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Sample records for monocarbonyl cations neutrals

  1. Lipopolysaccharide Neutralization by Cationic-Amphiphilic Polymers through Pseudoaggregate Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppu, Divakara S S M; Haldar, Jayanta

    2016-03-14

    Synthetic polymers incorporating the cationic charge and hydrophobicity to mimic the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been developed. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind to bacterial membranes that generally contain negatively charged phospholipids and cause membrane disintegration resulting in cell death; however, cationic-amphiphilic antibacterial polymers with endotoxin neutralization properties, to the best of our knowledge, have not been reported. Bacterial endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) cause sepsis that is responsible for a great amount of mortality worldwide. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers can also bind to negatively charged and hydrophobic LPS and cause detoxification. Hence, we envisaged that cationic-amphiphilic polymers can have both antibacterial as well as LPS binding properties. Here we report synthetic amphiphilic polymers with both antibacterial as well as endotoxin neutralizing properties. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines in human monocytes caused by LPS stimulation were inhibited by >80% when coincubated with these polymers. These reductions were found to be dependent on concentration and, more importantly, on the side-chain chemical structure due to variations in the hydrophobicity profiles of these polymers. These cationic-amphiphilic polymers bind and cause LPS neutralization and detoxification. Investigations of polymer interaction with LPS using fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that these polymers bind but neither dissociate nor promote LPS aggregation. We show that polymer binding to LPS leads to sort of a pseudoaggregate formation resulting in LPS neutralization/detoxification. These findings provide an unusual mechanism of LPS neutralization using novel synthetic cationic-amphiphilic polymers.

  2. Spectroscopic and theoretical investigations of vibrational frequencies in binary unsaturated transition-metal carbonyl cations, neutrals, and anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M; Andrews, L; Bauschlicher, C W

    2001-07-01

    Figure 18 presents the C-O stretching vibrational frequencies of the first-row transition-metal monocarbonyl cations, neutrals, and anions in solid neon; similar diagrams have been reported for neutral MCO species in solid argon, but three of the early assignments have been changed by recent work and one new assignment added. The laser-ablation method produces mostly neutral atoms with a few percent cations and electrons for capture to make anions; in contrast, thermal evaporation gives only neutral species. Hence, the very recent neon matrix investigations in our laboratory provide carbonyl cations and anions for comparison to neutrals on a level playing field. Several trends are very interesting. First, for all metals, the C-O stretching frequencies follow the order cations > neutrals > anions with large diagnostic 100-200 cm-1 separations, which is consistent with the magnitude of the metal d to CO pi * donation. Second, for a given charge, there is a general increase in C-O stretching vibrational frequencies with increasing metal atomic number, which demonstrates the expected decrease in the metal to CO pi * donation with increasing metal ionization potential. Some of the structure in this plot arises from the extra stability of the filled and half-filled d shell and from the electron pairing that occurs at the middle of the TM row; the plot resembles the "double-humped" graph found for the variation in properties across a row of transition metals. For the anions, the variation with metal atom is the smallest since all of the metals can easily donate charge to the CO ligand. Third, for the early transition-metal Ti, V, and Cr families, the C-O stretching frequencies decrease when going down the family, but the reverse relationship is observed for the late transition-metal Fe, Co, and Ni families. In most of the present discussion, we have referred to neon matrix frequencies; however, the argon matrix frequencies are complementary, and useful information can be

  3. Photoinduced Dynamics of Neutral, Cationic, and Anionic Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stephansen, Anne Boutrup

    In contrast to ground state (thermal) chemistry where internal energy is statistically distributed among the molecular degrees of freedom, photo-activation of a reaction entails initial localization of the internal energy in a highly non-statistical manner. The result is often reaction rates fast...... impact on the evolution of the ensuing reaction. The diversity of the processes studied illustrates the versatility of the experimental method as a means to increase knowledge on the complex interplay between structural dynamics and (photo)-reactivity....... than those predicted by statistical models, but also a more critical dependence between molecular structure and (photo)-reactivity. This thesis presents a collection of studies of various types of photoinduced processes in neutral, anionic, or cationic molecular species as introduced below....... The investigations have primarily employed femtosecond time-resolved photoionization or photodetachment techniques. Intersystem crossing (ISC) in neutral organic species is conventionally assumed to be slow due to the spin-forbidden nature of the process; this assumption has been challenged during the past decade...

  4. Base cation deposition in Europe - Part II. Acid neutralization capacity and contribution to forest nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaijers, G.P.J.; Leeuwen, E.P. van; Jong, P.G.H. de; Erisman, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capacity of base cations to neutralize acid deposition and of the contribution of base cation deposition to forest nutrition in Europe. In large parts of southern Europe more than 50% of the potential acid deposition was found counteracted by deposition of non-sea salt

  5. Theoretical Infrared Spectra for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Neutrals, Cations and Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1995-01-01

    Calculations are carried out using density functional theory (DFT) to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities of the neutrals and cations of thirteen polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) up to the size of ovalene. Calculations are also carried out for a few PAH anions. The DFT harmonic frequencies, when uniformly scaled by the factor of 0.958 to account primarily for anharmonicity, agree with the matrix isolation fundamentals to within an average error of about 10 per centimeter. Electron correlation is found to significantly reduce the intensities of many of the cation harmonics, bringing them into much better agreement with the available experimental data. While the theoretical infrared spectra agree well with the experimental data for the neutral systems and for many of the cations, there are notable discrepancies with the experimental matrix isolation data for some PAH cations that are difficult to explain in terms of limitations in the calculations. In agreement with previous theoretical work, the present calculations show that the relative intensities for the astronomical unidentified infrared (UIR) bands agree reasonably well with those for a distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations, but not with a distribution of PAH neutrals. We also observe that the infrared spectra of highly symmetrical cations such as coronene agree much better with astronomical observations than do those of, for example, the polyacenes such as tetracene and pentacene. The total integrated intensities for the neutral species are found to increase linearly with size, while the total integrated intensities are much larger for the cations and scale more nearly quadratically with size. We conclude that emission from moderate-sized highly symmetric PAH cations such as coronene and larger could account for the UIR bands.

  6. Neutral, anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic diblock copolymers featuring poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) hydrophobic segments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Jankova Atanasova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Amphiphilic diblock copolymers incorporating hydrophobic poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate) (PMEA) and hydrophilic neutral poly(ethylene glycol) monomethyl ether (mPEG), anionic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA), cationic poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA), and ...

