B) is an important biomarker for many solid tumours, development of small-molecule fluorescence light-up probes for detection and imaging of LAPTM4B proteins is particularly valuable. In this work, we reported the design and synthesis of a far-red/near-infrared (FR/NIR) fluorescence light-up probe DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG, which could specifically visualize LAPTM4B proteins in cancer cells and tumour-bearing live mice. DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG was synthesized by the conjugation of two LAPTM4B-binding peptide ligands (EEGIHGHHIISVG) with one environment-sensitive fluorogen, 4,7-di(thiophen-2-yl)-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole (DBT). Owing to the intramolecular charge transfer character of DBT, DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG is weakly emissive in aqueous solution, but switches to fluoresce upon LAPTM4B proteins specifically bind to the peptide ligand of the probe, which provide the DBT with hydrophobic microenvironment, greatly reducing its charge transfer effect with water. It is found that DBT-2EEGIHGHHIISVG can achieve targeted imaging of LAPTM4B proteins in HepG2 cancer cells and visualize LAPTM4B protein-expressed tumour tissues of live mice in a selective and high-contrast manner.

  20. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  1. Design and Construction of a Single-Tube, LATE-PCR, Multiplex Endpoint Assay with Lights-On/Lights-Off Probes for the Detection of Pathogens Associated with Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel K. Carver-Brown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. The goal of this study was to construct a single tube molecular diagnostic multiplex assay for the detection of microbial pathogens commonly associated with septicemia, using LATE-PCR and Lights-On/Lights-Off probe technology. Methods and Results. The assay described here identified pathogens associated with sepsis by amplification and analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene sequence for bacteria and specific gene sequences for fungi. A sequence from an unidentified gene in Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris served as a positive control for assay function. LATE-PCR was used to generate single-stranded amplicons that were then analyzed at endpoint over a wide temperature range in a specific fluorescent color. Each bacterial target was identified by its pattern of hybridization to Lights-On/Lights-Off probes derived from molecular beacons. Complex mixtures of targets were also detected. Conclusions. All microbial targets were identified in samples containing low starting copy numbers of pathogen genomic DNA, both as individual targets and in complex mixtures. Significance and Impact of the Study. This assay uses new technology to achieve an advance in the field of molecular diagnostics: a single-tube multiplex assay for identification of pathogens commonly associated with sepsis.

  2. Fusion of colour and monochromatic images with edge emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rade M. Pavlović

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel method to fuse true colour images with monochromatic non-visible range images that seeks to encode important structural information from monochromatic images efficiently but also preserve the natural appearance of the available true chromacity information. We utilise the β colour opponency channel of the lαβ colour as the domain to fuse information from the monochromatic input into the colour input by the way of robust grayscale fusion. This is followed by an effective gradient structure visualisation step that enhances the visibility of monochromatic information in the final colour fused image. Images fused using this method preserve their natural appearance and chromacity better than conventional methods while at the same time clearly encode structural information from the monochormatic input. This is demonstrated on a number of well-known true colour fusion examples and confirmed by the results of subjective trials on the data from several colour fusion scenarios. Introduction The goal of image fusion can be broadly defined as: the representation of visual information contained in a number of input images into a single fused image without distortion or loss of information. In practice, however, a representation of all available information from multiple inputs in a single image is almost impossible and fusion is generally a data reduction task.  One of the sensors usually provides a true colour image that by definition has all of its data dimensions already populated by the spatial and chromatic information. Fusing such images with information from monochromatic inputs in a conventional manner can severely affect natural appearance of the fused image. This is a difficult problem and partly the reason why colour fusion received only a fraction of the attention than better behaved grayscale fusion even long after colour sensors became widespread. Fusion method Humans tend to see colours as contrasts between opponent

  3. A LightCycler real-time PCR hybridization probe assay for detecting food-borne thermophilic Campylobacter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perelle, S.; Josefsen, Mathilde Hartmann; Hoorfar, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Cycler real-time PCR assay (LC-PCR), which used fluorescent hybridization probes was developed. The test incorporated an internal amplification control co-amplified with the 16S rRNA gene of Campylobacter to monitor potential PCR inhibitors and ensure successful amplifications. The specificity study involving...

  4. Ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy of Zinc Phthalocynine (ZnPc) and light harvesting complex II (LHC II)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ombinda-Lemboumba, Saturnin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The presentation discusses basic principles of pump-probe technique, possible transient absorption signals, LHC II and ZnPc, experimental setup, chirp measurement and correction methods. The results of the study, conclusion and future work are also...

  5. INFLUENCE OF FILM STRUCTURE AND LIGHT ON CHARGE TRAPPING AND DISSIPATION DYNAMICS IN SPUN-CAST ORGANIC THIN-FILM TRANSISTORS MEASURED BY SCANNING KELVIN PROBE MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, L.; Moth, M.; Anthony, J.

    2012-05-03

    Herein, time-dependent scanning Kelvin probe microscopy of solution processed organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) reveals a correlation between film microstructure and OTFT device performance with the location of trapped charge within the device channel. The accumulation of the observed trapped charge is concurrent with the decrease in I{sub SD} during operation (V{sub G}=-40 V, V{sub SD}= -10 V). We discuss the charge trapping and dissipation dynamics as they relate to the film structure and show that application of light quickly dissipates the observed trapped charge.

  6. Preliminary experimental study and simulation of an energy-tunable quasi-monochromatic laser-Compton X/γ-ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO We; XU Wang; ZHUO Hong-Bin; MA Yan-Yun

    2012-01-01

    We propose a slanting collision scheme for Compton scattering of a laser light against a relativistic electron beam.This scheme is suitable to generate an energy-tunable X/γ-ray source.In this paper,we present theoretical study and simulation of the spectral,spatial and temporal characteristics of such a source.We also describe two terms laser-Compton scattering (LCS) experiments at the 100 MeV Linac of Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics,where quasi-monochromatic LCS X-ray energy spectra with peak energies of ~30 keV are observed successfully.These preliminary investigations are carried out to understand the feasibility of developing an energy-tunable quasi-monochromatic X/γ-ray source,the future Shanghai Laser Electron Gamma Source.

  7. The quasi-monochromatic ULF wave foreshock boundary at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Lican; Mazelle, Christian; Meziane, Karim; Romanelli, Norberto; Ge, Yasong; Du, Aimin; Lu, Quanming; Zhang, Tielong

    2017-04-01

    The location of ULF quasi-monochromatic wave onsets upstream of Venus bow shock is explored using VEX magnetic field data. We report the existence of a spatial foreshock boundary from which ULF waves are present. It is found that the ULF boundary is sensitive to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) direction and appears well defined for a cone-angle larger than 30 degrees. In the Venusian foreshock, the slope of the boundary increases with the cone-angle and for a nominal direction of the IMF, it makes an inclination of 70 degrees with the Sun-Venus direction. Moreover, we have found that the velocity of an ion traveling along the ULF boundary presents a qualitative agreement with the hypothesis of a quasi-adiabatic reflection of a portion of the solar wind at the bow shock. For a nominal IMF direction, the ions associated with the boundary have enough momentum to overcome the solar wind convection. These elements strongly suggest that backstreaming ions upstream of Venus bow shock provide the main energy source of the ULF foreshock waves.

  8. The effect of monochromatic infrared energy on diabetic wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yayi; Yip, Selina Ly; Cheung, Kwok-Kuen; Huang, Lin; Wang, Shijie; Cheing, Gladys Ly

    2013-12-01

    This study examined the effect of monochromatic infrared energy (MIRE) on diabetic wound healing. Fifteen diabetic rats were given MIRE intervention on their skin wounds located on the dorsum and compared with 15 control diabetic rats. Assessments were conducted for each group at weeks 1, 2 and 4 post wounding (five rats at each time point) by calculating the percentage of wound closures (WCs) and performing histological and immunohistochemical staining on sections of wound tissue. Evaluations of WCs and histological examinations of reepithelialisation, cellular content and granulation tissue formation showed no significant difference between the MIRE and the control group at each time point. Through semi-quantitative immunohistochemical staining, the deposition of type I collagen in the MIRE group was found to have improved when compared with the control group at the end of week 2 (P = 0.05). No significant differences in the myofibroblast population were detected between the two groups. In conclusion, MIRE appeared to promote collagen deposition in the early stage of wound healing in diabetic rats, but the overall wound healing in the MIRE group was not significantly different from that of the control group. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  9. How accurate are infrared luminosities from monochromatic photometric extrapolation?

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Zesen; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Template-based extrapolations from only one photometric band can be a cost-effective method to estimate the total infrared (IR) luminosities ($L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$) of galaxies. By utilizing multi-wavelength data that covers across 0.35--500\\,$\\mathrm{\\mu m}$ in GOODS-North and GOODS-South fields, we investigate the accuracy of this monochromatic extrapolated $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ based on three IR spectral energy distribution (SED) templates (\\citealt[CE01]{Chary2001}; \\citealt[DH02]{Dale2002}; \\citealt[W08]{Wuyts2008a}) out to $z\\sim 3.5$. We find that the CE01 template provides the best estimate of $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$ in {\\it Herschel}/PACS bands, while the DH02 template performs best in {\\it Herschel}/SPIRE bands. To estimate $L_{\\mathrm{IR}}$, we suggest that extrapolations from the available longest wavelength PACS band based on the CE01 template can be a good estimator. Moreover, if PACS measurement is unavailable, extrapolations from SPIRE observations but based on the \\cite{Dale2002} template can also provide ...

  10. First Sub-arcsecond Collimation of Monochromatic Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Apoorva G; Abbas, Sohrab; Treimer, Wolfgang, E-mail: nintsspd@barc.gov.in

    2010-11-01

    We have achieved the tightest collimation to date of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. An optimised silicon {l_brace}111{r_brace} Bragg prism has collimated 5.26A neutrons down to 0.58 arcsecond. In conjunction with a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, this ultra-parallel beam yielded a 0.62 arcsecond wide rocking curve. This beam has produced the first SUSANS spectrum in Q {approx} 10{sup -6} A{sup -1} range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability of characterising agglomerates upto 150 {mu}m in size. The super-collimation has also enabled recording of the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 {mu}m period. An analysis of this pattern yielded the beam transverse coherence length of 175 {mu}m (FWHM), the greatest achieved to date for A wavelength neutrons.

  11. Coloring random graphs online without creating monochromatic subgraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Mütze, Torsten; Spöhel, Reto

    2011-01-01

    Consider the following random process: The vertices of a binomial random graph $G_{n,p}$ are revealed one by one, and at each step only the edges induced by the already revealed vertices are visible. Our goal is to assign to each vertex one from a fixed number $r$ of available colors immediately and irrevocably without creating a monochromatic copy of some fixed graph $F$ in the process. Our first main result is that for any $F$ and $r$, the threshold function for this problem is given by $p_0(F,r,n)=n^{-1/m_1^*(F,r)}$, where $m_1^*(F,r)$ denotes the so-called \\emph{online vertex-Ramsey density} of $F$ and $r$. This parameter is defined via a purely deterministic two-player game, in which the random process is replaced by an adversary that is subject to certain restrictions inherited from the random setting. Our second main result states that for any $F$ and $r$, the online vertex-Ramsey density $m_1^*(F,r)$ is a computable rational number. Our lower bound proof is algorithmic, i.e., we obtain polynomial-time...

  12. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  13. Light Driven Energy Research at LCLS: Planned Pump-Probe X-ray Spectroscopy Studies on Photosynthetic Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe

    2010-02-01

    Arguably the most important chemical reaction on earth is the photosynthetic splitting of water to molecular oxygen by the Mn-containing oxygen-evolving complex (Mn-OEC) in the protein known as photosystem II (PSII). It is this reaction which has, over the course of some 3.8 billion years, gradually filled our atmosphere with O2 and consequently enabled and sustained the evolution of complex aerobic life. Coupled to the reduction of carbon dioxide, biological photosynthesis contributes foodstuffs for nutrition while recycling CO2 from the atmosphere and replacing it with O2. By utilizing sunlight to power these energy-requiring reactions, photosynthesis also serves as a model for addressing societal energy needs as we enter an era of diminishing fossil hydrocarbon resources. Understanding, at the molecular level, the dynamics and mechanism of how nature has solved this problem is of fundamental importance and could be critical to aid in the design of manufactured devices to accomplish the conversion of sunlight into useful electrochemical energy and transportable fuel in the foreseeable future. In order to understand the photosynthetic splitting of water by the Mn-OEC we need to be able to follow the reaction in real time at an atomic level. A powerful probe to study the electronic and molecular structure of the Mn-OEC is x-ray spectroscopy. Here, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has two crucial qualities for LCLS based time-dependent pump-probe studies of the Mn-OEC: a) it directly probes the Mn oxidation state and ligation, b) it can be performed with wavelength dispersive optics to avoid the necessity of scanning in pump probe experiments. Recent results and the planned time dependent experiments at LCLS will be discussed. )

  14. Spitzer Analysis of HII Region Complexes in the Magellanic Clouds: Determining a Suitable Monochromatic Obscured Star Formation Indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Lawton, Brandon; Babler, Brian; Block, Miwa; Bolatto, Alberto D; Bracker, Steve; Carlson, Lynn R; Engelbracht, Charles W; Hora, Joseph L; Indebetouw, Remy; Madden, Suzanne C; Meade, Marilyn; Meixner, Margaret; Misselt, Karl; Oey, M S; Oliveira, Joana M; Robitaille, Thomas; Sewilo, Marta; Shiao, Bernie; Vijh, Uma P; Whitney, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    HII regions are the birth places of stars, and as such they provide the best measure of current star formation rates (SFRs) in galaxies. The close proximity of the Magellanic Clouds allows us to probe the nature of these star forming regions at small spatial scales. We aim to determine the monochromatic IR band that most accurately traces the bolometric IR flux (TIR), which can then be used to estimate an obscured SFR. We present the spatial analysis, via aperture/annulus photometry, of 16 LMC and 16 SMC HII region complexes using the Spitzer IRAC and MIPS bands. UV rocket data and SHASSA H-alpha data are also included. We find that nearly all of the LMC and SMC HII region SEDs peak around 70um, from ~10 to ~400 pc from the central sources. As a result, the sizes of HII regions as probed by 70um is approximately equal to the sizes as probed by TIR (about 70 pc in radius); the radial profile of the 70um flux, normalized by TIR, is constant at all radii (70um ~ 0.45 TIR); the 1-sigma standard deviation of the 7...

  15. Rapid Genotyping of the Human Renin (REN Gene by the LightCycler® Instrument: Identification of Unexpected Nucleotide Substitutions within the Selected Hybridization Probe Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Wee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia is a serious disorder affecting nearly 3% of all in the Western world. It is associated with hypertension and proteinuria, and several lines of evidence suggest that the renin-angiotensin system (RAS may be involved in the development of hypertension at different stages of a preeclamptic pregnancy. In this study, we developed rapid genotyping assays on the LightCycler® instrument to allow the detection of genetic variants in the renin gene (REN that may predispose to preeclampsia. The method is based on real-time PCR and allele-specific hybridization probes, followed by fluorescent melting curve analysis to expose a change in melting temperature (Tm. Ninety-two mother-father-child triads (n=276 from preeclamptic pregnancies were genotyped for three haplotype-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (htSNPs in REN. All three htSNPs (rs5705, rs1464816 and rs3795575 were successfully genotyped. Furthermore, two unexpected nucleotide substitutions (rs11571084 and rs61757041 were identified within the selected hybridization probe area of rs1464816 and rs3795575 due to aberrant melting peaks. In conclusion, genotyping on the LightCycler® instrument proved to be rapid and highly reproducible. The ability to uncover additional nucleotide substitutions is particularly important in that it allows the identification of potentially etiological variants that might otherwise be overlooked by other genotyping methods.

  16. Relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities of flat-spectrum radio quasars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Fu Chen; Zhao-Yu Chen; Yi-Ping Qin; Min-Feng Gu; Lian-Zhong Lü; Cheng-Yue Su; You-Bing Li; Ye Chen

    2011-01-01

    We employ a sample of 362 flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) to calculate their integrated luminosities by integrating the spectral energy distribution (SED) constructed with multi-band (radio, IR, optical, UV and X-ray) data.We compare these luminosities with those estimated from monochromatic luminosities by multiplying them by the conventional bolometric correction factors.Our analysis shows that the integrated luminosities calculated from the SED are much larger than the bolometric luminosities estimated from monochromatic luminosities.Their departing behavior tightly correlates with radio luminosities.The relations between integrated and monochromatic luminosities are explored, which are regarded as empirical relations that might be more suitable to be applied to estimate integrated luminosities of FSRQs from their monochromatic luminosities.

  17. A monochromatized chopped beam of cold neutrons for low background experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussiere, A. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Grivot, P. (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kossakowski, R. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Liaud, P. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Saintignon, P. de (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Schreckenbach, K. (Inst. Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1993-07-15

    The design and performance of a monochromatized, chopped beam of cold neutrons are described. The beam is particularly suited for experiments where a low level of gamma ray and diffused neutron background is required. (orig.)

  18. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  19. Emission of monochromatic microwave radiation from a nonequilibrium condensation of excited magnons

    OpenAIRE

    Vannucchi, FS; Vasconcellos, AR; Luzzi,R.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of monochromatic emission of radiation from a nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein-like condensate of magnons suggests the possibility of creating a monochromatic microwave generator pumped by incoherent broadband sources. The device would have a tunable emitted frequency as a function of the applied constant magnetic field. We present an analysis of the mechanisms of interaction between the condensate of magnons and the radiation field producing the super-radiant emission of photons....

  20. Observing Fluorescent Probes in Living Cells using a Low-Cost LED Flashlight Retrofitted to a Common Vintage Light Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Babbitt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While the application of molecular biological techniques based upon fluorescent probes has rapidly expanded over recent decades, the equipment cost of fluorescent microscopy has largely prevented its adoption in the college and high school classroom. We offer a simple solution to this problem by describing in detail how to build with simple tools, a fluorescent microscope using a common brand of colored LED flashlights and second-hand components of vintage Nikon microscopes. This extremely low cost solution is qualitatively compared to an expensive modern Zeiss system.

  1. Monochromatic 4-term arithmetic progressions in 2-colorings of $\\mathbb Z_n$

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Linyuan

    2011-01-01

    This paper is motivated by a recent result of Wolf \\cite{wolf} on the minimum number of monochromatic 4-term arithmetic progressions(4-APs, for short) in $\\Z_p$, where $p$ is a prime number. Wolf proved that there is a 2-coloring of $\\Z_p$ with 0.000386% fewer monochromatic 4-APs than random 2-colorings; the proof is probabilistic and non-constructive. In this paper, we present an explicit and simple construction of a 2-coloring with 9.3% fewer monochromatic 4-APs than random 2-colorings. This problem leads us to consider the minimum number of monochromatic 4-APs in $\\Z_n$ for general $n$. We obtain both lower bound and upper bound on the minimum number of monochromatic 4-APs in all 2-colorings of $\\Z_n$. Wolf proved that any 2-coloring of $\\Z_p$ has at least $(1/16+o(1))p^2$ monochromatic 4-APs. We improve this lower bound into $(7/96+o(1))p^2$. Our results on $\\Z_n$ naturally apply to the similar problem on $[n]$ (i.e., $\\{1,2,..., n\\}$). In 2008, Parillo, Robertson, and Saracino \\cite{prs} constructed a 2-...

  2. Light scattering calculations for the nephelometer experiment on the 1981/1982 Jupiter Orbiter-Probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grams, G. W.

    1982-01-01

    A variety of studies were carried out to help establish the accuracy of quantities describing physical characteristics of cloud particles (such as size, shape, and composition) that are to be inferred from light scattering data obtained with the nephelameter experiment on the Galileo spacecraft. The objectives were to provide data for validating and testing procedures for analyzing the Galileo nephelameter data with light scattering observations in a variety of on-going laboratory and field measurement programs for which simultaneous observations of the physical characteristics of the scattering particles were available.

  3. Evaluation of the Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH probes for identification of Candida species from positive blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Leslie; Le Febre, Kara M; Deml, Sharon M; Wohlfiel, Sherri L; Wengenack, Nancy L

    2012-04-01

    The Yeast Traffic Light PNA FISH kit (YTL) correctly identified Candida spp. in 207/216 (96%) positive blood cultures. Discordant results were seen with known cross-reacting species and cultures containing Candida lambica and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa. The YTL provides rapid, reliable identification of the five common Candida species found in blood cultures.

  4. Determination of thorium (IV) using isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole as probe by resonance light scattering, second-order scattering and frequency-doubling scattering spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiao; Xue, Jinhua; Xiao, Xilin; Xu, Li; Jiang, Min; Peng, Pengcheng; Liao, Lifu

    2017-12-05

    The coordination reaction of thorium (IV) with a ditopic bidentate ligand to form supramolecular polymer was studied by resonance light scattering (RLS) spectra, second-order scattering (SOS) spectra and frequency-doubling scattering (FDS) spectra, respectively. The ditopic bidentate ligand is isophthalaldehyde-tetrapyrrole (IPTP). It was synthesized through a condensation reaction of isophthalaldehyde with pyrrole. The formation of supramolecular polymer results in remarkable intensity enhancements of the three light scattering signals. The maximum scattering wavelengths of RLS, FDS and SOS were 290, 568 and 340nm, respectively. The reaction was used to establish new light scattering methods for the determination of thorium (IV) by using IPTP as probe. Under optimum conditions, the intensity enhancements of RLS, SOS and FDS were directly proportional to the concentration of thorium (IV) in the ranges of 0.01 to 1.2μgmL(-1), 0.05 to 1.2μgmL(-1) and 0.05 to 1.2μgmL(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 0.003μgmL(-1), 0.012μgmL(-1) and 0.021μgmL(-1), respectively. The methods were suitable for analyzing thorium (IV) in actual samples. The results show acceptable recoveries and precision compared with a reference method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  6. Novel lanthanide pH fluorescent probes based on multiple emissions and its visible-light-sensitized feature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jintai [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zheng, Yuhui, E-mail: yhzheng78@scnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, Guangzhou 510006 (China); State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Zhi [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhang, Cheng Cheng [Departments of Physiology and Developmental Biology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (United States)

    2014-08-11

    Graphical abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been reported. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. - Highlights: • The pH probe offers a very wide working range in water (pH 1–14). • The emission changes have multiple colors. • Long-lived excited state lifetimes of Eu(III) has been used. • Two types of pH sensitive hydrogels were fabricated. - Abstract: A new type of Eu(III) ofloxacin complex as the fluorescent pH indicator has been presented. Compared to pure ligand, the complex offers more distinguished color changes (green–red–blue) derived from both lanthanide line emissions and the secondary ionization steps of ofloxacin. During the concentration dependence experiments, the photoluminescence studies on the complex showed that the excitation of this pH probe can occur at a very long wavelength which extends to visible range (Ex = 427 nm). Furthermore, the functional complex was successfully incorporated into soft networks and two novel luminescent hydrogels (rod and film) were fabricated. The soft materials also exhibited specific responses towards the pH variation. Finally, the onion cell-stain experiments were carried out to further confirm the validity of pH dependence and the results support the idea that the material will be suitable for monitoring biological samples in the future.

  7. TO GUIDE A PROBE TO THE MOON WITH LIGHT PRESSURE%借助光压将探测器推向月球

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘林

    2001-01-01

    若采用圆型限制性三体问题模型,从近地停泊轨道上发射一个月球探测器,其最小初始速度必须使相应的Jacobi常数C小于某一临界值C2.但这仅仅是探测器可能飞向月球的必要条件,而且这样飞向月球耗时过长.若采用Hohmann转移轨道,则需要获得较大的变轨冲量,能量消耗较大.如果需要仔细探测地月空间环境,而又不必很快地飞往月球,那么采用较大的太阳帆板,并使其法向有一特殊指向,可借助太阳光压加速引导探测器在不长的时间内飞往月球. 利用相应的分析和计算,证实上述考虑是有效的,而且若使太阳帆板截面积大到一定程度(如果技术上能实现),则无需任何动力,也可借助光压将探测器推向月球,就像一条太空帆船(简称太空帆).%In the dynamical model of the circular restricted three-body problem and for launching a lunar probe from parking orbit, the minimum initial velocity should satisfy the condition that the Jacobian constant C is smaller than C2 (in the Earth-Moon system, C2=3. 20034491). Then the probe may be accelerated to a speed of Vv > 10. 8746 km/s at perigee (some 200 km high). However, this is only the necessary condition for the probe to fly to the moon and the voyage time is too long. If a Hohmann transfer orbit is adopted, a more impulse for the orbit transfer will be required, and in a sense more power will be consumed. If it is needed to carefully explore the environment of the Eath-Moon space and not to fly to the moon so quickly, then to the base of the above minimum velocity the probe can be guided faster to the moon with light pressure. For this reason, a large solar energy sail with a special normal needs to be installed on the probe. In this way, the purpose of exploring the Earth-Moon space can be attained and the flight will not spend a very long time.   The results of computations show that the above-stated plan is

  8. A Bright Fluorescent Probe for H2S Enables Analyte-Responsive, 3D Imaging in Live Zebrafish Using Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Matthew D; Taormina, Michael J; Cerda, Matthew M; Montoya, Leticia A; Seidenkranz, Daniel T; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer; Pluth, Michael D

    2015-08-19

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a critical gaseous signaling molecule emerging at the center of a rich field of chemical and biological research. As our understanding of the complexity of physiological H2S in signaling pathways evolves, advanced chemical and technological investigative tools are required to make sense of this interconnectivity. Toward this goal, we have developed an azide-functionalized O-methylrhodol fluorophore, MeRho-Az, which exhibits a rapid >1000-fold fluorescence response when treated with H2S, is selective for H2S over other biological analytes, and has a detection limit of 86 nM. Additionally, the MeRho-Az scaffold is less susceptible to photoactivation than other commonly used azide-based systems, increasing its potential application in imaging experiments. To demonstrate the efficacy of this probe for H2S detection, we demonstrate the ability of MeRho-Az to detect differences in H2S levels in C6 cells and those treated with AOAA, a common inhibitor of enzymatic H2S synthesis. Expanding the use of MeRho-Az to complex and heterogeneous biological settings, we used MeRho-Az in combination with light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to visualize H2S in the intestinal tract of live zebrafish. This application provides the first demonstration of analyte-responsive 3D imaging with LSFM, highlighting the utility of combining new probes and live imaging methods for investigating chemical signaling in complex multicellular systems.

  9. Aqueous Solubility and Degradation Kinetics of the Phytochemical Anticancer Thymoquinone; Probing the Effects of Solvents, pH and Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jumah Masoud M. Salmani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Thymoquinone (TQ is a potent anticancer phytochemical with confirmed in vitro efficacy. Its clinical use has not yet established, and very few reports have documented its formulation. There also are no reports about the aqueous solubility and stability of this valuable drug, despite their direct correlation with the in vivo efficacy. In the current research, we have established and validated a stability-indicating HPLC method for the detection of TQ and its degradation products under different conditions. We then investigated the solubility and stability profiles of TQ in aqueous solutions. The stability study was aimed to determine the effect of pH, solvent type and light on the degradation process of TQ, along with the investigation of the kinetics of this degradation. The solubility of TQ varied in different aqueous solvents, and might be compromised due to stability issues. However, these findings confirm that the aqueous solubility is not the major obstacle for the drug formulations mainly due to the considerable water solubility (>500 μg/mL that may be enough to exert pharmacologic effects if administered via parenteral route. Stability study results showed a very low stability profile of TQ in all the aqueous solutions with rapid degradation that varied with solvent type. The study of the degradation kinetics showed a significant effect of pH on the degradation process. The process followed first order kinetics at more acidic and alkaline pH values, and second order kinetics at pH 5–7.4, regardless of the solvent type. The results also expressed that light has a greater impact on the stability of TQ as a shorter period of exposure led to severe degradation, independent of the solution pH and solvent type. Our results also addressed some discrepancies in previously published researches regarding the formulation and quantification of TQ with suggested solutions. Overall, the current study concludes that TQ is unstable in aqueous

  10. Defect recognition by means of light and electron probe techniques for the characterization of mc-Si wafers and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralejo, B.; Tejero, A.; Hortelano, V.; Martínez, O.; González, M. A.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-11-01

    Multicristalline Silicon (mc-Si) is the preferred material for current terrestrial photovoltaic applications. However, the high density of defects present in mc-Si deteriorates the material properties, in particular the minority carrier diffusion length. For this reason, a large effort to characterize the mc-Si material is demanded, aiming to visualize the defective areas and to quantify the type of defects, density and its origin. In this work, several complementary light and electron probe techniques are used for the analysis of both mc-Si wafers and solar cells. These techniques comprise both fast and whole-area detection techniques such as Photoluminescence imaging, and highly spatially resolved time consuming techniques, such as light and electron beam induced current techniques and μRaman spectroscopy. These techniques were applied to the characterization of different mc-Si wafers for solar cells, e.g. ribbon wafers, cast mc-Si as well as quasi-monocrystalline material, upgraded metallurgical mc-Si wafers, and finished solar cells.

  11. Networking properties of cyclodextrin-based cross-linked polymers probed by inelastic light-scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Barbara; Caponi, Silvia; Castiglione, Franca; Corezzi, Silvia; Fontana, Aldo; Giarola, Marco; Mariotto, Gino; Mele, Andrea; Petrillo, Caterina; Trotta, Francesco; Viliani, Gabriele

    2012-05-03

    An integrated experimental approach, based on inelastic light-scattering techniques, has been here employed for a multilength scale characterization of networking properties of cyclodextrin nanosponges, a new class of cross-linked polymeric materials built up from natural oligosaccharides cyclodextrins. By using Raman and Brillouin scattering experiments, we performed a detailed inspection of the vibrational dynamics of these polymers over a wide frequency window ranging from gigahertz to terahertz, with the aim of providing physical descriptors correlated to the cross-linking degree and elastic properties of the material. The results seem to suggest that the stiffness of cross-linked polymers can be successfully tuned by acting on the type and the relative amount of the cross-linker during the synthesis of a polymer matrix, predicting and controlling their swelling and entrapment properties. The proposed experimental approach is a useful tool for investigating the structural and physicochemical properties of polymeric network systems.

  12. Do not mess with time: Probing faster than light travel and chronology protection with superluminal warp drives

    CERN Document Server

    Liberati, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    While General Relativity ranks undoubtedly among the best physics theories ever developed, it is also among those with the most striking implications. In particular, General Relativity admits solutions which allow faster than light motion and consequently time travel. Here we shall consider a "pre-emptive" chronology protection mechanism that destabilises superluminal warp drives via quantum matter back-reaction and hence forbids even the conceptual possibility to use these solutions for building a time machine. This result will be considered both in standard quantum field theory in curved spacetime as well as in the case of a quantum field theory with Lorentz invariance breakdown at high energies. Some lessons and future perspectives will be finally discuss.

  13. Fundamentals of Polarized Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The analytical and numerical basis for describing scattering properties of media composed of small discrete particles is formed by the classical electromagnetic theory. Although there are several excellent textbooks outlining the fundamentals of this theory, it is convenient for our purposes to begin with a summary of those concepts and equations that are central to the subject of this book and will be used extensively in the following chapters. We start by formulating Maxwell's equations and constitutive relations for time- harmonic macroscopic electromagnetic fields and derive the simplest plane-wave solution that underlies the basic optical idea of a monochromatic parallel beam of light. This solution naturally leads to the introduction of such fundamental quantities as the refractive index and the Stokes parameters. Finally, we define the concept of a quasi-monochromatic beam of light and discuss its implications.

  14. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jung, Jin-Ho; Jin, Gye-Hwan; Kim, Sung Youb; Jeon, Insu

    2014-09-01

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  15. A mirror for lab-based quasi-monochromatic parallel x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanhhai; Lu, Xun; Lee, Chang Jun; Jeon, Insu, E-mail: i-jeon@chonnam.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin-Ho [Pro-optics Co., Ltd., 475 Ami-ri, Bubal-eup, Icheon 467-866 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Gye-Hwan [Department of Radiology, Nambu University, 76 Chumdan Jungang 1-ro, Gwangsan-gu, Gwangju 506-706 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung Youb [School of Mechanical and Advanced Materials Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, 100 Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    A multilayered parabolic mirror with six W/Al bilayers was designed and fabricated to generate monochromatic parallel x-rays using a lab-based x-ray source. Using this mirror, curved bright bands were obtained in x-ray images as reflected x-rays. The parallelism of the reflected x-rays was investigated using the shape of the bands. The intensity and monochromatic characteristics of the reflected x-rays were evaluated through measurements of the x-ray spectra in the band. High intensity, nearly monochromatic, and parallel x-rays, which can be used for high resolution x-ray microscopes and local radiation therapy systems, were obtained.

