WorldWideScience

Sample records for monochromatic photon beam

  1. A Monochromatic electron neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lindroos, Mats; Burguet-Castell, J; Espinoza, C

    In the last few years spectacular results have been achieved with the demonstration of non vanishingneutrino masses and flavour mixing. Here, a novel method to create a monochromaticneutrino beam, an old dream for neutrino physics, is described based on the recent discoveryof nuclei with fast decay through electron-capture to Gamow-Teller resonances in super allowedtransitions.

  2. Breast tomosynthesis with monochromatic beams: a feasibility study using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malliori, A.; Bliznakova, K.; Sechopoulos, I.; Kamarianakis, Z.; Fei, B.; Pallikarakis, N.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the impact on image quality of using monochromatic beams for lower dose breast tomosynthesis (BT). For this purpose, modeling and simulation of BT and mammography imaging processes have been performed using two x-ray beams: one at 28 kVp and a monochromatic one at 19 keV at different entrance surface air kerma ranging between 0.16 and 5.5 mGy. Two 4 cm thick computational breast models, in a compressed state, were used: one simple homogeneous and one heterogeneous based on CT breast images, with compositions of 50% glandular-50% adipose and 40% glandular-60% adipose tissues by weight, respectively. Modeled lesions, representing masses and calcifications, were inserted within these breast phantoms. X-ray transport in the breast models was simulated with previously developed and validated Monte Carlo application. Results showed that, for the same incident photon fluence, the use of the monochromatic beam in BT resulted in higher image quality compared to the one using polychromatic acquisition, especially in terms of contrast. For the homogenous phantom, the improvement ranged between 15% and 22% for calcifications and masses, respectively, while for the heterogeneous one this improvement was in the order of 33% for the masses and 17% for the calcifications. For different exposures, comparable image quality in terms of signal-difference-to-noise ratio and higher contrast for all features was obtained when using a monochromatic 19 keV beam at a lower mean glandular dose, compared to the polychromatic one. Monochromatic images also provide better detail and, in combination with BT, can lead to substantial improvement in visualization of features, and particularly better edge detection of low-contrast masses.

  3. A monochromatized chopped beam of cold neutrons for low background experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussiere, A. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Grivot, P. (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Kossakowski, R. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Liaud, P. (Lab. de Physique des Particules, 74 - Annecy le Vieux (France)); Saintignon, P. de (Inst. des Sciences Nucleaires, 38 - Grenoble (France)); Schreckenbach, K. (Inst. Laue-Langevin, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1993-07-15

    The design and performance of a monochromatized, chopped beam of cold neutrons are described. The beam is particularly suited for experiments where a low level of gamma ray and diffused neutron background is required. (orig.)

  4. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for the two-step three- photon ionization process, 1S (2(h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow, 2S ((h)over-bar-omega)under-right-arrow epsilon P, of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependen

  5. Resonant three-photon ionization of hydrogenic atoms by a non-monochromatic laser field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakhontov, V.; Santra, R.; Jungmann, K.

    1999-01-01

    We present ionization probability and lineshape calculations for a specifed two-step three-photon ionization process of the ground state of hydrogenic atoms in a non-monochromatic laser field with a time-dependent amplitude. Within the framework of a three-level model, the AC Stark shifts and non-ze

  6. Dispersion-free monochromatization method for selecting a single-order harmonic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, Eiji J; Ichimaru, Satoshi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to monochromatize multiple orders of high harmonics by using a proper designed multilayer mirror. Multilayer mirrors designed by our concept realize the perfect extraction of a single-order harmonic from multiple-order harmonic beam, and exhibit broadband tenability and high reflectivity in the soft-x-ray region. Furthermore, the proposed monochromatization method can preserve the femtosecond to attosecond pulse duration for the reflected beam. This device is very useful for ultrafast soft x-ray experiments that require high-order harmonic beams, such as femtosecond/attosecond, time-resolved, pump-probe spectroscopy.

  7. Dark Matter Decay to a Photon and a Neutrino: the Double Monochromatic Smoking Gun Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Aisati, Chaïmae El; Hambye, Thomas; Scarna, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    In the energy range from few TeV to 25 TeV, upper bounds on the dark matter decay rate into high energy monochromatic neutrinos have recently become comparable to those on monochromatic gamma-ray lines. This implies clear possibilities of a future double "smoking-gun" evidence for the dark matter particle, from the observation of both a gamma and a neutrino line at the same energy. In particular, we show that a scenario where both lines are induced from the same dark matter particle decay leads to correlations that can already be tested. We study this "double monochromatic" scenario by considering the complete list of lowest dimensional effective operators that could induce such a decay. Furthermore, we argue that, on top of lines from decays into two-body final states, three-body final states can also be highly relevant. In addition to producing a distinct hard photon spectrum, three-body final states also produce a line-like feature in the neutrino spectrum that can be searched for by neutrino telescopes.

  8. Excitation of monochromatic and stable electron acoustic wave by two counter-propagating laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, C. Z.; Liu, Z. J.; Zheng, C. Y.; He, X. T.

    2017-07-01

    The undamped electron acoustic wave is a newly-observed nonlinear electrostatic plasma wave and has potential applications in ion acceleration, laser amplification and diagnostics due to its unique frequency range. We propose to make the first attempt to excite a monochromatic and stable electron acoustic wave (EAW) by two counter-propagating laser beams. The matching conditions relevant to laser frequencies, plasma density, and electron thermal velocity are derived and the harmonic effects of the EAW are excluded. Single-beam instabilities, including stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering, on the excitation process are quantified by an interaction quantity, η =γ {τ }B, where γ is the growth rate of each instability and {τ }B is the characteristic time of the undamped EAW. The smaller the interaction quantity, the more successfully the monochromatic and stable EAW can be excited. Using one-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell simulations, we excite EAW wave trains which are amplitude tunable, have a duration of thousands of laser periods, and are monochromatic and stable, by carefully controlling the parameters under the above conditions.

  9. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  10. Colliding. gamma. e and. gamma gamma. beams based in single-pass e/sup +/e/sup -/ accelerators. Pt. 2. Polarization effects, monochromatization improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Panfil, S.L.; Telnov, V.I.

    Polarization effects are considered in colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams, which are proposed to be obtained on the basis of linear e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliders (by backward Compton scattering of laser light on electron beams). It is shown that using electrons and laser photons with helicities lambda and Psub(c), such that lambdaPsub(c) < 0, essentially improves the monochromatization. The characteristic laser flash energy, A/sub 0/, which is necessary to obtain a conversion coefficient k proportional 1 with a definite degree of monochromatization, is considerably less (somestimes by one order of magnitude) in the case 2 lambdaPsub(c) = -1 in contrast to the case lambdaPsub(c) = 0. Simultaneously the luminosities Lsub(..gamma..e) and Lsub(..gamma gamma..) essentially increase. Formulae are obtained which allow one to extract the polarization information about ..gamma..e -> X and ..gamma gamma.. -> X reactions. Perculiarities connected with the specific scheme of the ..gamma.. beam preparation are discussed. Problems of the calibration of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions for the polarized beams are discussed.

  11. Energy dependence of CP-violation reach for monochromatic neutrino beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabeu, Jose [IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Espinoza, Catalina [IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.catalina.espinoza@uv.es

    2008-06-26

    The ultimate goal of future neutrino facilities is the determination of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. Besides |U(e3)|{ne}0, this will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: (I) {gamma}=90 and {gamma}=195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; (II) {gamma}=195 and {gamma}=440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is important to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline.

  12. Verification of TG-61 dose for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams using fluence-normalized MCNP5 calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; 10.1118/1.4761870

    2012-01-01

    Ion chamber dosimetry is being used to calibrate dose for cell irradiations designed to investigate photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. This study performed a dosimetry intercomparison for synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams at 25 and 35 keV. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements in a PMMA phantom were compared with the product of MCNP5 Monte Carlo calculations of dose per fluence and measured incident fluence. Monochromatic beams of 25 and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. A cylindrical, air-equivalent ion chamber was used to measure the ionization created in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom for depths from 0.6 to 7.7 cm. The American Association of Physicists in Medicine TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Photon fluence was determined using a NaI detector to make scattering measurements of the beam from a thin polyethylene target at angles 30 degrees to 60 degrees. Differential Compto...

  13. Optical theorem for two-dimensional (2D) scalar monochromatic acoustical beams in cylindrical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2015-09-01

    The optical theorem for plane waves is recognized as one of the fundamental theorems in optical, acoustical and quantum wave scattering theory as it relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. Here, the optical theorem is extended and generalized in a cylindrical coordinates system for the case of 2D beams of arbitrary character as opposed to plane waves of infinite extent. The case of scalar monochromatic acoustical wavefronts is considered, and generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption and scattering cross-sections are derived and extended in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term describing the interaction between the diffracted Franz waves with the resonance elastic waves. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates is applicable to any object of arbitrary geometry in 2D located arbitrarily in the beam's path. Related investigations in optics, acoustics and quantum mechanics will benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by a cloud of particles, as well as the resulting radiation force and torque.

  14. The capabilities of monochromatic EC neutrino beams with the SPS upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, C; Bernabeu, J [IFIC, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC, E-46100, Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: m.catalina.espinoza@uv.es, E-mail: jose.bernabeu@uv.es

    2008-05-15

    The goal for future neutrino facilities is the determination of the U(e3) mixing and CP violation in neutrino oscillations. This will require precision experiments with a very intense neutrino source and energy control. With this objective in mind, the creation of monochromatic neutrino beams from the electron capture decay of boosted ions by the SPS of CERN has been proposed. We discuss the capabilities of such a facility as a function of the energy of the boost and the baseline for the detector. We conclude that the SPS upgrade to 1000 GeV is crucial to reach a better sensitivity to CP violation iff it is accompanied by a longer baseline. We compare the physics potential for two different configurations: I) {gamma} = 90 and {gamma} = 195 (maximum achievable at present SPS) to Frejus; II) {gamma} = 195 and {gamma} = 440 (maximum achievable at upgraded SPS) to Canfranc. The main conclusion is that, whereas the gain in the determination of U(e3) is rather modest, setup II provides much better sensitivity to CP violation.

  15. Photofission of {sup NAT} Pt by monochromatic and polarized photons in the quasi-deuteron region; Fotofissao da {sup NAT} Pt por fotons monocromaticos e polarizados na regiao do quase-deuteron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva, Eduardo de

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of the Nat Pt photofission yield at 69 MeV of effective average energy of the incident photon is made using a polarized and monochromatic photon beam from the LADON system of the National Laboratory of Frascati, Italy, produced by inverse Compton scattering of laser light by high energy electrons of the ADONE Accelerator and using as fission track solid detector the Makrofol, being the developing made by usual procedure. The experimental value of the nuclear fissionability is compared to a theoretical value obtained following a model at two stages: in the first, the photon energy is absorbed by a neutron-proton pair inducing to the nucleus excitation, and in the second the nucleus de-excites due to the competition between nucleon evaporation and fission. The effect of fast nucleon emission during the first stage and the successive evaporation of neutrons in the second stage are considered. 40 refs, 12 figs, 9 tabs.

  16. Photon collider beam simulation with CAIN

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aleksander Filip Żarnecki

    2007-11-01

    The CAIN simulation program was used to study the outgoing beam profile for the photon collider at ILC. The main aim of the analysis was to verify the feasibility of the photon linear collider running with 20 mrad electron beam crossing angle. The main problem is the distorted electron beam, which has to be removed from the interaction region. It is shown that with a new design of the final dipole, it should be possible to avoid large energy losses at the face of the magnet.

  17. Improvement of Image Quality in Transmission Computed Tomography Using Synchrotron Monochromatic X-Ray Sheet Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    7] T. Takeda, M. Kazama, T. Zeniya, T. Yuasa, M. Akiba, A. Uchida, K. Hyodo, T. Akatsuka, M. Ando, and Y. Itai , “Development of a Mono- chromatic X...Uyama (Springer-Verlag, Tokyo), pp. 103-110 (1998). [8] Y. Itai , T. Takeda, T. Akatsuka, T. Maeda, K. Hyodo, A. Uchida, T. Yuasa, M. Kazama, J. Wu...T. Yuasa, K. Hyodo, M. Ando, T. Akatsuka, and Y. Itai , “Performance Study of Monochromatic Synchro- tron X-ray Computed Tomography using a Linear

  18. An alignment method for the ATLAS end-cap TRT detector using a narrow monochromatic X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Åkesson, T; Dixon, N; Dolgoshein, B A; Eerola, Paule Anna Mari; Farthouat, Philippe; Fedin, O; Froidevaux, Daniel; Gavrilenko, I; Hajduk, Z; Hauviller, Claude; Ivanov, V; Ivochkin, V G; Jelamkov, A; Konovalov, S V; Lichard, P; Lundberg, B; Muraviev, S; Nadtochy, A; Nevski, P; Peshekhonov, V D; Platonov, Yu P; Price, M; Romaniouk, A; Shchegelskii, V; Shmeleva, A; Smirnov, A; Smirnov, S; Sosnovtsev, V V

    2001-01-01

    The end-cap transition radiation tracker (TRT), consisting of 36 modules (wheels), is being constructed as a part of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the CERN LHC. This paper describes a method for determining the wire positions inside the straw proportional tubes (SPT), which are the basic building blocks of the ATLAS TRT, with an accuracy of better than 10 mu m. The procedure involves moving a narrow monochromatic X-ray beam across the straw and measuring the counting rate as a function of the position of the X-ray beam in the straw. To achieve this goal, a beam directing device (BDD), providing the possibility to direct the X-ray beam in a chosen direction within some solid angle and supplying an accurate angular measurement system, has been constructed. The results of the wire position measurements performed using this BDD on a full-scale mechanical prototype end-cap wheel of the TRT are presented in this paper. (11 refs).

  19. Focused-ion-beam processing for photonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, de René M.; Hopman, Wico C.L.; Ay, Feridun

    2007-01-01

    Although focused ion beam (FIB) processing is a well-developed technology for many applications in electronics and physics, it has found limited application to photonics. Due to its very high spatial resolution in the order of 10 nm, and its ability to mill almost any material, it seems to have a go

  20. Transparency induced by two photon interference in a beam splitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Kai-Ge; Yang Guo-Jian

    2004-01-01

    We propose a special two-photon state which is completely transparent in a 50/50 beam splitter. This effect is caused by the destructive two-photon interference and shows the signature of photon entanglement. We find that the symmetry of the two-photon spectrum plays the key role for the properties of two-photon interference.

  1. Data analysis of photon beam position at PLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Shin, S., E-mail: tlssh@postech.ac.kr; Huang, Jung-Yun; Kim, D.; Kim, C.; Kim, Ilyou; Lee, T.-Y.; Park, C.-D.; Kim, K. R. [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-834 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-27

    In the third generation light source, photon beam position stability is critical issue on user experiment. Generally photon beam position monitors have been developed for the detection of the real photon beam position and the position is controlled by feedback system in order to keep the reference photon beam position. In the PLS-II, photon beam position stability for front end of particular beam line, in which photon beam position monitor is installed, has been obtained less than rms 1μm for user service period. Nevertheless, detail analysis for photon beam position data in order to demonstrate the performance of photon beam position monitor is necessary, since it can be suffers from various unknown noises. (for instance, a back ground contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, undulator gap dependence, etc.) In this paper, we will describe the start to end study for photon beam position stability and the Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) analysis to demonstrate the reliability on photon beam position data.

  2. New frontiers in nuclear physics with high-power lasers and brilliant monochromatic gamma beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gales, S.; Balabanski, D. L.; Negoita, F.; Tesileanu, O.; Ur, C. A.; Ursescu, D.; Zamfir, N. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of high power lasers and the combination of such novel devices with accelerator technology has enlarged the science reach of many research fields, in particular particle and nuclear physics, astrophysics as well as societal applications in material science, nuclear energy and applications for medicine. The European Strategic Forum for Research Infrastructures has selected a proposal based on these new premises called the Extreme Light Infrastructure (ELI). The ELI will be built as a network of three complementary pillars at the frontier of laser technologies. The ELI-NP pillar (NP for nuclear physics) is under construction near Bucharest (Romania) and will develop a scientific program using two 10 PW lasers and a Compton back-scattering high-brilliance and intense low-energy gamma beam, a combination of laser and accelerator technology at the frontier of knowledge. This unique combination of beams that are unique worldwide allows us to develop an experimental program in nuclear physics at the frontiers of present-day knowledge as well as society driven applications. In the present paper, the technical description of the facility as well as the new perspectives in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nuclear astrophysics will be presented.

  3. Extended optical theorem for scalar monochromatic acoustical beams of arbitrary wavefront in cylindrical coordinates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-04-01

    One of the fundamental theorems in (optical, acoustical, quantum, gravitational) wave scattering is the optical theorem for plane waves, which relates the extinction cross-section to the forward scattering complex amplitude function. In this analysis, the optical theorem is extended for the case of 3D-beams of arbitrary character in a cylindrical coordinates system for any angle of incidence and any scattering angle. Generalized analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, scattering cross-sections and efficiency factors are derived in the framework of the scalar resonance scattering theory for an object of arbitrary shape. The analysis reveals the presence of an interference scattering cross-section term, which describes interference between the diffracted or specularly reflected inelastic (Franz) waves with the resonance elastic waves. Moreover, an alternate expression for the extinction cross-section, which relates the resonance cross-section with the scattering cross-section for an impenetrable object, is obtained, suggesting an improved method for particle characterization. Cross-section expressions are also derived for known acoustical wavefronts centered on the object, defined as the on-axis case. The extended optical theorem in cylindrical coordinates can be applied to evaluate the extinction efficiency from any object of arbitrary geometry placed on or off the axis of the incident beam. Applications in acoustics, optics, and quantum mechanics should benefit from this analysis in the context of wave scattering theory and other phenomena closely connected to it, such as the multiple scattering by many particles, as well as the radiation force and torque.

  4. Polarization effect in the photon beam collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F. (AN SSSR, Novosibirsk. Inst. Matematiki); Kotkin, G.L.; Panfil' , S.L.; Serbo, V.G. (Novosibirskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ., USSR)

    1983-10-01

    Polarization effects are investigated for collisions of high-energy ..gamma.. beams produced from the Compton scattering of laser light on electrons. To do this, were obtained Stokes parameters Xisub(i), xisub(j) tilde of the ..gamma..-beams, and their average values (xisub(i)), (xisub(j) tilde), as functions of the photon energies and polarizations of the initial beams. The quantities to be measUred in the ..gamma gamma.. collisions are expressed via the average values (xisub(i)xisub(j) tilde), which are in general different from (Hisub(i))(xisub(j) tilde), the fact making the investigation of the polarization effects more complicated. In particular, (xi/sub 3/xi/sub 3/ tilde-xi/sub 11/ tilde) not equal to 0 even if the electron and the laser beams are not Polarized. It is shown that (xisub(i)xisub(j) tilde) approximately (xisub(i))(xisub(j) tilde) for two important limiting cases. Effects due to a correlation between the beams are considered.

  5. Feasibility of Strong and Quasi-Monochromatic Gamma-Ray Generation by the Laser Compton Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jiyoung; Rehman, Haseeb ur; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    This is because LCS γ-rays are energy-tunable, quasi-monochromatic, and beam-like. The photon intensity of the mono-chromatic LCS gamma-ray should be high or strong for efficient and high transmutation rate. It was recently reported that a so-called energy-recovery linac system is able to produce a very high-intensity LCS photons in the order of approximately 1013 photons/s economically. It however did not evaluate quality of the LCS photon beam although a quasi-monoenergetic LCS beam is of huge importance in the photo-nuclear transmutation reactions. It is upon this observation that this paper was prepared. Specifically, this work attempts to quantify intensity of the quasi-monochromatic LCS beam from the said linac system. In addition, this paper aims to discuss general characteristics of the LCS photon, and possible approaches to increase its intensity. This paper presents essential characteristics of the laser Compton scattering (LCS) in terms of its photon energy, cross-section and photon intensity. By using different combinations of electron energy, laser energy and scattering angle, we can effectively generate high-intensity and highly-chromatic LCS gamma-rays. Our preliminary analyses indicate that, in view of Compton cross-section, higher-energy photon can be better generated by increasing the electron energy rather than increasing the laser energy. However, in order to maximize the intensity of monochromatic beam, the laser energy should be maximized for a targeted LCS photon energy.

  6. Valley-dependent beam manipulators based on photonic graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fu-Sheng; Sun, Yong; Dong, Li-Juan; Liu, Yan-Hong; Shi, Yun-Long

    2017-02-01

    Trigonal warping distortion in energy band lifts the degeneracy of two valleys (K and K' points) of graphene. In this situation, electron transport becomes valley dependent, which can be used to design the valley beam splitter, collimator, or guiding device. Here, valley-dependent beam manipulators are designed based on artificial photonic graphene. In this scheme, the finite-size artificial photonic graphene is intentionally designed to realize the novel device functionalities. This kind of valley-dependent beam manipulators can work at an arbitrary range of electromagnetic waves from microwave to visible light. It potentially paves the way for the application of photonic graphene in future integrated photonic devices.

  7. Two-photon flow cytometer with laser scanning Bessel beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongdong; Ding, Yu; Ray, Supriyo; Paez, Aurelio; Xiao, Chuan; Li, Chunqiang

    2016-03-01

    Flow cytometry is an important technique in biomedical discovery for cell counting, cell sorting and biomarker detection. In vivo flow cytometers, based on one-photon or two-photon excited fluorescence, have been developed for more than a decade. One drawback of laser beam scanning two-photon flow cytometer is that the two-photon excitation volume is fairly small due to the short Rayleigh range of a focused Gaussian beam. Hence, the sampling volume is much smaller than one-photon flow cytometry, which makes it challenging to count or detect rare circulating cells in vivo. Bessel beams have narrow intensity profiles with an effective spot size (FWHM) as small as several wavelengths, making them comparable to Gaussian beams. More significantly, the theoretical depth of field (propagation distance without diffraction) can be infinite, making it an ideal solution as a light source for scanning beam flow cytometry. The trade-off of using Bessel beams rather than a Gaussian beam is the fact that Bessel beams have small concentric side rings that contribute to background noise. Two-photon excitation can reduce this noise, as the excitation efficiency is proportional to intensity squared. Therefore, we developed a two-photon flow cytometer using scanned Bessel beams to form a light sheet that intersects the micro fluidic channel.

  8. Can AERONET data be used to accurately model the monochromatic beam and circumsolar irradiances under cloud-free conditions in desert environment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Eissa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine measurements of the beam irradiance at normal incidence (DNI include the irradiance originating from within the extent of the solar disc only (DNIS whose angular extent is 0.266° ± 1.7 %, and that from a larger circumsolar region, called the circumsolar normal irradiance (CSNI. This study investigates if the spectral aerosol optical properties of the AERONET stations are sufficient for an accurate modelling of the monochromatic DNIS and CSNI under cloud-free conditions in a desert environment. The data from an AERONET station in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, and a collocated Sun and Aureole Measurement (SAM instrument which offers reference measurements of the monochromatic profile of solar radiance, were exploited. Using the AERONET data both the radiative transfer models libRadtran and SMARTS offer an accurate estimate of the monochromatic DNIS, with a relative root mean square error (RMSE of 5 %, a relative bias of +1 % and acoefficient of determination greater than 0.97. After testing two configurations in SMARTS and three in libRadtran for modelling the monochromatic CSNI, libRadtran exhibits the most accurate results when the AERONET aerosol phase function is presented as a Two Term Henyey–Greenstein phase function. In this case libRadtran exhibited a relative RMSE and a bias of respectively 22 and −19 % and a coefficient of determination of 0.89. The results are promising and pave the way towards reporting the contribution of the broadband circumsolar irradiance to standard DNI measurements.

  9. Analytical description of photon beam phase spaces in inverse Compton scattering sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Curatolo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the description of inverse Compton scattering sources and the photon beams generated therein, emphasizing the behavior of their phase space density distributions and how they depend upon those of the two colliding beams of electrons and photons. The main objective is to provide practical formulas for bandwidth, spectral density, brilliance, which are valid in general for any value of the recoil factor, i.e. both in the Thomson regime of negligible electron recoil, and in the deep Compton recoil dominated region, which is of interest for gamma-gamma colliders and Compton sources for the production of multi-GeV photon beams. We adopt a description based on the center of mass reference system of the electron-photon collision, in order to underline the role of the electron recoil and how it controls the relativistic Doppler/boost effect in various regimes. Using the center of mass reference frame greatly simplifies the treatment, allowing us to derive simple formulas expressed in terms of rms momenta of the two colliding beams (emittance, energy spread, etc. and the collimation angle in the laboratory system. Comparisons with Monte Carlo simulations of inverse Compton scattering in various scenarios are presented, showing very good agreement with the analytical formulas: in particular we find that the bandwidth dependence on the electron beam emittance, of paramount importance in Thomson regime, as it limits the amount of focusing imparted to the electron beam, becomes much less sensitive in deep Compton regime, allowing a stronger focusing of the electron beam to enhance luminosity without loss of mono-chromaticity. A similar effect occurs concerning the bandwidth dependence on the frequency spread of the incident photons: in deep recoil regime the bandwidth comes out to be much less dependent on the frequency spread. The set of formulas here derived are very helpful in designing inverse Compton sources in diverse regimes, giving a

  10. Modelling polychromatic high energy photon beams by superposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, P E; Hoban, P W; Murray, D C; Round, W H

    1989-09-01

    A unified three dimensional superposition approach to dose calculations used in treatment planning of polychromatic high energy photon beams in radiotherapy is developed. The approach we have used involves computing the dose at all points in a medium by superposing the dose spread array (DSA) from the interaction of a photon at a point in the medium with an array of data representing the TERMA (photon fluence times the photon energy) at points in the beam. The polychromatic nature of the beam is accounted for by modelling the beam as having ten spectral components. A "polychromatic dose spread array" (PDSA) for an interaction from a beam with this spectrum was derived. The TERMA array is calculated from a weighted average of the TERMA arrays for the ten photon energies to give a "polychromatic TERMA array". Thus the method accounts for the effect of beam hardening of the TERMA. But it does not account for the effect of beam hardening on the PDSA since a single PDSA (usually for the spectrum at the surface of the medium) is used at all depths. However, by considering measured and calculated beam central axis data, this model is shown to be adequate for computing depth doses for beams in a homogeneous medium penetrating to extreme radiological depths. A computation time advantage is gained because only one superposition per beam is required.

  11. Photonic Crystal Polarizing and Non-Polarizing Beam Splitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Chun-Ying; SHI Jin-Hui; YUAN Li-Bo

    2008-01-01

    A polarizing beam splitter(PBS)and a non-polarizing beam splitter(NPBS)based on a photonic crystal(PC)directional coupler are demonstrated.The photonic crystal directional coupler consists of a hexagonal lattice of dielectric pillars in air and has a complete photonic band gap.The photonic band structure and the band gap map are calculated using the plane wave expansion(PWE)method.The splitting properties of the splitter are investigated numerically using the finite difference time domain(FDTD)method.

  12. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas A D; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P; 10.1118/1.4767770

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University CAMD synchrotron facility. Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10x10x10-cm3 PMMA phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Cent...

  13. Dose-response curve of EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films to synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Thomas A. D.; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.; Alvarez, Diane; Matthews, Kenneth L. II; Ham, Kyungmin; Dugas, Joseph P. [Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 6980 Jefferson Highway, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and A and M College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: This work investigates the dose-response curves of GAFCHROMIC{sup Registered-Sign} EBT, EBT2, and EBT3 radiochromic films using synchrotron-produced monochromatic x-ray beams. EBT2 film is being utilized for dose verification in photoactivated Auger electron therapy at the Louisiana State University Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices (CAMD) synchrotron facility. Methods: Monochromatic beams of 25, 30, and 35 keV were generated on the tomography beamline at CAMD. Ion chamber depth-dose measurements were used to determine the dose delivered to films irradiated at depths from 0.7 to 8.5 cm in a 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 Multiplication-Sign 10-cm{sup 3} polymethylmethacrylate phantom. AAPM TG-61 protocol was applied to convert measured ionization into dose. Films were digitized using an Epson 1680 Professional flatbed scanner and analyzed using the net optical density (NOD) derived from the red channel. A dose-response curve was obtained at 35 keV for EBT film, and at 25, 30, and 35 keV for EBT2 and EBT3 films. Calibrations of films for 4 MV x-rays were obtained for comparison using a radiotherapy accelerator at Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center. Results: The sensitivity (NOD per unit dose) of EBT film at 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays was 0.73 and 0.76 for doses 50 and 100 cGy, respectively. The sensitivity of EBT2 film at 25, 30, and 35 keV relative to that for 4-MV x-rays varied from 1.09-1.07, 1.23-1.17, and 1.27-1.19 for doses 50-200 cGy, respectively. For EBT3 film the relative sensitivity was within 3% of unity for all three monochromatic x-ray beams. Conclusions: EBT and EBT2 film sensitivity showed strong energy dependence over an energy range of 25 keV-4 MV, although this dependence becomes weaker for larger doses. EBT3 film shows weak energy dependence, indicating that it would be a better dosimeter for kV x-ray beams where beam hardening effects can result in large changes in the effective energy.

  14. Dynamics of a multi-beam photonic free electron laser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, J.H.H.; van Dijk, M.W.; Denis, T.; van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Boller, Klaus J.

    2012-01-01

    A photonic free-electron laser (pFEL) uses free electrons streaming through a photonic crystal (PhC) to generate tunable coherent radiation. Here, we consider a pFEL driven by a set of three low energy (~ 10 keV), low perveance (< 0.1 μP) electron beams. Using a particle-in- cell code, we numericall

  15. Optical microscope using an interferometric source of two-color, two-beam entangled photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-07-13

    Systems and methods are described for an optical microscope using an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. A method includes: downconverting a beam of coherent energy to provide a beam of multi-color entangled photons; converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; transforming at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam by interaction with a sample to generate an entangled photon specimen beam; and combining the entangled photon specimen beam with an entangled photon reference beam within a single beamsplitter. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a beam probe director and specimen assembly optically coupled to the condenser device; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the beam probe director and specimen assembly, the beam splitter combining an entangled photon specimen beam from the beam probe director and specimen assembly with an entangled photon reference beam.

  16. (U) Estimating the Photonics Budget, Resolution, and Signal Requirements for a Multi-Monochromatic X-ray Imager

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tregillis, Ian Lee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-22

    This document examines the performance of a generic flat-mirror multimonochromatic imager (MMI), with special emphasis on existing instruments at NIF and Omega. We begin by deriving the standard equation for the mean number of photons detected per resolution element. The pinhole energy bandwidth is a contributing factor; this is dominated by the finite size of the source and may be considerable. The most common method for estimating the spatial resolution of such a system (quadrature addition) is, technically, mathematically invalid for this case. However, under the proper circumstances it may produce good estimates compared to a rigorous calculation based on the convolution of point-spread functions. Diffraction is an important contribution to the spatial resolution. Common approximations based on Fraunhofer (farfield) diffraction may be inappropriate and misleading, as the instrument may reside in multiple regimes depending upon its configuration or the energy of interest. It is crucial to identify the correct diffraction regime; Fraunhofer and Fresnel (near-field) diffraction profiles are substantially different, the latter being considerably wider. Finally, we combine the photonics and resolution analyses to derive an expression for the minimum signal level such that the resulting images are not dominated by photon statistics. This analysis is consistent with observed performance of the NIF MMI.

  17. Consequences of photon beam excitation in an inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiter, E.R.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Plasma enhanced deposition and etching processes have been common in the semiconductor industry for some time. Generally the chemical systems are complex and consist of many different neutral and ionic species, only a subset of which are desired. Establishing process control is sometimes difficult, as changing most system parameters will not be selective in terms of which species they affect It may also be difficult to simultaneously optimize all process variables. In this paper, the authors present results from a numerical study of an Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) system which is excited by a photon beam. The Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM), modified to include the Monte Carlo Photon Beam (MCPB) module, is the simulation tool used in the study. The MCPB models the injection and propagation of a photon beam through a plasma processing reactor using a Monte Carlo simulation. Photon absorption in the plasma is described using a variable particle weighting method. Multiple photon species are allowed, and photon absorption cross sections for photolysis and ionization are input through a parser. Source rates for charged and neutral species, which result from photon absorption, are generated by the MCPB and used by the fluid module of the HPEM. They will present the results of a parametric study of the effects of an auxiliary photon source on species densities and plasma potential for a Cl{sub 2} etching plasma.

  18. A concept of the photon collider beam dump

    CERN Document Server

    Shekhtman, L I

    2014-01-01

    Photon beams at photon colliders are very narrow, powerful (10--15 MW) and cannot be spread by fast magnets (because photons are neutral). No material can withstand such energy density. For the ILC-based photon collider, we suggest using a 150 m long, pressurized (P ~ 4 atm) argon gas target in front of a water absorber which solves the overheating and mechanical stress problems. The neutron background at the interaction point is estimated and additionally suppressed using a 20 m long hydrogen gas target in front of the argon.

  19. Dynamic photonic crystals dimensionality tuning by laser beams polarization changing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golinskaya, Anastasia D.; Stebakova, Yulia V.; Valchuk, Yana V.; Smirnov, Aleksandr M.; Mantsevich, Vladimir N.

    2017-05-01

    A simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of quantum dots was demonstrated. With the proposed technique we have made micro-periodic dynamic semiconductor structure with strong nonlinear changing of refraction and absorption and analyzed the self-diffraction processes of two, three and four non-coplanar laser beams at the dynamic photonic crystal (diffraction grating) with hexagonal lattice structure. To reach the best uniform contrast of the structure and for better understanding of the problems, specially raised by the interference of multiple laser beams theoretical calculation of the periodic intensity field in the QDs solution were performed. It was demonstrated that dynamic photonic crystal structure and even it's dimension can be easily tuned with a high speed by the laser beams polarization variation without changing the experimental setup geometry.

  20. QED-based Optical Bloch Equations without electric dipole approximation: A model for a two-level atom interacting with a monochromatic X-ray laser beam

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Wen-Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    We derive a set of optical Bloch equations (OBEs) directly from the minimal-coupling Hamiltonian density of the bound-state quantum electrodynamics (bound-state QED). Such optical Bloch equations are beyond the former widely-used ones due to that there is no electric dipole approximation (EDA) on the minimal-coupling Hamiltonian density of the bound-state QED. Then our optical Bloch equations can describe a two-level atom interacting with a monochromatic light of arbitrary wavelength, which are suitable to study the spectroscopy and the Rabi oscillations of two-level atoms in X-ray laser beams since that the wavelength of X-ray is close to an atom to make the electric dipole approximation (EDA) invalid.

  1. Synchrotron beam test of a photon counting pixel prototype based on Double-SOI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.; Lu, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Nishimura, R.; Kishimoto, S.; Arai, Y.; Ouyang, Q.

    2017-01-01

    The overall noise performances and first synchrotron beam measurement results of CPIXETEG3b, the first counting type Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI) pixel sensor prototype without crosstalk issue, are reported. The prototype includes a 64 × 64 pixel matrix with 50 μm pitch size. Each pixel consists of an N-in-P charge collection diode, a charge sensitive preamplifier, a shaper, a discriminator with thresholds adjustable by an in-pixel 4-bit DAC, and a 6-bit counter. The study was performed using the beam line 14A at KEK Photon Factory (KEK-PF) . The homogeneous response of the prototype, including charging-sharing effects between pixels were studied. 16 keV and 8 keV monochromatic small size (~ 10 μm diameter) X-ray beams were used for the charge sharing study, and a flat-field was added for homogenous response investigation. The overall detector homogeneity and the influence of basic detector parameters on charge sharing between pixels has been investigated.

  2. Beam Steering at Higher Photonic Bands and Design of a Directional Cloak Formed by Photonic Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatachalam Subramanian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Beam steering due to anomalous dispersion at higher photonic bands in dielectric photonic crystal is reported in this work. Based on this concept, directional cloak is designed that conceals a larger dimensional scattering object against the normal incident, linearly polarizedelectromagnetic waves.

  3. Photon beam convolution using polyenergetic energy deposition kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoban, P.W.; Murray, D.C.; Round, W.H. (Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand). Dept. of Physics)

    1994-04-01

    In photon beam convolution calculations where polyenergetic energy deposition kernels (EDKs) are used, the primary photon energy spectrum should be correctly accounted for in Monte Carlo generation of EDKs. This requires the probability of interaction, determined by the linear attenuation coefficient, [mu], to be taken into account when primary photon interactions are forced to occur at the EDK origin. The use of primary and scattered EDKs generated with a fixed photon spectrum can give rise to an error in the dose calculation due to neglecting the effects of beam hardening with depth. The proportion of primary photon energy that is transferred to secondary electrons increases with depth of interaction, due to the increase in the ratio [mu][sub ab]/[mu] as the beam hardens. Convolution depth-dose curves calculated using polyenergetic EDKs generated for the primary photon spectra which exist at depths of 0, 20 and 40 cm in water, show a fall-off which is too steep when compared with EGS4 Monte Carlo results. A beam hardening correction factor applied to primary and scattered 0 cm EDKs, based on the ratio of kerma to terma at each depth, gives primary, scattered and total dose in good agreement with Monte Carlo results. (Author).

  4. Photon trap for neutralization of negative ions beams

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S S; Ivanov, A A; Kotelnikov, I A

    2015-01-01

    For effectively neutralization of the powerful negative ions beams of hydrogen and deuterium the photon target is considered in long time. The attractiveness of the traditional approach (Fabry-Perot resonators) to their creation is limited to a number of stringent technical requirements and large economic costs. In this paper we propose a new concept of non-resonant photon trap (storage) for creation more technologically simple optical neutralizers.

  5. Shaping of light beams with photonic crystals : spatial filtering, beam collimation and focusing

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The research developed in the framework of this PhD thesis is a theoretical, numerical and experimental study of light beam shaping (spatial filtering, beam collimation and focusing) in the visible frequency range using photonic crystal structures. Photonic crystals (PhCs) are materials with periodic, spatially modulated refractive index on the wavelength scale. They are primarily known for their chromatic dispersion properties. However, they can also modify the spatial dispersion, which allo...

  6. Milling of polymeric photonic crystals by focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pialat, E. [Unite de Microelectronique et Optoelectronique Polymere (UMOP/CNRS), Pole Limousin des Sciences et Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication (PLSTIC) de l' Universite de Limoges, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Trigaud, T. [Unite de Microelectronique et Optoelectronique Polymere (UMOP/CNRS), Pole Limousin des Sciences et Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication (PLSTIC) de l' Universite de Limoges, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Bernical, V. [Unite de Microelectronique et Optoelectronique Polymere (UMOP/CNRS), Pole Limousin des Sciences et Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication (PLSTIC) de l' Universite de Limoges, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France); Moliton, J.P. [Unite de Microelectronique et Optoelectronique Polymere (UMOP/CNRS), Pole Limousin des Sciences et Technologies de l' Information et de la Communication (PLSTIC) de l' Universite de Limoges, 123 Avenue A. Thomas, 87060 Limoges Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jpmlt@unilim.fr

    2005-12-15

    The achievement of low cost photonic crystals in organic materials is not a trivial challenge even by top-down processes. Firstly the required conditions for the opening of a 2D Photonic Band Gap (PBG) in polymers by implementation of adapted software are shortly presented. The Focused Ion Beam (FIB) technique appears as a suitable process to carry out the patterning of the required sub-micronic dimensions. Then, the optimum experimental procedures leading to the fabrication of 2D photonic crystals in PMMA and CR39 are mainly exposed and discussed.

  7. Focused ion beam milling of photonic crystals in bulk silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Wenbin; Ridder, de René M.; Tong, Xing-Lin

    2009-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) direct milling was used to fabricate photonic crystals in bulk silicon. The milling requires the sidewalls as nearly perpendicular to the slab as possible and the top profile of the holes to be smooth. The re-deposition of milled material exaggerates the hole profiles. The eff

  8. Polarization beam splitting using a birefringent graded photonic crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassan, Eric; Van Do, Khanh; Dellinger, Jean; Le Roux, Xavier; de Fornel, Frédérique; Cluzel, Benoit

    2013-02-15

    The use of a birefringent graded photonic crystal (GPhC) is proposed for the realization of an efficient polarization beam splitter. This approach allows decoupling the two functions of efficient light injection for both polarizations and TE/TM beam splitting. A smooth light polarization splitting is naturally achieved due to the different curved trajectories followed within the graded medium by the TE and TM waves. A 160 nm operating bandwidth with insertion loss around 1 dB and interpolarization crosstalk below -15 dB is predicted by a finite difference time domain simulation. The unusually exploited electromagnetic phenomena are experimentally evidenced by scanning near-field optical measurements performed on samples fabricated using the silicon on insulator photonics technology. These experimental works open perspectives for the use of birefringent GPhCs to manage polarization diversity in silicon photonic circuits.

  9. Linearly polarized photon beam at MAX-lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganenko, V., E-mail: ganenko@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Brudvik, J. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Burdeinyi, D. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Fissum, K. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Hansen, K. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Isaksson, L. [Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Livingston, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Lundin, M. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Morokhovskii, V. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Nilsson, B.; Pugachov, D. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Schroder, B. [MAX IV Laboratory, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Vashchenko, G. [National Science Center, Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2014-11-01

    A linearly polarized photon beam has been produced at MAX-lab using the coherent bremsstrahlung of electrons with an energy of 192.6 MeV in a 0.1 mm thick diamond crystal. The intensity and shape of the coherent maxima and their dependence on the crystal orientation are similar to the features observed at higher electron energies (∼ 1 GeV) and are well described by coherent bremsstrahlung theory. The linear polarization of the uncollimated beam at the coherent peak energy ≈50–60 MeV is about 20% and can be increased to 40–45% if collimation of half the characteristic angle is used. At present the degree of polarization is high enough to allow the study of polarization observables in photo-nuclear reactions at MAX-lab in the energy range from Giant Dipole Resonance up to ≈80 MeV. -- Highlights: •A linearly polarized tagged photon beam has been produced at the MAX-lab facility. •The coherent bremsstrahlung spectra were measured for various crystal orientations. •The measured spectra are well described by the coherent bremsstrahlung theory. •The photon beam polarization can reach 50% at the Giant Resonance region. •Polarized beam provides performing nuclear experiments in the energy range 10–90 MeV.

  10. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  11. Beam position monitor data acquisition for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Kahana, E.; Votaw, A.J.; Decker, G.A.; Chung, Y.; Ciarlette, D.J.; Laird, R.J.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes the Beam Position Monitor (BPM) data acquisition scheme for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. The storage ring contains 360 beam position monitors distributed around its 1104-meter circumference. The beam position monitor data acquisition system is capable of making turn-by-turn measurements of all BPMs simultaneously. It is VXI-based with each VXI crate containing the electronics for 9 BPMS. The VXI Local Bus is used to provide sustained data transfer rates of up to 13 mega-transfers per second to a scanner module. The system provides single-bunch tracking, bunch-to-bunch measurements, fast digital-averaged positions, beam position history buffering, and synchronized multi-turn measurements. Data is accessible to the control system VME crates via an MXI bus. Dedicated high-speed ports are provided to supply position data to beam orbit feedback systems.

  12. Interaction of Airy-Gaussian beams in defected photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xing; Xiang, Ying; Li, Huagang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate interactions by means of direct numerical simulations between two finite Airy-Gaussian (AiG) beams in different media with the defected photonic lattices in one transverse dimension. We discuss different lattice structures in which the beams with different intensities and phases are launched into the medium, but accelerate in opposite directions. During interactions we see the interference fringe, breathers and soliton pairs generated that are not accelerating. In the linear media, the initial deflection direction of the accelerated beams is changed by adjusting the phase shift and the beam interval. For a certain lattice period, the periodic interference fringe can form. A constructive or destructive interference can vary with the defect depth and phase shift. While the nonlinearity is introduced, the breathers is generated. Especially, the appropriate beam amplitude and lattice depth may lead to the formation of soliton pairs.

  13. Temporal nonlinear beam dynamics in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennet, Francis; Rosberg, Christian Romer; Neshev, Dragomir N.

    of nonlinear beam reshaping occurring on a short time scale before the establishment of a steady state regime. In experiment, a 532nm laser beam can be injected into a single hole of an infiltrated PCF cladding structure, and the temporal dynamics of the nonlinear response is measured by monitoring......Liquid-infiltrated photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) offer a new way of studying light propagation in periodic and discrete systems. A wide range of available fiber structures combined with the ease of infiltration opens up a range of novel experimental opportunities for optical detection and bio......-sensing as well as active devices for all-optical switching at low (mW) laser powers. Commercially available PCFs infiltrated with liquids also provide a versatile and compact tool for exploration of the fundamentals of nonlinear beam propagation in periodic photonic structures. To explore the full scientific...

  14. Photonic quantum walk in a single beam with twisted light

    CERN Document Server

    Cardano, Filippo; Karimi, Ebrahim; Slussarenko, Sergei; Paparo, Domenico; de Lisio, Corrado; Sciarrino, Fabio; Santamato, Enrico; Marrucci, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by the classical phenomenon of random walk, the concept of quantum walk has emerged recently as a powerful platform for the dynamical simulation of complex quantum systems, entanglement production and universal quantum computation. Such a wide perspective motivates a renewing search for efficient, scalable and stable implementations of this quantum process. Photonic approaches have hitherto mainly focused on multi-path schemes, requiring interferometric stability and a number of optical elements that scales quadratically with the number of steps. Here we report the experimental realization of a quantum walk taking place in the orbital angular momentum space of light, both for a single photon and for two simultaneous indistinguishable photons. The whole process develops in a single light beam, with no need of interferometers, and requires optical resources scaling linearly with the number of steps. Our demonstration introduces a novel versatile photonic platform for implementing quantum simulations, b...

  15. High intensity X/γ photon beams for nuclear physics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, L.; Alesini, D.; Bacci, N.; Bliss, N.; Cassou, K.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Dupraz, K.; Giribono, A.; Petrillo, V.; Palumbo, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Variola, A.; Zomer, F.

    2016-05-01

    In this manuscript we review the challenges of Compton backscattering sources in advancing photon beam performances in the 1 - 20 MeV energy range, underlining the design criteria bringing to maximum spectral luminosity and briefly describing the main achievements in conceiving and developing new devices (multi-bunch RF cavities and Laser recirculators) for the case of ELI-NP Gamma Beam System (ELI-NP-GBS).

  16. Reconnection Remnants in the Magnetic Cloud of October 18-19, 1995: A Shock, Monochromatic Wave, Heat Flux Dropout and Energetic Ion Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Szabo, A.; Farrell, W.; Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Fitzenreiter, R.; Thompson, B.; Hamilton, D. C.; Gloeckler, G.; Ho, G. C.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the WIND spacecraft observed particle and field signatures on October 18-19, 1995 due to reconnection near the footpoints of a magnetic cloud (i.e., between 1 and 5 solar radii). These signatures include: (1) an internal shock traveling approximately along the axis of the magnetic cloud, (2) a simple compression of the magnetic field consistent with the footpoint magnetic fields being thrust outwards at speeds much greater than the solar wind speed, (3) an electron heat flux dropout occurring within minutes of the shock indicating a topological change resulting from disconnection from the solar surface, (4) a very cold 5 keV proton beam and (5) an associated monochromatic wave. We expect that, given observations of enough magnetic clouds, Wind and other spacecraft will see signatures similar to the ones reported here indicating reconnection. However, these observations require the spacecraft to be fortuitously positioned to observe the passing shock and other signatures and will therefore be associated with only a small fraction of magnetic clouds. Consistent with this, a few magnetic clouds observed by Wind have been found to possess internal shock waves.

  17. Characterization of grown-in dislocations in high-quality glucose isomerase crystals by synchrotron monochromatic-beam X-ray topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Kojima, Kenichi; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Arai, Yasutomo; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Masaru

    2017-06-01

    High quality glucose isomerase (GI) single crystals are grown by using chemical cross-linked seed crystals. The crystal structure is an orthorhombic system in which the molecular arrangement is close to a body-centered cubic (bcc) one. The crystal defects, especially dislocations, in GI crystals are experimentally characterized by synchrotron monochromatic-beam X-ray topography. Two straight dislocations are clearly observed, which originate from the interface between the cross-linked seed crystal and the grown crystal. From the invisibility criterion of the dislocation images, it is experimentally identified that they are close to be of pure edge character with the Burgers vector of [1 1 bar 1] which is typical one in bcc metal crystals. Moreover, bead-like contrasts along the dislocation images and the equal-thickness fringes, related to Pendellösung fringes, at crystal edges are clearly observed, which have never been observed in other protein crystals so far. These contrasts can attributed to the dynamical diffraction effect which has been often observed in high-quality crystals such as Si. Thus it seems that the perfection of GI crystals shown in this paper is extremely high compared with other protein crystals reported so far.

  18. Analysis and control of the photon beam position at PLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, J.; Kim, I.-Y.; Kim, C.; Kim, D.-T.; Huang, J.-Y.; Shin, S., E-mail: tlssh@postech.ac.kr [POSTECH, Pohang, Kyungbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-18

    The variation of the photon beam position in a beamline, which is a critical issue for user experiments, is analyzed and corrected through the correlation link with the electron beam position in the storage ring. At third-generation light sources, the photon beam position stability is a critical issue for user experiments. In general, photon beam position monitors are developed to detect the real photon beam position, and the position is controlled by a feedback system in order to maintain the reference photon beam position. At Pohang Light Source II, a photon beam position stability of less than 1 µm r.m.s. was achieved for a user service period in the beamline, where the photon beam position monitor is installed. Nevertheless, a detailed analysis of the photon beam position data was necessary in order to ensure the performance of the photon beam position monitor, since it can suffer from various unknown types of noise, such as background contamination due to upstream or downstream dipole radiation, and undulator gap dependence. This paper reports the results of a start-to-end study of the photon beam position stability and a singular value decomposition analysis to confirm the reliability of the photon beam position data.

  19. Photonic crystal waveguides by direct writing of e-beam on self-assembled photonic crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sunita Kedia; R Vijaya

    2011-04-01

    Direct electron beam lithography technique is used for writing a variety of waveguide structures on thin films of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and self-assembled three-dimensionally ordered photonic crystals made up of PMMA colloidal spheres. The waveguide structures fabricated on both these type of samples are characterized by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope images.

  20. Chiral separation and twin-beam photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, David S.; Andrews, David L.

    2016-03-01

    It is well-known that, in a homogeneous fluid medium, most optical means that afford discrimination between molecules of opposite handedness are intrinsically weak effects. The reason is simple: the wide variety of origins for differential response commonly feature real or virtual electronic transitions that break a parity condition. Despite being electric dipole allowed, they manifest the chirality of the material in which they occur by breaking a selection rule that would otherwise preclude the simultaneous involvement of magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole forms of coupling. Although the latter are typically weaker than electric dipole effects by several orders of magnitude, it is the involvement of these weak forms of interaction that are responsible for chiral sensitivity. There have been a number of attempts to cleverly exploit novel optical configurations to enhance the relative magnitude - and hence potentially the efficiency - of chiral discrimination. The prospect of success in any such venture is enticing, because of the huge impact that such an advance might be expected to have in the health, food and medical sectors. Some of these proposals have utilized mirror reflection, and others surface plasmon coupling, or optical binding methods. Several recent works in the literature have drawn attention to a further possibility: the deployment of optical beam interference as a means to achieve chiral separations of sizeable extent. In this paper the underlying theory is fully developed to identify the true scope and limitations of such an approach.

  1. Characteristics of mobile MOSFET dosimetry system for megavoltage photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sathish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of a mobile metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (mobile MOSFET detector for standard bias were investigated for megavoltage photon beams. This study was performed with a brass alloy build-up cap for three energies namely Co-60, 6 and 15 MV photon beams. The MOSFETs were calibrated and the performance characteristics were analyzed with respect to dose rate dependence, energy dependence, field size dependence, linearity, build-up factor, and angular dependence for all the three energies. A linear dose-response curve was noted for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photons. The calibration factors were found to be 1.03, 1, and 0.79 cGy/mV for Co-60, 6 MV, and 15 MV photon energies, respectively. The calibration graph has been obtained to the dose up to 600 cGy, and the dose-response curve was found to be linear. The MOSFETs were found to be energy independent both for measurements performed at depth as well as on the surface with build-up. However, field size dependence was also analyzed for variable field sizes and found to be field size independent. Angular dependence was analyzed by keeping the MOSFET dosimeter in parallel and perpendicular orientation to the angle of incidence of the radiation with and without build-up on the surface of the phantom. The maximum variation for the three energies was found to be within ± 2% for the gantry angles 90° and 270°, the deviations without the build-up for the same gantry angles were found to be 6%, 25%, and 60%, respectively. The MOSFET response was found to be independent of dose rate for all three energies. The dosimetric characteristics of the MOSFET detector make it a suitable in vivo dosimeter for megavoltage photon beams.

  2. Experimental verification of beam quality in high-contrast imaging with orthogonal bremsstrahlung photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Jabbari, Keyvan; Seuntjens, Jan; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2007-07-01

    Since taken with megavoltage, forward-directed bremsstrahlung beams, the image quality of current portal images is inferior to that of diagnostic quality images produced by kilovoltage beams. In this paper, the beam quality of orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams defined as the 90 degrees component of the bremsstrahlung distribution produced from megavoltage electron pencil beams striking various targets is presented, and the suitability of their use for improved radiotherapy imaging is evaluated. A 10 MeV electron beam emerging through the research port of a Varian Clinac-18 linac was made to strike targets of carbon, aluminum, and copper. PDD and attenuation measurements of both the forward and orthogonal beams were carried out, and the results were also used to estimate the effective and mean energy of the beams. The mean energy of a spectrum produced by a carbon target dropped by 83% from 1296 keV in the forward direction to 217 keV in the orthogonal direction, while for an aluminum target it dropped by 77% to 412 keV, and for a copper target by 65% to 793 keV. An in-depth Monte Carlo study of photon yield and electron contamination was also performed. Photon yield and effective energy are lower for orthogonal beams than for forward beams, and the differences are more pronounced for targets of lower atomic number. Using their relatively low effective energy, orthogonal bremsstrahlung beams produced by megavoltage electrons striking low atomic number targets yield images with a higher contrast in comparison with forward bremsstrahlung beams.

  3. Consistency check of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadman, B.; Chawapun, N.; Ua-apisitwong, S.; Asakit, T.; Chumpu, N.; Rueansri, J.

    2016-03-01

    In radiotherapy, medical linear accelerator (Linac) is the key system used for radiation treatments delivery. Although, recommissioning was recommended after major modification of the machine by AAPM TG53, but it might not be practical in radiotherapy center with heavy workloads. The main purpose of this study was to compare photon beam physical data between initial commissioning and recommissioning of 6 MV Elekta Precise linac. The parameters for comparing were the percentage depth dose (PDD) and beam profiles. The clinical commissioning test cases followed IAEA-TECDOC-1583 were planned on REF 91230 IMRT Dose Verification Phantom by Philips’ Pinnacle treatment planning system. The Delta4PT was used for dose distribution verification with 90% passing criteria of the gamma index (3%/3mm). Our results revealed that the PDDs and beam profiles agreed within a tolerance limit recommended by TRS430. Most of the point doses and dose distribution verification passed the acceptance criteria. This study showed the consistency of photon beam physical data after recommissioning process. There was a good agreement between initial commissioning and recommissioning within a tolerance limit, demonstrated that the full recommissioning process might not be required. However, in the complex treatment planning geometry, the initial data should be applied with great caution.

  4. Application of spherical diodes for megavoltage photon beams dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbés, Benigno, E-mail: bbarbes@unav.es [Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Pío XII, 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Azcona, Juan D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Servicio de Oncología Radioterápica, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Pío XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Burguete, Javier [Departamento de Física y Matemática Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain); Martí-Climent, Josep M. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Avda. Pío XII 36, E-31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy (EBRT) usually uses heterogeneous dose distributions in a given volume. Designing detectors for quality control of these treatments is still a developing subject. The size of the detectors should be small to enhance spatial resolution and ensure low perturbation of the beam. A high uniformity in angular response is also a very important feature in a detector, because it has to measure radiation coming from all the directions of the space. It is also convenient that detectors are inexpensive and robust, especially to performin vivo measurements. The purpose of this work is to introduce a new detector for measuring megavoltage photon beams and to assess its performance to measure relative dose in EBRT. Methods: The detector studied in this work was designed as a spherical photodiode (1.8 mm in diameter). The change in response of the spherical diodes is measured regarding the angle of incidence, cumulated irradiation, and instantaneous dose rate (or dose per pulse). Additionally, total scatter factors for large and small fields (between 1 × 1 cm{sup 2} and 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}) are evaluated and compared with the results obtained from some commercially available ionization chambers and planar diodes. Additionally, the over-response to low energy scattered photons in large fields is investigated using a shielding layer. Results: The spherical diode studied in this work produces a high signal (150 nC/Gy for photons of nominal energy of 15 MV and 160 for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and its angular dependence is lower than that of planar diodes: less than 5% between maximum and minimum in all directions, and 2% around one of the axis. It also has a moderated variation with accumulated dose (about 1.5%/kGy for 15 MV photons and 0.7%/kGy for 6 MV, after 12 kGy) and a low variation with dose per pulse (±0.4%), and its behavior is similar to commercial diodes in total scatter factor measurements. Conclusions: The measurements of relative dose

  5. Reflection of focused beams from opal photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varis, Karri; Mattila, Marco; Arpiainen, Sanna; Ahopelto, Jouni; Jonsson, Fredrik; Sotomayor Torres, Clivia; Egen, Marc; Zentel, Rudolf

    2005-04-04

    We present a robust method for computing the reflection of arbitrarily shaped and sized beams from finite thickness photonic crystals. The method is based on dividing the incident beam into plane waves, each of which can be solved individually using Bloch periodic boundary conditions. This procedure allows us to take a full advantage of the crystal symmetry and also leads to a linear scaling of the computation time with respect to the number of plane waves needed to expand the incident beam. The algorithm for computing the reflection of an individual plane wave is also reviewed. Finally, we find an excellent agreement between the computational results and measurement data obtained from opals that are synthesized using polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) microspheres.

  6. The Variation of Surface Dose by Beam Spoiler in 10 MV Photon Beam from Linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Seong Cheol; Kim, Jun Ho; Lee, Choul Soo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kosin University Gospel Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to find a optimal beam spoiler condition on the dose distribution near the surface, when treating a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and a lymphatic region with 10 MV photon beam. The use of a optimal spoiler allows delivering high dose to a superficial tumor volume, while maintaining the skin-sparing effect in the area between the surface to the depth of 0.4 cm. The lucite beam spoiler, which were a tissue equivalent, were made and placed between the surface and the photon collimators of linear accelerator. The surface-dose, the dose at the depth of 0.4 cm, and the maximum dose at the dmax were measured with a parallel-plate ionization chamber for 5 x 5 cm to 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} field sizes using lucite spoilers with different thicknesses at varying skin-to-spoiler separation (SSS). In the same condition, the dose was measured with bolus and compared with beam spoiler. The spoiler increased the surface and build-up dose and shifted the depth of maximum dose toward the surface. With a 10 MV x-ray beam and a optimal beam spoiler when treating a patient, a similar build-up dose with a 6 MV photon beam could be achieved, while maintaining a certain amount of skin spring. But it was provided higher surface dose under SSS of less than 5 cm, the spoiler thickness of more than 1.8 cm or more, and larger field size than 20 x 20 cm{sup 2} provided higher surface dose like bolus and obliterated the spin-sparing effect. the effects of the beam spoiler on beam profile was reduced with increasing depths. The lucite spoiler allowed using of a 10 MV photon beam for the radiation treatment of head and neck caner by yielding secondary scattered electron on the surface. The dose at superficial depth was increased and the depth of maximum dose was moved to near the skin surface. Spoiling the 10 MV x-ray beam resulted in treatment plans that maintained dose homogeneity without the consequence of increased skin reaction or treat volume underdose

  7. Deconfinement of Quarks with TeV Attosecond Photon Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2010-02-01

    Recently, I have proposed a novel heuristic method for the deconfinement of quarks.footnotetextM. Gell-Mann. The Quark and the Jaguar: Adventures in the Simple and the Complex (New York, NY: W.H. Freeman and Co., 1994) [cf. M. Gell-Mann, The Garden of Live Flowers in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. Essays Honoring Victor Frederick Weisskopf (Springer, 1998), pp. 109-121]. It proceeds in two phases.footnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, On a Heuristic Point of View About Inertial Deconfinement of Quarks, American Physical Society, 2009 APS April Meeting, May 2-5, 2009, abstract #E1.038. Firstly, a frozen hydrogen pellet is inertially confined by the ultra-intense lasers up to a solid state density. Secondly, a solid state nano-pellet is ``punched'' by the photon beam created in the beat wave driven free electron laser (BW-FEL), leading to the ``rapture'' (in a ``karate chop'' model) of the ``MIT Bag''footnotetextJ. I. Friedman and H. Kendall, Viki, in: V. Stefan (Editor), Physics and Society. (Springer, 1998), pp. 103-108]. before the asymptotically free quarks move apart. Hereby, I propose TeV, a few 100s attosecond, photon beams in interaction with the nano-pellet. The threshold ``rapture force'' of the TeV attosecond photon is 10^7 N. )

  8. Integrated single- and two-photon light sheet microscopy using accelerating beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the first light sheet microscope using propagation invariant, accelerating Airy beams that operates both in single- and two-photon modes. The use of the Airy beam permits us to develop an ultra compact, high resolution light sheet system without beam scanning. In two-photon mode, a...