  7. Optimizing Cationic and Neutral Lipids for Efficient Gene Delivery at High Serum Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majzoub, Ramsey N.; Hwu, Yeu-kuang; Liang, Keng S.; Leal, Cecília; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cationic liposome (CL)-DNA complexes are promising gene delivery vectors with potential applications in gene therapy. A key challenge in creating CL-DNA complexes for applications is that their transfection efficiency (TE) is adversely affected by serum. In particular, little is known about the effects of high serum contents on TE even though this may provide design guidelines for applications in vivo. Methods We prepared CL-DNA complexes in which we varied the neutral lipid (DOPC, glycerol-monooleate (GMO), cholesterol), the headgroup charge and chemical structure of the cationic lipid, and the ratio of neutral to cationic lipid; we then measured the TE of these complexes as a function of serum content and assessed their cytotoxicity. We tested selected formulations in two human cancer cell lines (M21/melanoma and PC-3/prostate cancer). Results In the absence of serum, all CL-DNA complexes of custom-synthesized multivalent lipids show high TE. Certain combinations of multivalent lipids and neutral lipids, such as MVL5(5+)/GMO-DNA complexes or complexes based on the dendritic-headgroup lipid TMVLG3(8+) exhibited high TE both in the absence and presence of serum. Although their TE still dropped to a small extent in the presence of serum, it reached or surpassed that of benchmark commercial transfection reagents, in particular at high serum content. Conclusions Two-component vectors (one multivalent cationic lipid and one neutral lipid) can rival or surpass benchmark reagents at low and high serum contents (up to 50%, v/v). We suggest guidelines for optimizing the serum resistance of CL-DNA complexes based on a given cationic lipid. PMID:24753287

  8. Nature of the lowest excited states of neutral polyenyl radicals and polyene radical cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcke, Jan Hendrik; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2009-10-01

    Due to the close relation of the polyenyl radicals C2n+1H2n+3• and polyene radical cations C2nH2n+2•+ to the neutral linear polyenes, one may suspect their excited states to possess substantial double excitation character, similar to the famous S1 state of neutral polyenes and thus to be equally problematic for simple excited state theories. Using the recently developed unrestricted algebraic-diagrammatic construction scheme of second order perturbation theory and the equation-of-motion coupled-cluster method, the vertical excitation energies, their corresponding oscillator strengths, and the nature of the wave functions of the lowest excited electronic states of the radicals are calculated and analyzed in detail. For the polyenyl radicals two one-photon allowed states are found as D1 and D4 states, with two symmetry-forbidden D2 and D3 states in between, while in the polyene radical cations D1 and D2 are allowed and D3 is forbidden. The order of the states is conserved with increasing chain length. It is found that all low-lying excited states exhibit a significant but similar amount of doubly excited configuration in their wave functions of 15%-20%. Using extrapolation, predictions for the excitation energies of the five lowest excited states of the polyene radical cations are made for longer chain lengths.

  9. High-Performance Liquid Chromatographic Resolution of Neutral and Cationic Hetero[6]Helicenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrador, Geraldine M; Bosson, Johann; Breitbach, Zachary S; Lim, Yeeun; Francotte, Eric R; Sabia, Rocchina; Villani, Claudio; Armstrong, Daniel W; Lacour, Jérôme

    2016-04-01

    Cationic hetero[6]helicenes 1+, 2+ and 3+ have been recently disclosed. Herein we report on their enantiomeric separation using high-performance liquid chromatography. Separation of the antipodes can be achieved in preparative scale on neutral adducts with Chiralcel OD-I or Chiralpak ID CSP. Selectivity factors of 1.90, 1.67, and 1.96 were obtained for 1-H, 2-H, and 3-H, respectively. Separation can also be performed on the carbenium ions on regular Chiralpak IA CSP using water-containing eluents, thus allowing for enantiomeric purity determinations in aqueous environments. Resolution of neutral and cationic helicenes is also achieved on more recently developed LARIHC columns. The versatility of the cyclofructan phases allows for baseline separations for both cases and their loading capabilities are demonstrated. Finally, the configurational stability of 1+, 2+, and 3+ was measured. For each replacement of an oxygen atom by an amino group, the racemization barrier increases significantly (ΔG‡ = 29.8, 36.3 and >37 kcal mol(-1) for 1+, 2+, and 3+ respectively).

  10. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  11. Protection of adenovirus from neutralizing antibody by cationic PEG derivative ionically linked to adenovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun X

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Qin Zeng, Jianfeng Han, Dong Zhao, Tao Gong, Zhirong Zhang, Xun SunKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery Systems, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The generation of anti-adenovirus neutralizing antibody (NAb in humans severely restricts the utilization of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5 vectors in gene therapy for a wide range of clinical trials. To overcome this limitation, we ionically complexed Ad5 with a newly synthesized copolymer, which we called APC, making an adenovirus shielded from NAb.Methods: APC, a cationic polyethylene glycol derivative, was synthesized via two steps of ring-opening copolymerization of ethylene oxide and allyl glycidyl ether, followed by the addition of 2-mercaptoethylamine. The copolymer or the control PEI-2k was ionically complexed to anionic Ad5 in 5% glucose, and in vitro transduction assays were carried out in coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor-positive cells (A549 and coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor-negative cells (B16 and SKOV3. The physical properties and morphology of adenovirus alone or the complexes were investigated respectively by zeta potential, size distribution, and transmission electron microscopy image. Then cytotoxicity of APC was examined using 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays. Finally, the ability of APC to protect adenovirus from NAb was evaluated by transfection assays after a neutralizing effect.Results: APC was successfully synthesized and showed a low cytotoxicity. Positively charged Ad5/APC exhibited slightly increased diameter (130.2 ± 0.60 nm than naked Ad5 (115.6 ± 5.46 nm while Ad5/PEI-2k showed severe aggregation (1382 ± 79.9 nm. Ad5/APC achieved a gene transfection level as high as Ad5/PEI-2k in A549 or B16 cells, and significantly higher than Ad5/PEI-2k in SKOV3 cells. Most importantly, after the exposure to the neutralizing

  12. First principle study of the interaction of elemental Hg with small neutral, anionic and cationic Pd ( = 1-6) clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shamoon Ahmad Siddiqui; Nadir Bouarissa

    2013-11-01

    Density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations have been performed so as to study the interaction of elemental mercury (Hg) with small neutral, cationic and anionic palladium clusters (Pd, = 1-6). Results of these calculations clearly indicate that frontier molecular orbital (FMO) theory is a useful method to predict the selectivity of Hg adsorption. Binding energies of Hg on cationic Pd clusters are generally found to be greater than those on neutral and anionic clusters. Results of natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis show that the flow of electrons in the neutral and charged complexes is mainly due to s orbitals of Hg. NBO analysis also indicates that, in most of the cases, the binding energies of Hg with Pdn clusters are directly proportional to charge transfer, i.e., greater the charge transfer, higher is the binding energy.

  13. Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery with Cationic Versus Neutral Microbubbles: Effect of DNA and Microbubble Dose on In Vivo Transfection Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panje, Cedric M.; Wang, David S.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy; Ren, Ying; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the effect of varying microbubble (MB) and DNA doses on the overall and comparative efficiencies of ultrasound (US)-mediated gene delivery (UMGD) to murine hindlimb skeletal muscle using cationic versus neutral MBs. Materials and Methods: Cationic and control neutral MBs were characterized for size, charge, plasmid DNA binding, and ability to protect DNA against endonuclease degradation. UMGD of a codon optimized firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter plasmid to endothelial cells (1 MHz, 1 W/cm², 20% duty cycle, 1 min) was performed in cell culture using cationic, neutral, or no MBs. In vivo UMGD to mouse hindlimb muscle was performed by insonation (1 MHz, 2 W/cm², 50% duty cycle, 5 min) after intravenous administration of Fluc combined with cationic, neutral, or no MBs. Gene delivery efficiency was assessed by serial in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Efficiency of in vivo UMGD with cationic versus neutral MBs was systematically evaluated by varying plasmid DNA dose (10, 17.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 µg) while maintaining a constant MB dose of 1x108 MBs and by changing MB dose (1x107, 5x107, 1x108, or 5x108 MBs) while keeping a constant DNA dose of 50 µg. Results: Cationic and size-matched control neutral MBs differed significantly in zeta potential with cationic MBs being able to bind plasmid DNA (binding capacity of 0.03 pg/MB) and partially protect DNA from nuclease degradation while neutral MBs could not. Cationic MBs enhanced UMGD compared to neutral MBs as well as no MB and no US controls both in cell culture (P < 0.001) and in vivo (P < 0.05). Regardless of MB type, in vivo UMGD efficiency increased dose-dependently with DNA dose and showed overall maximum transfection with 50 µg DNA. However, there was an inverse correlation (ρ = -0.90; P = 0.02) between DNA dose and the degree of enhanced UMGD efficiency observed with using cationic MBs instead of neutral MBs. The delivery efficiency advantage associated with cationic MBs was most prominent