  16. Cycles and transitivity by monochromatic paths in arc-coloured digraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Casas-Bautista

    2015-11-01

    The result by Sands et al. (1982 that asserts: Every 2-coloured digraph has a kernel by monochromatic paths, and the result by Galeana-Sánchez et al. (2011 that asserts: If D is a finite m-coloured digraph that admits a partition {C1,C2} of the set of colours of D such that for each i∈{1,2} every cycle in the subdigraph D[Ci] spanned by the arcs with colours in Ci is monochromatic, C(D does not contain neither rainbow triangles nor rainbow P3⃗ (path of length 3 involving colours of both C1 and C2; then D has a kernel by monochromatic paths.

  17. Probing the micellization kinetics of pyrene end-labeled diblock copolymer via a combination of stopped-flow light-scattering and fluorescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyan; Li, Yuting; Armes, Steven P; Liu, Shiyong

    2007-10-25

    A pyrene end-labeled double hydrophilic diblock copolymer, poly(2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (Py-PDEA-b-PDMA), was synthesized by sequential monomer addition via oxyanionic polymerization using a 1-pyrenemethanol-based initiator. This diblock copolymer exhibits reversible pH-responsive micellization behavior in aqueous solution, forming PDEA-core micelles stabilized by the soluble PDMA block at neutral or alkaline pH. Taking advantage of the pyrene probe covalently attached to the end of the PDEA block, the pH-induced micellization kinetics of Py-PDEA-b-PDMA was monitored by stopped-flow light scattering using a fluorescence detector. Upon a pH jump from 4.0 to 9.0, both the scattered light intensity and excimer/monomer fluorescence intensity ratios (IE/IM) increase abruptly initially, followed by a more gradual increase to reach plateau values. Interestingly, the IE/IM ratio increases abruptly within the first 10 ms: a triple exponential function is needed to fit the corresponding dynamic trace, leading to three characteristic relaxation time constants (tau(1,fluo) fluo) fluo)). On the other hand, dynamic traces for the scattered light intensity can be well-fitted by double exponential functions: the resulting time constants tau(1,scat) and tau(2,scat) can be ascribed to formation of the quasi-equilibrium micelles and relaxation into their final equilibrium state, respectively. Most importantly, tau(1,scat) obtained from stopped-flow light scattering is in general agreement with tau(2,fluo) obtained from stopped-flow fluorescence. The fastest process (tau(1,fluo) approximately 4 ms) detected by stopped-flow fluorescence is ascribed to the burst formation of small transient micelles comprising only a few chains, which are too small to be detected by conventional light scattering. These nascent micelles undergo rapid fusion and grow into quasi-equilibrium micelles and then slowly approach their final equilibrium

  18. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  19. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  20. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  1. BSA adsorption onto nanospheres: Influence of surface curvature as probed by electrophoretic light scattering and UV/vis spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Julio A.; Gallardo-Moreno, Amparo M.; González-Martín, M. Luisa; Vadillo-Rodríguez, Virginia

    2015-10-01

    The influence of surface curvature on the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) was evaluated through the combination of two fairly simple techniques: electrophoretic light scattering and UV/vis spectroscopy. Measurements were carried out for a range of protein concentrations (0-320 μg/ml) at pH 3.5, 4.5 and 7 using hydrophobic polystyrene nanospheres of 38.8, 82 and 220 nm in diameter. The results obtained demonstrate that the charge of the BSA molecules in solution dictates the pH-dependent behavior of the protein-coated nanospheres, indicating in all cases a significant adsorption of BSA molecules. At a fixed pH, however, it is the zeta potential that characterizes the uncoated nanospheres normalized by their surface area that primarily controls protein adsorption. In particular, it is found that the rate at which BSA interact with the different nanospheres increases as their negative zeta potential per unit area (or diameter) increases (decreases) regardless of the pH. Moreover, provided that adsorption occurs away from the isoelectric point of the protein, highly curved surfaces are found to stabilize the native-like conformation of BSA upon adsorption by likely reducing lateral interactions between adsorbed molecules.

  2. Probing energy transfer events in the light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides with two-dimensional spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Andrew F; Singh, Ved P; Long, Phillip D; Dahlberg, Peter D; Engel, Gregory S

    2013-10-21

    Excitation energy transfer events in the photosynthetic light harvesting complex 2 (LH2) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated with polarization controlled two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. A spectrally broadened pulse allows simultaneous measurement of the energy transfer within and between the two absorption bands at 800 nm and 850 nm. The phased all-parallel polarization two-dimensional spectra resolve the initial events of energy transfer by separating the intra-band and inter-band relaxation processes across the two-dimensional map. The internal dynamics of the 800 nm region of the spectra are resolved as a cross peak that grows in on an ultrafast time scale, reflecting energy transfer between higher lying excitations of the B850 chromophores into the B800 states. We utilize a polarization sequence designed to highlight the initial excited state dynamics which uncovers an ultrafast transfer component between the two bands that was not observed in the all-parallel polarization data. We attribute the ultrafast transfer component to energy transfer from higher energy exciton states to lower energy states of the strongly coupled B850 chromophores. Connecting the spectroscopic signature to the molecular structure, we reveal multiple relaxation pathways including a cyclic transfer of energy between the two rings of the complex.

  3. Note on 2-edge-colorings of complete graphs with small monochromatic k-connected subgraphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ze-min; WANG Yu-ling; WEN Shi-li

    2014-01-01

    Bollob´as and Gy´arf´as conjectured that for n > 4(k-1) every 2-edge-coloring of Kn contains a monochromatic k-connected subgraph with at least n-2k+2 vertices. Liu, et al. proved that the conjecture holds when n ≥ 13k-15. In this note, we characterize all the 2-edge-colorings of Kn where each monochromatic k-connected subgraph has at most n-2k+2 vertices for n≥13k-15.

  4. The monochromatic imaging mode of a RITA-type neutron spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, C.R.H.; Andersen, P.; Klausen, S.N.;

    2004-01-01

    The imaging monochromatic mode of a neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed RITA analyser system is so far unexplored. We present analytical calculations that define the mode. It is shown that the mode can be realised for PG (002) analyser crystals, from incident energies of about 3.2 meV and up......, allowing the important cases of 3.7, 5.0 and 13.7 meV. Due to beam divergence, the neutron rays from neighbouring analyser blades are found to overlap slightly. Hence, the optimal use of the monochromatic imaging mode would be found by employing an adjustable radial collimator to limit the spread...

  5. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enriquez, Miriam M.; Zhang, Cheng; Tan, Howe-Siang, E-mail: howesiang@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore); Akhtar, Parveen; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H., E-mail: lambrev@brc.hu [Institute of Plant Biology, Biological Research Centre, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 521, H-6701 Szeged (Hungary)

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Q{sub y} band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240–270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet–singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  6. Energy transfer dynamics in trimers and aggregates of light-harvesting complex II probed by 2D electronic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Miriam M; Akhtar, Parveen; Zhang, Cheng; Garab, Győző; Lambrev, Petar H; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-06-07

    The pathways and dynamics of excitation energy transfer between the chlorophyll (Chl) domains in solubilized trimeric and aggregated light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) are examined using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES). The LHCII trimers and aggregates exhibit the unquenched and quenched excitonic states of Chl a, respectively. 2DES allows direct correlation of excitation and emission energies of coupled states over population time delays, hence enabling mapping of the energy flow between Chls. By the excitation of the entire Chl b Qy band, energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a states is monitored in the LHCII trimers and aggregates. Global analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) spectra reveals that energy transfer from Chl b to Chl a occurs on fast and slow time scales of 240-270 fs and 2.8 ps for both forms of LHCII. 2D decay-associated spectra resulting from the global analysis identify the correlation between Chl states involved in the energy transfer and decay at a given lifetime. The contribution of singlet-singlet annihilation on the kinetics of Chl energy transfer and decay is also modelled and discussed. The results show a marked change in the energy transfer kinetics in the time range of a few picoseconds. Owing to slow energy equilibration processes, long-lived intermediate Chl a states are present in solubilized trimers, while in aggregates, the population decay of these excited states is significantly accelerated, suggesting that, overall, the energy transfer within the LHCII complexes is faster in the aggregated state.

  7. Wave-flume experiments of soft-rock cliff erosion under monochromatic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regard, Vincent; Astruc, Dominique; Caplain, Bastien

    2017-04-01

    We investigate how cliffs erode under wave attack. Rocky coast erosion works through cycles, each one corresponding to three successive phases: (i) notch creation at cliff toe by mechanical action of waves, (ii) cliff fracturation leading to collapse, and (iii) evacuation of scree aprons by waves and currents. We performed experiments in a 5m x 14cm x 25cm wave flume (15 cm water depth) to investigate how waves are eroding a rocky coast. The cliff is made of wet sand and models a relatively soft rock. We used 3 different grain size (D50 = 0.28-0.41-0.48 mm), changing the cliff rheology. Waves are monochromatic; their height and period differ for the various experiments. Actual wave parameters are estimated by capacitive probes located offshore. The experiments are monitored by two video cameras both on the side and above the flume. Pictures are taken at a rate of 1Hz during the first 4h and then the rate is decreased to 0.1Hz till the end of experiment (about 1 day). The monitoring ensure a confident characterization of experiments in terms of waves (surf similarity parameter ξ and the incident wave energy flux F) and in terms of sediment (Dean number Ω and Shields number θb at breakers). Experiments begin by an initial phase of quick cliff retreat. Then the system evolves with slower cliff retreat. We focus on bottom morphology which we characterize in function of wave forcing (ξ, F). We show that the bottom morphology mainly depends on ξ. For our reference sediment (Dm = 0.41 mm), we observed: (i) surging breakers on a steep terrace (type T1) for ξ > 0.65; (ii)collapsing breakers on a bared profile attached to the inner platform (type T2) for 0.55< ξ <0.6; (iii) spilling breakers on gentle terrace (type T3) for F < 1.3 W/m and 0.55< ξ <0.6. Another bottom morphology, type T4, displays two sub-systems, an outer system with a double-bar profile where breaking waves are plunging, and an inner system with a T1, T2 or T3 profile. Some of these bottom

  8. Action of low-energy monochromatic coherent light on the stability of retinal lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metelitsina, Irina P.; Leus, N. F.

    1995-05-01

    The data had been obtained during the experiment in vitro by irradiation of solubilized lysosomal enzymes, retinal homogenates and native lysosomes enabled us to conclude that the laser beam ((lambda) equals 632.8 nm, power density from 0.1 to 15.0 mWt/cm2) acts on the level of membranous structures of lysosomes. During irradiation of rabbits eyes in vitro with an unfocused laser beam (power density on the cornea aur face from 0.01 to 15.0 mWt/cm2 was shown, that low-energy, ranged from 0.01 to 1.0 mWt/cm2 promotes stabilization of lysosomal membranes. Irradiation with laser beam of 8.0 mWt/cm2 and more power induces destabilization of lysosomal membranes. We have also shown that vitamins A and E effecting membranotropic on lysosomes may be corrected by low-energy radiation of helium-neon laser. It is substantiated experimentally that the stabilizing effect of vitamin E may be intensified in case of the combined action of laser radiation on lysosomes. The labilizing effect of vitamin A on membranes of organelles, as was studied, may be weakened by application of laser radiation of low intensities.

  9. Electronic-generated holograms by FPGA and monochromatic LCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Atoche, A.; Pérez-Cortés, M.; López, M. A.; Ortiz-Gutiérrez, M.

    2006-02-01

    The majority of holograms are made using interference of light and computer-generated holograms. In this work we propose a technique in real time to generate digital holograms with a VLSI digital component, being specific FPGA and a liquid crystal device. The digital design with FPGA presents great advantage for its parallel procesing that carry out by its flexible structure, high integration and velocity. The design was verified using the platform MathLab/Simulink and Xilinx System Generator.

  10. Probing the fractal pattern and organization of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria colonies growing under different conditions using quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Purwar, Harsh; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K

    2013-03-01

    Development of methods for quantification of cellular association and patterns in growing bacterial colony is of considerable current interest, not only to help understand multicellular behavior of a bacterial species but also to facilitate detection and identification of a bacterial species in a given space and under a given set of condition(s). We have explored quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for probing the morphological and structural changes taking place during colony formations of growing Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria under different conditions (in normal nutrient agar representing favorable growth environment, in the presence of 1% glucose as an additional nutrient, and 3 mM sodium arsenate as toxic material). The method is based on the measurement of spectral 3×3 Mueller matrices (which involves linear polarization measurements alone) and its subsequent analysis via polar decomposition to extract the intrinsic polarization parameters. Moreover, the fractal micro-optical parameter, namely, the Hurst exponent H, is determined via fractal-Born approximation-based inverse analysis of the polarization-preserving component of the light scattering spectra. Interesting differences are noted in the derived values for the H parameter and the intrinsic polarization parameters (linear diattenuation d, linear retardance δ, and linear depolarization Δ coefficients) of the growing bacterial colonies under different conditions. The bacterial colony growing in presence of 1% glucose exhibit the strongest fractality (lowest value of H), whereas that growing in presence of 3 mM sodium arsenate showed the weakest fractality. Moreover, the values for δ and d parameters are found to be considerably higher for the colony growing in presence of glucose, indicating more structured growth pattern. These findings are corroborated further with optical microscopic studies conducted on the same samples.

  11. Probing the fractal pattern and organization of Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria colonies growing under different conditions using quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Purwar, Harsh; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K.

    2013-03-01

    Development of methods for quantification of cellular association and patterns in growing bacterial colony is of considerable current interest, not only to help understand multicellular behavior of a bacterial species but also to facilitate detection and identification of a bacterial species in a given space and under a given set of condition(s). We have explored quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for probing the morphological and structural changes taking place during colony formations of growing Bacillus thuringiensis bacteria under different conditions (in normal nutrient agar representing favorable growth environment, in the presence of 1% glucose as an additional nutrient, and 3 mM sodium arsenate as toxic material). The method is based on the measurement of spectral 3×3 Mueller matrices (which involves linear polarization measurements alone) and its subsequent analysis via polar decomposition to extract the intrinsic polarization parameters. Moreover, the fractal micro-optical parameter, namely, the Hurst exponent H, is determined via fractal-Born approximation-based inverse analysis of the polarization-preserving component of the light scattering spectra. Interesting differences are noted in the derived values for the H parameter and the intrinsic polarization parameters (linear diattenuation d, linear retardance δ, and linear depolarization Δ coefficients) of the growing bacterial colonies under different conditions. The bacterial colony growing in presence of 1% glucose exhibit the strongest fractality (lowest value of H), whereas that growing in presence of 3 mM sodium arsenate showed the weakest fractality. Moreover, the values for δ and d parameters are found to be considerably higher for the colony growing in presence of glucose, indicating more structured growth pattern. These findings are corroborated further with optical microscopic studies conducted on the same samples.

  12. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2015-01-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution ($\\sim1\\%$ for electrons and photons and $20\\%$ for nuclei) and a large geometry factor ($>3\\, m^2sr$ for electrons and diffuse photons and $>2\\, m^2sr$ for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray searches at energies between $\\sim10$ to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  13. Perspective of monochromatic gamma-ray line detection with the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection (HERD) facility onboard China's space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan; Lamperstorfer, Anna S.; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Qiang; Chang, Jin; Dong, Yong-Wei; Hu, Bing-Liang; Lü, Jun-Guang; Wang, Le; Wu, Bo-Bing; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-05-01

    HERD is the High Energy cosmic-Radiation Detection instrument proposed to operate onboard China's space station in the 2020s. It is designed to detect energetic cosmic ray nuclei, leptons and photons with a high energy resolution (∼1% for electrons and photons and 20% for nuclei) and a large geometry factor (>3 m2 sr for electrons and diffuse photons and > [2]m2 sr for nuclei). In this work we discuss the capability of HERD to detect monochromatic γ-ray lines, based on simulations of the detector performance. It is shown that HERD will be one of the most sensitive instruments for monochromatic γ-ray searches at energies between ∼ 10 to a few hundred GeV. Above hundreds of GeV, Cherenkov telescopes will be more sensitive due to their large effective area. As a specific example, we show that a good portion of the parameter space of a supersymmetric dark matter model can be probed with HERD.

  14. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for the two-step three- photon ionization process, 1S (2(h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow, 2S ((h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow epsilon P, of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependen

  15. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for a specifed two-step three-photon ionization process of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependent amplitude. Within the framework of a three-level model, the AC Stark shifts and non-ze

  16. Broadband EM radiation amplification by means of a monochromatically driven two-level system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, Andrey V.

    2017-02-01

    It is shown that a two-level quantum system possessing dipole moment operator with permanent non-equal diagonal matrix elements and driven by external semiclassical monochromatic high-frequency electromagnetic (EM) (laser) field can amplify EM radiation waves of much lower frequency.

  17. Probing the Charge Separation Process on In2S3/Pt-TiO2 Nanocomposites for Boosted Visible-light Photocatalytic Hydrogen Production

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fenglong; Jiang, Yijiao; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa; Lou, Shi Nee; Turchinovich, Dmitry; Amala, Rose

    2016-01-01

    A simple refluxing wet-chemical approach is employed for fabricating In2S3/Pt-TiO2 heterogeneous catalysts for hydrogen generation under visible light irradiation. When the mass ratio between Pt-TiO2 and cubic-phased In2S3 (denoted as In2S3/Pt-TiO2) is two, the composite catalyst shows the highest hydrogen production, which exhibits an 82-fold enhancement over in-situ deposited Pt-In2S3. UV-vis diffuse reflectance and valence band X-ray photoelectron spectra elucidate that the conduction band of In2S3 is 0.3 eV more negative compared to that of TiO2, favoring charge separation in the nanocomposites. Photoelectrochemical transient photo-current measurements and optical pump - terahertz probe spectroscopic studies further corroborate the charge separation in In2S3/Pt-TiO2. The migration of photo-induced electrons from the In2S3 conduction band to the TiO2 conduction band and subsequently into the Pt nanoparticles is found to occur within 5 picoseconds. Based on the experimental evidence, a charge separation pro...

  18. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  19. Breast tomosynthesis with monochromatic beams: a feasibility study using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliori, A.; Bliznakova, K.; Sechopoulos, I.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Fei, B.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact on image quality of using monochromatic beams for lower dose breast tomosynthesis (BT). For this purpose, modeling and simulation of BT and mammography imaging processes have been performed using two x-ray beams: one at 28 kVp and a monochromatic one at 19 keV at different entrance surface air kerma ranging between 0.16 and 5.5 mGy. Two 4 cm thick computational breast models, in a compressed state, were used: one simple homogeneous and one heterogeneous based on CT breast images, with compositions of 50% glandular-50% adipose and 40% glandular-60% adipose tissues by weight, respectively. Modeled lesions, representing masses and calcifications, were inserted within these breast phantoms. X-ray transport in the breast models was simulated with previously developed and validated Monte Carlo application. Results showed that, for the same incident photon fluence, the use of the monochromatic beam in BT resulted in higher image quality compared to the one using polychromatic acquisition, especially in terms of contrast. For the homogenous phantom, the improvement ranged between 15% and 22% for calcifications and masses, respectively, while for the heterogeneous one this improvement was in the order of 33% for the masses and 17% for the calcifications. For different exposures, comparable image quality in terms of signal-difference-to-noise ratio and higher contrast for all features was obtained when using a monochromatic 19 keV beam at a lower mean glandular dose, compared to the polychromatic one. Monochromatic images also provide better detail and, in combination with BT, can lead to substantial improvement in visualization of features, and particularly better edge detection of low-contrast masses.

  20. Application of FEL technique for constructing high-intensity, monochromatic, polarized gamma-sources at storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldin, E.L.; Schneidmiller, E.A.; Ulyanov, Yu.N. [Automatic Systems Corporation, Samara (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    A possibility to construct high-intensity tunable monochromatic{gamma}-source at high energy storage rings is discussed. It is proposed to produce {gamma}-quanta by means of Compton backscattering of laser photons on electrons circulating in the storage. The laser light wavelength is chosen in such a way that after the scattering, the electron does not leave the separatrix. So as the probability of the scattering is rather small, energy oscillations are damped prior the next scattering. As a result, the proposed source can operate in {open_quotes}parasitic{close_quote} mode not interfering with the main mode of the storage ring operation. Analysis of parameters of existent storage rings (PETRA, ESRF, Spring-8, etc) shows that the laser light wavelength should be in infrared, {lambda}{approximately} 10 - 400 {mu}m, wavelength band. Installation at storage rings of tunable free-electron lasers with the peak and average output power {approximately} 10 MW and {approximately} 1 kW, respectively, will result in the intensity of the {gamma}-source up to {approximately} 10{sup 14}s{sup -1} with tunable {gamma}-quanta energy from several MeV up to several hundreds MeV. Such a {gamma}-source will reveal unique possibilities for precision investigations in nuclear physics.

  1. OCT assessment of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions by variation of incidence angle of probe light and refractive index matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Jin; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk; Krause, Felix; Schneider, Hartmut

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated (1) the detection and assessment of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and (2) the impact of varying angle of incidence (AI) of probe light and refractive index matching (RIM). Nine extracted human molars with 18 occlusal lesions (ICDAS code 2) were visually selected. 18 regions of interest (ROI) were imaged with SD-OCT under varying AI (0°, ±5°, ±10°, ±15°) and with/without application of glycerine at 0°. X-ray micro computed tomography (μCT) was used as a validation standard. μCT and OCT signals were categorized according to the lesion extent: 1-sound, 2-lesion limited to half of enamel, 3-lesion limited to enamel, 4-lesion into dentin. Agreement between both methods was assessed. Intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility analyses were conducted. Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ), Spearman's rho correlation (rs) and Wilcoxon test (α=0.05). Slight to moderate agreement (κ=0.153) between μCT and OCT was obtained at an AI of 0° (Wilcoxon: p=0.02). With variation of Al a substantial agreement (κ=0.607) was observed (p=0.74). Spearman's correlation between both methods was 0.428 at 0°, 0.75 with varying AI and 0.573 with glycerine. Kappa values for intra-and inter-examiner analysis ranged between 0.81 and 0.88 and between 0.25 and 0.73, respectively. Variation of AI improves the detectability of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions. RIM can enhance signal-to-noise ratio. OCT could provide additional diagnostic information in single and longitudinal assessments of occlusal carious lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards a Monochromatization Scheme for Direct Higgs Production at FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Valdivia Garcia, Marco Alan; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Direct Higgs production in e+e− collisions at the FCC is of interest if the centre-of-mass energy spread can be reduced by at least an order of magnitude. A monochromatization scheme, to accomplish this, can be realized with horizontal dispersion of opposite sign for the two colliding beams at the interaction point (IP). We recall historical approaches to monochromatization, then derive a set of IP parameters which would provide the required performance in FCC e+e− collisions at 62.5 GeV beam energy, compare these with the baseline optics parameters at neighbouring energies (45.6 and 80 GeV), comment on the effect of beamstrahlung, and indicate the modifications of the FCC-ee final-focus optics needed to obtain the required parameters.

  3. Monochromatic imaging instrumentation for applications in aeronomy of the earth and planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardner, Jeffrey; Flynn, Brian; Mendillo, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Monochromatic imaging instrumentation has been developed that uses narrow-band (12 A FWHP) interference filters or plane reflection gratings for 2D imaging and imaging spectrograph applications. By changing the optics in front of the filter or grating, the field of view of the instruments can be varied from 180 deg to 6 deg. In the case of the 2D monochromatic imager, the 12 mm-diameter filtered image is formed at about f/1 on the input photocathode of an intensified CCD camera (380 x 488 pixels). The sensitivities of the systems are about 50-100 R s (S/N about 2). Examples of data taken with both of these instruments include detection and mapping of Jupiter's sodium magnetonebula and stable auroral red arcs in the terrestrial ionosphere.

  4. Colliding. gamma. e and. gamma gamma. beams based in single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ accelerators. Pt. 2. Polarization effects, monochromatization improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Panfil, S.L.; Telnov, V.I.

    Polarization effects are considered in colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams, which are proposed to be obtained on the basis of linear e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders (by backward Compton scattering of laser light on electron beams). It is shown that using electrons and laser photons with helicities lambda and Psub(c), such that lambdaPsub(c) < 0, essentially improves the monochromatization. The characteristic laser flash energy, A/sub 0/, which is necessary to obtain a conversion coefficient k proportional 1 with a definite degree of monochromatization, is considerably less (somestimes by one order of magnitude) in the case 2 lambdaPsub(c) = -1 in contrast to the case lambdaPsub(c) = 0. Simultaneously the luminosities Lsub(..gamma..e) and Lsub(..gamma gamma..) essentially increase. Formulae are obtained which allow one to extract the polarization information about ..gamma..e -> X and ..gamma gamma.. -> X reactions. Perculiarities connected with the specific scheme of the ..gamma.. beam preparation are discussed. Problems of the calibration of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions for the polarized beams are discussed.

  5. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  6. Feasibility of Strong and Quasi-Monochromatic Gamma-Ray Generation by the Laser Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoung; Rehman, Haseeb ur; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This is because LCS γ-rays are energy-tunable, quasi-monochromatic, and beam-like. The photon intensity of the mono-chromatic LCS gamma-ray should be high or strong for efficient and high transmutation rate. It was recently reported that a so-called energy-recovery linac system is able to produce a very high-intensity LCS photons in the order of approximately 1013 photons/s economically. It however did not evaluate quality of the LCS photon beam although a quasi-monoenergetic LCS beam is of huge importance in the photo-nuclear transmutation reactions. It is upon this observation that this paper was prepared. Specifically, this work attempts to quantify intensity of the quasi-monochromatic LCS beam from the said linac system. In addition, this paper aims to discuss general characteristics of the LCS photon, and possible approaches to increase its intensity. This paper presents essential characteristics of the laser Compton scattering (LCS) in terms of its photon energy, cross-section and photon intensity. By using different combinations of electron energy, laser energy and scattering angle, we can effectively generate high-intensity and highly-chromatic LCS gamma-rays. Our preliminary analyses indicate that, in view of Compton cross-section, higher-energy photon can be better generated by increasing the electron energy rather than increasing the laser energy. However, in order to maximize the intensity of monochromatic beam, the laser energy should be maximized for a targeted LCS photon energy.

  7. Dichromatic and monochromatic laser radiation effects on survival and morphology of Pantoea agglomerans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomé, A. M. C.; Souza, B. P.; Mendes, J. P. M.; Soares, L. C.; Trajano, E. T. L.; Fonseca, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    Despite the beneficial effects of low-level lasers on wound healing, their application for treatment of infected injuries is controversial because low-level lasers could stimulate bacterial growth exacerbating the infectious process. Thus, the aim of this work was to evaluate in vitro effects of low-level lasers on survival, morphology and cell aggregation of Pantoea agglomerans. P. agglomerans samples were isolated from human pressure injuries and cultures were exposed to low-level monochromatic and simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation to study the survival, cell aggregation, filamentation and morphology of bacterial cells in exponential and stationary growth phases. Fluence, wavelength and emission mode were those used in therapeutic protocols for wound healing. Data show no changes in morphology and cell aggregation, but dichromatic laser radiation decreased bacterial survival in exponential growth phase and monochromatic red and infrared lasers increased bacterial survival at the same fluence. Simultaneous dichromatic laser radiation induces biological effects that differ from those induced by monochromatic laser radiation and simultaneous dichromatic laser could be the option for treatment of infected pressure injuries by Pantoea agglomerans.

  8. Excitation of monochromatic and stable electron acoustic wave by two counter-propagating laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C. Z.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T.

    2017-07-01

    The undamped electron acoustic wave is a newly-observed nonlinear electrostatic plasma wave and has potential applications in ion acceleration, laser amplification and diagnostics due to its unique frequency range. We propose to make the first attempt to excite a monochromatic and stable electron acoustic wave (EAW) by two counter-propagating laser beams. The matching conditions relevant to laser frequencies, plasma density, and electron thermal velocity are derived and the harmonic effects of the EAW are excluded. Single-beam instabilities, including stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering, on the excitation process are quantified by an interaction quantity, η =γ {τ }B, where γ is the growth rate of each instability and {τ }B is the characteristic time of the undamped EAW. The smaller the interaction quantity, the more successfully the monochromatic and stable EAW can be excited. Using one-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, we excite EAW wave trains which are amplitude tunable, have a duration of thousands of laser periods, and are monochromatic and stable, by carefully controlling the parameters under the above conditions.

  9. Dark Matter Decay to a Photon and a Neutrino: the Double Monochromatic Smoking Gun Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Aisati, Chaïmae El; Hambye, Thomas; Scarna, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    In the energy range from few TeV to 25 TeV, upper bounds on the dark matter decay rate into high energy monochromatic neutrinos have recently become comparable to those on monochromatic gamma-ray lines. This implies clear possibilities of a future double "smoking-gun" evidence for the dark matter particle, from the observation of both a gamma and a neutrino line at the same energy. In particular, we show that a scenario where both lines are induced from the same dark matter particle decay leads to correlations that can already be tested. We study this "double monochromatic" scenario by considering the complete list of lowest dimensional effective operators that could induce such a decay. Furthermore, we argue that, on top of lines from decays into two-body final states, three-body final states can also be highly relevant. In addition to producing a distinct hard photon spectrum, three-body final states also produce a line-like feature in the neutrino spectrum that can be searched for by neutrino telescopes.

  10. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kuchenbecker@dkfz.de; Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU), Erlangen 91054 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Dual Energy CT (DECT) provides so-called monoenergetic images based on a linear combination of the original polychromatic images. At certain patient-specific energy levels, corresponding to certain patient- and slice-dependent linear combination weights, e.g., E = 160 keV corresponds to α = 1.57, a significant reduction of metal artifacts may be observed. The authors aimed at analyzing the method for its artifact reduction capabilities to identify its limitations. The results are compared with raw data-based processing. Methods: Clinical DECT uses a simplified version of monochromatic imaging by linearly combining the low and the high kV images and by assigning an energy to that linear combination. Those pseudo-monochromatic images can be used by radiologists to obtain images with reduced metal artifacts. The authors analyzed the underlying physics and carried out a series expansion of the polychromatic attenuation equations. The resulting nonlinear terms are responsible for the artifacts, but they are not linearly related between the low and the high kV scan: A linear combination of both images cannot eliminate the nonlinearities, it can only reduce their impact. Scattered radiation yields additional noncanceling nonlinearities. This method is compared to raw data-based artifact correction methods. To quantify the artifact reduction potential of pseudo-monochromatic images, they simulated the FORBILD abdomen phantom with metal implants, and they assessed patient data sets of a clinical dual source CT system (100, 140 kV Sn) containing artifacts induced by a highly concentrated contrast agent bolus and by metal. In each case, they manually selected an optimal α and compared it to a raw data-based material decomposition in case of simulation, to raw data-based material decomposition of inconsistent rays in case of the patient data set containing contrast agent, and to the frequency split normalized metal artifact reduction in case of the metal

  11. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H.; Duijzer, Wianne; Bos, Elisabeth; V, Hommes,

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the

  12. Absorption of monochromatic and narrow band radiation in the visible and near IR by both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial photoacceptors results in photobiomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarella, Salvatore; Karu, Tiina

    2014-11-01

    In addition to the major functions performed by in the cell, mitochondria play a major role in cell-light interaction. Accordingly it is generally accepted that mitochondria are crucial in cell photobiomodulation; however a variety of biomolecules themselves proved to be targets of light irradiation. We describe whether and how mitochondria can interact with monochromatic and narrow band radiation in the red and near IR optical regions with dissection of both structural and functional effects likely leading to photobiostimulation. Moreover we also report that a variety of biomolecules localized in mitochondria and/or in other cell compartments including cytochrome c oxidase, some proteins, nucleic acids and adenine nucleotides are light sensitive with major modifications in their biochemistry. All together the reported investigations show that the elucidation of the mechanism of the light interaction with biological targets still remains to be completed, this needing further research, however the light sensitivity of a variety of molecules strongly suggests that photobiomodulation could be used in both in photomedicine and in biotechnology.

  13. QED-based Optical Bloch Equations without electric dipole approximation: A model for a two-level atom interacting with a monochromatic X-ray laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wen-Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    We derive a set of optical Bloch equations (OBEs) directly from the minimal-coupling Hamiltonian density of the bound-state quantum electrodynamics (bound-state QED). Such optical Bloch equations are beyond the former widely-used ones due to that there is no electric dipole approximation (EDA) on the minimal-coupling Hamiltonian density of the bound-state QED. Then our optical Bloch equations can describe a two-level atom interacting with a monochromatic light of arbitrary wavelength, which are suitable to study the spectroscopy and the Rabi oscillations of two-level atoms in X-ray laser beams since that the wavelength of X-ray is close to an atom to make the electric dipole approximation (EDA) invalid.

  14. Experiments with twisted light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtial, J.; O'Holleran, K.

    2007-06-01

    The generic that is, stable under perturbations nodes of the field in a monochromatic light beam are optical vortices. We describe here their connection to Chladni's nodal lines in the oscillations of metal plates, as well as a few experiments that have been performed with optical vortices. We will describe how optical vortices can be generated experimentally; how it can be shown that they possess orbital angular momentum; how individual photons can be sorted according to their vortex state; and how optical vortices can be used to demonstrate higher-dimensional quantum entanglement.