  9. Mechanically tunable photonic crystal split-beam nanocavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Zou, Yongchao; Zhou, Guangya; Chau, Fook Siong; Deng, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Photonic crystal split-beam nanocavities allow for ultra-sensitive optomechanical transductions but are degraded due to their relatively low optical quality factors. We report our recent work in designing a new type of one-dimensional photonic crystal split-beam nanocavity optimized for an ultra-high optical quality factor. The design is based on the combination of the deterministic method and hill-climbing algorithm. The latter is the simplest and most straightforward method of the local search algorithm, which provides the local maximum of the chosen quality factors. This split-beam nanocavity is made up of two mechanical uncoupled cantilever beams with Bragg mirrors patterned onto it and separated by a 75 nm air gap. Experimental results emphasize that the quality factor of the second order TE mode can be as high as 19,900. Additionally, one beam of the device is actuated in the lateral direction with the aid of a NEMS actuator and the quality factor maintains quite well even there's a lateral offset up to 64 nm. We also apply Fano resonance to further increase the Q-factor by constructing two interfering channels. Before tuning, the original Q-factor is 60,000; it's noteworthy that the topmost Q-factor reaches 67,000 throughout out-of-plane electrostatic force tuning. The dynamic mechanical modes of two devices is analyzed as well. Potentially promising applications, such as ultra-sensitive optomechanical torque sensor, local tuning of fano resonance, all-optical-reconfigurable filters etc, are foreseen.

  10. Characterization of electron contamination in megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Medina, Antonio; Teijeiro, Antonio; Garcia, Juan; Esperon, Jorge; Terron, J Antonio; Ruiz, Diego P; Carrion, Maria C

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of the present study is to characterize electron contamination in photon beams in different clinical situations. Variations with field size, beam modifier (tray, shaping block) and source-surface distance (SSD) were studied. Percentage depth dose measurements with and without a purging magnet and replacing the air by helium were performed to identify the two electron sources that are clearly differentiated: air and treatment head. Previous analytical methods were used to fit the measured data, exploring the validity of these models. Electrons generated in the treatment head are more energetic and more important for larger field sizes, shorter SSD, and greater depths. This difference is much more noticeable for the 18 MV beam than for the 6 MV beam. If a tray is used as beam modifier, electron contamination increases, but the energy of these electrons is similar to that of electrons coming from the treatment head. Electron contamination could be fitted to a modified exponential curve. For machine modeling in a treatment planning system, setting SSD at 90 cm for input data could reduce errors for most isocentric treatments, because they will be delivered for SSD ranging from 80 to 100 cm. For very small field sizes, air-generated electrons must be considered independently, because of their different energetic spectrum and dosimetric influence.

  11. Modeling transmission and scatter for photon beam attenuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnesjö, A; Weber, L; Nilsson, P

    1995-11-01

    The development of treatment planning methods in radiation therapy requires dose calculation methods that are both accurate and general enough to provide a dose per unit monitor setting for a broad variety of fields and beam modifiers. The purpose of this work was to develop models for calculation of scatter and transmission for photon beam attenuators such as compensating filters, wedges, and block trays. The attenuation of the beam is calculated using a spectrum of the beam, and a correction factor based on attenuation measurements. Small angle coherent scatter and electron binding effects on scattering cross sections are considered by use of a correction factor. Quality changes in beam penetrability and energy fluence to dose conversion are modeled by use of the calculated primary beam spectrum after passage through the attenuator. The beam spectra are derived by the depth dose effective method, i.e., by minimizing the difference between measured and calculated depth dose distributions, where the calculated distributions are derived by superposing data from a database for monoenergetic photons. The attenuator scatter is integrated over the area viewed from the calculation point of view using first scatter theory. Calculations are simplified by replacing the energy and angular-dependent cross-section formulas with the forward scatter constant r2(0) and a set of parametrized correction functions. The set of corrections include functions for the Compton energy loss, scatter attenuation, and secondary bremsstrahlung production. The effect of charged particle contamination is bypassed by avoiding use of dmax for absolute dose calibrations. The results of the model are compared with scatter measurements in air for copper and lead filters and with dose to a water phantom for lead filters for 4 and 18 MV. For attenuated beams, downstream of the buildup region, the calculated results agree with measurements on the 1.5% level. The accuracy was slightly less in situations

  12. Multi-photon resonance phenomena using Laguerre-Gaussian beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamideh Kazemi, Seyedeh; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2016-12-01

    We study the influence of laser profile on the linewidth of the optical spectrum of multi-photon resonance phenomena. First, we investigate the dependence of the absorption spectrum on the laser profile in a two-level system. Thanks to the Laguerre-Gaussian field, the linewidth of the one-photon optical pumping and two-photon absorption peaks are explicitly narrower than that obtained with a Gaussian field. In the next section, it is shown that, compared to the Gaussian fields, the Laguerre-Gaussian ones reduce the linewidth of the optical spectrum in the coherent population trapping. Interestingly, it turns out that the use of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam makes the linewidth of the spectrum narrower as compared with a Gaussian one in Doppler-broadened electromagnetically induced transparency. Moreover, we study the effect of the laser profile on the Autler-Townes doublet structure in the absorption spectrum for a laser-driven four-level atomic system. We also consider the different values of the Laguerre-Gaussian mode beam waist, and, perhaps more remarkably, we find that for the small waist values, the Autler-Townes doublet can be removed and a prominent narrow central peak appears in the absorption spectrum. Finally, we investigate the effect of the laser profile on the linewidth of the sub-natural three-photon absorption peak of double dark resonance. The differences in the linewidth are quite large, offering potential applications in metrology and isotope separation methods. Our results can be used for super ultra-high resolution laser spectroscopy and to improve the resolution of the technology of isotope/isomer separation and photo-biology even at essential overlap of the spectra of the different particles.

  13. Characterization of geological materials using ion and photon beams.

    CERN Document Server

    Torok, S B; Tuniz, C

    1998-01-01

    Geological specimens are often complex materials that require different analytical methods for their characterization. The parameters of interest may include the chemical composition of major, minor and trace elements. The chemical compounds incorporated in the minerals, the crystal structure and isotopic composition need to be considered. Specimens may be highly heterogeneous thus necessitating analytical methods capable of measurements on small sample volumes with high spatial resolution and sensitivity. Much essential information on geological materials can be obtained by using ion or photon beams. In this chapter we describe the principal analytical techniques based on particle accelerators, showing some applications that are hardly possible with conventional methods. In particular, the following techniques will be discussed: (1) Synchrotron radiation (SR) induced X-ray emission (SRIXE) and particle-induced X-ray emission (PEE) and other ion beam techniques for trace element analysis. (2) Accelerator mass...

  14. Radiosurgery with high energy photon beams: a comparison among techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podgorsak, E.B.; Pike, G.B.; Olivier, A.; Pla, M.; Souhami, L.

    1989-03-01

    The presently known radiosurgical techniques with high energy photon beams are based either on the commercially available Gamma unit utilizing 201 stationary cobalt beams or on isocentric linear accelerators. The techniques using linear accelerators are divided into the single plane rotation, the multiple non-coplanar arcs, and the dynamic rotation. A brief description of these techniques is given, and their physical characteristics, such as precision of dose delivery, dose fall-off outside the target volume, and isodose distributions are discussed. It is shown that the multiple non-coplanar arcs technique and the dynamic rotation give dose distributions similar to those of the Gamma unit, which makes these two linear accelerator based techniques attractive alternatives to radiosurgery with the Gamma unit.22 references.

  15. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  16. Status report on the tunable monochromatic gamma—ray source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bertschy; W.Mondelaers; 等

    1996-01-01

    The tunable monochromatic gamma-ray source at the Ghent 15MeV linac is described.The characteristics of the monochromatic beam are given,and some applications,as the detection of heavy elements in other materials,are presented.

  17. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.bouchard@npl.co.uk; Duane, Simon [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Kamio, Yuji [Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Medical Physics, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  18. Interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons with mirror and mixer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dress, William B.; Kisner, Roger A.; Richards, Roger K.

    2004-06-01

    53 Systems and methods are described for an interferometric source of multi-color, multi-beam entangled photons. An apparatus includes: a multi-refringent device optically coupled to a source of coherent energy, the multi-refringent device providing a beam of multi-color entangled photons; a condenser device optically coupled to the multi-refringent device, the condenser device i) including a mirror and a mixer and ii) converging two spatially resolved portions of the beam of multi-color entangled photons into a converged multi-color entangled photon beam; a tunable phase adjuster optically coupled to the condenser device, the tunable phase adjuster changing a phase of at least a portion of the converged multi-color entangled photon beam to generate a first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam; and a beam splitter optically coupled to the condenser device, the beam splitter combining the first interferometeric multi-color entangled photon beam with a second interferometric multi-color entangled photon beam.

  19. Mini-beam collimator applications at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Shenglan, E-mail: sxu@anl.gov [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Keefe, Lisa J.; Mulichak, Anne [IMCA CAT, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Yan Lifen; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao Jiyong [X-ray Sciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Fischetti, Robert F. [GM/CA CAT, Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In 2007, the General Medicine and Cancer Institutes Collaborative Access Team (GM/CA CAT, Sector 23, Advanced Photon Source) began providing mini-beam collimators to its users. These collimators contained individual, 5- or 10-{mu}m pinholes and were rapidly exchangeable, thereby allowing users to tailor the beam size to their experimental needs. The use of these collimators provided a reduction in background noise, and thus improved the signal-to-noise ratio . Recent improvements in the collimator design include construction of the device from a monolithic piece of molybdenum with multiple pinholes mounted inside . This allows users to select from various size options from within the beamline control software without the realignment that was previously necessary. In addition, a new, 20-{mu}m pinhole has been added to create a 'quad-collimator', resulting in greater flexibility for the users. The mini-beam collimator is now available at multiple crystallographic beamlines and also is a part of the first Moessbauer Microscopic system at sector 3-ID.

  20. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1993-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e -, e +) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest X-ray sources in the 10-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV injector synchrotron (IS), 7-GeV storage ring (SR), and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  1. Photon counting spectroscopic CT with dynamic beam attenuator

    CERN Document Server

    Atak, Haluk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Photon counting (PC) computed tomography (CT) can provide material selective CT imaging at lowest patient dose but it suffers from suboptimal count rate. A dynamic beam attenuator (DBA) can help with count rate by modulating x-ray beam intensity such that the low attenuating areas of the patient receive lower exposure, and detector behind these areas is not overexposed. However, DBA may harden the beam and cause artifacts and errors. This work investigates positive and negative effects of using DBA in PCCT. Methods: A simple PCCT with single energy bin, spectroscopic PCCT with 2 and 5 energy bins, and conventional energy integrating CT with and without DBA were simulated and investigated using 120kVp tube voltage and 14mGy air dose. The DBAs were modeled as made from soft tissue (ST) equivalent material, iron (Fe), and holmium (Ho) K-edge material. A cylindrical CT phantom and chest phantom with iodine and CaCO3 contrast elements were used. Image artifacts and quantification errors in general and mat...

  2. An upgraded experiment of X-ray photon-photon elastic scattering with a Laue-case beam collider

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaji, T; Yamazaki, T; Namba, T; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Tamasaku, K; Tanaka, Y; Inubushi, Y; Sawada, K; Yabashi, M; Ishikawa, T

    2016-01-01

    The new result of a photon-photon scattering experiment in the X-ray region is reported. An X-ray beam collider is used to divide and collide X-ray beams from an X-ray Free Electron Laser, SACLA. The sensitivity of the experiment is enhanced by an upgraded X-ray beam collider and improvement of the SACLA beam quality. The intensity of the colliding photon beams increased significantly, giving an integrated luminosity of (1.24 \\pm 0.08) \\times 10^{28} m^{-2}. No signal of scattered X rays was observed. The obtained 95% C.L. limit on the QED cross section is 1.9 \\times 10^{-27} m^2 at \\omega_{cms}=6.5 keV, which is more stringent by around three orders of magnitude than our previous result.

  3. Detecting photons in the dark region of Laguerre-Gauss beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel; Ducloy, Martial; Rios Leite, Jose R

    2009-06-08

    We show that a photon detector, sensitive to the magnetic field or to the gradient of electric field, can help to characterize the quantum properties of spatially-dependent optical fields. We discuss the excitation of an atom through magnetic dipole or electric quadrupole transitions with the photons of a Bessel beam or a Laguerre-Gauss (LG) beams. These spiral beams are shown to be not true hollow beams, due to the presence of magnetic fields and gradients of electric fields on beam axis. This approach paves the way to an analysis at the quantum level of the propagating light beams having a complicated spatial structure.

  4. Coalescence and Anti-Coalescence Interference of Two-Photon Wavepacket in a Beam Splitter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Kai-Ge; YANG Guo-Jian

    2004-01-01

    @@ We study theoretically the interference of a two-photon wavepacket in a beam splitter. We find that the spectrum symmetry for the two-photon wavepacket dominates the perfect coalescence and anti-coalescence interference.The coalescence interference is unrelated to photon entanglement. Only the anti-coalescence interference has evidence of photon entanglement. We prove that the two-photon wavepacket with an anti-symmetric spectrum is transparent to pass the 50/50 beam splitter, showing perfect anti-coalescence interference.

  5. Rf-synchronized imaging for particle and photon beam characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-07-01

    The usefulness of imaging electro-optics for rf-driven accelerators can be enhanced by synchronizing the instruments to the system fundamental frequency or an appropriate subharmonic. This step allows one to obtain micropulse bunch length and phase during a series of linac bunches or storage ring passes. Several examples now exist of the use of synchroscan and dual-sweep streak cameras and/or image dissector tubes to access micropulse scale phenomena (10 to 30 ps) during linac and storage ring operations in the US, Japan, and Europe. As space permits, selections will be presented from the list of phase stability phenomena on photoelectric injectors, micropulse length during a macropulse, micropulse elongation effects, transverse Wakefield effects within a micropulse, and submicropulse phenomena on a stored beam. Potential applications to the subsystems of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be briefly addressed.

  6. [Depth dose characteristics of photon beams released from a scanning-type racetrack microtron].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomoharu

    2002-06-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron that can emit photon beams or electron beams up to 50 MeV. The MM22 using the scanning beam method and the MM22 using a flattening filter method both to flatten the emission field and a water phantom with particular function measurable of PDD etc. in an accelerator using the scanning beam method to make up the PDD curve of photon beams from the linear accelerator. The Clinac21EX was thus employed. The maximum depth of beam flux was shallow, the gradient of the flux decrement large, the surface dose large, and the estimated nominal energy low to the same nominal energy. From these findings, it can be said that thorough comprehension of the characteristics of beam flux properties for these units is necessary when photon beams are to be used.

  7. Depth dose characteristics of photon beams released from a scanning-type racetrack microtron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Tomoharu [National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital

    2002-06-01

    The MM50 is a racetrack microtron that can emit photon beams or electron beams up to 50 MeV. The MM22 using the scanning beam method and the MM22 using a flattening filter method both to flatten the emission field and a water phantom with particular function measurable of PDD etc. in an accelerator using the scanning beam method to make up the PDD curve of photon beams from the linear accelerator. The Clinac21EX was thus employed. The maximum depth of beam flux was shallow, the gradient of the flux decrement large, the surface dose large, and the estimated nominal energy low to the same nominal energy. From these findings, it can be said that thorough comprehension of the characteristics of beam flux properties for these units is necessary when photon beams are to be used. (author)

  8. Constraining the monochromatic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation by the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaili, Arman; Khatibi, Sara; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba

    2017-07-01

    The installation of forward detectors in CMS and ATLAS turn the LHC into an effective photon-photon collider. The elastic scattering of the beam protons via the emission of photons, which can be identified by tagging the intact protons in the forward detectors, provides a powerful diagnostic of the central production of new particles through photon-photon annihilation. In this paper we study the central production of dark matter particles and the potential of the LHC to constrain the cross section of this process. By virtue of the crossing symmetry, this limit can immediately be used to constrain the production of monochromatic gamma rays in dark matter annihilation, a smoking gun signal under investigation in indirect dark matter searches. We show that with the integrated luminosity L =30 fb-1 in the LHC at center-of-mass energy √{s }=13 TeV , for dark matter masses ˜(50 - 600 ) GeV , a model-independent constraint on the cross section of dark matter annihilation to monochromatic gamma rays at the same order of magnitude as the current Fermi-LAT and the future limits from CTA can be obtained.

  9. Constraining the monochromatic gamma-rays from dark matter annihilation by the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Esmaili, Arman; Najafabadi, Mojtaba Mohammadi

    2016-01-01

    The installation of forward detectors in CMS and ATLAS turn the LHC to an effective photon-photon collider. The elastic scattering of the beam-protons via the emission of photons, which can be identified by tagging the intact protons in the forward detectors, provides a powerful diagnostic of the central production of new particles through photon-photon annihilation. In this letter we study the central production of dark matter particles and the potential of LHC to constrain the cross section of this process. By virtue of the crossing symmetry, this limit can immediately be used to constrain the production of monochromatic gamma-rays in dark matter annihilation, a smoking gun signal under investigation in indirect dark matter searches. We show that with the integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L}=30~{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ in LHC at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=$ 13 TeV, for dark matter masses $\\sim (50-600)$ GeV, a model-independent constraint on the cross section of dark matter annihilation to monochromatic gamma-rays...

  10. Salivary Gland. Photon beam and particle radiotherapy: Present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Ester; Iacovelli, Nicola Alessandro; Bonora, Maria; Cavallo, Anna; Fossati, Piero

    2016-09-01

    Salivary gland cancers (SGCs) are rare diseases and their treatment depends upon histology, stage and site of origin. Radical surgery is the mainstay of treatment but radiotherapy (RT) plays a key role in both the postoperative and the inoperable setting, as well as in recurrent disease. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, a wide retrospective literature suggests postoperative RT (PORT) in patients with high risk pathological features. SGCs, and adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) in particular, are known to be radio-resistant tumors and should therefore respond well to particle beam therapy. Recently, excellent outcome has been reported with radical carbon ion RT (CIRT) in particular for ACC. Both modern photon- and hadron-based treatments are effective and are characterized by a favourable toxicity profile. But it is not clear whether one modality is superior to the other for disease control, due to the differences in patients' selection, techniques, fractionation schedules and outcome measurements among clinical experiences. In this paper, we review the role of photon and particle RT for malignant SGCs, discussing the difference between modalities in terms of biological and technical characteristics. RT dose and target volumes for different histologies (ACC versus non-ACC) have also been taken into consideration.

  11. Beam Characterization of 10-MV Photon Beam from Medical Linear Accelerator without Flattening Filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimozato, Tomohiro; Aoyama, Yuichi; Matsunaga, Takuma; Tabushi, Katsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    This work investigated the dosimetric properties of a 10-MV photon beam emitted from a medical linear accelerator (linac) with no flattening filter (FF). The aim of this study is to analyze the radiation fluence and energy emitted from the flattening filter free (FFF) linac using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. The FFF linac was created by removing the FF from a linac in clinical use. Measurements of the depth dose (DD) and the off-axis profile were performed using a three-dimensional water phantom with an ionization chamber. A MC simulation for a 10-MV photon beam from this FFF linac was performed using the BEAMnrc code. The off-axis profiles for the FFF linac exhibited a chevron-like distribution, and the dose outside the irradiation field was found to be lower for the FFF linac than for a linac with an FF (FF linac). The DD curves for the FFF linac included many contaminant electrons in the build-up region. Therefore, for clinical use, a metal filter is additionally required to reduce the effects of the electron contamination. The mean energy of the FFF linac was found to be lower than that of the FF linac owing to the absence of beam hardening caused by the FF.

  12. Photonic crystals in lithium niobate by combining focussed ion beam writing and ion-beam enhanced etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geiss, Reinhard; Diziain, Severine; Steinert, Michael; Schrempel, Frank; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard; Pertsch, Thomas [Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743, Jena (Germany); Tuennermann, Andreas [Institute of Applied Physics, Abbe Center of Photonics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743, Jena (Germany); Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Optics and Precision Engineering, Albert-Einstein-Str. 7, 07745, Jena (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The realization of photonic crystals in self-suspended lithium niobate membranes by means of focussed ion beam writing and ion-beam enhanced etching is presented. The influence of gallium contamination is discussed and considered in the realization of a L3 photonic crystal resonator that is showing the designed linear optical response in a cross-polarization resonant scattering experiment. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Asymmetric 2D spatial beam filtering by photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailevicius, D.; Purlys, V.; Maigyte, L.; Gaizauskas, E.; Peckus, M.; Gadonas, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2016-04-01

    Spatial filtering techniques are important for improving the spatial quality of light beams. Photonic crystals (PhCs) with a selective spatial (angular) transmittance can also provide spatial filtering with the added benefit transversal symmetries, submillimeter dimensions and monolithic integration in other devices, such as micro-lasers or semiconductor lasers. Workable bandgap PhC configurations require a modulated refractive index with period lengths that are approximately less than the wavelength of radiation. This imposes technical limitations, whereby the available direct laser write (DLW) fabrication techniques are limited in resolution and refractive index depth. If, however, a deflection mechanism is chosen instead, a functional filter PhC can be produced that is operational in the visible wavelength regime. For deflection based PhCs glass is an attractive choice as it is highly stable medium. 2D and 3D PhC filter variations have already been produced on soda-lime glass. However, little is known about how to control the scattering of PhCs when approaching the smallest period values. Here we look into the internal structure of the initially symmetric geometry 2D PhCs and associating it with the resulting transmittance spectra. By varying the DLW fabrication beam parameters and scanning algorithms, we show that such PhCs contain layers that are comprised of semi-tilted structure voxels. We show the appearance of asymmetry can be compensated in order to circumvent some negative effects at the cost of potentially maximum scattering efficiency.

  14. Two-Photon-Absorption Scheme for Optical Beam Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Gerardo G.; Farr, William H.

    2011-01-01

    A new optical beam tracking approach for free-space optical communication links using two-photon absorption (TPA) in a high-bandgap detector material was demonstrated. This tracking scheme is part of the canonical architecture described in the preceding article. TPA is used to track a long-wavelength transmit laser while direct absorption on the same sensor simultaneously tracks a shorter-wavelength beacon. The TPA responsivity was measured for silicon using a PIN photodiode at a laser beacon wavelength of 1,550 nm. As expected, the responsivity shows a linear dependence with incident power level. The responsivity slope is 4.5 x 10(exp -7) A/W2. Also, optical beam spots from the 1,550-nm laser beacon were characterized on commercial charge coupled device (CCD) and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) imagers with as little as 13.7 microWatts of optical power (see figure). This new tracker technology offers an innovative solution to reduce system complexity, improve transmit/receive isolation, improve optical efficiency, improve signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and reduce cost for free-space optical communications transceivers.

  15. Beaming Properties of Energetic Electrons and Photons Inside Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Eric; Briggs, Michael

    2017-01-01

    It has been well established that thunderstorm environments allow relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) to develop under the influence of strong electric fields. This process can be seeded by external sources, such as cosmic-ray secondary electrons. The resulting bremsstrahlung x-rays and gamma rays that are emitted, propagate through the atmosphere and into space where they are detected by orbiting spacecraft, e.g. NASA Fermi. These high energy radiation blasts are known as Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). Using a Monte Carlo particle simulation, we show beaming characteristics of these electrons and photons such as the angular distribution, energy spectra, and the radial distribution from the thunderstorm source to the observation point of orbiting spacecraft. These features are related to the thunderstorm electric field, Earth's geomagnetic field, and the potential inside the thundercloud region. Observations of TGFs made by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will also be discussed, as well as a future multipoint CubeSat mission targeted to measure the beaming geometry of the gamma rays. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1524533.

  16. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peřina, Jan; Haderka, Ondřej; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria

    2014-01-01

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  17. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peřina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ondřej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell' Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  18. Photon activated therapy (PAT using monochromatic Synchrotron x-rays and iron oxide nanoparticles in a mouse tumor model: feasibility study of PAT for the treatment of superficial malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Gi-Hwan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-rays are known to interact with metallic nanoparticles, producing photoelectric species as radiosensitizing effects, and have been exploited in vivo mainly with gold nanoparticles. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of sensitizing effect of iron oxide nanoparticles for photon activated therapy. Methods X-rays photon activated therapy (PAT was studied by treating CT26 tumor cells and CT26 tumor-bearing mice loaded with 13-nm diameter FeO NP, and irradiating them at 7.1 keV near the Fe K-edge using synchrotron x-rays radiation. Survival of cells was determined by MTT assay, and tumor regression assay was performed for in vivo model experiment. The results of PAT treated groups were compared with x-rays alone control groups. Results A more significant reduction in viability and damage was observed in the FeO NP-treated irradiated cells, compared to the radiation alone group (p Conclusions An iron oxide nanoparticle enhanced therapeutic effect with relatively low tissue concentration of iron and 10 Gy of monochromatic X-rays. Since 7.1 keV X-rays is attenuated very sharply in the tissue, FeO NP-PAT may have promise as a potent treatment option for superficial malignancies in the skin, like chest wall recurrence of breast cancer.

  19. Propagation of an Airy-Gaussian beam in defected photonic lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Zhiwei; Zhu, Xing; Li, Yang; Li, Huagang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate numerically that a finite Airy-Gaussian (AiG) beam varies its trajectory and shape in the defected photonic lattices. The propagation properties and beam self-bending are controlled with modulation depth and period of the photonic lattices, positive and negative defects, beam distribution factor and nonlinearity change. For positive defects, the pseudo-period oscillation and localization of the AiG beam may be formed under a certain condition, while the beam is diffused for negative defects. Moreover, the solitons may appear during the propagation process when the self-focusing nonlinearity is introduced.

  20. Beam characteristics and stopping-power ratios of small radiosurgery photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X; Ding, Frances

    2012-09-07

    Small megavoltage (MV) photon fields of dimensions less than 3 × 3 cm(2) are increasingly being used in modern radiation therapy. To our knowledge, small beam characteristics and dosimetric parameters, such as the energy spectra, particle fluence, and water-to-air stopping-power ratios (SPRs) directly affect the accuracy of small field dosimetry. This study presents the characteristics of small photon beams and investigates the variations of energy spectra of photons and electrons as a function of field size and their effects on the water-to-air SPRs for field sizes ranging from a small 4 mm diameter circular field to a 10 × 10 cm(2) field. It sheds light on the differences between small fields collimated by the cone accessory and X- and Y-jaws and on beam characteristics outside the primary radiation fields. In addition, we also investigated the use of an 'intermediate machine-specific-reference field' (Alfonso et al 2008 Med. Phys. 35 5179-86) to determine if the variations between a small and a reference field can be eased by introducing an intermediate 4 × 4 cm(2) field instead of a standard 10 × 10 cm(2) reference field. The Monte Carlo simulation codes BEAMnrc, DOSXYZnrc and SPRRZnrc were used in this study. The accelerator head and circular cone accessory were simulated in detail including two designs of flattening filters: one for a standard-dose rate (100-600 MU min(-1)) and the other for a high-dose rate (1000 MU min(-1)) 6 MV beam. The mean energy of photons at depths (1.5-30 cm) in water are 1.72-2.36 MeV, 1.55-1.97 MeV, and 1.44-1.74 MeV for field sizes of 4 mm diameter, 4 × 4 cm(2), and 10 × 10 cm(2), respectively. The mean energy also varies significantly for electrons at depths (1.5-30 cm): 0.99-1.25 MeV, 0.94-1.09 MeV, and 0.93-1.04 MeV for field sizes of 4 mm, 4 × 4 cm(2), and 10 × 10 cm(2), respectively. The calculated water-to-air SPRs at depths (1.5-30 cm) are 1.120-1.113, 1.121-1.117, and 1.122-1.119 for field sizes of 4 mm, 4 × 4 cm

  1. B factory via conversion of 1 TeV electron beams into 1 TeV photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mtingwa, S.K.; Strikman, M.

    1989-01-01

    We derive formulae which describe the interaction of laser beams with electron beams. Specializing to the case of 1 TeV electron beams from the future generation of electron linear accelerators, we calculate the production rate of backscattered 1 TeV photons, and using these photons, we show that it is possible to organize the photoproduction of beauty particles so as to measure 10/sup 9/b/bar b/ pairs per year. This should be adequate to study rare decays and CP violation in B meson decay. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Femtosecond correlated photon echo in CdS crystal under two-photon excitation by two pairs of crossed laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samartsev, V. V.; Leontiev, A. V.; Mitrofanova, T. G.

    2015-07-01

    We consider the possibility of observing a femtosecond correlated photon echo (FCPE) under two-photon excitation of CdS crystal by two pairs of crossed laser beams. The peculiarities of FCPE signals and their possible applications are discussed.

  3. Multilayer optics for monochromatic high-resolution X-ray imaging diagnostic in a broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troussel, Ph., E-mail: philippe.troussel@cea.fr [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Dennetiere, D. [Synchrotron Soleil, L’orme des Merisiers, 91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Maroni, R. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Høghøj, P.; Hedacq, S. [Xenocs SA, 19, rue François Blumet, F-38360 Sassenage (France); Cibik, L.; Krumrey, M. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestr. 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany)

    2014-12-11

    The “Commissariat à l’énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives” (CEA) studies and designs advanced X-ray diagnostics to probe dense plasmas produced at the future Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) facility. Mainly for X-ray imaging with high spatial resolution, different types of multilayer mirrors were developed to provide broadband X-ray reflectance at grazing incidence. These coatings are deposited on two toroidal mirror substrates that are then mounted into a Wolter-type geometry (working at a grazing angle of 0.45°) to realize an X-ray microscope. Non-periodic (depth graded) W/Si multilayer can be used in the broad photon energy range from 2 keV to 22 keV. A third flat mirror can be added for the spectral selection of the microscope. This mirror is coated with a Mo/Si multilayer for which the d-spacing varies in the longitudinal direction to satisfy the Bragg condition within the angular acceptance of the microscope and also to compensate the angular dispersion due to the field of the microscope. We present a study of such a so-called Göbel mirror which was optimized for photon energy of 10.35 keV. The three mirrors were coated using magnetron sputtering technology by Xenocs SA. The reflectance in the entire photon energy range was determined in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) at the synchrotron radiation facility BESSY II in Berlin.

  4. Azimuthal and radial shaping of vortex beams generated in twisted nonlinear photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemer, Keren; Voloch-Bloch, Noa; Shapira, Asia; Libster, Ana; Juwiler, Irit; Arie, Ady

    2013-12-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of a second harmonic (SH) beam, generated within twisted nonlinear photonic crystals, depends both on the OAM of the input pump beam and on the quasi-angular momentum of the crystal. In addition, when the pump's radial index is zero, the radial index of the SH beam is equal to that of the nonlinear crystal. Furthermore, by mixing two noncollinear pump beams in this crystal, we generate, in addition to the SH beams, a new "virtual beam" having multiple values of OAM that are determined by the nonlinear process.

  5. Electron and photon beams from a 50 MeV racetrack microtron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahme, A; Kraepelien, T; Svensson, H

    1980-01-01

    The quality of broad high energy photon and electron beams can be improved considerably by the scanning of elementary narrow beams. Dose distributions produced in this way have advantages with respect to improved dose gradients and therapeutic ranges for electrons and lower surface doses, increased depth doses and half value depths for photons. The possibility of giving the whole therapeutic dose in a single local pulse of short duration is discussed as a new method to protect superficial tissues.

  6. Highly integrated optical phased arrays: photonic integrated circuits for optical beam shaping and beam steering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heck Martijn J.R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Technologies for efficient generation and fast scanning of narrow free-space laser beams find major applications in three-dimensional (3D imaging and mapping, like Lidar for remote sensing and navigation, and secure free-space optical communications. The ultimate goal for such a system is to reduce its size, weight, and power consumption, so that it can be mounted on, e.g. drones and autonomous cars. Moreover, beam scanning should ideally be done at video frame rates, something that is beyond the capabilities of current opto-mechanical systems. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC technology holds the promise of achieving low-cost, compact, robust and energy-efficient complex optical systems. PICs integrate, for example, lasers, modulators, detectors, and filters on a single piece of semiconductor, typically silicon or indium phosphide, much like electronic integrated circuits. This technology is maturing fast, driven by high-bandwidth communications applications, and mature fabrication facilities. State-of-the-art commercial PICs integrate hundreds of elements, and the integration of thousands of elements has been shown in the laboratory. Over the last few years, there has been a considerable research effort to integrate beam steering systems on a PIC, and various beam steering demonstrators based on optical phased arrays have been realized. Arrays of up to thousands of coherent emitters, including their phase and amplitude control, have been integrated, and various applications have been explored. In this review paper, I will present an overview of the state of the art of this technology and its opportunities, illustrated by recent breakthroughs.

  7. Highly integrated optical phased arrays: photonic integrated circuits for optical beam shaping and beam steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Martijn J. R.

    2017-01-01

    Technologies for efficient generation and fast scanning of narrow free-space laser beams find major applications in three-dimensional (3D) imaging and mapping, like Lidar for remote sensing and navigation, and secure free-space optical communications. The ultimate goal for such a system is to reduce its size, weight, and power consumption, so that it can be mounted on, e.g. drones and autonomous cars. Moreover, beam scanning should ideally be done at video frame rates, something that is beyond the capabilities of current opto-mechanical systems. Photonic integrated circuit (PIC) technology holds the promise of achieving low-cost, compact, robust and energy-efficient complex optical systems. PICs integrate, for example, lasers, modulators, detectors, and filters on a single piece of semiconductor, typically silicon or indium phosphide, much like electronic integrated circuits. This technology is maturing fast, driven by high-bandwidth communications applications, and mature fabrication facilities. State-of-the-art commercial PICs integrate hundreds of elements, and the integration of thousands of elements has been shown in the laboratory. Over the last few years, there has been a considerable research effort to integrate beam steering systems on a PIC, and various beam steering demonstrators based on optical phased arrays have been realized. Arrays of up to thousands of coherent emitters, including their phase and amplitude control, have been integrated, and various applications have been explored. In this review paper, I will present an overview of the state of the art of this technology and its opportunities, illustrated by recent breakthroughs.

  8. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The sim

  9. Radiative instability of a relativistic electron beam moving in a photonic crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2010-01-01

    The radiative instability of a beam moving in a photonic crystal of finite dimensions is studied. The dispersion equation is obtained. The law $\\Gamma\\sim \\rho ^{1/\\left( {s + 3} \\right)}$ is shown to be valid and caused by the mixing of the electromagnetic field modes in the finite volume due to the periodic disturbance from the photonic crystal.

  10. Radiative instability of a relativistic electron beam moving in a photonic crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Baryshevsky, V.G.; Gurinovich, A. A.

    2013-01-01

    The radiative instability of a beam moving in a photonic crystal of finite dimensions is studied. The dispersion equation is obtained. The law $\\Gamma\\sim \\rho ^{1/\\left( {s + 3} \\right)}$ is shown to be valid and caused by the mixing of the electromagnetic field modes in the finite volume due to the periodic disturbance from the photonic crystal.

  11. Corpuscular Model of Two-Beam Interference and Double-Slit Experiments with Single Photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Fengping; Yuan, Shengjun; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double-slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The

  12. Multipass beam position, profile, and polarization measurements using intense photon target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karabekov, I.P.; Neil, G.R. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Karabekian, S.; Musakhanian, V. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Erevan (Armenia)

    1994-05-01

    The Compton scattering of a circularly polarized laser beam condensed by an optical resonator can be used for multipass measurement of beam profile, position, and polarization in CEBAF`s 250-m-long linac straight sections. The position and profile of the beam will be measured with an accuracy of {approximately}10 {mu}m in about 200 seconds and beam polarization with 10% accuracy in 100 seconds when the lowest beam energy is 500 MeV and the beam current is 100 {mu}A. For higher energies the times for measurement are much less. The photon target is within an optical resonator having a quality factor of 50. The Nd:Yag 5 W CW laser photon beam at wavelength {lambda} = 0.532 nm will have a waist {omega}{sub o} {approximately}30 {mu}m and a Rayleigh range of about 10 mm. Scanning the electron beams in the linac sections by this photon beam at a crossing angle of 0.1 rad will send to a proportional detector installed after the spreader magnet scattered photons with energies sharply correlated with the energy of the electrons.

  13. Patient-dependent beam-modifier physics in Monte Carlo photon dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schach von Wittenau, A E; Bergstrom, P M; Cox, L J

    2000-05-01

    Model pencil-beam on slab calculations are used as well as a series of detailed calculations of photon and electron output from commercial accelerators to quantify level(s) of physics required for the Monte Carlo transport of photons and electrons in treatment-dependent beam modifiers, such as jaws, wedges, blocks, and multileaf collimators, in photon teletherapy dose calculations. The physics approximations investigated comprise (1) not tracking particles below a given kinetic energy, (2) continuing to track particles, but performing simplified collision physics, particularly in handling secondary particle production, and (3) not tracking particles in specific spatial regions. Figures-of-merit needed to estimate the effects of these approximations are developed, and these estimates are compared with full-physics Monte Carlo calculations of the contribution of the collimating jaws to the on-axis depth-dose curve in a water phantom. These figures of merit are next used to evaluate various approximations used in coupled photon/electron physics in beam modifiers. Approximations for tracking electrons in air are then evaluated. It is found that knowledge of the materials used for beam modifiers, of the energies of the photon beams used, as well as of the length scales typically found in photon teletherapy plans, allows a number of simplifying approximations to be made in the Monte Carlo transport of secondary particles from the accelerator head and beam modifiers to the isocenter plane.

  14. Mixing intensity modulated electron and photon beams: combining a steep dose fall-off at depth with sharp and depth-independent penumbras and flat beam profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korevaar, E W; Heijmen, B J; Woudstra, E; Huizenga, H; Brahme, A

    1999-09-01

    For application in radiotherapy, intensity modulated high-energy electron and photon beams were mixed to create dose distributions that feature: (a) a steep dose fall-off at larger depths, similar to pure electron beams, (b) flat beam profiles and sharp and depth-independent beam penumbras, as in photon beams, and (c) a selectable skin dose that is lower than for pure electron beams. To determine the required electron and photon beam fluence profiles, an inverse treatment planning algorithm was used. Mixed beams were realized at a MM50 racetrack microtron (Scanditronix Medical AB, Sweden), and evaluated by the dose distributions measured in a water phantom. The multileaf collimator of the MM50 was used in a static mode to shape overlapping electron beam segments, and the dynamic multileaf collimation mode was used to realize the intensity modulated photon beam profiles. Examples of mixed beams were generated at electron energies of up to 40 MeV. The intensity modulated electron beam component consists of two overlapping concentric fields with optimized field sizes, yielding broad, fairly depth-independent overall beam penumbras. The matched intensity modulated photon beam component has high fluence peaks at the field edges to sharpen this penumbra. The combination of the electron and the photon beams yields dose distributions with the characteristics (a)-(c) mentioned above.

  15. Metrology and quality of radiation therapy dosimetry of electron, photon and epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosunen, A

    1999-08-01

    In radiation therapy using electron and photon beams the dosimetry chain consists of several sequential phases starting by the realisation of the dose quantity in the Primary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory and ending to the calculation of the dose to a patient. A similar procedure can be described for the dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). To achieve the required accuracy of the dose delivered to a patient the quality of all steps in the dosimetry procedure has to be considered. This work is focused on two items in the dosimetry chains: the determination of the dose in the reference conditions and the evaluation of the accuracy of dose calculation methods. The issues investigated and discussed in detail are: a)the calibration methods of plane parallel ionisation chambers used in electron beam dosimetry, (b) the specification of the critical dosimetric parameter i.e. the ratio of stopping powers for water to air, (S I ?){sup water} {sub air}, in photon beams, (c) the feasibility of the twin ionization chamber technique for dosimetry in epithermal neutron beams applied to BNCT and (d) the determination accuracy of the calculated dose distributions in phantoms in electron, photon, and epithermal neutron beams. The results demonstrate that up to a 3% improvement in the consistency of dose determinations in electron beams is achieved by the calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers in high energy electron beams instead of calibrations in {sup 60}Co gamma beams. In photon beam dosimetry (S I ?){sup water} {sub air} can be determined with an accuracy of 0.2% using the percentage dose at the 10 cm depth, %dd(10), as a beam specifier. The use of %odd(10) requires the elimination of the electron contamination in the photon beam. By a twin ionisation chamber technique the gamma dose can be determined with uncertainty of 6% (1 standard deviation) and the total neutron dose with an uncertainty of 15 to 20% (1 standard deviation

  16. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on Self-Collimation of a Hybrid Photonic Crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Bagci

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A photonic crystal polarization beam splitter based on photonic band gap and self-collimation effects is designed for optical communication wavelengths. The photonic crystal structure consists of a polarization-insensitive self-collimation region and a splitting region. TM- and TE-polarized waves propagate without diffraction in the self-collimation region, whereas they split by 90 degrees in the splitting region. Efficiency of more than 75% for TM- and TE-polarized light is obtained for a polarization beam splitter size of only 17 μm x 17 μm in a wavelength interval of 60 nm including 1.55 μm.

  17. Tunable Goos-Haenchen shift for self-collimated beams in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Aaron [Nonlinear Physics Centre and Centre for Ultra-high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: afm124@rsphysse.anu.edu.au; Kivshar, Yuri [Nonlinear Physics Centre and Centre for Ultra-high Bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-04-21

    We present finite-difference time-domain studies of the Goos-Haenchen effect observed at the reflection of a self-collimated beam from the surface of a two-dimensional photonic crystal. We describe a method of tuning the shift of the reflected beam in photonic crystals through the modification of the surface, first structurally, as a change in the radius of the surface rods, and then all-optically, with the addition of nonlinear material to the surface layer. We demonstrate all-optical tunability and intensity-dependent control of the beam shift.

  18. IMRT and Rotational IMRT (mARC) Using Flat and Unflat Photon Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Sheta, Amal

    2016-01-01

    For more than 50 years attening filters have been inserted into the beam path oflinacs to produce a uniform energy fluence distribution of the photon beam and make it suitable for clinical use. Recently, linacs without flattening fifilter (Flattening FilterFree - FFF) are increasingly used in radiotherapy because of its benefifits, e.g. high dose rate (2000 MU/min), reduced scattered and leakage radiation. Hypofractionated radiotherapy is interested in the high dose rate of FFF beams t...

  19. Absolute efficiency estimation of photon-number-resolving detectors using twin beams

    CERN Document Server

    Worsley, A P; Lundeen, J S; Mosley, P J; Smith, B J; Puentes, G; Thomas-Peter, N; Walmsley, I A; 10.1364/OE.17.004397

    2009-01-01

    A nonclassical light source is used to demonstrate experimentally the absolute efficiency calibration of a photon-number-resolving detector. The photon-pair detector calibration method developed by Klyshko for single-photon detectors is generalized to take advantage of the higher dynamic range and additional information provided by photon-number-resolving detectors. This enables the use of brighter twin-beam sources including amplified pulse pumped sources, which increases the relevant signal and provides measurement redundancy, making the calibration more robust.

  20. Thomson scattering of polarized photons in an intense laser beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byung Yunn

    2006-02-21

    We present a theoretical analysis of the Thomson scattering of linearly and circularly polarized photons from a pulsed laser by electrons. The analytical expression for the photon distribution functions presented in this paper should be useful to designers of Thomson scattering experiments.

  1. Monochromatic X-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics including Kα Resonance Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximillian; Lim, Sara; Nahar, Sultana; Pradhan, Anil

    2016-05-01

    Aimed at monochromatic X-ray imaging and therapy, broadband, monochromatic, and quasi-monochromatic X-ray sources and propagation through low and high-Z (HZ) media were studied with numerically and experimentally. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the software package Geant4, and a new code Photx, to simulate X-ray image contrast, depth of penetration, and total attenuation. The data show that monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic X-rays achieve improved contrast at lower absorbed radiation doses compared to conventional broadband 120 kV or CT scans. Experimental quasi-monochromatic high-intensity laser-produced plasma sources and monochromatic synchrotron beam data are compared. Physical processes responsible for X-ray photoexcitation and absorption are numerically modelled, including a novel mechanism for accelerating Kα resonance fluorescence via twin monochromatic X-ray beam. Potential applications are medical diagnostics and high-Z material detection. Acknowledgement: Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus, OH.

  2. Fabrication of novel three-dimensional photonic crystals using multi-beam interference lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanan, Vinayak

    Optical Communications has seen an explosion in recent times with new types of devices and materials. In the last decade, considerable study has been devoted to the control of the optical properties of materials and guiding the propagation of light through the use of photonic crystals. Photonic crystals are materials with a periodic arrangement of dielectric medium in one, two or three dimensions, with periodicities on the order of the wavelength of the electromagnetic radiation in use. Photonic crystals exhibit photonic band gaps depending on their geometry and refractive index. Holographic lithography has been proven to be an attractive technique for the creation of large area, defect-free, three-dimensional photonic crystals. Structures with potential in photonic applications are fabricated in the photoresist SU-8, through concurrent exposure with four non-coplanar coherent beams of laser radiation. Polymer-air structures with face centered cubic symmetry are used as a template to create higher refractive index contrast photonic crystals by infilling using Atomic Layer Deposition and Chemical Vapor Deposition. These photonic crystals exhibit excellent optical properties with strong reflectance peaks at the calculated band gap frequencies. Two-photon polymerization is used to demonstrate the ability to create designed defect structures such as waveguides in silicon-air photonic crystals. Genetic algorithms are demonstrated as a technique to design an interference lithography experiment. A four-beam setup with beams originating in opposite hemispheres and linear polarizations is found to generate a structure with diamond symmetry and a large complete photonic band gap. Band gap studies on structures that possess both high band gap and high contrast are performed. The optical setup for a diamond structure utilizing two right-angled prisms is discussed and promising experimental results are presented.

  3. Photon beam characteristics on the MM50 racetrack microtron and a new approach for beam quality determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Nyström, H; Svensson, H

    1993-01-01

    The photon beams of the MM50 racetrack microtron have special characteristics which make them more suitable than conventional photon beams for precision radiation therapy with good dosimetric control. The beam flattening is obtained by the scanning of an elementary beam instead of using a flattening filter. This will give a number of advantages such as the possibility to optimize field flattening to individual field forms and field sizes. The radiation quality is the same across the whole beam, which gives smaller changes in dose profiles with depth and also makes it easier to perform careful dose planning. Beam collimation is mainly performed by a multileaf collimator and the special design of the treatment head gives nearly ideal characteristics for dose determination in an arbitrary point in the treatment fields. The output factor has been shown to depend almost solely on scattering within the treatment field. The conventional methods for beam quality characterization have been found less suitable at high energies and a new method based on HVL measurements in water is proposed.

  4. Compact beam splitters based on self-imaging phenomena in one-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Chen; Lin Huang; Yongdong Li; Chunliang Liu; Guizhong Liu

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental 1 ×2 beam splitter based on the self-imaging phenomena in multi-mode one-dimensional (1D) photonic crystal (PC) waveguides is presented,and its transmission characteristics are investigated using the finite-difference time-domain method.Calculated results indicate that a high transmittance (>95%) can be observed within a wide frequency band for the 1×2 beam splitter without complicated structural optimizations.In this letter,a simple and compact 1 ×4 beam splitter is constructed by combining the fundamental 1 ×2 beam splitter with the flexible bends of 1D PC waveguides.Such beam splitters can be applied to highly dense photonic integrated circuits.

  5. Hollow Gaussian beam generation through nonlinear interaction of photons with orbital-angular-momemtum

    CERN Document Server

    Chaitanya, N Apurv; Banerji, J; Samanta, G K

    2016-01-01

    Hollow Gaussian beams (HGB) are a special class of doughnut shaped beams that do not carry orbital angular momentum (OAM). Such beams have a wide range of applications in many fields including atomic optics, bio-photonics, atmospheric science, and plasma physics. Till date, these beams have been generated using linear optical elements. Here, we show a new way of generating HGBs by three-wave mixing in a nonlinear crystal. Based on nonlinear interaction of photons having OAM and conservation of OAM in nonlinear processes, we experimentally generated ultrafast HGBs of order as high as 6 and power >180 mW at 355 nm. This generic concept can be extended to any wavelength, timescales (continuous-wave and ultrafast) and any orders. We show that the removal of azimuthal phase of vortices does not produce Gaussian beam. We also propose a new and only method to characterize the order of the HGBs.

  6. Optical Bloch oscillations and Zener tunneling of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fajun; Zhu, Weiren; Shang, Wuyun; Wang, Meirong; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2016-08-01

    We report on the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (OBOs) and Zener tunneling (ZT) of Airy beams in ionic-type photonic lattices with a refractive index ramp. Different from their counterparts in uniform lattices, Airy beams undergoing OBOs show an alternatively switched concave and convex trajectory as well as a periodical revival of input beam profiles. Moreover, the ionic-type photonic lattice established in photorefractive crystal exhibits a reconfigurable lattice structure, which provides a flexible way to tune the amplitude and period of the OBOs. Remarkably, it is demonstrated that the band gap of the lattice can be readily controlled by rotating the lattice inducing beam, which forces the ZT rate to follow two significant different decay curves amidst decreasing index gradient. Our results open up new possibilities for all-optical switching, routing and manipulation of Airy beams.

  7. Hollow Gaussian beam generation through nonlinear interaction of photons with orbital angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaitanya, N. Apurv; Jabir, M. V.; Banerji, J.; Samanta, G. K.

    2016-09-01

    Hollow Gaussian beams (HGB) are a special class of doughnut shaped beams that do not carry orbital angular momentum (OAM). Such beams have a wide range of applications in many fields including atomic optics, bio-photonics, atmospheric science, and plasma physics. Till date, these beams have been generated using linear optical elements. Here, we show a new way of generating HGBs by three-wave mixing in a nonlinear crystal. Based on nonlinear interaction of photons having OAM and conservation of OAM in nonlinear processes, we experimentally generated ultrafast HGBs of order as high as 6 and power >180 mW at 355 nm. This generic concept can be extended to any wavelength, timescales (continuous-wave and ultrafast) and any orders. We show that the removal of azimuthal phase of vortices does not produce Gaussian beam. We also propose a new and only method to characterize the order of the HGBs.

  8. Tunable nonlinear beam defocusing in infiltrated photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosberg, Christian Romer; Bennet, Francis H; Neshev, Dragomir N.;

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel experimental platform for discrete nonlinear optics based on infiltrated photonic crystal fibers. We observe tunable discrete diffraction and nonlinear self-defocusing, and apply the effects to realize a compact all-optical power limiter....

  9. Requirements on the LWFA electron beam for the user-oriented photon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodozhentsev, Alexander; Přibyl, Lukáš; Korn, Georg; Winkler, Paul; Maier, Andreas R.

    2017-05-01

    The laser-driven Undulator X-ray source (LUX) is designed to be a user beamline providing ultra-short EUV photon pulses with a central wavelength tuneable in the range of 0.4 to 4.5 nm and a peak brilliance of up to 1021 photons/(s.mrad2.mm2.0.1% B.W.), which makes this source comparable with modern synchrotron sources. The source shall provide a focal spot size well below 10 μm and a range of auxiliary beams for complex pump-and-probe experiments and it is also an important experimental milestone towards a future laser driven Free Electron Laser. Unique femtosecond nature of the laser-plasma electron acceleration in combination with extremely small transverse emittance of the electron beam is the major advantage of the LWFA technique. Preservation of the electron beam quality is a complicated task for a dedicated electron beam line, which has to be designed to transport the electron beam from the LWFA source up to the undulator. In this report we discuss main requirements on the LWFA source and the electron beam optics of the LUX source and solutions to produce required quality photon beam in the undulator and we also discuss the effect of realistic setup parameters on the quality of the electron beam in the undulator within the range of systematic errors.

  10. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on a Self-Collimation Michelson Interferometer in a Silicon Photonic Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xi-Yao; LIN Gui-Min; LI Jun-Jun; XU Xiao-Fu; JIANG Jun-Zhen; QIANG Ze-Xuan; QIU Yi-Shen; LI Hui

    2012-01-01

    A polarization beam splitter based on a self-collimation Michelson interferometer (SMI) in a hole-type silicon photonic crystal is proposed and numerically demonstrated.Utilizing the polarization dependence of the transmission spectra of the SMI and polarization peak matching method,the SMI can work as a polarization beam splitter (PBS) by selecting an appropriate path length difference in the structure.Based on its novel polarization beam splitting mechanics,the polarization extinction ratios (PERs) for TM and TE modes are as high as 18.4 dB and 24.3 dB,respectively.Since its dimensions are only several operating wavelengths,the PBS may have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits.%A polarization beam splitter based on a self-collimation Michelson interferometer (SMI) in a hole-type silicon photonic crystal is proposed and numerically demonstrated. Utilizing the polarization dependence of the transmission spectra of the SMI and polarization peak matching method, the SMI can work as a polarization beam splitter (PBS) by selecting an appropriate path length difference in the structure. Based on its novel polarization beam splitting mechanics, the polarization extinction ratios (PERs) for TM and TE modes are as high as 18.4 dB and 24.3 dB, respectively. Since its dimensions are only several operating wavelengths, the PBS may have practical applications in photonic integrated circuits.

  11. Surface dose measurements and comparison of unflattened and flattened photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokkumar Sigamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the central axis dose in the build-up region and the surface dose of a 6 MV and 10 MV flattened photon beam (FB and flattening filter free (FFF therapeutic photon beam for different square field sizes (FSs for a Varian Truebeam linear accelerator using parallel-plate ionization chamber and Gafchromic film. Knowledge of dosimetric characteristics in the build-up region and surface dose of the FFF is essential for clinical care. The dose measurements were also obtained empirically using two different commonly used dosimeters: a p-type photon semiconductor dosimeter and a cylindrical ionization chamber. Surface dose increased linearly with FS for both FB and FFF photon beams. The surface dose values of FFF were higher than the FB FSs. The measured surface dose clearly increases with increasing FS. The FFF beams have a modestly higher surface dose in the build-up region than the FB. The dependence of source to skin distance (SSD is less significant in FFF beams when compared to the flattened beams at extended SSDs.

  12. Benchmarking of Touschek Beam Lifetime Calculations for the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, A.; Yang, B.

    2017-06-25

    Particle loss from Touschek scattering is one of the most significant issues faced by present and future synchrotron light source storage rings. For example, the predicted, Touschek-dominated beam lifetime for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) Upgrade lattice in 48-bunch, 200-mA timing mode is only ∼ 2 h. In order to understand the reliability of the predicted lifetime, a series of measurements with various beam parameters was performed on the present APS storage ring. This paper first describes the entire process of beam lifetime measurement, then compares measured lifetime with the calculated one by applying the measured beam parameters. The results show very good agreement.

  13. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portmann, G.; Bengtsson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices.

  14. Practical Entangled-Photon Virtual-State Spectroscopy using Intense Twin Beams

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new practical approach towards ultrasensitive measurements in chemical and biological systems based on the so-called virtual-state spectroscopy technique. The proposed scheme makes use of intense twin beams generated by pump pulses with different frequency chirps to successfully extract information about the virtual states that contribute to the two-photon excitation of an absorbing medium. Interestingly, we show that our approach may enable entangled-photon absorption rates up t...

  15. Response of MEDEA BaF 2 detectors to 20-280 MeV photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellia, G.; Alba, R.; Coniglione, R.; Del Zoppo, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Maiolino, C.; Migneco, E.; Piattelli, P.; Sapienza, P.; Frascaria, N.; Lhenry, I.; Roynette, J. C.; Suomijärvi, T.; Alamanos, N.; Auger, F.; Gillibert, A.; Pierroutsakou, D.; Sida, J. L.; Silveira Gomes, P. R.

    1993-05-01

    The response function of MEDEA BaF 2 crystals to high energy photons, up to 280 MeV, has been studied using monochromatic γ-rays from the in flight annihilation of positron beams. The experimental response functions are compared to the results of Monte Carlo simulations based on the EGS3 code and parametrized over the whole investigated energy range.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamic photonic crystal creation by four laser beams interference in colloidal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. M.; Mantsevich, V. N.; Ezhova, K. V.; Tikhonov, I. V.; Dneprovskii, V. S.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a simple way to create dynamic photonic crystals with different lattice symmetry by interference of four non-coplanar laser beams in colloidal solution of CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs). The formation of dynamic photonic crystal was confirmed by the observed diffraction of the beams that have excited photonic crystal at the angles equal to that calculated for the corresponding three-dimensional lattice (self-diffraction regime). Self-diffraction from an induced 3D transient photonic crystal has been discovered in the case of resonant excitation of the excitons (electron - hole transitions) in CdSe/ZnS QDs (highly absorbing colloidal solution) by powerful beams of mode-locked laser with picosecond pulse duration. Self-diffraction arises for four laser beams intersecting in the cell with colloidal CdSe/ZnS QDs due to the induced 3D dynamic photonic crystal. The physical processes that arise in CdSe/ZnS QDs and are responsible for the observed self-action effects are discussed.

  17. Experimental validation of the dual parameter beam quality specifier for reference dosimetry in flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Emma; Gajewski, Romuald; Flower, Emily; Stensmyr, Rachel

    2015-07-21

    Removal of the flattening filter alters the energy spectrum of the photon beam such that current beam quality specifiers may not correctly account for this change when predicting the Spencer-Attix restricted water-to-air mass collision stopping-power ratio, (L/ρ)(water)(air). Johnsson et al (2000 Phys. Med. Biol. 45 2733-45) proposed a beam quality specifier, known as the dual parameter beam quality specifier, which was calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using transmission data of primary kerma through two differing thicknesses of water material. Ceberg et al (2010 Med. Phys. 37 1164-8) extended this MC study to include relevant flattening filter free (FFF) beam data. Experimental investigations of this dual parameter beam quality specifier have not previously been published, therefore the purpose of this work was to validate that the dual parameter beam quality specifier could be measured experimentally for clinical beams (both with a flattening filter (WFF) and without (FFF)). Transmission measurements of primary kerma were performed by employing the setup outlined in Johnsson et al (1999 Phys. Med. Biol. 44 2445-50). Varying absorber thicknesses, in 5 cm increments from 5 to 40 cm, were placed at isocentre with the chamber positioned at an extended source to chamber distance of 300 cm. Experimental setup for TPR20,10 and %dd(10)x followed the methodology outlined in IAEA TRS398 (2004) and TG-51 (1999) with AAPM Addendum to TG-51 (2014) respectively. The maximum difference of (L/ρ)(water)(air) determined using the different beam quality specifiers was found to be 0.35%. Analysis of the absorber thickness combination found that small thicknesses (quality specifiers. The results demonstrated successful experimental determination of the dual parameter beam quality specifier, indicating its potential as an alternate beam quality specifier for FFF beams.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of spectrum changes in a photon beam due to a brass compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Custidiano, E.R., E-mail: ernesto7661@gmail.com [Department of Physics, FaCENA, UNNE, Av., Libertad 5470, C.P.3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Valenzuela, M.R., E-mail: meraqval@gmail.com [Department of Physics, FaCENA, UNNE, Av., Libertad 5470, C.P.3400, Corrientes (Argentina); Dumont, J.L., E-mail: Joseluis.Dumont@elekta.com [Elekta CMS Software, St.Louis, MO (United States); McDonnell, J., E-mail: josemc@express.com.ar [Cumbres Institute, Riobamba 1745, C.P.2000, Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Rene, L, E-mail: luismrene@gmail.com [Radiotherapy Center, Crespo 953, C.P.2000, Rosario, Santa Fe (Argentina); Rodriguez Aguirre, J.M., E-mail: juakcho@gmail.com [Department of Physics, FaCENA, UNNE, Av., Libertad 5470, C.P.3400, Corrientes (Argentina)

    2011-06-15

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the changes in the incident spectrum when a poly-energetic photon beam passes through a static brass compensator. The simulated photon beam spectrum was evaluated by comparing it against the incident spectra. We also discriminated the changes in the transmitted spectrum produced by each of the microscopic processes. (i.e. Rayleigh scattering, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, and pair production). The results show that the relevant process in the energy range considered is the Compton Effect, as expected for composite materials of intermediate atomic number and energy range considered.