  14. Ultrasound-Mediated Gene Delivery with Cationic Versus Neutral Microbubbles: Effect of DNA and Microbubble Dose on In Vivo Transfection Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric M. Panje, David S. Wang, Marybeth A. Pysz, Ramasamy Paulmurugan, Ying Ren, Francois Tranquart, Lu Tian, Jürgen K. Willmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of varying microbubble (MB and DNA doses on the overall and comparative efficiencies of ultrasound (US-mediated gene delivery (UMGD to murine hindlimb skeletal muscle using cationic versus neutral MBs.Materials and Methods: Cationic and control neutral MBs were characterized for size, charge, plasmid DNA binding, and ability to protect DNA against endonuclease degradation. UMGD of a codon optimized firefly luciferase (Fluc reporter plasmid to endothelial cells (1 MHz, 1 W/cm², 20% duty cycle, 1 min was performed in cell culture using cationic, neutral, or no MBs. In vivo UMGD to mouse hindlimb muscle was performed by insonation (1 MHz, 2 W/cm², 50% duty cycle, 5 min after intravenous administration of Fluc combined with cationic, neutral, or no MBs. Gene delivery efficiency was assessed by serial in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Efficiency of in vivo UMGD with cationic versus neutral MBs was systematically evaluated by varying plasmid DNA dose (10, 17.5, 25, 37.5, and 50 µg while maintaining a constant MB dose of 1x108 MBs and by changing MB dose (1x107, 5x107, 1x108, or 5x108 MBs while keeping a constant DNA dose of 50 µg.Results: Cationic and size-matched control neutral MBs differed significantly in zeta potential with cationic MBs being able to bind plasmid DNA (binding capacity of 0.03 pg/MB and partially protect DNA from nuclease degradation while neutral MBs could not. Cationic MBs enhanced UMGD compared to neutral MBs as well as no MB and no US controls both in cell culture (P < 0.001 and in vivo (P < 0.05. Regardless of MB type, in vivo UMGD efficiency increased dose-dependently with DNA dose and showed overall maximum transfection with 50 µg DNA. However, there was an inverse correlation (ρ = -0.90; P = 0.02 between DNA dose and the degree of enhanced UMGD efficiency observed with using cationic MBs instead of neutral MBs. The delivery efficiency advantage associated with cationic MBs was most

  15. Calix[4]arene Polyaza Derivatives: Novel Effective Neutral Receptors for Cations and (a)-Amino Acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction Calixarenes are one of the most important supramolecular building blocks, which can be modified by introducing different functional and/or structrual groups to create a specific interaction between the host and the target molecules, such as metal cations and small organic molecules[1,2]. In particular, the recognition of amino acids is an interesting theme in biomimetic chemistry[3].

  16. 1D-coupled photochemical model of neutrals, cations and anions in the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-04-01

    Many models with different characteristics have been published so far to study the chemical processes at work in Titan's atmosphere. Some models focus on neutral species in the stratosphere or ionic species in the ionosphere, but few of them couple all the species throughout the whole atmosphere. Very few of these emphasize the importance of uncertainties in the chemical scheme and study their propagation in the model. We have developed a new 1D-photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere coupling neutral species with positive and negative ions from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and have compared our results with observations to have a comprehensive view of the chemical processes driving the composition of the stratosphere and ionosphere of Titan. We have updated the neutral, positive ion and negative ion chemistry and have improved the description of N2 photodissociation by introducing high resolution N2 absorption cross sections. We performed for the first time an uncertainty propagation study in a fully coupled ion-neutral model. We determine how uncertainties on rate constants on both neutral and ionic reactions influence the model results and pinpoint the key reactions responsible for this behavior. We find very good agreement between our model results and observations in both the stratosphere and in the ionosphere for most neutral compounds. Our results are also in good agreement with an average INMS mass spectrum and specific flybys in the dayside suggesting that our chemical model (for both neutral and ions) provides a good approximation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as a whole. Our uncertainty propagation study highlights the difficulty to interpret the INMS mass spectra for masses 14, 31, 41 and we identified the key reactions responsible for these ambiguities. Despite an overall improvement in the chemical model, disagreement for some specific compounds (HC3N, C2H5CN, C2H4) highlights the role that certain physical processes could play

  17. Cationic and neutral nitrosamide: Viable molecules in the dilute gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egsgaard, H.; Carlsen, L.; Weiske, T.;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrosamide, NH2NO, has been generated and characterized in the dilute gas phase by means of neutralization reionization mass spectrometry in combination with extensive isotopic labelling. The molecule was found to be stable under these conditions having a minimal lifetime in the microsecond time...

  18. Cation-like Doppler shifts from a neutral molecule in an electrical discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Herbin, H; Guelachvili, G; Picqué, N; Herbin, Herv\\'{e}; Farrenq, Robert; Guelachvili, Guy; Picqu\\'{e}, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    Velocity-modulation Fourier transform emission spectra from a N_2O/He discharge plasma recorded between 1 and 5.5 $\\mu$m are described. Surprisingly, they show Doppler-shifted lines for the E ^2 \\Sigma ^+ - D ^2 \\Sigma ^+, C ^2 \\Pi - A ^2 \\Sigma ^+, and D ^2 \\Sigma ^+ - A ^2 \\Sigma ^+ Rydberg-Rydberg rovibronic transitions of the nitric oxide neutral molecule. These polarity-dependent Doppler-shifts are those of positively charged particles. Vibration-rotation lines of NO and transitions from other neutral molecules like N_2 are also present in the spectra with comparable intensities and remain unshifted. Experimental investigations and possible explanations are discussed.

  19. Protection of adenovirus from neutralizing antibody by cationic PEG derivative ionically linked to adenovirus

    OpenAIRE

    Sun X; Zhang Z; Gong T; Zhao D.; Han J; Zeng Q

    2012-01-01

    Qin Zeng, Jianfeng Han, Dong Zhao, Tao Gong, Zhirong Zhang, Xun SunKey Laboratory of Drug Targeting and Drug Delivery Systems, Ministry of Education, West China School of Pharmacy, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: The generation of anti-adenovirus neutralizing antibody (NAb) in humans severely restricts the utilization of recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vectors in gene therapy for a wide range of clinical trials. To overcome this limitation, w...