  15. High-Energy Compton Scattering Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hartemann, Fred V; Barty, C; Crane, John; Gibson, David J; Hartouni, E P; Tremaine, Aaron M

    2005-01-01

    No monochromatic, high-brightness, tunable light sources currently exist above 100 keV. Important applications that would benefit from such new hard x-ray sources include: nuclear resonance fluorescence spectroscopy, time-resolved positron annihilation spectroscopy, and MeV flash radiography. The peak brightness of Compton scattering light sources is derived for head-on collisions and found to scale with the electron beam brightness and the drive laser pulse energy. This gamma 2

  16. Source mechanics for monochromatic icequakes produced during iceberg calving at Columbia Glacier, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neel, Shad; Pfeffer, W.T.

    2007-01-01

    Seismograms recorded during iceberg calving contain information pertaining to source processes during calving events. However, locally variable material properties may cause signal distortions, known as site and path effects, which must be eliminated prior to commenting on source mechanics. We applied the technique of horizontal/vertical spectral ratios to passive seismic data collected at Columbia Glacier, AK, and found no dominant site or path effects. Rather, monochromatic waveforms generated by calving appear to result from source processes. We hypothesize that a fluid-filled crack source model offers a potential mechanism for observed seismograms produced by calving, and fracture-processes preceding calving.

  17. Solar monochromatic images in magneto-sensitive spectral lines and maps of vector magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihui, Y.; Jiehai, J.; Minhan, J.

    1985-01-01

    A new method which allows by use of the monochromatic images in some magneto-sensitive spectra line to derive both the magnetic field strength as well as the angle between magnetic field lines and line of sight for various places in solar active regions is described. In this way two dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields may be constructed. This method was applied to some observational material and reasonable results were obtained. In addition, a project for constructing the three dimensional maps of vector magnetic fields was worked out.

  18. Directional and monochromatic thermal emitter from epsilon-near-zero conditions in semiconductor hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Salvatore; Marquier, Francois; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Ellis, A. Robert; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Luk, Ting S.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel thermal sources that control the emission spectrum and the angular emission pattern is of fundamental importance. In this paper, we investigate the thermal emission properties of semiconductor hyperbolic metamaterials (SHMs). Our structure does not require the use of any periodic corrugation to provide monochromatic and directional emission properties. We show that these properties arise because of epsilon-near-zero conditions in SHMs. The thermal emission is dominated by the epsilon-near-zero effect in the doped quantum wells composing the SHM. Furthermore, different properties are observed for s and p polarizations, following the characteristics of the strong anisotropy of hyperbolic metamaterials.

  19. Improvement of Image Quality in Transmission Computed Tomography Using Synchrotron Monochromatic X-Ray Sheet Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    7] T. Takeda, M. Kazama, T. Zeniya, T. Yuasa, M. Akiba, A. Uchida, K. Hyodo, T. Akatsuka, M. Ando, and Y. Itai , “Development of a Mono- chromatic X...Uyama (Springer-Verlag, Tokyo), pp. 103-110 (1998). [8] Y. Itai , T. Takeda, T. Akatsuka, T. Maeda, K. Hyodo, A. Uchida, T. Yuasa, M. Kazama, J. Wu...T. Yuasa, K. Hyodo, M. Ando, T. Akatsuka, and Y. Itai , “Performance Study of Monochromatic Synchro- tron X-ray Computed Tomography using a Linear

  20. Enhancing monochromatic multipole emission by a subwavelength enclosure of degenerate Mie resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Jiajun

    2017-07-06

    Sound emission is inefficient at low frequencies as limited by source size. This letter presents enhancing emission of monochromatic monopole and multipole sources by enclosing the source with a subwavelength circular enclosure filled of an anisotropic material of a low radial sound speed. The anisotropy is associated with an infinite tangential density along the azimuth. Numerical simulations show that emission gain is produced at frequencies surrounding degenerate Mie resonant frequencies of the enclosure, and meanwhile the radiation directivity pattern is well preserved. The degeneracy is theoretically analyzed. A realization of the material is suggested by using a space-coiling structure.

  1. A monochromatic x-ray imaging system for characterizing low-density foams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanier, Nicholas E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taccetti, Jose M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamilton, Christopher E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04

    In High Energy Density (HED) laser experiments, targets often require small, low-density, foam components. However, their limited size can preclude single component characterization, forcing one to rely solely on less accurate bulk measurements. We have developed a monochromatic imaging a system to characterize both the density and uniformity of single component low-mass foams. This x-ray assembly is capable of determining line-averaged density variations near the 1% level, and provides statistically identical results to those obtained at the Brookhaven's NSLS. This system has the added benefit of providing two-dimensional density data, allowing an assessment of density uniformity.

  2. Directional and monochromatic thermal emitter from epsilon-near-zero conditions in semiconductor hyperbolic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campione, Salvatore; Marquier, Francois; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Ellis, A. Robert; Klem, John F.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Luk, Ting S.

    2016-10-01

    The development of novel thermal sources that control the emission spectrum and the angular emission pattern is of fundamental importance. In this paper, we investigate the thermal emission properties of semiconductor hyperbolic metamaterials (SHMs). Our structure does not require the use of any periodic corrugation to provide monochromatic and directional emission properties. We show that these properties arise because of epsilon-near-zero conditions in SHMs. The thermal emission is dominated by the epsilon-near-zero effect in the doped quantum wells composing the SHM. Furthermore, different properties are observed for s and p polarizations, following the characteristics of the strong anisotropy of hyperbolic metamaterials.

  3. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopori, Bhushan L.; Hambarian, Artak

    2008-09-02

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  4. Statistical analysis of ocular monochromatic aberrations in Chinese population for adaptive optics ophthalmoscope design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlei Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to know the distribution of the Chinese eye’s aberrations in clinical environment to guide high-resolution retinal imaging system design for large Chinese population application. We collected the monochromatic wave aberration of 332 healthy eyes and 344 diseased eyes in Chinese population across a 6.0-mm pupil. The aberration statistics of Chinese eyes including healthy eyes and diseased eyes were analyzed, and some differences of aberrations between the Chinese and European race were concluded. On this basis, the requirement for adaptive optics (AO correction of the Chinese eye’s monochromatic aberrations was analyzed. The result showed that a stroke of 20μm and ability to correct aberrations up to the 8th Zernike order were needed for reflective wavefront correctors to achieve near diffraction-limited imaging in both groups for a reference wavelength of 550nm and a pupil diameter of 6.0mm. To verify the analysis mentioned above, an AO flood-illumination system was established, and high-resolution retinal imaging in vivo was achieved for Chinese eye including both healthy and diseased eyes.

  5. Dual-energy tissue cancellation in mammography with quasi-monochromatic x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziani, M; Taibi, A; Tuffanelli, A; Gambaccini, M

    2002-01-21

    Dual-energy radiography has not evolved into a routine clinical examination yet due to intrinsic limitations of both dual-kVp imaging and single-exposure imaging with conventional x-ray sources. The recent introduction of novel quasi-monochromatic x-ray sources and detectors could lead to interesting improvements, especially in mammography where the complex structure of healthy tissues often masks the detectability of lesions. A dual-energy radiography technique based on a tissue cancellation algorithm has been developed for mammography, with the aim of maximizing the low intrinsic contrast of pathologic tissues while being able to minimize or cancel the contrast between glandular and fat tissues. Several images of a plastic test object containing various tissue equivalent inserts were acquired in the energy range 17-36 keV using a quasi-monochromatic x-ray source and a scintillator-coated CCD detector. Images acquired at high and low energies were nonlinearly combined to generate two energy-independent basis images. Suitable linear combinations of these two basis images result in the elimination of the contrast of a given material with respect to another. This makes it possible to selectively cancel certain details in the processed image.

  6. Frequency-locked pulse sequencer for high-frame-rate monochromatic tissue motion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azar, Reza Zahiri; Baghani, Ali; Salcudean, Septimiu E; Rohling, Robert

    2011-04-01

    To overcome the inherent low frame rate of conventional ultrasound, we have previously presented a system that can be implemented on conventional ultrasound scanners for high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic tissue motion. The system employs a sector subdivision technique in the sequencer to increase the acquisition rate. To eliminate the delays introduced during data acquisition, a motion phase correction algorithm has also been introduced to create in-phase displacement images. Previous experimental results from tissue- mimicking phantoms showed that the system can achieve effective frame rates of up to a few kilohertz on conventional ultrasound systems. In this short communication, we present a new pulse sequencing strategy that facilitates high-frame-rate imaging of monochromatic motion such that the acquired echo signals are inherently in-phase. The sequencer uses the knowledge of the excitation frequency to synchronize the acquisition of the entire imaging plane to that of an external exciter. This sequencing approach eliminates any need for synchronization or phase correction and has applications in tissue elastography, which we demonstrate with tissue-mimicking phantoms.

  7. Constraining the monochromatic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation by the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Arman; Khatibi, Sara; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba

    2017-07-01

    The installation of forward detectors in CMS and ATLAS turn the LHC into an effective photon-photon collider. The elastic scattering of the beam protons via the emission of photons, which can be identified by tagging the intact protons in the forward detectors, provides a powerful diagnostic of the central production of new particles through photon-photon annihilation. In this paper we study the central production of dark matter particles and the potential of the LHC to constrain the cross section of this process. By virtue of the crossing symmetry, this limit can immediately be used to constrain the production of monochromatic gamma rays in dark matter annihilation, a smoking gun signal under investigation in indirect dark matter searches. We show that with the integrated luminosity L =30 fb-1 in the LHC at center-of-mass energy √{s }=13 TeV , for dark matter masses ˜(50 - 600 ) GeV , a model-independent constraint on the cross section of dark matter annihilation to monochromatic gamma rays at the same order of magnitude as the current Fermi-LAT and the future limits from CTA can be obtained.

  8. Rod and Rod-driven Function in Achromatopsia and Blue Cone Monochromatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Anne; Hansen, Ronald M.; Akula, James D.; Eklund, Susan E.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate rod photoreceptor and postreceptor retinal function in pediatric patients with achromatopsia (ACHR) and blue cone monochromatism (BCM) using contemporary electroretinographic (ERG) procedures. Methods Fifteen patients (age 1 to 20 years) with ACHR and six patients (age 4 to 22 years) with BCM were studied. ERG responses to full-field stimuli were obtained in scotopic and photopic conditions. Rod photoreceptor (Srod, Rrod) and rod-driven postreceptor (log σ, Vmax) response parameters were calculated from the a-wave and b-wave. The ERG records were digitally filtered to demonstrate the oscillatory potentials (OPs); a sensitivity parameter, log SOPA1/2, and an amplitude parameter, SOPAmax, were used to characterize the OP response. Response parameters were compared to those of 12 normal control subjects. Results As expected, photopic responses were non-detectable in patients with ACHR and BCM. In addition, mean scotopic photoreceptor (Rrod) and postreceptor (Vmax and SOPAmax) amplitude parameters were significantly reduced compared to those in normal controls. The flash intensity required to evoke a half maximum b-wave amplitude (log σ) was significantly increased. Conclusions The results of this study provide evidence that deficits in rod and rod mediated function occur in the primary cone dysfunction syndromes, achromatopsia and blue cone monochromatism. PMID:18824728

  9. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterhold, K; Bech, M; Schleede, S; Potdevin, G; Ruth, R; Loewen, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered.

  10. Constraining the monochromatic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation by the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Esmaili, Arman; Najafabadi, Mojtaba Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    The installation of forward detectors in CMS and ATLAS turn the LHC to an effective photon-photon collider. The elastic scattering of the beam-protons via the emission of photons, which can be identified by tagging the intact protons in the forward detectors, provides a powerful diagnostic of the central production of new particles through photon-photon annihilation. In this letter we study the central production of dark matter particles and the potential of LHC to constrain the cross section of this process. By virtue of the crossing symmetry, this limit can immediately be used to constrain the production of monochromatic gamma-rays in dark matter annihilation, a smoking gun signal under investigation in indirect dark matter searches. We show that with the integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}=30~{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ in LHC at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV, for dark matter masses $\\sim (50-600)$ GeV, a model-independent constraint on the cross section of dark matter annihilation to monochromatic gamma-rays...

  11. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  12. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  13. A New FRET-Based Sensitive DNA Sensor for Medical Diagnostics using PNA Probe and Water-Soluble Blue Light Emitting Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mathur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A reliable, fast, and low-cost biosensor for medical diagnostics using DNA sequence detection has been developed and tested for the detection of the bacterium “Bacillus anthracis.” In this sensor, Poly [9,9-di (6,6′- N, N′ trimethylammonium hexylfluorenyl-2, 7-diyl-alt-co- (1,4-phenylene] dibromide salt (PFP has been taken as cationic conjugated polymer (CCP and PNA attached with fluorescein dye (PNAC∗ as a probe. The basic principle of this sensor is that when a PNAC∗ probe is hybridized with a single strand DNA (ssDNA having complementary sequence, Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET may take place from PFP to the PNAC∗/DNA complex. If the FRET is efficient, the photoluminescence from the PFP will be highly quenched and that from PNAC∗ will be enhanced. On the other hand, if the DNA sequence is noncomplementary to PNA, FRET will not occur.

  14. Skin Treatment with Pulsed Monochromatic UVA1 355 Device and Computerized Morphometric Analysis of Histochemically Identified Langerhans Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Zerbinati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent or metal halide lamps are widely used in therapeutic applications in dermatological diseases, with broadband or narrow band emission UVA/UVA1 (320–400 nm obtained with suitable passive filters. Recently, it has been possible for us to use a new machine provided with solid state source emitting pulsed monochromatic UVA1 355 nm. In order to evaluate the effects of this emission on immunocells of the skin, human skin samples were irradiated with monochromatic 355 nm UVA1 with different energetic fluences and after irradiation Langerhans cells were labeled with CD1a antibodies. The immunohistochemical identification of these cells permitted evaluating their modifications in terms of density into the skin. Obtained results are promising for therapeutical applications, also considering that a monochromatic radiation minimizes thermic load and DNA damage in the skin tissues.

  15. Dose-dependent collagen cross-linking of rabbit scleral tissue by blue light and riboflavin treatment probed by dynamic shear rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuldt, Carsten; Karl, Anett; Körber, Nicole; Koch, Christian; Liu, Qing; Fritsch, Anatol W; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Käs, Josef A; Francke, Mike; Iseli, Hans Peter

    2015-08-01

    To determine the visco-elastic properties of isolated rabbit scleral tissue and dose-dependent biomechanical and morphological changes after collagen cross-linking by riboflavin/blue light treatment. Scleral patches from 87 adult albino rabbit eyes were examined by dynamic shear rheology. Scleral patches were treated by riboflavin and different intensities of blue light (450 nm), and the impact on the visco-elastic properties was determined by various rheological test regimes. The relative elastic modulus was calculated from non-treated and corresponding treated scleral patches, and treatments with different blue light intensities were compared. Shear rheology enables us to study the material properties of scleral tissue within physiological relevant parameters. Cross-linking treatment increased the viscous as well as the elastic modulus and changed the ratio of the elastic versus viscous proportion in scleral tissue. Constant riboflavin application combined with different blue light intensities from 12 mW/cm(2) up to 100 mW/cm(2) increased the relative elastic modulus of scleral tissue by factors up to 1.8. Further enhancement of the applied light intensity caused a decline of the relative elastic modulus. This might be due to destructive changes of the collagen bundle structure at larger light intensities, as observed by histological examination. Collagen cross-linking by riboflavin/blue light application increases the biomechanical stiffness of the sclera in a dose-dependent manner up to certain light intensities. Therefore, this treatment might be a suitable therapeutic approach to stabilize the biomechanical properties of scleral tissue in cases of pathological eye expansion. © 2014 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  17. Probing the constancy of the speed of light with future galaxy survey: the case of SKA, Euclid, and WFIRST-2.4

    CERN Document Server

    Salzano, Vincenzo; Lazkoz, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    In [1] a new method to measure the speed of light through Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) was introduced. Here, we describe in much more detail the theoretical basis of that method, its implementation, and give some newly updated results about its application to the forecast data. In particular, we will show that SKA will be able to detect a 1% variation (if any) in the speed of light at 3$\\sigma$ level. Smaller signals will be hardly detected by already-planned future galaxy surveys, but we give indications about what sensitivity requirements should a survey ful?ll in order to be successful.

  18. Computational study of nonlinear plasma waves: 1: Simulation model and monochromatic wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matda, Y.; Crawford, F. W.

    1974-01-01

    An economical low noise plasma simulation model is applied to a series of problems associated with electrostatic wave propagation in a one-dimensional, collisionless, Maxwellian plasma, in the absence of magnetic field. The model is described and tested, first in the absence of an applied signal, and then with a small amplitude perturbation, to establish the low noise features and to verify the theoretical linear dispersion relation at wave energy levels as low as 0.000,001 of the plasma thermal energy. The method is then used to study propagation of an essentially monochromatic plane wave. Results on amplitude oscillation and nonlinear frequency shift are compared with available theories. The additional phenomena of sideband instability and satellite growth, stimulated by large amplitude wave propagation and the resulting particle trapping, are described.

  19. Energy dependence of CP-violation reach for monochromatic neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, Jose [IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Espinoza, Catalina [IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.catalina.espinoza@uv.es

    2008-06-26

    The ultimate goal of future neutrino facilities is the determination of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. Besides |U(e3)|{ne}0, this will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: (I) {gamma}=90 and {gamma}=195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; (II) {gamma}=195 and {gamma}=440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is important to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline.

  20. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, G N; Burdiak, G C; Suttle, L; Stuart, N H; Swadling, G F; Lebedev, S V; Smith, R A; Patankar, S; Suzuki-Vidal, F; de Grouchy, P; Harvey-Thompson, A J; Bennett, M; Bland, S N; Pickworth, L; Skidmore, J

    2014-11-01

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  1. X-ray Absorption Imaging of High-Intensity Discharge Lamps Using Monochromatic Synchrotron Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, John J.; Sansonetti, Craig J.; Hechtfischer, Ulrich; Adler, Helmar G.

    2002-10-01

    We will report results from the imaging of Hg vapor in high-intensity discharge lamps using synchrotron radiation and digital detectors. These measurements extend previous work on x-ray absorption imaging in arc lamps using an x-ray tube and a passive phosphor image plate detector^i. The large x-ray flux obtained from the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne National Laboratory) combined with the electronic gating capabilities of an intensified charge-coupled device detector have allowed us to obtain time-resolved Hg distributions with high spatial resolution. Monochromatic synchrotron radiation improves the accuracy over what can be obtained with quasi-continuum radiation from an x-ray tube source. ^iJ. J. Curry, M. Sakai, and J. E. Lawler, Journal of Applied Physics 84, 3066 (1998).

  2. Monochromatic radiography of high energy density physics experiments on the MAGPIE generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: gareth.hall@imperial.ac.uk; Burdiak, G. C.; Suttle, L.; Stuart, N. H.; Swadling, G. F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Smith, R. A.; Patankar, S.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Grouchy, P. de; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Bennett, M.; Bland, S. N.; Pickworth, L.; Skidmore, J. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    A monochromatic X-ray backlighter based on Bragg reflection from a spherically bent quartz crystal has been developed for the MAGPIE pulsed power generator at Imperial College (1.4 MA, 240 ns) [I. H. Mitchell et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 67, 1533 (2005)]. This instrument has been used to diagnose high energy density physics experiments with 1.865 keV radiation (Silicon He-α) from a laser plasma source driven by a ∼7 J, 1 ns pulse from the Cerberus laser. The design of the diagnostic, its characterisation and performance, and initial results in which the instrument was used to radiograph a shock physics experiment on MAGPIE are discussed.

  3. Parametric decay of a parallel propagating monochromatic whistler wave: Particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yangguang; Gao, Xinliang; Lu, Quanming; Wang, Shui

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, by using one-dimensional (1-D) particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the parametric decay of a parallel propagating monochromatic whistler wave with various wave frequencies and amplitudes. The pump whistler wave can decay into a backscattered daughter whistler wave and an ion acoustic wave, and the decay instability grows more rapidly with the increase of the frequency or amplitude. When the frequency or amplitude is sufficiently large, a multiple decay process may occur, where the daughter whistler wave undergoes a secondary decay into an ion acoustic wave and a forward propagating whistler wave. We also find that during the parametric decay a considerable part of protons can be accelerated along the background magnetic field by the enhanced ion acoustic wave through the Landau resonance. The implication of the parametric decay to the evolution of whistler waves in Earth's magnetosphere is also discussed in the paper.

  4. Statistical analysis of monochromatic whistler waves near the Moon detected by Kaguya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Katoh

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Observations are presented of monochromatic whistler waves near the Moon detected by the Lunar Magnetometer (LMAG on board Kaguya. The waves were observed as narrowband magnetic fluctuations with frequencies close to 1 Hz, and were mostly left-hand polarized in the spacecraft frame. We performed a statistical analysis of the waves to identify the distributions of their intensity and occurrence. The results indicate that the waves were generated by the solar wind interaction with lunar crustal magnetic anomalies. The conditions for observation of the waves strongly depend on the solar zenith angle (SZA, and a high occurrence rate is recognized in the region of SZA between 40° to 90° with remarkable north-south and dawn-dusk asymmetries. We suggest that ion beams reflected by the lunar magnetic anomalies are a possible source of the waves.

  5. Non-destructive characterization of minerals in ancient Greek ceramics using monochromatic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siouris, I M [Department of Production and Management Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace Xanthi, 67100 Xanthis (Greece); Department of Informatics and Communication, Technological and Educational, Institute of Serres, SimLab, 62124 Serres (Greece)], E-mail: jsiou@pme.duth.gr

    2008-03-12

    A collection of ancient Greek ceramic pieces originating from different excavations from Neos Scopos, Serres, in the North East of Greece has been studied at room temperature by means of non-destructive neutron diffraction using a monochromatic beam. Quantitative phase analyses revealed different compositions of the mineral fractions present, but a general similarity of the main materials is still recognizable. It is shown that the observed variations are partly due to the experimental set-up and they can be remedied by taking a sufficient number of measurements for different sample orientations while bathing the entire object in the beam. An additional reason for the observed anomaly in the mineral phase compositions may be the different heat treatments to which the mixtures of clays/pastes was subjected as well as the postproduction environmental conditions for the selected samples. The firing temperatures were estimated to be in the range of 850-1000 deg. C.

  6. Train of high-power femtosecond pulses: Probe wave in a gas of prepared atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradyan, Gevorg; Muradyan, Atom Zh.

    2009-09-01

    We present a method for generating a regular train of ultrashort optical pulses in a prepared two-level medium. The train develops from incident monochromatic probe radiation traveling in a medium of atoms, which are in a quantum mechanical superposition of dressed internal states. In the frame of linear theory for the probe radiation, the energy of individual pulses is an exponentially growing function of atom density and of interaction cross section. Pulse repetition rate is determined by the pump field’s generalized Rabi frequency and can be around 1 THz and greater. We also show that the terms, extra to the dipole approximation, endow the gas by a new property: nonsaturating dependence of refractive index on dressing monochromatic field intensity. Contribution of these nonsaturating terms can be compatible with the main dipole approximation term contribution in the wavelength region of about ten micrometers (the range of CO2 laser) or larger.

  7. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    CERN Document Server

    Hara, Hidetake; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Abe, Shinji; Satoh, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize acute-stage cerebral infarction by applying virtual monochromatic images to this phantom using dual-energy CT (DECT). Virtual monochromatic images were created using DECT from 40 to 100 keV at every 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV at every 1 keV, under three energy conditions of tube voltages with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created energy images. Therefore, optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  8. Electron Spin Resonance of Single Crystals of Cystine Dihydrochloride Irradiated with Monochromatic UV Radiation at Various Wavelenghts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, E.; Nielsen, S. O.

    1972-01-01

    Single crystals of cystine dihydrochloride were irradiated at room temperature with monochromatic uv radiation. The optical bandwidth was about 20 Å for each wavelength used. Essentially two ESR centers were observed, the relative yield being approximately 1. One center is identified as the RS...

  9. Virtual monochromatic imaging in dual-source and dual-energy CT for visualization of acute ischemic stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hidetake; Muraishi, Hiroshi; Matsuzawa, Hiroki; Inoue, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Yasuo; Satoh, Hitoshi; Abe, Shinji

    2015-07-01

    We have recently developed a phantom that simulates acute ischemic stroke. We attempted to visualize an acute-stage cerebral infarction by using dual-energy Computed tomography (DECT) to obtain virtual monochromatic images of this phantom. Virtual monochromatic images were created by using DECT voltages from 40 to 100 keV in steps of 10 keV and from 60 to 80 keV in steps of 1 keV, under three conditions of the tube voltage with thin (Sn) filters. Calculation of the CNR values allowed us to evaluate the visualization of acute-stage cerebral infarction. The CNR value of a virtual monochromatic image was the highest at 68 keV under 80 kV / Sn 140 kV, at 72 keV under 100 kV / Sn 140 kV, and at 67 keV under 140 kV / 80 kV. The CNR values of virtual monochromatic images at voltages between 65 and 75 keV were significantly higher than those obtained for all other created images. Therefore, the optimal conditions for visualizing acute ischemic stroke were achievable.

  10. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... in a photo-sensitive film illuminated with the probes, and it is confirmed that the radiated optical field is unambigiously confined only for the coated probe. Near-field optical imaging of a standing evanescent-wave pattern is used to compare the detection characteristics of the probes, and it is concluded...... that, for the imaging of optical-field intensity distributions containing predominantly evanescent-wave components, a sharp uncoated tip is the probe of choice. Complementary results obtained with optical phase-conjugation experiments with he uncoated probes are discussed in relation to the probe...

  11. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  12. Developing a new supplemental lighting device with ultra-bright white LED for vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongguang; Li, Pingping; Jiang, Jianghai

    2007-02-01

    It has been proved that monochromatic or compound light-emitting diode (LED) or laser diode (LD) can promote the photosynthesis of horticultural crops, but the promotion of polychromatic light like white LED is unclear. A new type of ultra-bright white LED (LUW56843, InGaN, \

  13. Mobile probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed to in an inter......A project investigating the effectiveness of a collection of online resources for teachers' professional development used mobile probes as a data collection method. Teachers received questions and tasks on their mobile in a dialogic manner while in their everyday context as opposed...... to in an interview. This method provided valuable insight into the contextual use, i.e. how did the online resource transfer to the work practice. However, the research team also found that mobile probes may provide the scaffolding necessary for individual and peer learning at a very local (intra-school) community...... level. This paper is an initial investigation of how the mobile probes process proved to engage teachers in their efforts to improve teaching. It also highlights some of the barriers emerging when applying mobile probes as a scaffold for learning....

  14. Photonics at the frontiers. Generation of few-cycle light pulses via NOPCPA and real-time probing of charge transfer in hybrid photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Daniel

    2011-11-11

    In the first part of this thesis the methodics of the non-collinear, optically parametric amplification of chirped light pulses (NOPCPA) for the generation of few-cycle light pulses in the visible (Vis) and near infrared (NIR) with of 5-8 fs half-width are essential further developed. Fundamental parametric influences, like the existence of a parametrically induced phase and the generation of optically parametric fluorescence (OPF), are studied both by theoretical analyses and numerical simulations and by concrete experiments. Experimentally in the framework of this thesis fwe-cycle light pulses with a pulse width of 7.9 fs, 130 mJ energy, at 805 nm central wavelength and a very high seed-pulse-limited prepulse contrast of 11 and 8 orders of magnitude are reached at 30 ps and approximately 3 ps. One the one hand it has been succeeded to accelerate with the broad-band pulse amplifier quasi-monoenergetic electrons with energies of up to 50 MeV. For this the light pulse is focussed to relativistic intensities of several W/cm{sup 2} in a helium gas jet. On the other hand XUV light was produced up to the 20th harmonic of the generated light pulse from the broad-band pulse amplifier by its sub-cycle interaction with solid surfaces. In the framework of this thesis furthermore new, extended concepts for still broader-band NOPCPA over one octave were developed and characterized, which contain the application of two pump pulses in one NOPCPA stage and the application of two different pump wavelength in two subsequent NOPCPA stages. In the second part of this thesis broad-band white-light spectra and by means of NOPCPA spectrally tunable light pulses are applied in order to realize a transient absorption spectrometer with multichannel detection. This new excitation-query construction combines a very broad-band UV-Vis-NIR query with a high time resolution of 40 fs and high sensitivity for the transient change of the optical density of less than 10{sup -4}. By this it has in

  15. Monte Carlo simulations incorporating Mie calculations of light transport in tissue phantoms: Examination of photon sampling volumes for endoscopically compatible fiber optic probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mourant, J.R.; Hielscher, A.H.; Bigio, I.J.

    1996-04-01

    Details of the interaction of photons with tissue phantoms are elucidated using Monte Carlo simulations. In particular, photon sampling volumes and photon pathlengths are determined for a variety of scattering and absorption parameters. The Monte Carlo simulations are specifically designed to model light delivery and collection geometries relevant to clinical applications of optical biopsy techniques. The Monte Carlo simulations assume that light is delivered and collected by two, nearly-adjacent optical fibers and take into account the numerical aperture of the fibers as well as reflectance and refraction at interfaces between different media. To determine the validity of the Monte Carlo simulations for modeling the interactions between the photons and the tissue phantom in these geometries, the simulations were compared to measurements of aqueous suspensions of polystyrene microspheres in the wavelength range 450-750 nm.

  16. SU-E-I-40: Phantom Research On Monochromatic Images Taken by Dual CBCT with Multiple Energy Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, H [Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, Y [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Mao, R [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Ren, L; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of monochromatic images at the same virtual monochromatic energy using dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with either kV/kV or MV/kV or MV/MV energy sets. Methods: CT images of Catphan 504 phantom were acquired using four different KV and MV settings: 80kV, 140kV, 4MV, 6MV. Three sets of monochromatic images were calculated: 80kV-140kV, 140kV-4MV and 4MV-6MV. Each set of CBCT images were reconstructed from the same selected virtual monochromatic energy of 1MeV. Contrast-to-Noise Ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared between each pair of images with different energy sets. Results: Between kV/MV and MV/MV images, the CNRs are comparable for all inserts. However, differences of CNRs were observed between the kV/kV and kV/MV images. Delrin’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 1.634. LDPE’s (Low-Density Polyethylene) CNR ratio between kV/kV and kV/MV images is 0.509. Polystyrene’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 2.219. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicated that the CNRs calculated from CBCT images reconstructed from either kV/MV projections or MV/MV projections for the same selected virtual monochromatic energy may be comparable.

  17. Probing the Effects of Templating on the UV and Visible Light Photocatalytic Activity of Porous Nitrogen-Modified Titania Monoliths for Dye Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nursam, Natalita M; Wang, Xingdong; Tan, Jeannie Z Y; Caruso, Rachel A

    2016-07-13

    Porous nitrogen-modified titania (N-titania) monoliths with tailored morphologies were prepared using phase separation and agarose gel templating techniques. The doping and templating process were simultaneously carried out in a one-pot step using alcohol amine-assisted sol-gel chemistry. The amount of polymer used in the monoliths that were prepared using phase separation was shown to affect both the physical and optical properties: higher poly(ethylene glycol) content increased the specific surface area, porosity, and visible light absorption of the final materials. For the agarose-templated monoliths, the infiltration conditions affected the monolith morphology. A porous monolith with high surface area and the least shrinkage was obtained when the N containing alkoxide precursor was infiltrated into the agarose scaffolds at 60 °C. The effect of the diverse porous morphologies on the photocatalytic activity of N-titania was studied for the decomposition of methylene blue (MB) under visible and UV light irradiation. The highest visible light activity was achieved by the agarose-templated N-titania monolith, in part due to higher N incorporation. This sample also showed better UV activity, partly because of the higher specific surface area (up to 112 m(2) g(-1)) compared to the phase separation-induced monoliths (up to 103 m(2) g(-1)). Overall, agarose-templated, porous N-titania monoliths provided better features for effectively removing the MB contaminant.

  18. Green light drives leaf photosynthesis more efficiently than red light in strong white light: revisiting the enigmatic question of why leaves are green.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashima, Ichiro; Fujita, Takashi; Inoue, Takeshi; Chow, Wah Soon; Oguchi, Riichi

    2009-04-01

    The literature and our present examinations indicate that the intra-leaf light absorption profile is in most cases steeper than the photosynthetic capacity profile. In strong white light, therefore, the quantum yield of photosynthesis would be lower in the upper chloroplasts, located near the illuminated surface, than that in the lower chloroplasts. Because green light can penetrate further into the leaf than red or blue light, in strong white light, any additional green light absorbed by the lower chloroplasts would increase leaf photosynthesis to a greater extent than would additional red or blue light. Based on the assessment of effects of the additional monochromatic light on leaf photosynthesis, we developed the differential quantum yield method that quantifies efficiency of any monochromatic light in white light. Application of this method to sunflower leaves clearly showed that, in moderate to strong white light, green light drove photosynthesis more effectively than red light. The green leaf should have a considerable volume of chloroplasts to accommodate the inefficient carboxylation enzyme, Rubisco, and deliver appropriate light to all the chloroplasts. By using chlorophylls that absorb green light weakly, modifying mesophyll structure and adjusting the Rubisco/chlorophyll ratio, the leaf appears to satisfy two somewhat conflicting requirements: to increase the absorptance of photosynthetically active radiation, and to drive photosynthesis efficiently in all the chloroplasts. We also discuss some serious problems that are caused by neglecting these intra-leaf profiles when estimating whole leaf electron transport rates and assessing photoinhibition by fluorescence techniques.