  19. Genetic algorithms optimization of photonic crystal fibers for half diffraction angle reduction of output beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jyun-Hong; Cai, Dong-Po; Tsai, Ya-Lun; Chen, Chii-Chang; Lin, Chu-En; Yen, Ta-Jen

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we optimize the structure of the photonic crystal fibers by using genetic algorithms to provide strong light confinement in fiber and small half diffraction angle of output beam. Furthermore, this article shows the potentials of this study, such as optimizing three purposes at the same time and the arbitrary structure design is achieved. We report two optimized results obtained by different optimization conditions. The results show that the half diffraction angle of the output beam of the photonic crystal fibers can be reduced.

  20. Atom Interferometry with up to 24-Photon-Momentum-Transfer Beam Splitters

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Holger; Long, Quan; Herrmann, Sven; Chu, Steven

    2007-01-01

    We present multi- (up to 24-)photon Bragg diffraction as beam splitter to achieve the largest splitting in momentum space in any light-pulse atom interferometer thus far. Relative to the 2-photon processes used in the most sensitive present interferometers, these large momentum transfer beam splitters increase the phase shift 12-fold for Mach-Zehnder and 144-fold for Ramsey-Borde geometries. As the atom's internal state is not changed, important systematic effects can cancel. This dramatic increase in sensitivity and precision opens the door to improved measurements of the fine-structure constant, inertial forces, and tests of relativity and quantum electrodynamics.

  1. Polarization Beam Splitter Based on Self-Collimation Effect in Two-Dimensional Photonics Crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jie; ZHAO De-Yin; ZHOU Chnan-Hong; JIANG Xun-Ya

    2007-01-01

    A photonic crystal polarization beam splitter based on the self-collimation effect is proposed. By means of the plane wave expansion method and the finite-difference time-domain method, we analyse the splitting mechanism in two alternative ways: performing a band gap structure analysis and simulating the field distribution. The results indicate that two beams of different polarizations can be split with an extinction ratio of nearly 20 dB in a wavelength range of 90nm. The splitter may have practical applications in integrated photonic circuits.

  2. TU-A-BRE-01: The Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Beams Relative to Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospital ' Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Stewart, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Carabe-Fernandez, A [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Proton therapy patients receive a 10% lower physical dose than the dose administered using photons, i.e. the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is 1.1 in comparison to high-energy photons. The use of a generic, spatially invariant RBE within tumor targets and normal tissue structures disregards a large body of evidence indicating that proton RBE tends to increase with increasing linear energy transfer (LET). Because the doseaveraged proton LET in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is larger than the LET in the plateau region or proximal edge of a SOBP, the use of a spatially invariant RBE is not well justified from a mechanistic point of view. On the other hand, the available clinical data on local tumor control rates and early or late side effects do not provide strong evidence against the continued use of a constant and spatially invariant clinical RBE. The only potential downside to the ongoing use of a constant RBE of 1.1 seems to be that we are missing a potential opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio, i.e., design proton therapy treatments in ways that exploit, rather than mitigate, spatial variations in proton RBE. Speakers in this symposium will: 1-review the laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, 2-examine some of the putative mechanisms connecting spatial variations in particle LET to estimates of the proton RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels 3-assess the possible clinical significance of incorporating models for spatial variations in proton RBE into treatment planning systems. 4-discuss treatment planning and delivery techniques that will exploit the spatial variations of RBE within proton beams. Learning Objectives: To review laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a constant RBE of 1.1 To understand major mechanisms connecting proton LET to RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. To quantify the

  3. Electromagnetic waves and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    We explore how the thermal ground states of two mixing and pure SU(2) Yang-Mills theories, SU(2)$_{\\tiny\\mbox{CMB}}$ of scale $\\Lambda_{\\tiny\\mbox{CMB}}\\sim 10^{-4}\\,$eV and SU(2)$_{e}$ of scale $\\Lambda_{e}\\sim 5\\times 10^5\\,$eV, associate either wave or particle aspects to electromagnetic disturbances during thermalisation towards the photon gas of a blackbody, in realising the photoelectric effect, and through the frequency dependence of the monochromatic, nonthermal beam structure in Thomson/Compton scattering.

  4. Commissioning of a medical accelerator photon beam Monte Carlo simulation using wide-field profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J.; Franco, L.; Gómez, F.; Iglesias, A.; Lobato, R.; Mosquera, J.; Pazos, A.; Pardo, J.; Pombar, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Sendón, J.

    2004-11-01

    A method for commissioning an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation of medical linac photon beams through wide-field lateral profiles at moderate depth in a water phantom is presented. Although depth-dose profiles are commonly used for nominal energy determination, our study shows that they are quite insensitive to energy changes below 0.3 MeV (0.6 MeV) for a 6 MV (15 MV) photon beam. Also, the depth-dose profile dependence on beam radius adds an additional uncertainty in their use for tuning nominal energy. Simulated 40 cm × 40 cm lateral profiles at 5 cm depth in a water phantom show greater sensitivity to both nominal energy and radius. Beam parameters could be determined by comparing only these curves with measured data.

  5. Commissioning of a medical accelerator photon beam Monte Carlo simulation using wide-field profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Franco, L [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Gomez, F [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Iglesias, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Lobato, R [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Mosquera, J [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pazos, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pardo, J [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Pombar, M [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); RodrIguez, A [Departamento de Fisica de PartIculas, Facultade de Fisica, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sendon, J [Hospital ClInico Universitario de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2004-11-07

    A method for commissioning an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation of medical linac photon beams through wide-field lateral profiles at moderate depth in a water phantom is presented. Although depth-dose profiles are commonly used for nominal energy determination, our study shows that they are quite insensitive to energy changes below 0.3 MeV (0.6 MeV) for a 6 MV (15 MV) photon beam. Also, the depth-dose profile dependence on beam radius adds an additional uncertainty in their use for tuning nominal energy. Simulated 40 cm x 40 cm lateral profiles at 5 cm depth in a water phantom show greater sensitivity to both nominal energy and radius. Beam parameters could be determined by comparing only these curves with measured data.

  6. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle.

  7. Polarity correction factor for flattening filter free photon beams in several cylindrical ionization chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Toshiyuki; Uehara, Kazuyuki; Nakayama, Masao; Tsudou, Shinji; Masutani, Takashi; Okayama, Takanobu

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to compare the polarity correction factor in ionization chambers for flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams and flattening filter (FF) beams. Measurements were performed with both 6 and 10 MV FFF and FF beams. Five commercial ionization chambers were evaluated: PTW TN30013; IBA Dosimetry CC01, CC04, and CC13; and Exradin A12S. Except for the CC01 ionization chamber, the other four chambers showed less than a 0.3 % difference in the polarity effect between the FFF and the FF beams. The CC01 chamber showed a strong field-size-dependence, unlike the other chambers. The polarity effect for all chambers with FFF beams did not change with the dose rate. Except in the case of the CC01 chamber, the difference in the polarity effect between FFF and FF beams was not significant.

  8. Linearly polarised photon beams at ELSA and measurement of the beam asymmetry in pi^0-photoproduction off the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Elsner, D; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D E; Beck, R; Beloglasov, Yu A; Castelijns, R; Credé, V; Ehmanns, A; Essig, K; Ewald, R; Fabry, I; Fornet-Ponse, K; Fuchs, M; Funke, C; Gridnev, A B; Gutz, E; Hoeffgen, S; Hoffmeister, P; Horn, I; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Konrad, M; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Löhner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lotz, J; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Morales, C; Nanova, M; Novinski, D V; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; Van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Sarantsev, A V; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Suele, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Walther, D; Weinheimer, C; Wendel, C

    2008-01-01

    At the electron accelerator ELSA a linearly polarised tagged photon beam is produced by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal. Orientation and energy range of the linear polarisation can be deliberately chosen by accurate positioning of the crystal with a goniometer. The degree of polarisation is determined by the form of the scattered electron spectrum. Good agreement between experiment and expectations on basis of the experimental conditions is obtained. Polarisation degrees of P = 40% are typically achieved at half of the primary electron energy. The determination of P is confirmed by measuring the beam asymmetry, \\Sigma, in pi^0 photoproduction and a comparison of the results to independent measurements using laser backscattering.

  9. Interaction of Photon Vortex Beams with Atomic Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solyanik, Maria; Afanasev, Andrei; Carlson, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    In our work we consider helical Bessel beams' (BB's) propagation and interaction with isotropic matter. Dynamical properties of the beams with non-zero orbital angular momentum (OAM), which are determined by spatial degrees of freedom and polarization, modify the fundamental processes in light-matter interactions. Circular dichroism of BBs propagating in hydrogen gas was considered within the frame of studying the vortex beams' attenuation due to photoabsorption in hydrogen gas. In this case, the phenomenon is due to the topology of the wave front, contrary to the zero OAM case, when the change in polarization state is due to matter inhomogeneity. The effect of circular dichroism has been predicted by calculating the beam ellipticity evolution when traversing an isotropic target. According to our results, the BBs' transverse ellipticity profile has a structure of concentric circular maxima which correspond to minima of the intensity. The characteristic polarization singularity arises on the beam axis as the result of interaction with matter. It is shown, that even for the case of the paraxial approximation the effect of circular dichroism takes place. These signatures can be used for theoretical and experimental analysis of the interactions of optical vortices with atomic matter.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of MOSFET detectors for high-energy photon beams using the PENELOPE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panettieri, Vanessa [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Duch, Maria Amor [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Jornet, Nuria [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Ginjaume, Merce [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Carrasco, Pablo [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain); Badal, Andreu [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ortega, Xavier [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ribas, Montserrat [Servei de RadiofIsica i Radioproteccio, Hospital de la Santa Creu i San Pau Sant Antoni Maria Claret 167, 08025 Barcelona (Spain)

    2007-01-07

    The aim of this work was the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the response of commercially available dosimeters based on metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) for radiotherapeutic photon beams using the PENELOPE code. The studied Thomson and Nielsen TN-502-RD MOSFETs have a very small sensitive area of 0.04 mm{sup 2} and a thickness of 0.5 {mu}m which is placed on a flat kapton base and covered by a rounded layer of black epoxy resin. The influence of different metallic and Plastic water(TM) build-up caps, together with the orientation of the detector have been investigated for the specific application of MOSFET detectors for entrance in vivo dosimetry. Additionally, the energy dependence of MOSFET detectors for different high-energy photon beams (with energy >1.25 MeV) has been calculated. Calculations were carried out for simulated 6 MV and 18 MV x-ray beams generated by a Varian Clinac 1800 linear accelerator, a Co-60 photon beam from a Theratron 780 unit, and monoenergetic photon beams ranging from 2 MeV to 10 MeV. The results of the validation of the simulated photon beams show that the average difference between MC results and reference data is negligible, within 0.3%. MC simulated results of the effect of the build-up caps on the MOSFET response are in good agreement with experimental measurements, within the uncertainties. In particular, for the 18 MV photon beam the response of the detectors under a tungsten cap is 48% higher than for a 2 cm Plastic water(TM) cap and approximately 26% higher when a brass cap is used. This effect is demonstrated to be caused by positron production in the build-up caps of higher atomic number. This work also shows that the MOSFET detectors produce a higher signal when their rounded side is facing the beam (up to 6%) and that there is a significant variation (up to 50%) in the response of the MOSFET for photon energies in the studied energy range. All the results have shown that the PENELOPE code system

  11. A mirror-less, multi-beam photonic free-electron laser oscillator pumped far beyond threshold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Slot, Petrus J.M.; Boller, Klaus J.; Strooisma, A.; Kang, Heung-Sik; Kim, Dong Eon; Schaa, Volker R.W.

    2015-01-01

    In a photonic free-electron laser electrons are transmitted through a photonic crystal in the form of one or multiple electron beams to generate coherent Cerenkov radiation. Here we consider a photonic-crystal slab consisting of a two-dimensional, periodic array of bars inside a rectangular waveguid

  12. Multi-photon Resonance Phenomena Using Laguerre-Gaussian Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kazemi, Seyedeh Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) and Gaussian fields on the linewidth of the optical spectrum of multi-photon resonance phenomena. First, we investigate the dependence of the steady-state coherence on the laser profile in a two-level system. Thanks to the LG field, the linewidth of the one-photon optical pumping peak is explicitly narrower than for a Gaussian field. We then investigate the atomic coherence in a two-level pump-probe atomic system and show that using the LG fields, a narrower two-photon absorption peak can be obtained compared to the usual Gaussian ones. In next section, we investigate the effect of the laser profiles on the coherent population trapping in the $\\Lambda$-type molecular open systems. It is shown that, comparing with the the Gaussian fields, the LG fields reduce the linewidth of the optical spectrum. In addition, for a laser-driven four-level atomic system we study the effect of laser profiles on the Autler-Townes doublet structure in the absorption spectrum. We al...

  13. Determination of ion recombination correction factors for a liquid ionization chamber in megavoltage photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Kum-Bae; Ji, Young Hoon; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Seonghoon; Huh, Hyun Do

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the ion recombination correction factor for a liquid ionization chamber in a high energy photon beam by using our experimental method. The ion recombination correction factors were determined by using our experimental method and were compared with theoretical and experimental methods proposed by using the theoretical method (Greening, Johansson) and the two-dose rate method in a cobalt beam and a high energy photon beam. In order to apply the liquid ionization chamber in a reference and small field dosimetry, we acquired the absorbed dose to water correction coefficient, the beam quality correction factor, and the influence quantities for the microLion chamber according to the TRS-398 protocol and applied the results to a high energy photon beam used in clinical fields. As a result, our experimental method for ion recombination in a cobalt beam agreed with the results from the heoretical method (Greening theory) better than it did with the results from the two-dose rate method. For high energy photon beams, the two-dose rate and our experimental methods were in good agreement, less than 2% deviation, while the theoretical general collection efficiency (Johansson et al.) deviated greatly from the experimental values. When we applied the factors for the absorbed dose to water measurement, the absorbed dose to water for the microLion chamber was in good agreement, within 1%, compared with the values for the PTW 30013 chamber in 6 and 10 MV Clinac iX and 6 and 15 MV Oncor impression. With these results, not only can the microLion ionization chamber be used to measure the absorbed dose to water in a reference condition, it can also be used to a the chamber for small, non-standard field dosimetry.

  14. Focused ion beam milling of photonic crystals in silicon on insulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hu, Wenbin; Hopman, Wico; Ridder, de René

    2009-01-01

    A photonic crystal slab, consisting of an array of circular sub-micron diameter holes in Silicon on Insulator (SOI), has been fabricated using focused ion beam (FIB) milling. This application requires the sidewalls of the holes to be very smooth and as nearly perpendicular to the slab as possible. T

  15. Event-based simulation of single-photon beam splitters and Mach-Zehnder interferometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, H; De Raedt, K; Michielsen, K

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate that networks of locally connected processing units with a primitive learning capability exhibit a behavior that is usually only attributed to quantum systems. We describe networks that simulate single-photon beam splitter and Mach-Zehnder interferometer experiments on a causal, event

  16. Analysis of guided-resonance-based polarization beam splitting in photonic crystal slabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilic, Onur; Fan, Shanhui; Solgaard, Olav

    2008-11-01

    We present an analysis of the phase and amplitude responses of guided resonances in a photonic crystal slab. Through this analysis, we obtain the general rules and conditions under which a photonic crystal slab can be employed as a general elliptical polarization beam splitter, separating an incoming beam equally into its two orthogonal constituents, so that half the power is reflected in one polarization state, and half the power is transmitted in the other state. We show that at normal incidence a photonic crystal slab acts as a dual quarter-wave retarder in which the fast and slow axes are switched for reflection and transmission. We also analyze the case where such a structure operates at oblique incidences. As a result we show that the effective dielectric constant of the photonic crystal slab imposes the Brewster angle as a boundary, separating two ranges of angles with different mechanisms of polarization beam splitting. We show that the diattenuation can be tuned from zero to one to make the structure a circular or linear polarization beam splitter. We verify our analytical analysis through finite-difference time-domain simulations and experimental measurements at infrared wavelengths.

  17. Tolerances for the accuracy of photon beam dose calculations of treatment planning systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venselaar, J; Welleweerd, H; Mijnheer, B

    2001-01-01

    Background and purpose: To design a consistent set of criteria for acceptability of photon beam dose calculations of treatment planning systems. The set should be applicable in combination with a test package used for evaluation of a treatment planning system, such as the ones proposed by the AAPM T

  18. Entanglement and photon statistics of output fields from beam splitter for binomial state inputs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Qing-Ping; Fang Mao-Fa

    2004-01-01

    The entanglement properties are investigated based on linear entropy, and nonclassicalities are examined of output fields from a beam splitter for pure binomial state inputs. It is shown that the properties of the entanglement and the photon statistics of output fields are not only strongly dependent on the parameters of input binomial states but also quite involved with the nature of the beam splitter. The best entanglement can be obtained when the parameters of both input states and the beam splitter are chosen appropriately. Finally, we analyse briefly the distinguishability between the joint input state and the joint output state.

  19. Beam splitting at the output of photonic crystal waveguides with discrete surface point defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lanlan; Li, Qi

    2010-11-08

    With the method of adding two point defects on modulated surface, novel photonic crystal (PC) waveguide-based beam splitters were presented. The modulated surface layer supports surface states, and introduced discrete point defects can serve as discrete light emitters. The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations show that the number of beams is sensitive to the distance of two point defects. By adjusting the positions of the point defects, 1-to-N beam splitters can be realized. These simple, easy-to-fabricate and controllable structures have important potential applications in integrated optical circuits.

  20. Generation of terahertz hollow beams by a photonic quasi-crystal flat lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Bo; Liu, Exian; Wang, Ziming; Cai, Weicheng; Liu, Hongfei; Wang, Shuo; Liang, Taiyuan; Xiao, Wei; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-06-01

    We have designed a decagonal photonic quasi-crystal (PQC) flat lens, which turns an incident terahertz (THz) plane wave into a hollow beam easily and flexibly. The features of the THz hollow beam can be controlled by varying the parameters of a point defect in the center of the lens, i.e., the PQC flat lens can be used as a flexible tool for THz optical captivity or optical tweezer. The results showing that an airy disk, whose mean beam width is similar to the incident wavelength and power-in-the-bucket (PIB) is more than 96%, can be generated in the far field.

  1. T-shaped polarization beam splitter based on two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguide structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinlan; Shen, Hongjun; Li, Ting; Liu, Jie; Huang, Xianjian

    2016-12-01

    A T-shaped polarization beam splitter based on two-dimensional photonic crystal is proposed, which is composed of three waveguides: one input and two output. Unpolarized beams incident from the input port will be separated into two different polarization modes and outputted individually by two different coupling structures. Simulation results can be obtained by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. In the normalized frequency range of 0.3456 extinction ratio is all 30dB for both modes. The polarization beam splitter attains the requirement we expected by analyzing simulation results.

  2. Absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of flattened versus unflattened megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Puysseleyr, Annemieke; Lechner, Wolfgang; De Neve, Wilfried; Georg, Dietmar; De Wagter, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated absorbed dose measurements in the build-up region of conventional (FF) versus flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams. The absorbed dose in the build-up region of static 6 and 10MV FF and FFF beams was measured using radiochromic film and extrapolation chamber dosimetry for single beams with a variety of field sizes, shapes and positions relative to the central axis. Removing the flattening filter generally resulted in slightly higher relative build-up doses. No considerable impact on the depth of maximum dose was found. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  3. Assessment of radiotherapy photon beams: A practical and low cost methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, C. Q. M.; Nicolucci, P.

    2017-02-01

    Dosimetric properties of radiation beams used in radiotherapy are directly related to the energy spectrum produced by the treatment unit. Therefore, the development of methodologies to evaluate in a simple and accurate way the spectra of clinical beams can help establishing the quality control of the treatment. The purpose of this study is to present a practical and low cost methodology for determining primary spectra of radiotherapy photon beams from transmission measurements in attenuators of aluminum and using the method of the inverse Laplace transform. Monte Carlo simulation with PENELOPE code was used in order to evaluate and validate the reconstructed spectra by the calculation of dosimetric parameters that characterize the beam. Percentage depth dose values simulated with a 6 MV reconstructed spectrum shows maximum difference of 4.4% when compared to values measured at the corresponding clinical beam. For a 10 MV beam that difference was around 4.2%. Results obtained in this study confirm the adequacy of the proposed methodology for assessing primary photon beams produced by clinical accelerators.

  4. Dosimetric aspects of the therapeutic photon beams from a dual-energy linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ghazi, M.S.A.L.; Arjune, B.; Fiedler, J.A.; Sharma, P.D.

    1988-03-01

    Parameters of the photon beams (6 and 20 MV) from a dual-energy linear accelerator (Mevatron-KD, Siemens Medical Laboratories, CA) are presented. The depth dose characteristics of the photon beams are d/sub max/ of 1.8 and 3.8 cm and percentage depth dose of 68% and 80% at 10-cm depth and 100-cm source--surface distance for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ for 6 and 20 MV, respectively. The 6 and 20 MV beams were found to correspond to nominal accelerating potentials of 4.7 and 17 MV, respectively. The stability of output is within +- 1% and flatness and symmetry are within +- 3%. These figures compare favorably with the manufacturer's specifications.

  5. Design of a novel multi channel photonic crystal fiber polarization beam splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunyan; Li, Shuguang; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Guangyao; Shi, Min; Wu, Junjun

    2017-10-01

    A kind of multi channel dual-core photonic crystal fiber polarization beam splitter is designed. We analyze the effects of the lattice parameters and the thickness of gold layer on the beam splitting by the finite element method. Numerical results show that the thickness of metal layer and the size of the air holes near the fiber cores are closely linked with the nature of the polarization beam splitter. We also obtain that extinction ratio can reach -73.87 dB at 1 . 55 μm wavelength and at 1 . 41 μm, 1 . 65 μm extinction ratio can reach 30.8978 dB and 31.1741 dB, respectively. The comparison of the effect on the characteristic of the photonic crystal fiber with coating no gold is also taken into account.

  6. Equivalent (uniform) square field sizes of flattening filter free photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Wolfgang; Kuess, Peter; Georg, Dietmar; Palmans, Hugo

    2017-10-01

    Various types of treatment units, such as CyberKnife, TomoTherapy and C-arm linear accelerators (LINACs) are operated using flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams. Their reference dosimetry, however, is currently based on codes of practice that provide data which were primarily developed and tested for high-energy photon beams with flattening filter (WFF). The aim of this work was to introduce equivalent uniform square field sizes of FFF beams to serve as a basis of a unified reference dosimetry procedure applicable to all aforementioned FFF machines. For this purpose, in-house determined experimental data together with published data of the ratio of doses at depths of 20 cm and 10 cm in water (D 20,10) were used to characterize the depth dose distribution of 6 and 10 MV WFF and FFF beams. These data were analyzed for field sizes ranging from 2  ×  2 cm2 to 40  ×  40 cm2. A scatter function that takes the lateral profiles of the individual beams into account was fitted to the experimental data. The lateral profiles of the WFF beams were assumed to be uniform, while those of the FFF beams were approximated using fourth or sixth order polynomials. The scatter functions of the FFF beams were recalculated using a uniform lateral profile (the same as the physical profile of the WFF beams), and are henceforth denoted as virtual uniform FFF beams (VUFFF). The field sizes of the VUFFF beams having the same scatter contribution as the corresponding FFF beams at a given field size were defined as the equivalent uniform square field (EQUSF) size. Data from four different LINACs with 18 different beams in total, as well as a CyberKnife beam, were analyzed. The average values of EQUSFs over all investigated LINACs of the conventional 10  ×  10 cm2 reference fields of 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for C-arm LINACs and machine-specific reference fields for CyberKnife and TomoTherapy were 9.5 cm, 9 cm, 5.0 cm and 6.5 cm respectively. The

  7. A comparison of phantom scatter from flattened and flattening filter free high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Neil, E-mail: neil.richmond@stees.nhs.uk [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Allen, Vince [The Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Daniel, Jim [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom); Dacey, Rob [The Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Walker, Chris [Department of Medical Physics, The James Cook University Hospital, Middlesbrough (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams have different dosimetric properties from those of flattened beams. The aim of this work was to characterize the collimator scatter (S{sub c}) and total scatter (S{sub cp}) from 3 FFF beams of differing quality indices and use the resulting mathematical fits to generate phantom scatter (S{sub p}) data. The similarities and differences between S{sub p} of flattened and FFF beams are described. S{sub c} and S{sub cp} data were measured for 3 flattened and 3 FFF high-energy photon beams (Varian 6 and 10 MV and Elekta 6 MV). These data were fitted to logarithmic power law functions with 4 numerical coefficients. The agreement between our experimentally determined flattened beam S{sub p} and published data was within ± 1.2% for all 3 beams investigated and all field sizes from 4 × 4 to 40 × 40 cm{sup 2}. For the FFF beams, S{sub p} was only within 1% of the same flattened beam published data for field sizes between 6 × 6 and 14 × 14 cm{sup 2}. Outside this range, the differences were much greater, reaching − 3.2%, − 4.5%, and − 4.3% for the fields of 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} for the Varian 6-MV, Varian 10-MV, and Elekta 6-MV FFF beams, respectively. The FFF beam S{sub p} increased more slowly with increasing field size than that of the published and measured flattened beam of a similar reference field size quality index, i.e., there is less Phantom Scatter than that found with flattened beams for a given field size. This difference can be explained when the fluence profiles of the flattened and FFF beams are considered. The FFF beam has greatly reduced fluence off axis, especially as field size increases, compared with the flattened beam profile; hence, less scatter is generated in the phantom reaching the central axis.

  8. Corpuscular model of two-beam interference and double-slit experiments with single photons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Fengping; De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel; Miyashita, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We introduce an event-based corpuscular simulation model that reproduces the wave mechanical results of single-photon double slit and two-beam interference experiments and (of a one-to-one copy of an experimental realization) of a single-photon interference experiment with a Fresnel biprism. The simulation comprises models that capture the essential features of the apparatuses used in the experiment, including the single-photon detectors recording individual detector clicks. We demonstrate that incorporating in the detector model, simple and minimalistic processes mimicking the memory and threshold behavior of single-photon detectors is sufficient to produce multipath interference patterns. These multipath interference patterns are built up by individual particles taking one single path to the detector where they arrive one-by-one. The particles in our model are not corpuscular in the standard, classical physics sense in that they are information carriers that exchange information with the apparatuses of the ...

  9. Development of photon beam diagnostics for VUV radiation from a SASE FEL

    CERN Document Server

    Treusch, R; Xu, W; Jastrow, U; Hahn, U; Bittner, L; Feldhaus, J

    2000-01-01

    For the proof-of-principle experiment of self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) at short wavelengths on the VUV FEL at DESY a multi-facetted photon beam diagnostics experiment has been developed employing new detection concepts to measure all SASE specific properties on a single pulse basis. The present setup includes instrumentation for the measurement of the energy and the angular and spectral distribution of individual photon pulses. Different types of photon detectors such as PtSi-photodiodes and fast thermoelectric detectors based on YBaCuO-films are used to cover some five orders of magnitude of intensity from the level of spontaneous emission to FEL radiation at saturation. A 1 m normal incidence monochromator in combination with a fast intensified CCD camera allows to select single photon pulses and to record the full spectrum at high resolution to resolve the fine structure due to the start-up from noise.

  10. A Polarized High-Energy Photon Beam for Production of Exotic Mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senderovich, Igor [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This work describes design, prototyping and testing of various components of the Jefferson Lab Hall D photon beamline. These include coherent bremsstrahlung radiators to be used in this facility for generating the photon beam, a fine resolution hodoscope for the facility's tagging spectrometer, and a photon beam position sensor for stabilizing the beam on a collimator. The principal instrumentation project was the hodoscope: its design, implementation and beam testing will be thoroughly described. Studies of the coherent bremsstrahlung radiators involved X-ray characterization of diamond crystals to identify the appropriate line of manufactured radiators and the proper techniques for thinning them to the desired specification of the beamline. The photon beam position sensor project involved completion of a designed detector and its beam test. The results of these shorter studies will also be presented. The second part of this work discusses a Monte Carlo study of a possible photo-production and decay channel in the GlueX experiment that will be housed in the Hall D facility. Specifically, the γ p → Xp → b1 π → ω π+1 π-1 channel was studied including its Amplitude Analysis. This exercise attempted to generate a possible physics signal, complete with internal angular momentum states, and be able to reconstruct the signal in the detector and find the proper set of JPC quantum numbers through an amplitude fit. Derivation of the proper set of amplitudes in the helicity basis is described, followed by a discussion of the implementation, generation of the data sets, reconstruction techniques, the amplitude fit and results of this study.

  11. Combining tissue-phantom ratios to provide a beam-quality specifier for flattening filter free photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalaryd, Mårten, E-mail: Marten.Dalaryd@med.lu.se; Knöös, Tommy [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00, Sweden and Radiation Physics, Skåne University Hospital, Lund SE-221 85 (Sweden); Ceberg, Crister [Department of Clinical Sciences, Medical Radiation Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 117, Lund SE-221 00 (Sweden)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: There are currently several commercially available radiotherapy treatment units without a flattening filter in the beam line. Unflattened photon beams have an energy and lateral fluence distribution that is different from conventional beams and, thus, their attenuation properties differ. As a consequence, for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, the relationship between the beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and the Spencer–Attix restricted water-to-air mass collision stopping-power ratios, (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water}, may have to be refined in order to be used with equivalent accuracy as for beams with a flattening filter. The purpose of this work was twofold. First, to study the relationship between TPR{sub 20,10} and (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water} for FFF beams, where the flattening filter has been replaced by a metal plate as in most clinical FFF beams. Second, to investigate the potential of increasing the accuracy in determining (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water} by adding another beam-quality metric, TPR{sub 10,5}. The relationship between (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water} and %dd(10){sub x} for beams with and without a flattening filter was also included in this study. Methods: A total of 24 realistic photon beams (10 with and 14 without a flattening filter) from three different treatment units have been used to calculate (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water}, TPR{sub 20,10}, and TPR{sub 10,5} using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo package. The relationship between (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water} and the dual beam-quality specifier TPR{sub 20,10} and TPR{sub 10,5} was described by a simple bilinear equation. The relationship between the photon beam-quality specifier %dd(10){sub x} used in the AAPM’s TG-51 dosimetry protocol and (L{sup -}/ρ){sub air}{sup water} was also investigated for the beams used in this study, by calculating the photon component of the percentage depth dose at 10 cm depth with SSD 100 cm. Results: The calculated (L{sup -}/

  12. The Study of New Signal Processing Technique in Photon Beam Position Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shunfu; Lu, Ping; Sun Bao Gen; Wang, Jigang

    2005-01-01

    A log-ratio signal processing technique in photon beam position monitors (PBPM) was presented in this paper. The main performances (e.g. sensitivity, position offset and linearity range) of split PBPM and a pair of wires PBPM were analyzed , and the result of the measurement fit well with the theory. An inexpensive logarithmic amplifier chip which can measure photon currents from 0.1nA to 3.5mA was used in electronic circuits. The logarithmic ratio of the signal amplitudes from the PBPM provides a real-time analog signal that has wider linearity range and higher bandwidth than signal processing technique.

  13. Correlated two-photon interference in a dual-beam Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiat, P.G.; Vareka, W.A. (Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (USA)); Hong, C.K.; Nathel, H. (University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 (USA)); Chiao, R.Y. (Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (USA))

    1990-03-01

    We report on an interference effect arising from a two-photon entangled state produced in a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal pumped by an ultraviolet argon-ion laser. Two conjugate beams of signal and idler photons were injected in a parallel configuration into a single Michelson interferometer, and detected separately by two photomultipliers, while the difference in its arm lengths was slowly scanned. The coincidence rate exhibited fringes with a visibility of nearly 50%, and a period given by half the ultraviolet (not the signal or idler) wavelength, while the singles rate exhibited no fringes.

  14. Practical Entangled-Photon Virtual-State Spectroscopy using Intense Twin Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Svozilík, Jiří; León-Montiel, Roberto de J

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new practical approach towards ultrasensitive measurements in chemical and biological systems based on the so-called virtual-state spectroscopy technique. The proposed scheme makes use of intense twin beams generated by pump pulses with different frequency chirps to successfully extract information about the virtual states that contribute to the two-photon excitation of an absorbing medium. Interestingly, we show that our approach may enable entangled-photon absorption rates up to four orders of magnitude larger than previously reported. Because of its simplicity, our method paves the way towards the first experimental implementation of the virtual-state spectroscopy technique.

  15. A novel optical beam splitter based on photonic crystal with hybrid lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Qing-Yi; Fu Yong-Qi; Hu De-Qing; Zhang Zhi-Min

    2012-01-01

    A novel optical beam splitter constructed on the basis of photonic crystal (PC) with hybrid lattices is proposed in this paper.The band gap of square-lattice PC is so designed that the incident light is divided into several branch beams.Triangular-lattice graded-index PCs are combined for focusing each branch.Computational calculations are carried out on the basis of finite-different time-domain algorithm to prove the feasibility of our design.The waveguide is unnecessary in the design.Thus the device has functions of both splitting and focusing beams.Size of the divided beam at site of full-width at half-maximum is of the order of λ/2.The designed splitter has the advantages that it has a small volume and can be integrated by conventional semiconductor manufacturing process.

  16. An analytical formalism to calculate phantom scatter factors for flattening filter free (FFF) mode photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Heeteak; Prado, Karl L; Yi, Byong Yong

    2014-02-21

    Phantom Scatter Factors, Sp in the Khan formalism (Khan et al 1980 J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys. 6 745-51) describe medium-induced changes in photon-beam intensity as a function of size of the beam. According to the British Journal of Radiology, Supplement 25, megavoltage phantom scatter factors are invariant as a function of photon-beam energy. However, during the commissioning of an accelerator with flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams (Varian TrueBeam(TM) 6-MV FFF and 10-MV FFF), differences were noted in phantom scatter between the filtered beams and FFF-mode beams. The purpose of this work was to evaluate this difference and provide an analytical formalism to explain the phantom scatter differences between FFF-mode and the filtered mode. An analytical formalism was devised to demonstrate the source of phantom scatter differences between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams. The reason for the differences in the phantom scatter factors between the filtered and the FFF-mode beams is hypothesized to be the non-uniform beam profiles of the FFF-mode beams. The analytical formalism proposed here is based on this idea, taking the product of the filtered phantom scatter factors and the ratio of the off-axis ratio between the FFF-mode and the filtered beams. All measurements were performed using a Varian TrueBeam(TM) linear accelerator with photon energies of 6-MV and 10-MV in both filtered and FFF-modes. For all measurements, a PTW Farmer type chamber and a Scanditronix CC04 cylindrical ionization were used. The in-water measurements were made at depth dose maximum and 100 cm source-to-axis distance. The in-air measurements were done at 100 cm source-to-axis distance with appropriate build-up cap. From these measurements, the phantom scatter factors were derived for the filtered beams and the FFF-mode beams for both energies to be evaluated against the phantoms scatter factors calculated using the proposed algorithm. For 6-MV, the difference between the measured

  17. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  18. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosalaei, Homeira, E-mail: homeira.mosalaei@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, Ontario (Canada); Karnas, Scott [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, Ontario (Canada); University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Shah, Sheel [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Van Doodewaard, Sharon [McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Foster, Tim [University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Jeff [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Science Centre, Ontario (Canada); University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  19. Matching of electron and photon beams with a multi-leaf collimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, M; Zackrisson, B

    1993-12-01

    Multi-leaf collimators (MLCs) are offered as an accessory to many accelerators for radiation therapy. However, beam edges generated with these collimators are not as smooth as can be achieved with individually made blocks. The clinical drawbacks and benefits of this ripple were evaluated both for single field treatments and for combined adjacent fields of different beam qualities. In this investigation the MLC-collimated beams of the MM50 racetrack microtron were studied. The distance between the field edge and the 90% isodose was measured at the reference depth for four beam qualities (20 MV photons and 10, 20 and 50 MeV electrons). This distance was found to vary from approximately 6 mm for straight beam edges (i.e., all collimator leaves aligned) to approximately 2 mm from the tip of the leaves for a saw-tooth shaped beam edge. The over- and under-dosage in the joint between combined adjacent fields was found to be typically +/- 10% in small volumes. Improved clinical techniques using adjacent photon and electron fields with the same isocentre and source position (without moving the gantry) have been developed. For treatments of the breast, including the mammary chain, a uniform dose distribution was created with special attention given to the irradiation of the heart and lung outside the target volume. A method for head and neck treatments was optimised to give uniform dose distribution in the joint between the photon and electron fields and a method of treating the mediastinum, including the chest wall in front of the left lung, was analysed with respect to dose uniformity in the tumour and shielding of the lung.

  20. Design of mechanically-tunable photonic crystal split-beam nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tong; Tian, Feng; Shi, Peng; Chau, Fook Siong; Zhou, Guangya; Tang, Xiaosong; Deng, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Photonic crystal split-beam nanocavities allow for ultra-sensitive optomechanical transductions but are degraded due to their relatively low optical quality factors. We have proposed and experimentally demonstrated a new type of one-dimensional photonic crystal split-beam nanocavity optimized for an ultra-high optical-quality factor. The design is based on the combination of the deterministic method and hill-climbing algorithm. The latter is the simplest and most straightforward method of the local search algorithm that provides the local maximum of the chosen quality factors. This split-beam nanocavity is made up of two mechanical uncoupled cantilever beams with Bragg mirrors patterned onto it and separated by a 75-nm air gap. Experimental results emphasize that the quality factor of the second-order TE mode can be as high as 1.99×10(4). Additionally, one beam of the device is actuated in the lateral direction with the aid of a NEMS actuator, and the quality factor maintains quite well even if there is a lateral offset up to 64 nm. Potentially promising applications, such as sensitive optomechanical torque sensor, local tuning of Fano resonance, all-optical-reconfigurable filters, etc., are foreseen.

  1. Mie scattering of Laguerre-Gaussian beams: photonic nanojets and near-field optical vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Kiselev, Alexei D

    2014-01-01

    We study Mie scattering of Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) light beams remodelled using the method of far-field matching. The theoretical results are used to analyze the optical field in the near-field region for purely azimuthal LG beams characterized by a nonzero azimuthal mode number $m_{LG}$. The mode number $m_{LG}$ is found to have a profound effect on the morphology of photonic nanojets and the near-field structure of optical vortices associated with the components of the electric field.

  2. Photonic-based laser driven electron beam deflection and focusing structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Plettner

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We propose a dielectric photonic structure for ultrafast deflection and focusing of relativistic charged particle beams. The structure is designed to transform a free-space laser beam into a deflection force that acts on the free particles with the same optical phase over a distance of travel that is much greater than the laser wavelength. The proposed structure has a two-dimensional geometry and is compatible with existing nanofabrication methods. Deflection fields of GV/m magnitude and subfemtosecond switching speeds are expected to be possible from these dielectric structures. With these elements a submeter scale extreme ultraviolet synchrotron source seems feasible.

  3. 6 MV photon beam modeling for Varian Clinac iX using GEANT4 virtual jaw

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Byung Yong; Kim, Dong Ho; Baek, Jong Geun; Moon, Su Ho; Rho, Gwang Won; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Most virtual source models (VSM) use beam modeling, with the exception of the patient-dependent secondary collimator (jaw). Unlike other components of the treatment head, the jaw absorbs many photons generated by the bremsstrahlung, which decreases the efficiency of the simulation. In the present study, a new method of beam modeling using a virtual jaw was applied to improve the calculation efficiency of VSM. The results for the percentage depth dose and profile of the virtual jaw VSM calculated in a homogeneous water phantom agreed with the measurement results for the CC13 cylinder type ion chamber within an error rate of 2%, and the 80 to 20% penumbra width agreed with the measurement results within an error of 0.6 mm. Compared with the existing VSM, in which a great number of photons are absorbed, the calculation efficiency of the VSM using the virtual jaw was expected to increase by approximately 67%.

  4. Energy response of an aluminium oxide detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams: an EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agyingi, Ephraim O; Mobit, Paul N; Sandison, George A

    2006-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of the energy response of an aluminium oxide (Al(2)O(3)) detector in kilovoltage and megavoltage photon beams relative to (60)Co gamma rays has been performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The sensitive volume of the Al(2)O(3) detector was simulated as a disc of diameter 2.85 mm and thickness 1 mm. The phantom material was water and the irradiation depth chosen was 2.0 cm in kilovoltage photon beams and 5.0 cm in megavoltage photon beams. The results show that the energy response of the Al(2)O(3) detector is constant within 3% for photon beam energies in the energy range of (60)Co gamma rays to 25 MV X rays. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector shows an enhanced energy response for kilovoltage photon beams, which in the case of 50 kV X rays is 3.2 times higher than that for (60)Co gamma rays. There is essentially no difference in the energy responses of LiF and Al(2)O(3) detectors irradiated in megavoltage photon beams when these Al(2)O(3) results are compared with literature data for LiF thermoluminescence detectors. However, the Al(2)O(3) detector has a much higher enhanced response compared with LiF detectors in kilovoltage X-ray beams, more than twice as much for the case of 50 kV X rays.

  5. Linearly polarised photon beams at ELSA and measurement of the beam asymmetry in π0_{} photoproduction off the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, D.; Bantes, B.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D. E.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Crede, V.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Ewald, R.; Fabry, I.; Frommberger, F.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gridnev, A. B.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Höffgen, S.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Konrad, M.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lotz, J.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Morales, C.; Nanova, M.; Novinski, D. V.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Walther, D.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C.

    2009-03-01

    At the electron accelerator ELSA a linearly polarised tagged photon beam is produced by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal. Orientation and energy range of the linear polarisation can be deliberately chosen by accurate positioning of the crystal with a goniometer. The degree of polarisation is determined by the form of the scattered electron spectrum. Good agreement between experiment and expectations on the basis of the experimental conditions is obtained. Polarisation degrees of ensuremath P_{γ}=40 % are typically achieved at half of the primary electron energy. The determination of ensuremath P_{γ} is confirmed by measuring the beam asymmetry, Σ , in π0_{} photoproduction and by a comparison of the results to independent measurements using laser backscattering.

  6. Wide-angle beam splitting by use of positive-negative refraction in photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ye; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Zhao, Jianhui; Peng, Jiangde

    2004-12-15

    We present a positive-negative refraction effect in which, under certain conditions, an incident plane wave launched into a photonic crystal excites a positive-refracted Bloch wave and a negative-refracted Bloch wave simultaneously, both of which maintain the polarization. By utilizing this phenomenon, wide-angle beam splitting can be realized at the microscale level. Numerical simulations are employed to demonstrate this anomalous refraction behavior.

  7. Focused Ion Beam Milling Strategies of Photonic Crystal Structures in Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Hopman, Wico C.L.; Ay, Feridun; Hu, Wenbin; Gadgil, Vishwas J.; Kuipers, Laurens; Pollnau, Markus; Ridder, De, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    We report on optimisation of the side wall angle of focused ion beam (FIB) fabricated submicron diameter holes in silicon. Two optimisation steps were performed. First, we compare two different FIB scanning procedures and show the advantages of using a spiral scanning method for the definition of holes in photonic crystal slab structures. Secondly, we investigate the effect on the geometry, of parameters for reducing the tapering effect. Furthermore, we report on the initial results regarding...

  8. Low emittance pion beams generation from bright photons and relativistic protons

    CERN Document Server

    Serafini, L; Petrillo, V

    2015-01-01

    Present availability of high brilliance photon beams as those produced by X-ray Free Electron Lasers in combination with intense TeV proton beams typical of the Large Hadron Collider makes it possible to conceive the generation of pion beams via photo-production in a highly relativistic Lorentz boosted frame: the main advantage is the low emittance attainable and a TeV-class energy for the generated pions, that may be an interesting option for the production of low emittance muon and neutrino beams. We will describe the kinematics of the two classes of dominant events, i.e. the pion photo-production and the electron/positron pair production, neglecting other small cross-section possible events like Compton and muon pair production. Based on the phase space distributions of the pion and muon beams we will analyze the pion beam brightness achievable in three examples, based on advanced high efficiency high repetition rate FELs coupled to LHC or Future Circular Collider (FCC) proton beams, together with the stud...

  9. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η‧ photoproduction from the proton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, P.; Ritchie, B. G.; Dugger, M.; Anisovich, A. V.; Döring, M.; Klempt, E.; Nikonov, V. A.; Rönchen, D.; Sadasivan, D.; Sarantsev, A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Akbar, Z.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Balossino, I.; Bashkanov, M.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Cao, Frank Thanh; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Chetry, T.; Ciullo, G.; Clark, L.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fanchini, E.; Fedotov, G.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Glazier, D. I.; Gleason, C.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Heddle, D.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khachatryan, G.; Khachatryan, M.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lanza, L.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Murdoch, G.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, W.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Roy, P.; Sabatié, F.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, G. D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Torayev, B.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Zachariou, N.; Zhang, J.

    2017-08-01

    Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry Σ for photoproduction from the proton of η and η‧ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the γp → ηp reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the γp →η‧ p reaction. For γp → ηp, the data reported here considerably extend the range of measurements to higher energies, and are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold. For γp →η‧ p, the results obtained are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold, but also greatly expand the incident photon energy coverage for that reaction. Initial analysis of the data reported here with the Bonn-Gatchina model strengthens the evidence for four nucleon resonances - the N (1895) 1 /2-, N (1900) 3 /2+, N (2100) 1 /2+ and N (2120) 3 /2- resonances - which presently lack the ;four-star; status in the current Particle Data Group compilation, providing examples of how these new measurements help refine models of the photoproduction process.

  10. Photon beam asymmetry Σ for η and η′ photoproduction from the proton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Collins

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the linearly-polarized photon beam asymmetry Σ for photoproduction from the proton of η and η′ mesons are reported. A linearly-polarized tagged photon beam produced by coherent bremsstrahlung was incident on a cryogenic hydrogen target within the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Results are presented for the γp→ηp reaction for incident photon energies from 1.070 to 1.876 GeV, and from 1.516 to 1.836 GeV for the γp→η′p reaction. For γp→ηp, the data reported here considerably extend the range of measurements to higher energies, and are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold. For γp→η′p, the results obtained are consistent with the few previously published measurements for this observable near threshold, but also greatly expand the incident photon energy coverage for that reaction. Initial analysis of the data reported here with the Bonn–Gatchina model strengthens the evidence for four nucleon resonances – the N(18951/2−, N(19003/2+, N(21001/2+ and N(21203/2− resonances – which presently lack the “four-star” status in the current Particle Data Group compilation, providing examples of how these new measurements help refine models of the photoproduction process.

  11. Influence of photon beam irradiation on Lymnaea natalensis snails infected with Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Doaa E; Rostom, Yousry A

    2006-04-01

    Lymnaea natalensis is the intermediate host of Fasciola gigantica in Egypt. The effect of photon beam irradiation on the ability of the laboratory reared L. natalensis to support the larval development of F. gigantica has been studied. 120 snails were divided into two groups: The control infected non irradiated group (GI) and the experimental infected irradiated group (GII). The later group was subdivided into two subgroups: GIIa: snails irradiated before infection and GIIb: snails irradiated after infection. Photon beam irradiation had non significant effect on the survival rate between the all groups at the 30th day post infection. The life span, the number of infected snails and the length of the shedding period were significantly decreased in the two irradiated subgroups than the control group. The effect was more obvious on GIIb without significant difference. The number of metacercariae significantly decreased in the 2 irradiated subgroups than the control one. Also, it was significantly decreased in GIIb when compared with GIIa. So, photon beam irradiation has a great role on retarding larval development of F. gigantica inside the snail. This opens the way to a new strategy for fascioliasis control of in Egypt.

  12. The FiR 1 photon beam model adjustment according to in-air spectrum measurements with the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunoro, H; Schmitz, T; Hippeläinen, E; Liu, Y-H; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2014-06-01

    The mixed neutron-photon beam of FiR 1 reactor is used for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland. A beam model has been defined for patient treatment planning and dosimetric calculations. The neutron beam model has been validated with an activation foil measurements. The photon beam model has not been thoroughly validated against measurements, due to the fact that the beam photon dose rate is low, at most only 2% of the total weighted patient dose at FiR 1. However, improvement of the photon dose detection accuracy is worthwhile, since the beam photon dose is of concern in the beam dosimetry. In this study, we have performed ionization chamber measurements with multiple build-up caps of different thickness to adjust the calculated photon spectrum of a FiR 1 beam model.

  13. Radiation induced currents in parallel plate ionization chambers: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation for megavoltage photon and electron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2006-09-01

    Polarity effects in ionization chambers are caused by a radiation induced current, also known as Compton current, which arises as a charge imbalance due to charge deposition in electrodes of ionization chambers. We used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) for measurements of Compton current in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Electron contamination of photon beams and photon contamination of electron beams have a negligible effect on the measured Compton current. To allow for a theoretical understanding of the Compton current produced in the PEEC effect we carried out Monte Carlo calculations with a modified user code, the COMPTON/ EGSnrc. The Monte Carlo calculated COMPTON currents agree well with measured data for both photon and electron beams; the calculated polarity correction factors, on the other hand, do not agree with measurement results. The conclusions reached for the PEEC can be extended to parallel-plate ionization chambers in general.

  14. Positive operator-valued measure reconstruction of a beam-splitter tree-based photon-number-resolving detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacentini, F; Levi, M P; Avella, A; López, M; Kück, S; Polyakov, S V; Degiovanni, I P; Brida, G; Genovese, M

    2015-04-01

    Here we present a reconstruction of the positive operator-value measurement of a photon-number-resolving detector comprised of three 50∶50 beam-splitters in a tree configuration, terminated with four single-photon avalanche detectors. The four detectors' outputs are processed by an electronic board that discriminates detected photon number states from 0 to 4 and implements a "smart counting" routine to compensate for dead time issues at high count rates.

  15. Study of the dosimetric properties of an unflattened 6-MV photon beam by using the BEAMnrc code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajaria, Ankit; Sharma, Neeraj; Sharma, Shiru; Pradhan, Satyajit; Mandal, Abhijit; Aggarwal, Lalit. M.

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the basic dosimetric properties of a Flattening-filter-free 6-MV photon beam based on the unique performance model of the Varian Clinic 600 linac operated with and without a flattening filter. Dosimetric features, including the central-axis absorbed dose, the beam profiles and the photon and electron fluences were calculated for the flattened and unflattened cases separately by using Monte Carlo simulations. We observe that the dosimetric field size and penumbra were slightly smaller for the unflattened beam, but the beam's non-flatness is unlikely to present a problem for treatments with small fields. Absolute depth dose calculations showed an increase in the dose rate by a factor of more than 2.4 for the unflattened 6-MV beam which depended on the depth. These results suggest that the removal of the filter could result in higher central-axis dose rates and hence, shorter beam delivery times for treatments. Surface doses were found to be higher for the unflattened beam due to more contamination electrons and low-energy photons being present in the beam. The total scatter factor, SCP, varies less with the field sizes, indicating that removing the filter from the beam line can reduce significantly the amount of head scatter photons and therefore, doses to normal tissues and organs.

  16. Treatment planning and delivery of IMRT using 6 and 18 MV photon beams without flattening filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stathakis, Sotirios [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)], E-mail: stathakis@uthscsa.edu; Esquivel, Carlos; Gutierrez, Alonso; Buckey, Courtney R.; Papanikolaou, Niko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7979 Wurzbach Rd, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    In light of the increasing use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in modern radiotherapy practice, the use of a flattening filter may no longer be necessary. Commissioning data have been measured for a Varian 23EX linear accelerator with 6 and 18 MV photon energies without a flattening filter. Measurements collected for the commissioning of the linac included percent depth dose curves and profiles for field sizes ranging from 2x2 to 40x40 cm{sup 2} as defined by the jaws and multileaf collimator. Machine total scatter factors were measured and calculated. Measurements were used to model the unflattened beams with the Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system. IMRT plans for prostate, lung, brain and head and neck cancer cases were generated using the flattening filter and flattening filter-free beams. From our results, no difference in the quality of the treatment plans between the flat and unflattened photon beams was noted. There was however a significant decrease in the number of monitor units required for unflattened beam treatment plans due to the increase in linac output-approximately two times and four times higher for the 6 and 18 MV, respectively.

  17. Post mastectomy chest wall irradiation using mixed electron-photon beams with or without isocentric technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdy, H K; Zikry, M S

    2008-01-01

    To describe our technique in delivering post mastectomy radiotherapy to chest wall using electron-photon mixed beam with or without isocentric application of the tangential photon portals, and to evaluate the associated acute and delayed morbidities. Twenty-two females with invasive breast cancer were subjected to modified radical mastectomy with adequate axillary dissection. All the patients have either tumour > or = 5 cm and/ or positive axillary nodes > 3. Chest wall was irradiated by a mixed beam of 6-Mev electrons (10Gy) and opposed tangential fields using 6 Mev-photons (36 Gy) followed by 6-Mev electrons boost to the scar of mastectomy for 4 Gy/2 fractions. We randomly allocated our patients to receive the photon beam with or without the isocentric technique. The mean dose to the planned target volume (PTV) by mixed beam was 44 Gy (96%) with a mean dose of 42 Gy (91%) to the overlying skin for the whole study group. In cases with right breast disease (17 cases), the mean right lung tissue volume within the PTV was 220 ml (15%). It was relatively higher with the non-iscocentric technique, 281 ml (19%), compared to the isocentric technique of 159 ml (10.5%). In cases with left breast disease (5 cases), the mean left lung volume within the PTV was 175 ml (14%). Larger volume of the lung tissue was included with the non-isocentric technique, 197 ml (16%) compared to the isocentric technique of 153 ml (12%). The mean scattered doses to the rest of the lung tissue, the rest of the heart in left breast cases, and the contra-lateral breast for the whole study group were 2.8 Gy, 1.8 Gy, and 1.4 Gy respectively and was comparable in both treatment arms. None of the cases developed any element of acute radiation related pneumonitis. Delayed radiation induced pneumonitis was seen in 2 cases (18%), with the chest wall treated with radiation with the non-isocentric technique. This study clearly demonstrated the utility of mixed beam in irradiating the chest wall after

  18. Beam Loss Simulation and Collimator System Configurations for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, A.; Borland, M.

    2017-06-25

    The proposed multi-bend achromat lattice for the Advanced Photon Source upgrade (APS-U) has a design emittance of less than 70 pm. The Touschek loss rate is high: compared with the current APS ring, which has an average beam lifetime ~ 10 h, the simulated beam lifetime for APS-U is only ~2 h when operated in the high flux mode (I=200 mA in 48 bunches). An additional consequence of the short lifetime is that injection must be more frequent, which provides another potential source of particle loss. In order to provide information for the radiation shielding system evaluation and to avoid particle loss in sensitive locations around the ring (for example, insertion device straight sections), simulations of the detailed beam loss distribution have been performed. Several possible collimation configurations have been simulated and compared.

  19. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  20. Emission of monochromatic microwave radiation from a nonequilibrium condensation of excited magnons

    OpenAIRE

    Vannucchi, FS; Vasconcellos, AR; Luzzi,R.

    2013-01-01

    The observation of monochromatic emission of radiation from a nonequilibrium Bose-Einstein-like condensate of magnons suggests the possibility of creating a monochromatic microwave generator pumped by incoherent broadband sources. The device would have a tunable emitted frequency as a function of the applied constant magnetic field. We present an analysis of the mechanisms of interaction between the condensate of magnons and the radiation field producing the super-radiant emission of photons....

  1. Collimated Blue and Infrared Beams Generated by Two-Photon Excitation in Rb Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Sell, J F; DePaola, B D; Knize, R J

    2013-01-01

    Utilizing two-photon excitation in hot Rb vapor we demonstrate the generation of collimated optical fields at 420 nm and 1324 nm. Input laser beams at 780 nm and 776 nm enter a heated Rb vapor cell collinear and circularly polarized, driving Rb atoms to the $5D_{5/2}$ state. Under phase-matching conditions coherence among the $5S_{1/2}\\rightarrow 5P_{3/2}\\rightarrow 5D_{5/2} \\rightarrow 6P_{3/2}$ transitions produces a blue (420 nm) beam by four-wave mixing. We also observe a forward and backward propagating IR (1324 nm) beam, due to cascading decays through the $6S_{1/2}\\rightarrow 5P_{1/2}$ states. Power saturation of the generated beams is investigated by scaling the input powers to greater than 200 mW, resulting in a coherent blue beam of 9.1 mW power, almost an order of magnitude larger than previously achieved. We measure the dependences of both beams in relation to the Rb density, the frequency detuning between Rb ground state hyperfine levels, and the input laser intensities.

  2. Tuning beam power-splitting characteristics through modulating a photonic crystal slab’s output surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shuai; Xiao, Ting-Hui; Gan, Lin; Wang, Yi-Quan

    2017-01-01

    Light-beam-splitting characteristics are theoretically and experimentally studied in 2D square-lattice photonic crystals (PhCs) with delicately designed and modulated output surfaces. Compared with the traditional branch-waveguide and self-collimation-type PhC splitters, our proposed structure can not only split the input light beam into different numbers of branches but also realize the adjustment of their relative light intensities in each branch. Moreover, the influence of a light beam’s incident angle on both the output branch beams’ relative intensity and propagation direction is investigated. This proposed light beam splitter is able to work within a broad frequency range, and the propagation directions of the output split beams can be modified with the incident beam’s frequency. In addition, when the PhC device becomes thicker, a kind of light-beam-focusing phenomenon is observed. Advantageously, our light-beam-splitting device has no restriction as to the incident light beam’s location and width, so it is much more convenient and practical for achieving optical connection with other functional devices in complicated, large-scale, all-optical integrated circuits.

  3. SU-E-T-781: Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID) for Correlating Linac Photon Beam Energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S [Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have proven to be useful for measuring several parameters of interest in linear accelerator (linac) quality assurance (QA). The purpose of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of using EPIDs for determining linac photon beam energies. Methods: Two non-clinical Varian TrueBeam linacs (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with 6MV and 10MV photon beams were used to perform the measurements. The linacs were equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPIDs (aSi1000) that were used for the measurements. We compared the use of flatness versus percent depth dose (PDD) for predicting changes in linac photon beam energy. PDD was measured in 1D water tank (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne FL) and the profiles were measured using 2D ion-chamber array (IC-Profiler, Sun Nuclear) and the EPID. Energy changes were accomplished by varying the bending magnet current (BMC). The evaluated energies conformed with the AAPM TG142 tolerance of ±1% change in PDD. Results: BMC changes correlating with a ±1% change in PDD corresponded with a change in flatness of ∼1% to 2% from baseline values on the EPID. IC Profiler flatness values had the same correlation. We observed a similar trend for the 10MV beam energy changes. Our measurements indicated a strong correlation between changes in linac photon beam energy and changes in flatness. For all machines and energies, beam energy changes produced change in the uniformity (AAPM TG-142), varying from ∼1% to 2.5%. Conclusions: EPID image analysis of beam profiles can be used to determine linac photon beam energy changes. Flatness-based metrics or uniformity as defined by AAPM TG-142 were found to be more sensitive to linac photon beam energy changes than PDD. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical Systems, the sponsor of this study.