  20. Structure and spectroscopic properties of neutral and cationic tetratomic [C,H,N,Zn] isomers: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio; Vega-Vega, Álvaro; Barrientos, Carmen, E-mail: cbb@qf.uva.es [Departamento de Química Física y Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Valladolid, 47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2015-05-14

    The structure and spectroscopic parameters of the most relevant [C,H,N,Zn] isomers have been studied employing high-level quantum chemical methods. For each isomer, we provide predictions for their molecular structure, thermodynamic stabilities as well as vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters which could eventually help in their experimental detection. In addition, we have carried out a detailed study of the bonding situations by means of a topological analysis of the electron density in the framework of the Bader’s quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The analysis of the relative stabilities and spectroscopic parameters suggests two linear isomers of the neutral [C,H,N,Zn] composition, namely, cyanidehydridezinc HZnCN ({sup 1}Σ) and hydrideisocyanidezinc HZnNC ({sup 1}Σ), as possible candidates for experimental detections. For the cationic [C,H,N,Zn]{sup +} composition, the most stable isomers are the ion-molecule complexes arising from the direct interaction of the zinc cation with either the nitrogen or carbon atom of either hydrogen cyanide or hydrogen isocyanide, namely, HCNZn{sup +} ({sup 2}Σ) and HCNZn{sup +} ({sup 2}Σ)

  1. Structure and spectroscopic properties of neutral and cationic tetratomic [C,H,N,Zn] isomers: A theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Pilar; Largo, Antonio; Vega-Vega, Álvaro; Barrientos, Carmen

    2015-05-14

    The structure and spectroscopic parameters of the most relevant [C,H,N,Zn] isomers have been studied employing high-level quantum chemical methods. For each isomer, we provide predictions for their molecular structure, thermodynamic stabilities as well as vibrational and rotational spectroscopic parameters which could eventually help in their experimental detection. In addition, we have carried out a detailed study of the bonding situations by means of a topological analysis of the electron density in the framework of the Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The analysis of the relative stabilities and spectroscopic parameters suggests two linear isomers of the neutral [C,H,N,Zn] composition, namely, cyanidehydridezinc HZnCN ((1)Σ) and hydrideisocyanidezinc HZnNC ((1)Σ), as possible candidates for experimental detections. For the cationic [C,H,N,Zn](+) composition, the most stable isomers are the ion-molecule complexes arising from the direct interaction of the zinc cation with either the nitrogen or carbon atom of either hydrogen cyanide or hydrogen isocyanide, namely, HCNZn(+) ((2)Σ) and HCNZn(+) ((2)Σ).

  2. Discovery and evaluation of asymmetrical monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin as anti-inflammatory agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Yali Zhang,1,2,* Chengguang Zhao,1,2,* Wenfei He,2,* Zhe Wang,2 Qilu Fang,2 Bing Xiao,2 Zhiguo Liu,2 Guang Liang,2 Shulin Yang1 1School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People's Republic of China; 2Chemical Biology Research Center, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Wenzhou Medical University, University Town, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response syndrome and is mainly caused by lipopolysaccharides (LPS – a component of the cell walls of gram-negative bacteria, via toll-like receptor 4–mitogen-activated protein kinases/nuclear factor-kappa B-dependent proinflammatory signaling pathway. Here, we synthesized 26 asymmetric monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin and evaluated their anti-inflammatory activity by inhibiting the LPS-induced secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Five active compounds (3a, 3c, 3d, 3j, and 3l exhibited dose-dependent inhibition against the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, and they also showed much higher chemical stability than curcumin in vitro. The anti-inflammatory activity of analogs 3a and 3c may be associated with their inhibition of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the activation of nuclear factor-kappa B. In addition, 3c exhibited significant protection against LPS-induced septic death in vivo. These results indicate that asymmetrical monocarbonyl curcumin analogs may be utilized as candidates for the treatment of acute inflammatory diseases. Keywords: sepsis, inflammatory cytokines, anti-inflammation, quantitative structure–activity relationship

  3. Expedient Syntheses of Neutral and Cationic Au(I)–NHC Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Veenboer, Richard M. P.

    2017-09-08

    The synthesis and isolation of gold(I) precatalysts often requires the generation of several isolable intermediates as well as numerous purification steps. New protocols for the expedient synthesis of neutral [Au(OH)(NHC)] and [Au(CH2COCH3)(NHC)] species from [AuCl(NHC)] or [AuCl(DMS)] precursors bearing a variety of N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligands are presented. These methods can be employed in a telescoping manner for the synthesis of catalytically relevant [Au(NTf2)(NHC)] and [Au(NHC)(NCCH3)][BF4] complexes. These attractive methods are straightforward and practical leading to various complexes in high isolated yields and purity.

  4. Antioxidant activity of idebenone-loaded neutral and cationic solid-lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Antonio; Crasci', Lucia; Panico, Annamaria; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-01-01

    Idebenone (IDE) is a lipophilic benzoquinone electron carrier synthetic analogue of coenzyme Q10, which behaves as an antioxidant and free radical scavenging molecule. Recently, the therapeutic application of IDE in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy has been discussed. This work was aimed at evaluating the encapsulation of IDE in solid-lipid nanoparticles (SLN). In particular, we tested the possibility of adapting the quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion technique, already proposed to produce polymeric nanoparticles, to prepare positively charged SLN with different compositions. Such a charge, due to the addition of a cationic lipid, would facilitate the interaction with the negatively charged eye surface epithelium, with a consequent longer pre-corneal residence time of the colloidal systems. In a preliminary evaluation of the produced IDE-loaded SLN, the antioxidant activity of the drug was demonstrated using an oxygen radical absorbance capacity assay. Encapsulation of the drug in the nanocarrier systems seems able to protect IDE from degradation and prolong its antioxidant potential.

  5. Methyl cation affinities of neutral and anionic maingroup-element hydrides: trends across the periodic table and correlation with proton affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, R Joshua; Guerra, Célia Fonseca; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2010-07-22

    We have computed the methyl cation affinities in the gas phase of archetypal anionic and neutral bases across the periodic table using ZORA-relativistic density functional theory (DFT) at BP86/QZ4P//BP86/TZ2P. The main purpose of this work is to provide the methyl cation affinities (and corresponding entropies) at 298 K of all anionic (XH(n-1)(-)) and neutral bases (XH(n)) constituted by maingroup-element hydrides of groups 14-17 and the noble gases (i.e., group 18) along the periods 2-6. The cation affinity of the bases decreases from H(+) to CH(3)(+). To understand this trend, we have carried out quantitative bond energy decomposition analyses (EDA). Quantitative correlations are established between the MCA and PA values.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo Study of π-Bonded Transition Metal Organometallics: Neutral and Cationic Vanadium-Benzene and Cobalt-Benzene Half Sandwiches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, L; Dubecký, M; Mitas, L; Štich, I

    2013-01-08

    We present accurate quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) calculations that enabled us to determine the structure, spin multiplicity, ionization energy, dissociation energy, and spin-dependent electronic gaps of neutral and positively charged vanadium-benzene and cobalt-benzene systems. From total/ionization energy, we deduce a sextet (quintet) state of neutral (cationic) vanadium-benzene systems and quartet (triplet) state of the neutral (cationic) cobalt-benzene systems. Vastly different energy gaps for the two spin channels are predicted for the vanadium-benzene system and broadly similar energy gaps for the cobalt-benzene system. For this purpose, we have used a multistage combination of techniques with consecutive elimination of systematic biases except for the fixed-node approximation in QMC. Our results significantly differ from the established picture based on previous less accurate calculations and point out the importance of high-level many-body methods for predictive calculations of similar transition metal-based organometallic systems.