  19. A Probe into Senior High School English Vocabulary Teaching in the Light of New Curriculum Standard%探究新课标下的高中英语词汇教学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟广志

    2012-01-01

    词汇教学是英语教学的重要内容。教师应继承和发扬传统的行之有效的词汇教学方法和经验,同时积极探索新课程理念下提高词汇教学效率的方法和策略,使学生在掌握英语词汇的同时提高运用英语的能力。%Vocabulary teaching is an important content in English teaching. Teachers should inherit and develop traditional and effective vocabulary teaching methods and experience, and actively probe into methods and strategies for improving vocabulary teaching effect in the light of new curriculum idea, so that students can improve English applying ability while grasping English vocabulary.

  20. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  1. A best-case probe, light source, and database for H2O absorption thermometry to 2100 K and 50 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittelle, Mack S.

    This work aspired to improve the ability of forthcoming researchers to utilize near IR H2O absorption spectroscopy for thermometry with development of three best-case techniques: the design of novel high temperature sapphire optical access probes, the construction of a fixed-wavelength H 2O absorption spectroscopy system enhanced by an on-board external-cavity diode laser, and the creation of an architecture for a high-temperature and -pressure H2O absorption cross-section database. Each area's main goal was to realize the best-case for direct absorption spectroscopy H2O vapor thermometry at combustion conditions. Optical access to combustion devices is explored through the design and implementation of two versions of novel high-temperature (2000 K) sapphire immersion probes (HTSIPs) for use in ambient flames and gas turbine combustors. The development and evaluation of a fixed wavelength H2O absorption spectroscopy (FWAS) system that is demonstrates how the ECDL allows the system to operate in multiple modes that enhance FWAS measurement accuracy by improving wavelength position monitoring, and reducing non-absorption based contamination in spectral scans. The architecture of a high temperature (21000 K) and pressure (50 bar) database (HTPD) is developed that can enhance absorption spectroscopy based thermometry. The HTPD formation is developed by the evaluation of two approaches, a line-by-line (LBL) approach, where transition lineshape parameters are extracted from spectra and used along with a physics based model to allow the simulation of spectra over a wide range of temperatures and pressures, or an absorption cross-section (sigmaabs) approach, where spectra generated from a high temperature and pressure furnace are catalog spectra at various conditions forming a database of absorption cross-sections that is then interpolated to provide a simulated absorbance spectra based on measured reference grade spectra. Utilizing near future reference grade H2O

  2. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  3. 探究电视机无光故障的检修%Probe into the maintenance of television's no light fault

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵晖

    2016-01-01

    电视机无光故障维修,对电视机维修人员要求相对较高,除了要具备电视机无光故障维修的理论知识,同时还要熟练的掌握维修操作基本技能。对维修中经常出现的问题要进行了解,还要保障维修时候的合理性,更好的提高维修技术。对电视机可调元件的处理和建立维修条件等几个方面的注意点,为今后的电视机维修提供一些参考与帮助。%The television without light fault maintenance,the television maintenance personnel is relatively high,in addition to have the theory of knowledge of the maintenance of the television without light fault,but also familiar with the basic skills of the maintenance operation.The attention of several aspects of the processing of the components of the TV set and the establishment of maintenance conditions, to provide some reference and help for the future TV repair.

  4. Designing display primaries with currently available light sources for UHDTV wide-gamut system colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaoka, Kenichiro; Nishida, Yukihiro; Sugawara, Masayuki

    2014-08-11

    The wide-gamut system colorimetry has been standardized for ultra-high definition television (UHDTV). The chromaticities of the primaries are designed to lie on the spectral locus to cover major standard system colorimetries and real object colors. Although monochromatic light sources are required for a display to perfectly fulfill the system colorimetry, highly saturated emission colors using recent quantum dot technology may effectively achieve the wide gamut. This paper presents simulation results on the chromaticities of highly saturated non-monochromatic light sources and gamut coverage of real object colors to be considered in designing wide-gamut displays with color filters for the UHDTV.

  5. Evaluation of light scattering and absorption properties ofin vivorat liver using a single-reflectance fiber probe during preischemia, ischemia-reperfusion, and postmortem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akter, Sharmin; Maejima, Satoshi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Sato, Shunichi; Hinoki, Akinari; Aosasa, Suefumi; Yamamoto, Junji; Nishidate, Izumi

    2015-07-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) has been extensively used for characterization of biological tissues as a noninvasive optical technique to evaluate the optical properties of tissue. We investigated a method for evaluating the reduced scattering coefficient , the absorption coefficient μa, the tissue oxygen saturation StO2, and the reduction of heme aa3 in cytochrome c oxidase CcO of in vivo liver tissue using a single-reflectance fiber probe with two source-collector geometries. We performed in vivo recordings of diffuse reflectance spectra for exposed rat liver during the ischemia-reperfusion induced by the hepatic portal (hepatic artery, portal vein, and bile duct) occlusion. The time courses of μa at 500, 530, 570, and 584 nm indicated the hemodynamic change in liver tissue as well as StO2. Significant increase in μa(605)/μa(620) during ischemia and after euthanasia induced by nitrogen breathing was observed, which indicates the reduction of heme aa3, representing a sign of mitochondrial energy failure. The time courses of at 500, 530, 570, and 584 nm were well correlated with those of μa, which also reflect the scattering by red blood cells. On the other hand, at 700 and 800 nm, a temporary increase in and an irreversible decrease in were observed during ischemia-reperfusion and after euthanasia induced by nitrogen breathing, respectively. The change in in the near-infrared wavelength region during ischemia is indicative of the morphological changes in the cellular and subcellular structures induced by the ischemia, whereas that after euthanasia implies the hepatocyte vacuolation. The results of the present study indicate the potential application of the current DRS system for evaluating the pathophysiological conditions of in vivo liver tissue.

  6. First correlated measurements of the shape and light scattering properties of cloud particles using the new Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering (PHIPS probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdelmonem

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds requires knowledge of the relationship between their microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles. Usually, this relationship is obtained by modeling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. We present here a novel optical sensor (the Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe, PHIPS designed to measure simultaneously the 3-D morphology and the corresponding optical and microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles. Clouds containing particles ranging from a few micrometers to about 800 μm diameter in size can be characterized systematically with an optical resolution power of 2 μm and polar scattering resolution of 1° for forward scattering directions (from 1° to 10° and 8° for side and backscattering directions (from 18° to 170°. The maximum acquisition rates for scattering phase functions and images are 262 KHz and 10 Hz, respectively. Some preliminary results collected in two ice cloud campaigns conducted in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber are presented. PHIPS showed reliability in operation and produced size distributions and images comparable to those given by other certified cloud particles instruments. A 3-D model of a hexagonal ice plate is constructed and the corresponding scattering phase function is compared to that modeled using the Ray Tracing with Diffraction on Facets (RTDF program. PHIPS is a highly promising novel airborne optical sensor for studying the radiative impact of cirrus clouds and correlating the particle habit-scattering properties which will serve as a reference for other single, or multi-independent, measurement instruments.

  7. Immobilized Multifunctional Polymersomes on Solid Surfaces: Infrared Light-Induced Selective Photochemical Reactions, pH Responsive Behavior, and Probing Mechanical Properties under Liquid Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyisan, Banu; Janke, Andreas; Reichenbach, Philipp; Eng, Lukas M; Appelhans, Dietmar; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-06-22

    Fixing polymersomes onto surfaces is in high demand not only for the characterization with advanced microscopy techniques but also for designing specific compartments in microsystem devices in the scope of nanobiotechnology. For this purpose, this study reports the immobilization of multifunctional, responsive, and photo-cross-linked polymersomes on solid substrates by utilizing strong adamantane-β-cyclodextrin host-guest interactions. To reduce nonspecific binding and retain better spherical shape, the level of attractive forces acting on the immobilized polymersomes was tuned through poly(ethylene glycol) passivation as well as decreased β-cyclodextrin content on the corresponding substrates. One significant feature of this system is the pH responsivity of the polymersomes which has been demonstrated by swelling of the immobilized vesicles at acidic condition through in situ AFM measurements. Also, light responsivity has been provided by introducing nitroveratryloxycarbonyl (NVOC) protected amine molecules as photocleavable groups to the polymersome surface before immobilization. The subsequent low-energy femtosecond pulsed laser irradiation resulted in the cleavage of NVOC groups on immobilized polymersomes which in turn led to free amino groups as an additional functionality. The freed amines were further conjugated with a fluorescent dye having an activated ester that illustrates the concept of bio/chemo recognition for a potential binding of biological compounds. In addition to the responsive nature, the mechanical stability of the analyzed polymersomes was supported by computing Young's modulus and bending modulus of the membrane through force curves obtained by atomic force microscopy measurements. Overall, polymersomes with a robust and pH-swellable membrane combined with effective light responsive behavior are promising tools to design smart and stable compartments on surfaces for the development of microsystem devices such as chemo/biosensors.

  8. Light-dependent magnetoreception in birds: the effect of intensity of 565-nm green light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, W.; Wiltschko, R.; Munro, U.

    In a previous study, Australian silvereyes tested in autumn under monochromatic 565-nm green light at intensities of 2.1 and 7.5mWm-2 preferred their normal northerly migratory direction, whereas they showed a significantly different tendency towards northwest at 15.0mWm-2. Repeating these experiments in spring with silvereyes migrating southward, we again observed well-oriented tendencies in the migratory direction at 2.1 and 7.5mWm-2. At 15.0mWm-2, however, the birds once more preferred northwesterly directions, i.e. their response under this condition proved to be independent of the migratory direction. This contradicts the interpretation that monochromatic green light of this high intensity leads to a rotation of compass information; instead, it appears to produce sensory input that causes birds to give up their migratory direction in favor of a fixed direction of as yet unknown origin.

  9. Visible light emitting Ln{sup 3+} ion (Ln=Sm, Eu and Dy) as a structural probe: A case study with SrZrO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Santosh K., E-mail: santufrnd@gmail.com [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India); Yadav, A.K.; Bhattacharya, D.; Jha, S.N. [Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Natarajan, V. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (India)

    2015-08-15

    Undoped and various rare earth ion doped SrZrO{sub 3} (SZO) perovskite based phosphors have been synthesized using the gel-combustion technique employing citric acid as a fuel. The phase purity of the sample is confirmed by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. It was observed that average particle size of perovskite particle was around 100 nm. In order to probe the local structure and symmetry around lanthanide ions in SrZrO{sub 3}, detailed experimental investigation has been carried out. X-ray absorption near edge fine (XANES) measurements along with their respective emission spectroscopy confirm that on doping lanthanide ion; in cases they were found to get stabilized as trivalent species. Extensive time resolved emission spectroscopy (TRES) on doped samples shows that on doping Sm{sup 3+} in SZO; an efficient energy transfer takes place and Sm{sup 3+} ions are localized both in Sr and Zr positions of SZO. PL decay time shows the presence of two life time values in case of nanocrystalline SrZrO{sub 3}:Sm{sup 3+}: (i) Sm{sup 3+} at Zr{sup 4+} site (τ=500 µs) and (ii) Sm{sup 3+} at Sr{sup 2+} site (τ=1.2 ms) in the ratio of 3:1. Based on TRES for europium doped sample, it was inferred that, two different types of Eu{sup 3+} ions were present in the SZO matrix. The first type was a long lived species present at relatively higher symmetric site of 'Sr{sup 2+}' and the second was a short lived species present at relatively lower symmetric 'Zr{sup 4+}' site which gets selectively excited at 296 nm. Dysprosium ion specifically occupies Zr{sup 4+} site only in SZO. EXAFS studies supported the TRES results. - Highlights: • Site occupancy of lanthanide. • Time resolved emission is explored. • XANES is used for oxidation state determination. • EXAFS for local structure investigation.

  10. Tunable, all-optical quasi-monochromatic Thomson X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, K; Buck, A; Xu, J; Heigoldt, M; Veisz, L; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    Brilliant X-ray sources are of great interest for many research fields from biology via medicine to material research. The quest for a cost-effective, brilliant source with unprecedented temporal resolution has led to the recent realization of various high-intensity-laser-driven X-ray beam sources. Here we demonstrate the first all-laser-driven, energy-tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on Thomson backscattering. This is a decisive step beyond previous results, where the emitted radiation exhibited an uncontrolled broad energy distribution. In the experiment, one part of the laser beam was used to drive a few-fs bunch of quasi-monoenergetic electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), while the remainder was scattered off the bunch in a near-counter-propagating geometry. When the electron energy was tuned from 10-50 MeV, narrow-bandwidth X-ray spectra peaking at 5-35keV were directly measured, limited in photon energy by the sensitivity curve of our X-ray detector. Due to the ultrashor...

  11. The capabilities of monochromatic EC neutrino beams with the SPS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, C; Bernabeu, J [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.catalina.espinoza@uv.es, E-mail: jose.bernabeu@uv.es

    2008-05-15

    The goal for future neutrino facilities is the determination of the U(e3) mixing and CP violation in neutrino oscillations. This will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is crucial to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: I) {gamma} = 90 and {gamma} = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; II) {gamma} = 195 and {gamma} = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. The main conclusion is that, whereas the gain in the determination of U(e3) is rather modest, setup II provides much better sensitivity to CP violation.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Wave Breaking Characteristics over a Fringing Reef under Monochromatic Wave Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-In Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fringing reefs play an important role in protecting the coastal area by inducing wave breaking and wave energy dissipation. However, modeling of wave transformation and energy dissipation on this topography is still difficult due to the unique structure. In the present study, two-dimensional laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the cross-shore variations of wave transformation, setup, and breaking phenomena over an idealized fringing reef with the 1/40 reef slope and to verify the Boussinesq model under monochromatic wave conditions. One-layer and two-layer model configurations of the Boussinesq model were used to figure out the model capability. Both models predicted well (r2>0.8 the cross-shore variation of the wave heights, crests, troughs, and setups when the nonlinearity is not too high (A0/h0<0.07 in this study. However, as the wave nonlinearity and steepness increase, the one-layer model showed problems in prediction and stability due to the error on the vertical profile of fluid velocity. The results in this study revealed that one-layer model is not suitable in the highly nonlinear wave condition over a fringing reef bathymetry. This data set can contribute to the numerical model verification.

  13. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque.

  14. A tunable XUV monochromatic light source based on the time preserving grating selection of high-order harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yong; Liang, Hongjing; Liu, Yi; Liu, Fangyuan; Ma, Ri; Ding, Dajun

    2017-06-01

    Not Available Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 11627807, 11127403, and 11474130), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB922200), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jilin Province of China (Grant No. 20160101332JC).

  15. Thermoluminescence dependence on the wavelength of monochromatic UV-radiation in Cu-doped KCl and KBr at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez R, A.; Piters, T.; Aceves, R.; Rodriguez M, R.; Perez S, R., E-mail: rperez@cifus.uson.mx [Universidad de Sonora, Departamento de Investigaciones en Fisica, Apdo. Postal 5-088, 83190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    Thermoluminescence (Tl) dependence on the UV irradiation wavelengths from 200 to 500 nm in Cu-doped KCl and KBr crystals with different thermal treatment has been analyzed. Spectrum of the Tl intensity of each material show lower intensity at wavelengths longer than 420 nm. The Tl intensity depends on the irradiation wavelength. Structure of the Tl intensity spectrum of each sample is very similar to the structure of its optical absorption spectrum, indicating that at each wavelength, monochromatic radiation is absorbed to produce electronic transitions and electron hole pairs. Thermoluminescence of materials with thermal treatment at high temperature shows electron-hole trapping with less efficiency. The results show that Cu-doped alkali-halide materials are good detectors of a wide range of UV monochromatic radiations and could be used to measure UV radiation doses. (Author)

  16. A study of photoemission using CW and pulsed UV light sources to probe surface slip band structure evolution of single crystal aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Mingdong; Langford, Stephen; Dickinson, J. Thomas

    2008-03-01

    We report measurements of photoelectron emission from high-purity single crystal aluminum during uniaxial tensile deformation. A 248 nm pulsed excimer laser was used as a light source and the generated photoemission data was compared with that using a filtered mercury lamp. Time-of-flight curves of photoelectrons generated by pulsed excimer laser irradiation were observed showing a two peaked structure. These two peaks correspond to photoelectrons of two energy levels. It was also found that real time total photoelectron charge increases linearly with strain; and the increment is heterogeneous. Photoemission using low-energy photons is sensitive to changes in surface morphology accompanying deformation, including slip line and band formation. The discontinuity in photoelectron intensity and the heterogeneous surface slip band structure prove the production of fresh surface area is not continuous, which is predicted by a recent dislocation dynamics theory based on percolation process. Except for differences in instrumentation and data analysis, the photoemission data from a filtered mercury lamp and from the excimer laser are comparable. Current studies extend the application of the excimer laser into surface dynamics analysis.

  17. NanoDLSay: a new platform technology for biomolecular detection and analysis using gold nanoparticle probes coupled with dynamic light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanovic, Jelena; Huo, Qun

    2010-04-01

    Most analytical techniques that are routinely used in biomedical research for detection and quantification of biomolecules are time-consuming, expensive and labor-intensive, and there is always a need for rapid, affordable and convenient methods. Recently we have developed a new platform technology for biomolecular detection and analysis: NanoDLSay. NanoDLSay employs antibody-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and dynamic light scattering, and correlates the specific increase in particle size after antigen-antibody interaction to the target antigen concentration. We applied this technology to develop an assay for rapid detection of actin, a protein widely used as a loading control in Western Blot analysis. GNPs were coated with two types of polyclonal anti-actin antibodies, and used in the assay to detect two types of actin: β- and bovine skeletal muscle actin in RIPA buffer. The results of our study revealed some complex aspects of actin binding characteristics, which depended on the type of actin reagent and anti-actin antibody used. A surprising finding was a reverse dose-response relationship between the actin concentration and the average particle size in the assay solution, which we attributed to the effect of RIPA buffer. Our results indicate that RIPA may also interfere in other types of nanoparticle-based assays, and that this interference deserves further study.

  18. CITIUS: an IR-XUV light source for fundamental and applied ultrafast science

    CERN Document Server

    Grazioli, C; Ciavardini, A; Coreno, M; Frassetto, F; Gauthier, D; Golob, D; Ivanov, R; Kivimäki, A; Mahieu, B; Bucar, Bojan; Merhar, M; Miotti, P; Poletto, L; Polo, E; Ressel, B; Spezzani, C; De Ninno, G

    2013-01-01

    We present the main features of CITIUS, a new light source for ultrafast science, generating tunable, intense, femtosecond pulses in the spectral range from IR to XUV. The XUV pulses (about 10^5-10^8 photons/pulse in the range 14-80 eV) are produced by laser-induced high-order harmonic generation in gas. This radiation is monochromatized by a time-preserving monochromator, allowing also to work with high-resolution bandwidth selection. The tunable IR-UV pulses (10^{12}-10^{15} photons/pulse in the range 0.4-5.6 eV) are generated by an optical parametric amplifier, which is driven by a fraction of the same laser pulse that generates high order harmonics. The IR-UV and XUV pulses follow different optical paths and are eventually recombined on the sample for pump-probe experiments. The new light source will become the fulcrum of a new center located at the University of Nova Gorica, active in a wide range of scientific fields, including materials science, catalysis, biochemistry and magnetism. We also present th...

  19. The correlation of the energy resolution of incident light with the measured reflectance of multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯仕猛; 赵海鹰; 黄梅珍; 窦晓鸣

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an expression for describing the correlation of the energy resolution of incident light with the measured reflectance of multilayers, and gives a new method for calculating the polychromatic-light reflectance of multilayers. Using this method we give the reflectance spectrum of some multilayers in the case in which the incident light is polychromatic. The theoretical analysis shows that for the multilayers of a given design the peak reflectance of the polychromatic light is smaller than that of the monochromatic light, but no-peak reflectance of the polychromatic light is bigger than that of the monochromatic light. Further, the measured reflectance spectrum will be a line if the energy resolution is less than a decided value. The shorter the design-wavelength of the multilayer, the stronger the effect of the energy resolution on the reflectance.

  20. Metal artifacts reduction using monochromatic images from spectral CT: Evaluation of pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang, E-mail: wangzhang227@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qian, Bangping, E-mail: qianbangping@163.com [Spine Service, Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Baoxin, E-mail: wangzhi68@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qin, Guochu, E-mail: qgc7605@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhou, Zhengyang, E-mail: zyzhou@nju.edu.cn [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Qiu, Yong, E-mail: scoliosis2002@sina.com [Spine Service, Drum Tower Hospital, Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China); Sun, Xizhao, E-mail: sunxizhaonj@163.com [Department of Radiology and Urology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, No. 321 Zhongshan Road, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhu, Bin, E-mail: gobin10266@163.com [Department of Radiology, The Affiliated Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of spectral CT in reducing metal artifacts caused by pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis. Materials and methods: Institutional review committee approval and written informed consents from patients were obtained. 18 scoliotic patients with a total of 228 pedicle screws who underwent spectral CT imaging were included in this study. Monochromatic image sets with and without the additional metal artifacts reduction software (MARS) correction were generated with photon energy at 65 keV and from 70 to 140 keV with 10 keV interval using the 80 kVp and 140 kVp projection sets. Polychromatic images corresponded to the conventional 140 kVp imaging were also generated from the same scan data as a control group. Both objective evaluation (screw width and quantitative artifacts index measurements) and subjective evaluation (depiction of pedicle screws, surrounding structures and their relationship) were performed. Results: Image quality of monochromatic images in the range from 110 to 140 keV (0.97 ± 0.28) was rated superior to the conventional polychromatic images (2.53 ± 0.54) and also better than monochromatic images with lower energy. Images of energy above 100 keV also give accurate measurement of the width of screws and relatively low artifacts index. The form of screws was slightly distorted in MARS reconstruction. Conclusions: Compared to conventional polychromatic images, monochromatic images acquired from dual-energy CT provided superior image quality with much reduced metal artifacts of pedicle screws in patients with scoliosis. Optimal energy range was found between 110 and 140 keV.

  1. Mapping the subcellular distribution of α-synuclein in neurons using genetically encoded probes for correlated light and electron microscopy: implications for Parkinson's disease pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boassa, Daniela; Berlanga, Monica L; Yang, Mary Ann; Terada, Masako; Hu, Junru; Bushong, Eric A; Hwang, Minju; Masliah, Eliezer; George, Julia M; Ellisman, Mark H

    2013-02-06

    Modifications to the gene encoding human α-synuclein have been linked to the development of Parkinson's disease. The highly conserved structure of α-synuclein suggests a functional interaction with membranes, and several lines of evidence point to a role in vesicle-related processes within nerve terminals. Using recombinant fusions of human α-synuclein, including new genetic tags developed for correlated light microscopy and electron microscopy (the tetracysteine-biarsenical labeling system or the new fluorescent protein for electron microscopy, MiniSOG), we determined the distribution of α-synuclein when overexpressed in primary neurons at supramolecular and cellular scales in three dimensions (3D). We observed specific association of α-synuclein with a large and otherwise poorly characterized membranous organelle system of the presynaptic terminal, as well as with smaller vesicular structures within these boutons. Furthermore, α-synuclein was localized to multiple elements of the protein degradation pathway, including multivesicular bodies in the axons and lysosomes within neuronal cell bodies. Examination of synapses in brains of transgenic mice overexpressing human α-synuclein revealed alterations of the presynaptic endomembrane systems similar to our findings in cell culture. Three-dimensional electron tomographic analysis of enlarged presynaptic terminals in several brain areas revealed that these terminals were filled with membrane-bounded organelles, including tubulovesicular structures similar to what we observed in vitro. We propose that α-synuclein overexpression is associated with hypertrophy of membrane systems of the presynaptic terminal previously shown to have a role in vesicle recycling. Our data support the conclusion that α-synuclein is involved in processes associated with the sorting, channeling, packaging, and transport of synaptic material destined for degradation.

  2. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A. [Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) Space, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J., E-mail: mxiong@spacweather.ac.cn [Reading University, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  3. Test-retest repeatability of the pupil light response to blue and red light stimuli in normal human eyes using a novel pupillometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Milea, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the repeatability of pupil responses to colored light stimuli in healthy subjects using a prototype chromatic pupillometer. One eye of 10 healthy subjects was tested twice in the same day using monochromatic light exposure at two selected wavelengths (660 and 470¿nm......, we have developed a novel prototype of color pupillometer which demonstrates good repeatability in evoking and recording the pupillary response to a bright blue and red light stimulus....

  4. SU-D-BRA-06: Dual-Energy Chest CT: The Effects of Virtual Monochromatic Reconstructions On Texture Analysis Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorensen, J; Duran, C; Stingo, F; Wei, W; Rao, A; Zhang, L; Court, L; Erasmus, J; Godoy, M [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To characterize the effect of virtual monochromatic reconstructions on several commonly used texture analysis features in DECT of the chest. Further, to assess the effect of monochromatic energy levels on the ability of these textural features to identify tissue types. Methods: 20 consecutive patients underwent chest CTs for evaluation of lung nodules using Siemens Somatom Definition Flash DECT. Virtual monochromatic images were constructed at 10keV intervals from 40–190keV. For each patient, an ROI delineated the lesion under investigation, and cylindrical ROI’s were placed within 5 different healthy tissues (blood, fat, muscle, lung, and liver). Several histogram- and Grey Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM)-based texture features were then evaluated in each ROI at each energy level. As a means of validation, these feature values were then used in a random forest classifier to attempt to identify the tissue types present within each ROI. Their predictive accuracy at each energy level was recorded. Results: All textural features changed considerably with virtual monochromatic energy, particularly below 70keV. Most features exhibited a global minimum or maximum around 80keV, and while feature values changed with energy above this, patient ranking was generally unaffected. As expected, blood demonstrated the lowest inter-patient variability, for all features, while lung lesions (encompassing many different pathologies) exhibited the highest. The accuracy of these features in identifying tissues (76% accuracy) was highest at 80keV, but no clear relationship between energy and classification accuracy was found. Two common misclassifications (blood vs liver and muscle vs fat) accounted for the majority (24 of the 28) errors observed. Conclusion: All textural features were highly dependent on virtual monochromatic energy level, especially below 80keV, and were more stable above this energy. However, in a random forest model, these commonly used features were

  5. Probing magnetochirality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupamanjari Ghosh

    2002-08-01

    Magnetochiral anisotropy refers to the phenomenon that when light is passed through a chiral medium placed in an external magnetic field, the refractive index, or equivalently, the absorption encountered by the light differs depending on whether it travels parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. It is a very small effect, the change in refractive index because of this effect alone being of the order of 10-11. This effect has recently been measured in an active ring laser interferometer in which the detection scheme convincingly eliminates the contributions from natural optical activity, the Faraday effect and other stray anisotropies in the system. The phenomenon is important in the context of fundamental interactions between light and matter and the governing symmetry principles, and also in biochemistry as one possible explanation for the homochirality of life.

  6. Photofission of {sup NAT} Pt by monochromatic and polarized photons in the quasi-deuteron region; Fotofissao da {sup NAT} Pt por fotons monocromaticos e polarizados na regiao do quase-deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Eduardo de

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of the Nat Pt photofission yield at 69 MeV of effective average energy of the incident photon is made using a polarized and monochromatic photon beam from the LADON system of the National Laboratory of Frascati, Italy, produced by inverse Compton scattering of laser light by high energy electrons of the ADONE Accelerator and using as fission track solid detector the Makrofol, being the developing made by usual procedure. The experimental value of the nuclear fissionability is compared to a theoretical value obtained following a model at two stages: in the first, the photon energy is absorbed by a neutron-proton pair inducing to the nucleus excitation, and in the second the nucleus de-excites due to the competition between nucleon evaporation and fission. The effect of fast nucleon emission during the first stage and the successive evaporation of neutrons in the second stage are considered. 40 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs.

  7. Enhancing the light-matter interaction using slow light: towards the concept of dense light

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, Luc; Dicaire, Isabelle; Chin, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    A couple of experiments are here presented to clarify the impact of slow light on light-matter interaction. The experiments are designed, so that the process generating slow light and the probed light-matter interaction only present a marginal cross-effect. The impact of slow light on simple molecular absorption could be separately evaluated under either material or structural slow light propagation in the same medium and led to an entirely different response.

  8. Steady state of a low-density ensemble of atoms in a monochromatic field taking into account recoil effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Il'enkov, R. Ya.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Tumaikin, A. M.; Yudin, V. I.

    2011-06-01

    A method has been developed for obtaining the steady-state solution of a quantum kinetic equation for the atomic density matrix in an arbitrarily polarized monochromatic field with the complete inclusion of recoil effects and degeneracy of atomic levels in the projection of the angular momentum. This method makes it possible to obtain the most general solution beyond the previously accepted approximations (semiclassical approximation, secular approximation, etc.). In particular, it has been shown that the laser cooling temperature is a function of not only the depth of the optical potential (as was previously thought), but also the mass of an atom.

  9. Amplified spontaneous emission spectrum at the output of a diode amplifier saturated by an input monochromatic wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatov, A. P.; Drakin, A. E.; D'yachkov, N. V.; Gushchik, T. I.

    2016-08-01

    Expressions for the amplitudes of amplified spontaneous emission waves in a diode amplifier near the frequency ω0 of a 'strong' input monochromatic wave have been derived in terms of a random function of a stationary Gaussian process. We have found expressions for the spectral density of the amplitudes and shown that, on the red side of the spectrum with respect to frequency ω0, spontaneous emission waves obtain additional nonlinear gain, induced by the strong wave, whereas on the blue side of the spectrum an additional loss is induced. Such behaviour of the amplitudes of amplified waves agrees with previous results.

  10. Dirac-graphene quasiparticles in strong slow-light pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Astapenko, V. A.; Yakovets, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical Volkov's solution of the massless Dirac equation for graphene in the field of slow-light pulse with arbitrary time dependence is obtained. Exact solutions are presented for special cases of monochromatic field and a single-cycle pulse. Following the Fock-Schwinger proper time method, the Green's function for quasiparticles is derived with the account of the influence an external classical electromagnetic wave field.

  11. Implementation of dual-energy technique for virtual monochromatic and linearly mixed CBCTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Hao; Giles, William; Ren Lei; Bowsher, James; Yin Fangfang [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To implement dual-energy imaging technique for virtual monochromatic (VM) and linearly mixed (LM) cone beam CTs (CBCTs) and to demonstrate their potential applications in metal artifact reduction and contrast enhancement in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: A bench-top CBCT system was used to acquire 80 kVp and 150 kVp projections, with an additional 0.8 mm tin filtration. To implement the VM technique, these projections were first decomposed into acrylic and aluminum basis material projections to synthesize VM projections, which were then used to reconstruct VM CBCTs. The effect of VM CBCT on the metal artifact reduction was evaluated with an in-house titanium-BB phantom. The optimal VM energy to maximize contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for iodine contrast and minimize beam hardening in VM CBCT was determined using a water phantom containing two iodine concentrations. The LM technique was implemented by linearly combining the low-energy (80 kVp) and high-energy (150 kVp) CBCTs. The dose partitioning between low-energy and high-energy CBCTs was varied (20%, 40%, 60%, and 80% for low-energy) while keeping total dose approximately equal to single-energy CBCTs, measured using an ion chamber. Noise levels and CNRs for four tissue types were investigated for dual-energy LM CBCTs in comparison with single-energy CBCTs at 80, 100, 125, and 150 kVp. Results: The VM technique showed substantial reduction of metal artifacts at 100 keV with a 40% reduction in the background standard deviation compared to a 125 kVp single-energy scan of equal dose. The VM energy to maximize CNR for both iodine concentrations and minimize beam hardening in the metal-free object was 50 keV and 60 keV, respectively. The difference of average noise levels measured in the phantom background was 1.2% between dual-energy LM CBCTs and equivalent-dose single-energy CBCTs. CNR values in the LM CBCTs of any dose partitioning are better than those of 150 kVp single-energy CBCTs. The

  12. Measurement of Monochromatic Emissivity of Cement Clinker with Various Fe2O3 Content at High Temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Z.J.Ye; C.F.Ma; 等

    1996-01-01

    An applicatiopn of the optical pyrometer is studied for measuring monochromatic emissivities of cement clinker with various Fe2O3 contnet.The idsa of using “brightness temperature” is introduced into the eimssivity measurement.In this method,there is no need for measuring an actual temperature of sample surfaces,only with determining both brightness temperatures of a sample and a blackbody can the required emissivity be evaluated according to Wien's radiation law.In practice,the cement clinker is regarded as a greybody,the monochromatic emissivity is approximately equal to the total emissivity,so a single-colour optical pyrometer is applied for this purpose,Test measurements are carried out on 10 kinds of cement clinkers,Experimental data are treated by the least square method.As a result ,the emissivity variation with temperature at a certain Fe2O3 content is quite well represented by εn=a+bT.Furthermore,this work first reported that the eimissivities of cement clinker change consierably with Fe2O3 contents.In multiple cement production this conclusion is very important.