  4. Assessment of ionization chamber correction factors in photon beams using a time saving strategy with PENELOPE code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, C Q M; Nicolucci, P

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Monte Carlo-based perturbation and beam quality correction factors for ionization chambers in photon beams using a saving time strategy with PENELOPE code. Simulations for calculating absorbed doses to water using full spectra of photon beams impinging the whole water phantom and those using a phase-space file previously stored around the point of interest were performed and compared. The widely used NE2571 ionization chamber was modeled with PENELOPE using data from the literature in order to calculate absorbed doses to the air cavity of the chamber. Absorbed doses to water at reference depth were also calculated for providing the perturbation and beam quality correction factors for that chamber in high energy photon beams. Results obtained in this study show that simulations with phase-space files appropriately stored can be up to ten times shorter than using a full spectrum of photon beams in the input-file. Values of kQ and its components for the NE2571 ionization chamber showed good agreement with published values in the literature and are provided with typical statistical uncertainties of 0.2%. Comparisons to kQ values published in current dosimetry protocols such as the AAPM TG-51 and IAEA TRS-398 showed maximum percentage differences of 0.1% and 0.6% respectively. The proposed strategy presented a significant efficiency gain and can be applied for a variety of ionization chambers and clinical photon beams.

  5. Validation of Monte Carlo calculated surface doses for megavoltage photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Wamied; Seuntjens, Jan P; Verhaegen, Frank; Deblois, François; Podgorsak, Ervin B

    2005-01-01

    Recent work has shown that there is significant uncertainty in measuring build-up doses in mega-voltage photon beams especially at high energies. In this present investigation we used a phantom-embedded extrapolation chamber (PEEC) made of Solid Water to validate Monte Carlo (MC)-calculated doses in the dose build-up region for 6 and 18 MV x-ray beams. The study showed that the percentage depth ionizations (PDIs) obtained from measurements are higher than the percentage depth doses (PDDs) obtained with Monte Carlo techniques. To validate the MC-calculated PDDs, the design of the PEEC was incorporated into the simulations. While the MC-calculated and measured PDIs in the dose build-up region agree with one another for the 6 MV beam, a non-negligible difference is observed for the 18 MV x-ray beam. A number of experiments and theoretical studies of various possible effects that could be the source of this discrepancy were performed. The contribution of contaminating neutrons and protons to the build-up dose region in the 18 MV x-ray beam is negligible. Moreover, the MC calculations using the XCOM photon cross-section database and the NIST bremsstrahlung differential cross section do not explain the discrepancy between the MC calculations and measurement in the dose build-up region for the 18 MV. A simple incorporation of triplet production events into the MC dose calculation increases the calculated doses in the build-up region but does not fully account for the discrepancy between measurement and calculations for the 18 MV x-ray beam.

  6. In-beam PET at high-energy photon beams: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.; Enghardt, W.

    2006-04-01

    For radiation therapy with carbon ion beams, either for the stable isotope 12C or for the radioactive one 11C, it has been demonstrated that the β+-activity distribution created or deposited, respectively, within the irradiated volume can be visualized by means of positron emission tomography (PET). The PET images provide valuable information for quality assurance and precision improvement of ion therapy. Dedicated PET scanners have been integrated into treatment sites at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator at Chiba (HIMAC), Japan, and the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany, to make PET imaging feasible during therapeutic irradiation (in-beam PET). A similar technique may be worthwhile for radiotherapy with high-energy bremsstrahlung. In addition to monitoring the dose delivery process which in-beam PET has been primarily developed for, it may be expected that radiation response of tissue can be detected by means of in-beam PET. We investigate the applicability of PET for treatment control in the case of using bremsstrahlung spectra produced by 15-50 MeV electrons. Target volume activation due to (γ, n) reactions at energies above 20 MeV yields moderate β+-activity levels, which can be employed for imaging. The radiation from positrons produced by pair production is not presently usable because the detectors are overloaded due to the low duty factor of medical electron linear accelerators. However, the degradation of images caused by positron motion between creation and annihilation seems to be tolerable.

  7. Ant colony algorithm implementation in electron and photon Monte Carlo transport: Application to the commissioning of radiosurgery photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S.; Galan, P.; Manzano, F.; Brualla, L.; Lallena, A. M. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' ' Carlos Haya' ' , Avda. Carlos Haya s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain); Unidad de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Xanit Internacional, Avda. de los Argonautas s/n, E-29630 Benalmadena (Malaga) (Spain); NCTeam, Strahlenklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45122 Essen (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: In this work, the authors describe an approach which has been developed to drive the application of different variance-reduction techniques to the Monte Carlo simulation of photon and electron transport in clinical accelerators. Methods: The new approach considers the following techniques: Russian roulette, splitting, a modified version of the directional bremsstrahlung splitting, and the azimuthal particle redistribution. Their application is controlled by an ant colony algorithm based on an importance map. Results: The procedure has been applied to radiosurgery beams. Specifically, the authors have calculated depth-dose profiles, off-axis ratios, and output factors, quantities usually considered in the commissioning of these beams. The agreement between Monte Carlo results and the corresponding measurements is within {approx}3%/0.3 mm for the central axis percentage depth dose and the dose profiles. The importance map generated in the calculation can be used to discuss simulation details in the different parts of the geometry in a simple way. The simulation CPU times are comparable to those needed within other approaches common in this field. Conclusions: The new approach is competitive with those previously used in this kind of problems (PSF generation or source models) and has some practical advantages that make it to be a good tool to simulate the radiation transport in problems where the quantities of interest are difficult to obtain because of low statistics.

  8. The response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter in megavoltage photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araki, Fujio, E-mail: f-araki@kumamoto-u.ac.jp; Ohno, Takeshi [Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, 4-24-1 Kuhonji, Chuo-ku, Kumamoto 862-0976 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the response of a radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeter (RGD) in megavoltage photon and electron beams. Methods: The RGD response was compared with ion chamber measurements for 4–18 MV photons and 6–20 MeV electrons in plastic water phantoms. The response was also calculated via Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with EGSnrc/egs-chamber and Cavity user-codes, respectively. In addition, the response of the RGD cavity was analyzed as a function of field sizes and depths according to Burlin’s general cavity theory. The perturbation correction factor, P{sub Q}, in the RGD cavity was also estimated from MC simulations for photon and electron beams. Results: The calculated and measured RGD energy response at reference conditions with a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field and 10 cm depth in photons was lower by up to 2.5% with increasing energy. The variation in RGD response in the field size range of 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} was 3.9% and 0.7%, at 10 cm depth for 4 and 18 MV, respectively. The depth dependence of the RGD response was constant within 1% for energies above 6 MV but it increased by 2.6% and 1.6% for a large (20 × 20 cm{sup 2}) field at 4 and 6 MV, respectively. The dose contributions from photon interactions (1 − d) in the RGD cavity, according to Burlin’s cavity theory, decreased with increasing energy and decreasing field size. The variation in (1 − d) between field sizes became larger with increasing depth for the lower energies of 4 and 6 MV. P{sub Q} for the RGD cavity was almost constant between 0.96 and 0.97 at 10 MV energies and above. Meanwhile, P{sub Q} depends strongly on field size and depth for 4 and 6 MV photons. In electron beams, the RGD response at a reference depth, d{sub ref}, varied by less than 1% over the electron energy range but was on average 4% lower than the response for 6 MV photons. Conclusions: The RGD response for photon beams depends on both (1 − d) and perturbation effects in the

  9. Calculation of the absorbed dose distribution due to irregularly shaped photon beams using pencil beam kernels derived from basic beam data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storchi, Pascal; Woudstra, Evert

    1996-04-01

    In radiotherapy, accurately calculated dose distributions of irregularly shaped photon beams are needed. In this paper, an algorithm is presented which enables the calculation of dose distributions due to irregular fields using pencil beam kernels derived from simple basic beam data usually measured on treatment units, i.e. central axis depth - dose curves and profiles. The only extra data that are needed, and are not currently measured, is the phantom scatter factor curve at the reference depth. The algorithm has been developed as an extension to a previously developed algorithm for rectangular fields which is based on the Milan - Bentley storage model. In the case of an irregular field, the depth dose and the boundary function are computed by convolution of a field intensity function with pencil beam kernels. The depth dose is computed by using a `scatter' kernel, which is derived from the stored depth - dose curves and from the phantom scatter factor curve. The boundary function is computed by using a `boundary' kernel, which is derived from the boundary profile of a number of large square fields. Because of the simplicity of the data used and the underlying concepts, which for instance do not separate the head scatter from the primary beam, this algorithm presents some shortcomings. On the other hand, this simplicity is also of great advantage and the inaccuracy is acceptable for most clinical situations.

  10. Nuclear Structure Observable with Polarized Target and Polarized Real Photon Beam at Mainz Microtron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudyal, Dilli

    2016-09-01

    The nucleon polarizabilities are fundamental structure observables, like the nucleon mass or charge. While the electric (αE 1) and magnetic (βM 1) scalar polarizabilities of the nucleon have been measured, little effort has been made to extract the spin dependent polarizabilities. These nucleon polarizabilities, γE1E1 ,γM1M1 ,γM1E2 and γE1M2 describe the spin response of a proton to electric and magnetic dipole and quadrupole interactions. We plan to extract them using polarized photon beam and polarized target at the MAMI tagged photon facility in Mainz, Germany. This requires precise measurement of the double polarization observable ∑2 z which is sensitive to these polarizabilities. The ∑2 z is measured via a circularly polarized photon beam on a longitudinally polarized butanol target in the resonance region (E = 250 - 310 MeV). Together with constraints from αE 1 and βM 1, the forward spin polarizability (γ0) , and QCD based models, should allow us to extract all four spin polarizabilities. This presentation will be focused on the preliminary experimental results for the measurement of ∑2 z at different energies and angles. Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  11. FDTD analysis of photonic quasicrystals with different tiling geometries and fabrication by single beam computer-generated holography

    CERN Document Server

    Zito, G; Santamato, E; Marino, A; Tkachenko, V; Abbate, G

    2013-01-01

    Multiple-beam holography has been widely used for the realization of photonic quasicrystals with high rotational symmetries not achievable by the conventional periodic crystals. Accurate control of the properties of the interfering beams is necessary to provide photonic band-gap structures. Here we show, by FDTD simulations of the transmission spectra of 8-fold quasiperiodic structures, how the geometric tiling of the structure affects the presence and properties of the photonic band-gap for low refractive index contrasts. Hence, we show an interesting approach to the fabrication of photonic quasicrystals based on the use of a programmable Spatial Light Modulator encoding Computer-Generated Holograms, that permits an accurate control of the writing pattern with almost no limitations in the pattern design. Using this single-beam technique we fabricated quasiperiodic structures with high rotational symmetries and different geometries of the tiling, demonstrating the great versatility of our technique.

  12. Investigation of beam splitter in a zero-refractive-index photonic crystal at the frequency of Dirac-like point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Pingping; Qiu, Weibin; Lin, Zhili; Chen, Houbo; Ren, Junbo; Wang, Jia-Xian; Kan, Qiang; Pan, Jiao-Qing

    2017-08-29

    The Dirac-like cone dispersion of the photonic crystal induced by the three-fold accidental degeneracy at the Brillouin center is calculated in this paper. Such photonic crystals can be mapped to zero-refractive-index materials at the vicinity of the Dirac-like point frequency, and utilized to construct beam splitter of high transmission efficiency. The splitting ratio is studied as a function of the position of the input/output waveguides. Furthermore, variant beam splitters with asymmetric structures, bulk defects, and some certain bending angles are numerically simulated. Finally, we show that 1 × 2 to 1 × N beam splitting can be realized with high transmission efficiency in such a zero-refractive-index photonic crystal at the frequency of Dirac-like point. The proposed structure could be a fundamental component of the high density photonic integrated circuit technique.

  13. Breast Radiotherapy with Mixed Energy Photons; a Model for Optimal Beam Weighting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgani, Mohammadjavad Tahmasebi; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Hosseini, Seyed Mohammad; Bagheri, Ali; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabiehzadeh, Mansour; Meskani, Reza; Gomari, Maryam Talaei

    2015-01-01

    Utilization of high energy photons (>10 MV) with an optimal weight using a mixed energy technique is a practical way to generate a homogenous dose distribution while maintaining adequate target coverage in intact breast radiotherapy. This study represents a model for estimation of this optimal weight for day to day clinical usage. For this purpose, treatment planning computed tomography scans of thirty-three consecutive early stage breast cancer patients following breast conservation surgery were analyzed. After delineation of the breast clinical target volume (CTV) and placing opposed wedge paired isocenteric tangential portals, dosimeteric calculations were conducted and dose volume histograms (DVHs) were generated, first with pure 6 MV photons and then these calculations were repeated ten times with incorporating 18 MV photons (ten percent increase in weight per step) in each individual patient. For each calculation two indexes including maximum dose in the breast CTV (Dmax) and the volume of CTV which covered with 95% Isodose line (VCTV, 95%IDL) were measured according to the DVH data and then normalized values were plotted in a graph. The optimal weight of 18 MV photons was defined as the intersection point of Dmax and VCTV, 95%IDL graphs. For creating a model to predict this optimal weight multiple linear regression analysis was used based on some of the breast and tangential field parameters. The best fitting model for prediction of 18 MV photons optimal weight in breast radiotherapy using mixed energy technique, incorporated chest wall separation plus central lung distance (Adjusted R2=0.776). In conclusion, this study represents a model for the estimation of optimal beam weighting in breast radiotherapy using mixed photon energy technique for routine day to day clinical usage.

  14. Proton beam writing of long, arbitrary structures for micro/nano photonics and fluidics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udalagama, Chammika, E-mail: chammika@nus.edu.sg [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Teo, E.J. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); Chan, S.F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore); NUS Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, 2 Science Drive 3, 117542 (Singapore); Department of Chemistry, NUS, 3 Science Drive 3, 117543 (Singapore); Kumar, V.S.; Bettiol, A.A.; Watt, F. [Centre for Ion Beam Applications (CIBA), Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (NUS), 2 Science Drive 3, Singapore 117542 (Singapore)

    2011-10-15

    The last decade has seen proton beam writing maturing into a versatile lithographic technique able to produce sub-100 nm, high aspect ratio structures with smooth side walls. However, many applications in the fields of photonics and fluidics require the fabrication of structures with high spatial resolution that extends over several centimetres. This cannot be achieved by purely magnetic or electrostatic beam scanning due to the large off-axis beam aberrations in high demagnification systems. As a result, this has limited us to producing long straight structures using a combination of beam and stage scanning. In this work we have: (1) developed an algorithm to include any arbitrary pattern into the writing process by using a more versatile combination of beam and stage scanning while (2) incorporating the use of the ubiquitous AutoCAD DXF (drawing exchange format) into the design process. We demonstrate the capability of this approach in fabricating structures such as Y-splitters, Mach-Zehnder modulators and microfluidic channels that are over several centimetres in length, in polymer. We also present optimisation of such parameters as scanning speed and scanning loops to improve on the surface roughness of the structures. This work opens up new possibilities of using CAD software in PBW for microphotonics and fluidics device fabrication.

  15. Spin-orbit photonic interaction engineering of Bessel beams (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksanyan, Artur; Brasselet, Etienne

    2016-09-01

    Interaction between the polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of a light field has become a powerful tool to tailor the amplitude and phase of light beams. This usually implies the use of space-variant photonic elements involving sophisticated fabrication technologies. Here we report on the optical spin-orbit engineering of the intensity, phase, and polarization structure of Bessel light beams using a homogeneous birefringent axicon. Various kinds of spatially modulated free-space light fields are predicted depending on the nature of the incident light field impinging on the birefringent axicon. In particular, we present the generation of bottle beam arrays, hollow beams with periodic modulation of the core size, and hollow needle beams with periodic modulation of the orbital angular momentum. An experimental attempt is also reported. The proposed structured light fields may find applications in long-distance optical manipulation endowed with self-healing features, periodic atomic waveguides, contactless handling of high aspect ratio micro-objects, and optical shearing of matter.

  16. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  17. Why diamond dimensions and electrode geometry are crucial for small photon beam dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsolat, F.; Tromson, D.; Tranchant, N.; Pomorski, M.; Bergonzo, P. [CEA, LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bassinet, C.; Huet, C. [IRSN, PRP-HOM/SDE/LDRI, 31 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Derreumaux, S. [IRSN, PRP-HOM/SER/UEM, 31 Av. de la Division Leclerc, 92260 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Chea, M.; Cristina, K.; Boisserie, G. [Pitié Salpêtrière Hospital, 47-83 Blvd de l' Hôpital, 75013 Paris (France); Buchheit, I.; Marchesi, V. [Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, 6 Av. de Bourgogne, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Gaudaire-Josset, S.; Lisbona, A. [Institut de Cancérologie de l' Ouest, Blvd Prof. Jacques Monod, 44805 Saint-Herblain (France); Lazaro, D.; Hugon, R. [CEA, LIST, LM2S, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-12-21

    Recent use of very small photon beams (down to 4 mm) in stereotactic radiotherapy requires new detectors to accurately determine the delivered dose. Diamond detectors have been presented in the literature as an attractive candidate for this application, due to their small detection volume and the diamond atomic number (Z = 6) which is close to water effective atomic number (Zeff ∼ 7.42). However, diamond exhibits a density 3.51 times greater than that of water and recent studies using Monte Carlo simulations have demonstrated the drawback of a high-density detector on small beam output factors. The current study focuses on geometrical parameters of diamond detector, namely, the diamond dimensions and the electrode geometry, in order to solve the dosimetric issues still observed in small photon beams with diamond detectors. To give better insights to these open questions, we have used both computational method and experimental analysis. This study highlighted that reducing diamond dimensions is crucial for small beam output factor measurements and to limit the influence of its high density. Furthermore, electrodes covering the whole diamond surface were essential for a dose rate independence of the diamond detector. The optimal dosimeter derived from this work presented small diamond dimensions of approximately 1 × 1 × 0.15 mm{sup 3}, with diamond-like-carbon electrodes covering the whole diamond surface. A dose rate independence of this diamond detector (better than 0.5% over a wide range of dose rates available on a stereotactic dedicated facility) was obtained due to the electrode geometry. Concerning the output factor measurements, a good agreement (better than 1.1%) was observed between this carbon material detector and two types of passive dosimeters (LiF microcubes and EBT2 radiochromic films) for all beam sizes except the smallest field of 0.6 × 0.6 cm{sup 2} with a deviation of 2.6%. This new study showed the high performance

  18. A feasibility study of Dynamic Phantom scanner for quality assurance of photon beam profiles at various gantry angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunkai; Hsi, Wen C; Chu, James C H; Bernard, Damian B; Abrams, Ross A

    2005-01-01

    The effect of gantry rotation on beam profiles of photon and electron beams is an important issue in quality assurance for radiotherapy. To address variations in the profiles of photon and electron beams at different gantry angles, a Dynamic Phantom scanner composed of a 20 x 12 x 6 cm3 scanning Lucite block was designed as a cross-beam-profile scanner. To our knowledge, differences between scanned profiles acquired at different gantry angles with a small size Lucite block and those acquired a full-size (60 x 60 x 50 cm3) water phantom have not been previously investigated. We therefore performed a feasibility study for a first prototype Dynamic Phantom scanner without a gantry attachment mount. Radiation beams from a Varian LINAC 21EX and 2100C were used. Photon beams (6 MV and 18 MV) were shaped by either collimator jaws or a Varian 120 Multileaf (MLC) collimator, and electron beams (6 MeV, 12 MeV, and 20 MeV) were shaped by a treatment cone. To investigate the effect on profiles by using a Lucite block, a quantitative comparison of scanned profiles with the Dynamic Phantom and a full-size water phantom was first performed at a 0 degrees gantry angle for both photon and electron beams. For photon beam profiles defined by jaws at 1.0 cm and 5.0 cm depths of Lucite (i.e., at 1.1 cm and 5.7 cm depth of water), a good agreement (less than 1% variation) inside the field edge was observed between profiles scanned with the Dynamic Phantom and with a water phantom. The use of Lucite in the Dynamic Phantom resulted in reduced penumbra width (about 0.5 mm out of 5 mm to 8mm) and reduced (1% to 2%) scatter dose beyond the field edges for both 6 MV and 18 MV beams, compared with the water phantom scanner. For profiles of the MLC-shaped 6 MV photon beam, a similar agreement was observed. For profiles of electron beams scanned at 2.9 cm depth of Lucite (i.e., at 3.3 cm depth of water), larger disagreements in profiles (3% to 4%) and penumbra width (3 mm to 4 mm out of 12 mm

  19. Therapeutic dose simulation of a 6 MV Varian Linac photon beam using GEANT4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, E.; Ali, A. S.; Khaled, N. E.; Radi, A.

    2015-10-01

    A developed program in C++ language using GEANT4 libraries was used to simulate the gantry of a 6 MV high energy photon linear accelerator (Linac). The head of a clinical linear accelerator based on the manufacturer's detailed information is simulated. More than 2× 109 primary electrons are used to create the phase space file. Evaluation of the percentage depth dose (PDD) and flatness symmetry (lateral dose profiles) in water phantom were performed. Comparisons between experimental and simulated data were carried out for three field sizes; 5 × 5, 10 × 10 and 15 × 15 cm2. A relatively good agreement appeared between computed and measured PDD. Electron contamination and spatial distribution for both photons and electrons in the simulated beam are evaluated. Moreover, the obtained lateral dose profiles at 15, 50, and 100 mm depth are compatible with the measured values. The obtained results concluded that, GEANT4 code is a promising applicable Monte Carlo program in radiotherapy applications.

  20. The test of the LKr calorimeter prototype at the tagged photon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulchenko, V.M. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki; Bondar, A.E. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation). Inst. Yadernoj Fiziki; Cantoni, P.; Frabetti, P.L.; Ganzhur, S.F.; Kezerashvili, G.Ya.; Klimenko, S.G.; Lanni, F.; Leontiev, L.A.; Maggi, B.; Malyshev, V.M.; Maslennikov, A.L.; Manfredi, P.F.; Milov, A.M.; Muchnoi, N.Yu.; Onuchin, A.P.; Palombo, F.; Panin, V.S.; Peleganchuk, S.V.; Pogorelov, Yu.A.; Pospelov, G.E.; Protopopov, I.Ya.; Re, V.; Sala, A.; Shamov, A.G.; Shatilov, D.N.; Simonov, E.A.; Speziali, V.; Stagni, L.; Tikhonov, Yu.A.

    1997-07-11

    The experiment with the prototype of liquid krypton electromagnetic calorimeter for the KEDR detector is described. The experiment was carried out at the VEPP-4M collider at the tagged photon beam. The tagged photons were obtained in the energy region 50-625 MeV using the ROKK-1M facility. The edges of the bremsstrahlung spectra were used for the energy resolution measurement in the high-energy region up to 4500 MeV. The energy resolution comparable with the resolution of the best crystal calorimeters and the excellent spatial resolution ({proportional_to}1 mm) have been obtained. The results are in good agreement with the Monte-Carlo simulation. (orig.).

  1. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  2. Instrumentation and beam dynamics study of advanced electron-photon facility in Indiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianhuan

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips' geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been speci ed. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  3. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. I. Theoretical concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchard, Hugo, E-mail: hugo.bouchard@npl.co.uk; Duane, Simon [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Kamio, Yuji [Centre hospitalier de l’Université de Montréal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montréal, Québec H2L 4M1 (Canada); Palmans, Hugo [Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Team, National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Medical Physics, EBG MedAustron GmbH, A-2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To explain the reasons for significant quality correction factors in megavoltage small photon fields and clarify the underlying concepts relevant to dosimetry under such conditions. Methods: The validity of cavity theory and the requirement of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are addressed from a theoretical point of view in the context of nonstandard beams. Perturbation effects are described into four main subeffects, explaining their nature and pointing out their relative importance in small photon fields. Results: It is demonstrated that the failure to meet classical cavity theory requirements, such as CPE, is not the reason for significant quality correction factors. On the contrary, it is shown that the lack of CPE alone cannot explain these corrections and that what matters most, apart from volume averaging effects, is the relationship between the lack of CPE in the small field itself and the density of the detector cavity. The density perturbation effect is explained based on Fano’s theorem, describing the compensating effect of two main contributions to cavity absorbed dose. Using the same approach, perturbation effects arising from the difference in atomic properties of the cavity medium and the presence of extracameral components are explained. Volume averaging effects are also discussed in detail. Conclusions: Quality correction factors of small megavoltage photon fields are mainly due to differences in electron density between water and the detector medium and to volume averaging over the detector cavity. Other effects, such as the presence of extracameral components and differences in atomic properties of the detection medium with respect to water, can also play an accentuated role in small photon fields compared to standard beams.

  4. SU-E-T-577: Commissioning of a Deterministic Algorithm for External Photon Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, T; Finlay, J; Mesina, C; Liu, H [University Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We report commissioning results for a deterministic algorithm for external photon beam treatment planning. A deterministic algorithm solves the radiation transport equations directly using a finite difference method, thus improve the accuracy of dose calculation, particularly under heterogeneous conditions with results similar to that of Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. Methods: Commissioning data for photon energies 6 – 15 MV includes the percentage depth dose (PDD) measured at SSD = 90 cm and output ratio in water (Spc), both normalized to 10 cm depth, for field sizes between 2 and 40 cm and depths between 0 and 40 cm. Off-axis ratio (OAR) for the same set of field sizes was used at 5 depths (dmax, 5, 10, 20, 30 cm). The final model was compared with the commissioning data as well as additional benchmark data. The benchmark data includes dose per MU determined for 17 points for SSD between 80 and 110 cm, depth between 5 and 20 cm, and lateral offset of up to 16.5 cm. Relative comparisons were made in a heterogeneous phantom made of cork and solid water. Results: Compared to the commissioning beam data, the agreement are generally better than 2% with large errors (up to 13%) observed in the buildup regions of the FDD and penumbra regions of the OAR profiles. The overall mean standard deviation is 0.04% when all data are taken into account. Compared to the benchmark data, the agreements are generally better than 2%. Relative comparison in heterogeneous phantom is in general better than 4%. Conclusion: A commercial deterministic algorithm was commissioned for megavoltage photon beams. In a homogeneous medium, the agreement between the algorithm and measurement at the benchmark points is generally better than 2%. The dose accuracy for a deterministic algorithm is better than a convolution algorithm in heterogeneous medium.

  5. Design and fabrication of Si-based photonic crystal stamps with electron beam lithography (EBL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannesary, Reyhaneh; Bergmair, Iris; Zamiri, Saeid; Hingerl, Kurt; Hubbard, Graham; Abbott, Steven; Chen, Qin; Allsopp, Duncan

    2009-05-01

    The quest for mass replication has established technologies like nanoimprinting via hard stamps or PDMS stamps, where the stamps are usually produced via Electron Beam Lithography (EBL) for applications in the microelectronic industry. On the other hand, nanopatterning with self ordered structures1 or via holographic patterns provide the basis for large area imprints for applications for example, antireflection coatings based on biomimetic motheyes2. In this work we report on a technology for enabling the mass replication of custom-designed and e-beam lithographically prepared structures via establishing novel roll to roll nanoimprint processes for pattern transfer into UV curable pre-polymers. The new nano-fabrication technology is based on the concept of Disposal Master Technology (DMT) capable of patterning areas up to 1 x 1 m2 and is suitable for mass volume manufacturing of large area arrays of sub-wavelength photonic elements. As an example to show the potential of the application of the new nanoimprint technologies, we choose the fabrication of a photonic crystal (PhC) structure with integrated light coupling devices for low loss interconnection between PhC lightwave circuits and optical fibre systems. We present two methods for fabrication of nanoimprint lithography stamps in Si substrate. In the first method optimized electron beam lithography (EBL) and lift-off patterning of a 15-nm thick Cr mask, and then the pattern transfer into Si using reacting ion etching (RIE) with SF6 as etch gas. In the first method, we use 200nm of positive resist PMMA 950K for EBL exposure. In this method, resist thickness, exposure dose, development time and parameter for etching have been optimized and a photonic crystal of Si-rods in air was fabricated. In the second method lift-off has not been performed and metal mask has been used as master. The subsequent steps for fabricating the master will be presented in detail.

  6. Formation of Photonic Structures in Photorefractive Lithium Niobate by 1D and 2D Bessel-like Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushov, A.; Safronova, P.; Trushnikov, I.; Sarkyt, A.; Shandarov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Both, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Bessel-like beams with different topology of 2D beam cross-sections are formed from Gaussian laser beams using the amplitude masks and Fresnel biprisms. These almost diffraction-free light fields with wavelengths of 532 and 633 nm can change the refractive indices of photorefractive lithium niobate samples and form within them the nonlinear photonic diffraction structures. The characteristics of photonic structures induced in this way are studied by diffraction of monochromatic light with wavelengths of 633 and 532 nm.

  7. Selective filling of photonic crystal fibers using focused ion beam milled microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fei; Yuan, Scott Wu; Hansen, Ole;

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a versatile, robust, and integrated technique to selectively fill fluid into a desired pattern of air holes in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Focused ion beam (FIB) is used to efficiently mill a microchannel on the end facet of a PCF before it is spliced to a single-mode fiber (SMF......). Selected air holes are therefore exposed to the atmosphere through the microchannel for fluid filling. A low-loss in-line tunable optical hybrid fiber device is demonstrated by using such a technique. (C) 2011 Optical Society of America...

  8. Partial wave analysis of 3 π with pion and photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackura, Andrew; Mikhasenko, Mikhail; Szczepaniak, Adam; Ketzer, Bernhard; Joint Physics Analysis Center Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We present some results on the analysis of 3 π resonances from peripheral scattering of pions off of nuclear targets. The analysis is motivated by the recent release of the largest data set on diffractively produced three pions by the COMPASS collaboration. The model emphasizes the 3 π production process and their final state interactions which satisfy S-matrix principles. We apply our model to fit partial wave intensities and relative phases from COMPASS in the JPC =2-+ sector and search for resonances. We then discuss the extension of our formalism to photon beams to be used in the GlueX experiment.

  9. Hollow-core photonic crystal fibre for high power laser beam delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying; Wang; Meshaal; Alharbi; Thomas; D.Bradley; Coralie; Fourcade-Dutin; Benot; Debord; Benot; Beaudou; Frdric; Ger??me; Fetah; Benabid

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of hollow-core photonic crystal fibre(HC-PCF)for high power laser beam delivery.A comparison of bandgap HC-PCF with Kagome-lattice HC-PCF on the geometry,guidance mechanism,and optical properties shows that the Kagome-type HC-PCF is an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation because of its large core size,low attenuation,broadband transmission,single-mode guidance,low dispersion and the ultra-low optical overlap between the core-guided modes and the silica core-surround.The power handling capability of Kagome-type HC-PCF is further experimentally demonstrated by millijoule nanosecond laser spark ignition and~100μJ sub-picosecond laser pulse transportation and compression.

  10. Study on the consistency of the voxel of two photon polymerization with inclined beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kai; Zhou, Xiaoqin; Zheng, Xu; Lin, Jieqiong

    2016-12-01

    In the process of two photon polymerization, the focused beam should be perpendicular to the materials to be processed. But actually it is hard to control, because of the errors of the optical system and the three-dimensional motion platform. So, the inconsistencies of voxels in size and angle due to the errors mentioned above will seriously impact the surface quality of the products. In this paper, the size, angle and location of the titled voxels formed by inclined beam are simulated according to matrix optics and polymerization theory. According to the simulation results, a method for angle errors compensation with the aid of scanning galvanometer is proposed. Although the angle of the voxels can be controlled by scanning galvanometer, but the deflection angles of the scanning galvanometer have a certain range, it should be lower than 3°, or the deformation of the voxels will be serious. Therefore the consistency of the voxel in both size and angle will be ensured.

  11. Challenges of fabricating plasmonic and photonic structures with Neon ion beam milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leißner, Till; Fiutowski, Jacek; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    properties. We are currently studying the capabilities of focussed Helium and Neon ion beam milling for the fabricating of plasmonic and photonic devices. We found that Neon ion beam milling enables us to prepare plasmonic structures, such as trenches (see Fig. 1) and V-grooves without doping and alloying...... effects specific to Galium FIB. Neon FIB milling is superior to Helium FIB milling in terms of the processing speed and smaller levels of implanted ions. From our perspective it is the most promising technique for the fabrication of individual plasmonic devices with a few nanometers precision. The main...... presentation we show the current progress in Neon FIB milling of plasmonic structures. We compare different materials, in particular poly- and mono-crystalline gold as well as thin films of Titanium Nitride, which are commonly used for plasmonic applications....

  12. Self-trapping Characteristics of Partially Coherent Optical Beam in Photonic Crystal Fiber under Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; LI Ji-zhou

    2007-01-01

    Using the mutually coherent function, the self-trapping of the circle partially coherent optical beam in the total internal reflective photonic crystal fiber(TIRPCF) under Compton scattering is studied.The study shows that the composition of the non-coherent optical beam in the optical spectrum and the diffraction effect are decreased by Compton scattering,and the probability of forming the soliton is greatly increased.The vibration peak value in the propagation,compressed degree,changed cycle,and radius of the soliton are all smaller than those before the scattering,but its coherent radius is larger than that before the scattering.In this propagation,the self-focusing plays a key role.

  13. Giant negative Goos-Hänchen shifts for a photonic crystal with a negative effective index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinlong; Yi, Jin; He, Sailing

    2006-04-03

    The Goos-Hänchen effects are investigated for a monochromatic Gaussian beam totally reflected by a photonic crystal with a negative effective index. By choosing an appropriate thickness for the homogeneous cladding layer, a giant negative GH lateral shift can be obtained and the totally reflected beam retains a single beam of good profile even for a very narrow incident beam. The GH lateral shift can be very sensitive to the change of the refractive index of the cladding layer, and this property can be utilized for e.g. the switching applications.

  14. Effect of Photon Beam Energy, Gold Nanoparticle Size and Concentration on the Dose Enhancement in Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahideh Gharehaghaji

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gold nanoparticles have been used as radiation dose enhancing materials in recent investigations. In the current study, dose enhancement effect of gold nanoparticles on tumor cells was evaluated using Monte Carlo (MC simulation. Methods: We used MCNPX code for MC modeling in the current study. A water phantom and a tumor region with a size of 1×1×1 cm3 loaded with gold nanoparticles were simulated. The macroscopic dose enhancement factor was calculated for gold nanoparticles with sizes of 30, 50, and 100 nm. Also, we simulated different photon beams including mono-energetic beams (50-120 keV, a Cobalt-60 beam, 6 & 18 MV photon beams of a conventional linear accelerator. Results: We found a dose enhancement factor (DEF of from 1.4 to 3.7 for monoenergetic kilovoltage beams, while the DEFs for megavoltage beams were negligible and less than 3% for all GNP sizes and concentrations. The optimum energy for higher DEF was found to be the 90 keV monoenergetic beam. The effect of GNP size was not considerable, but the GNP concentration had a substantial impact on achieved DEF in GNP-based radiation therapy. Conclusion: The results were in close agreement with some previous studies considering the effect of photon energy and GNP concentration on observed DEF. Application of GNP-based radiation therapy using kilovoltage beams is recommended.

  15. Coherent beam control through inhomogeneous media in multi-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari Prasad

    Multi-photon fluorescence microscopy has become a primary tool for high-resolution deep tissue imaging because of its sensitivity to ballistic excitation photons in comparison to scattered excitation photons. The imaging depth of multi-photon microscopes in tissue imaging is limited primarily by background fluorescence that is generated by scattered light due to the random fluctuations in refractive index inside the media, and by reduced intensity in the ballistic focal volume due to aberrations within the tissue and at its interface. We built two multi-photon adaptive optics (AO) correction systems, one for combating scattering and aberration problems, and another for compensating interface aberrations. For scattering correction a MEMS segmented deformable mirror (SDM) was inserted at a plane conjugate to the objective back-pupil plane. The SDM can pre-compensate for light scattering by coherent combination of the scattered light to make an apparent focus even at a depths where negligible ballistic light remains (i.e. ballistic limit). This problem was approached by investigating the spatial and temporal focusing characteristics of a broad-band light source through strongly scattering media. A new model was developed for coherent focus enhancement through or inside the strongly media based on the initial speckle contrast. A layer of fluorescent beads under a mouse skull was imaged using an iterative coherent beam control method in the prototype two-photon microscope to demonstrate the technique. We also adapted an AO correction system to an existing in three-photon microscope in a collaborator lab at Cornell University. In the second AO correction approach a continuous deformable mirror (CDM) is placed at a plane conjugate to the plane of an interface aberration. We demonstrated that this "Conjugate AO" technique yields a large field-of-view (FOV) advantage in comparison to Pupil AO. Further, we showed that the extended FOV in conjugate AO is maintained over a

  16. Two dimensional thermo-optic beam steering using a silicon photonic optical phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Rita; Preussner, Marcel W.; Rabinovich, William S.; Goetz, Peter G.; Kozak, Dmitry A.; Ferraro, Mike S.; Murphy, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Components for free space optical communication terminals such as lasers, amplifiers, and receivers have all seen substantial reduction in both size and power consumption over the past several decades. However, pointing systems, such as fast steering mirrors and gimbals, have remained large, slow and power-hungry. Optical phased arrays provide a possible solution for non-mechanical beam steering devices that can be compact and lower in power. Silicon photonics is a promising technology for phased arrays because it has the potential to scale to many elements and may be compatible with CMOS technology thereby enabling batch fabrication. For most free space optical communication applications, two-dimensional beam steering is needed. To date, silicon photonic phased arrays have achieved two-dimensional steering by combining thermo-optic steering, in-plane, with wavelength tuning by means of an output grating to give angular tuning, out-of-plane. While this architecture might work for certain static communication links, it would be difficult to implement for moving platforms. Other approaches have required N2 controls for an NxN element phased array, which leads to complexity. Hence, in this work we demonstrate steering using the thermo-optic effect for both dimensions with a simplified steering mechanism requiring only two control signals, one for each steering dimension.

  17. Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors in clinical photon beams using liquid water and PMMA phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Luciana C., E-mail: lmatsushima@ipen.br [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Veneziani, Glauco R. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sakuraba, Roberto K. [Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes (GMR) - Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 05508-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cruz, Jose C. da [Sociedade Beneficente Israelita Brasileira - Hospital Albert Einstein (HAE), Avenida Albert Einstein, 665, Morumbi, CEP: 05652-000, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    The purpose of this study was the dosimetric evaluation of thermoluminescent detectors of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) produced by IPEN compared to the TL response of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti) dosimeters and microdosimeters produced by Harshaw Chemical Company to clinical photon beams dosimetry (6 and 15 MV) using liquid water and PMMA phantoms. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dosimetric study of thermoluminescent detectors of CaSO{sub 4}:Dy, LiF:Mg,Ti and {mu}LiF:Mg,Ti. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Clinical (6 and 15 MV) photon beams dosimetry using liquid water and PMMA phantom. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Linear behavior to the dose range (0.1 to 5 Gy). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL response reproducibility better than {+-}4.34%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaSO{sub 4}:Dy represent a cheaper alternative to the TLD-100.

  18. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, S.; Tursinah, R.; Rhani, M. F.; Soh, R. C. X.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-03-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible.

  19. Proton and photon beams interaction with radiosensitizing agents in human glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafiandra, M.

    2016-03-01

    In oncological field, chemoradiotherapy treatments that combine radiations to radiosensitizing chemical agents are spreading out. The aim of this kind of treatment is to obtain a better tumor local control and at the same time to reduce the distant failure. The combination of radiation with microtubule-stabilizing agents is very promising in cancer therapy. In the present study, the combination of clinical proton beams and the microtubule-stabilizing agent Epothilone B has been investigated in human glioblastoma cells cultured in vitro. Photon beams have been used for comparison. Cell survival has been evaluated by colony forming assay and the interaction mechanism between radiation and Epothilone B has been investigated: survival curves relative to the combined treatment (protons or photons with Epothilone B) showed a linear trend, different from the linear quadratic behavior found with radiation alone. The analysis performed showed a synergism in the radiation-drug interaction. Thus, Epothilone B in conjunction with radiation acts as a radiosensitizer. Finally proton Relative Biological Effectiveness has been determined and results are reported in this paper.

  20. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  1. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka, E-mail: ekadirgayussa@gmail.com; Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy, E-mail: freddy@fi.itb.ac.id [Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, 40132 (Indonesia); Rhani, M. Fahdillah [Tang Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  2. A controllable single photon beam-splitter as a node of a quantum network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Gautam, Gaurav; Ghosh, Saikat; Kumar, Deepak; Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India Collaboration; Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi, India Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A theoretical model for a controlled single-photon beam-splitter is proposed and analysed. It consists of two crossed optical-cavities with overlapping waists, dynamically coupled to a single flying atom. The system is shown to route a single photon with near-unity efficiency in an effective ``weak-coupling'' regime. Furthermore, two such nodes, forming a segment of a quantum network, are shown to perform several controlled quantum operations. All one-qubit operations involve a transfer of a photon from one cavity to another in a single node, while two-qubit operations involve transfer from one node to a next one, coupled via an optical fiber. Novel timing protocols for classical optical fields are found to simplify possible experimental realizations along with achievable effective parameter regime. This model can be extended to various other physical systems including gated quantum dots, circuit-QED or opto-mechanical elements. This work is supported by DST-SERB, and DAE, Government of India.

  3. Photon reconstruction in the ATLAS Inner Detector and Liquid Argon Barrel Calorimeter at the 2004 Combined Test Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Abat, E; Addy, T N; Adragna, P; Aharrouche, M; Ahmad, A; Akesson, T.P A; Aleksa, M; Alexa, C; Anderson, K; Andreazza, A; Anghinolfi, F; Antonaki, A; Arabidze, G; Arik, E; Atkinson, T; Baines, J; Baker, O K; Banfi, D; Baron, S; Barr, A J; Beccherle, R; Beck, H P; Belhorma, B; Bell, P J; Benchekroun, D; Benjamin, D P; Benslama, K; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Bernabeu, J; Bertelsen, H; Binet, S; Biscarat, C; Boldea, V; Bondarenko, V G; Boonekamp, M; Bosman, M; Bourdarios, C; Broklova, Z; Burckhart-Chromek, D; Bychkov, V; Callahan, J; Calvet, D; Canneri, M; Capeans Garrido, M; Caprini, M; Cardiel Sas, L; Carli, T; Carminati, L; Carvalho, J; Cascella, M; Castillo, M V; Catinaccio, A; Cauz, D; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Cetin, S A; Chen, H; Cherkaoui, R; Chevalier, L; Chevallier, F; Chouridou, S; Ciobotaru, M; Citterio, M; Clark, A; Cleland, B; Cobal, M; Cogneras, E; Conde Muino, P; Consonni, M; Constantinescu, S; Cornelissen, T; Correard, S; Corso-Radu, A; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Cuneo, S; Cwetanski, P; Da Silva, D; Dam, M; Dameri, M; Danielsson, H O; Dannheim, D; Darbo, G; Davidek, T; De, K; Defay, P O; Dekhissi, B; Del Peso, J; Del Prete, T; Delmastro, M; Derue, F; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Girolamo, B; Dita, S; Dittus, F; Djama, F; Djobava, T; Dobos, D; Dobson, M; Dolgoshein, B A; Dotti, A; Drake, G; Drasal, Z; Dressnandt, N; Driouchi, C; Drohan, J; Ebenstein, W L; Eerola, P; Efthymiopoulos, I; Egorov, K; Eifert, T F; Einsweiler, K; El Kacimi, M; Elsing, M; Emelyanov, D; Escobar, C; Etienvre, A I; Fabich, A; Facius, K; Idrissi Fakhr-Eddine, A; Fanti, M; Farbin, A; Farthouat, P; Fassouliotis, D; Fayard, L; Febbraro, R; Fedin, O L; Fenyuk, A; Fergusson, D; Ferrari, P; Ferrari, R; Ferreira, B C; Ferrer, A; Ferrere, D; Filippini, G; Flick, T; Fournier, D; Francavilla, P; Francis, D; Froeschl, R; Froidevaux, D; Fullana, E; Gadomski, S; Gagliardi, G; Gagnon, P; Gallas, M; Gallop, B J; Gameiro, S; Gan, K K; Garcia, R; Garcia, C; Gavrilenko, I L; Gemme, C; Gerlach, P; Ghodbane, N; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giangiobbe, V; Giokaris, N; Glonti, G; Gottfert, T.; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gomes, A; Gomez, M D; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S; Goodrick, M J; Gorfine, G; Gorini, B; Goujdami, D; Grahn, K J; Grenier, P; Grigalashvili, N; Grishkevich, Y; Grosse-Knetter, J; Gruwe, M; Guicheney, C; Gupta, A; Haeberli, C; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z; Hakobyan, H; Hance, M; Hansen, J D; Hansen, P H; Hara, K; Harvey, A., Jr; Hawkings, R J; Heinemann, F.E W; Henriques Correia, A; Henss, T; Hervas, L; Higon, E; Hill, J C; Hoffman, J; Hostachy, J Y; Hruska, I; Hubaut, F; Huegging, F; Hulsbergen, W; Hurwitz, M; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Jansen, E; Jen-La Plante, I; Johansson, P.D C; Jon-And, K; Joos, M; Jorgensen, S; Joseph, J; Kaczmarska, A; Kado, M; Karyukhin, A; Kataoka, M; Kayumov, F; Kazarov, A; Keener, P T; Kekelidze, G D; Kerschen, N; Kersten, S; Khomich, A; Khoriauli, G; Khramov, E; Khristachev, A; Khubua, J; Kittelmann, T H; Klingenberg, R; Klinkby, E B; Kodys, P; Koffas, T; Kolos, S; Konovalov, S P; Konstantinidis, N; Kopikov, S; Korolkov, I; Kostyukhin, V; Kovalenko, S; Kowalski, T Z; Kruger, K.; Kramarenko, V; Kudin, L G; Kulchitsky, Y; Lacasta, C; Lafaye, R; Laforge, B; Lampl, W; Lanni, F; Laplace, S; Lari, T; Le Bihan, A C; Lechowski, M; Ledroit-Guillon, F; Lehmann, G; Leitner, R; Lelas, D; Lester, C G; Liang, Z; Lichard, P; Liebig, W; Lipniacka, A; Lokajicek, M; Louchard, L; Loureiro, K F; Lucotte, A; Luehring, F; Lund-Jensen, B; Lundberg, B; Ma, H; Mackeprang, R; Maio, A; Maleev, V P; Malek, F; Mandelli, L; Maneira, J; Mangin-Brinet, M; Manousakis, A; Mapelli, L; Marques, C; Marti i Garcia, S; Martin, F; Mathes, M; Mazzanti, M; McFarlane, K W; McPherson, R; Mchedlidze, G; Mehlhase, S; Meirosu, C; Meng, Z; Meroni, C; Mialkovski, V; Mikulec, B; Milstead, D; Minashvili, I; Mindur, B; Mitsou, V A; Moed, S; Monnier, E; Moorhead, G; Morettini, P; Morozov, S V; Mosidze, M; Mouraviev, S V; Moyse, E.W J; Munar, A; Myagkov, A; Nadtochi, A V; Nakamura, K; Nechaeva, P; Negri, A; Nemecek, S; Nessi, M; Nesterov, S Y; Newcomer, F M; Nikitine, I; Nikolaev, K; Nikolic-Audit, I; Ogren, H; Oh, S H; Oleshko, S B; Olszowska, J; Onofre, A; Padilla Aranda, C; Paganis, S; Pallin, D; Pantea, D; Paolone, V; Parodi, F; Parsons, J; Parzhitski, S; Pasqualucci, E; Passmore, S M; Pater, J; Patrichev, S; Peez, M; Perez Reale, V; Perini, L; Peshekhonov, V D; Petersen, J; Petersen, T C; Petti, R; Phillips, P W; Pilcher, J; Pina, J; Pinto, B; Podlyski, F; Poggioli, L; Poppleton, A; Poveda, J; Pralavorio, P; Pribyl, L; Price, M J; Prieur, D; Puigdengoles, C; Puzo, P; Ragusa, F; Rajagopalan, S; Reeves, K; Reisinger, I; Rembser, C; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Reznicek, P; Ridel, M; Risso, P; Riu, I; Robinson, D; Roda, C; Roe, S; Rohne, O.; Romaniouk, A; Rousseau, D; Rozanov, A; Ruiz, A; Rusakovich, N; Rust, D; Ryabov, Y F; Ryjov, V; Salto, O; Salvachua, B; Salzburger, A; Sandaker, H; Santamarina Rios, C.Santamarina; Santi, L; Santoni, C; Saraiva, J G; Sarri, F; Sauvage, G; Says, L P; Schaefer, M; Schegelsky, V A; Schiavi, C; Schieck, J; Schlager, G; Schlereth, J; Schmitt, C; Schultes, J; Schwemling, P; Schwindling, J; Seixas, J M; Seliverstov, D M; Serin, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalanda, N; Shaw, C; Shin, T; Shmeleva, A; Silva, J; Simion, S; Simonyan, M; Sloper, J E; Smirnov, S.Yu; Smirnova, L; Solans, C; Solodkov, A; Solovianov, O; Soloviev, I; Sosnovtsev, V V; Spano, F; Speckmayer, P; Stancu, S; Stanek, R; Starchenko, E; Straessner, A; Suchkov, S I; Suk, M; Szczygiel, R; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, F; Tas, P; Tayalati, Y; Tegenfeldt, F; Teuscher, R; Thioye, M; Tikhomirov, V O; Timmermans, C.J.W P; Tisserant, S; Toczek, B; Tremblet, L; Troncon, C; Tsiareshka, P; Tyndel, M; Karagoz Unel, M.; Unal, G; Unel, G; Usai, G; Van Berg, R; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valls, J A; Vandelli, W; Vannucci, F; Vartapetian, A; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vasilyeva, L; Vazeille, F; Vernocchi, F; Vetter-Cole, Y; Vichou, I; Vinogradov, V; Virzi, J; Vivarelli, I; de Vivie, J B; Volpi, M; Vu Anh, T; Wang, C; Warren, M; Weber, J; Weber, M; Weidberg, A R; Weingarten, J; Wells, P S; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wiesmann, M; Wilkens, H; Williams, H H; Wingerter-Seez, I; Yasu, Y; Zaitsev, A; Zenin, A; Zenis, T; Zenonos, Z; Zhang, H; Zhelezko, A; Zhou, N

    2011-01-01

    The reconstruction of photons in the ATLAS detector is studied with data taken during the 2004 Combined Test Beam, where a full slice of the ATLAS detector was exposed to beams of particles of known energy at the CERN SPS. The results presented show significant differences in the longitudinal development of the electromagnetic shower between converted and unconverted photons as well as in the total measured energy. The potential to use the reconstructed converted photons as a means to precisely map the material of the tracker in front of the electromagnetic calorimeter is also considered. All results obtained are compared with a detailed Monte-Carlo simulation of the test-beam setup which is based on the same simulation and reconstruction tools as those used for the ATLAS detector itself.

  4. Monte Carlo study of conversion factors for ionization chamber dosimetry in solid slab phantoms for MV photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Dong-wook; Lee, Jai-ki

    2016-08-01

    For high energy photon beams, solid phantom to water dose conversion factors were calculated by using a Monte Carlo method, and the result were compared with measurements and published data. Based on the absorbed dose to water dosimetry protocol, the conversion factor was theoretically divided into stopping powers ratios, perturbation factors and ratios of absorbed dose to water and that to solid phantom. Data for a Farmer-type chamber and a solid phantom based on polystyrene which is one of the most common material were applied to calculate the conversion factors for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. All measurements were conducted after 10 Gy pre-irradiation and thermal equilibrium had been established with solid slabs in a treatment room. The calculated and the measured conversion factors were in good agreement and could be used to confirm the feasibility of the solid phantom as a substitute for water for high energy photon beam.

  5. Evaluation of a 50-MV photon therapy beam from a racetrack microtron using MCNP4B Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gudowska, I.; Svensson, R. [Karolinska Inst. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics]|[Huddinge Univ. Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Physics; Sorcini, B. [Karolinska Inst. (Sweden). Dept. of Medical Radiation Physics]|[Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    High energy photon therapy beam from the 50 MV racetrack microtron has been evaluated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B. The spatial and energy distribution of photons, radial and depth dose distributions in the phantom are calculated for the stationary and scanned photon beams from different targets. The calculated dose distributions are compared to the experimental data using a silicon diode detector. Measured and calculated depth-dose distributions are in fairly good agreement, within 2-3% for the positions in the range 2-30 cm in the phantom, whereas the larger discrepancies up to 10% are observed in the dose build-up region. For the stationary beams the differences in the calculated and measured radial dose distributions are about 2-10%. (orig.)

  6. Effect of dosimeter type for commissioning small photon beams on calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Garduño, O. A., E-mail: oagarciag@innn.edu.mx, E-mail: amanda.garcia.g@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México and Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Legaria 694, México City 11500, México (Mexico); Rodríguez-Ponce, M. [Departamento de Biofísica, Instituto Nacional de Cancerología, Mexico City 14080, México (Mexico); Gamboa-deBuen, I. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Rodríguez-Villafuerte, M. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico City 04510 (Mexico); Galván de la Cruz, O. O. [Laboratorio de Física Médica, Instituto Nacional de Neurología y Neurocirugía, Mexico City 14269, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of the detector used to commission small photon beams on the calculated dose distribution in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Methods: In this study, six types of detectors were used to characterize small photon beams: three diodes [a silicon stereotactic field diode SFD, a silicon diode SRS, and a silicon diode E], an ionization chamber CC01, and two types of radiochromic film models EBT and EBT2. These detectors were used to characterize circular collimated beams that were generated by a Novalis linear accelerator. This study was conducted in two parts. First, the following dosimetric data, which are of particular interest in SRS, were compared for the different detectors: the total scatter factor (TSF), the tissue phantom ratios (TPRs), and the off-axis ratios (OARs). Second, the commissioned data sets were incorporated into the treatment planning system (TPS) to compare the calculated dose distributions and the dose volume histograms (DVHs) that were obtained using the different detectors. Results: The TSFs data measured by all of the detectors were in good agreement with each other within the respective statistical uncertainties: two exceptions, where the data were systematically below those obtained for the other detectors, were the CC01 results for all of the circular collimators and the EBT2 film results for circular collimators with diameters below 10.0 mm. The OAR results obtained for all of the detectors were in excellent agreement for all of the circular collimators. This observation was supported by the gamma-index test. The largest difference in the TPR data was found for the 4.0 mm circular collimator, followed by the 10.0 and 20.0 mm circular collimators. The results for the calculated dose distributions showed that all of the detectors passed the gamma-index test at 100% for the 3 mm/3% criteria. The aforementioned observation was true regardless of the size of the calculation grid for all of the circular collimators

  7. Photon generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  8. Gamma beam system at ELI-NP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ur, Calin Alexandru, E-mail: calin.ur@eli-np.ro [Extreme Light Infrastructure, IFIN-HH, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-02-24

    The Gamma Beam System of ELI-NP will produce brilliant, quasi-monochromatic gamma-ray beams via Inverse Compton Scattering of short laser pulses on relativistic electron beam pulses. The scattered radiation is Doppler upshifted by more than 1,000,000 times and is forward focused in a narrow, polarized, tunable, laser-like beam. The gamma-ray beam at ELI-NP will be characterized by large spectral density of about 10{sup 4} photons/s/eV, narrow bandwidth (< 0.5%) and tunable energy from 200 keV up to about 20 MeV. The Gamma Beam System is a state-of-the-art equipment employing techniques and technologies at the limits of the present-day's knowledge.

  9. Proceeding of the workshop on gamma-ray spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, photon and RI beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshima, Masumi; Sugita, Michiaki; Hayakawa, Takehito [eds.

    1998-03-01

    Three time since 1992, we have held the symposia entitled `Joint Spectroscopy Experiments Utilizing JAERI Tandem-Booster Accelerator` at the Tokai Research Establishment. In the symposia, we have mainly discussed the plans of experiments to be done in this joint program. The joint program started in 1994. Several experiments have been made since and some new results have already come up. This symposium `Gamma-ray Spectroscopy utilizing heavy-ion, Photon and RI beams` was held at Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI. Because this symposium is the first occasion after the program started, the first purpose of the symposium is to present and discuss the experimental results so far obtained using the JAERI Tandem-Booster. The second purpose of the symposium is to discuss new possibilities of gamma-ray spectroscopy using new resources such as RI-beam and Photon-beam. The participants from RIKEN, Tohoku University and JAERI Neutron Science Research Center presented the future plans of experiments with RI-beam at each facility. Compared with these nuclear beams, photon beam provides a completely new tool for the {gamma}-ray spectroscopy, which is achieved by inverse Compton scattering between high-energy electron and laser beams. The 23 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  10. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying the technology instrumentation of photonics This volume discusses photonics technology and instrumentation. The topics discussed in this volume are: Communication Networks; Data Buffers; Defense and Security Applications; Detectors; Fiber Optics and Amplifiers; Green Photonics; Instrumentation and Metrology; Interferometers; Light-Harvesting Materials; Logic Devices; Optical Communications; Remote Sensing; Solar Energy; Solid-State Lighting; Wavelength Conversion Comprehensive and accessible coverage of the whole of modern photonics Emphas

  11. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern photonics accessibly and discusses the basic physical principles underlying all the applications and technology of photonicsThis volume covers the basic physical principles underlying the technology and all applications of photonics from statistical optics to quantum optics. The topics discussed in this volume are: Photons in perspective; Coherence and Statistical Optics; Complex Light and Singular Optics; Electrodynamics of Dielectric Media; Fast and slow Light; Holography; Multiphoton Processes; Optical Angular Momentum; Optical Forces, Trapping and Manipulation; Pol

  12. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying Biomedical Photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy This volume discusses biomedical photonics, spectroscopy and microscopy, the basic physical principles underlying the technology and its applications. The topics discussed in this volume are: Biophotonics; Fluorescence and Phosphorescence; Medical Photonics; Microscopy; Nonlinear Optics; Ophthalmic Technology; Optical Tomography; Optofluidics; Photodynamic Therapy; Image Processing; Imaging Systems; Sensors; Single Molecule Detection; Futurology in Photonics. Comprehensive and accessible cov

  13. Photonics

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2015-01-01

    Discusses the basic physical principles underlying thescience and technology of nanophotonics, its materials andstructures This volume presents nanophotonic structures and Materials.Nanophotonics is photonic science and technology that utilizeslight/matter interactions on the nanoscale where researchers arediscovering new phenomena and developing techniques that go wellbeyond what is possible with conventional photonics andelectronics.The topics discussed in this volume are: CavityPhotonics; Cold Atoms and Bose-Einstein Condensates; Displays;E-paper; Graphene; Integrated Photonics; Liquid Cry

  14. Optimization of photon beam energies in gold nanoparticle enhanced arc radiation therapy using Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koger, B; Kirkby, C

    2016-12-02

    As a recent area of development in radiation therapy, gold nanoparticle (GNP) enhanced radiation therapy has shown potential to increase tumour dose while maintaining acceptable levels of healthy tissue toxicity. In this study, the effect of varying photon beam energy in GNP enhanced arc radiation therapy (GEART) is quantified through the introduction of a dose scoring metric, and GEART is compared to a conventional radiotherapy treatment. The PENELOPE Monte Carlo code was used to model several simple phantoms consisting of a spherical tumour containing GNPs (concentration: 15 mg Au g(-1) tumour, 0.8 mg Au g(-1) normal tissue) in a cylinder of tissue. Several monoenergetic photon beams, with energies ranging from 20 keV to 6 MeV, as well as 100, 200, and 300 kVp spectral beams, were used to irradiate the tumour in a 360° arc treatment. A dose metric was then used to compare tumour and tissue doses from GEART treatments to a similar treatment from a 6 MV spectrum. This was also performed on a simulated brain tumour using patient computed tomography data. GEART treatments showed potential over the 6 MV treatment for many of the simulated geometries, delivering up to 88% higher mean dose to the tumour for a constant tissue dose, with the effect greatest near a source energy of 50 keV. This effect is also seen with the inclusion of bone in a brain treatment, with a 14% increase in mean tumour dose over 6 MV, while still maintaining acceptable levels of dose to the bone and brain.