  7. Modeling deoxyribose radicals by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. Part 1. Preparation, dissociations, and energetics of 2-hydroxyoxolan-2-yl radical, neutral isomers, and cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda, Shetty; Sadílek, Martin; Chen, Xiaohong; Turecek, Frantisek

    2004-07-01

    Collisional neutralization of several isomeric C(4)H(7)O(2) cations is used to generate radicals that share some structural features with transient species that are thought to be produced by radiolysis of 2-deoxyribose. The title 2-hydroxyoxolan-2-yl radical (1) undergoes nearly complete dissociation when produced by femtosecond electron transfer from thermal organic electron donors dimethyl disulfide and N,N-dimethylaniline in the gas phase. Product analysis, isotope labeling ((2)H and (18)O), and potential energy surface mapping by ab initio calculations at the G2(MP2) and B3-PMP2 levels of theory and in combination with Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) kinetic calculations are used to assign the major and some minor pathways for 1 dissociations. The major (approximately 90%) pathway is initiated by cleavage of the ring C-5[bond]O bond in 1 and proceeds to form ethylene and *CH(2)COOH as main products, whereas loss of a hydrogen atom forms 4-hexenoic acid as a minor product. Loss of the OH hydrogen atom forming butyrolactone (2, approximately 9%) and cleavage of the C-3[bond]C-4 bonds (<1%) in 1 are other minor pathways. The major source of excitation in 1 is by Franck-Condon effects that cause substantial differences between the adiabatic and vertical ionization of 1 (5.40 and 6.89 eV, respectively) and vertical recombination in the precursor ion 1(+) (4.46 eV). (+)NR(+) mass spectra distinguish radical 1 from isomeric radicals 2-oxo-(1H)oxolanium (3), 1,3-dioxan-2-yl (9), and 1,3-dioxan-4-yl (10) that were generated separately from their corresponding ion precursors.

  8. Eliminating the Heart from the Curcumin Molecule: Monocarbonyl Curcumin Mimics (MACs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Shetty

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a natural product with several thousand years of heritage. Its traditional Asian application to human ailments has been subjected in recent decades to worldwide pharmacological, biochemical and clinical investigations. Curcumin’s Achilles heel lies in its poor aqueous solubility and rapid degradation at pH ~ 7.4. Researchers have sought to unlock curcumin’s assets by chemical manipulation. One class of molecules under scrutiny are the monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin (MACs. A thousand plus such agents have been created and tested primarily against cancer and inflammation. The outcome is clear. In vitro, MACs furnish a 10–20 fold potency gain vs. curcumin for numerous cancer cell lines and cellular proteins. Similarly, MACs have successfully demonstrated better pharmacokinetic (PK profiles in mice and greater tumor regression in cancer xenografts in vivo than curcumin. The compounds reveal limited toxicity as measured by murine weight gain and histopathological assessment. To our knowledge, MAC members have not yet been monitored in larger animals or humans. However, Phase 1 clinical trials are certainly on the horizon. The present review focuses on the large and evolving body of work in cancer and inflammation, but also covers MAC structural diversity and early discovery for treatment of bacteria, tuberculosis, Alzheimer’s disease and malaria.

  9. The low-lying excited states of neutral polyacenes and their radical cations: a quantum chemical study employing the algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme of second order

    OpenAIRE

    Knippenberg, Stefan; Starcke, Jan-Hendrik; Wormit, Michael; Dreuw, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The vertical excited electronic states of linearly fused neutral polyacenes and their radical cations have been investigated using the algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme of sec- ond order (ADC(2)). While strict ADC(2) (ADC(2)-s) correctly reproduces trends for mainly singly excited states, in extended ADC(2) (ADC(2)-x) the description of doubly excited states is critically improved. It is shown that a combined application of strict and extended ADC(2) nicely reveal...

  10. Electronic spectroscopy of transient species in solid neon: the indene-motif polycyclic hydrocarbon cation family C9Hy(+) (y = 7-9) and their neutrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Adam; Garkusha, Iryna; Fulara, Jan; Maier, John P

    2013-11-28

    In this Perspective the development and application of a mass-selective matrix isolation approach, employed with success over the last two decades in the spectroscopic characterization of numerous ions and neutral reactive species, is illustrated with original data for hydrocarbon cations and neutrals with a six- and a five-membered carbon ring fused. The setup allows for the electronic and vibrational assessment of these isolated molecules and ions in the inert neon environment. The transient species of interest are chosen due to their astrophysical relevance, and the role they play in flames, plasmas, combustion, organic reactions and atmospheric chemistry. Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of indene-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon derivatives, C9Hy(+) (y = 7-9) cations, are presented. The ions were produced in a discharge source and investigated by means of absorption and emission spectroscopies after selectively trapping them in 6 K neon matrices. Photoconversion between the two C9H8(+) indenylium isomers and, upon irradiation, H2 loss from C9H9(+) were observed. Corresponding neutral species C9Hy are identified by photobleaching the matrices containing the cations.

  11. A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Study of the Neutral, Cationic and Anionic Si3N Cluster Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-22

    molecules4e by neutralization- reionization mass spectrometry (NRMS). 6 This mass spectrometric technique 3 has been applied successfully for the generation...neutralization- reionization mass spectrometry. 8 High-level ab initio methods have been employed for the structural and energetic description of the various...helium was introduced as a collision gas into the second part of a differentially pumped tandem collision cell. For the neutralization- reionization

  12. G2(+)M study on N-alkylamino cation affinities of neutral main-group element hydrides: trends across the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Song; Wu, Ding-Lu; Yang, Jing; Wei, Xi-Guang; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Hai-Bo; Ren, Yi; Lau, Kai-Chung

    2014-05-08

    We have made an extensive theoretical exploration of gas-phase N-alkylamino cation affinities (NAAMCA), including amino cation affinities (AMCA) and N-dimethylamino cation affinities (NDMAMCA), of neutral main-group element hydrides of groups 15-17 and periods 2-4 in the periodic table by using the G2(+)M method. Some similarities and differences are found between NAAMCA and the corresponding alkyl cation affinities (ACA) of H(n)X. Our calculations show that the AMCA and NDMAMCA are systematically lower than the corresponding proton affinities (PA) for H(n)X. In general, there is no linear correlation between NAAMCA and PA of H(n)X. Instead, the correlations exist only within the central elements X in period 2, or periods 3-4, which is significantly different from the reasonable correlations between ACA and PA for all H(n)X. NAAMCA (H(n)X) are weaker than NAAMCA (H(n-1)X(-)) by more than 700 kJ/mol and generally stronger than ACA (H(n)X), with three exceptions: H2ONR2(+)(R = H, Me) and HFNH2(+). These new findings can be rationalized by the negative hyperconjugation and Pauli repulsion.