  13. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  14. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne B.; Hommes, Vanja

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of ...

  15. The effects of low-intensity narrow-band blue-light treatment compared to bright white-light treatment in sub-syndromal seasonal affective disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Meesters, Ybe; Winthorst, Wim H; Duijzer, Wianne; Bos, Elisabeth; V, Hommes,

    2016-01-01

    Background The discovery of a novel photoreceptor in the retinal ganglion cells with a highest sensitivity of 470-490 nm blue light has led to research on the effects of short-wavelength light in humans. Several studies have explored the efficacy of monochromatic blue or blue-enriched light in the treatment of SAD. In this study, a comparison has been made between the effects of broad-wavelength light without ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths compared to narrow-band blue light in the treatment of ...

  16. IVVS probe mechanical concept design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.rossi@enea.it; Neri, Carlo; De Collibus, Mario Ferri; Mugnaini, Giampiero; Pollastrone, Fabio; Crescenzi, Fabio

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • ENEA designed, developed and tested a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS). • IVVS mechanical design has been revised from 2011 to 2013 to meet ITER requirements. • Main improvements are piezoceramic actuators and a step focus system. • Successful qualification activities validated the concept design for ITER environment. - Abstract: ENEA has been deeply involved in the design, development and testing of a laser based In Vessel Viewing System (IVVS) required for the inspection of ITER plasma-facing components. The IVVS probe shall be deployed into the vacuum vessel, providing high resolution images and metrology measurements to detect damages and possible erosion. ENEA already designed and manufactured an IVVS probe prototype based on a rad-hard concept and driven by commercial micro-step motors, which demonstrated satisfying viewing and metrology performances at room conditions. The probe sends a laser beam through a reflective rotating prism. By rotating the axes of the prism, the probe can scan all the environment points except those present in a shadow cone and the backscattered light signal is then processed to measure the intensity level (viewing) and the distance from the probe (metrology). During the last years, in order to meet all the ITER environmental conditions, such as high vacuum, gamma radiation lifetime dose up to 5 MGy, cumulative neutron fluence of about 2.3 × 10{sup 17} n/cm{sup 2}, temperature of 120 °C and magnetic field of 8 T, the probe mechanical design was significantly revised introducing a new actuating system based on piezo-ceramic actuators and improved with a new step focus system. The optical and mechanical schemes have been then modified and refined to meet also the geometrical constraints. The paper describes the mechanical concept design solutions adopted in order to fulfill IVVS probe functional performance requirements considering ITER working environment and geometrical constraints.

  17. Close Up of Monochromatic Aberrations Using Snell's Law: An Undergraduate Computational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, L.

    2009-01-01

    Images formed from light rays refracting a spherical surface are often introduced in textbooks using the paraxial approximation. Incoming rays propagating from the object meeting the surface of a transparent medium at a given point for which the angle is larger than 15 degrees with respect to the normal are not described accurately from the…

  18. Close Up of Monochromatic Aberrations Using Snell's Law: An Undergraduate Computational Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, L.

    2009-01-01

    Images formed from light rays refracting a spherical surface are often introduced in textbooks using the paraxial approximation. Incoming rays propagating from the object meeting the surface of a transparent medium at a given point for which the angle is larger than 15 degrees with respect to the normal are not described accurately from the…

  19. Probe tip heating assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Roger William; Oh, Yunje

    2016-10-25

    A heating assembly configured for use in mechanical testing at a scale of microns or less. The heating assembly includes a probe tip assembly configured for coupling with a transducer of the mechanical testing system. The probe tip assembly includes a probe tip heater system having a heating element, a probe tip coupled with the probe tip heater system, and a heater socket assembly. The heater socket assembly, in one example, includes a yoke and a heater interface that form a socket within the heater socket assembly. The probe tip heater system, coupled with the probe tip, is slidably received and clamped within the socket.

  20. Cylindrical shock waves in rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas with increasing energy under the action of monochromatic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, P. K.

    2017-08-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in a rotational axisymmetric non-ideal dusty gas under the action of monochromatic radiation with increasing energy, which has variable azimuthal and axial components of fluid velocity, is investigated. The dusty gas is assumed to be a mixture of non-ideal (or perfect) gas and small solid particles, in which solid particles are continuously distributed. Similarity solutions are obtained as well as the effects of the variation of the radiation parameters, the parameter of non-idealness of the gas, the mass concentration of solid particles in the mixture, the ratio of the density of solid particles to the initial density of the gas, and the piston velocity index are worked out in detail. The total energy of the shock wave is varying and increases with time. It is observed that the radiation parameter and the piston velocity index have opposite behaviour on the flow variables as well as the shock strength.

  1. Impact of light quality on biomass production and fatty acid content in the microalga Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultberg, Malin; Jönsson, Helene Larsson; Bergstrand, Karl-Johan; Carlsson, Anders S

    2014-05-01

    In this study, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris was exposed to monochromatic light at six different wavelengths in order to study the effect on biomass productivity and fatty acid content. A significantly higher amount of biomass by produced in the treatments with yellow, red and white light compared with blue, green and purple light. There were also significant differences in total lipid content and fatty acid profile between the treatments. The green light regime gave the lowest concentration of lipids, but increased the concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Thus it can be concluded that light quality significantly affects biomass productivity, total lipid concentration and fatty acid profile in the microalga C. vulgaris.

  2. Dual Energy CT (DECT Monochromatic Imaging: Added Value of Adaptive Statistical Iterative Reconstructions (ASIR in Portal Venography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqin Zhao

    Full Text Available To investigate the effect of the adaptive statistical iterative reconstructions (ASIR on image quality in portal venography by dual energy CT (DECT imaging.DECT scans of 45 cirrhotic patients obtained in the portal venous phase were analyzed. Monochromatic images at 70keV were reconstructed with the following 4 ASIR percentages: 0%, 30%, 50%, and 70%. The image noise (IN (standard deviation, SD of portal vein (PV, the contrast-to-noise-ratio (CNR, and the subjective score for the sharpness of PV boundaries, and the diagnostic acceptability (DA were obtained. The IN, CNR, and the subjective scores were compared among the four ASIR groups.The IN (in HU of PV (10.05±3.14, 9.23±3.05, 8.44±2.95 and 7.83±2.90 decreased and CNR values of PV (8.04±3.32, 8.95±3.63, 9.80±4.12 and 10.74±4.73 increased with the increase in ASIR percentage (0%, 30%, 50%, and 70%, respectively, and were statistically different for the 4 ASIR groups (p<0.05. The subjective scores showed that the sharpness of portal vein boundaries (3.13±0.59, 2.82±0.44, 2.73±0.54 and 2.07±0.54 decreased with higher ASIR percentages (p<0.05. The subjective diagnostic acceptability was highest at 30% ASIR (p<0.05.30% ASIR addition in DECT portal venography could improve the 70 keV monochromatic image quality.

  3. Ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography with monochromatic and chromatic aberration correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawadzki, Robert J; Cense, Barry; Zhang, Yan; Choi, Stacey S; Miller, Donald T; Werner, John S

    2008-05-26

    We have developed an improved adaptive optics - optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT) system and evaluated its performance for in vivo imaging of normal and pathologic retina. The instrument provides unprecedented image quality at the retina with isotropic 3D resolution of 3.5 x 3.5 x 3.5 microm(3). Critical to the instrument's resolution is a customized achromatizing lens that corrects for the eye's longitudinal chromatic aberration and an ultra broadband light source (Delta lambda=112 nm lambda(0)= approximately 836 nm). The eye's transverse chromatic aberrations is modeled and predicted to be sufficiently small for the imaging conditions considered. The achromatizing lens was strategically placed at the light input of the AO-OCT sample arm. This location simplifies use of the achromatizing lens and allows straightforward implementation into existing OCT systems. Lateral resolution was achieved with an AO system that cascades two wavefront correctors, a large stroke bimorph deformable mirror (DM) and a micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) DM with a high number of actuators. This combination yielded diffraction-limited imaging in the eyes examined. An added benefit of the broadband light source is the reduction of speckle size in the axial dimension. Additionally, speckle contrast was reduced by averaging multiple B-scans of the same proximal patch of retina. The combination of improved micron-scale 3D resolution, and reduced speckle size and contrast were found to significantly improve visibility of microscopic structures in the retina.

  4. Improvement of the tuneable monochromatic gamma-ray source at the 15 MeV linac of the University of Gent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masschaele, B.; Jolie, J.; Mondelaers, W.; Materna, T.; Cauwels, P.; Dierick, M.

    2001-07-01

    It is shown how the tuneable gamma-ray source based on a bremsstrahlung source and a crystal, diffracting in Cauchois geometry, can be made intense and monochromatic using an asymmetrically cut Si crystal. The results and implications are here presented.

  5. Sensitivity and specificity of monochromatic photography of the ocular fundus in differentiating optic nerve head drusen and optic disc oedema: optic disc drusen and oedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gili, Pablo; Flores-Rodríguez, Patricia; Yangüela, Julio; Orduña-Azcona, Javier; Martín-Ríos, María Dolores

    2013-03-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of monochromatic photography of the ocular fundus in differentiating optic nerve head drusen (ONHD) and optic disc oedema (ODE). Sixty-six patients with ONHD, 31 patients with ODE and 70 healthy subjects were studied. Colour and monochromatic fundus photography with different filters (green, red and autofluorescence) were performed. The results were analysed blindly by two observers. The sensitivity, specificity and interobserver agreement (k) of each test were assessed. Colour photography offers 65.5 % sensitivity and 100 % specificity for the diagnosis of ONHD. Monochromatic photography improves sensitivity and specificity and provides similar results: green filter (71.20 % sensitivity, 96.70 % specificity), red filter (80.30 % sensitivity, 96.80 % specificity), and autofluorescence technique (87.8 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity). The interobserver agreement was good with all techniques used: autofluorescence (k = 0.957), green filter (k = 0.897), red filter (k = 0.818) and colour (k = 0.809). Monochromatic fundus photography permits ONHD and ODE to be differentiated, with good sensitivity and very high specificity. The best results were obtained with autofluorescence and red filter study.

  6. Mobile Game Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup Lynggaard, Aviaja

    2006-01-01

    This paper will examine how probes can be useful for game designers in the preliminary phases of a design process. The work is based upon a case study concerning pervasive mobile phone games where Mobile Game Probes have emerged from the project. The new probes are aimed towards a specific target...... group and the goal is to specify the probes so they will cover the most relevant areas for our project. The Mobile Game Probes generated many interesting results and new issues occurred, since the probes came to be dynamic and favorable for the process in new ways....

  7. Quantitative full-colour transmitted light microscopy and dyes for concentration mapping and measurement of diffusion coefficients in microfluidic architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Martinus H V; Raimbault, Vincent; Texier-Picard, Rozenn; Poizat, Rémi; Français, Olivier; Griscom, Laurent; Navarro, Julien R G

    2012-02-21

    A simple and versatile methodology has been developed for the simultaneous measurement of multiple concentration profiles of colourants in transparent microfluidic systems, using a conventional transmitted light microscope, a digital colour (RGB) camera and numerical image processing combined with multicomponent analysis. Rigorous application of the Beer-Lambert law would require monochromatic probe conditions, but in spite of the broad spectral bandwidths of the three colour channels of the camera, a linear relation between the measured optical density and dye concentration is established under certain conditions. An optimised collection of dye solutions for the quantitative optical microscopic characterisation of microfluidic devices is proposed. Using the methodology for optical concentration measurement we then implement and validate a simplified and robust method for the microfluidic measurement of diffusion coefficients using an H-filter architecture. It consists of measuring the ratio of the concentrations of the two output channels of the H-filter. It enables facile determination of the diffusion coefficient, even for non-fluorescent molecules and nanoparticles, and is compatible with non-optical detection of the analyte.

  8. Monochromatic Pupillometry in Unilateral Glaucoma Discloses no Adaptive Changes Subserved by the ipRGCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Claus; Sander, Birgit Agnes; Milea, Dan;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To detect signs of a possible adaptive mechanism of the intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells in unilateral glaucoma. METHOD: Eleven patients with unilateral glaucoma, classified by automated perimetry (glaucoma: mean deviation ... in the glaucomatous eyes of unilateral glaucoma. No difference was detected between the pupillary light response of the unafflicted fellow eyes and that of a healthy, age-matched control group. Thus no sign of an adaptive mechanism was detected, neither in the glaucomatous nor in the unafflicted fellow eyes......, and consequently glaucoma appears to differ from non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy....

  9. Light-driven robotics for nanoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2013-01-01

    The science fiction inspired shrinking of macro-scale robotic manipulation and handling down to the micro- and nanoscale regime opens new doors for exploiting the forces and torques of light for micro- and nanoscopic probing, actuation and control. Advancing light-driven micro-robotics requires...... and matter for robotically probing at the smallest biological length scales....

  10. Orientation of migratory birds under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Munro, Ursula; Ford, Hugh; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    In view of the finding that cryptochrome 1a, the putative receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, is restricted to the ultraviolet single cones in European Robins, we studied the orientation behaviour of robins and Australian Silvereyes under monochromatic ultraviolet (UV) light. At low intensity UV light of 0.3 mW/m(2), birds showed normal migratory orientation by their inclination compass, with the directional information originating in radical pair processes in the eye. At 2.8 mW/m(2), robins showed an axial preference in the east-west axis, whereas silvereyes preferred an easterly direction. At 5.7 mW/m(2), robins changed direction to a north-south axis. When UV light was combined with yellow light, robins showed easterly 'fixed direction' responses, which changed to disorientation when their upper beak was locally anaesthetised with xylocaine, indicating that they were controlled by the magnetite-based receptors in the beak. Orientation under UV light thus appears to be similar to that observed under blue, turquoise and green light, albeit the UV responses occur at lower light levels, probably because of the greater light sensitivity of the UV cones. The orientation under UV light and green light suggests that at least at the level of the retina, magnetoreception and vision are largely independent of each other.

  11. Development of a transient internal probe diagnostic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjers, G. G.; Galambos, J. P.; Bohnet, M. A.; Jarboe, T. R.; Christiansen, W. H.; Wurden, G. A.; Wright, B. L.; Smith, R. J.

    1992-10-01

    The transient internal probe (TIP) diagnostic is a novel method for probing the interior of hot magnetic fusion plasmas. In the TIP scheme, a probe is fired, using a two-stage light gas gun, through a hot plasma at velocities up to 5 km/s, and makes direct, local measurements of the internal magnetic field structure. The data are relayed to the laboratory optical detection system using an incident laser that is directed through a Faraday rotator payload acting as a magneto-optic sensor. Ablative effects are avoided by minimizing the probe size, limiting the time that the probe is in the hot plasma, and encasing the probe with a diamond cladding. The degree to which the diamond probe cladding is susceptible to ablative effects will determine the plasma density and temperature regime in which the TIP diagnostic can be used. If the TIP suffers significant ablation it is an indication that the diagnostic is not usable on this hot and dense of a plasma (or that greater velocity must be imparted to the probe to further minimize the time that it is in the plasma). A quantitative experimental study of the ablation rates of diamond is planned as part of the TIP development. The integrated TIP system will be functional in 1992 and installed on the Helicity Injected Torus (HIT) [T. R. Jarboe, Fusion Tech. 15, 9 (1989)] at the University of Washington.

  12. Model of light variations of Be stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T. (Polska Akademia Nauk, Warsaw. Centrum Astronomiczne)

    1980-01-01

    The following model of Be star is proposed: a star rotating rigidly with a ''break up'' velocity is surrounded with a flat, geometrically thin, optically thick gaseous disk rotating with a Keplerian velocity. The disk absorbs and reemits stellar light. Viscous heat dissipation in the disk is neglected. The emerging spectrum of the system is calculated in black body approximation with temperature being a function of a position on the star and on the disk. Variation of the inner and outer disk radii may give rise to monochromatic light variations of the whole system in the range of 0.1-0.7 magnitudes. The light variations observed in Be stars are in the same range.

  13. Method for nanoscale spatial registration of scanning probes with substrates and surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Lawrence A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Embodiments in accordance with the present invention relate to methods and apparatuses for aligning a scanning probe used to pattern a substrate, by comparing the position of the probe to a reference location or spot on the substrate. A first light beam is focused on a surface of the substrate as a spatial reference point. A second light beam then illuminates the scanning probe being used for patterning. An optical microscope images both the focused light beam, and a diffraction pattern, shadow, or light backscattered by the illuminated scanning probe tip of a scanning probe microscope (SPM), which is typically the tip of the scanning probe on an atomic force microscope (AFM). Alignment of the scanning probe tip relative to the mark is then determined by visual observation of the microscope image. This alignment process may be repeated to allow for modification or changing of the scanning probe microscope tip.

  14. Ultrafast laser pump/x-ray probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, J.; Judd, E.; Schuck, P.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In an ongoing project aimed at probing solids using x-rays obtained at the ALS synchrotron with a sub-picosecond time resolution following interactions with a 100 fs laser pulse, the authors have successfully performed pump-probe experiments limited by the temporal duration of ALS-pulse. They observe a drop in the diffraction efficiency following laser heating. They can attribute this to a disordering of the crystal. Studies with higher temporal resolution are required to determine the mechanism. The authors have also incorporated a low-jitter streakcamera as a diagnostic for observing time-dependant x-ray diffraction. The streakcamera triggered by a photoconductive switch was operated at kHz repetition rates. Using UV-pulses, the authors obtain a temporal response of 2 ps when averaging 5000 laser pulses. They demonstrate the ability to detect monochromatized x-ray radiation from a bend-magnet with the streak camera by measuring the pulse duration of a x-ray pulse to 70 ps. In conclusion, the authors show a rapid disordering of an InSb crystal. The resolution was determined by the duration of the ALS pulse. They also demonstrate that they can detect x-ray radiation from a synchrotron source with a temporal resolution of 2ps, by using an ultrafast x-ray streak camera. Their set-up will allow them to pursue laser pump/x-ray probe experiments to monitor structural changes in materials with ultrafast time resolution.

  15. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhlanov, S. V.; Bazlov, N. V.; Derbin, A. V.; Drachnev, I. S.; Kayunov, A. S.; Muratova, V. N.; Semenov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  16. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhlanov, S V; Derbin, A V; Drachnev, I S; Kayunov, A S; Muratova, V N; Semenov, D A; Unzhakov, E V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  17. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhlanov, S.V. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Bazlov, N.V. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Universitetskaja nab. 7/9, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Derbin, A.V., E-mail: derbin@pnpi.spb.ru [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Drachnev, I.S. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); GranSasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila (AQ) I-67100 (Italy); Kayunov, A.S.; Muratova, V.N.; Semenov, D.A.; Unzhakov, E.V. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-11

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  18. Properties of Ultrasound Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Rusina, M.

    2015-01-01

    This work deals with the measurement properties of ultrasound probes. Ultrasound probes and their parameters significantly affect the quality of the final image. In this work there are described the possibility of measuring the spatial resolution, sensitivity of the probe and measuring the length of the dead zone. Ultrasound phantom ATS Multi Purpose Phantom Type 539 was used for measurements.

  19. Tunable nanowire nonlinear optical probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yuri; Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Radenovic, Aleksandra; Onorato, Robert M.; Saykally, Richard J.; Liphardt, Jan; Yang, Peidong

    2008-02-18

    One crucial challenge for subwavelength optics has been thedevelopment of a tunable source of coherent laser radiation for use inthe physical, information, and biological sciences that is stable at roomtemperature and physiological conditions. Current advanced near-fieldimaging techniques using fiber-optic scattering probes1,2 have alreadyachieved spatial resolution down to the 20-nm range. Recently reportedfar-field approaches for optical microscopy, including stimulatedemission depletion (STED)3, structured illumination4, and photoactivatedlocalization microscopy (PALM)5, have also enabled impressive,theoretically-unlimited spatial resolution of fluorescent biomolecularcomplexes. Previous work with laser tweezers6-8 has suggested the promiseof using optical traps to create novel spatial probes and sensors.Inorganic nanowires have diameters substantially below the wavelength ofvisible light and have unique electronic and optical properties9,10 thatmake them prime candidates for subwavelength laser and imagingtechnology. Here we report the development of an electrode-free,continuously-tunable coherent visible light source compatible withphysiological environments, from individual potassium niobate (KNbO3)nanowires. These wires exhibit efficient second harmonic generation(SHG), and act as frequency converters, allowing the local synthesis of awide range of colors via sum and difference frequency generation (SFG,DFG). We use this tunable nanometric light source to implement a novelform of subwavelength microscopy, in which an infrared (IR) laser is usedto optically trap and scan a nanowire over a sample, suggesting a widerange of potential applications in physics, chemistry, materials science,and biology.

  20. Phosphor-free polychromatic emission InGaN light-emitting diode

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Cong; 冯聪

    2016-01-01

    Broadband white light is indispensable for applications involving general illumination and displaying, a task conventionally fulfilled by fluorescent light sources. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) based on the Group-III nitrides have been taking over that role in recent years, despite the fact that LEDs are inherently monochromatic sources with spectral line-widths in the range of 20 to 50nm. The most adopted industrial solution is to shift part of the light emitted by a blue InGaN chip into lon...

  1. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  2. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  3. Energy Dependence of the Relative Light Output of YAlO3:Ce, Y2SiO5:Ce, and YPO4:Ce Scintillators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khodyuk, I.V.; Rodnyi, P.A.; Dorenbos, P.

    2012-01-01

    The nonlinear dependence of the relative light output on the energy deposited in single-crystal scintillation materials YAlO3:Ce (YAP:Ce), Y2SiO5:Ce (YSO:Ce), and YPO4:Ce (YPO:Ce) has been studied. The investigations have been conducted under quasi-monochromatic X-ray excitation in the energy range

  4. Probe and method for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  5. I12: the Joint Engineering, Environment and Processing (JEEP) beamline at Diamond Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drakopoulos, Michael, E-mail: michael.drakopoulos@diamond.ac.uk; Connolley, Thomas; Reinhard, Christina; Atwood, Robert; Magdysyuk, Oxana; Vo, Nghia; Hart, Michael; Connor, Leigh; Humphreys, Bob; Howell, George; Davies, Steve; Hill, Tim; Wilkin, Guy; Pedersen, Ulrik; Foster, Andrew; De Maio, Nicoletta; Basham, Mark; Yuan, Fajin; Wanelik, Kaz [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-08

    JEEP is a high-energy (50–150 keV) multi-purpose beamline offering polychromatic and monochromatic modes. It can accommodate large samples and experimental rigs, enabling in situ studies using radiography, tomography, energy-dispersive diffraction, monochromatic and white-beam two-dimensional diffraction/scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. I12 is the Joint Engineering, Environmental and Processing (JEEP) beamline, constructed during Phase II of the Diamond Light Source. I12 is located on a short (5 m) straight section of the Diamond storage ring and uses a 4.2 T superconducting wiggler to provide polychromatic and monochromatic X-rays in the energy range 50–150 keV. The beam energy enables good penetration through large or dense samples, combined with a large beam size (1 mrad horizontally × 0.3 mrad vertically). The beam characteristics permit the study of materials and processes inside environmental chambers without unacceptable attenuation of the beam and without the need to use sample sizes which are atypically small for the process under study. X-ray techniques available to users are radiography, tomography, energy-dispersive diffraction, monochromatic and white-beam two-dimensional diffraction/scattering and small-angle X-ray scattering. Since commencing operations in November 2009, I12 has established a broad user community in materials science and processing, chemical processing, biomedical engineering, civil engineering, environmental science, palaeontology and physics.

  6. Structured light scatteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Elliott, Jonathan T; McClatchy, David M; Barth, Richard J; Wells, Wendy A; Pogue, Brian W; Paulsen, Keith D

    2014-01-01

    A new imaging approach, structured light scatteroscopy (SLS), is demonstrated, which offers rapid wide-field imaging of microscopic morphological variations in bulk tissue surfaces. Elastic scattering of light offers exquisite sensitivity to ultrastructural changes at multiple size scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters, but in bulk tissues the confounding effects of molecular absorption and strong multiple scattering of light often lead to a dramatic reduction in scatter contrast and specificity. It is demonstrated that the SLS using structured high spatial frequency illumination and detection to probe the tissue achieves direct, absorption-independent, high-resolution maps of the scattering response. The scattering response is observed to be dependent on both the wavelength and spatial frequency of choice, indicating a potential for multiscale probing of ultrastructural changes in superficial tissue layers. This methodology can be easily applied in most wide-field imaging systems.

  7. Study of probe-sample distance for biomedical spectra measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Lei

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fiber-based optical spectroscopy has been widely used for biomedical applications. However, the effect of probe-sample distance on the collection efficiency has not been well investigated. Method In this paper, we presented a theoretical model to maximize the illumination and collection efficiency in designing fiber optic probes for biomedical spectra measurement. This model was in general applicable to probes with single or multiple fibers at an arbitrary incident angle. In order to demonstrate the theory, a fluorescence spectrometer was used to measure the fluorescence of human finger skin at various probe-sample distances. The fluorescence spectrum and the total fluorescence intensity were recorded. Results The theoretical results show that for single fiber probes, contact measurement always provides the best results. While for multi-fiber probes, there is an optimal probe distance. When a 400- μm excitation fiber is used to deliver the light to the skin and another six 400- μm fibers surrounding the excitation fiber are used to collect the fluorescence signal, the experimental results show that human finger skin has very strong fluorescence between 475 nm and 700 nm under 450 nm excitation. The fluorescence intensity is heavily dependent on the probe-sample distance and there is an optimal probe distance. Conclusions We investigated a number of probe-sample configurations and found that contact measurement could be the primary choice for single-fiber probes, but was very inefficient for multi-fiber probes. There was an optimal probe-sample distance for multi-fiber probes. By carefully choosing the probe-sample distance, the collection efficiency could be enhanced by 5-10 times. Our experiments demonstrated that the experimental results of the probe-sample distance dependence of collection efficiency in multi-fiber probes were in general agreement with our theory.

  8. Mapping the Ionization State of Laser-Irradiated Ar Gas Jets With Multi-Wavelength Monochromatic X-Ray Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugland, N L; Doppner, T; Kemp, A; Schaeffer, D; Glenzer, S H; Niemann, C

    2010-04-08

    Two-dimensional monochromatic images of fast-electron stimulated Ar K{alpha} and He-{alpha} x-ray self-emission have recorded a time-integrated map of the extent of Ar{sup {approx}6+} and Ar{sup 16+} ions, respectively, within a high density (10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} atomic density) Ar plasma. This plasma was produced by irradiating a 2 mm wide clustering Ar gas jet with an ultra-high intensity (10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}, 200 fs) Ti:Sapphire laser operating at 800 nm. Spherically bent quartz crystals in the 200 (for K{alpha}) and 201 (for He-{alpha}) planes were used as near-normal incidence reflective x-ray optics. We see that a large (830 {micro}m long) region of plasma emits K{alpha} primarily along the laser axis, while the He-{alpha} emission is confined to smaller hot spot (230 {micro}m long) region that likely corresponds to the focal volume of the f/8 laser beam. X-ray spectra from a Bragg spectrometer operating in the von Hamos geometry, which images in one dimension, indicate that the centroids of the K{alpha} and He-{alpha} emission regions are separated by approximately 330 {micro}m along the laser axis.

  9. Dual energy computed tomography quantification of carotid plaques calcification: comparison between monochromatic and polychromatic energies with pathology correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannelli, Lorenzo [University of Washington, Departments of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); MacDonald, Lawrence; Ferguson, Marina; Shuman, William P.; Xu, Dongxiang; Yuan, Chun; Mitsumori, Lee M. [University of Washington, Departments of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States); Mancini, Marcello; Ragucci, Monica; Monti, Serena [IRCCS Fondazione SDN, Naples (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    We compared carotid plaque calcification detection sensitivity and apparent cross-sectional area on CT as a function of CT beam energy using conventional CT techniques and virtual mono-energetic CT images generated from dual-energy acquisitions. Five ex-vivo carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens were imaged with dual-energy computed tomography. Virtual monochromatic spectrum (VMS) CT images were reconstructed at energies between 40-140 keV. The same specimens were imaged using conventional polyenergetic spectrum (PS) CT with peak beam energies 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp. The histological calcium areas on each corresponding CEA specimen were traced manually on digitized images of Toluidine-Blue/Basic-Fuchsin stained plastic sections. 40 keV VMS CT images provided high detection sensitivity (97 %) similar to conventional PS CT images (∝96 %). The calcification size measured on CT decreased systematically with increasing CT beam energy; the rate of change was larger for the VMS images than for PS images. From a single dual-energy CT, multiple VMS-CT images can be generated, yielding equivalent detection sensitivity and size correlations as conventional PS-CT in CEA calcification imaging. VMS-CT at 80-100 keV provided the most accurate estimates of calcification size, as compared to histology, but detection sensitivity was reduced for smaller calcifications on these images. (orig.)

  10. Computer simulations on resonant fluorescence spectra in atomic gases in two monochromatic laser fields of arbitrary intensity and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagodova, Tamara Y.

    1996-03-01

    In the intense radiation fields with power density from 104W/cm2 to 109W/cm2 the essential modification of electronic states of atoms occurs displaying, in particular, in modifications of resonant fluorescence (rf) spectra. We use 'Fermi golden rule' for calculations of relative intensities and frequencies for rf multiplet for real multilevel initially unexcited atoms in two monochromatic laser fields of arbitrary intensity resonant to adjacent transitions of (Xi) or (Lambda) types and magnetic field, giving the level splittings of different values from Zeeman to Paschen-Back effect. The dependence of quasienergies on parameters obtained with the help of a sorting program permits us to define the values of parameters for which the states of the system are mixed and so to receive the correct probability amplitudes for instantaneous or adiabatic regimes of switching the perturbation. The analysis of the quasienergies and form of rf spectra permits us to get relations between the form of the spectra and modifications of electronic structure of the atom due to radiation fields and external magnetic field.

  11. An alignment method for the ATLAS end-cap TRT detector using a narrow monochromatic X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Åkesson, T; Dixon, N; Dolgoshein, B A; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, Daniel; Gavrilenko, I; Hajduk, Z; Hauviller, Claude; Ivanov, V; Ivochkin, V G; Jelamkov, A; Konovalov, S V; Lichard, P; Lundberg, B; Muraviev, S; Nadtochy, A; Nevski, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Platonov, Yu P; Price, M; Romaniouk, A; Shchegelskii, V; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, A; Smirnov, S; Sosnovtsev, V V

    2001-01-01

    The end-cap transition radiation tracker (TRT), consisting of 36 modules (wheels), is being constructed as a part of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the CERN LHC. This paper describes a method for determining the wire positions inside the straw proportional tubes (SPT), which are the basic building blocks of the ATLAS TRT, with an accuracy of better than 10 mu m. The procedure involves moving a narrow monochromatic X-ray beam across the straw and measuring the counting rate as a function of the position of the X-ray beam in the straw. To achieve this goal, a beam directing device (BDD), providing the possibility to direct the X-ray beam in a chosen direction within some solid angle and supplying an accurate angular measurement system, has been constructed. The results of the wire position measurements performed using this BDD on a full-scale mechanical prototype end-cap wheel of the TRT are presented in this paper. (11 refs).

  12. The Effect of Monochromatic Infrared Photo Energy on the Irritability of Myofascial Trigger Spot of Rabbit Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ta-Shen Kuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine whether the vasodilatation effect of monochromatic infrared photo energy (MIRE had the potential for the treatment of myofascial trigger spot (MTrS in rabbits. Design. A randomized-controlled animal study. Subjects. Twelve adult New Zealand rabbits. Methods. For each rabbit, a MTrS (equivalent to a myofascial trigger point in humans in one side of the biceps femoris muscle was randomly selected for MIRE treatment (experimental side, while another MTrS in the other side (control side received a sham treatment. The intervention consisted of a daily 40 minutes treatment, three times per week for 2 weeks. The prevalence of endplate noise (EPN loci in the MTrS was assessed before, immediately after, and one week after the completion of the 2-week treatment. Results. MIRE could suppress the prevalence of EPN in the MTrS. The degree of reduction in EPN prevalence in the MTrS between the experimental side and the control side was significantly different immediately after MIRE treatment, but not significantly different one week after MIRE treatment. Conclusion. Our study suggests that MIRE may be a useful therapeutic option for the management of the myofascial trigger point in humans.