  15. Stereotactic photon beam irradiation of uveal melanoma: indications and experience at the University of Vienna since 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieckmann, K.; Georg, D.; Rottenfusser, A.; Poetter, R. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. of Vienna (Austria); Zehetmayer, M. [Dept. of Ophthalmology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)

    2007-12-15

    Most uveal melanomas are currently treated by eye-preserving radiotherapy. No advantage of enucleation of posterior uveal melanoma (< 12 mm) could be demonstrated in multiple studies (e.g.). Besides brachytherapy and highly conformal proton therapy advanced photon beam therapy techniques have been introduced during the last years. Since 1997, at the Medical University of Vienna, patients with uveal melanoma have been treated with 3D stereotactic photon beam radiotherapy. Special fixation- and eye-monitoring systems have been developed to perform a local treatment which provides high local tumor control with acceptable long term side effects. (orig.)

  16. A phase-space beam position monitor for synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samadi, Nazanin, E-mail: nazanin.samadi@usask.ca [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Bassey, Bassey; Martinson, Mercedes [University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Belev, George; Dallin, Les; Jong, Mark de [Canadian Light Source, 44 Innovation Boulevard, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Chapman, Dean [University of Saskatchewan, 107 Wiggins Road, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2015-06-25

    A system has been developed to measure the vertical position and angle of the electron beam at a single location from a synchrotron source. The system uses a monochromator tuned to the absorption edge of a contrast material and has a sensitivity comparable with other beam position monitors. The stability of the photon beam position on synchrotron beamlines is critical for most if not all synchrotron radiation experiments. The position of the beam at the experiment or optical element location is set by the position and angle of the electron beam source as it traverses the magnetic field of the bend-magnet or insertion device. Thus an ideal photon beam monitor would be able to simultaneously measure the photon beam’s position and angle, and thus infer the electron beam’s position in phase space. X-ray diffraction is commonly used to prepare monochromatic beams on X-ray beamlines usually in the form of a double-crystal monochromator. Diffraction couples the photon wavelength or energy to the incident angle on the lattice planes within the crystal. The beam from such a monochromator will contain a spread of energies due to the vertical divergence of the photon beam from the source. This range of energies can easily cover the absorption edge of a filter element such as iodine at 33.17 keV. A vertical profile measurement of the photon beam footprint with and without the filter can be used to determine the vertical centroid position and angle of the photon beam. In the measurements described here an imaging detector is used to measure these vertical profiles with an iodine filter that horizontally covers part of the monochromatic beam. The goal was to investigate the use of a combined monochromator, filter and detector as a phase-space beam position monitor. The system was tested for sensitivity to position and angle under a number of synchrotron operating conditions, such as normal operations and special operating modes where the photon beam is intentionally altered

  17. Analyzing the characteristics of 6 MV photon beam at low monitor unit settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing the characteristics of a low monitor unit (MU setting is essential, particularly for intensity-modulated techniques. Intensity modulation can be achieved through intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. There is possibility for low MUs in the segments of IMRT and VMAT plans. The minimum MU/segment must be set by the physicist in the treatment planning system at the time of commissioning. In this study, the characteristics such as dose linearity, stability, flatness, and symmetry of 6 MV photon beam of a Synergy linear accelerator at low MU settings were investigated for different dose rates. The measurements were performed for Synergy linear accelerator using a slab phantom with a FC65-G chamber and Profiler 2. The MU linearity was studied for 1–100 MU using a field size of 10 cm ×10 cm. The linearity error for 1 MU was 4.2%. Flatness of the beam was deteriorated in 1 MU condition. The beam stability and symmetry was well within the specification. Using this study, we conclude that the treatment delivered with <3 MU may result in uncertainty in dose delivery. To ensure the correct dose delivery with less uncertainty, it is recommended to use ≥3 MU as the minimum MU per segment in IMRT and VMAT plans.

  18. Overview of charged-particle beam diagnostics for the advanced photon source (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Votaw, A.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1992-07-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e-,e+) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest x-ray sources in the 10-keV to 100-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV booster synchrotron, 7-GeV storage ring, and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  19. Charged-particle beam diagnostics for the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Decker, G.; Kahana, E.; Patterson, D.; Sellyey, W.; Wang, X.; Chung, Y.

    1992-08-01

    Plans, prototypes, and initial test results for the charged-particle beam (e-), e(+) diagnostic systems on the injector rings, their transport lines, and the storage ring for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are presented. The APS will be a synchrotron radiation user facility with one of the world's brightest x-ray sources in the 10-keV to 100-keV regime. Its 200-MeV electron linac, 450-MeV positron linac, positron accumulator ring, 7-GeV booster synchrotron, 7-GeV storage ring, and undulator test lines will also demand the development and demonstration of key particle-beam characterization techniques over a wide range of parameter space. Some of these parameter values overlap or approach those projected for fourth generation light sources (linac-driven FELs and high brightness storage rings) as described at a recent workshop. Initial results from the diagnostics prototypes on the linac test stand operating at 45-MeV include current monitor data, beam loss monitor data, and video digitization using VME architecture.

  20. Optical Bloch oscillations of an Airy beam in a photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fajun; Li, Baoran; Wang, Meirong; Zhu, Weiren; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Premaratne, Malin; Zhao, Jianlin

    2014-09-22

    We theoretically report the existence of optical Bloch oscillations (BO) of an Airy beam in a one-dimensional optically induced photonic lattice with a linear transverse index gradient. The Airy beam experiencing optical BO shows a more robust non-diffracting feature than its counterparts in free space or in a uniform photonic lattice. Interestingly, a periodical recurrence of Airy shape accompanied with constant alternation of its acceleration direction is also found during the BO. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the period and amplitude of BO of an Airy beam can be readily controlled over a wide range by varying the index gradient and/or the lattice period. Exploiting these features, we propose a scheme to rout an Airy beam to a predefined output channel without losing its characteristics by longitudinally modulating the transverse index gradient.

  1. The energy dependence of the lateral dose response functions of detectors with various densities in photon-beam dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2017-02-01

    The lateral dose response function is a general characteristic of the volume effect of a detector used for photon dosimetry in a water phantom. It serves as the convolution kernel transforming the true absorbed dose to water profile, which would be produced within the undisturbed water phantom, into the detector-measured signal profile. The shape of the lateral dose response function characterizes (i) the volume averaging attributable to the detector’s size and (ii) the disturbance of the secondary electron field associated with the deviation of the electron density of the detector material from the surrounding water. In previous work, the characteristic dependence of the shape of the lateral dose response function upon the electron density of the detector material was studied for 6 MV photons by Monte Carlo simulation of a wall-less voxel-sized detector (Looe et al 2015 Phys. Med. Biol. 60 6585-07). This study is here continued for 60Co gamma rays and 15 MV photons in comparison with 6 MV photons. It is found (1) that throughout these photon spectra the shapes of the lateral dose response functions are retaining their characteristic dependence on the detector’s electron density, and (2) that their energy-dependent changes are only moderate. This appears as a practical advantage because the lateral dose response function can then be treated as practically invariant across a clinical photon beam in spite of the known changes of the photon spectrum with increasing distance from the beam axis.

  2. Points to be noted in using radiation treatment planning system; External photon beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irifune, Toraji (Tokyo Metropolitan Coll. of Allied Medical Sciences (Japan))

    1993-09-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations for external photon beam therapy depends on the computational algorithms being used: the acquisition of basic beam data, the patient's anatomical information, the spacing of the points in the matrices, the interpolation routine, inhomogeneity corrections, etc. At present, the dose calculation algorithms employed in most commercially available treatment planning systems for absorbed dose calculation are two-dimensional methods for photon fluence and do not take electronic equilibrium into account. Therefore, their use for radiation treatment planning is limited. In particular, the problem of inhomogeneity correction for lung is the most significant. The inhomogeneity correction methods most commonly used are ratio of TAR (RTAR), power law TAR (PTAR) and equivalent TAR (ETAR) methods. One Japanese society for therapeutic radiology and oncology (JASTRO) task group has compared the three correction methods mentioned above with measured values using the same JARP level dosimeter and lung model phantom. The photon energies were [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays, 4, 6, 10 and 18 MV x rays, and field sizes were 5 x 5, 10 x 10 and 20 x 20 cm[sup 2] at SSD 100 cm. RTAR lead to errors (%) of 2.5 to 12.6, 1.7 to 10.9, 2.7 to 8.5, 3.1 to 9.9, and 1.0 to 19.1; PTAR errors were -0.7 to 2.3, -2.1 to 1.6, -1.1 to 2.2, -0.3 to 3.9, and -2.0 to 6.6; and ETAR errors were 0.7 to 2.5, 0 to 3.1, -0.1 to 6.8, 3.4 to 9.2, and 1.0 to 18.6 for [sup 60]Co [gamma] rays, 4, 6, 10 and 18 MV x rays, respectively. Survey results showed that about 50% of the institutions used measured data obtained by themselves. Basic beam data acquisition should be self-contained. (author).

  3. Photonic band gap effect and structural color from silver nanoparticle gelatin emulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Mang Hin; Ma, Rui; Lee, Jeffrey Chi Wai; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Sheng, Ping; Cheah, Kok Wai

    2005-10-01

    We have fabricated planar structures of silver nanoparticles in monochromatic gelatin emulsion with a continuous spacing ranging from 0.15-0.40 micron using a two-beam interference of a single laser source. Our planar holograms display a colorful "rainbow" pattern and photonic bandgaps covering the visible and IR ranges. We model the planar silver nanoparticle-gelatin composite system using an effective medium approach and good agreement is obtained between theory and experiment.

  4. Tunable, all-optical quasi-monochromatic Thomson X-ray source

    CERN Document Server

    Khrennikov, K; Buck, A; Xu, J; Heigoldt, M; Veisz, L; Karsch, S

    2014-01-01

    Brilliant X-ray sources are of great interest for many research fields from biology via medicine to material research. The quest for a cost-effective, brilliant source with unprecedented temporal resolution has led to the recent realization of various high-intensity-laser-driven X-ray beam sources. Here we demonstrate the first all-laser-driven, energy-tunable and quasi-monochromatic X-ray source based on Thomson backscattering. This is a decisive step beyond previous results, where the emitted radiation exhibited an uncontrolled broad energy distribution. In the experiment, one part of the laser beam was used to drive a few-fs bunch of quasi-monoenergetic electrons from a Laser-Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA), while the remainder was scattered off the bunch in a near-counter-propagating geometry. When the electron energy was tuned from 10-50 MeV, narrow-bandwidth X-ray spectra peaking at 5-35keV were directly measured, limited in photon energy by the sensitivity curve of our X-ray detector. Due to the ultrashor...

  5. Relation between lineal energy distribution and relative biological effectiveness for photon beams according to the microdosimetric kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Kase, Yuki; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Fujita, Yukio; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Itami, Jun; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Our cell survival data showed the obvious dependence of RBE on photon energy: The RBE value for 200 kV X-rays was approximately 10% greater than those for mega-voltage photon beams. In radiation therapy using mega-voltage photon beams, the photon energy distribution outside the field is different with that in the radiation field because of a large number of low energy scattering photons. Hence, the RBE values outside the field become greater. To evaluate the increase in RBE, the method of deriving the RBE using the Microdosimetric Kinetic model (MK model) was proposed in this study. The MK model has two kinds of the parameters, tissue-specific parameters and the dose-mean lineal energy derived from the lineal energy distributions measured with a Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC). The lineal energy distributions with the same geometries of the cell irradiations for 200 kV X-rays, (60)Co γ-rays, and 6 MV X-rays were obtained with the TEPC and Monte Carlo code GEANT4. The measured lineal energy distribution for 200 kV X-rays was quite different from those for mega-voltage photon beams. The dose-mean lineal energy of 200 kV X-rays showed the greatest value, 4.51 keV/µm, comparing with 2.34 and 2.36 keV/µm for (60)Co γ-rays and 6 MV X-rays, respectively. By using the results of the TEPC and cell irradiations, the tissue-specific parameters in the MK model were determined. As a result, the RBE of the photon beams (y(D): 2~5 keV/µm) in arbitrary conditions can be derived by the measurements only or the calculations only of the dose-mean lineal energy.

  6. Laser-Driven Very High Energy Electron/Photon Beam Radiation Therapy in Conjunction with a Robotic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a new external-beam radiation therapy system using very-high-energy (VHE electron/photon beams generated by a centimeter-scale laser plasma accelerator built in a robotic system. Most types of external-beam radiation therapy are delivered using a machine called a medical linear accelerator driven by radio frequency (RF power amplifiers, producing electron beams with an energy range of 6–20 MeV, in conjunction with modern radiation therapy technologies for effective shaping of three-dimensional dose distributions and spatially accurate dose delivery with imaging verification. However, the limited penetration depth and low quality of the transverse penumbra at such electron beams delivered from the present RF linear accelerators prevent the implementation of advanced modalities in current cancer treatments. These drawbacks can be overcome if the electron energy is increased to above 50 MeV. To overcome the disadvantages of the present RF-based medical accelerators, harnessing recent advancement of laser-driven plasma accelerators capable of producing 1-GeV electron beams in a 1-cm gas cell, we propose a new embodiment of the external-beam radiation therapy robotic system delivering very high-energy electron/photon beams with an energy of 50–250 MeV; it is more compact, less expensive, and has a simpler operation and higher performance in comparison with the current radiation therapy system.

  7. A Laue–Bragg monolithic beam splitter for efficient X-ray 2-beam imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberta, P., E-mail: peter.oberta@rigaku.com [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, v.v.i., Na Slovance 2, CZ-18221 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Mokso, R. [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-03-01

    Newly emerging techniques for probing matter simultaneously by two spatially and angularly separated X-ray beams require efficient and versatile beam splitting. We present a Laue–Bragg monolithic crystal beam splitter in the form of an L-shaped monolithic Si crystal. By simultaneous Laue and Bragg diffractions the X-ray beam is split into a transmitted polychromatic and a diffracted monochromatic branch with a spatial separation of tens of millimeters. The energy spectrum of the transmitted branch can be tuned via diffraction on a second crystal re-creating a beam intersection on the sample. We propose three multi-modal imaging setups exploiting the large angular separation of the two intersecting beams provided by the proposed optics. Photon efficiency and dual-energy operation are the main assets of our scheme as compared to other existing setups. The theoretical description for an energy range between 10 keV and 30 keV was developed.

  8. Design of a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren Cang; Zheng Wan-Hua; Wang Ke; Du Xiao-Yu; Xing Ming-Xin; Chen Liang-Hui

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a compact polarization beam splitter based on a deformed photonic crystal directional coupler is designed and simulated. The transverse-electric (TE) guided mode and transverse-magnetic (TM) guided mode are split due to different guiding mechanisms. The effect of the shape deformation of the air holes on the coupler is studied. It discovered that the coupling strength of the coupled wavegnides is strongly enhanced by introducing elliptical airholes, which reduce the device length to less than 18.5μm. A finite-difference time-domain simulation is performed to evaluate the performance of the device, and the extinction ratios for both TE and TM polarized light are higher than 20 dB.

  9. Dependence of alanine gel dosimeter response as a function of photon clinical beams dose rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Cleber Feijo, E-mail: cleber.feijo@famesp.com.br [Faculdade Metodo de Sao Paulo (FAMESP), SP (Brazil); Campos, Leticia Lucente, E-mail: Icrodri@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    Gel dosimetry is a new area developed by Gore, it is ery useful for application in radiotherapy because using NMR imaging as evaluation technique is possible to evaluate three dimensional absorbed dose distribution. The measure technique is based on difference of ferrous (Fe{sup 2+}) and ferric (Fe{sup 3+}) ) ions concentration that can be measured also by spectrophotometry technique. The Alanine gel dosimeter was developed at IPEN. The alanine is an amino acid and tissue equivalent material that presents significant improvement on previous alanine dosimetry systems. The addition of Alanine increases the production of ferric ions in the solution. This work aims to study the dose rate dependence of photon clinical beams radiation on the alanine gel dosimeter optical response, as well as the response repeatability and gel production reproducibility, since this property is very important for characterization and standardization of any dosimeter. (author)

  10. Volume dose ratios relevant for alanine dosimetry in small, 6 MV photon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard O.; Andersen, Claus Erik; Behrens, Claus F.

    2012-01-01

    averaged doses to water (D¯W) and alanine (D¯det) was found to be approximately 1.025 for most situations studied, and a constant ratio is likely to be representative for many applications in radiation therapy. However, D¯W/D¯det was found to be as low as 0.9908 ± 0.0037 in situations where one might...... therapy). To this end, we here present the results of a Monte Carlo simulation study with DOSRZnrc that investigated the influence of field and detector size for small 6 MV photon beams. The study focusses on doses averaged over the volume of the detector rather than point doses.The ratio of volume...

  11. Transmission characteristics of high-power 589-nm laser beam in photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Meguru; Hayano, Yutaka; Saito, Norihito; Akagawa, Kazuyuki; Kato, Mayumi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Takazawa, Akira; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori; Wada, Satoshi; Colley, Stephen A.; Dinkins, Matthew C.; Eldred, Michael; Golota, Taras I.; Guyon, Olivier; Hattori, Masayuki; Oya, Shin; Watanabe, Makoto

    2006-06-01

    We are developing Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGSAO) system for Subaru Telescope at Hawaii, Mauna Kea. We achieved an all-solid-state 589.159 nm laser in sum-frequency generation. Output power at 589.159 nm reached 4W in quasi-continuous-wave operation. To relay the laser beam from laser location to laser launching telescope, we used an optical fiber because the optical fiber relay is more flexible and easier than mirror train. However, nonlinear scattering effect, especially stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), will happen when the inputted laser power increases, i.e., intensity at the fiber core exceed each threshold. In order to raise the threshold levels of each nonlinear scattering, we adopt photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Because the PCF can be made larger core than usual step index fiber (SIF), one can reduce the intensity in the core. We inputted the high power laser into the PCF whose mode field diameter (MFD) is 14 μm and the SIF whose MFD is 5 μm, and measured the transmission characteristics of them. In the case of the SIF, the SRS was happen when we inputted 2 W. On the other hand, the SRS and the SBS were not induced in the PCF even for an input power of 4 W. We also investigated polarization of the laser beam transmitting through the PCF. Because of the fact that the backscattering efficiency of exciting the sodium layer with a narrowband laser is dependent on the polarization state of the incident beam, we tried to control the polarization of the laser beam transmitted the PCF. We constructed the system which can control the polarization of input laser and measure the output polarization. The PCF showed to be able to assume as a double refraction optical device, and we found that the output polarization is controllable by injecting beam with appropriate polarization through the PCF. However, the Laser Guide Star made by the beam passed through the PCF had same brightness as the state of the polarization.

  12. Dose distribution near thin titanium plate for skull fixation irradiated by a 4-MV photon beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimozato Tomohiro

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the effects of scattered radiation when a thin titanium plate (thickness, 0.05 cm used for skull fixation in cerebral nerve surgery is irradiated by a 4-MV photon beam. We investigated the dose distribution of radiation inside a phantom that simulates a human head fitted with a thin titanium plate used for post-surgery skull fixation and compared the distribution data measured using detectors, obtained by Monte Carlo (MC simulations, and calculated using a radiation treatment planning system (TPS. Simulations were shown to accurately represent measured values. The effects of scattered radiation produced by high-Z materials such as titanium are not sufficiently considered currently in TPS dose calculations. Our comparisons show that the dose distribution is affected by scattered radiation around a thin high-Z material. The depth dose is measured and calculated along the central beam axis inside a water phantom with thin titanium plates at various depths. The maximum relative differences between simulation and TPS results on the entrance and exit sides of the plate were 23.1% and − 12.7%, respectively. However, the depth doses do not change in regions deeper than the plate in water. Although titanium is a high-Z material, if the titanium plate used for skull fixation in cerebral nerve surgery is thin, there is a slight change in the dose distribution in regions away from the plate. In addition, we investigated the effects of variation of photon energies, sizes of radiation field and thickness of the plate. When the target to be irradiated is far from the thin titanium plate, the dose differs little from what it would be in the absence of a plate, though the dose escalation existed in front of the metal plate.

  13. Portal verification of high-energy electron beams using their photon contamination by film-cassette systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyer, Peter; Baus, Wolfgang W; Baumann, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Though electron beams are widely used in radiotherapy, their verification is not well established in clinical practice. The present study compares the suitability of several sensitive film-cassette systems for electron-portal verification by contaminating photons. The characteristics of the optical density curves of film-cassette combinations were determined by exposing them to the bremsstrahlung contamination of a variety of electron beams. Using a Las-Vegas Phantom the spatial low-contrast resolution of the combinations was investigated. The absorbed dose rates due to the contaminant photons were measured for different geometric conditions. Suitable film-cassette combinations were found for portal verification of all usual electron energies. The best image quality was obtained using the EC film and the EC-L cassettes. For electron energies higher than 6 MeV some film-cassette combinations are suitable to verify abutted electron and photon portals using the same film sheet. The verification of electron portals and of abutted electron-photon portals can be performed by sensitive film-cassette systems with an image quality comparable to photon-beam verification.

  14. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ′}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ′} ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ′} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  15. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, John P; Antolak, John A; Followill, David S; Huq, M Saiful; Klein, Eric E; Lam, Kwok L; Palta, Jatinder R; Roback, Donald M; Reid, Mark; Khan, Faiz M

    2014-03-01

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D'0, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D'0 = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D'0 ≤ 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of dm, with D'0 = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  16. Treatment of patient-dependent beam modifiers in photon treatments by the Monte Carlo dose calculation code PEREGRINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schach von Wittenau, A.E.; Cox, L.J.; Bergstrom, P.M. Jr.; Hornstein, S.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Mohan, R.; Libby, B.; Wu, Q. [Medical Coll. of Virginia, Richmond, VA (United States); Lovelock, D.M.J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1997-03-01

    The goal of the PEREGRINE Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Project is to deliver a Monte Carlo package that is both accurate and sufficiently fast for routine clinical use. One of the operational requirements for photon-treatment plans is a fast, accurate method of describing the photon phase-space distribution at the surface of the patient. The open-field case is computationally the most tractable; we know, a priori, for a given machine and energy, the locations and compositions of the relevant accelerator components (i.e., target, primary collimator, flattening filter, and monitor chamber). Therefore, we can precalculate and store the expected photon distributions. For any open-field treatment plan, we then evaluate these existing photon phase-space distributions at the patient`s surface, and pass the obtained photons to the dose calculation routines within PEREGRINE. We neglect any effect of the intervening air column, including attenuation of the photons and production of contaminant electrons. In principle, for treatment plans requiring jaws, blocks, and wedges, we could precalculate and store photon phase-space distributions for various combinations of field sizes and wedges. This has the disadvantage that we would have to anticipate those combinations and that subsequently PEREGRINE would not be able to treat other plans. Therefore, PEREGRINE tracks photons through the patient-dependent beam modifiers. The geometric and physics methods used to do this are described here. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Optical cone beam tomography of Cherenkov-mediated signals for fast 3D dosimetry of x-ray photon beams in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, Adam K., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Zhang, Rongxiao [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Pogue, Brian W., E-mail: Adam.K.Glaser@dartmouth.edu, E-mail: Brian.W.Pogue@dartmouth.edu [Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Gladstone, David J. [Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To test the use of a three-dimensional (3D) optical cone beam computed tomography reconstruction algorithm, for estimation of the imparted 3D dose distribution from megavoltage photon beams in a water tank for quality assurance, by imaging the induced Cherenkov-excited fluorescence (CEF). Methods: An intensified charge-coupled device coupled to a standard nontelecentric camera lens was used to tomographically acquire two-dimensional (2D) projection images of CEF from a complex multileaf collimator (MLC) shaped 6 MV linear accelerator x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 600 MU/min. The resulting projections were used to reconstruct the 3D CEF light distribution, a potential surrogate of imparted dose, using a Feldkamp–Davis–Kress cone beam back reconstruction algorithm. Finally, the reconstructed light distributions were compared to the expected dose values from one-dimensional diode scans, 2D film measurements, and the 3D distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system using a gamma index analysis. A Monte Carlo derived correction was applied to the Cherenkov reconstructions to account for beam hardening artifacts. Results: 3D light volumes were successfully reconstructed over a 400 × 400 × 350 mm{sup 3} volume at a resolution of 1 mm. The Cherenkov reconstructions showed agreement with all comparative methods and were also able to recover both inter- and intra-MLC leaf leakage. Based upon a 3%/3 mm criterion, the experimental Cherenkov light measurements showed an 83%–99% pass fraction depending on the chosen threshold dose. Conclusions: The results from this study demonstrate the use of optical cone beam computed tomography using CEF for the profiling of the imparted dose distribution from large area megavoltage photon beams in water.

  18. Real-time optical-fibre luminescence dosimetry for radiotherapy: physical characteristics and applications in photon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, M.C.; Andersen, C.E.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.;

    2004-01-01

    A new optical-fibre radiation dosimeter system, based on radioluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence from carbon-doped aluminium oxide, was developed and tested in clinical photon beams. This prototype offers several features, such as a small detector (1 x 1 x 2 mm), high sensitivity...

  19. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures — a choice of parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S.; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J.; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2016-09-01

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm2. Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications.

  20. High speed e-beam writing for large area photonic nanostructures - a choice of parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kezheng; Li, Juntao; Reardon, Christopher; Schuster, Christian S; Wang, Yue; Triggs, Graham J; Damnik, Niklas; Müenchenberger, Jana; Wang, Xuehua; Martins, Emiliano R; Krauss, Thomas F

    2016-09-16

    Photonic nanostructures are used for many optical systems and applications. However, some high-end applications require the use of electron-beam lithography (EBL) to generate such nanostructures. An important technological bottleneck is the exposure time of the EBL systems, which can exceed 24 hours per 1 cm(2). Here, we have developed a method based on a target function to systematically increase the writing speed of EBL. As an example, we use as the target function the fidelity of the Fourier Transform spectra of nanostructures that are designed for thin film light trapping applications, and optimize the full parameter space of the lithography process. Finally, we are able to reduce the exposure time by a factor of 5.5 without loss of photonic performance. We show that the performances of the fastest written structures are identical to the original ones within experimental error. As the target function can be varied according to different purposes, the method is also applicable to guided mode resonant grating and many other areas. These findings contribute to the advancement of EBL and point towards making the technology more attractive for commercial applications.

  1. Ion beam etching of multilevel masking layers written by two-photon lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Jana; Hengsbach, Stefan; Bade, Klaus; Wallrabe, Ulrike; Völklein, Friedemann

    2017-07-01

    Ion beam etching (IBE) provides high surface quality. Finding suitable masking layers is one of the key issues for process optimization. In case of high-intensity and long-term IBE conventional photoresists are not appropriate as masking layers. As an alternative in terms of thermal durability, photoresist masking layers polymerized with two-photon lithography were investigated here and their IBE etch rates were measured. A hard bake (200 °C) lowered them due to higher crosslinking without an alteration of the structure shapes. Two-photon lithography enables the fabrication of multilevel structures which can be etched in one process step. Two types of 3D masking layers were transferred into fused silica to demonstrate this approach. Diffractive structures were chosen because their diffraction efficiency benefits from the high surface quality provided by IBE and it is influenced by fabrication induced deviations of the geometry: 3D line gratings with overlapping photoresist areas are a new approach to avoid delamination problems without the necessity of the integration of unwanted gaps into the resist patterns. Measurements proved good agreement of the diffraction efficiency with simulated results, differ only by 1.14%. The transfer of blazed grating structures illustrated the effect of the angle dependence of the etch rate. The transferred structures showed good agreement with the step heights forecast on the basis of process selectivity.

  2. First doubly polarised photoproduction on {sup 3}He at the photon beam of MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguar Bartolome, Patricia

    2010-11-15

    A first experiment with a polarised {sup 3}He target was carried out in July 2009 at the MAMI accelerator in Mainz in a photon energy range between 200 MeV and 800 MeV. The aim of this measurement was to investigate the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn sum rule on the neutron. The use of the data obtained with the polarised {sup 3}He target, compared to existing data on the deuteron, gives a complementary and more direct access to the neutron, due to the spin structure of the {sup 3}He. The measurement of the helicity dependence of the inclusive total photoabsorption cross section required a beam of tagged circularly polarised photons incident on the longitudinally polarised {sup 3}He target. The data were taken using the 4{pi} Crystal Ball photon spectrometer in combination with TAPS as a forward wall and complemented by a threshold Cherenkov detector used to on-line suppress the background from electromagnetic events. The development and preparation of the different components of the {sup 3}He experimental setup was an important part of this work and are described in detail in this thesis. The detector system and the analysis method were tested by the measurement of the unpolarised total inclusive photoabsorption cross section on liquid hydrogen. The results obtained are in good agreement with previous published data. Preliminary results of the unpolarised total photoabsorption cross section, as well as the helicity dependent photoabsorption cross section difference on {sup 3}He compared with several theoretical models will also be presented. (orig.)

  3. ``Entangled'' free-induction decay in CdS crystal under two-photon excitation by two crossed laser beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiev, A. V.; Lobkov, V. S.; Mitrofanova, T. G.; Shmelyov, A. G.; Samartsev, V. V.

    2012-09-01

    A new method of two-photon excitation of femtosecond signals of ``entangled'' free induction decay (EFID) by two crossed 790-nm laser beams in a CdS crystal at room temperature has been realized for the first time. This ``entangled'' (through the wave vectors) coherent response appears only in the case when the photons involved to the process of two-photon excitation of the sample belong to the different laser beams. This technique allows one to separate the EFID signal from the exciting femtosecond pulses and to vary the response wavelength by varying the angle between their wave vectors. The most optimal case occurs when the angle between the wave vectors of exciting pulses as well as the angle between each of these wave vectors and that of the response is equal to 60°.

  4. Boosting runtime-performance of photon pencil beam algorithms for radiotherapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggel, M; Ziegenhein, P; Nill, S; Oelfke, U

    2012-10-01

    Pencil beam algorithms are still considered as standard photon dose calculation methods in Radiotherapy treatment planning for many clinical applications. Despite their established role in radiotherapy planning their performance and clinical applicability has to be continuously adapted to evolving complex treatment techniques such as adaptive radiation therapy (ART). We herewith report on a new highly efficient version of a well-established pencil beam convolution algorithm which relies purely on measured input data. A method was developed that improves raytracing efficiency by exploiting the capability of modern CPU architecture for a runtime reduction. Since most of the current desktop computers provide more than one calculation unit we used symmetric multiprocessing extensively to parallelize the workload and thus decreasing the algorithmic runtime. To maximize the advantage of code parallelization, we present two implementation strategies - one for the dose calculation in inverse planning software, and one for traditional forward planning. As a result, we could achieve on a 16-core personal computer with AMD processors a superlinear speedup factor of approx. 18 for calculating the dose distribution of typical forward IMRT treatment plans.

  5. Characterization techniques for the high-brightness particle beams of the Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A.H.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) will be a third-generation synchrotron radiation (SR) user facility in the hard x-ray regime (10--100 keV). The design objectives for the 7-GeV storage ring include a positron beam natural emittance of 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} m-rad at an average current of 100 mA. Proposed methods for measuring the transverse and longitudinal profiles will be described. Additionally, a research and development effort using an rf gun as a low-emittance source of electrons for injection into the 200- to 650-MeV linac subsystem is underway. This latter system is projected to produce electron beams with a normalized, rms emittance of {approximately}2 {pi} mm-mrad at peak currents of near one hundred amps. This interesting characterization problem will also be briefly discussed. The combination of both source types within one laboratory facility will stimulate the development of diagnostic techniques in these parameter spaces.

  6. Analysis of ionic mobilities in liquid isooctane with low dose radiotherapy pulsed photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo-Montero, J.; Tegami, S.; Gago-Arias, A.; González-Castaño, D. M.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Gómez, F.

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a model of signal temporal development in ionization chambers and we use it to determine ionic mobilities and relative densities of charge carriers in non-ultrapure liquid isooctane using a liquid-filled ionization chamber dosimeter. The detector has been irradiated with a low dose rate, short pulsed photon beam generated with a medical LINAC. Ionic mobilities have been obtained by studying the temporal development of the readout signal and fitting it to a model for low dose rate beams where recombination is negligible. The best fit has been obtained for 3 ionic species with mobilities k1 = (2.22±0.22) × 10-8, k2 = (3.37±0.43) × 10-8, k3 = (19.69±2.59) × 10-8 m2 V-1 s-1 and relative densities n1 = 0.5 (n1 is not a fitting parameter), n2 = 0.23±0.03 and n3 = 0.27±0.03.

  7. Evaluation of Electron Contamination in Cancer Treatment with Megavoltage Photon Beams: Monte Carlo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seif F

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Megavoltage beams used in radiotherapy are contaminated with secondary electrons. Different parts of linac head and air above patient act as a source of this contamination. This contamination can increase damage to skin and subcutaneous tissue during radiotherapy. Monte Carlo simulation is an accurate method for dose calculation in medical dosimetry and has an important role in optimization of linac head materials. The aim of this study was to calculate electron contamination of Varian linac. Materials and Method: The 6MV photon beam of Varian (2100 C/D linac was simulated by Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, based on its company’s instructions. The validation was done by comparing the calculated depth dose and profiles of simulation with dosimetry measurements in a water phantom (error less than 2%. The Percentage Depth Dose (PDDs, profiles and contamination electron energy spectrum were calculated for different therapeutic field sizes (5×5 to 40×40 cm2 for both linacs. Results: The dose of electron contamination was observed to rise with increase in field size. The contribution of the secondary contamination electrons on the surface dose was 6% for 5×5 cm2 to 27% for 40×40 cm2 , respectively. Conclusion: Based on the results, the effect of electron contamination on patient surface dose cannot be ignored, so the knowledge of the electron contamination is important in clinical dosimetry. It must be calculated for each machine and considered in Treatment Planning Systems.

  8. A compact T-branch beam splitter based on anomalous reflection in two-dimensional photonic crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifeng Shen; Jian Sun; Xiaopeng Shen; Juan Wang; Lulu Sun; Kui Han; Guozhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    @@ We project a compact T-branch beam splitter with a micron scale using a two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC). For TE polarization, one light beam can be split into two sub-beams along opposite directions. The propagating directions of the two splitting beams remain unchanged when the incident angle varies in a certain range. Coupled-mode theory is used to analyze the truncating interface structure in order to investigate the energy loss of the splitter. Simulation results and theoretical analysis show that choosing an appropriate location of the truncating interface (PC-air interface) is very important for obtaining high efficiency due to the effect of defect modes. The most advantage of this kind of beam splitter is being fabricated and integrated easily.

  9. X-ray beam stabilization at BL-17A, the protein microcrystallography beamline of the Photon Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Noriyuki; Ikuta, Kazuyuki; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Matsugaki, Naohiro; Yamada, Yusuke; Yousef, Mohammad S.; Wakatsuki, Soichi

    2008-01-01

    BL-17A is a new structural biology beamline at the Photon Factory, Japan. The high-brilliance beam, derived from the new short-gap undulator (SGU#17), allows for unique protein crystallographic experiments such as data collection from microcrystals and structural determination using softer X-rays. However, microcrystal experiments require robust beam stability during data collection and minor fluctuations could not be ignored. Initially, significant beam instability was observed at BL-17A. The causes of the beam instability were investigated and its various sources identified. Subsequently, several effective countermeasures have been implemented, and the fluctuation of the beam intensity successfully suppressed to within 1%. Here the instability reduction techniques used at BL-17A are presented. PMID:18421162

  10. A study of Rhizophora spp wood phantom for dosimetric purposes using high-energy photon and electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banjade, D.P. E-mail: dpbl4007@stud.usm.my; Tajuddin, A.A.; Shukri, A

    2001-09-01

    Previous scattering and depth-dose investigations involving use of the Malaysian hardwood Rhizophora spp have shown this medium to produce good agreement with measurements made in water. Present study extends the comparison, now including measurements of percentage depth-dose made for photons at 6 MV and 5 and 12 MeV electron beams. For the 6 MV photon and 5 MeV electron beams, discrepancies between percentage depth-dose for Rhizophora spp and water, at all depths, are found to be within 2.6 and 2.4% respectively. At 12 MeV electron energies, measured percentage depth-doses in Rhizophora spp beyond 3.5 cm depth are found to be in significant discord with those for water. The absorbed dose in water measured in Rhizophora spp at d{sub max} for all three beams produces discrepancies of no more than 1.1% when compared with measurements made in water.

  11. The effect of density on the 10MV photon beam penumbra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban, P W; Keal, P J; Round, W H

    1992-09-01

    An investigation into the density dependence of the penumbra of the Varian Clinac 18/10 10MV photon beam has been carried out. A water/lung phantom was constructed of polystyrene (r = 1.04 g cm-3) and cork (r = 0.23 g cm-3), in which interfaces exist both parallel and perpendicular to the beam axis. The irradiation of the phantom was also simulated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo system with a cartesian voxel geometry. Experimental (TLD) and Monte Carlo dose profiles are in close agreement, and show a large degree of penumbral broadening in the lung region. This broadening is due primarily to lateral electronic disequilibrium occurring at a larger distance from the geometric beam edge in lung than in water. This disequilibrium can also cause the dose in lung to drop below the dose in water at the same depth and off axis distance, even though the radiological depth is less in lung. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed where the dose is separated into primary and scattered components, for homogeneous media of densities 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 g cm-3. The penumbral width of the primary dose profile was found to be almost constant with depth for a point source of photons (after the initial build-up region), where the lateral distances from the 95-50% and 50-5% dose levels on the dose profile (normalised to the dose at the central axis) are equal in all cases. Also, primary penumbra width was found to be almost inversely proportional to density. The primary penumbra for a unit density material can be fitted accurately by an exponential forming function with empirical determined coefficients. The penumbral shape for the lower densities can then be closely fitted by scaling the coefficients in proportion to density. This scaling method has application in treatment planning, where the predicted primary penumbra shape should take account of inhomogeneities, and is particularly important in matching adjacent fields. When the scattered dose component is added to give the

  12. Extrapolation chamber mounted on perspex for calibration of high energy photon and electron beams from a clinical linear accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravichandran R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to establish radiation standards for absorbed doses, for clinical high energy linear accelerator beams. In the nonavailability of a cobalt-60 beam for arriving at Nd, water values for thimble chambers, we investigated the efficacy of perspex mounted extrapolation chamber (EC used earlier for low energy x-rays and beta dosimetry. Extrapolation chamber with facility for achieving variable electrode separations 10.5mm to 0.5mm using micrometer screw was used for calibrations. Photon beams 6 MV and 15 MV and electron beams 6 MeV and 15 MeV from Varian Clinac linacs were calibrated. Absorbed Dose estimates to Perspex were converted into dose to solid water for comparison with FC 65 ionisation chamber measurements in water. Measurements made during the period December 2006 to June 2008 are considered for evaluation. Uncorrected ionization readings of EC for all the radiation beams over the entire period were within 2% showing the consistency of measurements. Absorbed doses estimated by EC were in good agreement with in-water calibrations within 2% for photons and electron beams. The present results suggest that extrapolation chambers can be considered as an independent measuring system for absorbed dose in addition to Farmer type ion chambers. In the absence of standard beam quality (Co-60 radiations as reference Quality for Nd,water the possibility of keeping EC as Primary Standards for absorbed dose calibrations in high energy radiation beams from linacs should be explored. As there are neither Standard Laboratories nor SSDL available in our country, we look forward to keep EC as Local Standard for hospital chamber calibrations. We are also participating in the IAEA mailed TLD intercomparison programme for quality audit of existing status of radiation dosimetry in high energy linac beams. The performance of EC has to be confirmed with cobalt-60 beams by a separate study, as linacs are susceptible for minor

  13. Monochromatic gamma emitter for low energy quanta

    CERN Document Server

    Tomova, Z R; Mironova, S A

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of creating of a monochromatic gamma emitter of low energy quanta is analyzed. The idea is based on Daning's scheme. Except for purely scientific problems the monochromator is actual for therapy of wide range of diseases.

  14. Monte Carlo-based investigations on the impact of removing the flattening filter on beam quality specifiers for photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Damian; Poppe, Björn; Zink, Klemens

    2017-06-01

    The impact of removing the flattening filter in clinical electron accelerators on the relationship between dosimetric quantities such as beam quality specifiers and the mean photon and electron energies of the photon radiation field was investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. The purpose of this work was to determine the uncertainties when using the well-known beam quality specifiers or energy-based beam specifiers as predictors of dosimetric photon field properties when removing the flattening filter. Monte Carlo simulations applying eight different linear accelerator head models with and without flattening filter were performed in order to generate realistic radiation sources and calculate field properties such as restricted mass collision stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and secondary electron energies. To study the impact of removing the flattening filter on the beam quality correction factors kQ , this factor for detailed ionization chamber models was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater and kQ values for different ionization chambers as a function of TPR1020 and %dd(10)x were calculated. Moreover, mean photon energies in air and at the point of measurement in water as well as mean secondary electron energies at the point of measurement were calculated. The results revealed that removing the flattening filter led to a change within 0.3% in the relationship between %dd(10)x and (L¯/ρ)airwater, whereby the relationship between TPR1020 and (L¯/ρ)airwater changed up to 0.8% for high energy photon beams. However, TPR1020 was a good predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater for both types of linear accelerator with energies mean photon energy below the linear accelerators head as well as at the point of measurement may not be suitable as a predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater and kQ to merge the dosimetry of both linear accelerator types. It was possible to derive (L¯/ρ)airwater using the mean secondary electron energy

  15. Constraints on photon pulse duration from longitudinal electron beam diagnostics at a soft x-ray free-electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Behrens

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The successful operation of x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs, like the Linac Coherent Light Source or the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH, makes unprecedented research on matter at atomic length and ultrafast time scales possible. However, in order to take advantage of these unique light sources and to meet the strict requirements of many experiments in photon science, FEL photon pulse durations need to be known and tunable. This can be achieved by controlling the FEL driving electron beams, and high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics can be utilized to provide constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In this paper, we present comparative measurements of soft x-ray pulse durations and electron bunch lengths at FLASH. The soft x-ray pulse durations were measured by FEL radiation pulse energy statistics and compared to electron bunch lengths determined by frequency-domain spectroscopy of coherent transition radiation in the terahertz range and time-domain longitudinal phase space measurements. The experimental results, theoretical considerations, and simulations show that high-resolution longitudinal electron beam diagnostics provide reasonable constraints on the expected FEL photon pulse durations. In addition, we demonstrated the generation of soft x-ray pulses with durations below 50 fs (FWHM after the implementation of the new uniform electron bunch compression scheme used at FLASH.

  16. In vivo dosimetry using a single diode for megavoltage photon beam radiotherapy: implementation and response characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, V C; Beddar, A S; Kinsella, T J; Sibata, C H

    2001-01-01

    The AAPM Task Group 40 reported that in vivo dosimetry can be used to identify major deviations in treatment delivery in radiation therapy. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of using one single diode to perform in vivo dosimetry in the entire radiotherapeutic energy range regardless of its intrinsic buildup material. The only requirement on diode selection would be to choose a diode with the adequate build up to measure the highest beam energy. We have tested the new diodes from Sun Nuclear Corporation (called QED and ISORAD-p--both p-type) for low-, intermediate-, and high-energy range. We have clinically used both diode types to monitor entrance doses. In general, we found that the dose readings from the ISORAD (p-type) are closer of the dose expected than QED diodes in the clinical setting. In this paper we report on the response of these newly available ISORAD (p-type) diode detectors with respect to certain radiation field parameters such as source-to-surface distance, field size, wedge beam modifiers, as well as other parameters that affect detector characteristics (temperature and detector-beam orientation). We have characterized the response of the high-energy ISORAD (p-type) diode in the low- (1-4 MV), intermediate- (6-12 MV), and high-energy (15-25 MV) range. Our results showed that the total variation of the response of high-energy ISORAD (p-type) diodes to all the above parameters are within +/-5% in most encountered clinical patient treatment setups in the megavoltage photon beam radiotherapy. The usage of the high-energy buildup diode has the additional benefit of amplifying the response of the diode reading in case the wrong energy is used for patient treatment. In the light of these findings, we have since then switched to using only one single diode type, namely the "red" diode; manufacturer designation of the ISORAD (p-type) high-energy (15-25 MV) range diode, for all energies in our institution and satellites.

  17. Low-energy broad-beam photon shielding data for constituents of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundare, Folorunso O; Ogundele, Samuel A; Akerele, Olumide O; Balogun, Fatai A

    2012-03-08

    The ability of concrete to attenuate ionizing radiation intensity is assessed using its linear or mass attenuation coefficient. In this work, the broad-beam linear and mass attenuation coefficients of different types of soils and cements used for making concrete were measured at different photon energies (60-1333 keV), nearly spanning the diagnostic photon energy range, using a NaI detector. The mass attenuation coefficients of cement decreased from 0.133 ± 0.002 at 60 keV to 0.047 ± 0.003 at 1332.5 keV. For soils, the mass attenuation coefficient of those collected from the beach was the highest, decreasing from 0.176 ± 0.003 cm²/g at 60 keV to 0.054 ± 0.001 cm²/g at 1332.5 keV. Land soils had the least value, decreasing from 0.124 ± 0.002 cm²/g at 60 keV to 0.044 ± 0.003 cm²/g at 1332.5 keV. Limestone had smaller mass attenuation coefficients than the cement produced using it. The implication of the above is that for making concrete, beach sand should be preferred as the sand component of the concrete. Models of the form μ(L) = A(E) exp[B(E)ρ] and μ(m) = αln(E)+β are proposed for fitting the linear attenuation coefficient and mass attenuation coefficient data, respectively.

  18. On Analytical Solutions to Beam-Hardening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigaud, G.

    2017-01-01

    When polychromatic X-rays propagate through a material, for instance in computerized tomography (CT), low energy photons are more attenuated resulting in a "harder" beam. The beam-hardening phenomenon breaks the monochromatic radiation model based on the Radon transform giving rise to artifacts in CT reconstructions to the detriment of visual inspection and automated segmentation algorithms. We propose first a simplified analytic representation for the beam-hardening. Besides providing a general understanding of the phenomenon, this model proposes to invert the beam-hardening effect for homogeneous objects leading to classical monochromatic data. For heterogeneous objects, no analytical reconstruction of the density can be derived without more prior information. However, the beam-hardening is shown to be a smooth operation on the data and thus to preserve the encoding of the singularities of the attenuation map within the data. A microlocal analysis encourages the use of contour extraction methods to solve partially the beam-hardening effect even for heterogeneous objects. The application of both methods, exact analytical solution for homogeneous objects and feature extraction for heterogeneous ones, on real data demonstrates their relevancy and efficiency.

  19. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh, E-mail: asingh.rs.ece@iitbhu.ac.in [Faculty of Physical Sciences, Institute of Natural Sciences and Humanities, Shri Ramswaroop Memorial University, Lucknow-Deva Road, Uttar Pradesh 225003 (India); Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India); Jain, P. K. [Center of Research in Microwave Tubes, Department of Electronics Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  20. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Martin A; Iskhakov, Timur Sh; Joly, Nicolas Y; Chekhova, Maria V; Russell, Philip St J

    2015-10-02

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ∼2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (∼50  THz) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content.

  1. Raman-Free, Noble-Gas-Filled Photonic-Crystal Fiber Source for Ultrafast, Very Bright Twin-Beam Squeezed Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Martin A.; Iskhakov, Timur Sh.; Joly, Nicolas Y.; Chekhova, Maria V.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel source of twin beams based on modulational instability in high-pressure argon-filled hollow-core kagome-style photonic-crystal fiber. The source is Raman-free and manifests strong photon-number correlations for femtosecond pulses of squeezed vacuum with a record brightness of ˜2500 photons per mode. The ultra-broadband (˜50 THz ) twin beams are frequency tunable and contain one spatial and less than 5 frequency modes. The presented source outperforms all previously reported squeezed-vacuum twin-beam sources in terms of brightness and low mode content.

  2. Experimental analysis of general ion recombination in a liquid-filled ionization chamber in high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eunah; Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal General Hospital (L5-113), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Davis, Stephen [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal General Hospital (L5-112), 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To study experimentally the general ion recombination effect in a liquid-filled ionization chamber (LIC) in high-energy photon beams. Methods: The general ion recombination effect on the response of a micro liquid ion chamber (microLion) was investigated with a 6 MV photon beam in normal and SRS modes produced from a Varian{sup Registered-Sign} Novalis Tx{sup TM} linear accelerator. Dose rates of the linear accelerator were set to 100, 400, and 1000 MU/min, which correspond to pulse repetition frequencies of 60, 240, and 600 Hz, respectively. Polarization voltages applied to the microLion were +800 and +400 V. The relative collection efficiency of the microLion response as a function of dose per pulse was experimentally measured with changing polarization voltage and pulse repetition frequencies and was compared with the theoretically calculated value. Results: For the 60 Hz pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency was not different from the theoretical one for a pulsed beam more than 0.3% for both polarization voltages. For a pulsed radiation beam with a higher pulse repetition frequency, the experimental relative collection efficiency converged to the theoretically calculated efficiency for continuous beams. This result indicates that the response of the microLion tends toward the response to a continuous beam with increasing pulse repetition frequency of a pulsed beam because of low ion mobility in the liquid. Conclusions: This work suggests an empirical method to correct for differences in general ion recombination of a LIC between different radiation fields. More work is needed to quantitatively explain the LIC general ion recombination behavior in pulsed beams generated from linear accelerators.

  3. Surface dose variations in 6 and 10 MV flattened and flattening filter-free (FFF) photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashmore, Jason

    2016-01-01

    As the use of linear accelerators operating in flattening filter-free (FFF) modes becomes more widespread, it is important to have an understanding of the surface doses delivered to patients with these beams. Flattening filter removal alters the beam quality and relative contributions of low-energy X-rays and contamination electrons in the beam. Having dosimetric data to describe the surface dose and buildup regions under a range of conditions for FFF beams is important if clinical decisions are to be made. An Elekta Synergy linac with standard MLCi head has been commissioned to run at 6 MV and 10 MV running with the flattening filter in or out. In this linac the 6 MV FFF beam has been energy-matched to the clinical beam on the central axis (D10). The 10 MV beam energy has not been adjusted. The flattening filter in both cases is replaced by a thin (2 mm) stainless steel plate. A thin window parallel plate chamber has been used to measure a comprehensive set of surface dose data in these beams for variations in field size and SSD, and for the presence of attenuators (wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch). Surface doses are generally higher in FFF beams for small field sizes and lower for large field sizes with a crossover at 10 × 10 cm2 at 6 MV and 25 × 25 cm2 at 10 MV. This trend is also seen in the presence of the wedge, shadow tray, and treatment couch. Only small differences (free beams show far less variation with field size than conventional beams. By removing the flattening filter, a source of contamination electrons is exchanged for a source of low-energy photons (as these are no longer attenuated). In practice these two components almost balance out. No significant effects on surface dose are expected by the introduction of FFF delivery.

  4. Commissioning of photon beams of a flattening filter-free linear accelerator and the accuracy of beam modeling using an anisotropic analytical algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbacek, Jan; Lang, Stephanie; Klöck, Stephan

    2011-07-15

    To investigate dosimetric characteristics of a new linear accelerator designed to deliver flattened, as well as flattening filter-free (FFF), beams. To evaluate the accuracy of beam modeling under physical conditions using an anisotropic analytical algorithm. Dosimetric data including depth dose curves, profiles, surface dose, penumbra, out-of-field dose, output, total and scatter factors were examined for four beams (X6, X6FFF, X10, and X10FFF) of Varian's TrueBeam machine. Beams modeled by anisotropic analytical algorithm were compared with measured dataset. FFF beams have lower mean energy (tissue-phantom ratio at the depths of 20 and 10 cm (TPR 20/10): X6, 0.667; X6FFF, 0.631; X10, 0.738; X10FFF, 0.692); maximum dose is located closer to the surface; and surface dose increases by 10%. FFF profiles have sharper but faster diverging penumbra. For small fields and shallow depths, dose outside a field is lower for FFF beams; however, the advantage fades with increasing phantom scatter. Output increases 2.26 times for X6FFF and 4.03 times for X10FFF and is less variable with field size; collimator exchange effect is reduced. A good agreement between modeled and measured data is observed. Criteria of 2% depth-dose and 2-mm distance-to-agreement are always met. Reference dosimetric characteristics of TrueBeam photon bundles were obtained, and successful modeling of the beams was achieved. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of the recombination correction for the BIPM parallel-plate ionization chamber type in a pulsed photon beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picard, Susanne; Burns, David T. [Bureau International des Poids et Mesures, Pavillon de Breteuil, F92312 Sevres cedex (France); Ostrowsky, Aime [Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel - LNHB, CEA Saclay - 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The correction factor for recombination losses k{sub s} has been determined for the BIPM parallel-plate ionization chamber type in the pulsed photon beam of a clinical linear accelerator. Initial recombination is in agreement with that obtained for the same chamber type in a continuous beam, while linearity in the volume recombination loss is confirmed at dose rates up to 80 pC per pulse, which corresponds to about 0.33 mGy per pulse (or around 2 Gy min{sup -1} at 100 Hz)

  6. Penumbra characteristics of square photon beams delimited by a GEMS multi-leaf collimator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briot, E.; Julia, F. [Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer Gustave-Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1995-12-01

    A multi-leaf collimator (MLC) has been designed to replace directly the standard collimator of a SATURNE IV Series linac. It consists of 2 x 32 tungsten leaves and one set of upper block jaws. Isodose curves and dose profiles were measured for symmetric fields at the depth of the maximum and the reference depths for 6 MV, 10 MV, 18 MV photon beams. The penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the face and the side of the leaves have been compared with the standard collimators. Along with the X direction, the field delimitation is performed primarily with the leaves which are continuously variable in position. Along the Y direction, the field is initially approximated by the closure of opposite leaf pairs; then the Y upper jaws produce the exact size of the required field. As the leaves move linearly the penumbra (80%-20%) corresponding to the leaf ends is minimized and held constant at all positions by curvature of their faces. Penumbra obtained with the superposition of leaves and Y jaws depend on their relative position. The penumbra is minimum when the leaf side and the Y jaw edge coincide and the comparison of the measurement values with the conventional collimator shows that the differences are within 1 mm. When the leaves delineating the field are not entirely covered by the Y block upper jaws, the penumbra increases, and the junction of the opposing leaves, a width increase up to 3.5 mm has been measured.

  7. Diffraction inspired unidirectional and bidirectional beam splitting in defect-containing photonic structures without interface corrugations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colak, Evrim; Serebryannikov, Andriy E.; Usik, P. V.; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2016-05-01

    It is shown that strong diffractions and related dual-beam splitting can be obtained at transmission through the nonsymmetric structures that represent two slabs of photonic crystal (PhC) separated by a single coupled-cavity type defect layer, while there are no grating-like corrugations at the interfaces. The basic operation regimes include unidirectional and bidirectional splitting that occur due to the dominant contribution of the first positive and first negative diffraction orders to the transmission, which is typically connected with different manifestations of the asymmetric transmission phenomenon. Being the main component of the resulting transmission mechanism, diffractions appear owing to the effect exerted by the defect layer that works like an embedded diffractive element. Two mechanisms can co-exist in one structure, which differ, among others, in that whether dispersion allows coupling of zero order to a wave propagating in the regular, i.e., defect-free PhC segments or not. The possibility of strong diffractions and efficient splitting related to it strongly depend on the dispersion properties of the Floquet-Bloch modes of the PhC. Existence of one of the studied transmission scenarios is not affected by location of the defect layer.

  8. Diffraction inspired unidirectional and bidirectional beam splitting in defect-containing photonic structures without interface corrugations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colak, Evrim [Electrical Engineering Department, Ankara University, Golbasi, 06830 Ankara (Turkey); Serebryannikov, Andriy E., E-mail: andser@amu.edu.pl [Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Usik, P. V. [Institute of Radio Astronomy, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 61002 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Ozbay, Ekmel [Nanotechnology Research Center—NANOTAM, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-05-21

    It is shown that strong diffractions and related dual-beam splitting can be obtained at transmission through the nonsymmetric structures that represent two slabs of photonic crystal (PhC) separated by a single coupled-cavity type defect layer, while there are no grating-like corrugations at the interfaces. The basic operation regimes include unidirectional and bidirectional splitting that occur due to the dominant contribution of the first positive and first negative diffraction orders to the transmission, which is typically connected with different manifestations of the asymmetric transmission phenomenon. Being the main component of the resulting transmission mechanism, diffractions appear owing to the effect exerted by the defect layer that works like an embedded diffractive element. Two mechanisms can co-exist in one structure, which differ, among others, in that whether dispersion allows coupling of zero order to a wave propagating in the regular, i.e., defect-free PhC segments or not. The possibility of strong diffractions and efficient splitting related to it strongly depend on the dispersion properties of the Floquet-Bloch modes of the PhC. Existence of one of the studied transmission scenarios is not affected by location of the defect layer.

  9. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Boehlen, T.T.; Chin, M.P.W. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Collamati, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Faccini, R., E-mail: riccardo.faccini@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ferrari, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Lanza, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mancini-Terracciano, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “E. Fermi”, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Morganti, S. [INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Ortega, P.G. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Patera, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Piersanti, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Russomando, A. [Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Sala, P.R. [INFN Sezione di Milano, Milano (Italy); and others

    2014-05-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum. This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is reported.

  10. Tissue classifications in Monte Carlo simulations of patient dose for photon beam tumor treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Mu-Han [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, 101 Sec. 2, Kung Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chao, Tsi-Chian [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chung-Chi [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tung-Chieh Chang, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5 Fu-Hsin Street, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China); Tung, Chuan-Jong, E-mail: cjtung@mail.cgu.edu.t [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, 259 Wen-Hwa 1st Road, Kwei-Shan, Tao-Yuan 333, Taiwan (China)

    2010-07-21

    The purpose of this work was to study the calculated dose uncertainties induced by the material classification that determined the interaction cross-sections and the water-to-material stopping-power ratios. Calculations were made for a head- and neck-cancer patient treated with five intensity-modulated radiotherapy fields using 6 MV photon beams. The patient's CT images were reconstructed into two voxelized patient phantoms based on different CT-to-material classification schemes. Comparisons of the depth-dose curve of the anterior-to-posterior field and the dose-volume-histogram of the treatment plan were used to evaluate the dose uncertainties from such schemes. The results indicated that any misassignment of tissue materials could lead to a substantial dose difference, which would affect the treatment outcome. To assure an appropriate material assignment, it is desirable to have different conversion tables for various parts of the body. The assignment of stopping-power ratio should be based on the chemical composition and the density of the material.

  11. submitter Light Extraction From Scintillating Crystals Enhanced by Photonic Crystal Structures Patterned by Focused Ion Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Modrzynski, Pawel; Knapitsch, Arno; Kunicki, Piotr; Lecoq, Paul; Moczala, Magdalena; Papakonstantinou, Ioannis; Auffray, Etiennette

    2016-01-01

    Photonic Crystals (PhC)” have been used in a variety of fields as a structure for improving the light extraction efficiency from materials with high index of refraction. In previous work we already showed the light extraction improvement of several PhC covered LYSO crystals in computer simulations and practical measurements. In this work, new samples are made using different materials and techniques which allows further efficiency improvements. For rapid prototyping of PhC patterns on scintillators we tested a new method using “Focused Ion Beam (FIB)” patterning. The FIB machine is a device similar to a “Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)”, but it uses ions (mainly gallium) instead of electrons for the imaging of the samples' surface. The additional feature of FIB devices is the option of surface patterning in nano-scale which was exploited for our samples. Three samples using FIB patterning have been produced. One of them is a direct patterning of the extraction face of a 0.8×0.8×10 $mm^3$ LYS...