  13. Thermochemistry and infrared spectroscopy of neutral and cationic iron-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon complexes of astrophysical interest: fundamental density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Aude; Joblin, Christine

    2007-10-01

    This paper reports extensive calculations on the structural, thermodynamic, and mid-infrared spectroscopic properties of neutral and cationic model iron-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) complexes of astrophysical interest for three PAHs of increasing size, namely, naphthalene (C10H8), pyrene (C16H10), and coronene (C24H12). Geometry optimizations and frequency calculations were performed using hybrid Hartree-Fock/density functional theory (DFT) methods. The use of DFT methods is mandatory in terms of computational cost and efficiency to describe the electronic and vibrational structures of such large organometallic unsaturated species that present several low-energy isomers of different structures and electronic and spin states. The calculated structures for the low-energy isomers of the model Fe-PAH and Fe-PAH+ complexes are presented and discussed. Iron-PAH binding energies are extracted, and the consequences of the coordination of iron on the infrared spectra of neutral and cationic PAHs are shown with systematic effects on band intensities and positions being demonstrated. The first results are discussed in terms of astrophysical implications. This work is the first step of an ongoing effort in our group to understand the photophysics and spectroscopy of iron-PAH complexes in the conditions of the interstellar medium using a synergy between observations, laboratory experiments, and theory.

  14. Modeling deoxyribose radicals by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. Part 2. Preparation, dissociations, and energetics of 3-hydroxyoxolan-3-yl radical and cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda, Shetty; Sadílek, Martin; Chen, Xiaohong; Adams, Luke E; Turecek, Frantisek

    2004-07-01

    The title radical (1) is generated in the gas-phase by collisional neutralization of carbonyl-protonated oxolan-3-one. A 1.5% fraction of 1 does not dissociate and is detected following reionization as survivor ions. The major dissociation of 1 (approximately 56%) occurs as loss of the hydroxyl H atom forming oxolan-3-one (2). The competing ring cleavages by O[bond]C-2 and C-4[bond]C-5 bond dissociations combined account for approximately 42% of dissociation and result in the formation of formaldehyde and 2-hydroxyallyl radical. Additional ring-cleavage dissociations of 1 resulting in the formation of C(2)H(3)O and C(2)H(4)O cannot be explained as occurring competitively on the doublet ground (X) electronic state of 1, but are energetically accessible from the A and higher electronic states accessed by vertical electron transfer. Exothermic protonation of 2 also produces 3-oxo-(1H)-oxolanium cation (3(+)) which upon collisional neutralization gives hypervalent 3-oxo-(1H)-oxolanium radical (3). The latter dissociates spontaneously by ring opening and expulsion of hydroxy radical. Experiment and calculations suggest that carbohydrate radicals incorporating the 3-hydroxyoxolan-3-yl motif will prefer ring-cleavage dissociations at low internal energies or upon photoexcitation by absorbing light at approximately 590 and approximately 400 nm.

  15. A search for pure compounds suitable for use as matrix in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. III. A selection of compounds based on the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer reactions between neutral molecules and their cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bosch, Ann; Ceulemans, Jan

    A systematic investigation is made of the thermochemistry of hydrogen and proton transfer between neutral molecules and their cations covering the entire organic chemistry, with the aim of selecting those compounds that are suitable for use as matrices in spectroscopic studies of radiation-produced radical cations. Compounds that are characterized by positive reaction enthalpies may be considered promising for use as matrices in such studies. Calculations are based on experimentally determined ionization energies and proton affinities and on carbon-hydrogen bond strengths that are arbitrarily taken as 418 kJ.mol -1 (100 kcal.mol -1). Effects of actual deviations from this value are considered. In the aliphatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies depend strongly on functional groups present. Marked positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for alkenes, alkadienes, thioethers, mercaptans, iodoalkanes and tertiary amines. Non-aromatic cyclic compounds generally behave as their aliphatic counterparts. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are generally obtained for unsaturated alicyclic hydrocarbons and cyclic thioethers. Positive reaction enthalpies are also obtained for piperidine, quinuclidine, manxine and derivatives. In the homocyclic aromatic series of compounds, reaction enthalpies are generally positive. Thus, positive reaction enthalpies are obtained for aromatic hydrocarbons, fluoro- and chlorobenzenes, aromatic amines (amino group attached directly to the ring) and halo- and methoxyanilines. In the heterocyclic aromatic series of compounds reaction enthalpies are generally negative. This is for instance the case for a large number of pyridine derivatives, di- and triazines and a number of bi- and tricyclic compounds. Positive reaction enthalpies are however obtained for furan and pyrrole.

  16. Neutral and cationic free-space oxygen–silicon clusters SiO{sub n} (1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Facoltà di Farmacia, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 6, I-95126 Catania (Italy); Angilella, G.G.N., E-mail: giuseppe.angilella@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, 64, Via S. Sofia, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Scuola Superiore di Catania, Università di Catania, Via S. Nullo, 5/i, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, 64, Via S. Sofia, I-95123 Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania, 64, Via S. Sofia, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Pittalà, V. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, Facoltà di Farmacia, Università di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 6, I-95126 Catania (Italy); March, N.H. [Department of Physics, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Oxford University, Oxford (United Kingdom); Pucci, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Catania, 64, Via S. Sofia, I-95123 Catania (Italy); CNISM, UdR Catania, 64, Via S. Sofia, I-95123 Catania (Italy)

    2012-01-09

    Motivated by the theoretical study of Saito and Ono (2011) on three crystalline forms of SiO{sub 2} under pressure, quantum-chemical calculations on various free-space clusters of SiO{sub n} and GeO{sub n} for 1neutral and cationic clusters have been examined, for both geometry and equilibrium bond lengths. Coupled clusters and correlation-corrected MP2 calculations are presented. For the cations, we emphasize especially the structural distortions occurring in removing degeneracies. -- Highlights: ► Geometry and structure of various SiO{sub n} and GeO{sub n} clusters. ► Both neutral and cationic clusters. ► Varying coordination numbers. ► Relevant for high pressure studies.

  17. Theoretical study of the electronic spectra of neutral and cationic NpO and NpO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovács, Attila [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Infante, Ivan [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-08-21

    The electronic spectra of neutral NpO and NpO{sub 2} as well as of their mono- (NpO{sup +}, NpO{sub 2}{sup +}) and dications (NpO{sup 2+}, NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) were studied using multiconfigurational relativistic quantum chemical calculations at the complete active space self-consistent field/CASPT2 level of theory taking into account spin-orbit coupling. The active space included 16 orbitals: all the 7s, 6d, and 5f orbitals of neptunium together with selected orbitals of oxygen. The vertical excitation energies on the ground state geometries have been computed up to ca. 35 000 cm{sup −1}. The gas-phase electronic spectra were evaluated on the basis of the computed Einstein coefficients at 298 K and 3000 K. The computed vertical transition energies show good agreement with previous condensed-phase results on NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}.