  13. Development and Implementation of an Ultrafast Vacuum-UV (8eV) Light Source for use in UV-VUV Pump Probe Experiments of Neutral Excited State Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yusong; Horton, Spencer; Matsika, Spiridoula; Weinacht, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Probing neutral excited state dynamics in polyatomic molecules with ultrafast laser systems enables us to study phenomena such as internal conversion, isomerization, intersystem crossing, and dissociation. Using the third harmonic (260 nm) and the fifth harmonic (156 nm) of our laser system we have developed an apparatus to perform pump-probe experiments for the study neutral excited state dynamics in various polyatomic molecules. The fifth harmonic of our laser system is generated through the four-wave-mixing process of k5 ω = 2k3 ω -kω performed with a non-collinear geometry in an argon gas cell. In several polyatomic molecular systems of interest a photon with 8 eV of energy gives us the unique ability to ionize from essentially anywhere along the excited state potential, but does not produce any ionization yield from the ground state. This enables us to measure excited state lifetimes without the photon energy becoming too low to ionize while the nuclear wave-packet is traveling on the excited state potential. We also have the advantage of working in the perturbative weak-field ionization regime. These experiments can also be directly compare to strong-field ionization experiments conducted with a UV-pump and an IR-probe conducted on the same molecules.

  14. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Eissa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence (DNI include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and that from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI. This study investigates if the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and a collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement (SAM instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance, were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE of 5 %, a relative bias of +1 % and acoefficient of determination greater than 0.97. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a Two Term Henyey–Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 22 and −19 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.89. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard DNI measurements.

  15. Analysis of monochromatic signals by using data from the detector of Allegro gravitational waves; Analise de sinais monocromaticos utilizando dados do detector de ondas gravitacionais Allegro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Fernanda Gomes de

    2010-07-01

    The present work is developed in the searching for monochromatic gravitational waves signals in ALLEGRO's data. We have two procedures for data analysis based on the periodogram of Welch, which a method for the detection of monochromatic signals in the middle of noise which basically makes power spectrum estimates using averaged modified periodograms. By using this method it was possible to obtain a power spectrum for the data which reinforce peaks due to monochromatic signals. The two procedures of analysis for the years 1997 and 1999, were focused on monitoring a peak that appears in the spectral density of ALLEGRO's detector, so called 'mystery mode' (near 887 Hz). We look for variations in the frequency of the mystery mode that agree with the variation of the Doppler effect. In the rst analysis we have used by the variation of daily and annual Doppler shift. For the second one, we have only searched annual Doppler shift. We have applied the periodogram of Welch in both tests in the raw data of the detector in the search for a real signal and we found some peaks that can be candidates of gravitational radiation only the second analysis. In order to test the method we used in both analysis a simulated gravitational wave signal modulated by the Doppler effect injected in the data. We detected in both methods the artificial signal of GW simulated. Therefore we have reason to conclude that both methods are efficient in the search for monochromatic signals. (author)

  16. 1D Modeling of a Bifacial Silicon Solar Cell under Frequency Modulation Monochromatic Illumination: Determination of the Equivalent Electrical Circuit Related to the Surface Recombination Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ly Diallo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present in this study the determination of the equivalent electrical circuits associated to the recombination velocities for a bifacial silicon solar cell under frequency modulation and monochromatic illumination. This determination is based on Bode and Nyquist diagrams that is the variations of the phase and the module of the back surface and intrinsic junction recombination velocities. Their dependence on illumination wavelength is also shown.

  17. Lighting: Green Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  18. Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A special lighting technology was developed for space-based commercial plant growth research on NASA's Space Shuttle. Surgeons have used this technology to treat brain cancer on Earth, in two successful operations. The treatment technique, called Photodynamic Therapy, requires the surgeon to use tiny, pinhead-size Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) (a source that releases long wavelengths of light ) to activate light-sensitive, tumor-treating drugs. 'A young woman operated on in May 1999 has fully recovered with no complications and no evidence of the tumor coming back,' said Dr. Harry Whelan, a pediatric neurologist at the Medical Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. Laser light has been used for this type of surgery in the past, but the LED light illuminates through all nearby tissues, reaching parts of a tumor that shorter wavelengths of laser light carnot. The new probe is safer because the longer wavelengths of light are cooler than the shorter wavelengths of laser light, making the LED less likely to injure normal brain tissue near the tumor. It can be used for hours at a time while still remaining cool to the touch. The LED light source is compact, about the size of a briefcase, and can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a laser. The LEDs, developed and managed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, have been used on seven Space Shuttle flights inside the Microgravity Astroculture Facility. This technology has also been successfully used to further commercial research in crop growth.

  19. Local and Systemic Cardiovascular Effects from Monochromatic Infrared Therapy in Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ru-Lan Hsieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infrared (IR therapy is used for pain relief in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA. However, IR’s effects on the cardiovascular system remain uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the local and systemic cardiovascular effects of monochromatic IR therapy on patients with knee OA in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Seventy-one subjects with knee OA received one session of 40 min of active or placebo monochromatic IR treatment (with power output of 6.24 W, wavelength of 890 nm, power density of 34.7 mW/cm2 for 40 min, total energy of 41.6 J/cm2 per knee per session over the knee joints. Heart rate, blood pressure, and knee arterial blood flow velocity were periodically assessed at the baseline, during, and after treatment. Data were analyzed by repeated-measure analysis of covariance. Compared to baseline, there were no statistically significant group x time interaction effects between the 2 groups for heart rate (P=0.160, blood pressure (systolic blood pressure: P=0.861; diastolic blood pressure: P=0.757, or mean arterial blood flow velocity (P=0.769 in follow-up assessments. The present study revealed that although there was no increase of knee arterial blood flow velocity, monochromatic IR therapy produced no detrimental systemic cardiovascular effects.

  20. Atom probe crystallography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gault, Baptiste; Moody, Michael P; Cairney, Julie M; Ringer, Simon P

    2012-01-01

    This review addresses new developments in the emerging area of "atom probe crystallography", a materials characterization tool with the unique capacity to reveal both composition and crystallographic...

  1. Direct measurement of light waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulielmakis, E; Uiberacker, M; Kienberger, R; Baltuska, A; Yakovlev, V; Scrinzi, A; Westerwalbesloh, Th; Kleineberg, U; Heinzmann, U; Drescher, M; Krausz, F

    2004-08-27

    The electromagnetic field of visible light performs approximately 10(15) oscillations per second. Although many instruments are sensitive to the amplitude and frequency (or wavelength) of these oscillations, they cannot access the light field itself. We directly observed how the field built up and disappeared in a short, few-cycle pulse of visible laser light by probing the variation of the field strength with a 250-attosecond electron burst. Our apparatus allows complete characterization of few-cycle waves of visible, ultraviolet, and/or infrared light, thereby providing the possibility for controlled and reproducible synthesis of ultrabroadband light waveforms.

  2. Acceleration of relativistic electrons due to resonant interaction with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzichev, Ilya; Shklyar, David

    2016-04-01

    One of the most challenging problems of the radiation belt studies is the problem of particles energization. Being related to the process of particle precipitation and posing a threat to scientific instruments on satellites, the problem of highly energetic particles in the radiation belts turns out to be very important. A lot of progress has been made in this field, but still some aspects of the energization process remain open. The main mechanism of particle energization in the radiation belts is the resonant interaction with different waves, mainly, in whistler frequency range. The problem of special interest is the resonant wave-particle interaction of the electrons of relativistic energies. Relativistic resonance condition provides some important features such as the so-called relativistic turning acceleration discovered by Omura et al. [1, 2]. This process appears to be a very efficient mechanism of acceleration in the case of interaction with the whistler-mode waves propagating along geomagnetic field lines. But some whistler-mode waves propagate obliquely to the magnetic field lines, and the efficiency of relativistic turning acceleration in this case is to be studied. In this report, we present the Hamiltonian theory of the resonant interaction of relativistic electrons with oblique monochromatic whistler-mode waves. We have shown that the presence of turning point requires a special treatment when one aims to derive the resonant Hamiltonian, and we have obtained two different resonant Hamiltonians: one to be applied far enough from the turning point, while another is valid in the vicinity of the turning point. We have performed numerical simulation of relativistic electron interaction with whistler-mode waves generated in the ionosphere by a monochromatic source. It could be, for example, a low-frequency transmitter. The wave-field distribution along unperturbed particle trajectory is calculated by means of geometrical optics. We show that the obliquity of

  3. Abnormal hypothalamic response to light in Seasonal Affective Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles, Vandewalle; Marc, Hébert; Catherine, Beaulieu; Laurence, Richard; Véronique, Daneault; Marie-Lou, Garon; Jean, Leblanc; Didier, Grandjean; Pierre, Maquet; Sophie, Schwartz; Marie, Dumont; Julien, Doyon; Julie, Carrier

    2017-01-01

    Background Vulnerability to the reduction in natural light associated with fall/winter is generally accepted as the main trigger of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), while light therapy is a treatment of choice of the disorder. However, the relationship between exposure to light and mood regulation remains unclear. As compared to green light, blue light was shown to acutely modulate emotion brain processing in healthy individuals. Here, we investigated the impact of light on emotion brain processing in patients with SAD and healthy controls and its relationship with retinal light sensitivity. Methods Fourteen symptomatic untreated patients with SAD (34.5 ± 8.2 y.o.; 9F) and sixteen healthy controls (32.3 ± 7.7 y.o.; 11F) performed an auditory emotional task in functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during the fall/winter season, while being exposed to alternating blue and green monochromatic light. Scotopic and photopic retinal light sensitivities were then evaluated using electroretinography. Results Blue light enhanced responses to auditory emotional stimuli in the posterior hypothalamus in patients with SAD, while green light decreased these responses. These effects of blue and green light were not observed in healthy controls despite similar retinal sensitivity in SAD and control subjects. Conclusions; These results point to the posterior hypothalamus as the neurobiological substrate involved in specific aspects of SAD, including a distinctive response to light and altered emotional responses. PMID:21820647

  4. Monochromatic Minibeams Radiotherapy: From Healthy Tissue-Sparing Effect Studies Toward First Experimental Glioma Bearing Rats Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deman, Pierre [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Vautrin, Mathias [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); DOSIsoft, Cachan (France); Edouard, Magali [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Stupar, Vasile [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Bobyk, Laure; Farion, Regine [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Elleaume, Helene [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Remy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L. [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Esteve, Francois [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France); Adam, Jean-Francois, E-mail: adam@esrf.fr [INSERM, Grenoble (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Grenoble University Hospital, Grenoble (France)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate high-dose single fraction delivered with monochromatic X-rays minibeams for the radiotherapy of primary brain tumors in rats. Methods and Materials: Two groups of healthy rats were irradiated with one anteroposterior minibeam incidence (four minibeams, 123 Gy prescribed dose at 1 cm depth in the brain) or two interleaved incidences (54 Gy prescribed dose in a 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 4.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered in the right hemisphere), respectively. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up was performed over 1 year. T2-weighted (T2w) images, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and blood vessel permeability maps were acquired. F98 tumor bearing rats were also irradiated with interleaved minibeams to achieve a homogeneous dose of 54 Gy delivered to an 8 Multiplication-Sign 8 Multiplication-Sign 7.8 mm{sup 3} volume centered on the tumor. Anatomic and functional MRI follow-up was performed every 10 days after irradiation. T2w images, ADC, and perfusion maps were acquired. Results: All healthy rats were euthanized 1 year after irradiation without any clinical alteration visible by simple examination. T2w and ADC measurements remain stable for the single incidence irradiation group. Localized Gd-DOTA permeability, however, was observed 9 months after irradiation for the interleaved incidences group. The survival time of irradiated glioma bearing rats was significantly longer than that of untreated animals (49 {+-} 12.5 days versus 23.3 {+-} 2 days, p < 0.001). The tumoral cerebral blood flow and blood volume tend to decrease after irradiation. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the sparing effect of minibeams on healthy tissue. The increased life span achieved for irradiated glioma bearing rats was similar to the one obtained with other radiotherapy techniques. This experimental tumor therapy study shows the feasibility of using X-ray minibeams with high doses in brain tumor radiotherapy.

  5. FABRICATION AND APPLICATION OF NEARFIELD OPTICAL FIBRE PROBE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN JIA-LIN; XU JIAN-HUA; TIAN GUANG-YAN; GUo JI-HUA; ZHAO JUN; XIE AI-FANG; ZHANG ZE-BO

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the fabrication of a large cone angle near-field optical fibre probe, using the two-step chemical etching method and bent probe, is introduced, and the controlling parameters of the coated Cr-Al film at the probe tip are presented. The scanning electron microscopy images display that the tip diameter of the uncoated large cone angle fibre probe obtained is less than 50nm, the cone angle over 90°, and the diameter of light aperture at the coated probe tip is less than 100nm. The measured results of the optical transmission efficiency for various probe tips show that the uncoated straight optical fibre probe, film-coated straight probe and film-coated bent probe are 3×10-1, 2×10-3, and l×10-4 times that of the flat fibre probe, respectively. In addition, the force images and near-field optical images of a standard sample are acquired using a large cone angle and film-coated bent probe.

  6. Pioneer Jupiter orbiter probe mission 1980, probe description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    The adaptation of the Saturn-Uranus Atmospheric Entry Probe (SUAEP) to a Jupiter entry probe is summarized. This report is extracted from a comprehensive study of Jovian missions, atmospheric model definitions and probe subsystem alternatives.

  7. Geometric phase and Pancharatnam phase induced by light wave polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lages, J; Vigoureux, J -M

    2013-01-01

    We use the quantum kinematic approach to revisit geometric phases associated with polarizing processes of a monochromatic light wave. We give the expressions of geometric phases for any, unitary or non-unitary, cyclic or non-cyclic transformations of the light wave state. Contrarily to the usually considered case of absorbing polarizers, we found that a light wave passing through a polarizer may acquire in general a non zero geometric phase. This geometric phase exists despite the fact that initial and final polarization states are in phase according to the Pancharatnam criterion and can not be measured using interferometric superposition. Consequently, there is a difference between the Pancharatnam phase and the complete geometric phase acquired by a light wave passing through a polarizer. We illustrate our work with the particular example of total reflection based polarizers.

  8. Light on curved backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, D.; Nelson, S.; Nowakowski, M.

    2015-05-01

    We consider the motion of light on different spacetime manifolds by calculating the deflection angle, lensing properties and by probing into the possibility of bound states. The metrics in which we examine the light motion include, among other items, a general relativistic dark matter metric, a dirty black hole, and a worm hole metric, the last two inspired by noncommutative geometry. The lensing in a holographic screen metric is discussed in detail. We study also the bending of light around naked singularities like, e.g., the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric and include other cases. A generic property of light behavior in these exotic metrics is pointed out. For the standard metric like the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter cases, we improve the accuracy of the lensing results for the weak and strong regimes.

  9. Light on curved backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Batic, D; Nowakowski, M

    2014-01-01

    We consider the motion of light on different spacetime manifolds by calculating the deflection angle, lensing properties and by probing into the possibility of bound states. The metrics in which we examine the light motion include, among other, a general relativistic Dark Matter metric, a dirty Black Hole and a Worm Hole metric, the last two inspired by non-commutative geometry. The lensing in a Holographic Screen metric is discussed in detail. We study also the bending of light around naked singularities like, e.g., the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric and include other cases. A generic property of light behaviour in these exotic metrics is pointed out. For the standard metric like the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter cases we improve the accuracy of the lensing results for the weak and strong regime.

  10. From light to knowledge

    CERN Multimedia

    Globe Info

    2011-01-01

    An evening in two parts with Fabio Barblan. 1/ Light in daily life and what light means for an astronomer (exhibition). 2/ Light in all its states or how to extract information from the heavenly bodies: exploration using telescopes, space probes, spectrometry and imagery. Measuring and modelling using light (physical parameters, distances, etc.) Fabio Barblan is "an external scientific collaborator" and member of the photometry, stellar variability and GAIA group at the Observatoire de Genève. Observatoire de Genève Friday 14 October from 8:30 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. » Suitable for all – Admission free - Lecture in French For further information: +33 (0)4 50 41 96 80

  11. Is ‘Superluminal’Light Propagation Possible in Dispersive Media?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Kai; WU Ling-An; SHIH Yan-Hua

    2004-01-01

    @@ In a dispersive medium, different monochromatic modes of light have different phase velocities. Under special circumstances, a superposition of these modes results in an interesting effect wherein the group velocity (the velocity at which the peak of the wavepacket propagates) could be greater than c or even negative although the phase velocities of the modes are all less than c. Can this superluminal group velocity be used for information velocity of its component modes. Thus the maximum speed for information transfer, which involves the sending of a finite pulse, cannot be greater than the maximum phase velocity in the medium.

  12. Probing the nano-bio interface with nanoplasmonic optical probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, X.; Wu, Linxi; Khanehzar, Ali; Feizpour, Amin; Xu, Fangda; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2014-08-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles have large cross-sections in both optical and electron microscopy and plasmon coupling between noble metal nanoparticles facilitate the characterization of subdiffraction limit separations through spectral analysis of the scattered light in Plasmon Coupling Microscopy (PCM). The size compatibility of noble metal nanoparticles together with the ability to encode specific functionality in a rational fashion by control of the nanoparticle surface makes noble metal nanoparticles unique probes for a broad range of biological processes. Recent applications of the technology include i.) characterization of cellular heterogeneity in nanomaterial uptake and processing through macrophages, ii.) testing the role of viral membrane lipids in mediating viral binding and trafficking, and iii.) characterizing the spatial organization of cancer biomarkers in plasma membranes. This paper reviews some of these applications and introduces the physical and material science principles underlying them. We will also introduce the use of membrane wrapped noble metal nanoparticles, which combine the superb photophysical properties of a nanoparticle core with the biological functionality of a membrane, as probes in PCM.

  13. Refinement of a thermal threshold probe to prevent burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, M J; Taylor, P M; Slingsby, L C; Murrell, J C

    2016-02-01

    Thermal threshold testing is commonly used for pain research. The stimulus may cause burning and merits prevention. Thermal probe modifications hypothesized to reduce burning were evaluated for practicality and effect. Studies were conducted on two humans and eight cats. Unmodified probe 0 was tested on two humans and promising modifications were also evaluated on cats. Probe 1 incorporated rapid cooling after threshold was reached: probe 1a used a Peltier system and probe 1b used water cooling. Probe 2 released skin contact immediately after threshold. Probe 3 (developed in the light of evidence of 'hot spots' in probe 0) incorporated reduced thermal mass and even heating across the skin contact area. Human skin was heated to 48℃ (6℃ above threshold) and the resulting burn was evaluated using area of injury and a simple descriptive scale (SDS). Probe 1a cooled the skin but required further heat dissipation, excessive power, was not 'fail-safe' and was inappropriate for animal mounting. Probe 1b caused less damage than no cooling (27 ± 13 and 38 ± 11 mm(2) respectively, P = 0.0266; median SDS 1.5 and 4 respectively, P = 0.0317) but was cumbersome. Probe 2 was unwieldy and was not evaluated further. Probe 3 produced even heating without blistering in humans. With probe 3 in cats, after opioid treatment, thermal threshold reached cut-out (55℃) on 24 occasions, exceeded 50℃ in a further 32 tests and exceeded 48℃ in the remainder. No skin damage was evident immediately after testing and mild hyperaemia in three cats at 2-3 days resolved rapidly. Probe 3 appeared to be suitable for thermal threshold testing.

  14. TU-EF-204-12: Quantitative Evaluation of Spectral Detector CT Using Virtual Monochromatic Images: Initial Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X; Guild, J [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Arbique, G; Anderson, J [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Dhanantwari, A [Philips Healthcare, Highland Heights, OH (United States); Yagil, Y [Philips Medical Systems, Haifa (Israel)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To evaluate the image quality and spectral information of a spectral detector CT (SDCT) scanner using virtual monochromatic (VM) energy images. Methods The SDCT scanner (Philips Healthcare) was equipped with a dual-layer detector and spectral iterative reconstruction (IR), which generates conventional 80–140 kV polychromatic energy (PE) CT images using both detector layers, PE images from the low-energy (upper) and high-energy (lower) detector layers and VM images. A solid water phantom with iodine (2.0–20.0 mg I/ml) and calcium (50.0–600.0 mg Ca/ml) rod inserts was used to evaluate effective energy estimate (EEE) and iodine contrast to noise ratio (CNR). The EEE corresponding to an insert CT number in a PE image was calculated from a CT number fit to the VM image set. Since PE image is prone to beam-hardening artifact EEE may underestimate the actual energy separation from two layers of the detector. A 30-cm-diameter water phantom was used to evaluate noise power spectrum (NPS). The phantoms were scanned at 120 and 140 kV with the same CTDIvol. Results The CT number difference for contrast inserts in VM images (50–150 keV) was 1.3±6% between 120 and 140 kV scans. The difference of EEE calculated from low- and high-energy detector images was 11.5 and 16.7 keV for 120 and 140 kV scans, respectively. The differences calculated from 140 and 100 kV conventional PE images were 12.8, and 20.1 keV from 140 and 80 kV conventional PE images. The iodine CNR increased monotonically with decreased keV. Compared to conventional PE images, the peak of NPS curves from VM images were shifted to lower frequency. Conclusion The EEE results indicates that SDCT at 120 and 140 kV may have energy separation comparable to 100/140 kV and 80/140 kV dual-kV imaging. The effects of IR on CNR and NPS require further investigation for SDCT. Author YY and AD are Philips Healthcare employees.

  15. An Ultrasonographic Periodontal Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoncini, C. A.; Hinders, M. K.

    2010-02-01

    Periodontal disease, commonly known as gum disease, affects millions of people. The current method of detecting periodontal pocket depth is painful, invasive, and inaccurate. As an alternative to manual probing, an ultrasonographic periodontal probe is being developed to use ultrasound echo waveforms to measure periodontal pocket depth, which is the main measure of periodontal disease. Wavelet transforms and pattern classification techniques are implemented in artificial intelligence routines that can automatically detect pocket depth. The main pattern classification technique used here, called a binary classification algorithm, compares test objects with only two possible pocket depth measurements at a time and relies on dimensionality reduction for the final determination. This method correctly identifies up to 90% of the ultrasonographic probe measurements within the manual probe's tolerance.

  16. Hard probes 2006 Asilomar

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

  17. Low intensity monochromatic red, blue or green light increases the carbohydrate levels and substantially extends the shelf life of fresh-cut lettuce

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woltering, E.J.; Seifu, Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    During dark storage of fresh-cut product prepared from butterhead and iceberg lettuce the levels of carbohydrates (glucose, fructose, sucrose, starch) decrease. Carbohydrate levels were low in butterhead lettuce at the start [~20 mg/g dry matter (DW)] and levels decreased by over 50% during storage

  18. 单色光对产蛋鸡蛋重和蛋形的影响%Effect of Monochromatic Light on Egg Weight and Shape in Laying Hens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    额尔敦木图; 陈耀星; 王子旭; 李俊英; 曹静; 贾六军

    2007-01-01

    试验采用红(660 nm)、绿(560 nm)、蓝(480 nm)三种发光二极管(处理组)和白炽灯(400~700 nm)(对照组),对180只海兰褐蛋鸡进行人工光照,研究单色光对蛋重、蛋长径、短径和蛋形指数的影响.结果提示:蓝光使蛋长径变短而红光使蛋短径变短,蓝光和红光组蛋重随产蛋周龄而增长的趋势小于白光和绿光组.

  19. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  20. Information Gains from Cosmological Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Grandis, S; Refregier, A; Amara, A; Nicola, A

    2015-01-01

    In light of the growing number of cosmological observations, it is important to develop versatile tools to quantify the constraining power and consistency of cosmological probes. Originally motivated from information theory, we use the relative entropy to compute the information gained by Bayesian updates in units of bits. This measure quantifies both the improvement in precision and the 'surprise', i.e. the tension arising from shifts in central values. Our starting point is a WMAP9 prior which we update with observations of the distance ladder, supernovae (SNe), baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), and weak lensing as well as the 2015 Planck release. We consider the parameters of the flat $\\Lambda$CDM concordance model and some of its extensions which include curvature and Dark Energy equation of state parameter $w$. We find that, relative to WMAP9 and within these model spaces, the probes that have provided the greatest gains are Planck (10 bits), followed by BAO surveys (5.1 bits) and SNe experiments (3.1 ...

  1. Light dilution via wavelength management for efficient high-density photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D; Graham, Percival J; Nguyen, Brian; Sargent, Edward H; Sinton, David

    2017-02-06

    The spectral distribution of light influences microalgae productivity; however, development of photobioreactors has proceeded largely without regard to spectral optimization. Here we use monochromatic light to quantify the joint influence of path length, culture density, light intensity and wavelength on productivity and efficiency in Synechococcus elongatus. The productivity of green light was ∼4 x that of red at the highest levels of culture density, depth and light intensity. This performance is attributed to the combination of increased dilution and penetration of this weakly absorbed wavelength over a larger volume fraction of the reactor. In contrast, red light outperformed other wavelengths in low-density cultures with low light intensities. Low density cultures also adapted more rapidly to reduce absorption of longer wavelengths, allowing for prolonged cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that, particularly for artificially lit photobioreactors, wavelength needs to be included as a critical operational parameter to maintain optimal performance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Initial application of dual energy CT in enterography: monochromatic images of normal intestinal wall%正常回肠壁双能CT成像

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    容蓉; 邱建星; 王霄英; 孙晓伟; 蒋学祥

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the image quality of CT enterography (CTE) with monochromatic images of dual energy CT. Methods:Eighteen patients underwent CT enterography with dual energy CT (Gemstone spectral imaging,GSI) examinations. The spectrum analysis was used to select the monochromatic images for obtaining the best contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) for ileum wall. The CNR and image noise of ileum wall at the selected monochromatic level and the conventional polychromatic images were measured. Two readers assessed the image quality, noise and sharpness of both optimal CNR monochromatic level and the conventional polychromatic images. Results: At the selected monochromatic level,the image noise of monochromatic images was higher than that of polychromatic images (fat: 16. 87±2. 73 vs 14. 58±2. 26,t= 3. 85,P<0. 01;fluid: 16. 08±4. 17 vs 13. 51 ±2. 85,t= 4. 96,P<0. 01). The CNR of ileum wall in monochromatic images was also higher than that of polychromatic images (4. 36±0. 71 vs 3. 34±0. 78,t=4. 702,P<0. 01). The intraclass correlation coefficient values among readers for optimal CNR monochromatic images quality was 1. 00. Conclusion: Monochromatic images at optimal CNR keV for CTE can improve CNR for normal ileum wall and improve the overall image quality of CTE.%目的:探讨双能CT小肠成像单能量图像显示正常回肠壁的成像质量及其与混合能量图像在小肠CT成像中的差异.方法:对18例拟诊为炎症性肠病患者行小肠CT成像(CTE),采用双能CT宝石能谱成像技术行CT平扫及双期增强扫描(实质期和延迟期),将实质期图像数据分别进行混合能量和GSI单能量重建,应用能谱分析软件,获得正常回肠壁最佳对比噪声比(CNR)单能图像的KeY值.计算混合能量和单能图像上正常回肠壁的对比噪声比,测量两种图像的噪声并进行配对t检验;由两位医师对两种图像上主动脉锐利度、噪声和图像质量进行主观评分并进行配对t检验,计算组

  3. Monochromatic photography of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant. Plotting of isophotes of partial nebula radiation in the (OIII) and (NII)+H. cap alpha. lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sitnik, T.G.; Toropova, M.S. (Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Gosudarstvennyj Astronomicheskij Inst. ' ' GAISh' ' )

    1982-11-01

    System of the isophotes of the 9' size in the west part of the Cyg Loop supernova remnant using monochromatic photographs in the (O3) and (N2)+Hsub(..cap alpha..) lines is obtained. A relative displacement of the regions of emission in these lines is discovered and explained by temperature reduction due to radiative losses behind the shock wave of the supernova explosion. The morphology difference between the (O3) and (N2)+Hsub(..cap alpha..) lines is explained. Anomalously large intensity ratios Isub((O3))/Isub(Hsub(..beta..)) are supposed to be due to spatial separation of the corresponding emission regions.

  4. Single optical fiber probe for optogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Ryan; Habibi, Mohammad; Pashaie, Ramin

    2012-03-01

    With the advent of optogenetics, all optical control and visualization of the activity of specific cell types is possible. We have developed a fiber optic based probe to control/visualize neuronal activity deep in the brain of awake behaving animals. In this design a thin multimode optical fiber serves as the head of the probe to be inserted into the brain. This fiber is used to deliver excitation/stimulation optical pulses and guide a sample of the emission signal back to a detector. The major trade off in the design of such a system is to decrease the size of the fiber and intensity of input light to minimize physical damage and to avoid photobleaching/phototoxicity but to keep the S/N reasonably high. Here the excitation light, and the associated emission signal, are frequency modulated. Then the output of the detector is passed through a time-lens which compresses the distributed energy of the emission signal and maximizes the instantaneous S/N. By measuring the statistics of the noise, the structure of the time lens can be designed to achieve the global optimum of S/N. Theoretically, the temporal resolution of the system is only limited by the time lens diffraction limit. By adding a second detector, we eliminated the effect of input light fluctuations, imperfection of the optical filters, and back-reflection of the excitation light. We have also designed fibers and micro mechanical assemblies for distributed delivery and detection of light.

  5. Goos-Haenchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts for bounded wave packets of light

    CERN Document Server

    Ornigotti, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We present precise expressions of the spatial and angular Goos-Haenchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts experienced by a longitudinally and transversally limited beam of light (wave packet) upon reflection from a dielectric interface, as opposed to the well-known case of a monochromatic beam which is bounded in transverse directions but infinitely extended along the direction of propagation. This is done under the assumption that the detector time is longer than the temporal length of the wave packet (wave packet regime). Our results will be applied to the case of a Gaussian wave packet and show that, at the leading order in the Taylor expansion of reflected-field amplitudes, the results are the same of the monochromatic case.

  6. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  7. The Organic-Oxide Interfacial Layer on the Studies of Organic Electronics (Light-Emitting Diodes and Solar Cells)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-09

    Systems) after illuminating the devices with monochromatic light from xenon lamp (Oriel 66902 150 mW Solar Simulator) passing through a monochromator...60 s and then transferred to the sealed glass petri dish to carry out solvent annealing procedure as described in Ref. 3 (denoted as slow-grown film...order to avoid the morphological change upon heat annealing , the device is free of baking treatment. The current density -voltage (J-V

  8. Light cluster production at NICA

    CERN Document Server

    Bastian, N -U; Blaschke, D; Danielewicz, P; Ivanov, Yu B; Karpenko, Iu; Röpke, G; Rogachevsky, O; Wolter, H H

    2016-01-01

    Light cluster production at the NICA accelerator complex offers unique possibilities to use these states as "rare probes" of in-medium characteristics such as phase space occupation and early flow. In order to explain this statement, in this contribution theoretical considerations from the nuclear statistical equilibrium model and from a quantum statistical model of cluster production are supplemented with a discussion of a transport model for light cluster formation and with results from hydrodynamic simulations combined with the coalescence model.

  9. The nature of light what is a photon?

    CERN Document Server

    Roychoudhuri, Chandra; Creath, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Focusing on the unresolved debate between Newton and Huygens from 300 years ago, The Nature of Light: What is a Photon? discusses the reality behind enigmatic photons. It explores the fundamental issues pertaining to light that still exist today. Gathering contributions from globally recognized specialists in electrodynamics and quantum optics, the book begins by clearly presenting the mainstream view of the nature of light and photons. It then provides a new and challenging scientific epistemology that explains how to overcome the prevailing paradoxes and confusions arising from the accepted definition of a photon as a monochromatic Fourier mode of the vacuum. The book concludes with an array of experiments that demonstrate the innovative thinking needed to examine the wave-particle duality of photons. Looking at photons from both mainstream and out-of-box viewpoints, this volume is sure to inspire the next generation of quantum optics scientists and engineers to go beyond the Copenhagen interpretat...

  10. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; 10.1118/1.4761870

    2012-01-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a PMMA phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Differential Compto...

  11. Analysis and interpretation of the first monochromatic X-ray tomography data collected at the Australian Synchrotron Imaging and Medical beamline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Andrew W; Hall, Christopher J; Mayo, Sheridan C; Häusermann, Daniel; Maksimenko, Anton; Gureyev, Timur E; Nesterets, Yakov I; Wilkins, Stephen W; Lewis, Robert A

    2012-09-01

    The first monochromatic X-ray tomography experiments conducted at the Imaging and Medical beamline of the Australian Synchrotron are reported. The sample was a phantom comprising nylon line, Al wire and finer Cu wire twisted together. Data sets were collected at four different X-ray energies. In order to quantitatively account for the experimental values obtained for the Hounsfield (or CT) number, it was necessary to consider various issues including the point-spread function for the X-ray imaging system and harmonic contamination of the X-ray beam. The analysis and interpretation of the data includes detailed considerations of the resolution and efficiency of the CCD detector, calculations of the X-ray spectrum prior to monochromatization, allowance for the response of the double-crystal Si monochromator used (via X-ray dynamical theory), as well as a thorough assessment of the role of X-ray phase-contrast effects. Computer simulations relating to the tomography experiments also provide valuable insights into these important issues. It was found that a significant discrepancy between theory and experiment for the Cu wire could be largely resolved in terms of the effect of the point-spread function. The findings of this study are important in respect of any attempts to extract quantitative information from X-ray tomography data, across a wide range of disciplines, including materials and life sciences.