  12. Extended calibration range for prompt photon emission in ion beam irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Bellini, F.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the dose delivered during proton and carbon ion therapy is still a matter of research. Among the possible solutions, several exploit the measurement of the single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. To fully characterize such emission the detectors need development, since the energy spectrum spans the range above the MeV that is not traditionally used in medical applications. On the other hand, a deeper understanding of the reactions involving gamma production is needed in order to improve the physic models of Monte Carlo codes, relevant for an accurate prediction of the prompt-gamma energy spectrum.This paper describes a calibration technique tailored for the range of energy of interest and reanalyzes the data of the interaction of a 80MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. By adopting the FLUKA simulation with the appropriate calibration and resolution a significant improvement in the agreement between data and simulation is report...

  13. Experimental Observations of Nuclear Activity in Deuterated Materials Subjected to a Low-Energy Photon Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Benyo, Theresa L.; Pines, Vladimir; Pines, Marianna; Forsley, Lawrence P.; Westmeyer, Paul A.; Chait, Arnon; Becks, Michael D.; Martin, Richard E.; Hendricks, Robert C.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Exposure of highly deuterated materials to a low-energy (nom. 2 MeV) photon beam resulted in nuclear activity of both the parent metals of hafnium and erbium and a witness material (molybdenum) mixed with the reactants. Gamma spectral analysis of all deuterated materials, ErD2.8+C36D74+Mo and HfD2+C36D74+Mo, showed that nuclear processes had occurred as shown by unique gamma signatures. For the deuterated erbium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of erbium ((163)Er and (171)Er) and of molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo) and by beta decay, technetium (99mTc and 101Tc). For the deuterated hafnium specimens, posttest gamma spectra showed evidence of radioisotopes of hafnium (180mHf and 181Hf) and molybdenum ((99)Mo and (101)Mo), and by beta decay, technetium ((99m)Tc and (101)Tc). In contrast, when either the hydrogenated or non-gas-loaded erbium or hafnium materials were exposed to the gamma flux, the gamma spectra revealed no new isotopes. Neutron activation materials showed evidence of thermal and epithermal neutrons. CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors showed evidence of fast neutrons with energies between 1.4 and 2.5 MeV and several instances of triple tracks, indicating (is) greater than 10 MeV neutrons. Further study is required to determine the mechanism causing the nuclear activity.

  14. Monte Carlo Simulation of 6MV Elekta Synergy Platform Linac photon beam using Gate/Geant4

    CERN Document Server

    Tayalati, Yahya; Zerfaoui, Mustafa; Moussaa, Abdellilah

    2013-01-01

    The present work is devoted to develop a computational model using the Gate Monte Carlo software for the simulation of a 6MV photon beam given by Elekta Synergy Platform medical linear accelerator treatment head. The model includes the major components of the multileaf accelerator head and a homogeneous water phantom. Calculations were performed for a photon beam with several treatment fields size ranging from 5*5 cm2 to 30*30 cm2 at 100 cm distance from source. The simulation is successfully validated by comparison with experimental distributions measured at the Regional Hassan II Oncology Center. Good agreement between simulations and measurements was observed, with dose differences of about 1.6% and 1.8% for depth doses and lateral dose profiles, respectively. The gamma index comparisons were also performed where more than 98% of the points for all simulations passed the standard quality assurance criteria of 3mm/3%.

  15. New method of beam bunching in free-ion lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessonov, E.G. [Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effective ion beam bunching method is suggested. This method is based on a selective interaction of line spectrum laser light (e.g. axial mode structure light) with non-fully stripped ion beam cooled in a storage rings, arranging the ion beam in layers in radial direction of an energy-longitudinal coordinate plane and following rotation of the beam at the right angle after switching on the RF cavity or undulator grouper/buncher. Laser cooling of the ion beam can be used at this position after switching off the resonator to decrease the energy spread caused by accelerating field of the resonator. A relativistic multilayer ion mirror will be produced this way. Both monochromatic laser beams and intermediate monochromaticity and bandwidth light sources of spontaneous incoherent radiation can be used for production of hard and high power electromagnetic radiation by reflection from this mirror. The reflectivity of the mirror is rather high because of the cross-section of the backward Rayleigh scattering of photon light by non-fully stripped relativistic ions ({approximately}{lambda}{sup 2}) is much greater ({approximately} 10{divided_by}15 orders) then Thompson one ({approximately} r{sub e}{sup 2}). This position is valid even in the case of non-monochromatic laser light ({Delta}{omega}/{omega} {approximately} 10{sup -4}). Ion cooling both in longitudinal plane and three-dimensional radiation ion cooling had been proposed based on this observation. The using of these cooling techniques will permit to store high current and low emittance relativistic ion beams in storage rings. The bunched ion beam can be used in ordinary Free-Ion Lasers as well. After bunching the ion beam can be extracted from the storage ring in this case. Storage rings with zero momentum compaction function will permit to keep bunching of the ion beam for a long time.

  16. Comparison of Energy Dependence of PAGAT Polymer Gel Dosimeter with Electron and Photon Beams using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Azadbakht

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate dependence of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter 1/T2 on different electron and photon energies for a standard clinically used 60Co therapy unit and an electa linear accelerator.Using MRI, the formulation to give the maximum change in the transverse relaxation rate R2(1/T2 was determined to be 4.5% N,N'-methylen-bis-acrylamide(bis, 4.5% acrylamid(AA, 5% gelatine, 5 mM tetrakis (hydroxymethyl phosphonium chloride (THPC, 0.01 mM hydroquinone (HQ and 86% HPLC(Water. When the preparation of final polymer gel solution is completed, it is transferred into phantoms and allowed to set by storage in a refrigerator at about 4°C. The optimal post-manufacture irradiation and post imaging times were both determined to be 24 h. The sensitivity of PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter with irradiation of photon and electron beams was represented by the slope of calibration curve in the linear region measured for each modality. The response of PAGAT gel with photon and electron beams is very similar in the lower dose region. The R2-dose response was linear up to 30 Gy and the R2-dose response of the PAGAT polymer gel dosimeter is linear between 10 to 30 Gy. In electron beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 3 Gy is not exact, but in photon beams the R2-dose response for doses less than 2Gy is not exact. Dosimeter energy dependence was studied for electron energies of 4, 12 and 18MeV and photon energies of 1.25, 4, 6 and 18 MV. Evaluation of dosimeters were performed on Siemens Symphony, Germany 1.5T Scanner in the head coil. In this study no trend in polymer-gel dosimeter 1/T2 dependence was found on mean energy for electron and photon beams.

  17. Development of a silicon microstrip detector with single photon sensitivity for fast dynamic diffraction experiments at a synchrotron radiation beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakcheev, A.; Aulchenko, V.; Kudashkin, D.; Shekhtman, L.; Tolochko, B.; Zhulanov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved experiments on the diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) from crystalline materials provide information on the evolution of a material structure after a heat, electron beam or plasma interaction with a sample under study. Changes in the material structure happen within a microsecond scale and a detector with corresponding parameters is needed. The SR channel 8 of the VEPP-4M storage ring provides radiation from the 7-pole wiggler that allows to reach several tens photons within one μs from a tungsten crystal for the most intensive diffraction peak. In order to perform experiments that allow to measure the evolution of tungsten crystalline structure under the impact of powerful laser beam, a new detector is developed, that can provide information about the distribution of a scattered SR flux in space and its evolution in time at a microsecond scale. The detector is based on the silicon p-in-n microstrip sensor with DC-coupled metal strips. The sensor contains 1024 30 mm long strips with a 50 μm pitch. 64 strips are bonded to the front-end electronics based on APC128 ASICs. The APC128 ASIC contains 128 channels that consist of a low noise integrator with 32 analogue memory cells each. The integrator equivalent noise charge is about 2000 electrons and thus the signal from individual photons with energy above 40 keV can be observed. The signal can be stored at the analogue memory with 10 MHz rate. The first measurements with the beam scattered from a tungsten crystal with energy near 60 keV demonstrated the capability of this prototype to observe the spatial distribution of the photon flux with the intensity from below one photon per channel up to 0~10 photons per channel with a frame rate from 10 kHz up to 1 MHz.

  18. The monochromatic imaging mode of a RITA-type neutron spectrometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahl, C.R.H.; Andersen, P.; Klausen, S.N.;

    2004-01-01

    The imaging monochromatic mode of a neutron spectrometer with a multi-bladed RITA analyser system is so far unexplored. We present analytical calculations that define the mode. It is shown that the mode can be realised for PG (002) analyser crystals, from incident energies of about 3.2 meV and up......, allowing the important cases of 3.7, 5.0 and 13.7 meV. Due to beam divergence, the neutron rays from neighbouring analyser blades are found to overlap slightly. Hence, the optimal use of the monochromatic imaging mode would be found by employing an adjustable radial collimator to limit the spread...

  19. Comparison of Head Scatter Factor for 6MV and 10MV flattened (FB) and Unflattened (FFF) Photon Beam using indigenously Designed Columnar Mini Phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Sigamani; Nambi Raj, N Arunai; Sinha, Sujit Nath; Yadav, Girigesh; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, Manindra Bhushan

    2014-07-01

    To measure and compare the head scatter factor for flattened (FB) and unflattened (FFF) of 6MV and 10MV photon beam using indigenously designed mini phantom. A columnar mini phantom was designed as recommended by AAPM Task Group 74 with low and high atomic number materials at 10 cm (mini phantom) and at approximately twice the depth of maximum dose water equivalent thickness (brass build-up cap). Scatter in the accelerator (Sc) values of 6MV-FFF photon beams are lesser than that of the 6MV-FB photon beams (0.66-2.8%; Clinac iX, 2300CD) and (0.47-1.74%; True beam) for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). Sc values of 10MV-FFF photon beams are lesser (0.61-2.19%; True beam) than that of the 10MV-FB photons beams for field sizes ranging from 10 × 10 cm(2) to 40 × 40 cm(2). The SSD had no influence on head scatter for both flattened and unflattened beams and irrespective of head design of the different linear accelerators. The presence of field shaping device influences the Sc values. The collimator exchange effect reveals that the opening of the upper jaw increases Sc irrespective of FB or FFF photon beams and different linear accelerators, and it is less significant in FFF beams. Sc values of 6MV-FB square field were in good agreement with that of AAPM, TG-74 published data for Varian (Clinac iX, 2300CD) accelerator. Our results confirm that the removal of flattening filter decreases in the head scatter factor compared to flattened beam. This could reduce the out-of-field dose in advanced treatment delivery techniques.

  20. Strong Optomechanical Interaction in Hybrid Plasmonic-Photonic Crystal Nanocavities with Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzy-Rong; Lin, Chiang-Hsin; Hsu, Jin-Chen

    2015-09-08

    We propose dynamic modulation of a hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavity using monochromatic coherent acoustic phonons formed by ultrahigh-frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) to achieve strong optomechanical interaction. The crystal nanocavity used in this study consisted of a defective photonic crystal beam coupled to a metal surface with a nanoscale air gap in between and provided hybridization of a highly confined plasmonic-photonic mode with a high quality factor and deep subwavelength mode volume. Efficient photon-phonon interaction occurs in the air gap through the SAW perturbation of the metal surface, strongly coupling the optical and acoustic frequencies. As a result, a large modulation bandwidth and optical resonance wavelength shift for the crystal nanocavity are demonstrated at telecommunication wavelengths. The proposed SAW-based modulation within the hybrid plasmonic-photonic crystal nanocavities beyond the diffraction limit provides opportunities for various applications in enhanced sound-light interaction and fast coherent acoustic control of optomechanical devices.

  1. Thermal management and prototype testing of Compton scattering X-ray beam position monitor for the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yang, B. X.; Collins, J. T.; Ramanathan, M.

    2017-02-01

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are key elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade. In the next-generation XBPMs for the canted-undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0 mrad, the lower beam power (cost solutions based on Compton scattering from a diamond placed edge-on to the x-ray beam. Because of the high peak power density of the x-ray beams, this diamond experiences high temperatures and has to be clamped to a water-cooled heat spreader using thermal interface materials (TIMs), which play a key role in reducing the temperature of the diamond. To evaluate temperature changes through the interface via thermal simulations, the thermal contact resistance (TCR) of TIMs at an interface between two solid materials under even contact pressure must be known. This paper addresses the TCR measurements of several TIMs, including gold, silver, pyrolytic graphite sheet, and 3D graphene foam. In addition, a prototype of a Compton-scattering XBPM with diamond blades was installed at APS Beamline 24-ID-A in May 2015 and has been tested. This paper presents the design of the Compton-scattering XBPM, and compares thermal simulation results obtained for the diamond blade of this XBPM by the finite element method with in situ empirical measurements obtained by using reliable infrared technology.

  2. Optical laue diffraction on photonic structures designed by laser lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samusev, K. B.; Rybin, M. V.; Lukashenko, S. Yu.; Limonov, M. F.

    2016-06-01

    Two-dimensional photonic crystals with square symmetry C 4v were obtained using the laser lithography method. The structure of these samples was studied by scanning electron microscopy. Optical Laue diffraction for monochromatic light was studied experimentally depending on the incidence angle of laser beam and lattice constant. Interpretation of the observed diffraction patterns is given in the framework of the Laue diffraction mechanism for an one-dimensional chain of scattering elements. Red thresholds for different diffraction orders were determined experimentally and theoretically. The results of calculations are in an excellent agreement with experiment.

  3. Comparison of dose calculation algorithms for treatment planning in external photon beam therapy for clinical situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöös, Tommy; Wieslander, Elinore; Cozzi, Luca; Brink, Carsten; Fogliata, Antonella; Albers, Dirk; Nyström, Håkan; Lassen, Søren

    2006-11-21

    A study of the performance of five commercial radiotherapy treatment planning systems (TPSs) for common treatment sites regarding their ability to model heterogeneities and scattered photons has been performed. The comparison was based on CT information for prostate, head and neck, breast and lung cancer cases. The TPSs were installed locally at different institutions and commissioned for clinical use based on local procedures. For the evaluation, beam qualities as identical as possible were used: low energy (6 MV) and high energy (15 or 18 MV) x-rays. All relevant anatomical structures were outlined and simple treatment plans were set up. Images, structures and plans were exported, anonymized and distributed to the participating institutions using the DICOM protocol. The plans were then re-calculated locally and exported back for evaluation. The TPSs cover dose calculation techniques from correction-based equivalent path length algorithms to model-based algorithms. These were divided into two groups based on how changes in electron transport are accounted for ((a) not considered and (b) considered). Increasing the complexity from the relatively homogeneous pelvic region to the very inhomogeneous lung region resulted in less accurate dose distributions. Improvements in the calculated dose have been shown when models consider volume scatter and changes in electron transport, especially when the extension of the irradiated volume was limited and when low densities were present in or adjacent to the fields. A Monte Carlo calculated algorithm input data set and a benchmark set for a virtual linear accelerator have been produced which have facilitated the analysis and interpretation of the results. The more sophisticated models in the type b group exhibit changes in both absorbed dose and its distribution which are congruent with the simulations performed by Monte Carlo-based virtual accelerator.

  4. The dosimetric impact of different photon beam energy on RapidArc radiotherapy planning for cervix carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Yadav, Girigesh; Raman, Kothanda; Bhushan, Manindra; Pal, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to know the effect of three different photon energies viz., 6, 10, and 15 mega voltage (MV) on RapidArc (RA) planning for deep-seated cervix tumor and to develop clinically acceptable RA plans with suitable photon energy. RA plans were generated for 6, 10, and 15 MV photon energies for twenty patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of planning target volume (PTV) coverage, dose to organs at risk (OARs), conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient measure, external volume index of dose distribution produced, total number of monitor units (MUs), nontumor integral dose (ID), and low dose volume of normal tissue. A two-sample paired t-test was performed to compare the dosimetric parameters of RA plans. Irrespective of photon energy used for RA planning, plans were dosimetrically similar in terms of PTV coverage, OARs sparing, CI and HI. The numbers of MUs were 13.4 ± 1.4% and 18.2 ± 1.5% higher and IDs were 2.7 ± 0.8% and 3.7 ± 0.9% higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in the 10 and 15 MV plans, respectively. V1Gy, V2Gy, V3Gy, and V4Gy were higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in 10 and 15 MV plans. Based on this study, 6 MV photon beam is a good choice for RA planning in case of cervix carcinoma, as it does not deliver additional exposure to patients caused by photoneutrons produced in high energy beams.

  5. The dosimetric impact of different photon beam energy on RapidArc radiotherapy planning for cervix carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to know the effect of three different photon energies viz., 6, 10, and 15 mega voltage (MV on RapidArc (RA planning for deep-seated cervix tumor and to develop clinically acceptable RA plans with suitable photon energy. RA plans were generated for 6, 10, and 15 MV photon energies for twenty patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of planning target volume (PTV coverage, dose to organs at risk (OARs, conformity index (CI, homogeneity index (HI, gradient measure, external volume index of dose distribution produced, total number of monitor units (MUs, nontumor integral dose (ID, and low dose volume of normal tissue. A two-sample paired t-test was performed to compare the dosimetric parameters of RA plans. Irrespective of photon energy used for RA planning, plans were dosimetrically similar in terms of PTV coverage, OARs sparing, CI and HI. The numbers of MUs were 13.4 ± 1.4% and 18.2 ± 1.5% higher and IDs were 2.7 ± 0.8% and 3.7 ± 0.9% higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in the 10 and 15 MV plans, respectively. V1Gy, V2Gy, V3Gy, and V4Gywere higher in 6 MV plans in comparison to that in 10 and 15 MV plans. Based on this study, 6 MV photon beam is a good choice for RA planning in case of cervix carcinoma, as it does not deliver additional exposure to patients caused by photoneutrons produced in high energy beams.

  6. Contrast imaging with a monochromatic x-ray scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pole, Donald J.; Popovic, Kosta; Williams, Mark B.

    2008-03-01

    We are currently developing a monochromatic x-ray source for small animal tomographic imaging. This source consists of a conventional cone beam microfocus x-ray tube with a tungsten target coupled to a filter that uses Bragg diffraction to transmit only x-rays within a narrow energy range (~3 keV FWHM). A tissue-equivalent mouse phantom was used to a) evaluate how clearly CT imaging using the quasi-monoenergetic beam is able to differentiate tissue types compared to conventional polyenergetic CT, and b) to test the ability of the source and Bragg filter combination to perform dual energy, iodine contrast enhanced imaging. Single slice CT scans of the phantom were obtained both with polyenergetic (1.8 mm Al filtration) and quasi-monoenergetic beams. Region of interest analysis showed that pixel value variance was signifcantly reduced in the quasi-monochromatic case compared to the polyenergetic case, suggesting a reduction in the variance of the linear attenuation coefficients of the tissue equivalent materials due to the narrower energy spectrum. To test dual energy iodine K-edge imaging, vials containing solutions with a range of iodine contrasts were added to the phantom. Single-slice CT scans were obtained using spectra with maximum values at 30 and 35 keV, respectively. Analysis of the resulting difference images (35 keV image - 30 keV image) shows that the magnitude of the difference signal produced by iodine exceeds that of bone for iodine concentrations above ~20 mg/ml, and that of muscle and fat tissues for iodine concentrations above ~5 mg/ml.

  7. Linearly polarised photon beams at ELSA and measurement of the beam asymmetry in {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction off the proton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsner, D.; Bantes, B.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Fornet-Ponse, K.; Hillert, W.; Hoeffgen, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Konrad, M.; Menze, D.; Morales, C.; Ostrick, M.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Suele, A.; Walther, D. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bartholomy, O.; Beck, R.; Ehmanns, A.; Essig, K.; Fabry, I.; Fuchs, M.; Funke, C.; Gutz, E.; Hoffmeister, P.; Horn, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Klempt, E.; Lotz, J.; van Pee, H.; Schmidt, C.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Weinheimer, C.; Wendel, C. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Bayadilov, D.E.; Novinski, D.V.; Sarantsev, A.V. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Beloglazov, Y.A.; Gridnev, A.B.; Lopatin, I.V.; Sumachev, V.V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Castelijns, R.; Loehner, H.; Messchendorp, J.G.; Shende, S. [University of Groningen, KVI, Groningen (Netherlands); Crede, V. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Florida State University, Department of Physics, Tallahassee (United States); Jaegle, I.; Krusche, B.; Mertens, T. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Kotulla, M. [Universitaet Basel, Physikalisches Institut, Basel (Switzerland); Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany); Lugert, S.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Novotny, R.; Pant, L.M.; Pfeiffer, M.; Trnka, D. [Universitaet Giessen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Giessen (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    At the electron accelerator ELSA a linearly polarised tagged photon beam is produced by coherent bremsstrahlung off a diamond crystal. Orientation and energy range of the linear polarisation can be deliberately chosen by accurate positioning of the crystal with a goniometer. The degree of polarisation is determined by the form of the scattered electron spectrum. Good agreement between experiment and expectations on the basis of the experimental conditions is obtained. Polarisation degrees of P{sub {gamma}}=40 % are typically achieved at half of the primary electron energy. The determination of P{sub {gamma}} is confirmed by measuring the beam asymmetry, {sigma}, in {pi}{sup 0} photoproduction and by a comparison of the results to independent measurements using laser backscattering. (orig.)

  8. Determination of the beam quality correction factor k_{Q,Q_0 } for the microLion chamber in a clinical photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang Hyoun; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Huh, Hyun Do; Kim, Kum-Bae; Kim, SeongHoon

    2013-01-01

    The mcroLion chamber, which has a small volume (0.0017cc) and a high sensitivity suitable for small field dosimetry, is an ionization chamber with liquid (isooctane) filling the cavity volume. In the present work, we used two alternative ways to estimate the beam quality correction factor k_{Q,Q_0 }^{micL} of the microLion chamber in the 6 MV photon beam from a Clinac iX accelerator (Varian, USA); Monte Carlo simulations and experimental methods. The Monte Carlo calculation (1.0183 ± 0.58%) agreed to within 0.56% with the experimental determination (1.024 ± 0.58%). The results from the two methods were in good agreement within acceptable uncertainties. We think that the averaged factor, 1.0212, could be used for the microLion chamber in reference dosimetry.

  9. Two-color beam generation based on wakefield excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettoni, S.; Prat, E.; Reiche, S.

    2016-05-01

    Several beam manipulation methods have been studied and experimentally tested to generate two-color photon beams in free electron laser facilities to accommodate the user requests. We propose to use the interaction of the beam with an oscillating longitudinal wakefield source to obtain a suitable electron beam structure. The bunch generates two subpulses with different energies and delayed in time passing through a magnetic chicane after its longitudinal phase space has been modulated by the wakefield source. According to this approach the power of the emitted radiation is not degraded compared to the monochromatic beam, and the setup in the machine is quite simple because the bunch is manipulated only in the high energy section, where it is more rigid. We present the design applied to SwissFEL. We identified the parameters and the corresponding range of tunability of the time and energy separation among the two subbunches.

  10. Evaluating the influence of 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams on prostate intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reham A El Gendy; Ehab M Attalla; Yasser M Elkerm; Ali Alfarrash

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to determine the ef ects of low- and high-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photon beams on the target volume planning and on the critical organs in the case of prostate can-cer. Methods Thirty plans were generated by using either 6 MV or 15 MV beams separately, and a combination of both 6 and 15 MV beams. Al plans were generated by using suitable planning objectives and dose con-straints, which were identical across the plans, except the beam energy. The plans were analyzed in terms of their target coverage, conformity, and homogeneity, regardless of the beam energy. Results The mean percentage values of V70 Gy for the rectal wal for the plans with 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-energy beams were 16.9%, 17.8%, and 16.4%, respectively, while the mean percentage values of V40 Gy were 53.6%, 52.3%, and 50.4%. The mean dose values to the femoral heads for the 6 MV, 15 MV, and mixed-en-ergy plans were 30.1 Gy, 25.5 Gy, and 25.4 Gy, respectively. The mean integral dose for the 6 MV plans was 10% larger than those for the 15 MV and mixed-energy plans. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that mixed-energy IMRT plans may be advantageous with respect to the dosimetric characteristics of low- and high-energy beams. Although the reduction of dose to the organs at risk may not be clinical y relevant, in this study, IMRT plans using mixed-energy beams exhibited better OAR sparing and overal higher plan quality for deep-seated tumors.

  11. Effect of wedge filter and field size on photoneutron dose equivalent for an 18 MV photon beam of a medical linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesbahi, Asghar [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: asgharmesbahi@yahoo.com; Keshtkar, Ahmad [Medical Physics Department, Medical School, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Ehsan [Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadzadeh, Mohammad [Radiation Therapy Department, Imam Hospital, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Photoneutrons produced during radiation therapy with high energy photons is the main source of unwanted out-of-field received doses of patients. To analyze the neutron dose equivalent (NDE) for wedged beams and its variation with field size, Monte Carlo (MC) modeling of an 18 MV photon beam was performed using MCNPX MC code. The results revealed that the NDE is on average 6.5 times higher for wedged beams. For open beams, the NDE decreased with increasing field size especially for field sizes >20x20 cm{sup 2}. While, for wedged beams, the NDE increased with field size. It was suggested that the increase of NDE for wedged beams should be taken into account in radiation-induced secondary cancer risk estimations and radiation protection calculations.

  12. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm(2)-20  ×  20 cm(2) for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  13. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, S.; Tyler, M.; McNamara, J.; Sloan, K.; Ceylan, A.; Rinks, A.

    2016-12-01

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  14. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH FAST FIBER-OPTIC BEAM LOSS MONITORS FOR THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE STORAGE RING SUPERCONDUCTING UNDULATORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooling, J.; Harkay, K.; Sajaev, V.; Shang, H.

    2017-06-25

    Fast fiber-optic (FFO) beam loss monitors (BLMs) installed with the first two superconducting undulators (SCUs) in the Advanced Photon Source storage ring have proven to be a useful diagnostic for measuring deposited charge (energy) during rapid beam loss events. The first set of FFOBLMs were installed outside the cryostat of the short SCU, a 0.33-m long device, above and below the beam centerline. The second set are mounted with the first 1.1-mlong SCU within the cryostat, on the outboard and inboard sides of the vacuum chamber. The next 1.1-m-long SCU is scheduled to replace the short SCU later in 2016 and will be fitted with FFOBLMs in a manner similar to original 1.1-m device. The FFOBLMs were employed to set timing and voltage for the abort kicker (AK) system. The AK helps to prevent quenching of the SCUs during beam dumps [1] by directing the beam away from the SC magnet windings. The AK is triggered by the Machine Protection System (MPS). In cases when the AK fails to prevent quenching, the FFOBLMs show that losses often begin before detection by the MPS.

  15. Progress on the Development of the Next Generation X-ray Beam Position Monitors at the Advanced Photon Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Yang, B.X.; Decker, G.; Sereno, N.; Ramanathan, M.

    2016-07-27

    Accurate and stable x-ray beam position monitors (XBPMs) are ke y elements in obtaining the desired user beam stability in the Advanced Photon Source (APS). The next generat ion XBPMs for high heat load front ends (HHL FEs) have been designed to meet these requirements by utilizing Cu K-edge x-ray fluorescence (XRF) from a pair of copper absorbers and have been installed at the front ends (FEs) of the APS. Com missioning data showed a significant performance improvement over the existing photoemission-based XBPMs. While a similar design concept can be applied for the canted undulator front ends, where two undulator beams are separated by 1.0-mrad, the lower beam power (< 10 kW) per undulator allows us to explore lower-cost solutions based on Compton scat tering from the diamond blades placed edge-on to the x- ray beam. A prototype of the Compton scattering XBPM system was i nstalled at 24-ID-A in May 2015. In this report, the design and test results for XRF-based XBPM and Compton scattering based XBPM are presented. Ongoing research related to the development of the next generation XBPMs on thermal contac t resistance of a joint between two solid bodies is also discussed

  16. Effect of the thermoplastic masks on dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Półtorak, Michał; Fujak, Edyta; Kukołowicz, Paweł

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of thermoplastic masks material (Klarity Medical&Equipment Co., Guangzhou, China) with different diameters of holes (ϕ 0.25 cm and ϕ 0.40 cm) on the dose distribution in the build-up region for photon beams. Measurements were made for external radiation beams produced by the linear accelerator (TrueBeam, Varian Medical Systems, Inc., Palo Alto, CA, USA) using the Markus parallel plane ionization chamber and the Unidos electrometer (both from PTW, Freiburg, Germany). Measurements were made in a solid water phantom for two photon energies 6 MV and 15 MV, at 90 cm source to skin distance, for four fields of 5 cm × 5 cm, 10 cm × 10 cm, 15 cm × 15 cm and 20 cm × 20 cm. Compared to the open field, the maximum dose with mask was closer to the surface of the phantom by about 1.4 mm and 1.2 mm for 6 MV and 15 MV X-Rays, respectively. The surface dose increase from 10% to 42% for 6 MV and from 5% to 28% for 15 MV X-Rays.

  17. 6-MV photon beam modeling for the Varian Clinac iX by using the Geant4 virtual jaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung Yong; Kim, Hyung Dong; Kim, Dong Ho; Baek, Jong Geun; Moon, Su Ho; Rho, Gwang Won; Kang, Jeong Ku; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2015-07-01

    Most virtual source models (VSMs), with the exception of the patient-dependent secondary collimator (jaw), use beam modeling. Unlike other components of the treatment head, the jaw absorbs many photons generated by bremsstrahlung, which decreases the efficiency of the simulation. In the present study, a new method of beam modeling using a virtual jaw was applied to improve the calculation efficiency of VSM. This new method of beam modeling was designed so that the interaction was not generated in the jaw. The results for the percentage depth dose and the profile of the virtual jaw VSM calculated in a homogeneous water phantom agreed with the measurement results for the CC13 cylinder-type ion chamber to within an error of 2%, and the 80-20% penumbra width agreed with the measurement results to within an error of 0.6 mm. Compared with the existing VSM, in which a great number of photons are absorbed, the calculation efficiency of the VSM using the virtual jaw is expected to be increased by approximately 67%.

  18. First Sub-arcsecond Collimation of Monochromatic Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Apoorva G; Abbas, Sohrab; Treimer, Wolfgang, E-mail: nintsspd@barc.gov.in

    2010-11-01

    We have achieved the tightest collimation to date of a monochromatic neutron beam by diffracting neutrons from a Bragg prism, viz. a single crystal prism operating in the vicinity of Bragg incidence. An optimised silicon {l_brace}111{r_brace} Bragg prism has collimated 5.26A neutrons down to 0.58 arcsecond. In conjunction with a similarly optimised Bragg prism analyser of opposite asymmetry, this ultra-parallel beam yielded a 0.62 arcsecond wide rocking curve. This beam has produced the first SUSANS spectrum in Q {approx} 10{sup -6} A{sup -1} range with a hydroxyapatite casein protein sample and demonstrated the instrument capability of characterising agglomerates upto 150 {mu}m in size. The super-collimation has also enabled recording of the first neutron diffraction pattern from a macroscopic grating of 200 {mu}m period. An analysis of this pattern yielded the beam transverse coherence length of 175 {mu}m (FWHM), the greatest achieved to date for A wavelength neutrons.

  19. Observation of M1 resonance in sup 2 sup 0 sup 6 Pb using a highly linear polarized photon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ohgaki, H; Noguchi, T; Sugiyama, S; Mikado, T; Yamada, K; Suzuki, R; Ohdaira, T; Sei, N; Yamazaki, T

    1999-01-01

    More than twenty M1 states were discovered in sup 2 sup 0 sup 6 Pb from 6.5 to 8.1 MeV with a high-resolution NRF experiment that used a highly linear-polarized photon beam generated by laser-Compton backscattering. The total reduced transition probability of sigma B(M1 arrow up) = 17.4+-5.6 mu sup 2 sub N agreed well with QPM calculation (16.1 mu sup 2 sub N) and previous tagged photon experiment (19 +- 2 mu sup 2 sub N). A fine structure of two bumps at 7.2 and 7.9 MeV which was reproduced reasonably by the QPM calculation was clearly observed in the isovector M1 strength distribution.

  20. Spectral properties of Compton inverse radiation: Application of Compton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bulyak, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Compton inverse radiation emitted due to backscattering of laser pulses off the relativistic electrons possesses high spectral density and high energy of photons - in hard x-ray up to gamma-ray energies - because of short wavelength of laser radiation as compared with the classical electromagnetic devices such as undulators. In this report, the possibility of such radiation to monochromatization by means of collimation is studied. Two approaches have been considered for the description of the spectral-angular density of Compton radiation based on the classical field theory and on the quantum electrodynamics. As is shown, both descriptions produce similar total spectra. On the contrary, angular distribution of the radiation is different: the classical approach predicted a more narrow radiation cone. Also proposed and estimated is a method of the `electronic' monochromatization based on the electronic subtraction of the two images produced by the electron beams with slightly different energies. A `proof-of-prin...

  1. Measurement of azimuthal asymmetries with respect of both beam charge and transverse target polarization in exclusive electroproduction of real photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [DESY Hamburg (Germany); Akopov, N.; Akopov, Z. [Yerevan Physics Institute (AR)] (and others)

    2008-02-15

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of Azimuthal Asymmetries With Respect To Both Beam Charge and Transverse Target Polarization in Exclusive Electroproduction of Real Photons

    CERN Document Server

    Airapetian, A; Akopov, Z; Andrus, A; Aschenauer, E C; Augustyniak, W; Avakian, R; Avetisian, A; Avetisyan, E; Barion, L; Belostotskii, S; Bianchi, N; Blok, H P; Bttcher, H; Bonomo, C; Borisov, A; Brüll, A; Bryzgalov, V; Burns, J; Capiluppi, M; Capitani, G P; Cisbani, E; Ciullo, G; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, P F; Deconinck, W; De Leo, R; Demey, M; De Nardo, L; De Sanctis, E; Diefenthaler, M; Di Nezza, P; Dreschler, J; Düren, M; Ehrenfried, M; Elbakian, G; Ellinghaus, F; Elschenbroich, U; Fabbri, R; Fantoni, A; Felawka, L; Frullani, S; Funel, A; Gabbert, D; Gapienko, G; Gapienko, V; Garibaldi, F; Gavrilov, G; Karibian, V; Giordano, F; Gliske, S; Guler, H; Hadjidakis, C; Hasch, D; Hasegawa, T; Hill, G; Hillenbrand, A; Hoek, M; Holler, Y; Hristova, I; Iarygin, G; Imazu, Y; Ivanilov, A; Izotov, A; Jackson, H E; Jgoun, A; Joosten, S; Kaiser, R; Keri, T; Kinney, E; Kiselev, A; Kopytin, M; Korotkov, V; Kozlov, V; Kravchenko, P; Krivokhizhin, V G; Lagamba, L; Lamb, R; Lapiks, L; Lehmann, I; Lenisa, P; Linden-Levy, L A; Lorenzon, W; Lu, S; Lü, X; Ma, B Q; Mahon, D; Maiheu, B; Makins, N C R; Mao, Y; Marianski, B; Marukyan, H; Miller, C A; Miyachi, Y; Muccifora, V; Murray, M; Mussgiller, A; Nagaitsev, A; Nappi, E; Naryshkin, Yu; Nass, A; Negodaev, M; Nowak, W D; Osborne, A; Pappalardo, L L; Perez-Benito, R; Pickert, N; Raithel, M; Reimer, P E; Reischl, A; Reolon, A R; Riedl, C; Rith, K; Rock, S E; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, A; Rubacek, L; Rubin, J; Ruiz, A L; Ryckbosch, D; Salomatin, Y; Sanjiev, I; Schäfer, A; Schnell, G; Schüler, K P; Seitz, B

    2008-01-01

    Azimuthal asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons are measured for the first time with respect to transverse target polarisation, providing new constraints on Generalized Parton Distributions. From the same data set on a hydrogen target, new results for the beam-charge asymmetry are also extracted with better precision than those previously reported. By comparing model calculations with measured asymmetries attributed to the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering and Bethe-Heitler processes, a model-dependent constraint is obtained on the total angular momenta carried by up and down quarks in the nucleon.

  3. Design of a Novel Polarized Beam Splitter Based on a Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Resonator Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xuan; CHEN Shu-Wen; LIAO Qing-Hua; YU Tian-Bao; LIU Nian-Hua; HUANG Yong-Zhen

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose and analyze a novel ultra-compact polarization beam splitter based on a resonator cavity in a two-dimensional photonic crystal.The two polarizations can be separated efficientlyby the strong coupling between the microcavities and the waveguides occurring around the resonant frequency of the cavities.The transmittance of two polarized light around 1.55 iim can be more than 98.6%, and the size of the device is less than 15 μm x 13μm,so these features will play an important role in future integrated optical circuits.

  4. Two-photon polymerization of microstructures by a non-diffraction multifoci pattern generated from a superposed Bessel beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liang; Qian, Dongdong; Xin, Chen; Hu, Zhijiang; Ji, Shengyun; Wu, Dong; Hu, Yanlei; Li, Jiawen; Huang, Wenhao; Chu, Jiaru

    2017-02-15

    In this Letter, superposed Bessel beams (SBBs) are realized by alternatively imprinting holograms of opposite-order Bessel beams along the radial direction on a spatial light modulator. The propagation invariance and non-rotation properties of SBBs are theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated. The focusing property of SBBs with a high numerical aperture (NA) objective is investigated with the Debye vectorial diffraction theory. Near the focal plane, a circularly distributed multiple foci pattern is achieved. The multiple foci generated from SBBs are adopted in a two-photon fabrication system, and micropattern fabrication by a single exposure is demonstrated. Facile fabrication of three-dimensional microstructures with SBBs is realized by dynamically controlling the number of focal spots, and the diameter and rotation of the focal pattern.

  5. Multi-Beam Interference Advances and Applications: Nano-Electronics, Photonic Crystals, Metamaterials, Subwavelength Structures, Optical Trapping, and Biomedical Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K. Gaylord

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Research in recent years has greatly advanced the understanding and capabilities of multi-beam interference (MBI. With this technology it is now possible to generate a wide range of one-, two-, and three-dimensional periodic optical-intensity distributions at the micro- and nano-scale over a large length/area/volume. These patterns may be used directly or recorded in photo-sensitive materials using multi-beam interference lithography (MBIL to accomplish subwavelength patterning. Advances in MBI and MBIL and a very wide range of applications areas including nano-electronics, photonic crystals, metamaterials, subwavelength structures, optical trapping, and biomedical structures are reviewed and put into a unified perspective.

  6. Design and fabrication of hollow-core photonic crystal fibers for high power fast laser beam transportation and pulse compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. Y.; Peng, Xiang; Alharbi, M.; Dutin, C. F.; Bradley, T. D.; Mielke, Michael; Booth, Timothy; Benabid, F.

    2012-03-01

    We report on recent design and fabrication of Kagome type hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) for the purpose of high power fast laser beam transportation. The fabricated seven-cell three-ring hypocycloid-shaped large core fiber exhibits an up-to-date lowest attenuation (among all Kagome fibers) of 40dB/km over a broadband transmission centered at 1500nm. We show that the large core size, low attenuation, broadband transmission, single modedness, low dispersion and relatively low banding loss makes it an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation. By filling the fiber with helium gas, a 74μJ, 850fs and 40kHz repetition rate ultra-short pulse at 1550nm has been faithfully delivered with little propagation pulse distortion. Compression of a 105μJ laser pulse from 850fs to 300fs has been achieved by operating the fiber in ambient air.

  7. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: prompt photons produced by $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C and $^{16}$O ion beams in a PMMA target

    CERN Document Server

    Mattei, Ilaria; De Lucia, Erika; Faccini, Riccardo; Frallicciardi, Paola Maria; Mancini-Terracciano, Carlo; Marafini, Michela; Muraro, Silvia; Paramatti, Riccardo; Patera, Vincenzo; Piersanti, Luca; Pinci, Davide; Rucinski, Antoni; Russomando, Andrea; Sarti, Alessio; Sciubba, Adalberto; Camillocci, Elena Solfaroli; Toppi, Marco; Traini, Giacomo; Voena, Cecilia; Battistoni, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle beams are used in Particle Therapy (PT) to treat oncological patients due to their selective dose deposition in tissues and to their high biological effect in killing cancer cells with respect to photons and electrons used in conventional radiotherapy. Nowadays, protons and carbon ions are used in PT clinical routine but, recently, the interest on the potential application of helium and oxygen beams is growing due to their reduced multiple scattering inside the body and increased linear energy transfer, relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio. The precision of PT demands for online dose monitoring techniques, crucial to improve the quality assurance of treatments. The beam range confined in the irradiated target can be monitored thanks to the neutral or charged secondary radiation emitted by the interactions of hadron beams with matter. Prompt photons are produced by nuclear de-excitation processes and, at present, different dose monitoring and beam range verification t...

  8. Beaming photons with spin and orbital angular momentum via a dipole-coupled plasmonic spiral antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Guanghao; Nelson, Robert L; Zhan, Qiwen

    2012-08-13

    We analytically and numerically study the emission properties of an electric dipole coupled to a plasmonic spiral structure with different pitch. As a transmitting antenna, the spiral structure couples the radiation from the electric dipole into circularly polarized emitted photons in the far field. The spin carried by the emitted photons is determined by the handedness of the spiral antenna. By increasing the spiral pitch in the unit of surface plasmon wavelength, these circularly polarized photons also gain orbital angular momentum with different topological charges. This phenomenon is attributed to the presence of a geometric phase arising from the interaction of light from point source with the anisotropic spiral structure. The circularly polarized vortex emission from such optically coupled spiral antenna also has high directivity, which may find important applications in quantum optical information, single molecule sensing, and integrated photonic circuits.

  9. Radiation hardness test of the Philips Digital Photon Counter with proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnyakov, M. Yu.; Frach, T.; Kononov, S. A.; Kuyanov, I. A.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2016-07-01

    The Philips Digital Photon Counter (DPC) is a silicon photomultiplier combining Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (G-APD) and dedicated readout electronics in the same chip. The DPC is a promising photon sensor for future RICH detectors. A known issue of G-APD is its sensitivity to radiation damage. Two DPC sensors were tested using 800 MeV/c protons. An increase of dark counting rate with proton fluence up to 4 ·1011cm-2 has been measured.

  10. Birth of colliding beams in Europe, two photon studies at Adone

    CERN Document Server

    Bonolis, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    This article recalls the birth of the first electron-positron storage ring AdA, and the construction of the higher energy collider ADONE, where early photon-photon collisions were observed. The events which led the Austrian physicist Bruno Touschek to propose and construct AdA will be recalled, starting with early work on the Wideroe's betatron during World War II, up to the construction of ADONE, and the theoretical contribution to radiative corrections to electron-positron collisions.

  11. Beaming circularly polarized photons from quantum dots coupled with plasmonic spiral antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Guanghao; Chen, Weibin; Abeysinghe, Don C; Nelson, Robert L; Zhan, Qiwen

    2012-08-13

    Coupling nanoscale emitters via optical antennas enables comprehensive control of photon emission in terms of intensity, directivity and polarization. In this work we report highly directional emission of circularly polarized photons from quantum dots coupled to a spiral optical antenna. The structural chirality of the spiral antenna imprints spin state to the emitted photons. Experimental results reveal that a circular polarization extinction ratio of 10 is obtainable. Furthermore, increasing the number of turns of the spiral gives rise to higher antenna gain and directivity, leading to higher field intensity and narrower angular width of emission pattern in the far field. For a five-turn Archimedes' spiral antenna, field intensity increase up to 70-fold simultaneously with antenna directivity of 11.7 dB has been measured in the experiment. The highly directional circularly polarized photon emission from such optically coupled spiral antenna may find important applications in single molecule sensing, quantum optics information processing and integrated photonic circuits as a nanoscale spin photon source.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  13. Addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for clinical reference dosimetry of high-energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, Malcolm, E-mail: malcolm.mcewen@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [National Research Council, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); DeWerd, Larry [University of Wisconsin, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ibbott, Geoffrey [Department of Radiation Physics, M D Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Followill, David [IROC Houston QA Center, Radiological Physics Center, 8060 El Rio Street, Houston, Texas 77054 (United States); Rogers, David W. O. [Carleton Laboratory for Radiotherapy Physics, Physics Department, Carleton University, 1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Seltzer, Stephen [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Seuntjens, Jan [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, 1650 Cedar Avenue, Montreal, Québec (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    An addendum to the AAPM's TG-51 protocol for the determination of absorbed dose to water in megavoltage photon beams is presented. This addendum continues the procedure laid out in TG-51 but new k{sub Q} data for photon beams, based on Monte Carlo simulations, are presented and recommendations are given to improve the accuracy and consistency of the protocol's implementation. The components of the uncertainty budget in determining absorbed dose to water at the reference point are introduced and the magnitude of each component discussed. Finally, the consistency of experimental determination of N{sub D,w} coefficients is discussed. It is expected that the implementation of this addendum will be straightforward, assuming that the user is already familiar with TG-51. The changes introduced by this report are generally minor, although new recommendations could result in procedural changes for individual users. It is expected that the effort on the medical physicist's part to implement this addendum will not be significant and could be done as part of the annual linac calibration.

  14. A High-Pressure Polarized $^3$He Gas Target for Nuclear Physics Experiments Using A Polarized Photon Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Q; Chen, W; Gao, H; Zheng, W; Zong, X; Averett, T; Cates, G D; Tobias, W A

    2009-01-01

    Following the first experiment on three-body photodisintegration of polarized $^3$He utilizing circularly polarized photons from High Intensity Gamma Source (HI$\\gamma$S) at Duke Free Electron Laser Laboratory (DFELL), a new high-pressure polarized $^3$He target cell made of pyrex glass coated with a thin layer of sol-gel doped with aluminum nitrate nonahydrate has been built in order to reduce photon beam induced backgrounds. The target is based on the technique of spin-exchange optical pumping of hybrid rubidium and potassium and the highest polarization achieved is $\\sim$62\\% determined from both NMR-AFP and EPR polarimetry. The $X$ parameter is estimated to be $0.17\\pm0.06$ and the performance of the target is in good agreement with theoretical predictions. We also present beam test results from this new target cell and the comparison with the GE180 $^3$He target cell used previously at HI$\\gamma$S. This is the first time that sol-gel coating technique has been used in a polarized $^3$He target for nuclea...

  15. Inhomogeneity effect in Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using EGSnrc and Geant4 code system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yani, S.; Rhani, M. F.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-08-01

    Treatment fields consist of tissue other than water equivalent tissue (soft tissue, bones, lungs, etc.). The inhomogeneity effect can be investigated by Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. MC simulation of the radiation transport in an absorbing medium is the most accurate method for dose calculation in radiotherapy. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneity phantom on dose calculations in photon beam radiotherapy obtained by different MC codes. MC code system EGSnrc and Geant4 was used in this study. Inhomogeneity phantom dimension is 39.5 × 30.5 × 30 cm3 and made of 4 material slices (12.5 cm water, 10 cm aluminium, 5 cm lung and 12.5 cm water). Simulations were performed for field size 4 × 4 cm2 at SSD 100 cm. The spectrum distribution Varian Trilogy Clinac iX 10 MV was used. Percent depth dose (PDD) and dose profile was investigated in this research. The effects of inhomogeneities on radiation dose distributions depend on the amount, density and atomic number of the inhomogeneity, as well as on the quality of the photon beam. Good agreement between dose distribution from EGSnrc and Geant4 code system in inhomogeneity phantom was observed, with dose differences around 5% and 7% for depth doses and dose profiles.

  16. Characterization of Al2O3 optically stimulated luminescence films for 2D dosimetry using a 6 MV photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. F.; Shrestha, N.; Schnell, E.; Ahmad, S.; Akselrod, M. S.; Yukihara, E. G.

    2016-11-01

    This work evaluates the dosimetric properties of newly developed optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) films, fabricated with either Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg, using a prototype laser scanning reader, a developed image reconstruction algorithm, and a 6 MV therapeutic photon beam. Packages containing OSL films (Al2O3:C and Al2O3:C,Mg) and a radiochromic film (Gafchromic EBT3) were irradiated using a 6 MV photon beam using different doses, field sizes, with and without wedge filter. Dependence on film orientation of the OSL system was also tested. Diode-array (MapCHECK) and ionization chamber measurements were performed for comparison. The OSLD film doses agreed with the MapCHECK and ionization chamber data within the experimental uncertainties (response was approximately linear from the MDD up to a few grays (the linearity correction was  response, resolution and dosimetric properties. The negligible background and potential simple calibration make these OSLD films suitable for remote audits. The characterization presented here may motivate further commercial development of a 2D dosimetry system based on the OSL from Al2O3:C or Al2O3:C,Mg.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of photon emission below a few hundred kiloelectronvolts for beam monitoring in carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Mitsutaka; Nagao, Yuto; Satoh, Takahiro; Sugai, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Makoto; Arakawa, Kazuo; Kawachi, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether the main component of the low-energy (63-68 keV) particles emitted perpendicularly to the 12C beam from the 12C-irradiated region in a water phantom is secondary electron bremsstrahlung (SEB). Monte Carlo simulations of a 12C-beam (290 MeV/u) irradiated on a water phantom were performed. A detector was placed beside the water phantom with a lead collimator between the phantom and the detector. To move the Bragg-peak position, a binary filter was placed in an upper stream of the phantom. The energy distributions of the particles incident on the detector and those deposited in the detector were analyzed. The simulation was also performed with suppressed delta-ray and/or bremsstrahlung generation to identify the SEB components. It was found that the particles incident on the detector were predominantly photons and neutrons. The yields of the photons and energy deposition decreased with the suppression of SEB generation. It is concluded that one of the predominant components of the yields in the regions shallower than the Bragg-peak position is due to SEB generation, and these components become significantly smaller in regions deeper than the Bragg-peak position.

  18. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D; Halbur, J; Lemmer, S; Delfs, B; Harder, D; Looe, H K; Poppe, B

    2017-09-05

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm(-3)) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current-voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  19. FEC coding for QKD at higher photon flux levels based on spatial entanglement of twin beams in PDC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshgaran, Fred; Mondin, Marina; Bari, Inam

    2014-10-01

    A major problem with conventional QKD techniques is the raw key transmission rate which for acceptable level of security is generally low. One way to overcome this problem is to create either directly or indirectly a number of parallel QKD transmission channels thus achieving a rate multiplicity equal to the number of parallel channels. This paper explores how a number of parallel Discrete Memoryless Channels (DMCs) can be created from imaging twin beams from a Parametric Down Conversion (PDC) process and examines the performance of FEC coding for information reconciliation over the resulting parallel channels. Twin beams exhibit quantum correlations that has been effectively used as a tool for many applications including calibration of single photon detectors. By now, detection of multimode spatial correlations is a mature field and in principle, only depends on the transmission and detection efficiency of the devices and the channel. In,1-3 the authors utilized their know-how on almost perfect selection of modes of pairwise correlated entangled beams and the optimization of the noise reduction to below the shot-noise level, for absolute calibration of Charge Coupled Device (CCD) cameras. The same basic principle is currently being considered by the same authors for possible use in Quantum Key Distribution (QKD). The main advantage in such an approach would be the ability to work with much higher photon fluxes than that of a single photon regime that is theoretically required for discrete variable QKD applications (in practice, very weak laser pulses with mean photon count below one are used), and the fact that the QKD data rate is increased significantly since multiple equivalent parallel channels result from quantization of symmetric regions into super-pixels. The natural setup of quantization of CCD detection area and subsequent measurement of the correlation statistic needed to detect the presence of the eavesdropper Eve, leads to a number of parallel QKD

  20. Test study of boron nitride as a new detector material for dosimetry in high-energy photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppinga, D.; Halbur, J.; Lemmer, S.; Delfs, B.; Harder, D.; Looe, H. K.; Poppe, B.

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this test study is to check whether boron nitride (BN) might be applied as a detector material in high-energy photon-beam dosimetry. Boron nitride exists in various crystalline forms. Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) possesses high mobility of the electrons and holes as well as a high volume resistivity, so that ionizing radiation in the clinical range of the dose rate can be expected to produce a measurable electrical current at low background current. Due to the low atomic numbers of its constituents, its density (2.0 g cm‑3) similar to silicon and its commercial availability, h-BN appears as possibly suitable for the dosimetry of ionizing radiation. Five h-BN plates were contacted to triaxial cables, and the detector current was measured in a solid-state ionization chamber circuit at an applied voltage of 50 V. Basic dosimetric properties such as formation by pre-irradiation, sensitivity, reproducibility, linearity and temporal resolution were measured with 6 MV photon irradiation. Depth dose curves at quadratic field sizes of 10 cm and 40 cm were measured and compared to ionization chamber measurements. After a pre-irradiation with 6 Gy, the devices show a stable current signal at a given dose rate. The current–voltage characteristic up to 400 V shows an increase in the collection efficiency with the voltage. The time-resolved detector current behavior during beam interrupts is comparable to diamond material, and the background current is negligible. The measured percentage depth dose curves at 10 cm  ×  10 cm field size agreed with the results of ionization chamber measurements within  ±2%. This is a first study of boron nitride as a detector material for high-energy photon radiation. By current measurements on solid ionization chambers made from boron nitride chips we could demonstrate that boron nitride is in principle suitable as a detector material for high-energy photon-beam dosimetry.

  1. Towards a Monochromatization Scheme for Direct Higgs Production at FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Valdivia Garcia, Marco Alan; Zimmermann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Direct Higgs production in e+e− collisions at the FCC is of interest if the centre-of-mass energy spread can be reduced by at least an order of magnitude. A monochromatization scheme, to accomplish this, can be realized with horizontal dispersion of opposite sign for the two colliding beams at the interaction point (IP). We recall historical approaches to monochromatization, then derive a set of IP parameters which would provide the required performance in FCC e+e− collisions at 62.5 GeV beam energy, compare these with the baseline optics parameters at neighbouring energies (45.6 and 80 GeV), comment on the effect of beamstrahlung, and indicate the modifications of the FCC-ee final-focus optics needed to obtain the required parameters.

  2. The application of Monte Carlo method to electron and photon beams transport; Zastosowanie metody Monte Carlo do analizy transportu elektronow i fotonow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zychor, I. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The application of a Monte Carlo method to study a transport in matter of electron and photon beams is presented, especially for electrons with energies up to 18 MeV. The SHOWME Monte Carlo code, a modified version of GEANT3 code, was used on the CONVEX C3210 computer at Swierk. It was assumed that an electron beam is mono directional and monoenergetic. Arbitrary user-defined, complex geometries made of any element or material can be used in calculation. All principal phenomena occurring when electron beam penetrates the matter are taken into account. The use of calculation for a therapeutic electron beam collimation is presented. (author). 20 refs, 29 figs.

  3. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Research results of hard photon technology have been summarized as a part of novel technology development highly utilizing the quantum nature of photon. Hard photon technology refers to photon beam technologies which use photon in the 0.1 to 200 nm wavelength region. Hard photon has not been used in industry due to the lack of suitable photon sources and optical devices. However, hard photon in this wavelength region is expected to bring about innovations in such areas as ultrafine processing and material synthesis due to its atom selective reaction, inner shell excitation reaction, and spatially high resolution. Then, technological themes and possibility have been surveyed. Although there are principle proposes and their verification of individual technologies for the technologies of hard photon generation, regulation and utilization, they are still far from the practical applications. For the photon source technology, the laser diode pumped driver laser technology, laser plasma photon source technology, synchrotron radiation photon source technology, and vacuum ultraviolet photon source technology are presented. For the optical device technology, the multi-layer film technology for beam mirrors and the non-spherical lens processing technology are introduced. Also are described the reduction lithography technology, hard photon excitation process, and methods of analysis and measurement. 430 refs., 165 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Relative biological damage in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, A. O.

    2016-08-01

    The lower energy of scattered radiation in and out of a megavoltage (MV) photon beam suggests that relative biological damage (RBD) may change from in- to out-of-field regions for unit absorbed dose. Because of high linear energy transfer (LET) and potential of causing severe damage to the DNA, low-energy (10 eV-1 keV) slowing down electrons should be included in radiation biological damage calculations. In this study RBD was calculated in and out of field of 6, 10 and 18 MV clinical photon beams including low-energy slowing down electrons in the track length estimated method. Electron spectra at energies higher than 2 keV were collected in a water phantom at different depths and off-axis points by using the MCNP code. A new extrapolation method was used to estimate the electron spectra at energies lower than 2 keV. The obtained spectra at energies lower than 2 keV merged with spectra at energies higher than 2 keV by using continuity of the spectra. These spectra were used as an input to a validated microdosimetric Monte Carlo (MC) code, MC damage simulation (MCDS), to calculate the RBD of induced DSB in DNA at points in and out of the primary radiation field under fully aerobic (100% O2 and anoxic (0% O2 conditions. There was an observable difference in the energy spectra for electrons for points in the primary radiation field and those points out of field. RBD had maximum variation, 11% in 6 MV photons at field size of 20×20 cm2. This variation was less than 11% for 10 and 18 MV photons and field sizes smaller than 20×20 cm2. Our simulations also showed that under the anoxic condition, RBD increases up to 6% for 6 and 10 MV photons and the 20×20 cm2 field size. This work supports the hypothesis that in megavoltage treatments out-of-field radiation quality can vary enough to have an impact on RBD per unit dose and that this may play a role as the radiation therapy community explores biological optimization as a tool to assist treatment planning.

  5. An overview of the slow-positron beam facility at the photon factory, KEK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Toshikazu; Shirakawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Atsushi; Shidara, Tetsuo; Kobayashi, Hitoshi; Nakahara, Kazuo

    1995-01-01

    The KEK slow-positron source is in the final stage of construction. The beam line comprises a 31 m long vacuum duct within an axial magnetic field and a following electrostatic guided section. In order to vary the energy of a positron beam dedicated to depth-profile measurements, a high voltage station capable of applying 60 kV has been installed in the beam transport system. The target assembly (a water-cooled tantalum rod of 5 radiation lengths and a moderator with multiple tungsten vanes) and the following straight section (8 m; used for positron storage) are under high voltage. The beam duct located downstream is at ground potential. Positron beams passing through this region have a high kinetic energy. A focusing triplet quadrupole lens and a moderator on the retarding electrode are located at the end of the magnetic transport. This beam line has 9 right-angle-curved ducts, comprising a radius of curvature of 40 cm. Positrons with a maximum energy of 60 keV are guided by bending magnets attached to the beam-transport ducts. A transport system to switch from magnetically guided to electrostatically guided has been installed. The design of the brightness-enhancement stage of the positron beam for positron re-emission microscopy is in progress. In a preliminary experiments at 2.0 GeV with a 2 kW primary beam, 4×10 6e +/s of slow positrons were observed by detecting annihilation γ-rays at the end of the magnetic beam-transport line. Further improvements are expected by careful surface and thermal treatments of the moderator.

  6. Photonic homeostatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon C.; Li, Fan-Hui

    2010-11-01

    Photonic homeostatics is a discipline to study the establishment, maintenance, decay, upgrading and representation of function-specific homoestasis (FSH) by using photonics. FSH is a negative-feedback response of a biosystem to maintain the function-specific fluctuations inside the biosystem so that the function is perfectly performed. A stress may increase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activities above FSH-specific SIRT1 activity to induce a function far from its FSH. On the one hand, low level laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LLL) can not modulate a function in its FSH or a stress in its stress-specific homeostasis (StSH), but modulate a function far from its FSH or a stress far from its StSH. On the other hand, the biophotons from a biosystem with its function in its FSH should be less than the one from the biosystem with its function far from its FSH. The non-resonant interaction of low intensity laser irradiation or monochromatic light (LIL) and a kind of membrane protein can be amplified by all the membrane proteins if the function is far from its FSH. This amplification might hold for biophoton emission of the membrane protein so that the photonic spectroscopy can be used to represent the function far from its FSH, which is called photonomics.

  7. Secondary radiation measurements for particle therapy applications: prompt photons produced by 4He, 12C and 16O ion beams in a PMMA target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, I.; Bini, F.; Collamati, F.; De Lucia, E.; Frallicciardi, P. M.; Iarocci, E.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Muraro, S.; Paramatti, R.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pinci, D.; Rucinski, A.; Russomando, A.; Sarti, A.; Sciubba, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Voena, C.; Battistoni, G.