  18. Study on the Deactivation Kinetics of Pd(PPh3)2Cl2 in the Monocarbonylation of Benzyl Chloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zumin Qiu; Yunbing He; Huiping Xiao

    2004-01-01

    The deactivation kinetics of Pd(PPh3)2Cl2 in the monocarbonylation of benzyl chloride to synthesize phenylacetic acid is studied in this paper. Solid 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphthol (PAN) is used as the colouring agent, and the concentration of Pd(PPh3)2Cl2 in the system is measured through absorptiometry.The result shows that the optimum condition of the chromogenic reaction between Pd2+ and PAN is:0.5 ml of 0.04% PAN added to 10 ml of Pd2+ solution (1.0×10-6-2.0×10-5 mol/L), and heated in a constant temperature water bath at 40 ℃ for about 30 min, with pH of the solution being about 3.0.The molar coefficient of absorption is 1.384×104 L/(mol.cm); the orders of the hydrolytic reaction to the concentration of Pd(PPh3)2Cl2, PPh3, phenylacetic acid and NaOH are 0.5, minus 0.8, 2 and 1.2,respectively. The activation energy (E) of the hydrolytic reaction is 75.59 k J/mol, and the pre-exponential factor is 1.68×1012.

  19. Kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of the substitution of SMe for OMe substituents of cryptophane hosts on the binding of neutral and cationic guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Chantal; Humilière, Delphine; Riva, Nathalie; Collet, André; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre

    2003-06-21

    To investigate the origin of the high selectivity of cryptophane-E (1) towards Me3NH+, Me4N+, and CHCl3, and particularly to discriminate the different contributions that stabilize the supramolecular complexes, we have synthesized the new cryptophane 2 bearing six MeS groups instead of MeO groups in 1. This led to a decrease of the negative charge density in the equatorial region of 2 without affecting notably the size of the molecular cavity. The binding properties of 1 and 2 towards the three guests were examined in solution and showed a slight decrease of the deltaGa favoring the complexes of 1, accompanied by a significant modification of the deltaHa vs. deltaSa balance. The binding of the ammonium guests to 1 and 2 was strongly entropy driven, while that of CHCl3 was purely enthalpy driven. A combination of spectroscopic and computational techniques was used to assign the main intermolecular interactions that occurred during the inclusion process. The neutral CHCl3 molecule is more stabilized in the less negatively charged CTV cap of 1. The different behavior towards the ammonium cations can be explained in term of interactions with the electronegative heteroatoms and cation-pi interactions. Moreover, this study revealed a considerable slowing down of the guest exchange kinetics with host 2, for which the association and dissociation rates are reduced by a factor 10(3) to 10(4) with respect to 1. For example, at room temperature, the Me4N+@2 complex exhibits a half-life of ca. 2 years, instead of a few hours for the corresponding complex of 1.

  20. Cationic and neutral copper(I) iodide cluster MOFs derived from tridentate N-donor functionalized P(V) ligands: synthesis, structure and photophysical properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ASHOK YADAV; MAHESH S DESHMUKH; RAMAMOORTHY BOOMISHANKAR

    2017-08-01

    Formation of cationic and neutral CuI cluster MOFs have been reported starting from tridentate phosphoramide ligands, [(NHR) ₃P = E] (L¹: R = 3-aminoquinolinyl (AQ), E = S; L²: R = 3-pyridyl (PY), E = S; L³: R = 3-aminoquinolinyl (AQ), E = O). By utilizing L¹, a cationic 2D-MOF {[(L¹) ₂ (Cu₆I₅)](OH) · 3DMF·4MeOH}n, 1 containing a rugby ball shaped discrete Cu₆I₅ cluster has been reported earlier. Formation of a new 3D-MOF {[(L²) ₂ (Cu₆I₄)](OH) ₂· 2DMF}n containing a Zintl type [(Cu₆I₄4) ² ⁺]n cluster chains is reported in this paper. A neutral cluster MOFs 3 with formula unit of {[Cu₄I₄L³ (CH₃CN)] · 2DMF · 3H₂O}n has been prepared from the ligand L³. Formation of the smaller Cu₄I₄ clusters in the MOF 3 is due to the presence of a MeCN ligation at one of the Cu(I) atoms which not only precludes the extension of the assembly in three dimension but also reduces the size of the obtained cluster. Unlike 1 which showed a ligand-assisted thermochromism, photophysical studies on the 3D-MOF 2 exhibited green phosphorescence at both 298 K and 77 K. The occurrence of the phosphorescence at 77 K in 2 is due to triplet cluster centered (³CC) excited state of the cluster as there is no ligand-centered transition observed at 298 K. The 2D-MOF 3 does not show any characteristic luminescence behavior as the presence of the acetonitrile coordination at one of the Cu(I) ion is believed to quench the emission by non-radiative pathways. Further, luminescence quenching experiments on 1 and 2 with aromatic nitro-analytes showed a very high sensing selectivity for picric acid (TNP) over other aromatic nitro-analytes.

  1. High Tc superconductors: The scaling of Tc with the number of bound holes associated with charge transfer neutralizing the multivalence cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, G. C.; Chen, M. F.; Craver, F.

    1991-01-01

    It is observed that for the known high-T(sub c) Cu-, Tl-, and Bi-based superconductors, T(sub c) scales consistently with the number of bound holes per unit cell which arise from charge transfer excitations of frequency approximately = 3 x 10(exp 13) that neutralized the multivalence cations into diamagnetic states. The resulting holes are established on the oxygens. Extrapolation of this empirical fit in the up-temperature direction suggests a T(sub c) of about 220-230 K at a value of 25 holes/unit cell (approximately the maximum that can be materials-engineered into a high-T(sub c) K2MnF4 or triple Perovskite structure). In the down-temperature direction, the extrapolation gives a T(sub c) in the vicinity of 235 K for the Y-Ba-Cu-O system as well as the known maximum temperature of 23 K for low-T(sub c) materials shown by Nb3Ge. The approach is also consistent with the experimental findings that only multivalence ions which are diamagnetic in their atomic state (Cu, Tl, Bi, Pb, and Sb) associate with high-T(sub c) compounds.

  2. Heterocyclic cyclohexanone monocarbonyl analogs of curcumin can inhibit the activity of ATP-binding cassette transporters in cancer multidrug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revalde, Jezrael L; Li, Yan; Hawkins, Bill C; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Paxton, James W

    2015-02-01

    Curcumin (CUR) is a phytochemical that inhibits the xenobiotic ABC efflux transporters implicated in cancer multidrug resistance (MDR), such as P-glycoprotein (P-gp), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins 1 and 5 (MRP1 and MRP5). The use of CUR in the clinic however, is complicated by its instability and poor pharmacokinetic profile. Monocarbonyl analogs of CUR (MACs) are compounds without CUR's unstable β-diketone moiety and were reported to have improved stability and in vivo disposition. Whether the MACs can be used as MDR reversal agents is less clear, as the absence of a β-diketone may negatively impact transporter inhibition. In this study, we investigated 23 heterocyclic cyclohexanone MACs for inhibitory effects against P-gp, BCRP, MRP1 and MRP5. Using flow cytometry and resistance reversal assays, we found that many of these compounds inhibited the transport activity of the ABC transporters investigated, often with much greater potency than CUR. Overall the analogs were most effective at inhibiting BCRP and we identified three compounds, A12 (2,6-bis((E)-2,5-dimethoxy-benzylidene)cyclohexanone), A13 (2,6-bis((E)-4-hydroxyl-3-methoxybenzylidene)-cyclohexanone) and B11 (3,5-bis((E)-2-fluoro-4,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)-1-methylpiperidin-4-one), as the most promising BCRP inhibitors. These compounds inhibited BCRP activity in a non-cell line, non-substrate-specific manner. Their inhibition occurred by direct transporter interaction rather than modulating protein or cell surface expression. From these results, we concluded that MACs, such as the heterocyclic cyclohexanone analogs in this study, also have potential as MDR reversal agents and may be superior alternatives to the unstable parent compound, CUR.