  12. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P; 10.1118/1.4767770

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Cent...

  13. Depth of interaction and bias voltage depenence of the spectral response in a pixellated CdTe detector operating in time-over-threshold mode subjected to monochromatic X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröjdh, E.; Fröjdh, C.; Gimenez, E. N.; Maneuski, D.; Marchal, J.; Norlin, B.; O'Shea, V.; Stewart, G.; Wilhelm, H.; Modh Zain, R.; Thungström, G.

    2012-03-01

    High stopping power is one of the most important figures of merit for X-ray detectors. CdTe is a promising material but suffers from: material defects, non-ideal charge transport and long range X-ray fluorescence. Those factors reduce the image quality and deteriorate spectral information. In this project we used a monochromatic pencil beam collimated through a 20μm pinhole to measure the detector spectral response in dependance on the depth of interaction. The sensor was a 1mm thick CdTe detector with a pixel pitch of 110μm, bump bonded to a Timepix readout chip operating in Time-Over-Threshold mode. The measurements were carried out at the Extreme Conditions beamline I15 of the Diamond Light Source. The beam was entering the sensor at an angle of \\texttildelow20 degrees to the surface and then passed through \\texttildelow25 pixels before leaving through the bottom of the sensor. The photon energy was tuned to 77keV giving a variation in the beam intensity of about three orders of magnitude along the beam path. Spectra in Time-over-Threshold (ToT) mode were recorded showing each individual interaction. The bias voltage was varied between -30V and -300V to investigate how the electric field affected the spectral information. For this setup it is worth noticing the large impact of fluorescence. At -300V the photo peak and escape peak are of similar height. For high bias voltages the spectra remains clear throughout the whole depth but for lower voltages as -50V, only the bottom part of the sensor carries spectral information. This is an effect of the low hole mobility and the longer range the electrons have to travel in a low field.

  14. WOW: light print, light propel, light point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Aabo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    anywhere in a sample at any orientation using real-time 3D optical micromanipulation with six degrees of freedom. One of the key aspects of our demonstrated WOWs is the change in direction of in-coupled light and the marked increase in numerical aperture of the out-coupled light. Hence, each light...... propelled WOW can tap from a relatively broad incident beam and generate a much more tightly confined light at its tip. The presentation contains both numerical simulations related to the propagation of light through a WOW and preliminary experimental demonstrations on our BioPhotonics Workstation...

  15. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Street Lighting Host Site: Lija Loop, Portland, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2009-11-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in a residential street lighting application, under the U.S. Department of Energy GATEWAY Solid-State Lighting Technology Demonstration Program. In this project, eight 100W (nominal) high-pressure sodium cobra head fixtures were replaced with a like number of LED street light luminaires manufactured by Leotek, Inc. The Leotek product achieved an estimated payback in the Lija Loop installation of about 20 years for replacement scenarios and a much shorter 7.6 years for new installations. Much of the associated energy savings (55%) supporting these payback periods, however, were achieved by reducing average horizontal photopic illuminance a similar amount (53%). Examined from a different perspective, the measured performance suggests that the Leotek product is at approximate parity with the HPS cobra head in terms of average delivered photopic illumination for a given power consumption. HPS comprises the second most efficacious street lighting technology available, exceeded only by low pressure sodium (LPS). LPS technology is not considered suitable for most street lighting applications due to its monochromatic spectral output and poor color rendering ability; therefore, this LED product is performing at an efficiency level comparable to its primary competition in this application.

  16. Lightening up Light Therapy: Activation of Retrograde Signaling Pathway by Photobiomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Pyo

    2014-11-01

    Photobiomodulation utilizes monochromatic (or quasimonochromatic) light in the electromagnetic region of 600∼1000 nm for the treatment of soft tissues in a nondestructive and nonthermal mode. It is conceivable that photobiomodulation is based upon the ability of the light to alter cell metabolism as it is absorbed by general hemoproteins and cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in particular. Recently it has been suggested radiation of visible and infrared (IR) activates retrograde signaling pathway from mitochondria to nucleus. In this review, the role of COX in the photobiomodulation will be discussed. Further a possible role of water as a photoreceptor will be suggested.

  17. Optical Characterization of Organic Light-Emitting Thin Films in the Ultraviolet and Visible Spectral Ranges

    CERN Document Server

    Montereali, R M; Nichelatti, E; Di Pompeo, F; Segreto, E; Canci, N; Cavanna, F

    2012-01-01

    The spectrophotometric characterization of high efficiency, optically-active samples such as light-emitting organic bulks and thin films can be problematic because their broad-band luminescence is detected together with the monochromatic transmitted and reflected signals, hence perturbing measurements of optical transmittance and reflectance at wavelengths within the photoexcitation band. As a matter of fact, most commercial spectrophotometers apply spectral filtering before the light beam reaches the sample, not after it. In this Report, we introduce and discuss the method we have developed to correct photometric spectra that are perturbed by photoluminescence.

  18. Preparation, regulation and biological application of a Schiff base fluorescence probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ninghua; Diao, Haipeng; Liu, Wen; Wang, Jingru; Feng, Liheng

    2016-01-01

    A facile fluorescence switch with Schiff base units was designed and achieved by nucleophilic addition and dehydration reaction. The fluorescence of the probe can be regulated by metal ions (Al3 + and Cu2 +). The whole process shows that the weak fluorescence of the probe enhances with the addition of Al3 +, and then the strong fluorescence of the probe/Al3 + ensemble reduces by introducing Cu2 +. Meanwhile, the solution color changes of the probe with metal ions can be observed under 365 nm UV-vis light from weak light, pale green, green, pale green to weak light. Noticeably, the photo regulation processes of the probe by metal ions can be realized in the biological system and applied in cells imaging. The work provides a new strategy for designing facile regulation probe and develops a new application for Schiff base derivatives.

  19. An approach to directly probe simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipreos, Edward T.; Balachandran, Riju S.

    2016-08-01

    The theory of special relativity derives from the Lorentz transformation. The Lorentz transformation implies differential simultaneity and light speed isotropy. Experiments to probe differential simultaneity should be able to distinguish the Lorentz transformation from a kinematically-similar alternate transformation that predicts absolute simultaneity, the absolute Lorentz transformation. Here, we describe how published optical tests of light speed isotropy/anisotropy cannot distinguish between the two transformations. We show that the shared equations of the two transformations, from the perspective of the “stationary” observer, are sufficient to predict null results in optical resonator experiments and in tests of frequency changes in one-way light paths. In an influential 1910 exposition on differential simultaneity, Comstock described how a “stationary” observer would observe different clock readings for spatially-separated “moving” clocks. The difference in clock readings is an integral aspect of differential simultaneity. We derive the equation for the difference in clock readings and show that it is equivalent to the Sagnac correction that describes light speed anisotropies in satellite communications. We describe an experimental strategy that can measure the differences in spatially-separated clock times to allow a direct probe of the nature of simultaneity.

  20. Design considerations for miniaturized optical neural probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmann, Linda; Ordonez, Juan S.; Stieglitz, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Neural probes are designed to selectively record from or stimulate nerve cells. In optogenetics it is desirable to build miniaturized and long-term stable optical neural probes, in which the light sources can be directly and chronically implanted into the animals to allow free movement and behavior. Because of the size and the beam shape of the available light sources, it is difficult to target single cells as well as spatially localized networks. We therefore investigated design considerations for packages, which encapsulate the light source hermetically and have integrated hemispherical lens structures that enable to focus the light onto the desired region, by optical simulations. Integration of a biconvex lens into the package lid (diameter = 300 μm, material: silicon carbide) increased the averaged absolute irradiance ηA by 298 % compared to a system without a lens and had a spot size of around 120 μm. Solely integrating a plano-convex lens (same diameter and material) results in an ηA of up to 227 %.

  1. Creating and Probing Graphene Electron Optics with Local Scanning Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroscio, Joseph

    Ballistic propagation and the light-like dispersion of graphene charge carriers make graphene an attractive platform for optics-inspired graphene electronics where gate tunable potentials can control electron refraction and transmission. In analogy to optical wave propagation in lenses, mirrors and metamaterials, gate potentials can be used to create a negative index of refraction for Veselago lensing and Fabry-Pérot interferometers. In circular geometries, gate potentials can induce whispering gallery modes (WGM), similar to optical and acoustic whispering galleries albeit on a much smaller length scale. Klein scattering of Dirac carriers plays a central role in determining the coherent propagation of electron waves in these resonators. In this talk, I examine the probing of electron resonators in graphene confined by linear and circular gate potentials with the scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tip in the STM tunnel junction serves both as a tunable local gate potential, and as a probe of the graphene states through tunneling spectroscopy. A combination of a back gate potential, Vg, and tip potential, Vb, creates and controls a circular pn junction that confines the WGM graphene states. The resonances are observed in two separate channels in the tunneling spectroscopy experiment: first, by directly tunneling into the state at the bias energy eVb, and, second, by tunneling from the resonance at the Fermi level as the state is gated by the tip potential. The second channel produces a fan-like set of WGM peaks, reminiscent of the fringes seen in planar geometries by transport measurements. The WGM resonances split in a small applied magnetic field, with a large energy splitting approaching the WGM spacing at 0.5 T. These results agree well with recent theory on Klein scattering in graphene electron resonators. This work is done in collaboration with Y. Zhao, J. Wyrick, F.D. Natterer, J. F. Rodriquez-Nieva, C. Lewandoswski, K. Watanabe, T. Taniguchi, N. B

  2. Magnetic field concentrator for probing optical magnetic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J; Wróbel, Piotr; Szoplik, Tomasz

    2010-12-06

    Development of all dielectric and plasmonic metamaterials with a tunable optical frequency magnetic response creates a need for new inspection techniques. We propose a method of measuring magnetic responses of such metamaterials within a wide range of optical frequencies with a single probe. A tapered fiber probe with a radially corrugated metal coating concentrates azimuthally polarized light in the near-field into a subwavelength spot the longitudinal magnetic field component which is much stronger than the perpendicular electric one. The active probe may be used in a future scanning near-field magnetic microscope for studies of magnetic responses of subwavelength elementary cells of metamaterials.

  3. New accelerators for femtosecond beam pump-and-probe analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: uesaka@utnl.jp; Sakumi, Akira [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kinoshita, Kenichi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yamaoka, Nobuaki [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ohkubo, Takeru [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Ueda, Toru [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Muroya, Yusa [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Katsumura, Yosuke [Nuclear Engineering Research Laboratory, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Iijima, Hokuto [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 2-4 Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tomizawa, Hiromitsu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research InstituteI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kumagai, Noritaka [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research InstituteI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2005-12-15

    Femtosecond electron beams are novel tool for pump-probe analysis of condensed matter. Progress in developing femtosecond electron beams with the use of both conventional accelerators and laser-plasma accelerators is discussed. In conventional accelerators, the critical issue is timing jitter and drift of the linac-laser synchronization system. Sophisticated electronic devices are developed to reduce the jitter to 330 fs (rms); the precise control of temperature at several parts of the accelerator lessens the drift to 1 ps (rms). We also report on a full-optical X-ray and e-beam system based on the laser-plasma cathode by using a 12 TW 50 fs laser, which enables 40 MeV (at maximum), 40 fs (cal.), 100 pC and quasi-monochromatic single electron bunches. Since the synchronization is done by a passive optical beam-splitter, this system intrinsically has no jitter and drift. It could achieve tens of femtoseconds time-resolved analysis in the near future.

  4. Hard Probes at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Citron, Z; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has measured several hard probe observables in Pb+Pb and p+Pb collisions at the LHC. These measurements include jets which show modification in the hot dense medium of heavy ion collisions as well as color neutral electro-weak bosons. Together, they elucidate the nature of heavy ion collisions.

  5. Endocavity Ultrasound Probe Manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoianovici, Dan; Kim, Chunwoo; Schäfer, Felix; Huang, Chien-Ming; Zuo, Yihe; Petrisor, Doru; Han, Misop

    2013-06-01

    We developed two similar structure manipulators for medical endocavity ultrasound probes with 3 and 4 degrees of freedom (DoF). These robots allow scanning with ultrasound for 3-D imaging and enable robot-assisted image-guided procedures. Both robots use remote center of motion kinematics, characteristic of medical robots. The 4-DoF robot provides unrestricted manipulation of the endocavity probe. With the 3-DoF robot the insertion motion of the probe must be adjusted manually, but the device is simpler and may also be used to manipulate external-body probes. The robots enabled a novel surgical approach of using intraoperative image-based navigation during robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP), performed with concurrent use of two robotic systems (Tandem, T-RALP). Thus far, a clinical trial for evaluation of safety and feasibility has been performed successfully on 46 patients. This paper describes the architecture and design of the robots, the two prototypes, control features related to safety, preclinical experiments, and the T-RALP procedure.

  6. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  7. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  8. One-Probe Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Östlin, Anna; Pagh, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    We consider dictionaries that perform lookups by probing a single word of memory, knowing only the size of the data structure. We describe a randomized dictionary where a lookup returns the correct answer with probability 1 - e, and otherwise returns don't know. The lookup procedure uses an expan...

  9. Probing the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Humans have always had the vision to one day live on other planets. This vision existed even before the first person was put into orbit. Since the early space missions of putting humans into orbit around Earth, many advances have been made in space technology. We have now sent many space probes deep into the Solar system to explore the planets and…

  10. Near-Field Photothermal Heating with a Plasmonic Nanofocusing Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Dong, Biqing; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2016-03-01

    Noble metal nanostructures support plasmon resonances—collective oscillation of charge carriers at optical frequencies—and serve as effective tools to create bright light sources at the nanoscale. These sources are useful in broad application areas including, super-resolution imaging and spectroscopy, nanolithography, and near-field optomechanical transducers. The feasibility of these applications relies on efficient conversion of free-space propagating light to plasmons. Recently, we demonstrated a hybrid nanofocusing scheme for efficient coupling of light to plasmons at the apex of a scanning probe. In the approach, free-space light is coupled to propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on the tapered shaft of the scanning probe. The SPPs propagate adiabatically towards the probe tip where they are coupled to localized plasmons (LSPs). The nanofocusing scheme was explored in a near-field scanning optical microscope for super-resolution imaging, near-field transduction of nanomechanical vibrations, and local detection of ultrasound. Owing to the strong concentration of light at the probe, significant heating of the tip and a sample positioned in the optical near-field is expected. This paper investigates the local heating produced by the plasmonic nanofocusing probe under steady-state conditions using the tip-enhanced Raman scattering approach. In addition, a finite element model is explored to study the coupling of free propagating light to LSPs, and to estimate the temperature rise expected in a halfspace heated by absorption of the LSPs. This study has implications for exploring the plasmonic nanofocusing probe in heat-assisted nanofabrication and fundamental studies of nanoscale heat transport in materials.

  11. An approach to directly probe simultaneity

    CERN Document Server

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    The theory of special relativity derives from the Lorentz transformation. The Lorentz transformation implies differential simultaneity and light speed isotropy. Experiments to probe differential simultaneity should be able to distinguish the Lorentz transformation from a kinematically-similar alternate transformation that predicts absolute simultaneity, the absolute Lorentz transformation. Here, we describe how published optical tests of light speed isotropy/anisotropy cannot distinguish between the two transformations. We show that the shared equations of the two transformations, from the perspective of the "stationary" observer, are sufficient to predict null results in optical resonator experiments and in tests of frequency changes in one-way light paths. In an influential 1910 exposition on differential simultaneity, Comstock described how a "stationary" observer would observe different clock readings for spatially-separated "moving" clocks. The difference in clock readings is an integral aspect of differ...

  12. "Tangible Lights"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Tor; Merritt, Timothy; Andersen, Oskar

    2015-01-01

    While there has been much focus on tangible lighting interfaces embedded in physical objects and smartphones as remote control, there has not been sufficient attention on how the expressivity of bodily movement can be used when designing interactions with light. Therefore, we investigate interact...... knowledge from the tangible world. Tangible Lights has been subject to initial evaluations.......While there has been much focus on tangible lighting interfaces embedded in physical objects and smartphones as remote control, there has not been sufficient attention on how the expressivity of bodily movement can be used when designing interactions with light. Therefore, we investigate...... interaction with lighting technology beyond the smartphone and physical controllers. We examine the usefulness of the in-air gestural interaction style for lighting control. We bring forward "Tangible Lights", which serves as a novel interface for in-air interaction with lighting, drawing on existing...

  13. Laser terahertz emission microscopy with near-field probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Mittleman, Daniel M.

    2016-01-01

    Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm.......Using an AFM, an optical near-field image at 800 nm of a dipole antenna for THz emission is measured, and by simultaneously collecting the emitted THz radiation, the laser light confined under the AFM probe gives a THz emission resolution of less than 50 nm....

  14. EDITORIAL: Probing the nanoworld Probing the nanoworld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Mervyn

    2009-10-01

    In nanotechnology, it is the unique properties arising from nanometre-scale structures that lead not only to their technological importance but also to a better understanding of the underlying science. Over the last twenty years, material properties at the nanoscale have been dominated by the properties of carbon in the form of the C60 molecule, single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, nanodiamonds, and recently graphene. During this period, research published in the journal Nanotechnology has revealed the amazing mechanical properties of such materials as well as their remarkable electronic properties with the promise of new devices. Furthermore, nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanorods, and nanowires from metals and dielectrics have been characterized for their electronic, mechanical, optical, chemical and catalytic properties. Scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has become the main characterization technique and atomic force microscopy (AFM) the most frequently used SPM. Over the past twenty years, SPM techniques that were previously experimental in nature have become routine. At the same time, investigations using AFM continue to yield impressive results that demonstrate the great potential of this powerful imaging tool, particularly in close to physiological conditions. In this special issue a collaboration of researchers in Europe report the use of AFM to provide high-resolution topographical images of individual carbon nanotubes immobilized on various biological membranes, including a nuclear membrane for the first time (Lamprecht C et al 2009 Nanotechnology 20 434001). Other SPM developments such as high-speed AFM appear to be making a transition from specialist laboratories to the mainstream, and perhaps the same may be said for non-contact AFM. Looking to the future, characterisation techniques involving SPM and spectroscopy, such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, could emerge as everyday methods. In all these advanced techniques, routinely available probes will

  15. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC{sup Registered-Sign} EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09-1.07, 1.23-1.17, and 1.27-1.19 for doses 50-200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV-4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  16. Raman spectroscopy system with hollow fiber probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing-hong; Shi, Yi-Wei

    2012-11-01

    A Raman remote spectroscopy system was realized using flexible hollow optical fiber as laser emittion and signal collection probes. A silver-coated hollow fiber has low-loss property and flat transmission characteristics in the visible wavelength regions. Compared with conventional silica optical fiber, little background fluorescence noise was observed with optical fiber as the probe, which would be of great advantages to the detection in low frequency Raman shift region. The complex filtering and focusing system was thus unnecessary. The Raman spectra of CaCO3 and PE were obtained by using the system and a reasonable signal to noise ratio was attained without any lens. Experiments with probes made of conventional silica optical fibers were also conducted for comparisons. Furthermore, a silver-coated hollow glass waveguide was used as sample cell to detect liquid phase sample. We used a 6 cm-long hollow fiber as the liquid cell and Butt-couplings with emitting and collecting fibers. Experiment results show that the system obtained high signal to noise ratio because of the longer optical length between sample and laser light. We also give the elementary theoretical analysis for the hollow fiber sample cell. The parameters of the fiber which would affect the system were discussed. Hollow fiber has shown to be a potential fiber probe or sample cell for Raman spectroscopy.

  17. Impact of light irradiation on black tea quality during withering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zeyi; Zhang, Beibei; Chen, Yuqiong; Yu, Zhi; Chen, Huacai; Ni, Dejiang

    2017-04-01

    Black tea manufacture usually involves the processes of withering, cutting, fermentation and drying. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effect of the relationship between the quality and withering with different light sources (ultraviolet, yellow, blue, purple, orange, red, cyan, green and white) an quality attribute of tea. The results indicated that the yellow, orange and red light withering significantly improved the aroma and taste, imparting the tea a sweet flavor and a fresh and mellow taste. Tea treated with yellow light was scored highest the sensory scores and showed the highest content in catechins, theaflavins, amino acids and aroma components, followed by the orange and red light treatments. The black tea withered with ultraviolet light showed a strong astringency, probably resulting from low contents of theaflavins, amino acids and soluble sugar. The green light irradiation remarkably damaged the aroma and taste of the tea, leading to a strong greenish flavor and an astringent taste, probably owing to the lowest contents of chemical compositions. No significant cumulative effect was found in the hybrid light withering treatments. Therefore, monochromatic yellow, orange and red lights were suggested for withering the black tea to improve its overall quality.

  18. Calibration Fixture For Anemometer Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Charles R.; Nagel, Robert T.

    1993-01-01

    Fixture facilitates calibration of three-dimensional sideflow thermal anemometer probes. With fixture, probe oriented at number of angles throughout its design range. Readings calibrated as function of orientation in airflow. Calibration repeatable and verifiable.

  19. Light Robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    Light Robotics - Structure-Mediated Nanobiophotonics covers the latest means of sculpting of both light and matter for achieving bioprobing and manipulation at the smallest scales. The synergy between photonics, nanotechnology and biotechnology spans the rapidly growing field of nanobiophotonics...

  20. A possibility of parallel and anti-parallel diffraction measurements on neutron diffractometer employing bent perfect crystal monochromator at the monochromatic focusing condition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yong Nam Choi; Shin Ae Kim; Sung Kyu Kim; Sung Baek Kim; Chang-Hee Lee; Pivel Mikula

    2004-07-01

    In a conventional diffractometer having single monochromator, only one position, parallel position, is used for the diffraction experiment (i.e. detection) because the resolution property of the other one, anti-parallel position, is very poor. However, a bent perfect crystal (BPC) monochromator at monochromatic focusing condition can provide a quite flat and equal resolution property at both parallel and anti-parallel positions and thus one can have a chance to use both sides for the diffraction experiment. From the data of the FWHM and the / measured on three diffraction geometries (symmetric, asymmetric compression and asymmetric expansion), we can conclude that the simultaneous diffraction measurement in both parallel and anti-parallel positions can be achieved.

  1. Characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Moorti; A Raghuramaiah; P A Naik; P D Gupta

    2004-11-01

    Temporal, spatial and spectral characteristics of a multi-keV monochromatic point x-ray source based on vacuum diode with laser-produced plasma as cathode are presented. Electrons from a laser-produced aluminium plasma were accelerated towards a conical point tip titanium anode to generate K-shell x-ray radiation. Approximately 1010 photons/pulse were generated in x-ray pulses of ∼ 18 to ∼ 28 ns duration from a source of ∼ 300 m diameter, at ℎ = 4.51 keV ( emission of titanium), with a brightness of ∼ 1020 photons/cm2 /s/sr. This was sufficient to record single-shot x-ray radiographs of physical objects on a DEF-5 x-ray film kept at a distance of up to ∼ 10 cm.

  2. A probe station for testing silicon sensors

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    A probe station for testing silicon sensors. The probe station is located inside a dark box that can keep away light during the measurement. The set-up is located in the DSF (Department Silicon Facility). The golden plate is the "chuck" where the sensor is usually placed on. With the help of "manipulators", thin needles can be precisely positioned that can contact the sensor surface. Using these needles and the golden chuck, a high voltage can be applied to the sensor to test its behaviour under high voltage. We will use the silicon sensors that we test here for building prototypes of a highly granular sandwich calorimeter, the CMS HGC (Highly granular Calorimeter) upgrade for High-Luminosity LHC.

  3. A probe station for testing silicon sensors

    CERN Multimedia

    Ulysse, Fichet

    2017-01-01

    A probe station for testing silicon sensors. The probe station is located inside a dark box that can keep away light during the measurement. The set-up is located in the DSF (Department Silicon Facility). The golden plate is the "chuck" where the sensor is usually placed on. With the help of "manipulators", thin needles can be precisely positioned that can contact the sensor surface. Using these needles and the golden chuck, a high voltage can be applied to the sensor to test its behaviour under high voltage. We will use the silicon sensors that we test here for building prototypes of a highly granular sandwich calorimeter, the CMS HGC (Highly granular Calorimeter) upgrade for High-Luminosity LHC.

  4. Efficient tunable switch from slow light to fast light in quantum opto-electromechanical system

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    The control of slow and fast light propagation, in the probe transmission in a single experiment, is a challenging task. This type of control can only be achieved through highly nonlinear interactions and additional interfering pathway(s), which is therefore seldom reported. Here, we devise a scheme in which slow light, and a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved in the probe transmission based on a hybrid setup, which is composed of an optical cavity with two charged nano mechanical resonators (MRs). The two MRs are electrostatically coupled via tunable Coulomb coupling strength ($g_{c}$) making a quantum opto-electromechanical system (QOEMS). The parameter $g_{c}$ that couples the two MRs can be switched on and off by controlling the bias voltages on the MRs, and acts as a tunable switch that allows the propagation of transmitted probe field as slow light ($g_{c} \

  5. Probing properties of cold radiofrequency plasma with polymer probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, E.; Chaniel, G.; Multanen, V.

    2015-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows the estimation of Debye length of cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  6. Probing Properties of Cold Radiofrequency Plasma with Polymer Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward; Multanen, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The probe intended for the characterization of cold plasma is introduced. The probe allows estimation of the Debye length of the cold plasma. The probe is based on the pronounced modification of surface properties (wettability) of polymer films by cold plasmas. The probe was tested with the cold radiofrequency inductive air plasma discharge. The Debye length and the concentration of charge carriers were estimated for various gas pressures. The reported results coincide reasonably with the corresponding values established by other methods. The probe makes possible measurement of characteristics of cold plasmas in closed chambers.

  7. Phoenix Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 49, or the 49th Martian day of the mission (July 14, 2008), shows thermal and electrical conductivity probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Atom probe tomography today

    OpenAIRE

    Alfred Cerezo; Peter H. Clifton; Mark J. Galtrey; Humphreys, Colin J.; Kelly, Thomas. F.; David J. Larson; Sergio Lozano-Perez; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Oliver, Rachel A.; Gang Sha; Keith Thompson; Mathijs Zandbergen; Roger L. Alvis

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments) but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks) and also...

  9. Programmable apodizer to compensate chromatic aberration effects using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, A; Iemmi, C; Campos, J; Escalera, J; Yzuel, M

    2005-02-07

    Programmable apodizers written on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) offer the possibility of modifying the point spread function (PSF) of an optical system in monochromatic light with a high degree of flexibility. Extension to polychromatic light has to take into account the liquid crystal response dependence on the wavelength. Proper control of the chromatic properties of the LCSLM in combination with the design of the correct apodizer is necessary for this new range of applications. In this paper we report a successful application of a programmable amplitude apodizer illuminated with polychromatic light. We use an axial apodizing filter to compensate the longitudinal secondary axial color (LSAC) effects of a refractive optical system on the polychromatic PSF. The configuration of the LCSLM has been optimized to obtain a good amplitude transmission in polychromatic light. Agreement between experimental and simulated results shows the feasibility of our proposal.

  10. Twisted light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Research at the Mathematical Optics Group uses "twisted" light to study new quatum-based information security systems. In order to understand the structure of "twisted" light, it is useful to start with an ordinary light beam with zero twist, namely...

  11. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Visual perception is very important for road users and in the dark it can be facilitated by public lighting. Public lighting has a mostly positive road safety effect. Installing public lighting on roads that were previously unlit generally results in fewer and less serious crashes. This effect seems

  12. Einstein Inflationary Probe (EIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary

    2004-01-01

    I will discuss plans to develop a concept for the Einstein Inflation Probe: a mission to detect gravity waves from inflation via the unique signature they impart to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization. A sensitive CMB polarization satellite may be the only way to probe physics at the grand-unified theory (GUT) scale, exceeding by 12 orders of magnitude the energies studied at the Large Hadron Collider. A detection of gravity waves would represent a remarkable confirmation of the inflationary paradigm and set the energy scale at which inflation occurred when the universe was a fraction of a second old. Even a strong upper limit to the gravity wave amplitude would be significant, ruling out many common models of inflation, and pointing to inflation occurring at much lower energy, if at all. Measuring gravity waves via the CMB polarization will be challenging. We will undertake a comprehensive study to identify the critical scientific requirements for the mission and their derived instrumental performance requirements. At the core of the study will be an assessment of what is scientifically and experimentally optimal within the scope and purpose of the Einstein Inflation Probe.

  13. Nanoscale thermal probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanan Yue

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscale novel devices have raised the demand for nanoscale thermal characterization that is critical for evaluating the device performance and durability. Achieving nanoscale spatial resolution and high accuracy in temperature measurement is very challenging due to the limitation of measurement pathways. In this review, we discuss four methodologies currently developed in nanoscale surface imaging and temperature measurement. To overcome the restriction of the conventional methods, the scanning thermal microscopy technique is widely used. From the perspective of measuring target, the optical feature size method can be applied by using either Raman or fluorescence thermometry. The near-field optical method that measures nanoscale temperature by focusing the optical field to a nano-sized region provides a non-contact and non-destructive way for nanoscale thermal probing. Although the resistance thermometry based on nano-sized thermal sensors is possible for nanoscale thermal probing, significant effort is still needed to reduce the size of the current sensors by using advanced fabrication techniques. At the same time, the development of nanoscale imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging, provides a great potential solution to resolve the nanoscale thermal probing problem.

  14. Supercontinuum white light lasers for flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, William G.; Subach, Fedor V.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2009-01-01

    Excitation of fluorescent probes for flow cytometry has traditionally been limited to a few discrete laser lines, an inherent limitation in our ability to excite the vast array of fluorescent probes available for cellular analysis. In this report, we have used a supercontinuum (SC) white light laser as an excitation source for flow cytometry. By selectively filtering the wavelength of interest, almost any laser wavelength in the visible spectrum can be separated and used for flow cytometric analysis. The white light lasers used in this study were integrated into a commercial flow cytometry platform, and a series of high-transmission bandpass filters used to select wavelength ranges from the blue (~480 nm) to the long red (>700 nm). Cells labeled with a variety of fluorescent probes or expressing fluorescent proteins were then analyzed, in comparison with traditional lasers emitting at wavelengths similar to the filtered SC source. Based on a standard sensitivity metric, the white light laser bandwidths produced similar excitation levels to traditional lasers for a wide variety of fluorescent probes and expressible proteins. Sensitivity assessment using fluorescent bead arrays confirmed that the SC laser and traditional sources resulted in similar levels of detection sensitivity. Supercontinuum white light laser sources therefore have the potential to remove a significant barrier in flow cytometric analysis, namely the limitation of excitation wavelengths. Almost any visible wavelength range can be made available for excitation, allowing access to virtually any fluorescent probe, and permitting “fine-tuning” of excitation wavelength to particular probes. PMID:19072836

  15. Organic light-emitting diodes from homoleptic square planar complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omary, Mohammad A

    2013-11-12

    Homoleptic square planar complexes [M(N.LAMBDA.N).sub.2], wherein two identical N.LAMBDA.N bidentate anionic ligands are coordinated to the M(II) metal center, including bidentate square planar complexes of triazolates, possess optical and electrical properties that make them useful for a wide variety of optical and electrical devices and applications. In particular, the complexes are useful for obtaining white or monochromatic organic light-emitting diodes ("OLEDs"). Improved white organic light emitting diode ("WOLED") designs have improved efficacy and/or color stability at high brightness in single- or two-emitter white or monochrome OLEDs that utilize homoleptic square planar complexes, including bis[3,5-bis(2-pyridyl)-1,2,4-triazolato]platinum(II) ("Pt(ptp).sub.2").

  16. Directional orientation of birds by the magnetic field under different light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Stapput, Katrin; Thalau, Peter; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    This paper reviews the directional orientation of birds with the help of the geomagnetic field under various light conditions. Two fundamentally different types of response can be distinguished. (i) Compass orientation controlled by the inclination compass that allows birds to locate courses of different origin. This is restricted to a narrow functional window around the total intensity of the local geomagnetic field and requires light from the short-wavelength part of the spectrum. The compass is based on radical-pair processes in the right eye; magnetite-based receptors in the beak are not involved. Compass orientation is observed under 'white' and low-level monochromatic light from ultraviolet (UV) to about 565 nm green light. (ii) 'Fixed direction' responses occur under artificial light conditions such as more intense monochromatic light, when 590 nm yellow light is added to short-wavelength light, and in total darkness. The manifestation of these responses depends on the ambient light regime and is 'fixed' in the sense of not showing the normal change between spring and autumn; their biological significance is unclear. In contrast to compass orientation, fixed-direction responses are polar magnetic responses and occur within a wide range of magnetic intensities. They are disrupted by local anaesthesia of the upper beak, which indicates that the respective magnetic information is mediated by iron-based receptors located there. The influence of light conditions on the two types of response suggests complex interactions between magnetoreceptors in the right eye, those in the upper beak and the visual system.