    2017-02-01

    Charged particle beams are used in particle therapy (PT) to treat oncological patients due to their selective dose deposition in tissues with respect to the photons and electrons used in conventional radiotherapy. Heavy (Z  >  1) PT beams can additionally be exploited for their high biological effectiveness in killing cancer cells. Nowadays, protons and carbon ions are used in PT clinical routines. Recently, interest in the potential application of helium and oxygen beams has been growing. With respect to protons, such beams are characterized by their reduced multiple scattering inside the body, increased linear energy transfer, relative biological effectiveness and oxygen enhancement ratio. The precision of PT demands online dose monitoring techniques, crucial to improving the quality assurance of any treatment: possible patient mis-positioning and biological tissue changes with respect to the planning CT scan could negatively affect the outcome of the therapy. The beam range confined in the irradiated target can be monitored thanks to the neutral or charged secondary radiation emitted by the interactions of hadron beams with matter. Among these secondary products, prompt photons are produced by nuclear de-excitation processes, and at present, different dose monitoring and beam range verification techniques based on prompt-γ detection are being proposed. It is hence of importance to perform γ yield measurement in therapeutic-like conditions. In this paper we report on the yields of prompt photons produced by the interaction of helium, carbon and oxygen ion beams with a poly-methyl methacrylate (PMMA) beam stopping target. The measurements were performed at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT) with beams of different energies. An LYSO scintillator, placed at {{60}\\circ} and {{90}\\circ} with respect to the beam direction, was used as the photon detector. The obtained γ yields for the carbon ion beams are compared with results from the literature

  8. Computed tomography from photon statistics to modern cone-beam CT

    CERN Document Server

    Buzug, T M

    2008-01-01

    Tis book provides an overview of X-ray technology, the historic developmental milestones of modern CT systems, and gives a comprehensive insight into the main reconstruction methods used in computed tomography. Te basis of reconstr- tion is, undoubtedly, mathematics. However, the beauty of computed tomography cannot be understood without a detailed knowledge of X-ray generation, photon- matter interaction, X-ray detection, photon statistics, as well as fundamental signal processing concepts and dedicated measurement systems. Terefore, the reader will ?nd a number of references to these basic d

  9. Calculation of Nuclear Particles Production at High-Energy Photon Beams from a Linac Operating at 6, 10 and 15 MV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesini, Renato; Bettega, Daniela; Calzolari, Paola; Pignoli, Emanuele

    2017-05-01

    Production of photonuclear particles in a tissue-equivalent medium has been calculated for linacs at 6, 10 and 15 MV from Varian TrueBeam. Based on the knowledge of bremsstrahlung fluence spectra and linac photon beam parameters, numerical integration was performed on the cross sections for photoparticle production of the constituent elements of tissue (2H,12C,13C,16O,17O,18O,14N,15N). At 15 MV, at the depth of photon maximum dose, the total absorbed dose due to neutrons, protons, alphas and residual nuclei from photon reactions in tissue (5.5E-05 Gy per Gy of photons) is comparable to that due to neutrons from accelerator head. Results reasonably agree with data reported in the literature using Monte Carlo models simulating linac head components. This work suggests a simple method to estimate the dose contributed by the photon-induced nuclear particles for high-energy photon beams produced by linacs in use, as it might be relevant for late stochastic effects. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Comparison of Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) 6 MV photon beam characteristics for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, S.; Sureka, C. S.

    2017-06-01

    The present study is focused to compare the characteristics of Varian Clinac 600 C/D flattened and unflattened 6 MV photon beams for small field dosimetry using EGSnrc Monte Carlo Simulation since the small field dosimetry is considered to be the most crucial and provoking task in the field of radiation dosimetry. A 6 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 600 C/D medical linear accelerator operates with Flattening Filter (FF) and Flattening-Filter-Free (FFF) mode for small field dosimetry were performed using EGSnrc Monte Carlo user codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc) in order to calculate the beam characteristics using Educated-trial and error method. These includes: Percentage depth dose, lateral beam profile, dose rate delivery, photon energy spectra, photon beam uniformity, out-of-field dose, surface dose, penumbral dose and output factor for small field dosimetry (0.5×0.5 cm2 to 4×4 cm2) and are compared with magna-field sizes (5×5 cm2 to 40×40 cm2) at various depths. The results obtained showed that the optimized beam energy and Full-width-half maximum value for small field dosimetry and magna-field dosimetry was found to be 5.7 MeV and 0.13 cm for both FF and FFF beams. The depth of dose maxima for small field size deviates minimally for both FF and FFF beams similar to magna-fields. The depths greater than dmax depicts a steeper dose fall off in the exponential region for FFF beams comparing FF beams where its deviations gets increased with the increase in field size. The shape of the lateral beam profiles of FF and FFF beams varies remains similar for the small field sizes less than 4×4 cm2 whereas it varies in the case of magna-fields. Dose rate delivery for FFF beams shows an eminent increase with a two-fold factor for both small field dosimetry and magna-field sizes. The surface dose measurements of FFF beams for small field size were found to be higher whereas it gets lower for magna-fields than FF beam. The amount of out-of-field dose reduction gets

  11. A standard Fricke dosimeter compared to an ionization chamber used for dosimetric characterization of 60Co photon beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussous, Ouiza; Medjadj, Toufik

    2016-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the Fricke dosimeter water equivalent system for measurement of dosimetric parameters for photon beam. The parameters measured with the Fricke dosimeter were compared to those obtained with an ionization chamber. In this work characteristics for 60Co γ-rays of field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 cm2 to 20 × 20 cm2 are reported. The measurements were carried out in the secondary standard dosimetry laboratory using a collimated 60Co gamma source therapy unit. The 60Co beam output in terms of absorbed dose to water was obtained as per IAEA TRS 398 recommendations using cylindrical ionization chamber, whose ND,w has been supplied by the IAEA's reference laboratory. Specific quantities measured include: output factors, peak scatter factor, lateral beam profiles and percentage depth dose. The Fricke dosimeters were irradiated in a water phantom using the suitable poly (methyl methacrylate), PMMA stand. Our results demonstrate that Fricke dosimeter and ionization chamber agree with each other.

  12. Impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry of direct photons and free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Gui-Hua; MA Yu-Gang; CAI Xiang-Zhou; FANG De-Qing; SHEN Wen-Qing; TIAN Wen-Dong; WANG Kun

    2009-01-01

    Hard photon emitted from energetic heavy ion collisions is of very interesting since it does not experience the late-stage nuclear interaction, therefore it is useful to explore the early-stage information of matter phase. In this work, we have calculated the impact parameter and beam energy dependence for azimuthal asymmetry, characterized by directed transverse flow parameter F and elliptic asymmetry coefficient v2, of direct photons and the corresponding free protons in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions. It is further shown the anti-correlated azimuthal asymmetry between direct photons and free protons.

  13. Comparison between TG-51 and TRS-398: electron contamination effect on photon beam-quality specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, Antonio Lopez [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Teijeiro, Antonio [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Salvador, Francisco [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Medal, Daniela [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Vazquez, Julio [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Salgado, Manuel [Department of Medical Physics, Instituto Galego de Medicina Tecnica, Hospital do Meixoeiro, 36200, Vigo (Spain); Carrion, MarIa C [Department of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Granada, 18071, Granada (Spain)

    2004-01-07

    Two dosimetry protocols based on absorbed dose to water have recently been implemented: TG-51 and TRS-398. These protocols use different beam-quality indices. The effect of electron contamination in measurements of %dd(10){sub x} has been proposed as a disadvantage of the TG-51. For actual measurements of %dd(10){sub x} in five clinical beams ) a purging magnet was employed to remove the electron contamination. Also, %dd(10){sub x} was measured in the different ways described in TG-51 for high-energy beams: with a lead foil at 50 cm from the phantom surface, at 30 cm, and for open beam. Moreover, TPR{sub 20,10} was determined. Also, periodic quality-control measurements were used for comparing both quality indices and variation over time, but D{sub 20,10} was used instead of TPR{sub 20,10} and measurements in open beam for the %dd(10){sub x} determination. Considering both protocols, S{sub w,air} and k{sub Q} were calculated in order to compare the results with the experimental data. Significant differences (0.3% for k{sub Q}) were only found for the two high-energy beams, but when the electron contamination is underestimated by TG-51, the difference in k{sub Q} is lower. Differences in the other cases and variations over time were less than 0.1%.

  14. Optimization of photon beam energy in aperture-based inverse planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Hilaire, Jason; Sévigny, Caroline; Beaulieu, Frédéric; Gingras, Luc; Tremblay, Daniel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2009-09-03

    Optimal choice of beam energy in radiation therapy is easy in many well-documented cases, but less obvious in some others. Low-energy beams may provide better conformity around the target than their high-energy counterparts due to reduced lateral scatter, but they also contribute to overdosage of peripheral normal tissue. Beam energy was added as an optimization parameter in an automatic aperture-based inverse planning system. We have investigated two sites (prostate and lung), representative of deep-seated and moderately deep-seated tumors. For each case and different numbers of beam incidences, four plans were optimized: 6 MV, 23 MV, and mixed energy plans with one or two energies per incidence. Each plan was scored with a dose-volume cost function. Cost function values, number of segments, monitor units, dose-volume parameters and isodose distributions were compared. For the prostate and lung cases, energy mixing improved plans in terms of cost function values, with a more important reduction for a small number of beam incidences. Use of high energy allows better peripheral tissue sparing, while keeping similar target coverage and sensitive structures avoidance. Low energy contribution to monitor units usually increased with the number of beam incidences. Thus, for deep-seated and moderately deep-seated tumors, energy optimization can produce interesting plans with less peripheral dose and monitor units than for low energy alone.

  15. Low-versus high-energy photon beams in radiotherapy for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, R L; Robinow, J S; Shaw, E G; Kline, R W; Suman, V J; Ilstrup, D M; Lee, R E

    1993-01-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome of lung cancer patients who were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons. From October 1979 through December 1982, 126 patients with locally advanced, unresectable or medically inoperable, nonmetastatic non-small cell lung cancer were treated in a prospective trial in which they were randomly assigned to one of three chemotherapy combinations and thoracic radiotherapy. The patients were stratified by cell type, extent of operation, age, sex, and status of supraclavicular lymph nodes. All patients were followed until death or for a minimum of 4.8 years. Of the 102 evaluable patients, 98 were treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons (49 patients in each group). Outcomes examined included best primary tumor response, time to first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. No significant differences were detected between the patients treated with 4-MV or 10-MV photons for several important prognostic and treatment factors or for any of the study outcomes, including first local (in-field) recurrence, disease-free survival, and overall survival. For the group of 98 patients treated with either 4-MV or 10-MV photons, the estimated 2-year freedom from first local (in-field) recurrence was 47.7%. The estimated 2-year disease-free and overall survivals were 21.6% and 28.6%, respectively.

  16. Medium-Term Stability of the Photon Beam Energy of An Elekta CompactTM Linear Accelerator Based on Daily Measurements of Beam Quality Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Mosleh-Shirazi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In this study, we aimed to assess the medium-term energy stability of a 6MV Elekta CompactTM linear accelerator. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first published article to evaluate this linear accelerator in terms of energy stability. As well as investigating the stability of the linear accelerator energy over a period of several weeks, the results will be useful for estimation of the required tolerance values for the beam quality factor (BQF of the PTW QUICKCHECK weblineTM (QCW daily checking device. Materials and Methods Over a 13 week period of routine clinical service, 52 daily readings of BQF were taken and then analyzed for a 10×10 cm2 field. Results No decreasing or increasing trend in BQF was observed over the study period. The mean BQF value was estimated at 5.4483 with a standard deviation (SD of 0.0459 (0.8%. The mean value was only 0.1% different from the baseline value. Conclusion The results of this medium-term stability study of the Elekta Compact linear accelerator energy showed that 96.2% of the observed BQF values were within ±1.3% of the baseline value. This can be considered to be within the recommended tolerance for linear accelerator photon beam energy. If an approach of applying ±3 SD is taken, the tolerance level for BQF may be suggested to be set at ±2.5%. However, further research is required to establish a relationship between BQF value and the actual changes in beam energy and penetrative quality.

  17. Beam-helicity azimuthal asymmetry measured with the recoil detector in exclusive electroproduction of real photons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Weilin

    2009-11-15

    The experiments at the HERA storage ring at DESY yielded a large contribution to the understanding of the nucleon structure. They used for this the deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the collision of electrons/positrons and protons. The HERMES experiment at DESY applied the longitudinally polarized electron or positron beam with an energy of 27.6 GeV together with a polarized or unpolarized gas target in order to study the spin structure of the nucleon. By the measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) the generalized parton distributions (GPDs) can be determined. These allow a unified description of the nucleon structure. Furthermore they give an experimental approach to the orbital angular momenta of the quarks. However the DVCS process is not discriminable from the Bethe-Heitler (BH) process, in which the scattered electron produces by bremsstrahlung processes a real photon. But it was proved that the interference caused by this indiscriminability of BH and DVCS presents the approach to the DVCS amplitude. This pursues by the measurement of asymmetries of the BH-DVCS cross section in relation to the beam charge, the beam polarization, or the target polarization. The HERMES spectrometer was constructed in order to measure semi-inclusive and inclusive DIS processes. The extraction of the azimutal asymmetries in relation to the beam helicity from the data of 2007 at the hydrogen target were performed in this thesis. The extracted asymmetry amplitudes from the elastic BH/DVCS process agree well with the earlier measurements of HERMES. Furthermore for the first time the asymmetry of {delta}{sup +} resonances was extracted, however the events are because of the low statistics affect with large uncertainties.

  18. Calculation of dose profiles in homogeneous phantoms for irregular, partially attenuated, photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.; El-Khatib, E.

    1988-07-01

    Measured and calculated dose profiles under partial attenuators which cover only part of the radiation beam are presented. The study was performed for x-ray beams generated with a 4-MV linear accelerator at a source--surface distance of 120 cm in a water phantom for lead attenuators of arbitrary shape but constant thickness. Dose correction factors, which are used to multiply the open beam data to predict doses under partial attenuators, depend strongly on attenuator parameters, such as its thickness, lateral dimensions, and distance from phantom or patient surface, in addition to depending on depths in the phantom. The dose correction factors are calculated with Clarkson sector integration techniques, and the results, in spite of the simplifying assumptions used in the algorithm, generally agree with measured data to within 3%. The calculational method therefore may be applied to general clinical situations in which partial attenuators are used.

  19. φ-meson Photoproduction By Using a Beam of Linearly-Polarized Photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamanca, Julian; Cole, Philip

    2007-05-01

    The observables afforded by linearly-polarized photons provide the necessary means towards delineating the contributions of the various hadronic processes, which give rise to vector meson photoproduction. And in particular, We shall describe how φ meson production affords an incisive tool for exploring the nature of the parity exchange at threshold energies, the strangeness content of proton, as well as extracting signatures for the violation of Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka observation (OZI rule). Our goal will be measure the γ p ->φp reaction, with φ->K^+K^-, in the photon energy range of 1.7G to 2.1 GeV by using the Coherent Linear Bremsstrahlung Facility in Hall B of Jefferson Laboratory (Newport News, VA). The data were collected during the g8b run in the summer of 2005. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NWS07.B2.5

  20. Cross Modulation of Two Laser Beams at the Individual-Photon Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-12

    present photons in the two modes affect each other’s transmission [14,26,29,33]: When a signal photon travels in the atomic ensemble as a PRL 113...function of light cavity detuning Δ. Error bars are 1 s.d. PRL 113, 113603 (2014) P HY S I CA L R EV I EW LE T T ER S week ending 12 SEPTEMBER 2014...cavity-light- induced decoherence rate of γc=ð2πncÞ ¼ 70ð25Þ kHz. Error bars are 1 s.d. PRL 113, 113603 (2014) P HY S I CA L R EV I EW LE T T ER S week

  1. Single-beam two-photon three-dimensional optical storage in a pyrryl-substituted fulgide photochromic material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a high-density three-dimensional optical data storage approach by using a pyrryl-substituted fulgide photochromic material with a method of single-beam two-photon recording and fluorescence confocal readout. The detailed information about the photochromic material and the experimental setup are presented. The experiments about multi-layered recording and readout are carried out with a 100-μm-thick transparent photochromic material film. The results show that the lateral resolution is better than 1 μm, and the longitudinal resolution is about 3 μm. Besides, the readout times for the recorded data are desirable when using a readout laser power smaller than 5 mW.``

  2. Heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots for single photon emitters grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Gronin, S. V.; Belyaev, K. G.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Toropov, A. A.; Mukhin, I. S.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) of heterostructures with CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots (QDs) with relatively low surface density, which could be used as single-photon emitters. The QDs were formed on the surface of a 3.1- to 4.5-monolayer-thick two-dimensional strained CdTe layer by depositing amorphous Te layer and its fast thermal desorption. Subsequent thermal annealing of the surface with QDs in the absence of external Te flux led to strong broadening and short-wavelength shift of the QD photoluminescence (PL) peak. Measurement of the micro-PL spectra of individual CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots in fabricated mesastructures with a diameter of 200—1000 nm allowed estimation of the QD surface density as 1010 cm-2.

  3. Precision photo-induced cross-section measurements using the monoenergetic and polarized photon beams at HIγS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, A. P.; Howell, C. R.; Kwan, E.; Rusev, G.; Tornow, W.; Kelley, J. H.; Huibregtse, C.; Hammond, S. L.; Vieira, D.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    2009-10-01

    A research program has been initiated at TUNL to perform precision (γ,γ') and (γ,xn) cross-section measurements on actinide nuclei using the novel source of radiation at the High Intensity Gamma-ray Source (HIγS) facility. This facility provides nearly mono-energetic (E/E ± 2%) and intense (10^8 s-1) photon beams after the recent upgrade. A precision knowledge of photoinduced processes is of practical importance for new reactor technologies, nuclear transmutation, and nuclear forensics. Our recent photodisintegration cross section measurements on radioactive ^241Am targets in the energy range from 9 < Eγ < 16 MeV will be presented. The experimental data for the ^241Am(γ,n) reaction in the giant dipole resonance energy region will be compared with statistical nuclear-model calculations.

  4. Clinical implementation of the Peregrine Monte Carlo dose calculations system for photon beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, N; Bergstrom, P M; Daly, T P; Descalle, M; Garrett, D; House, R K; Knapp, D K; May, S; Patterson, R W; Siantar, C L; Verhey, L; Walling, R S; Welczorek, D

    1999-07-01

    PEREGRINE is a 3D Monte Carlo dose calculation system designed to serve as a dose calculation engine for clinical radiation therapy treatment planning systems. Taking advantage of recent advances in low-cost computer hardware, modern multiprocessor architectures and optimized Monte Carlo transport algorithms, PEREGRINE performs mm-resolution Monte Carlo calculations in times that are reasonable for clinical use. PEREGRINE has been developed to simulate radiation therapy for several source types, including photons, electrons, neutrons and protons, for both teletherapy and brachytherapy. However the work described in this paper is limited to linear accelerator-based megavoltage photon therapy. Here we assess the accuracy, reliability, and added value of 3D Monte Carlo transport for photon therapy treatment planning. Comparisons with clinical measurements in homogeneous and heterogeneous phantoms demonstrate PEREGRINE's accuracy. Studies with variable tissue composition demonstrate the importance of material assignment on the overall dose distribution. Detailed analysis of Monte Carlo results provides new information for radiation research by expanding the set of observables.

  5. 6D phase space electron beam analysis and machine sensitivity studies for ELI-NP GBS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giribono, A.; Bacci, A.; Curatolo, C.; Drebot, I.; Palumbo, L.; Petrillo, V.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Vaccarezza, C.; Vannozzi, A.; Variola, A.

    2016-09-01

    The ELI-NP Gamma Beam Source (GBS) is now under construction in Magurele-Bucharest (RO). Here an advanced source of gamma photons with unprecedented specifications of brilliance (>1021), monochromaticity (0.5%) and energy tunability (0.2-19.5 MeV) is being built, based on Inverse Compton Scattering in the head-on configuration between an electron beam of maximum energy 750 MeV and a high quality high power ps laser beam. These requirements make the ELI-NP GBS an advanced and challenging gamma ray source. The electron beam dynamics analysis and control regarding the machine sensitivity to the possible jitter and misalignments are presented. The effects on the beam quality are illustrated providing the basis for the alignment procedure and jitter tolerances.

  6. Interaction of electron beams with optical nanostructures and metamaterials: from coherent photon sources towards shaping the wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the interaction of electron beams with materials and light has been a field of research for more than a century. The field was advanced theoretically by the rise of quantum mechanics and technically by the introduction of electron microscopes and accelerators. It is possible nowadays to uncover a multitude of information from electron-induced excitations in matter by means of advanced techniques like holography, tomography, and, most recently, photon-induced near-field electron microscopy. The question is whether the interaction can be controlled in an even, more efficient way in order to unravel important questions like modal decomposition of the electron-induced polarization by performing experiments with better spatial, temporal, and energy resolutions. This review discusses recent advances in controlling electron and light interactions at the nanoscale. Theoretical and numerical aspects of the interaction of electrons with nanostructures and metamaterials will be discussed with the aim of understanding the mechanisms of radiation in the interaction of electrons with even more sophisticated structures. Based on these mechanisms of radiation, state-of-the art and novel electron-driven few-photon sources will be discussed. Applications of such sources to gain an understanding of quantum optical effects and also to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes will be covered. In an inverse approach, as in the case of the inverse Smith–Purcell effect, laser-induced excitations of nanostructures can cause electron beams traveling in the near-field of such structures to accelerate, provided a synchronization criterion is satisfied. This effect is the basis for linear dielectric and metallic electron accelerators. Moreover, acceleration is accompanied by bunching of the electrons. When single electrons are considered, an efficient design of nanostructures can lead to the shaping of the electron wave function travelling adjacent to them, for

  7. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided.

  8. Surface and Buildup Region Dose Measurements with Markus Parallel-Plate Ionization Chamber, GafChromic EBT3 Film, and MOSFET Detector for High-Energy Photon Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Akbas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance for 5 × 5, 10 × 10, and 20 × 20 cm2 field sizes and 0°, 30°, 60°, and 80° beam angles. The surface doses using 6 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.3%, 18.8%, and 25.5% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface doses using 15 MV photon beams for 10 × 10 cm2 field size were found to be 14.9%, 13.4%, and 16.4% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film, and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary; thus, the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry and must be taken into account.

  9. A review of treatment planning for precision image-guided photon beam pre-clinical animal radiation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Hoof, Stefan van; Granton, Patrick V.; Trani, Daniela [Maastricht University Medical Center (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO)

    2014-07-01

    Recently, precision irradiators integrated with a high-resolution CT imaging device became available for pre-clinical studies. These research platforms offer significant advantages over older generations of animal irradiators in terms of precision and accuracy of image-guided radiation targeting. These platforms are expected to play a significant role in defining experiments that will allow translation of research findings to the human clinical setting. In the field of radiotherapy, but also others such as neurology, the platforms create unique opportunities to explore e.g. the synergy between radiation and drugs or other agents. To fully exploit the advantages of this new technology, accurate methods are needed to plan the irradiation and to calculate the three-dimensional radiation dose distribution in the specimen. To this end, dedicated treatment planning systems are needed. In this review we will discuss specific issues for precision irradiation of small animals, we will describe the workflow of animal treatment planning, and we will examine several dose calculation algorithms (factorization, superposition-convolution, Monte Carlo simulation) used for animal irradiation with kilovolt photon beams. Issues such as dose reporting methods, photon scatter, tissue segmentation and motion will also be discussed briefly.

  10. Extended two-photon microscopy in live samples with Bessel beams: steadier focus, faster volume scans, and simpler stereoscopic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thériault, Gabrielle; Cottet, Martin; Castonguay, Annie; McCarthy, Nathalie; De Koninck, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Two-photon microscopy has revolutionized functional cellular imaging in tissue, but although the highly confined depth of field (DOF) of standard set-ups yields great optical sectioning, it also limits imaging speed in volume samples and ease of use. For this reason, we recently presented a simple and retrofittable modification to the two-photon laser-scanning microscope which extends the DOF through the use of an axicon (conical lens). Here we demonstrate three significant benefits of this technique using biological samples commonly employed in the field of neuroscience. First, we use a sample of neurons grown in culture and move it along the z-axis, showing that a more stable focus is achieved without compromise on transverse resolution. Second, we monitor 3D population dynamics in an acute slice of live mouse cortex, demonstrating that faster volumetric scans can be conducted. Third, we acquire a stereoscopic image of neurons and their dendrites in a fixed sample of mouse cortex, using only two scans instead of the complete stack and calculations required by standard systems. Taken together, these advantages, combined with the ease of integration into pre-existing systems, make the extended depth-of-field imaging based on Bessel beams a strong asset for the field of microscopy and life sciences in general. PMID:24904284

  11. A review of treatment planning for precision image-guided photon beam pre-clinical animal radiation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; van Hoof, Stefan; Granton, Patrick V; Trani, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Recently, precision irradiators integrated with a high-resolution CT imaging device became available for pre-clinical studies. These research platforms offer significant advantages over older generations of animal irradiators in terms of precision and accuracy of image-guided radiation targeting. These platforms are expected to play a significant role in defining experiments that will allow translation of research findings to the human clinical setting. In the field of radiotherapy, but also others such as neurology, the platforms create unique opportunities to explore e.g. the synergy between radiation and drugs or other agents. To fully exploit the advantages of this new technology, accurate methods are needed to plan the irradiation and to calculate the three-dimensional radiation dose distribution in the specimen. To this end, dedicated treatment planning systems are needed. In this review we will discuss specific issues for precision irradiation of small animals, we will describe the workflow of animal treatment planning, and we will examine several dose calculation algorithms (factorization, superposition-convolution, Monte Carlo simulation) used for animal irradiation with kilovolt photon beams. Issues such as dose reporting methods, photon scatter, tissue segmentation and motion will also be discussed briefly. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Focused ion beam nano-structuring of $Al_2O_3$ dielectric layers for photonic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ay, Feridun; Bradley, Jonathan D.B.; Hopman, Wico C.L.; Gadgil, Vishwas J.; Ridder, de René M.; Wörhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    2007-01-01

    In order to enable full integration of active integrated optical components based on Si-technology, high quality micro- and nano-structuring processes aiming at the development of on-chip resonator structures are to be achieved. By optimizing focused ion beam milling parameters such as ion current,

  13. Focused ion beam nano-structuring of photonic Bragg gratings in $Al_2O_3$ waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranga, Amaia; Ay, Feridun; Bradley, Jonathan D.B.; Ridder, de René M.; Wörhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus; Emplit, Ph.; Delqué, M.; Gorza, S.-P.; Kockaart, P.; Leijtens, X.

    2007-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) etching is receiving increasing attention for the fabrication of active integrated optical components such as waveguide amplifiers and lasers. Si-technology compatible low-loss $Al_2O_3$ channel waveguides grown on thermally oxidized silicon substrates have been reported recen

  14. Focused Ion Beam Milling Strategies of Photonic Crystal Structures in Silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, Wico C.L.; Ay, Feridun; Hu, Wenbin; Gadgil, Vishwas J.; Kuipers, Laurens; Pollnau, Markus; Ridder, de René M.

    2007-01-01

    We report on optimisation of the side wall angle of focused ion beam (FIB) fabricated submicron diameter holes in silicon. Two optimisation steps were performed. First, we compare two different FIB scanning procedures and show the advantages of using a spiral scanning method for the definition of ho

  15. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusciac, D.; Bordy, J.-M.; Daures, J.; Blideanu, V.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists' demands for high-energy (6 - 9 MeV) photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors) are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes), a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV) has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this "realistic" radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  16. High energy photon reference for radiation protection: technical design of the LINAC beam and ionization chambers; and calculation of monoenergetic conversion coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusciac D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the results of the first part of a research project aimed at offering a complete response to dosimeters providers and nuclear physicists’ demands for high-energy (6 – 9 MeV photon beams for radiation protection purposes. Classical facilities allowing the production of high-energy photonic radiation (proton accelerators, nuclear reactors are very rare and need large investment for development and use. A novel solution is proposed, consisting in the use of a medical linear accelerator, allowing a significant decrease of all costs.Using Monte Carlo simulations (MCNP5 and PENELOPE codes, a specifically designed electron-photon conversion target allowing for obtaining a high energy photon beam (with an average energy weighted by fluence of about 6 MeV has been built for radiation protection purposes. Due to the specific design of the target, this “realistic” radiation protection high-energy photon beam presents a uniform distribution of air kerma rate at a distance of 1 m, over a 30 × 30 cm2 surface. Two graphite cavity ionizing chambers for ionometric measurements have been built. For one of these chambers, the charge collection volume has been measured allowing for its use as a primary standard. The second ionizing chamber is used as a transfer standard; as such it has been calibrated in a 60Co beam, and in the high energy photon beam for radiation protection.The measurements with these ionizing chambers allowed for an evaluation of the air kerma rate in the LINAC based high-energy photon beam for radiation protection: the values cover a range between 36 mGy/h and 210 mGy/h, compatible with radiation protection purposes.Finally, using Monte Carlo simulations, conversion coefficients from air kerma to dose equivalent quantities have been calculated in the range between 10 keV and 22.4 MeV, for the spectral distribution of the fluence corresponding to the beam produced by the linear accelerator of the LNE-LNHB.

  17. Determining contrast sensitivity functions for monochromatic light emitted by high-brightness LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, Vasudha; Narendran, Nadarajah; Freyssinier, Jean Paul; Raghavan, Ramesh; Boyce, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Light-emitting diode (LED) technology is becoming the choice for many lighting applications that require monochromatic light. However, one potential problem with LED-based lighting systems is uneven luminance patterns. Having a uniform luminance distribution is more important in some applications. One example where LEDs are becoming a viable alternative and luminance uniformity is an important criterion is backlighted monochromatic signage. The question is how much uniformity is required for these applications. Presently, there is no accepted metric that quantifies luminance uniformity. A recent publication proposed a method based on digital image analysis to quantify beam quality of reflectorized halogen lamps. To be able to employ such a technique to analyze colored beams generated by LED systems, it is necessary to have contrast sensitivity functions (CSFs) for monochromatic light produced by LEDs. Several factors including the luminance, visual field size, and spectral power distribution of the light affect the CSFs. Although CSFs exist for a variety of light sources at visual fields ranging from 2 degrees to 20 degrees, CSFs do not exist for red, green, and blue light produced by high-brightness LEDs at 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields and at luminances typical for backlighted signage. Therefore, the goal of the study was to develop a family of CSFs for 2-degree and 10-degree visual fields illuminated by narrow-band LEDs at typical luminances seen in backlighted signs. The details of the experiment and the results are presented in this manuscript.

  18. Monochromatization of femtosecond XUV light pulses with the use of reflection zone plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metje, Jan; Borgwardt, Mario; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Kothe, Alexander; Engel, Nicholas; Wilke, Martin; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Tolksdorf, Daniel; Firsov, Alexander; Brzhezinskaya, Maria; Erko, Alexei; Kiyan, Igor Yu; Aziz, Emad F

    2014-05-05

    We report on a newly built laser-based tabletop setup which enables generation of femtosecond light pulses in the XUV range employing the process of high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in a gas medium. The spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics of the XUV beam are presented. Monochromatization of XUV light with minimum temporal pulse distortion is the central issue of this work. Off-center reflection zone plates are shown to be advantageous when selection of a desired harmonic is carried out with the use of a single optical element. A cross correlation technique was applied to characterize the performance of the zone plates in the time domain. By using laser pulses of 25 fs length to pump the HHG process, a pulse duration of 45 fs for monochromatized harmonics was achieved in the present setup.

  19. Diffraction control in PT-symmetric photonic lattices: from beam rectification to dynamic localization

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Yaroslav V; Konotop, Vladimir V; Torner, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    We address the propagation of light beams in longitudinally modulated PT-symmetric lattices, built as arrays of couplers with periodically varying separation between their channels, and show a number of possibilities for efficient diffraction control available in such non-conservative structures. The dynamics of light in such lattices crucially depends on the ratio of the switching length for the straight segments of each coupler and the longitudinal lattice period. Depending on the longitudinal period, one can achieve either beam rectification, when the input light propagates at a fixed angle across the structure without diffractive broadening, or dynamic localization, when the initial intensity distribution is periodically restored after each longitudinal period. Importantly, the transition between these two different propagation regimes can be achieved by tuning only gain and losses acting in the system, provided that the PT-symmetry remains unbroken. The impact of Kerr nonlinearity is also discussed.

  20. Monolithic beam steering in a mid-infrared, surface-emitting, photonic integrated circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slivken, Steven; Wu, Donghai; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-08-16

    The mid-infrared (2.5 infrared optical systems, however, mid-infrared component technology is still rather crude, with isolated components exhibiting limited functionality. In this manuscript, we make a significant leap forward in mid-infrared technology by developing a platform which can combine functions of multiple mid-infrared optical elements, including an integrated light source. In a single device, we demonstrate wide wavelength tuning (240 nm) and beam steering (17.9 degrees) in the mid-infrared with a significantly reduced beam divergence (down to 0.5 degrees). The architecture is also set up to be manufacturable and testable on a wafer scale, requiring no cleaved facets or special mirror coating to function.

  1. Calculation of dose in homogeneous phantoms for partially attenuated photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Khatib, E.; Podgorsak, E.B.; Pla, C.

    1988-03-01

    Measured and calculated dose distributions under attenuators, which are of smaller cross-sectional dimensions than the radiation field, are presented. The study was performed on a 4-MV linac at a source--surface distance of 120 cm on the beam central axis in a water phantom for several thicknesses and cross sections of lead attenuators. Dose correction factors, which are used to multiply the open beam data to get dose distributions under partial attenuators, depend strongly on attenuator parameters and on depths in phantom. A method to calculate dose correction factors for any combination of attenuator parameters and any phantom depth is presented. The calculated dose distributions under partial attenuators agree well with measured data, which indicates that the method can be applied in clinical situations.

  2. Laser-driven electron beam generation for secondary photon sources with few terawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohacek, K.; Chaulagain, U.; Horny, V.; Kozlova, M.; Krus, M.; Nejdl, J.

    2017-05-01

    Relativistic electron beams accelerated by laser wakefield have the ability to serve as sources of collimated, point-like and femtosecond X-ray radiation. Experimental conditions for generation of stable quasi-monoenergetic electron bunches using a femtosecond few-terawatt laser pulse (600 mJ, 50 fs) were investigated as they are crucial for generation of stable betatron radiation and X-ray pulses from inverse Compton scattering. A mixture of helium with argon, and helium with an admixture of synthetic air were tested for this purpose using different backing pressures and the obtained results are compared. The approach to use synthetic air was previously proven to stabilize the energy and energy spread of the generated electron beams at the given laser power. The accelerator was operated in nonlinear regime with forced self-injection and resulted in the generation of stable relativistic electron beams with an energy of tens of MeV and betatron X-ray radiation was generated in the keV range. A razor blade was tested to create a steep density gradient in order to improve the stability of electron injection and to increase the total electron bunch charge. It was proven that the stable electron and X-ray source can be built at small-scale facilities, which readily opens possibilities for various applications due to availability of such few-terawatt laser systems in many laboratories around the world.

  3. Direct two-photon excitation of isomeric transition in thorium-229 nucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, V I; Yatsenko, L P; Romanenko, A V; Litvinov, A N; Kazakov, G A

    2012-01-01

    A possibility of the two-photon excitation of an isomeric state in a nucleus of thorium-229 has been discussed. The fluorescence intensity of the excitation is demonstrated to be identical for the irradiation of nuclei with either monochromatic light or polychromatic radiation consisting of a sequence of short light pulses of the same intensity. The two-photon excitation of Th^{3+} ion in an electromagnetic trap with a focused laser beam with a wavelength of about 320 nm and power of 100 mW can lead to the absorption saturation, at which the fluorescence emission with the frequency of the transition in a nucleus is maximal. In crystals doped with Th^{4+} to a concentration of about 10^{18} cm^{-3} and irradiated with a laser radiation 10 W in power, the emission of several photons per second with a wavelength of about 160 nm becomes possible.

  4. The influence of neutron contamination on dosimetry in external photon beam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horst, Felix, E-mail: felix.ernst.horst@kmub.thm.de; Czarnecki, Damian [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390 (Germany); Zink, Klemens [Institute of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection (IMPS), University of Applied Sciences Giessen, Giessen D-35390, Germany and Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, University Medical Center Giessen-Marburg, Marburg D-35043 (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Photon fields with energies above ∼7 MeV are contaminated by neutrons due to photonuclear reactions. Their influence on dosimetry—although considered to be very low—is widely unexplored. Methods: In this work, Monte Carlo based investigations into this issue performed with FLUKA and EGSNRC are presented. A typical Linac head in 18 MV-X mode was modeled equivalently within both codes. EGSNRC was used for the photon and FLUKA for the neutron production and transport simulation. Water depth dose profiles and the response of different detectors (Farmer chamber, TLD-100, TLD-600H, and TLD-700H chip) in five representative depths were simulated and the neutrons’ impact (neutron absorbed dose relative to photon absorbed dose) was calculated. To take account of the neutrons’ influence, a theoretically required correction factor was defined and calculated for five representative water depths. Results: The neutrons’ impact on the absorbed dose to water was found to be below 0.1% for all depths and their impact on the response of the Farmer chamber and the TLD-700H chip was found to be even less. For the TLD-100 and the TLD-600H chip it was found to be up to 0.3% and 0.7%, respectively. The theoretical correction factors to be applied to absorbed dose to water values measured with these four detectors in a depth different from the reference/calibration depth were calculated and found to be below 0.05% for the Farmer chamber and the TLD-700H chip, but up to 0.15% and 0.35% for the TLD-100 and TLD-600H chips, respectively. In thermoluminescence dosimetry the neutrons’ influence (and therefore the additional inaccuracy in measurement) was found to be higher for TLD materials whose {sup 6}Li fraction is high, such as TLD-100 and TLD-600H, resulting from the thermal neutron capture reaction on {sup 6}Li. Conclusions: The impact of photoneutrons on the absorbed dose to water and on the response of a typical ionization chamber as well as three different types

  5. A water calorimeter for on-site absorbed dose to water calibrations in 60Co and MV-photon beams including MRI incorporated treatment equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Prez, Leon; de Pooter, Jacco; Jansen, Bartel; Aalbers, Tony

    2016-07-01

    In reference dosimetry the aim is to establish the absorbed dose to water, D w, under reference conditions. However, existing dosimetry protocols are not always applicable for rapidly emerging new treatment modalities. For primary standard dosimetry laboratories it is generally not feasible to acquire such modalities. Therefore it is strongly desired that D w measurements with primary standards can be performed on-site in clinical beams for the new treatment modalities in order to characterize and calibrate detectors. To serve this need, VSL has developed a new transportable water calorimeter serving as a primary D w standard for 60Co and MV-photons including MRI incorporated treatment equipment. Special attention was paid to its operation in different beam geometries and beam modalities including the application in magnetic fields. The new calorimeter was validated in the VSL 60Co beam and on-site in clinical MV-photon beams. Excellent agreement of 0.1% was achieved with previous 60Co field calibrations, i.e. well within the uncertainty of the previous calorimeter, and with measurements performed in horizontal and vertical MV-photon beams. k Q factors, determined for two PTW 30013 ionization chambers, agreed very well with available literature data. The relative combined standard uncertainty (k  =  1) for D w measurements in 60Co and MV-photons is 0.37%. Calibrations are carried out with a standard uncertainty of 0.42% and k Q -factors are determined with a relative standard uncertainty of 0.40%.

  6. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Ahmed; Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed; Kanaa'n, Haitham; Sarhan, Nasim; Roujob, Ibrahim; Salem, Abdel-Fattah; Afifi, Shatha; Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif

    2015-01-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V(20 Gy)), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V(25 Gy)). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p supraclavicular nodal irradiation and results in adequate target coverage, acceptable dosimetric hotspot volume, and slightly reduced lung dose. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimal energy for cell radiosensitivity enhancement by gold nanoparticles using synchrotron-based monoenergetic photon beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman WN

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Wan Nordiana Rahman,1,2 Stéphanie Corde,3,4 Naoto Yagi,5 Siti Aishah Abdul Aziz,1 Nathan Annabell,2 Moshi Geso21School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Kelantan, Malaysia; 2Division of Medical Radiation, School of Medical Sciences, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Bundoora, VIC, 3Radiation Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, 4Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 5Japanese Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: Gold nanoparticles have been shown to enhance radiation doses delivered to biological targets due to the high absorption coefficient of gold atoms, stemming from their high atomic number (Z and physical density. These properties significantly increase the likelihood of photoelectric effects and Compton scattering interactions. Gold nanoparticles are a novel radiosensitizing agent that can potentially be used to increase the effectiveness of current radiation therapy techniques and improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. However, the optimum radiosensitization effect of gold nanoparticles is strongly dependent on photon energy, which theoretically is predicted to occur in the kilovoltage range of energy. In this research, synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays in the 30–100 keV range were used to investigate the energy dependence of radiosensitization by gold nanoparticles and also to determine the photon energy that produces optimum effects. This investigation was conducted using cells in culture to measure dose enhancement. Bovine aortic endothelial cells with and without gold nanoparticles were irradiated with X-rays at energies of 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 81, and 100 keV. Trypan blue exclusion assays were performed after irradiation to determine cell viability. Cell radiosensitivity enhancement was indicated by the dose enhancement factor which was found to be maximum at 40 keV with a value of 3

  8. SU-E-T-313: Dosimetric Deviation of Misaligned Beams for a 6 MV Photon Linear Accelerator Using Monte Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S [Advocate Lutheran General Hospital, Park Ridge, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric variations of misaligned beams for a linear accelerator by using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Method and Materials: Misaligned beams of a Varian 21EX Clinac were simulated to estimate the dosimetric effects. All the linac head components for a 6 MV photon beam were implemented in BEAMnrc/EGSnrc system. For incident electron beam parameters, 6 MeV with 0.1 cm full-width-half-max Gaussian beam was used. A phase space file was obtained below the jaw per each misalignment condition of the incident electron beam: (1) The incident electron beams were tilted by 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 degrees on the x-axis from the central axis. (2) The center of the incident electron beam was off-axially moved toward +x-axis by 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 cm away from the central axis. Lateral profiles for each misaligned beam condition were acquired at dmax = 1.5 cm and 10 cm depth in a rectangular water phantom. Beam flatness and symmetry were calculated by using the lateral profile data. Results: The lateral profiles were found to be skewed opposite to the angle of the incident beam for the tilted beams. For the displaced beams, similar skewed lateral profiles were obtained with small shifts of penumbra on the +x-axis. The variations of beam flatness were 3.89–11.18% and 4.12–42.57% for the tilted beam and the translated beam, respectively. The beam symmetry was separately found to be 2.95 −9.93% and 2.55–38.06% separately. It was found that the percent increase of the flatness and the symmetry values are approximated 2 to 3% per 0.5 degree tilt or per 1 mm displacement. Conclusion: This study quantified the dosimetric effects of misaligned beams using MC simulations. The results would be useful to understand the magnitude of the dosimetric deviations for the misaligned beams.

  9. Continuous all-optical deceleration and single-photon cooling of molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Jayich, A M; Hummon, M T; Porto, J V; Campbell, W C

    2013-01-01

    Ultracold molecular gases are promising as an avenue to rich many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. This richness, which flows from the complex internal structure of molecules, makes the creation of ultracold molecular gases using traditional methods (laser plus evaporative cooling) a challenge, in particular due to the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states. We propose a way to circumvent this key bottleneck using an all-optical method for decelerating molecules using stimulated absorption and emission with a single ultrafast laser. We further describe single-photon cooling of the decelerating molecules that exploits their high dark state pumping rates, turning the principal obstacle to molecular laser cooling into an advantage. Cooling and deceleration may be applied simultaneously and continuously to load molecules into a trap. We discuss implementation details including multi-level numerical simulations of strontium monohydride (SrH). These techniqu...

  10. ESR response of phenol compounds for dosimetry of gamma photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrale, M., E-mail: maurizio.marrale@unipa.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Longo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Panzeca, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gallo, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Gruppo V Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy); Principato, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Edificio 18, 90128 Palermo (Italy); Tomarchio, E.; Parlato, A. [Dipartimento Energia, Ingegneria dell’Informazione e Modelli Matematici, Università di Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, I-90128 Palermo (Italy); Buttafava, A.; Dondi, D.; Zeffiro, A. [Dipartimento di Chimica, Università di Pavia, V.le Taramelli, 12 Pavia, Italy and INFN, Sezione di Pavia, Pavia, Italy. (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    In the present paper we investigate the features of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols as a material for electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. We experimentally analyzed the ESR response of pellets of IRGANOX® 1076 phenols irradiated with {sup 60}Co photons. The best experimental parameters (modulation amplitude and microwave power) for dosimetric applications have been obtained. The dependence of ESR signal as function of γ dose is found to be linear in the dose range studied (12–60 Gy) and the lowest measurable dose is found to be of the order of 1 Gy. The signal after irradiation is very stable in the first thirty days. From the point of view of the tissue equivalence, these materials have mass energy absorption coefficient values comparable with those of soft tissue.

  11. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, Mateusz Karol; Calabrese, Roberto; Cardinale, Roberta; Carniti, Paolo; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cojocariu, Lucian Nicolae; Cotta Ramusino, Angelo; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dorosz, Piotr Andrzej; Easo, Sajan; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Frei, Christoph; Gambetta, Silvia; Gibson, Valerie; Gotti, Claudio; Harnew, Neville; He, Jibo; Keizer, Floris; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Maciuc, Florin; Maino, Matteo; Malaguti, Roberto; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mccann, Michael Andrew; Morris, Adam; Muheim, Franz; Papanestis, Antonis; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petrolini, Alessandro; Piedigrossi, Didier; Pistone, Alessandro; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Sigurdsson, Saevar; Simi, Gabriele; Smith, Jackson William; Spradlin, Patrick; Tomassetti, Luca; Wotton, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to use the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors are one of the key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper, we describe the setup and the results of the first tests in a particle beam carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded optoelectronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  12. Correlative In Vivo 2 Photon and Focused Ion Beam Scanning Electron Microscopy of Cortical Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maco, Bohumil; Holtmaat, Anthony; Cantoni, Marco; Kreshuk, Anna; Straehle, Christoph N.; Hamprecht, Fred A.; Knott, Graham W.

    2013-01-01

    Correlating in vivo imaging of neurons and their synaptic connections with electron microscopy combines dynamic and ultrastructural information. Here we describe a semi-automated technique whereby volumes of brain tissue containing axons and dendrites, previously studied in vivo, are subsequently imaged in three dimensions with focused ion beam scanning electron microcopy. These neurites are then identified and reconstructed automatically from the image series using the latest segmentation algorithms. The fast and reliable imaging and reconstruction technique avoids any specific labeling to identify the features of interest in the electron microscope, and optimises their preservation and staining for 3D analysis. PMID:23468982

  13. Test of the photon detection system for the LHCb RICH Upgrade in a charged particle beam

    CERN Document Server

    Baszczyk, M.K.

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb detector will be upgraded to make more efficient use of the available luminosity at the LHC in Run III and extend its potential for discovery. The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors are key components of the LHCb detector for particle identification. In this paper we describe the setup and the results of tests in a charged particle beam, carried out to assess prototypes of the upgraded opto-electronic chain from the Multi-Anode PMT photosensor to the readout and data acquisition system.

  14. Correlative in vivo 2 photon and focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy of cortical neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohumil Maco

    Full Text Available Correlating in vivo imaging of neurons and their synaptic connections with electron microscopy combines dynamic and ultrastructural information. Here we describe a semi-automated technique whereby volumes of brain tissue containing axons and dendrites, previously studied in vivo, are subsequently imaged in three dimensions with focused ion beam scanning electron microcopy. These neurites are then identified and reconstructed automatically from the image series using the latest segmentation algorithms. The fast and reliable imaging and reconstruction technique avoids any specific labeling to identify the features of interest in the electron microscope, and optimises their preservation and staining for 3D analysis.

  15. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Huang, Tseng-Te, E-mail: huangtt@iner.gov.tw [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taoyuan County, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yuan-Hao [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wei-Lin [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yen-Fu [Atomic Energy Council, New Taipei City, Taiwan (China); Wu, Shu-Wei [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission, Petten (Netherlands); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Dept. of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary {sup 60}Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the {sup 60}Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations

  16. An assessment of the Photon Contamination due to Bremsstrahlung Radiation in the Electron Beams of a NEPTUN 10PC Linac using a Monte Carlo Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrollah Jabbari

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In clinical electron beams, most of bremsstrahlung radiation is produced by various linac head structures. This bremsstrahlung radiation dose is influenced by the geometry and construction of every component of the linac treatment head structures. Thus, it can be expected that the amount of the contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation varies among different linacs, even for the same electron beam energy. The aims of this study were to simulate the NEPTUN 10PC linac electron beams and to calculate the photon contamination dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation in these beams using a Monte Carlo method. Materials and methods: A NEPTUN 10PC linac was simulated in its electron mode using the BEAMnrc code. This linac can provide three electron beam energies of 6, 8 and 10 MeV. Detailed information required for the simulation, including the geometry and materials of various components of the linac treatment head, was provided by the vender. For all simulations, the cut-off energies for electron and photon transport were set at ECUT=0.521 MeV and PCUT=0.010 MeV, respectively. The KS statistical test was used for validation of the simulated models. Then, relevant bremsstrahlung radiation doses for the three electron beam energies of the linac were calculated for the reference field using the Monte Carlo method.   Results: The KS test showed a good agreement between the calculated values (resulting from the simulations and the measured ones. The results showed that the amount of contaminated photon dose due to bremsstrahlung radiation from various components of the simulated linac at the surface of the phantom was between 0.2%-0.5% of the maximum dose for the three electron beam energies. Conclusion:  Considering the good agreement between the measured and simulated data, it can be concluded that the simulation method as well as the calculated bremsstrahlung doses have been made at a good level of accuracy and precision

  17. Dosimetric properties of radiophotoluminescent glass rod detector in high-energy photon beams from a linear accelerator and cyber-knife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakia, Fujio; Moribe, Nobuyuki; Shimonobou, Toshiaki; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2004-07-01

    A fully automatic radiophotoluminescent glass rod dosimeter (GRD) system has recently become commercially available. This article discusses the dosimetric properties of the GRD including uniformity and reproducibility of signal, dose linearity, and energy and directional dependence in high-energy photon beams. In addition, energy response is measured in electron beams. The uniformity and reproducibility of the signal from 50 GRDs using a 60Co beam are both +/- 1.1% (one standard deviation). Good dose linearity of the GRD is maintained for doses ranging from 0.5 to 30 Gy, the lower and upper limits of this study, respectively. The GRD response is found to show little energy dependence in photon energies of a 60Co beam, 4 MV (TPR20(10)=0.617) and 10 MV (TPR(20)10=0.744) x-ray beams. However, the GRD responses for 9 MeV (mean energy, Ez = 3.6 MeV) and 16 MeV (Ez = 10.4 MeV) electron beams are 4%-5% lower than that for a 60Co beam in the beam quality dependence. The measured angular dependence of GRD, ranging from 0 degrees (along the long axis of GRD) to 120 degrees is within 1.5% for a 4 MV x-ray beam. As applications, a linear accelerator-based radiosurgery system and Cyber-Knife output factors are measured by a GRD and compared with those from various detectors including a p-type silicon diode detector, a diamond detector, and an ion chamber. It is found that the GRD is a very useful detector for small field dosimetry, in particular, below 10 mm circular fields.

  18. A Study of High Transverse Momentum Direct Photon Production in Interactions of 500 GeV/c $\\pi^{-}$ and Proton Beams on a Beryllium Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Brajesh Chandra [Univ. of Delhi, New Delhi (India)

    1991-01-01

    This thesis presents the measurement of inclusive direct photon production cross section for experiment E706* for the data accumulated during 1987-88 fixed target run at Fermilab.$^{\\dagger}$ The experiment employed a large liquid argon sampling calorimeter for electromagnetic particle detection with an energy resolution of approximately 15% $\\sqrt{E}$. The spectrometer was exposed to incident $\\pi^-$ and proton beam interacting with Beryllium (Be) target. The spectrometer triggered on high transverse momentum ($P_{\\tau}$) electromagnetic showers. The incident $\\pi^-$ beam was employed to measure the inclusive direct photon production cross sections from Be target in the $P_{\\tau}$ range 3.5 < $P_{\\tau}$ < 10 GeV/c. The incident proton beam was used to measure the inclusive direct photon production cross-sections from Be target in the $P_{\\tau}$ range 4 < $P_{\\tau}$ < 8 GeV/c. The cross sections are presented as a function of $P_{\\tau}$ averaged over the rapidity ranges - .7 < y < - .2, - .2 < y < .2, .2 < y < .7 and - .7 < y < .7, as well as a function of rapidity integrated over $P_{\\tau}$ range of 4 to 8 GeV/c. The ratio of direct photon production to $\\pi^0$ production ($\\gamma/\\pi^0$ ) is also presented. The $\\gamma/\\pi^0$ ratio for $\\pi^-$ and proton beam on Beryllium target is compared to leading log Quantum Chromodynarnics ( QCD) predictions. The direct photon cross sections are compared to next to leading log QCD predictions. Results are also compared to previous experiments.

  19. Combined photon-electron beams in the treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes in breast cancer: A novel technique that achieves adequate coverage while reducing lung dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Ahmed, E-mail: ahmed.salem@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Mohamad, Issa; Dayyat, Abdulmajeed [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Kanaa’n, Haitham [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Sarhan, Nasim [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Roujob, Ibrahim [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Salem, Abdel-Fattah [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hashemite University, Zarqa (Jordan); Afifi, Shatha [Section of Medical Physics, Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan); Jaradat, Imad; Mubiden, Rasmi; Almousa, Abdelateif [Department of Radiation Oncology, King Hussein Cancer Center, Amman (Jordan)

    2015-10-01

    Radiation pneumonitis is a well-documented side effect of radiation therapy for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to compare combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only plans in the radiation treatment of the supraclavicular lymph nodes. In total, 13 patients requiring chest wall and supraclavicular nodal irradiation were planned retrospectively using combined photon-electron, photon-only, and electron-only supraclavicular beams. A dose of 50 Gy over 25 fractions was prescribed. Chest wall irradiation parameters were fixed for all plans. The goal of this planning effort was to cover 95% of the supraclavicular clinical target volume (CTV) with 95% of the prescribed dose and to minimize the volume receiving ≥ 105% of the dose. Comparative end points were supraclavicular CTV coverage (volume covered by the 95% isodose line), hotspot volume, maximum radiation dose, contralateral breast dose, mean total lung dose, total lung volume percentage receiving at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20} {sub Gy}), heart volume percentage receiving at least 25 Gy (V{sub 25} {sub Gy}). Electron and photon energies ranged from 8 to 18 MeV and 4 to 6 MV, respectively. The ratio of photon-to-electron fractions in combined beams ranged from 5:20 to 15:10. Supraclavicular nodal coverage was highest in photon-only (mean = 96.2 ± 3.5%) followed closely by combined photon-electron (mean = 94.2 ± 2.5%) and lowest in electron-only plans (mean = 81.7 ± 14.8%, p < 0.001). The volume of tissue receiving ≥ 105% of the prescription dose was higher in the electron-only (mean = 69.7 ± 56.1 cm{sup 3}) as opposed to combined photon-electron (mean = 50.8 ± 40.9 cm{sup 3}) and photon-only beams (mean = 32.2 ± 28.1 cm{sup 3}, p = 0.114). Heart V{sub 25} {sub Gy} was not statistically different among the plans (p = 0.999). Total lung V{sub 20} {sub Gy} was lowest in electron-only (mean = 10.9 ± 2.3%) followed by combined photon-electron (mean = 13.8 ± 2.3%) and highest in photon

  20. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement for various detectors used in photon and electron beam dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khee Looe, Hui; Harder, Dietrich; Poppe, Björn

    2011-07-01

    The subject of this study is the 'shift of the effective point of measurement', Δz, well known as a method of correction compensating for the 'displacement effect' in photon and electron beam dosimetry. Radiochromic EBT 1 films have been used to measure the 'true' TPR curves of 6 and 15 MV photons and 6 and 9 MeV electrons in the solid water-equivalent material RW3. For the Roos and Markus chambers, the cylindrical 'PinPoint', 'Semiflex' and 'Rigid-Stem' chambers, the 2D-Array and the E-type silicon diode (all from PTW-Freiburg), the positions of the effective points of measurement have been determined by direct or indirect comparison between their TPR curves and those of the EBT 1 film. Both for the Roos and Markus chambers, we found Δz = (0.4 ± 0.1) mm, which confirms earlier experimental and Monte Carlo results, but means a shortcoming of the 'water-equivalent window thickness' formula. For the cylindrical chambers, the ratio Δz/r was observed to increase with r, confirming a recent Monte Carlo prediction by Tessier (2010 E2-CN-182, Paper no 147, IDOS, Vienna) as well as the experimental observations by Johansson et al (1978 IAEA Symp. Proc. (Vienna) IAEA-SM-222/35 pp 243-70). According to a theoretical consideration, the shift of the effective point of measurement from the reference point of the detector is caused by a gradient of the fluence of the ionizing particles. As the experiments have shown, the value of Δz depends on the construction of the detector, but remains invariant under changes of radiation quality and depth. Other disturbances, which do not belong to the class of 'gradient effects', are not corrected by shifting the effective point of measurement.

  1. Laser-Bioplasma Interaction: The Epilepsy-Topion-Bioplasma, (the Seizure Onset Area) Upon the Action of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2016-10-01

    The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions in the brain bioplasma and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. A novel method is based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy-topion-bioplasma, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion-bioplasma lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure-excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas.

  2. Physics of the Brain: Interaction of the Optical-Fiber-Guided Multi-Ultraviolet-Photon Beams with the Epilepsy Topion, (the Seizure Onset Area)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    A novel method for the possible prevention of epileptic seizures is proposed, based on the multi-ultraviolet-photon beam interaction with the epilepsy topion, (nonlinear coupling of an ultra high frequency mode to the brain beta phonons). It is hypothesized that epilepsy is a chaotic-dynamics phenomenon: small electrical changes in the epilepsy-topion lead, (within the 10s of milliseconds), to the onset of chaos, (seizure--excessive electrical discharge), and subsequent cascading into adjacent areas. The ultraviolet photons may control the imbalance of sodium and potassium ions and, consequently, may prove to be efficient in the prevention of epileptic seizures. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs, Stefan University.

  3. Colliding. gamma. e- and. gamma gamma. -beams on the basis of electron-positron linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginzburg, I.F.; Kotkin, G.L.; Serbo, V.G.; Tel' nov, V.I.

    1983-08-01

    Main properties of the ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. collisions are discussed in some detail with application to the generation of colliding ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams basing on the designed linear accelerators with colliding e/sup +/e/sup -/ beams, VLEEP and SLC, as it was proposed in a previous work. Intensive ..gamma.. beams with the energy 50 GeV would be produced from scattering of the laser light focused to the electron beams of the accelerators. Laser radiation is focused to the electron beam in the conversion region at a distance of about 10 cm from the place of collision. After scattering on electrons high-energy photons move practically along the electron primary trajectories and are focused in the collision region. The electrons are deflected from the collision region by means of approximately 1 T magnetic field. Then the produced ..gamma..-beam collides with an electron beam or a similar ..gamma..-beam. In the case when the maximum luminosity (L) is attained, the luminosity distribution in the invariant mass of the ..gamma..e or ..gamma gamma.. systems is wide. A monochromatization of the collisions up to the level of 5-10% is possible. That will entail a decrease in the luminosity, the procedure is most effective if one uses the electrons and the laser photons with opposite helicities. Examples of physically interesting problems to be investigated with the proposed ..gamma..e and ..gamma gamma.. beams are suggested.