  17. Development of Mackintosh Probe Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Noor Khazanah A.; Kaamin, Masiri; Suwandi, Amir Khan; Sahat, Suhaila; Jahaya Kesot, Mohd

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic probing is a continuous soil investigation technique, which is one of the simplest soil penetration test. It basically consist of repeatedly driving a metal tipped probe into the ground using a drop weight of fixed mass and travel. Testing was carried out continuously from ground level to the final penetration depth. Once the soil investigation work done, it is difficult to pull out the probe rod from the ground, due to strong soil structure grip against probe cone and prevent the probe rod out from the ground. Thus, in this case, a tool named Extracting Probe was created to assist in the process of retracting the probe rod from the ground. In addition, Extracting Probe also can reduce the time to extract the probe rod from the ground compare with the conventional method. At the same time, it also can reduce manpower cost because only one worker involve to handle this tool compare with conventional method used two or more workers. From experiment that have been done we found that the time difference between conventional tools and extracting probe is significant, average time difference is 155 minutes. In addition the extracting probe can reduce manpower usage, and also labour cost for operating the tool. With all these advantages makes this tool has the potential to be marketed.

  18. Probe-based data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Koelmans, Wabe W; Abelmann, L

    2015-01-01

    Probe-based data storage attracted many researchers from academia and industry, resulting in unprecendeted high data-density demonstrations. This topical review gives a comprehensive overview of the main contributions that led to the major accomplishments in probe-based data storage. The most investigated technologies are reviewed: topographic, phase-change, magnetic, ferroelectric and atomic and molecular storage. Also, the positioning of probes and recording media, the cantilever arrays and parallel readout of the arrays of cantilevers are discussed. This overview serves two purposes. First, it provides an overview for new researchers entering the field of probe storage, as probe storage seems to be the only way to achieve data storage at atomic densities. Secondly, there is an enormous wealth of invaluable findings that can also be applied to many other fields of nanoscale research such as probe-based nanolithography, 3D nanopatterning, solid-state memory technologies and ultrafast probe microscopy.

  19. PROcess Based Diagnostics PROBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clune, T.; Schmidt, G.; Kuo, K.; Bauer, M.; Oloso, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many of the aspects of the climate system that are of the greatest interest (e.g., the sensitivity of the system to external forcings) are emergent properties that arise via the complex interplay between disparate processes. This is also true for climate models most diagnostics are not a function of an isolated portion of source code, but rather are affected by multiple components and procedures. Thus any model-observation mismatch is hard to attribute to any specific piece of code or imperfection in a specific model assumption. An alternative approach is to identify diagnostics that are more closely tied to specific processes -- implying that if a mismatch is found, it should be much easier to identify and address specific algorithmic choices that will improve the simulation. However, this approach requires looking at model output and observational data in a more sophisticated way than the more traditional production of monthly or annual mean quantities. The data must instead be filtered in time and space for examples of the specific process being targeted.We are developing a data analysis environment called PROcess-Based Explorer (PROBE) that seeks to enable efficient and systematic computation of process-based diagnostics on very large sets of data. In this environment, investigators can define arbitrarily complex filters and then seamlessly perform computations in parallel on the filtered output from their model. The same analysis can be performed on additional related data sets (e.g., reanalyses) thereby enabling routine comparisons between model and observational data. PROBE also incorporates workflow technology to automatically update computed diagnostics for subsequent executions of a model. In this presentation, we will discuss the design and current status of PROBE as well as share results from some preliminary use cases.

  20. Probing black holes in non-perturbative gauge theory

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, N; Lifschytz, G; Lowe, D A; Iizuka, Norihiro; Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad; Lowe, David A.

    2002-01-01

    We use a 0-brane to probe a ten-dimensional near-extremal black hole with N units of 0-brane charge. We work directly in the dual strongly-coupled quantum mechanics, using mean-field methods to describe the black hole background non-perturbatively. We obtain the distribution of W boson masses, and find a clear separation between light and heavy degrees of freedom. To localize the probe we introduce a resolving time and integrate out the heavy modes. After a non-trivial change of coordinates, the effective potential for the probe agrees with supergravity expectations. We compute the entropy of the probe, and find that the stretched horizon of the black hole arises dynamically in the quantum mechanics, as thermal restoration of unbroken U(N+1) gauge symmetry. Our analysis of the quantum mechanics predicts a correct relation between the horizon radius and entropy of a black hole.

  1. Fluorescent cyanine probe for DNA detection and cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong-Chao; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2014-03-01

    In our study, two carbazole-based cyanines, 3,6-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-9-methyl carbazole diiodide (A) and 6,6'-bis[2-(1-methylpyridinium)vinyl]-bis(9-methyl-carbazol-3yl)methane diiodide (B) were synthesized and employed as light-up probes for DNA and cell imaging. Both of the cyanine probes possess a symmetric structure and bis-cationic center. The obvious induced circular dichroism signals in circular dichroism spectra reveal that the molecules can specifically interact with DNA. Strong fluorescence enhancement is observed when these two cyanines are bound to DNA. These cyanine probes show high binding affinity to oligonucleotides but different binding preferences to various secondary structures. Confocal microscopy images of fixed cell stained by the probes exhibit strong brightness and high contrast in nucleus with a very low cytoplasmic background.

  2. Atom probe tomography today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred Cerezo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This review aims to describe and illustrate the advances in the application of atom probe tomography that have been made possible by recent developments, particularly in specimen preparation techniques (using dual-beam focused-ion beam instruments but also of the more routine use of laser pulsing. The combination of these two developments now permits atomic-scale investigation of site-specific regions within engineering alloys (e.g. at grain boundaries and in the vicinity of cracks and also the atomic-level characterization of interfaces in multilayers, oxide films, and semiconductor materials and devices.

  3. Experimental probes of axions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  4. Atom Probe Tomography 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.; Larson, David J.

    2012-08-01

    In the world of tomographic imaging, atom probe tomography (APT) occupies the high-spatial-resolution end of the spectrum. It is highly complementary to electron tomography and is applicable to a wide range of materials. The current state of APT is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on applications and data analysis as they apply to many fields of research and development including metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and organic materials. We also provide a brief review of the history and the instrumentation associated with APT and an assessment of the existing challenges in the field.

  5. Mobile Probing Kit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Sørensen, J.K.

    2007-01-01

    characterized as being highly nomadic and thus potential users of mobile and ubiquitous technologies. The methodology has been applied in the 1ST MAGNET Beyond project in order to obtain user needs and requirements in the process of developing pilot services. We report on the initial findings from applying......Mobile Probing Kit is a low tech and low cost methodology for obtaining inspiration and insights into user needs, requirements and ideas in the early phases of a system's development process. The methodology is developed to identify user needs, requirements and ideas among knowledge workers...

  6. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    to be static, and no longer acts as a kind of spatial constancy maintaining stability and order? Moreover, what new potentials open in lighting design? This book is one of four books that is published in connection with the research project entitled LED Lighting; Interdisciplinary LED Lighting Research...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... the investigations of lighting scenarios carried out in two test installations: White Cube and White Box. The test installations are discussed as large-scale experiential instruments. In these test installations we examine what could potentially occur when light using LED technology is integrated and distributed...

  7. Adaptive Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Kjell Yngve; Søndergaard, Karin; Kongshaug, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive Lighting Adaptive lighting is based on a partial automation of the possibilities to adjust the colour tone and brightness levels of light in order to adapt to people’s needs and desires. IT support is key to the technical developments that afford adaptive control systems. The possibilities...... offered by adaptive lighting control are created by the ways that the system components, the network and data flow can be coordinated through software so that the dynamic variations are controlled in ways that meaningfully adapt according to people’s situations and design intentions. This book discusses...... differently into an architectural body. We also examine what might occur when light is dynamic and able to change colour, intensity and direction, and when it is adaptive and can be brought into interaction with its surroundings. In short, what happens to an architectural space when artificial lighting ceases...

  8. Propagation of polarized light through azobenzene polyester films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nedelchev, L; Matharu, A; Nikolova, Ludmila

    2002-01-01

    When elliptically polarized light of appropriate wavelength Corresponding to trans-cis-trans isomerisation process is incident on thin films of azobenzene polyesters, a helical structure is induced. We investigate the propagation of the exciting light beam (self-induced) as well as a probe light...

  9. Search for Light New Physics at B Factories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Echenard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many extensions of the Standard Model include the possibility of light new particles, such as light Higgs bosons or dark matter candidates. These scenarios can be probed using the large datasets collected by B factories, complementing measurements performed at the LHC. This paper summarizes recent searches for light new physics conducted by the BABAR and Belle experiments.

  10. Development of an autofluorescent probe for brain cancer: simulations and phantom studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leh, B.; Charon, Y.; Duval, M.-A.; Jean, F.; Lefebvre, F.; Menard, L.; Vu Thi, M. H.; Siebert, R.

    2009-07-01

    Autofluorescence spectroscopy from brain tissue may help to discriminate cancerous from healthy tissue. The characteristics of our probe are studied on phantoms and confronted to Monte Carlo simulations. Geometrical origins of fluorescence light are evaluated.

  11. Fabrication of Pure Silica Core Multimode Ultraviolet Optical Fibre Probes by Tube Etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xin; PAN Shi; WU Shi-Fa

    2007-01-01

    As a light wave-guide component for transmitting ultraviolet (UV) laser pulses, pure silica core UV fibre probes have attracted a great deal of attention in the near-field optical data storage and bio-medical studies. We fabricate UV fibre probes with tips in dimension of about 2-5μm and taper angle 16° by the tube etching method, using 40% HF acid as etching solution and xylene as overlayer. Probes produced have curvy configuration with smooth surface. The yield of fine probes is rather high and etching operation greatly simplified. With higher damage threshold, pure silica core multimode UV fibre probes can be coupled into more laser power. In addition, using UV light reduces the cutoff wavelength of the fibre probes, which is in favour of increasing the transmission efficiency of the probe. Furthermore, the larger tip dimension helps to enhance the light throughput either. The advances of fabrication technique of UV optical fibre probe may further support the studies of UV light data storage, pulsed laser biosurgery and UV photolithography.

  12. Light Controlled Modulation of Gene Expression by Chemical Optoepigenetic Probes

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Surya A.; Ghosh, Balaram; Hendricks, J. Adam; Szantai-Kis, D. Miklos; Törk, Lisa; Ross, Kenneth N.; Lamb, Justin; Read-Button, Willis; Zheng, Baixue; Wang, HongTao; Salthouse, Christopher; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Mazitschek, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic gene regulation is a dynamic process orchestrated by chromatin-modifying enzymes. Many of these master regulators exert their function through covalent modification of DNA and histone proteins. Aberrant epigenetic processes have been implicated in the pathophysiology of multiple human diseases. Small-molecule inhibitors have been essential to advancing our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of epigenetic processes. However, the resolution offered by small molecule...

  13. Neutrino Oscillations as a Probe of Light Scalar Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Asher

    2016-12-02

    We consider a class of models involving interactions between ultralight scalar dark matter and standard model neutrinos. Such couplings modify the neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles to include additional components that vary in time periodically with a frequency and amplitude set by the mass and energy density of the dark matter. Null results from recent searches for anomalous periodicities in the solar neutrino flux strongly constrain the dark matter-neutrino coupling to be orders of magnitude below current and projected limits derived from observations of the cosmic microwave background.

  14. Neutrino Oscillations as a Probe of Light Scalar Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Asher

    2016-12-01

    We consider a class of models involving interactions between ultralight scalar dark matter and standard model neutrinos. Such couplings modify the neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles to include additional components that vary in time periodically with a frequency and amplitude set by the mass and energy density of the dark matter. Null results from recent searches for anomalous periodicities in the solar neutrino flux strongly constrain the dark matter-neutrino coupling to be orders of magnitude below current and projected limits derived from observations of the cosmic microwave background.

  15. Probing Majorana Neutrino Textures at DUNE

    CERN Document Server

    Bora, Kalpana; Dutta, Debajyoti

    2016-01-01

    We study the possibility of probing different texture zero neutrino mass matrices at long baseline neutrino experiment DUNE. Assuming a diagonal charged lepton basis and Majorana nature of light neutrinos, we first classify the possible light neutrino mass matrices with one and two texture zeros and then numerically evaluate the parameter space in terms of atmospheric mixing angle $\\theta_{23}$ and Dirac CP phase $\\delta_{\\text{CP}}$ which satisfies the texture zero conditions. We then feed these parameter values into the numerical analysis in order to study the sensitivity of DUNE experiment to them. We find that the DUNE will be able to exclude some of these texture zero mass matrices which restrict the $(\\theta_{23}-\\delta_{\\text{CP}})$ to a very specific range of values.

  16. Phase-referenced probe interferometer for biological surface profiling and displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Chu, Mark C.; Seung, H. Sebastian; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    2007-12-01

    We present a probe-based, phase-referenced low coherence interferometer in which the reference field is provided by a fiber end reflection. A gradient-index microlens focuses light onto a sample and collects reflected light. We use the probe interferometer to measure surface profiles of the compound eye of a housefly (Musca domestica) and measure nanometer-scale vibrations in a test sample.

  17. Leaf Morphology, Photosynthetic Performance, Chlorophyll Fluorescence, Stomatal Development of Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) Exposed to Different Ratios of Red Light to Blue Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Lu, Wei; Tong, Yuxin; Yang, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Red and blue light are both vital factors for plant growth and development. We examined how different ratios of red light to blue light (R/B) provided by light-emitting diodes affected photosynthetic performance by investigating parameters related to photosynthesis, including leaf morphology, photosynthetic rate, chlorophyll fluorescence, stomatal development, light response curve, and nitrogen content. In this study, lettuce plants (Lactuca sativa L.) were exposed to 200 μmol⋅m(-2)⋅s(-1) irradiance for a 16 h⋅d(-1) photoperiod under the following six treatments: monochromatic red light (R), monochromatic blue light (B) and the mixture of R and B with different R/B ratios of 12, 8, 4, and 1. Leaf photosynthetic capacity (A max) and photosynthetic rate (P n) increased with decreasing R/B ratio until 1, associated with increased stomatal conductance, along with significant increase in stomatal density and slight decrease in stomatal size. P n and A max under B treatment had 7.6 and 11.8% reduction in comparison with those under R/B = 1 treatment, respectively. The effective quantum yield of PSII and the efficiency of excitation captured by open PSII center were also significantly lower under B treatment than those under the other treatments. However, shoot dry weight increased with increasing R/B ratio with the greatest value under R/B = 12 treatment. The increase of shoot dry weight was mainly caused by increasing leaf area and leaf number, but no significant difference was observed between R and R/B = 12 treatments. Based on the above results, we conclude that quantitative B could promote photosynthetic performance or growth by stimulating morphological and physiological responses, yet there was no positive correlation between P n and shoot dry weight accumulation.

  18. Exposing broiler eggs to green, red and white light during incubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, G S

    2017-07-01

    Previous work has shown that exposing broiler eggs to white light during incubation can improve hatchability and post-hatch animal welfare. It was hypothesized that due to how different wavelengths of light can affect avian physiology differently, and how pigmented eggshells filter light that different monochromatic wavelengths would have differential effects on hatchability and post-hatch animal welfare indicators. To determine, we incubated chicken eggs (n=6912) under either no light (dark), green light, red light or white light; the light level was 250 lux. White and red light were observed to increase hatch of fertile (P0.05). Fear response of during isolation and tonic immobility was reduced (P0.05) from dark incubated broilers. All light incubated broilers had lower (Plight and red light that is a component of it are possibly the key spectrum to improving hatchability and lower fear and stress susceptibility, whereas green light is not as effective. Incubating broiler eggs under these spectrums could be used to improve hatchery efficiency and post-hatch animal welfare at the same time.

  19. Optical encryption in spatially-incoherent light using two LC SLMs for both information input and encryption element imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondareva, Alyona P.; Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Sergey N.

    2014-10-01

    At present time methods of optical encryption are actively developed. The majority of existing methods of optical encryption use not only light intensity distribution, easily registered with photosensors, but also its phase distribution which require application of complex holographic schemes in conjunction with spatially coherent monochromatic illumination. This leads to complex optical schemes and low decryption quality. To eliminate these disadvantages it is possible to implement optical encryption using spatially incoherent monochromatic illumination which requires registration of light intensity distribution only. Encryption is accomplished by means of optical convolution of image of scene to be encrypted and encryption diffractive optical element (DOE) point spread function (PSF) which serves as encryption key. Encryption process is described as follows. Scene is illuminated with spatially-incoherent monochromatic light. In the absence of encryption DOE lens forms image of scene in photosensor plane. DOE serves as encryption element, its PSF - encryption key. Light passing through DOE forms convolution of object image and DOE PSF. Registered by photosensor convolution is encrypted image. Decryption was conducted numerically on computer by means of inverse filtration with regularization. Kinoforms were used as encryption DOE because they have single diffraction order. Two liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulators (SLM) were used to implement dynamic digital information input and dynamic encryption key change. As input scene amplitude LC SLM HoloEye LC2002 with 800×600 pixels 32×32 μm2 and 256 gray levels was used. To image synthesized encryption kinoforms phase LC SLM HoloEye PLUTO VIS with 1920×1080 pixels 8×8 μm2 and 256 phase levels was used. Set of test images was successfully optically encrypted and then numerically decrypted. Encrypted images contents are hidden. Decrypted images despite quite high noise levels are positively recognizable

  20. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  1. Noninvasive Micromanipulation of Live HIV-1 Infected Cells via Laser Light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mthunzi, P

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available sites can reduce drug-related toxicities [15]. On the other hand, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been a method of choice for its photostimulatory effect on slow-healing wounds [16]. For example, a number of monochromatic radiation sources... beneficial biological effect known as “photostimulation” or “biostimulation,” a process reported to generally depend on wavelength and dose of laser irradiation [16]. Because lasers and light- emitting diodes (LEDs) have a wide application in wound-healing...

  2. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A; Esirkepov, T; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-11-20

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (approximately 10/30 fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses.

  3. Characteristics of light reflected from a dense ionization wave with a tunable velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhidkov, A; Fujii, T; Nemoto, K; Koga, J; Bulanov, S V

    2009-01-01

    An optically-dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other is shown to be an efficient coherent x-ray converter. The resulting velocity of a quasi-plane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection increases with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing an easy tuning the wavelength of x-rays. The x-ray spectra of a converted, lower frequency coherent light change from the monochromatic to a high order harmonic-like with the duration of ionizing pulses and the intensity of scattered pulses; the spectrum are not symmetrical at Vc.

  4. Characteristics of Light Reflected from a Dense Ionization Wave with a Tunable Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhidkov, A.; Esirkepov, T.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K.; Koga, J.; Bulanov, S. V.

    2009-11-01

    An optically dense ionization wave (IW) produced by two femtosecond (˜10/30fs) laser pulses focused cylindrically and crossing each other may become an efficient coherent x-ray converter in accordance with the Semenova-Lampe theory. The resulting velocity of a quasiplane IW in the vicinity of pulse intersection changes with the angle between the pulses from the group velocity of ionizing pulses to infinity allowing a tuning of the wavelength of x rays and their bunching. The x-ray spectra after scattering of a lower frequency and long coherent light pulse change from the monochromatic to high order harmoniclike with the duration of the ionizing pulses.

  5. Pupillary response to direct and consensual chromatic light stimuli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traustason, Sindri; Brondsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess whether the direct and consensual postillumination (ipRGC-driven) pupil light responses to chromatic light stimuli are equal in healthy subjects. METHODS: Pupil responses in healthy volunteers were recorded using a prototype binocular chromatic pupillometer (IdeaMedical, Copenh......PURPOSE: To assess whether the direct and consensual postillumination (ipRGC-driven) pupil light responses to chromatic light stimuli are equal in healthy subjects. METHODS: Pupil responses in healthy volunteers were recorded using a prototype binocular chromatic pupillometer (Idea......Medical, Copenhagen), which is capable of both direct and consensual pupillometry measurements. The device uses a pair of dual monochromatic narrow bandwidth LED light sources, red (660 nm) and blue (470 nm). Pupil light responses were recorded with infrared video cameras and analysed using custom-made circuitry...... was slightly larger during consensual illumination compared to direct illumination (0.54 and 0.52, respectively, p = 0.027, paired Wilcoxon's test, n = 12), while no differences were found for CAmax or the PIPR. CONCLUSIONS: No difference was found between direct and consensual pupil response to either red...

  6. Real-time diameter measurement using diffuse light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaohe; Hui, Mei; Zhu, Qiudong; Wang, Shanshan

    2016-09-01

    A method for on-line rapid determination of the diameter of metallic cylinder is introduced in this paper. Under the radiation of diffuse light, there is a bright area close to the margin of metallic cylinder, and the method of this paper is based on the intensity distribution of the bright area. In this paper, with the radiation by a diffuse plane light with special shape, we present the relation expression of the distance between the peak point and the real edge of the cylinder and the distance between the diffuse light and the pinhole aperture of the camera. With the expression, the diameter of the cylinder to be measured can be calculated. In the experiments, monochromatic LED uniting with ground glass forms the diffuse light source, then the light irradiates the tested cylinder. After the cylinder, we use a lens with a front pinhole stop to choose the light into CMOS, then a computer is used to analyze images and export the measurement results. The measuring system using this method is very easily implemented, so it can realize the on-line rapid measurement. Experimental results are presented for six metallic cylinders with the diameter in 5 18mm range and roughness in Ra- 0.02um, and the precision reaches 3um.

  7. Light cluster production at NICA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, N.U. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Batyuk, P.; Rogachevsky, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Blaschke, D. [University of Wroclaw, Wroclaw (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); Danielewicz, P. [Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Karpenko, Iu. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); INFN, Sezione di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Roepke, G. [National Research Nuclear University (MEPhI), Moscow (Russian Federation); University of Rostock, Rostock (Germany); Wolter, H.H. [Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Light cluster production at the NICA accelerator complex offers unique possibilities to use these states as ''rare probes'' of in-medium characteristics such as phase space occupation and early flow. In order to explain this statement, in this contribution theoretical considerations from the nuclear statistical equilibrium model and from a quantum statistical model of cluster production are supplemented with a discussion of a transport model for light cluster formation and with results from hydrodynamic simulations combined with the coalescence model. (orig.)

  8. Baking Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    2005-01-01

    decisions. Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via...... radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today’s off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge by looking at still...... practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary....

  9. Lightness functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campi, Stefano; Gardner, Richard; Gronchi, Paolo;

    2012-01-01

    Variants of the brightness function of a convex body K in n-dimensional Euclidean are investigated. The Lambertian lightness function L(K; v , w ) gives the total reflected light resulting from illumination by a light source at infinity in the direction w that is visible when looking...... in the direction v . The partial brightness function R( K ; v , w ) gives the area of the projection orthogonal to v of the portion of the surface of K that is both illuminated by a light source from the direction w and visible when looking in the direction v . A class of functions called lightness functions...... is introduced that includes L(K;.) and R(K;.) as special cases. Much of the theory of the brightness function like uniqueness, stability, and the existence and properties of convex bodies of maximal and minimal volume with finitely many function values equal to those of a given convex body, is extended...

  10. Baking Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamke, Martin

    2005-01-01

    decisions. Display quality, comfortable navigation and realistic illumination are crucial ingredients here. Light is one of the principal elements in architectural design, so design reviews must enable the architect to judge the quality of his design in this respect. Realistic light simulations, e.g. via...... radiosity algorithms, are no longer the domain of high-end graphic workstations. Today’s off-the-shelf hardware and 3D-software provide the architect with high-quality tools to simulate physically correct light distributions. But the quality and impression of light is hard to judge by looking at still...... practical experiences with global-light-simulations. We share results which we think are helpful to others, and we highlight areas where further research is necessary....

  11. Abdominal CT: An intra-individual comparison between virtual monochromatic spectral and polychromatic 120-kVp images obtained during the same examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Yoshitake, E-mail: yamada@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Jinzaki, Masahiro, E-mail: jinzaki@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hosokawa, Takahiro, E-mail: snowglobe@infoseek.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Tanami, Yutaka, E-mail: tanami@rad.med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Abe, Takayuki, E-mail: tabe@z5.keio.jp [Center for Clinical Research, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Kuribayashi, Sachio, E-mail: skuribay@med.keio.ac.jp [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • We compared virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) images with 120-kVp images. • VMS images are generated using accurate two-material beam-hardening correction. • Abdominal 70-keV VMS images provide better image quality than 120-kVp images. • Iterative reconstruction can further improve the image quality of VMS images. - Abstract: Objectives: To compare quantitative and subjective image quality between virtual monochromatic spectral (VMS) and conventional polychromatic 120-kVp imaging performed during the same abdominal computed tomography (CT) examination. Materials and methods: Our institutional review board approved this prospective study; each participant provided written informed consent. 51 patients underwent sequential fast kVp-switching dual-energy (80/140 kVp, volume CT dose index: 12.7 mGy) and single-energy (120-kVp, 12.7 mGy) abdominal enhanced CT over an 8 cm scan length with a random acquisition order and a 4.3-s interval. VMS images with filtered back projection (VMS-FBP) and adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (so-called hybrid IR) (VMS-ASIR) (at 70 keV), as well as 120-kVp images with FBP (120-kVp-FBP) and ASIR (120-kVp-ASIR), were generated from dual-energy and single-energy CT data, respectively. The objective image noises, signal-to-noise ratios and contrast-to-noise ratios of the liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, portal vein and aorta, and the lesion-to-liver and lesion-to-kidney contrast-to-noise ratios were measured. Two radiologists independently and blindly assessed the subjective image quality. The results were analyzed using the paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed rank sum test and mixed-effects model with Bonferroni correction. Results: VMS-ASIR images were superior to 120-kVp-FBP, 120-kVp-ASIR and VMS-FBP images for all the quantitative assessments and the subjective overall image quality (all P < 0.001), while VMS-FBP images were superior to 120-kVp-FBP and 120-kVp-ASIR images (all P < 0.004). Conclusions: VMS

  12. Micro scanning probes

    CERN Document Server

    Niblock, T

    2001-01-01

    This thesis covers the design methodology, theory, modelling, fabrication and evaluation of a Micro-Scanning-Probe. The device is a thermally actuated bimorph quadrapod fabricated using Micro Electro Mechanical Systems technology. A quadrapod is a structure with four arms, in this case a planar structure with the four arms forming a cross which is dry etched out of a silicon diaphragm. Each arm has a layer of aluminium deposited on it forming a bimorph. Through heating each arm actuation is achieved in the plane of the quadrapod and the direction normal to it. Fabrication of the device has required the development of bulk micromachining techniques to handle post CMOS fabricated wafers and the patterning of thickly sputtered aluminium in bulk micro machined cavities. CMOS fabrication techniques were used to incorporate diodes onto the quadrapod arms for temperature measurement of the arms. Fine tungsten and silicon tips have also been fabricated to allow tunnelling between the tip and the platform at the centr...

  13. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Khlopov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  14. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  15. Spontaneous Symmetry Probing

    CERN Document Server

    Nicolis, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    For relativistic quantum field theories, we consider Lorentz breaking, spatially homogeneous field configurations or states that evolve in time along a symmetry direction. We dub this situation "spontaneous symmetry probing" (SSP). We mainly focus on internal symmetries, i.e. on symmetries that commute with the Poincare group. We prove that the fluctuations around SSP states have a Lagrangian that is explicitly time independent, and we provide the field space parameterization that makes this manifest. We show that there is always a gapless Goldstone excitation that perturbs the system in the direction of motion in field space. Perhaps more interestingly, we show that if such a direction is part of a non-Abelian group of symmetries, the Goldstone bosons associated with spontaneously broken generators that do not commute with the SSP one acquire a gap, proportional to the SSP state's "speed". We outline possible applications of this formalism to inflationary cosmology.

  16. New probe of naturalness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Englert, Christoph; McCullough, Matthew

    2013-09-20

    Any new scalar fields that perturbatively solve the hierarchy problem by stabilizing the Higgs boson mass also generate new contributions to the Higgs boson field-strength renormalization, irrespective of their gauge representation. These new contributions are physical, and in explicit models their magnitude can be inferred from the requirement of quadratic divergence cancellation; hence, they are directly related to the resolution of the hierarchy problem. Upon canonically normalizing the Higgs field, these new contributions lead to modifications of Higgs couplings that are typically great enough that the hierarchy problem and the concept of electroweak naturalness can be probed thoroughly within a precision Higgs boson program. Specifically, at a lepton collider this can be achieved through precision measurements of the Higgs boson associated production cross section. This would lead to indirect constraints on perturbative solutions to the hierarchy problem in the broadest sense, even if the relevant new fields are gauge singlets.

  17. Advanced Langmuir Probe (LP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronka, N. R.; Block, B. P.; Carignan, G. R.

    1991-01-01

    The dynamic response of the MK-2 version of the Langmuir probe amplifier was studied. The settling time of the step response is increased by: (1) stray node-to-ground capacitance at series connections between high value feedback resistors; and (2) input capacitance due to the input cable, FET switches, and input source follower. The stray node-to-ground capacitances can be reduced to tolerable levels by elevating the string of feedback resistors above the printing board. A new feedback network was considered, with promising results. The design uses resistances having much lower nominal values, thereby minimizing the effect of stray capacitances. Faster settling times can be achieved by using an operational amplifier having a higher gain-bandwidth product.

  18. Allometry as evidence of sexual selection in monochromatic birds: the case of the Coscoroba Swan (Anseriformes: Anatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia P. Calabuig

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Coscoroba Swan, Coscoroba coscoroba (Molina, 1782, is a poorly known aberrant Anserine endemic to South America. We captured adult birds (189 male, 157 female from the largest population in Brazil at the Taim Ecological Reserve, State of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Different patterns between sexes can reflect differences in selection, and positive allometry may indicate that a character is sexually selected. We used body weight and 10 morphological measurements to examine allometric differences between males and females of C. coscoroba. Males were consistently larger than females. Analysis of scaling relationships against body mass showed that nostril, tail, wing and bill height were positively allometric (i.e., heavier birds had relatively larger character lengths, but there were no sexual differences in allometric slopes. However, for a given mass, mature females had longer tails, longer wings (up to metacarpophalangeal articulation and shorter heads than males. In the light of current debate in the literature, we discuss whether such positively allometric traits and sexual differences in scaling may be indicative of sexual selection. Although Coscoroba Swan is a monogamous species, increasing the size of some attributes may confer some advantage for mate selection or male-male competition and, contrary to other studies, we suggest that positively allometric slopes alone should not be considered as evidence for sexual selection of the considered traits.

  19. Monochromatic subdiffusive spatial frequency domain imaging provides in-situ sensitivity to intratumoral morphological heterogeneity in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClatchy, David M; Hoopes, P Jack; Pogue, Brian W; Kanick, Stephen Chad

    2017-02-01

    For the first time, spatially resolved quantitative metrics of light scattering recovered with sub-diffusive spatial frequency domain imaging (sd-SFDI) are shown to be sensitive to changes in intratumoral morphology and viability by direct comparison to histopathological analysis. Two freshly excised subcutaneous murine tumor cross-sections were measured with sd-SFDI, and recovered optical scatter parameter maps were co-registered to whole mount histology. Unique clustering of the optical scatter parameters μs' vs. γ (i.e. diffuse scattering vs. relative backscattering) evaluated at a single wavelength showed complete separation between regions of viable tumor, aggresive tumor with stromal growth, varying levels of necrotic tumor, and also peritumor muscle. The results suggest that with further technical development, sd-SFDI may represent a non-destructive screening tool for analysis of excised tissue or a non-invasive approach to investigate suspicious lesions without the need for exogenous labels or spectrally resolved imaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Optical probing of long range spatial correlation and symmetry in complex biophotonic architectures in the transparent insect wings

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pramod; Singh, Dhirendra P; Mandal, Sudip; Singh, Kamal P

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally probe the natural complex structures in the transparent insect wings by a simple, non-invasive, real time optical technique using monochromatic lasers and broadband femtosecond laser pulses. A stable and reproducible complex diffraction pattern in trans-mission unveils the signature of a new form of spatial correlation and structural symmetry at various length scales for a variety of insect wings. A quantitative analysis of the diffraction reveals a direct link between the structural organization and transmitted diffraction patterns. While matching the sensitivity of SEM for micro-details, our technique is highly efficient to unveil the spatial correlation and symmetry of the photonic architecture from Micrometer to mm scale. Furthermore, when the laser beam is scanned across the wing sample a rotation of the original diffraction profile is observed which quantitatively agrees with the theoretical patterns generated from the corresponding SEM images. Our technique allows us to report the fir...