  4. Multi-octave spectral beam combiner on ultra-broadband photonic integrated circuit platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Eric J; Heck, Martijn J R; Bovington, Jock; Spott, Alexander; Bowers, John E

    2015-05-01

    We present the design of a novel platform that is able to combine optical frequency bands spanning 4.2 octaves from ultraviolet to mid-wave infrared into a single, low M2 output waveguide. We present the design and realization of a key component in this platform that combines the wavelength bands of 350 nm - 1500 nm and 1500 nm - 6500 nm with demonstrated efficiency greater than 90% in near-infrared and mid-wave infrared. The multi-octave spectral beam combiner concept is realized using an integrated platform with silicon nitride waveguides and silicon waveguides. Simulated bandwidth is shown to be over four octaves, and measured bandwidth is shown over two octaves, limited by the availability of sources.

  5. Characterization of Scattered X-Ray Photons in Dental Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ching Yang

    Full Text Available Scatter is a very important artifact causing factor in dental cone-beam CT (CBCT, which has a major influence on the detectability of details within images. This work aimed to improve the image quality of dental CBCT through scatter correction.Scatter was estimated in the projection domain from the low frequency component of the difference between the raw CBCT projection and the projection obtained by extrapolating the model fitted to the raw projections acquired with 2 different sizes of axial field-of-view (FOV. The function for curve fitting was optimized by using Monte Carlo simulation. To validate the proposed method, an anthropomorphic phantom and a water-filled cylindrical phantom with rod inserts simulating different tissue materials were scanned using 120 kVp, 5 mA and 9-second scanning time covering an axial FOV of 4 cm and 13 cm. The detectability of the CT image was evaluated by calculating the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR.Beam hardening and cupping artifacts were observed in CBCT images without scatter correction, especially in those acquired with 13 cm FOV. These artifacts were reduced in CBCT images corrected by the proposed method, demonstrating its efficacy on scatter correction. After scatter correction, the image quality of CBCT was improved in terms of target detectability which was quantified as the CNR for rod inserts in the cylindrical phantom.Hopefully the calculations performed in this work can provide a route to reach a high level of diagnostic image quality for CBCT imaging used in oral and maxillofacial structures whilst ensuring patient dose as low as reasonably achievable, which may ultimately make CBCT scan a reliable and safe tool in clinical practice.

  6. Continuous all-optical deceleration and single-photon cooling of molecular beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayich, A. M.; Vutha, A. C.; Hummon, M. T.; Porto, J. V.; Campbell, W. C.

    2014-02-01

    Ultracold molecular gases are promising as an avenue to rich many-body physics, quantum chemistry, quantum information, and precision measurements. This richness, which flows from the complex internal structure of molecules, makes the creation of ultracold molecular gases using traditional methods (laser plus evaporative cooling) a challenge, in particular due to the spontaneous decay of molecules into dark states. We propose a way to circumvent this key bottleneck using an all-optical method for decelerating molecules using stimulated absorption and emission with a single ultrafast laser. We further describe single-photon cooling of the decelerating molecules that exploits their high dark state pumping rates, turning the principal obstacle to molecular laser cooling into an advantage. Cooling and deceleration may be applied simultaneously and continuously to load molecules into a trap. We discuss implementation details including multilevel numerical simulations of strontium monohydride. These techniques are applicable to a large number of molecular species and atoms with the only requirement being an electric dipole transition that can be accessed with an ultrafast laser.

  7. Beam asymmetry for pi+ and pi0 photoproduction on the proton for photon energies from 1.102 to 1.862 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Dugger, M; Collins, P; Pasyuk, E; Briscoe, W J; Strakovsky, I I; Workman, R L; Azimov, Y

    2013-01-01

    Beam asymmetries for the reactions gamma p -> p pi0 and gamma p -> n pi+ have been measured with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) and a tagged, linearly polarized photon beam with energies from 1.102 to 1.862 GeV. A Fourier moment technique for extracting beam asymmetries from experimental data is described. The results reported here possess greater precision and finer energy resolution than previous measurements. Our data for both pion reactions appear to favor the SAID and Bonn-Gatchina scattering analyses over the older Mainz MAID predictions. After incorporating the present set of beam asymmetries into the world database, exploratory fits made with the SAID analysis indicate that the largest changes from previous fits are for properties of the Delta(1700) 3/2- and Delta(1905) 5/2+ states.

  8. Influence of standard RF coil materials on surface and buildup dose from a 6 MV photon beam in magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghila, A; Fallone, B G; Rathee, S

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic resonance guided teletherapy systems aspire to image the patient concurrently with the radiation delivery. Thus, the radiofrequency (RF) coils used for magnetic resonance imaging, placed on or close to patient skin and in close proximity to the treatment volume, would be irradiated leading to modifications of radiation dose to the skin and in the buildup region. The purpose of this work is to measure and assess these dose modifications due to standard off-the-shelf RF coil materials. A typical surface coil was approximated as layered sheets of polycarbonate, copper tape, and Teflon to emulate the base, conductor, and cover, respectively. A separate investigation used additional coil materials, such as copper pipe, plastic coil housing, a typical coil padding material, and a thin copper conductor. The materials were placed in the path of a 6 MV photon beam at various distances from polystyrene phantoms in which the surface and buildup doses were measured. The experiments were performed on a clinical Varian linac with no magnetic field and with a 0.21 T electromagnet producing a magnetic field parallel to the beam central axis. The authors repeated similar experiments in the presence of a 0.22 T magnetic field oriented perpendicular to the beam central axis using an earlier linac-MR prototype, with a biplanar permanent magnet. The radiation detectors used for the measurements were two different parallel plate ion chambers and GAFChromic films. A typical open beam surface dose of 20% (relative to open beam Dmax) was increased to 63% by the coil padding material and to >74% by all other materials when placed in direct contact with the phantom, irrespective of magnetic field presence or orientation. Without a magnetic field, the surface dose decreased as the test materials were moved away from the phantom surface toward the radiation source, reaching between 30% and 40% at 10 cm gap between the phantom and the test materials. In the presence of the transverse

  9. Assessment of computerized treatment planning system accuracy in calculating wedge factors of physical wedged fields for 6 MV photon beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Maqbool, Muhammad; Shahid, Muhammad; Hussain, Amjad; Tahir, Sajjad; Matiullah; Rooh, Gul; Ahmad, Tanveer; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-07-01

    Wedge filters are commonly used in external beam radiotherapy to achieve a uniform dose distribution within the target volume. The main objective of this study was to investigate the accuracy of the beam modifier algorithm of Theraplan plus (TPP version 3.8) treatment planning system and to confirm that either the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and wedged cross-sectional data or not. In this regard the effect of beam hardening and beam softening was studied with physical wedges for 6 MV photons. The Normalized Wedge Factors (NWFs) were measured experimentally as well as calculated with the Theraplan plus, as a function of depth and field size in a water phantom for 15°, 30°, 45°, and 60° wedge filters. The beam hardening and softening was determined experimentally by deriving the required coefficients for all wedge angles. The TPP version 3.8 requires wedge transmission factor at single depth and multiple field sizes. Without incorporating the hardening and softening coefficients the percent difference between measured and calculated NFWs was as high as 7%. After the introduction of these parameters into the algorithm, the agreement between measured and TPP (V 3.8) calculated NWFs were improved to within 2 percent for various depths. Similar improvement was observed in TPP version 3.8 while calculating NWFs for various field sizes when the required coefficients were adjusted. In conclusion, the dose calculation algorithm of TPP version 3.8 showed good accuracy for a 6 MV photon beam provided beam hardening and softening parameters are taken into account. From the results, it is also concluded that, the beam hardening, beam softening and attenuation coefficients along with wedge geometry and measured wedge factor at single depth and multiple fields sizes can be the replacement of wedged profile and

  10. A method of designing photonic crystal grating slow-wave circuit for Ribbon-Beam microwave travelling wave amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Hai-Rong; Gong Yu-Bin; Wei Yan-Yu; Gong Hua-Rong; Yue Ling-Na; Lu Zhi-Gang; Huang Min-Zhi; Wang Wen-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    A method of designing a photonic crystal grating slow-wave circuit in which the cylinders of the 2D photonic crystals dot on a cross-sectional plane is established by calculating the band structures of the 2D photonic crystals, and the eigenfrequency of the equivalent waveguide grating. For calculating the band structures, the eigenvalue equations of the photonic crystals in the system of photonic crystal grating slow-wave circuit are derived in a special polarization mode. Two examples are taken to show the method. The design result is validated by the scattering parameters of the same circuit. The result indicates that there exists no photonic band gap if the metal gratings do not extend into the photonic crystals; the design of the circuit without the metal gratings extending into the photonic crystals is less flexible than that with the metal gratings extending into the photonic crystals.

  11. Surface and buildup region dose measurements with Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, Gafchromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for high energy photon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Akbas, Ugur; Koksal, Canan; Bilge, Hatice

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate surface and buildup region doses for 6 MV photon beams using a Markus parallel-plate ionization chamber, GafChromic EBT3 film and MOSFET detector for different field sizes and beam angles. The measurements were made in a water equivalent solid phantom at the surface and in the buildup region of the 6 MV photon beams at 100 cm source-detector distance (SDD) for 5x5, 10x10 and 20x20 cm2 field sizes and 0, 30, 60, 80 and 90 beam angles. The surface doses for 10x10 cm2 field size were found to be 20.33%, 18.80% and 25.48% for Markus chamber, EBT3 film and MOSFET detector, respectively. The surface dose increased with field size for all dosimeters. As the angle of the incident radiation beam became more oblique, the surface dose increased. The effective measurement depths of dosimeters vary, thus the results of the measurements could be different. This issue can lead to mistakes at surface and buildup dosimetry, and must be taken into account.

  12. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-03-21

    The γ-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the γ-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate γ-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate γ-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original γ-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a γ-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the γ-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  13. On amplitude beam splitting of tender X-rays (2-8 keV photon energy) using conical diffraction from reflection gratings with laminar profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jark, Werner; Eichert, Diane

    2016-01-01

    Conical diffraction is obtained when a radiation beam impinges onto a periodically ruled surface structure parallel or almost parallel to the ruling. In this condition the incident intensity is diffracted through an arc, away from the plane of incidence. The diffracted intensity thus lies on a cone, which leads to the name `conical diffraction'. In this configuration almost no part of the ruled structure will produce any shadowing effect for the incident or the diffracted beam. Then, compared with a grating in the classical orientation, relatively higher diffraction efficiencies will be observed for fewer diffraction orders. When the incident beam is perfectly parallel to the grooves of a rectangular grating profile, the symmetry of the setup causes diffraction of the intensity symmetrically around the plane of incidence. This situation was previously tested experimentally in the VUV spectral range for the amplitude beam splitting of a radiation beam with a photon energy of 25 eV. In this case the ideally expected beam splitting efficiency of about 80% for the diffraction into the two first orders was confirmed for the optimum combination of groove depth and angle of grazing incidence. The feasibility of the amplitude beam splitting for hard X-rays with 12 keV photon energy by use of the same concept was theoretically confirmed. However, no related experimental data are presented yet, not even for lower energy soft X-rays. The present study reports the first experimental data for the conical diffraction from a rectangular grating profile in the tender X-ray range for photon energies of 4 keV and 6 keV. The expected symmetries are observed. The maximum absolute efficiency for beam splitting was measured to be only about 30%. As the reflectivity of the grating coating at the corresponding angle of grazing incidence was found to be only of the order of 50%, the relative beam splitting efficiency was thus 60%. This is to be compared also here with an ideally

  14. Ionization chamber dosimetry of small photon fields: a Monte Carlo study on stopping-power ratios for radiosurgery and IMRT beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Doblado, F; Andreo, P; Capote, R; Leal, A; Perucha, M; Arráns, R; Núñez, L; Mainegra, E; Lagares, J I; Carrasco, E

    2003-07-21

    Absolute dosimetry with ionization chambers of the narrow photon fields used in stereotactic techniques and IMRT beamlets is constrained by lack of electron equilibrium in the radiation field. It is questionable that stopping-power ratio in dosimetry protocols, obtained for broad photon beams and quasi-electron equilibrium conditions, can be used in the dosimetry of narrow fields while keeping the uncertainty at the same level as for the broad beams used in accelerator calibrations. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for two 6 MV clinical accelerators (Elekta SL-18 and Siemens Mevatron Primus), equipped with radiosurgery applicators and MLC. Narrow circular and Z-shaped on-axis and off-axis fields, as well as broad IMRT configured beams, have been simulated together with reference 10 x 10 cm2 beams. Phase-space data have been used to generate 3D dose distributions which have been compared satisfactorily with experimental profiles (ion chamber, diodes and film). Photon and electron spectra at various depths in water have been calculated, followed by Spencer-Attix (delta = 10 keV) stopping-power ratio calculations which have been compared to those used in the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. For water/air and PMMA/air stopping-power ratios, agreements within 0.1% have been obtained for the 10 x 10 cm2 fields. For radiosurgery applicators and narrow MLC beams, the calculated s(w,air) values agree with the reference within +/-0.3%, well within the estimated standard uncertainty of the reference stopping-power ratios (0.5%). Ionization chamber dosimetry of narrow beams at the photon qualities used in this work (6 MV) can therefore be based on stopping-power ratios data in dosimetry protocols. For a modulated 6 MV broad beam used in clinical IMRT, s(w,air) agrees within 0.1% with the value for 10 x 10 cm2, confirming that at low energies IMRT absolute dosimetry can also be based on data for open reference fields. At higher energies (24 MV) the difference in s

  15. Beam-helicity associated electroproduction of real photons ep {yields} e{gamma}{pi}N in the {Delta}-resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Randall Laboratory of Physics; Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Argentina); Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY Zeuthen (Germany)] [and others; Collaboration: HERMES Collaboration

    2013-10-15

    The beam-helicity asymmetry in associated electroproduction of real photons, ep {yields} e{gamma}{pi}N, in the {Delta}(1232)-resonance region is measured using the longitudinally polarized HERA positron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target. Azimuthal Fourier amplitudes of this asymmetry are extracted separately for two channels, ep {yields} e{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}p and ep {yields} e{gamma}{pi}{sup +}n, from a data set collected with a recoil detector. All asymmetry amplitudes are found to be consistent with zero.

  16. Ionization chamber dosimetry of small photon fields: a Monte Carlo study on stopping-power ratios for radiosurgery and IMRT beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Doblado, F [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Andreo, P [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, University of Stockholm, Karolinska Institute, PO Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Capote, R [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Leal, A [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Perucha, M [Dpto Fisica Medica y Biofisica, F Medicina, Universidad Sevilla (Spain); Arrans, R [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Nunez, L [Radiofisica, Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain); Mainegra, E [National Research Council, Ottawa (Canada); Lagares, J I [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain); Carrasco, E [Radiofisica, Hospital Univ Virgen Macarena, Avda Dr Fedriani s/n, E-41009 Sevilla (Spain)

    2003-07-21

    Absolute dosimetry with ionization chambers of the narrow photon fields used in stereotactic techniques and IMRT beamlets is constrained by lack of electron equilibrium in the radiation field. It is questionable that stopping-power ratio in dosimetry protocols, obtained for broad photon beams and quasi-electron equilibrium conditions, can be used in the dosimetry of narrow fields while keeping the uncertainty at the same level as for the broad beams used in accelerator calibrations. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for two 6 MV clinical accelerators (Elekta SL-18 and Siemens Mevatron Primus), equipped with radiosurgery applicators and MLC. Narrow circular and Z-shaped on-axis and off-axis fields, as well as broad IMRT configured beams, have been simulated together with reference 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} beams. Phase-space data have been used to generate 3D dose distributions which have been compared satisfactorily with experimental profiles (ion chamber, diodes and film). Photon and electron spectra at various depths in water have been calculated, followed by Spencer-Attix ({delta} = 10 keV) stopping-power ratio calculations which have been compared to those used in the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. For water/air and PMMA/air stopping-power ratios, agreements within 0.1% have been obtained for the 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} fields. For radiosurgery applicators and narrow MLC beams, the calculated s{sub w,air} values agree with the reference within {+-}0.3%, well within the estimated standard uncertainty of the reference stopping-power ratios (0.5%). Ionization chamber dosimetry of narrow beams at the photon qualities used in this work (6 MV) can therefore be based on stopping-power ratios data in dosimetry protocols. For a modulated 6 MV broad beam used in clinical IMRT, s{sub w,air} agrees within 0.1% with the value for 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, confirming that at low energies IMRT absolute dosimetry can also be based on data for open reference fields. At higher energies (24

  17. An experiment of X-ray photon–photon elastic scattering with a Laue-case beam collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yamaji

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a search for photon–photon elastic scattering in vacuum in the X-ray region at an energy in the center of mass system of ωcms=6.5keV for which the QED cross section is σQED=2.5×10−47m2. An X-ray beam provided by the SACLA X-ray Free Electron Laser is split and the two beamlets are made to collide at right angle, with a total integrated luminosity of (1.24±0.08×1028m−2. No signal X rays from the elastic scattering that satisfy the correlation between energy and scattering angle were detected. We obtain a 95% C.L. upper limit for the scattering cross section of 1.9×10−27m2 at ωcms=6.5keV. The upper limit is the lowest upper limit obtained so far by keV experiments.

  18. Measurement of the primary and scatter dose in high energy photon beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Linden, P.M. [Catharina Ziekenhuis, Eindhoven (Netherlands). Radiotherapy Dept.; Tiourina, T.B.; Dries, W.

    1995-12-01

    A method is presented to measure the primary and scatter components separately in a water tank using a small cylindrical absorber. Results from this experiment are compared with Monte Carlo calculations. The measurement setup consists of a small cylindrical absorber placed on a central axis of the beam a few centimetres above the radiation detector. Both absorber and detector move along the central axis while absorbed dose is registered. As the primary radiation is fully blocked, only scatter component is measured when a cylindrical absorber is used. Measurements in open fields result in the total absorbed dose being the sum of primary and scatter components. The primary dose component can be derived by substraction. Absorbers with different diameters are used. With decreasing dimensions the relative contribution of the dose due to scatter radiation increases. A steep increase is observed when the range of laterally scattered electrons becomes comparable with the radius of the absorber. Two different Monte Carlo simulations have been performed: with and without secondary electron transport. The data obtained for the former case perfectly agrees with the experiment. The situation where the secondary electron is assumed zero (i.e. local energy deposition) simulates the Cunningham model. Our results show that the Cunningham model predicts lower scatter component under the block edge which can be important for these applications.

  19. The SPARC_LAB femtosecond synchronization for electron and photon pulsed beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaveglia, M.; Gallo, A.; Piersanti, L.; Pompili, R.; Gatti, G.; Anania, M. P.; Petrarca, M.; Villa, F.; Chiadroni, E.; Biagioni, A.; Mostacci, A.

    2015-05-01

    The SPARC LAB complex hosts a 150 MeV electron photo-injector equipped with an undulator for FEL production (SPARC) together with a high power TW laser (FLAME). Recently the synchronization system reached the performance of < 100 fsRMS relative jitter between lasers, electron beam and RF accelerating fields. This matches the requirements for next future experiments: (i) the production of X-rays by means of Thomson scattering (first collisions achieved in 2014) and (ii) the particle driven PWFA experiment by means of multiple electron bunches. We report about the measurements taken during the machine operation using BAMs (Bunch Arrival Monitors) and EOS (Electro-Optical Sampling) system. A new R and D activity concerning the LWFA using the external injection of electron bunches in a plasma generated by the FLAME laser pulse is under design. The upgrade of the synchronization system is under way to guarantee the < 30 fs RMS jitter required specification. It foresees the transition from electrical to optical architecture that mainly affects the reference signal distribution and the time of arrival detection performances. The new system architecture is presented together with the related experimental data.

  20. Enhanced Etching, Surface Damage Recovery, and Submicron Patterning of Hybrid Perovskites using a Chemically Gas-Assisted Focused-Ion Beam for Subwavelength Grating Photonic Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alias, Mohd Sharizal

    2015-12-22

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic–inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted attention for photonic device applications. However, owing to the sensitivity of organic moieties to solvents and temperature, device processing is challenging, particularly for patterning. Here, we report the direct patterning of perovskites using chemically gas-assisted focused-ion beam (GAFIB) etching with XeF2 and I2 precursors. We demonstrate etching enhancement in addition to controllability and marginal surface damage compared to focused-ion beam (FIB) etching without precursors. Utilizing the GAFIB etching, we fabricated a uniform and periodic submicron perovskite subwavelength grating (SWG) absorber with broadband absorption and nanoscale precision. Our results demonstrate the use of FIB as a submicron patterning tool and a means of providing surface treatment (after FIB patterning to minimize optical loss) for perovskite photonic nanostructures. The SWG absorber can be patterned on perovskite solar cells to enhance the device efficiency through increasing light trapping and absorption.

  1. Enhanced Etching, Surface Damage Recovery, and Submicron Patterning of Hybrid Perovskites using a Chemically Gas-Assisted Focused-Ion Beam for Subwavelength Grating Photonic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, Mohd S; Yang, Yang; Ng, Tien K; Dursun, Ibrahim; Shi, Dong; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Priante, Davide; Bakr, Osman M; Ooi, Boon S

    2016-01-01

    The high optical gain and absorption of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have attracted attention for photonic device applications. However, owing to the sensitivity of organic moieties to solvents and temperature, device processing is challenging, particularly for patterning. Here, we report the direct patterning of perovskites using chemically gas-assisted focused-ion beam (GAFIB) etching with XeF2 and I2 precursors. We demonstrate etching enhancement in addition to controllability and marginal surface damage compared to focused-ion beam (FIB) etching without precursors. Utilizing the GAFIB etching, we fabricated a uniform and periodic submicron perovskite subwavelength grating (SWG) absorber with broadband absorption and nanoscale precision. Our results demonstrate the use of FIB as a submicron patterning tool and a means of providing surface treatment (after FIB patterning to minimize optical loss) for perovskite photonic nanostructures. The SWG absorber can be patterned on perovskite solar cells to enhance the device efficiency through increasing light trapping and absorption.

  2. The FERMI@Elettra free-electron-laser source for coherent X-ray physics: photon properties, beam transport system, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allaria, Enrico; Callegari, Carlo; Cocco, Daniele; Fawley, William M.; Kiskinova, Maya; Masciovecchio, Claudio; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2010-04-05

    FERMI@Elettra is comprised of two free electron lasers (FELs) that will generate short pulses (tau ~;; 25 to 200 fs) of highly coherent radiation in the XUV and soft X-ray region. The use of external laser seeding together with a harmonic upshift scheme to obtain short wavelengths will give FERMI@Elettra the capability to produce high quality, longitudinal coherent photon pulses. This capability together with the possibilities of temporal synchronization to external lasers and control of the output photon polarization will open new experimental opportunities not possible with currently available FELs. Here we report on the predicted radiation coherence properties and important configuration details of the photon beam transport system. We discuss the several experimental stations that will be available during initial operations in 2011, and we give a scientific perspective on possible experiments that can exploit the critical parameters of this new light source.

  3. Breaking the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in fiber-optical two-photon fluorescence endoscopy by an azimuthally-polarized beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Kang, Hong; Li, Xiangping

    2014-01-10

    Although fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy has been recognized as a potential high-resolution diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in vivo, its resolution is limited by the optical diffraction nature to a few micrometers due to the low numerical aperture of an endoscopic objective. On the other hand, stimulated emission depletion (STED) achieved by a circularly-polarized vortex beam has been used to break the diffraction-limited resolution barrier in a bulky microscope. It has been a challenge to apply the STED principle to a fiber-optical two-photon endoscope as a circular polarization state cannot be maintained due to the birefringence of a fiber. Here, we demonstrate the first fiber-optical STED two-photon endoscope using an azimuthally-polarized beam directly generated from a double-clad fiber. As such, the diffraction-limited resolution barrier of fiber-optical two-photon endoscopy can be broken by a factor of three. Our new accomplishment has paved a robust way for high-resolution in vivo biomedical studies.

  4. Potential applications of a dual-sweep streak camera system for characterizing particle and photon beams of VUV, XUV, and x-ray FELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumpkin, A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The success of time-resolved imaging techniques in the Characterization of particle beams and photon beams of the recent generation of L-band linac-driven or storage ring FELs in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet wavelength regions can be extended to the VUV, XUV, and x-ray FELs. Tests and initial data have been obtained with the Hamamatsu C5680 dual-sweep streak camera system which includes a demountable photocathode (thin Au) assembly and a flange that allows windowless operation with the transport vacuum system. This system can be employed at wavelengths shorter than 100 nm and down to 1 {Angstrom}. First tests on such a system at 248-nm wavelengths have been performed oil the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) drive laser source. A quartz window was used at the tube entrance aperture. A preliminary test using a Be window mounted on a different front flange of the streak tube to look at an x-ray bremsstrahlung source at the AWA was limited by photon statistics. This system`s limiting resolution of {sigma}{approximately}1.1 ps observed at 248 nm would increase with higher incoming photon energies to the photocathode. This effect is related to the fundamental spread in energies of the photoelectrons released from the photocathodes. Possible uses of the synchrotron radiation sources at the Advanced Photon Source and emerging short wavelength FELs to test the system will be presented.

  5. Monochromatic computed tomography with a compact laser-driven X-ray source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achterhold, K; Bech, M; Schleede, S; Potdevin, G; Ruth, R; Loewen, R; Pfeiffer, F

    2013-01-01

    A laser-driven electron-storage ring can produce nearly monochromatic, tunable X-rays in the keV energy regime by inverse Compton scattering. The small footprint, relative low cost and excellent beam quality provide the prospect for valuable preclinical use in radiography and tomography. The monochromaticity of the beam prevents beam hardening effects that are a serious problem in quantitative determination of absorption coefficients. These values are important e.g. for osteoporosis risk assessment. Here, we report quantitative computed tomography (CT) measurements using a laser-driven compact electron-storage ring X-ray source. The experimental results obtained for quantitative CT measurements on mass absorption coefficients in a phantom sample are compared to results from a rotating anode X-ray tube generator at various peak voltages. The findings confirm that a laser-driven electron-storage ring X-ray source can indeed yield much higher CT image quality, particularly if quantitative aspects of computed tomographic imaging are considered.

  6. A model based on the Fermi-Dirac distribution to determine the dose profile of a photon beam; Un modelo basado en la distribucion de Fermi-Dirac para determinar el perfil de dosis de un haz de fotones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero, R.; Silva, P.; Gutt, F.; Diaz, J. [Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas (IVIC), Laboratorio Secundario de Calibracion Dosimetrica (LSCD), Apartado 21827, Caracas 1020 A (Venezuela)

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this work is to propose a new model based in the Fermi-Dirac distribution, in which it is considered that the photon beams possess a particles behavior when they interact with the matter. (Author)

  7. Effusive molecular beam-sampled Knudsen flow reactor coupled to vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry using an external free radical source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leplat, N; Rossi, M J

    2013-11-01

    A new apparatus using vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization mass spectrometry (VUV SPIMS) of an effusive molecular beam emanating from a Knudsen flow reactor is described. It was designed to study free radical-molecule kinetics over a significant temperature range (300-630 K). Its salient features are: (1) external free radical source, (2) counterpropagating molecular beam and diffuse VUV photon beam meeting in a crossed-beam ion source of a quadrupole mass spectrometer with perpendicular ion extraction, (3) analog detection of the photocurrent of the free radical molecular cation, and (4) possibility of detecting both free radicals and closed shell species in the same apparatus and under identical reaction conditions owing to the presence of photoelectrons generated by the photoelectric effect of the used VUV-photons. The measured thermal molecular beam-to-background ratio was 6.35 ± 0.39 for Ar and 10.86 ± 1.59 for i-C4H10 at 300 K, a factor of 2.52 and 1.50 smaller, respectively, than predicted from basic gas-dynamic considerations. Operating parameters as well as the performance of key elements of the instrument are presented and discussed. Coupled to an external free radical source a steady-state specific exit flow of 1.6 × 10(11) and 5.0 × 10(11) molecule s(-1) cm(-3) of C2H5(●) (ethyl) and t-C4H9(●) (t-butyl) free radicals have been detected using VUV SPIMS at their molecular ion m/z 29 and 57, respectively, at 300 K.

  8. Wavefront sensor based diagnostic of FERMI FEL photon beam (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Lorenzo; Mahne, Nicola; Manfredda, Michele; Svetina, Cristian; Cocco, Daniele; Capotondi, Flavio; Pedersoli, Emanuele; Kiskinova, Maya; Zangrando, Marco

    2016-09-01

    FERMI is the first seeded EUV-SXR free electron laser (FEL) user facility, and it is operated at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste. Two of the four already operating beamlines, namely LDM (Low Density Matter) and DiProI (Diffraction and Projection Imaging), use a Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) active X-ray optics system for focusing the FEL pulses onto the target under investigation. A wafefront sensor is used as diagnostic for the characterization of the focused spot and for the optimization of the parameters of these active optical systems as well. The aim of this work is, first, to describe in detail the optimization procedure using the wavefront sensor through the minimization of the Zernike coefficients, and second, report on the final results obtained on the K-B optical system at the DiProI endstation. The wavefront sensor, mounted out of focus behind the DiProI chamber, allows to compute the intensity distribution of the FEL beam, typically a mix between several modes resulting in a "noisy hyper-Gaussian" intensity profile, and the wavefront residual from ideal propagation shape and after tilt correction. Combining these two measures we can obtain the electric field of the wave out of focus. Propagating back the electric field we reconstruct the focal spot in far field approximation. In this way the sensor works as a diagnostic reconstructing the focal spot. On the other hand, after modelling the electric field with a Zernike polynomial it is easy and fast to optimize the mirror bending and the optical system angles by minimizing the aberrations, quantified in terms of Zernike coefficients. Since each coefficient corresponds to a single parameter, they can be minimized one at the time. Online wavefront measurements have made possible the optimization of the bending acting on the mirror curvature, and of the (pitch and roll) angle positions of the K-B system. From the wavefront measurements we have inferred a focal spot for DiProI of 5.5 μm x 6.2 μm at 32 nm wavelength

  9. Study on paper moisture measurement method by monochromatic light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Changtao; Du, Xin; He, Ping; Zhang, Lili; Li, Nan; Wang, Ming

    2010-10-01

    We design the emission and detection optical paths of three monochromatic infrared light sources with different wavelength. The three light sources are placed according to the different angles, so that the three kinds of monochromatic lights are converged on the same point of the sample. Using the method, we can detect the same point and improve the measurement accuracy. We choose the standard near-infrared monochromatic light source, so that we can save some equipments, such as tungsten- halogen lamp, filtered wheel, collimation focalizer, electric machine, and so on. In particular, we save the cumbersome cooling system, reduce the volume of the instrument greatly and reduce the cost. The three monochromatic light sources are supplied by the same pulse power source, to ensure their synchronous working.

  10. Photon-photon collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The study of photon-photon collisions has progressed enormously, stimulated by new data and new calculational tools for QCD. In the future we can expect precise determinations of ..cap alpha../sub s/ and ..lambda../sup ms/ from the ..gamma..*..gamma.. ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/ form factor and the photon structure function, as well as detailed checks of QCD, determination of the shape of the hadron distribution amplitudes from ..gamma gamma.. ..-->.. H anti H, reconstruction of sigma/sub ..gamma gamma../ from exclusive channels at low W/sub ..gamma gamma../, definitive studies of high p/sub T/ hadron and jet production, and studies of threshold production of charmed systems. Photon-photon collisions, along with radiative decays of the psi and UPSILON, are ideal for the study of multiquark and gluonic resonances. We have emphasized the potential for resonance formation near threshold in virtually every hadronic exclusive channel, including heavy quark states c anti c c anti c, c anti c u anti u, etc. At higher energies SLC, LEP, ...) parity-violating electroweak effects and Higgs production due to equivalent Z/sup 0/ and W/sup + -/ beams from e ..-->.. eZ/sup 0/ and e ..-->.. nu W will become important. 44 references.

  11. Relief Restoration of Complicated form Objects by Monochromatic Microwave Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmenko Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Article demonstrates possibility of monochromatic radiation usage for relief restoration. There is a problem with restoration when scanned object is not flat and it is not parallel to the scanning plane. It was discovered that two-dimensional phase distribution could be applied for distance determination. It is reliable way to solve problems listed above. In conclusion offered methods allow monochromatic microwave radiation usage for screening system development.

  12. Photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements of extruded copper and of welded copper beam chambers for the PEP II asymmetric B-factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). NSLS; Perkins, C. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Calderon, M.; Barletta, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    PEP II is being built as a higher luminosity electron-positron collider, with asymmetric beams of 9 GeV and 3.1 GeV, having maximum currents of 3.0 A. Based on the previous work on the NSLS VUV beamline U10B, a copper was selected for construction of UHV beam chambers and absorbers to minimize the pressure rise from synchrotron radiation during operation. An extruded beam chamber and a welded beam chamber were fabricated from the selected copper for PSD measurements on NSLS X-ray beamline X28A. The chambers were exposed to white light with a critical energy of 5 KeV, both direct and through a 0.010 inch thick Beryllium filter. Each chamber was exposed to a dose of approximately 10{sup 23} photons per meter at an incidence angle of 25 mrad, after argon glow conditioning and a 150 C vacuum bake. Desorption yields for H{sub 2} CO, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} are reported as a function of accumulated photon flux, critical energy, and chamber preparation. The results are compared with the previous work on beamline U10B and with those of other published work for copper.

  13. Dosimetric influence of filtered and flattening filter free photon beam on rapid arc (RA) radiotherapy planning in case of cervix carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Lalit; Yadav, Girigesh; Samuvel, Kothanda Raman; Bhushan, Manindra; Kumar, Pawan; Suhail, Mahammood; Pal, Manoj

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the dosimetric influence of filtered and flattening filter free (FFF) photon beam of 6 and 10 MV energies on cervix RA radiotherapy planning and to find possibilities to develop the clinically acceptable RA plans with FFFB photon beam and explore their potential benefits to cervix cancer patients. FFF photon beams enhances the treatment delivery by increased dose rate which results in shorter treatment time, this shorter treatment time reduces intrafraction motion and enhance comfort to the patients. RA plans were generated for filtered and flattening filter free photon beams of 6 and 10 MV energies using same dose-volumes constraints. RA plans were generated to deliver a dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions, for a cohort of eleven patients reported with cervix carcinoma. RA plans were evaluated in terms of PTV coverage, dose to OAR's, CI, HI, total no. of monitor units (MUs) and NTID and low dose volume of normal tissues. Clinically acceptable and similar plans were generated for filtered and flattening filter free photon beams. FFFB delivered slightly higher mean target dose (52.28 Gy vs. 52.0 Gy, p = 0.000 for 6 MV and 52.42 Gy vs. 52.0 Gy, p = 0.000 for 10 MV) less homogeneous (1.062 vs. 1.052, p = 0.000 for 6 MV and 1.066 vs. 1.051, p = 0.000 for 10 MV) and less conformal (1.007 vs. 1.004, p = 0.104 for 6 MV and 1.012 vs. 1.003, p = 0.010 for 10 MV) RA plans compared to FB. FFFB delivered more doses to the bladder and rectum, also required more numbers of MUs in comparison to FB. This study concludes that FB is more beneficial for cervix RA planning in comparison to FFFB, as FB generates more conformal and homogenous rapid arc plans and offers better OAR's sparing.

  14. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer KeithleyÒ 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens PrimusÒ linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TXÒ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens PrimusÒ the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TXÒ the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  15. Dosimetric properties characterization of silicon diodes used in photon beam radiotherapy; Caracterizacao das propriedades dosimetricas de diodos de silicio empregados em radioterapia com feixe de fotons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizetto, Cesar Augusto

    2013-07-01

    In the current work it was studied the performance of epitaxial (EPI) and float zone (FZ) silicon diodes as on-line dosimeters for megavoltage (EPI diode) and orthovoltage (EPI and FZ diode) photon beam radiotherapy. In order to be used as dosimeters the diodes were enclosed in black polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) probes. The devices were then connected, on photovoltaic mode, to an electrometer Keithley Registered-Sign 6517B to allow measurements of the photocurrent. The irradiations were performed with 6 and 18 MV photon beams (Siemens Primus Registered-Sign linear accelerator), 6 and 15 MV (Novalis TX Registered-Sign ) and 10, 25, 30 and 50 kV of a Pantak / Seifert X ray radiation device. During the measurements with the Siemens Primus the diodes were held between PMMA plates placed at 10.0 cm depth. When using Novalis TX Registered-Sign the devices were held between solid water plates placed at 50 cm depth. In both cases the diodes were centered in a radiation field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, with the source-to-surface distance (SSD) kept at 100 cm. In measurements with orthovoltage photon beams the diodes were placed 50.0 cm from the tube in a radiation field of 8 cm diameter. The dose-rate dependency was studied for 6 and 15 MV (varying the dose-rate from 100 to 600 monitor units per minute) and for the 50 kV beam by varying the current tube from 2 to 20 mA. All devices showed linear response with dose rate and, within uncertainties the charge collected is independent of dose rate. The current signals induced showed good instantaneous repeatability of the diodes, characterized by coefficients of variation of current (CV) smaller than 1.14% (megavoltage beams) and 0.15% for orthovoltage beams and coefficients of variation of charge (CV) smaller than 1.84% (megavoltage beams) and 1.67% (orthovoltage beams). The dose response curves were quite linear with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.9999 for all diodes. (author)

  16. Dividing a light beam into two beams of orthogonal polarizations by reflection and refraction at a dielectric surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, R M A

    2006-05-15

    Reflection and refraction of monochromatic light by an air-dielectric interface at an incidence angle below the Brewster angle can generate split beams of equal power and orthogonal polarizations under certain achievable conditions. Generation of photon streams of orthogonal polarizations, previously thought to be possible mainly by double refraction in anisotropic crystals, is achieved for an infinite set of input states that leads to a correspondingly infinite set of pairs of orthogonal output states. A bare substrate of PbTe is particularly suitable for this beam splitting function in the IR. However, use of a high-refractive-index quarter-wave layer on a low-refractive-index substrate extends the operating range of this interesting device to a much wider spectral range including the visible.

  17. Long-term Cosmetic Outcomes and Toxicities of Proton Beam Therapy Compared With Photon-Based 3-Dimensional Conformal Accelerated Partial-Breast Irradiation: A Phase 1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galland-Girodet, Sigolène; Pashtan, Itai; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Ancukiewicz, Marek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hirsch, Ariel E.; Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Powell, Simon N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Taghian, Alphonse G., E-mail: ataghian@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To present long-term outcomes of a prospective feasibility trial using either protons or 3-dimensional conformal photon-based (accelerated partial-breast irradiation [APBI]) techniques. Methods and Materials: From October 2003 to April 2006, 98 evaluable patients with stage I breast cancer were treated with APBI (32 Gy in 8 fractions given twice daily) on a prospective clinical trial: 19 with proton beam therapy (PBT) and 79 with photons or mixed photons/electrons. Median follow-up was 82.5 months (range, 2-104 months). Toxicity and patient satisfaction evaluations were performed at each visit. Results: At 7 years, the physician rating of overall cosmesis was good or excellent for 62% of PBT patients, compared with 94% for photon patients (P=.03). Skin toxicities were more common for the PBT group: telangiectasia, 69% and 16% (P=.0013); pigmentation changes, 54% and 22% (P=.02); and other late skin toxicities, 62% and 18% (P=.029) for PBT and photons, respectively. There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidences of breast pain, edema, fibrosis, fat necrosis, skin desquamation, and rib pain or fracture. Patient-reported cosmetic outcomes at 7 years were good or excellent for 92% and 96% of PBT and photon patients, respectively (P=.95). Overall patient satisfaction was 93% for the entire cohort. The 7-year local failure rate for all patients was 6%, with 3 local recurrences in the PBT group (7-year rate, 11%) and 2 in photon-treated patients (4%) (P=.22). Conclusions: Local failure rates of 3-dimensional APBI and PBT were similar in this study. However, PBT, as delivered in this study, led to higher rates of long-term telangiectasia, skin color changes, and skin toxicities. We recommend the use of multiple fields and treatment of all fields per treatment session or the use of scanning techniques to minimize skin toxicity.

  18. Dose enhancement in gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy for the therapeutic photon beams using Monte Carlo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramesh Kakade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticle (GNP-aided radiation therapy (RT is useful to make the tumor more sensitive to radiation damage because of the enhancement in the dose inside the tumor region. Polymer gel dosimeter (PGD can be a good choice for the physical measurement of dose enhancement produced by GNP inside the gel. Materials and Methods: The present study uses EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to estimate dose enhancement factor (DEF due to the introduction of GNPs inside the PGD at different concentrations (7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel when irradiated by therapeutic X-rays of energy 100 kVp, 150 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV. The simulation was also carried out to quantify the dose enhancement in PAGAT gel and tumor for 100 kVp X-rays. Results: For 100 kVp X-rays, average DEF of 1.86 and 2.91 is observed in the PAGAT gel dosimeter with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. Average DEF of 1.69 and 2.61 is recorded for 150 kVp X-rays with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. No clinically meaningful DEF was observed for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Furthermore, the dose enhancement within the PAGAT gel dosimeter and tumor closely matches with each other. Conclusion: The polymer gel dosimetry can be a suitable method of dose estimation and verification for clinical implementation of GNP-aided RT. GNP-aided RT has the potential of delivering high localized tumoricidal dose with significant sparing of normal structures when the treatment is delivered with low energy X-rays.

  19. Dose enhancement in gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy for the therapeutic photon beams using Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakade, Nitin Ramesh; Sharma, Sunil Dutt

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (GNP)-aided radiation therapy (RT) is useful to make the tumor more sensitive to radiation damage because of the enhancement in the dose inside the tumor region. Polymer gel dosimeter (PGD) can be a good choice for the physical measurement of dose enhancement produced by GNP inside the gel. The present study uses EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to estimate dose enhancement factor (DEF) due to the introduction of GNPs inside the PGD at different concentrations (7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel) when irradiated by therapeutic X-rays of energy 100 kVp, 150 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV. The simulation was also carried out to quantify the dose enhancement in PAGAT gel and tumor for 100 kVp X-rays. For 100 kVp X-rays, average DEF of 1.86 and 2.91 is observed in the PAGAT gel dosimeter with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. Average DEF of 1.69 and 2.61 is recorded for 150 kVp X-rays with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. No clinically meaningful DEF was observed for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Furthermore, the dose enhancement within the PAGAT gel dosimeter and tumor closely matches with each other. The polymer gel dosimetry can be a suitable method of dose estimation and verification for clinical implementation of GNP-aided RT. GNP-aided RT has the potential of delivering high localized tumoricidal dose with significant sparing of normal structures when the treatment is delivered with low energy X-rays.

  20. Dual energy CT: How well can pseudo-monochromatic imaging reduce metal artifacts?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchenbecker, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.kuchenbecker@dkfz.de; Faby, Sebastian; Sawall, Stefan; Kachelrieß, Marc [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Lell, Michael [Friedrich-Alexander-University (FAU), Erlangen 91054 (Germany)

    2015-02-15

    implant. For each case, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was assessed. Results: In the simulation, the pseudo-monochromatic images yielded acceptable artifact reduction results. However, the CNR in the artifact-reduced images was more than 60% lower than in the original polychromatic images. In contrast, the raw data-based material decomposition did not significantly reduce the CNR in the virtual monochromatic images. Regarding the patient data with beam hardening artifacts and with metal artifacts from small implants the pseudo-monochromatic method was able to reduce the artifacts, again with the downside of a significant CNR reduction. More intense metal artifacts, e.g., as those caused by an artificial hip joint, could not be suppressed. Conclusions: Pseudo-monochromatic imaging is able to reduce beam hardening, scatter, and metal artifacts in some cases but it cannot remove them. In all cases, the CNR is significantly reduced, thereby rendering the method questionable, unless special post processing algorithms are implemented to restore the high CNR from the original images (e.g., by using a frequency split technique). Raw data-based dual energy decomposition methods should be preferred, in particular, because the CNR penalty is almost negligible.

  1. Dosimetry of interface region near closed air cavities for Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams using Monte Carlo simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Chandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Underdosing of treatment targets can occur in radiation therapy due to electronic disequilibrium around air-tissue interfaces when tumors are situated near natural air cavities. These effects have been shown to increase with the beam energy and decrease with the field size. Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT and tomotherapy techniques employ combinations of multiple small radiation beamlets of varying intensities to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy. The use of small beamlets in these techniques may therefore result in underdosing of treatment target in the air-tissue interfaces region surrounding an air cavity. This work was undertaken to investigate dose reductions near the air-water interfaces of 1x1x1 and 3x3x3 cm 3 air cavities, typically encountered in the treatment of head and neck cancer utilizing radiation therapy techniques such as IMRT and tomotherapy using small fields of Co-60, 6 MV and 15 MV photons. Additional investigations were performed for larger photon field sizes encompassing the entire air-cavity, such as encountered in conventional three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT techniques. The EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code was used to calculate the dose reductions (in water in air-water interface region for single, parallel opposed and four field irradiations with 2x2 cm 2 (beamlet, 10x2 cm 2 (fan beam, 5x5 and 7x7 cm 2 field sizes. The magnitude of dose reduction in water near air-water interface increases with photon energy; decreases with distance from the interface as well as decreases as the number of beams are increased. No dose reductions were observed for large field sizes encompassing the air cavities. The results demonstrate that Co-60 beams may provide significantly smaller interface dose reductions than 6 MV and 15 MV irradiations for small field irradiations such as used in IMRT and tomotherapy.

  2. The determination of phantom and collimator scatter components of the output of megavoltage photon beams; Measurement of the collimator scatter part with a beam-coaxial narrow cylindrical phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasteren, J.J.M. van (Catholic University Nijmegen, St. Radboud Hospital (Netherlands). Department of Radiotherapy); Heukelom, S. (Nederlands Kanker Inst. ' Antoni van Leeuwenhoekhuis' , Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Kleffens, H.J. van (Dr. Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)); Laarse, R. van der (Nucletron Research BV, Leersum (Netherlands)); Venselaar, J.L.M. (Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Institute, Tilburg (Netherlands)); Westermann, C.F. (Westeinde Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands). Department of Clinical Physics)

    1991-04-01

    The separation of the total scatter correction factor S{sub c,p} in a collimator scatter component, S{sub c}, and a phantom scatter component, S{sub p}, has proven to be a useful concept in megavoltage photon beam dose calculations in situations which differ from the standard treatment geometry. A clinically applicable method to determine S{sub c} is described. Measurements are carried out with an ionization chamber, placed at a depth beyond the range of contaminant electrons, in a narrow cylindrical polystyrene phantom with a diameter of 4 cm of which the axis coincides with the beam axis. S{sub c,p} is measured in a full-scatter phantom and S{sub p} can be derived from S{sub c,p} and S{sub c}. In order to obtain a reliable separation, i.e. excluding the influence of contaminant electrons, measurements of S{sub c,p} have been carried out at depths of 5 cm for photon beams with a quality (QI) index up to and including 0.75 and a depth of 10 cm with QI larger than 0.75. These depths are in accordance with recommendations given in recent dosimetry protocols. The consistency of the method was checked by comparing calculated and measured values of S{sub c,p} for a set of blocked fields for a range of photon beam energies from {sup 60}Co up to 25 MV showing a maximum deviation of 2 percent. The method can easily be implemented in existing procedures for the calculation of the number of monitor units to deliver a specified dose to a target volume. (author). 27 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs.

  3. Ultrahigh brilliance quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays based on self-synchronized all-optical Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Changhai; Qi, Rong; Wang, Wentao; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Wentao; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Jiaqi; Qin, Zhiyong; Fang, Ming; Feng, Ke; Wu, Ying; Tian, Ye; Xu, Yi; Wu, Fenxiang; Leng, Yuxin; Weng, Xiufeng; Wang, Jihu; Wei, Fuli; Yi, Yicheng; Song, Zhaohui; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-07-01

    Inverse Compton scattering between ultra-relativistic electrons and an intense laser field has been proposed as a major route to generate compact high-brightness and high-energy γ-rays. Attributed to the inherent synchronization mechanism, an all-optical Compton scattering γ-ray source, using one laser to both accelerate electrons and scatter via the reflection of a plasma mirror, has been demonstrated in proof-of-principle experiments to produce a x-ray source near 100 keV. Here, by designing a cascaded laser wakefield accelerator to generate high-quality monoenergetic e-beams, which are bound to head-on collide with the intense driving laser pulse via the reflection of a 20-um-thick Ti foil, we produce tunable quasi-monochromatic MeV γ-rays (33% full-width at half-maximum) with a peak brilliance of ~3 × 1022 photons s-1 mm-2 mrad-2 0.1% BW at 1 MeV. To the best of our knowledge, it is one order of magnitude higher than ever reported value of its kinds in MeV regime. This compact ultrahigh brilliance γ-ray source may provide applications in nuclear resonance fluorescence, x-ray radiology and ultrafast pump-probe nondestructive inspection.

  4. Consequences of removing the flattening filter from linear accelerators in generating high dose rate photon beams for clinical applications: A Monte Carlo study verified by measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishmael Parsai, E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)]. E-mail: Ishmael.parsai@utoledo.edu; Pearson, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kvale, Thomas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    An Elekta SL-25 medical linear accelerator (Elekta Oncology Systems, Crawley, UK) has been modelled using Monte Carlo simulations with the photon flattening filter removed. It is hypothesized that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatments may be carried out after the removal of this component despite it's criticality to standard treatments. Measurements using a scanning water phantom were also performed after the flattening filter had been removed. Both simulated and measured beam profiles showed that dose on the central axis increased, with the Monte Carlo simulations showing an increase by a factor of 2.35 for 6 MV and 4.18 for 10 MV beams. A further consequence of removing the flattening filter was the softening of the photon energy spectrum leading to a steeper reduction in dose at depths greater than the depth of maximum dose. A comparison of the points at the field edge showed that dose was reduced at these points by as much as 5.8% for larger fields. In conclusion, the greater photon fluence is expected to result in shorter treatment times, while the reduction in dose outside of the treatment field is strongly suggestive of more accurate dose delivery to the target.

  5. Photon technology. Hard photon technology; Photon technology. Hard photon gijutsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    For the application of photon to industrial technologies, in particular, a hard photon technology was surveyed which uses photon beams of 0.1-200nm in wavelength. Its features such as selective atom reaction, dense inner shell excitation and spacial high resolution by quantum energy are expected to provide innovative techniques for various field such as fine machining, material synthesis and advanced inspection technology. This wavelength region has been hardly utilized for industrial fields because of poor development of suitable photon sources and optical devices. The developmental meaning, usable time and issue of a hard photon reduction lithography were surveyed as lithography in ultra-fine region below 0.1{mu}m. On hard photon analysis/evaluation technology, the industrial use of analysis, measurement and evaluation technologies by micro-beam was viewed, and optimum photon sources and optical systems were surveyed. Prediction of surface and surface layer modification by inner shell excitation, the future trend of this process and development of a vacuum ultraviolet light source were also surveyed. 383 refs., 153 figs., 17 tabs.

  6. Derivation of equations to define inflection point and its analysis in flattening filter free photon beams based on the principle of polynomial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KR Muralidhar

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The objective of this work is to (1 present a mechanism for calculating inflection points on profiles at various depths and field sizes, and (2 study the doses at the inflection points for various field sizes at depth of maximum dose (Dmax for flattening filter free (FFF photon beam profiles. Methods: Graphical representation was done on percentage of dose versus inflection points. Also, using the polynomial function, the author formulated equations for calculating spot-on inflection point on the profiles for both the 6MV and 10 MV energies for different field sizes at various depths. Results: In a 10 MV FFF radiation beam, the dose at inflection point of the profile decreases as the field size increases. However, in 6MV FFF radiation beam, the dose at the inflection point initially increases with an increase in the field size up to 10 ×10 cm2 and decreases after 10 ×10 cm2. The polynomial function was fitted for both the 6 MV and 10 MV FFF beams for all field sizes and depths. Conclusion: Polynomial function is one of the easiest ways of identifying the inflection point in FFF beam for various field sizes and depths. Graphical representation of dose versus inflection point for both FFF energies was derived.

  7. Laser-Neuron Interaction with Femtosecond Beat-Modulated 800-1200 nm Photon Beams, as the Treatment of Brain Cancer Tissue. Laser Neurophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-03-01

    I propose a novel mechanism for the brain cancer tissue treatment: nonlinear interaction of ultrashort pulses of beat-photon, (ω1 -- ω2) , or double-photon, (ω1 +ω2) , beams with the cancer tissue. The multiphoton scattering is described via photon diffusion equation. The open-scull cerebral tissue can be irradiated with the beat-modulated photon pulses with the laser irradiances in the range of a few mW/cm2 , and repetition rate of a few 100s Hz generated in the beat-wave driven free electron laser. V. Stefan, B. I. Cohen, and C. Joshi, Nonlinear Mixing of Electromagnetic Waves in PlasmasScience 27 January 1989: V. Alexander Stefan, Genomic Medical Physics: A New Physics in the Making, (S-U-Press, 2008).} This highly accurate cancer tissue ablation removal may prove to be an efficient method for the treatment of brain cancer. Work supported in part by Nikola Tesla Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  8. Non-destructive characterization of minerals in ancient Greek ceramics using monochromatic neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siouris, I M [Department of Production and Management Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace Xanthi, 67100 Xanthis (Greece); Department of Informatics and Communication, Technological and Educational, Institute of Serres, SimLab, 62124 Serres (Greece)], E-mail: jsiou@pme.duth.gr

    2008-03-12

    A collection of ancient Greek ceramic pieces originating from different excavations from Neos Scopos, Serres, in the North East of Greece has been studied at room temperature by means of non-destructive neutron diffraction using a monochromatic beam. Quantitative phase analyses revealed different compositions of the mineral fractions present, but a general similarity of the main materials is still recognizable. It is shown that the observed variations are partly due to the experimental set-up and they can be remedied by taking a sufficient number of measurements for different sample orientations while bathing the entire object in the beam. An additional reason for the observed anomaly in the mineral phase compositions may be the different heat treatments to which the mixtures of clays/pastes was subjected as well as the postproduction environmental conditions for the selected samples. The firing temperatures were estimated to be in the range of 850-1000 deg. C.

  9. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B [University Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  10. Analysis of interference between two optical beams in a quasi-zero electric permittivity photonic crystal superlattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziyuan; Hattori, Haroldo T

    2013-02-01

    A quasi-zero-average-index photonic crystal structure has been recently demonstrated by using the concept of complementary media. It consists of dielectric photonic crystal superlattices with alternating layers of negative index photonic crystals and positive index dielectric media. This photonic crystal structure has unique optical properties, such as phase-invariant field and self-collimation of light. In particular, the nanofabricated superlattices can be used in chip-scale optical interconnects and interferometers with quasi-zero-average phase difference. However, in potential interconnect applications, crosstalk between neighboring signals needs to be avoided. In this article, we study simulations of the interference of propagating electromagnetic waves in a quasi-zero electric permittivity photonic crystal superlattice. The simulations here are restricted to TM modes, with the main electric field along the vertical direction.

  11. Merged beam laser design for reduction of gain-saturation and two-photon absorption in high power single mode semiconductor lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysevych, M; Tan, H H; Karouta, F; Fu, L; Jagadish, C

    2013-04-08

    In this paper we report a method to overcome the limitations of gain-saturation and two-photon absorption faced by developers of high power single mode InP-based lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOA) including those based on wide-waveguide or slab-coupled optical waveguide laser (SCOWL) technology. The method is based on Y-coupling design of the laser cavity. The reduction in gain-saturation and two-photon absorption in the merged beam laser structures (MBL) are obtained by reducing the intensity of electromagnetic field in the laser cavity. Standard ridge-waveguide lasers and MBLs were fabricated, tested and compared. Despite a slightly higher threshold current, the reduced gain-saturation in MBLs results in higher output power. The MBLs also produced a single spatial mode, as well as a strongly dominating single spectral mode which is the inherent feature of MBL-type cavity.

  12. SU-E-I-40: Phantom Research On Monochromatic Images Taken by Dual CBCT with Multiple Energy Sets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, R [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Wang, H [Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Zhang, Y [Duke University, Durham, NC - North Carolina (United States); Mao, R [The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Ren, L; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the quality of monochromatic images at the same virtual monochromatic energy using dual cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with either kV/kV or MV/kV or MV/MV energy sets. Methods: CT images of Catphan 504 phantom were acquired using four different KV and MV settings: 80kV, 140kV, 4MV, 6MV. Three sets of monochromatic images were calculated: 80kV-140kV, 140kV-4MV and 4MV-6MV. Each set of CBCT images were reconstructed from the same selected virtual monochromatic energy of 1MeV. Contrast-to-Noise Ratios (CNRs) were calculated and compared between each pair of images with different energy sets. Results: Between kV/MV and MV/MV images, the CNRs are comparable for all inserts. However, differences of CNRs were observed between the kV/kV and kV/MV images. Delrin’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 1.634. LDPE’s (Low-Density Polyethylene) CNR ratio between kV/kV and kV/MV images is 0.509. Polystyrene’s CNR ratio between kV/kV image and kV/MV image is 2.219. Conclusion: Preliminary results indicated that the CNRs calculated from CBCT images reconstructed from either kV/MV projections or MV/MV projections for the same selected virtual monochromatic energy may be comparable.

  13. Estimation of local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam IMRT system using AAPM TG 119 test protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Kadam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate local confidence limit for 6 MV photon beam based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT using TG119 test protocol.Methods: The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM Task Group 119 (TG119 prescribed a protocol to evaluate overall accuracy of IMRT system rather than independent uncertainty in dose calculation, dose delivery and measurement system. Two preliminary and five clinical test cases were created based on dose prescriptions and planning objectives given by TG119 report. Verification plans were created in a planning slab phantom, 2D Matrix dosimetry system (I’MatriXX with multicube phantom and aS-1000 electronic portal imaging device (EPID. Radiation absorbed doses to high dose points in the planning target volume (PTV region and low dose points in avoidance structures were measured using CC13 ionization chamber having sensitive volume of 0.13 cm3. The measured and planned doses were normalized with respect to their prescription doses and intercompared. The gamma analysis was carried out for both I’MatriXX and EPID, adopting the acceptance criteria of 3% DD (dose difference and 3 mm DTA (distance to agreement with 10% threshold dose.Results: For the point dose measurements with ion chamber, the average dose difference ratio in high dose low gradient PTV region was -0.0133 ± 0.012 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.037. The average dose difference in low dose region (avoidance structure was -0.00004 ± 0.010 corresponding to a confidence limit of 0.021. The average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for composite planar dose distribution measured by I’MatriXX was 99.47 ± 0.43 which corresponds to a confidence limit of 1.38 (i.e. 98.62% passing. Similarly, the average percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3% DD and 3 mm DTA for per-field dose distribution measured by EPID was 98.00 ± 2.49 which corresponds to a

  14. SU-E-T-409: Evaluation of Tissue Composition Effect On Dose Distribution in Radiotherapy with 6 MV Photon Beam of a Medical Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghorbani, M; Tabatabaei, Z; Noghreiyan, A Vejdani [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meigooni, A Soleimani [Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate soft tissue composition effect on dose distribution for various soft tissues and various depths in radiotherapy with 6 MV photon beam of a medical linac. Methods: A phantom and Siemens Primus linear accelerator were simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In a homogeneous cubic phantom, six types of soft tissue and three types of tissue-equivalent materials were defined separately. The soft tissues were muscle (skeletal), adipose tissue, blood (whole), breast tissue, soft tissue (9-component) and soft tissue (4-component). The tissue-equivalent materials included: water, A-150 tissue-equivalent plastic and perspex. Photon dose relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue at various depths on the beam’s central axis was determined for the 6 MV photon beam. The relative dose was also calculated and compared for various MCNPX tallies including,F8, F6 and,F4. Results: The results of the relative photon dose in various materials relative to dose in 9-component soft tissue and using different tallies are reported in the form of tabulated data. Minor differences between dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials were observed. The results from F6 and F4 were practically the same but different with,F8 tally. Conclusion: Based on the calculations performed, the differences in dose distributions in various soft tissues and tissue-equivalent materials are minor but they could be corrected in radiotherapy calculations to upgrade the accuracy of the dosimetric calculations.

  15. Broadband, monochromatic and quasi-monochromatic x-ray propagation in multi-Z media for imaging and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Maximil