  3. MC37, a new mono-carbonyl curcumin analog, induces G2/M cell cycle arrest and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Baoxia; Liu, Ziyi; Cao, Yingnan; Zhu, Cuige; Zuo, Yinglin; Huang, Lei; Wen, Gesi; Shang, Nana; Chen, Yu; Yue, Xin; Du, Jun; Li, Baojian; Zhou, Binhua; Bu, Xianzhang

    2017-02-05

    (E)-1-(3'-fluoro-[1,1'-biphenyl-3-yl)-3-(3-hydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one) (MC37), a novel mono-carbonyl curcumin analog, was previously synthesized in our laboratory as a nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) inhibitor with excellent cytotoxicity against several cancer cell lines. In this study, our further investigations showed that the potent growth inhibitory activity of MC37 in human colorectal cancer cells was associated with the arrest of cell cycle progression and the induction of apoptosis. As a multi-targeted agent, MC37 inhibited the intracellular microtubule assembly, altered the expression of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), and ultimately induced G2/M cell cycle arrest. Moreover, MC37 collapsed the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), increased the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, activated the caspase-9/3 cascade, and finally led to cancer cells apoptosis, suggesting that the mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway was involved in MC37-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, these observations demonstrated that mono-carbonyl curcumin analogs would serve as multi-targeted lead for promising anti-colorectal cancer agent development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Coordination Chemistry in Water of a Free and a Lipase-Embedded Cationic NCN-Pincer Platinum Center with Neutral and Ionic Triarylphosphines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieczorek, B.; Snelders, D.J.M.; Dijkstra, H.P.; Versluis, C.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Egmond, M.R.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; van Koten, G.

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry in aqueous media was studied for the platinum center of low-molecular-weight cationic NCN-pincer platinum complexes [RC6H2(CH2NMe2)2-3,5-Pt(H2O)-4]+ (R = −(CH2)3P(═O)(OEt)(OC6H4NO2-4) (1(OH2)), H (2(OH2))) as well as of the platinum center of the NCN-pincer platinum cation

  5. Coordination Chemistry in Water of a Free and a Lipase-Embedded Cationic NCN-Pincer Platinum Center with Neutral and Ionic Triarylphosphines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieczorek, B.; Snelders, D.J.M.; Dijkstra, H.P.; Versluis, C.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; Egmond, M.R.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.; van Koten, G.

    2012-01-01

    The coordination chemistry in aqueous media was studied for the platinum center of low-molecular-weight cationic NCN-pincer platinum complexes [RC6H2(CH2NMe2)2-3,5-Pt(H2O)-4]+ (R = −(CH2)3P(═O)(OEt)(OC6H4NO2-4) (1(OH2)), H (2(OH2))) as well as of the platinum center of the NCN-pincer platinum cation

  6. Silicification and biosilicification Part 5. An investigation of the silica structures formed at weakly acidic pH and neutral pH as facilitated by cationically charged macromolecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, Siddharth V.; Clarson, Stephen J

    2003-06-10

    Biosilicification in diatoms has been reported to occur at (or close to) neutral pH and it has been shown that protein molecules can act as catalysts/templates/scaffolds for this elegant materials chemistry. Here we report the formation of silica spheres from an aqueous silica precursor as facilitated by both poly-L-lysine (PLL) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) at pH 6.0 and under ambient conditions. It was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) that there were morphological differences in the silica formed at pH 6 when compared to the silica morphologies formed using the same macromolecules at neutral pH. Notably, a bimodal distribution of silica particles was seen for both the PLL and PAH systems at pH 6. These results are compared and contrasted with those previously reported for the pH dependence of silicification and biosilicification and in particular, those obtained for the pH dependence of silica formation in the presence silaffin proteins isolated form the diatom C. fusiformis. The findings for these cationically charged macromolecules suggest that lysine may be an important amino acid in the primary sequence of proteins that catalyze the formation of silica structures in vivo.

  7. High-Resolution Infrared-Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoion and Pulsed Field Ionization-Photoelectron Methods for Spectroscopic Studies of Neutrals and Cations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi Xing; Beth Reed; Mi Kyung Bahng; Peng Wang; Hin Koo Woo; Sun Jong Baek; Chee Shine Lam; Cheuk Yiu Ng

    2008-01-01

    We show that by scanning the frequency of a single mode infrared (IR) optical parametric oscillator (IR- OPO) laser to excite the molecular species of interest and fixing the frequency of a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) laser to photoionize the IR excited species, high-resolution IR spectra of polyatomic neutrals can be obtained with high sensitivity. The fact that this IR-VUV-photoion (IR-VUV-PI) method is based on VUV photoionization probe, and thus, allows the identification of the neutral IR absorber, makes it applicable for IR spectroscopy measurements of isotopemers, radicals, and clusters, which usually exist as impure samples. The highly resolved IR-VUV-PI measurements achieved using the single mode IR-OPO laser have made possible the selection of single rovibrational states of CH3X (X=Br and I), C2H4, and C3H4 for VUV-pulsed field ionization-photoelectron (VUV-PFI-PE) measurements, resulting in rovibrationally resolved photoelectron spectra for these polyatomic molecules. These experiments show that the signal- to-noise ratios of the IR-VUV-PI and IR-VUV-PFI-PE spectra obtained by employing the high-resolution IR-OPO laser are significantly higher than those observed in previous IR-VUV-PI and IR-VUV-PFI-PE studies using a low-resolution IR-OPO laser. Further improvement in sensitivity of IR-VUV-PI and IR- VUV-PFI-PE measurements by using the collinear arrangement of IR-VUV lasers and molecular beam is discussed.

  8. Polarizing a hydrophobic cavity for the efficient binding of organic guests: the case of calix[6]tren, a highly efficient and versatile receptor for neutral or cationic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbost, Ulrich; Rager, Marie-Noëlle; Petit, Samuel; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2005-06-15

    The host-guest properties of calix[6]tren 1 have been evaluated. The receptor is based on a calix[6]arene that is covalently capped at the narrow rim by a tren unit. As a result, the system presents a concave hydrophobic cavity with, at its bottom, a grid-like nitrogenous core. Despite its well-defined cavity and opening to the outside at the large rim, 1 did not behave as a good receptor for neutral molecules in chloroform. However, it exhibited efficient endo-complexation of ammonium guests. By contrast, the per-protonated host, 1.4H(+), behaved as a remarkable receptor for small organic molecules. The complexation is driven by a strong charge-dipole interaction and hydrogen bonds between the polar guest and the tetracationic cap of the calixarene. Finally, coordination of Zn(2+) to the tren core led to the asymmetrization of calixarene cavity and to the strong but selective endo-binding of neutral ligands. This study emphasizes the efficiency of a receptor presenting a concave hydrophobic cavity that is polarized at its bottom. The resulting combination of charge-dipole, hydrogen bonding, CH-pi, and van der Waals interactions highly stabilizes the supramolecular architectures. Also, importantly, the tren cap allows the tuning of the polarization, offering either a basic (1), a highly charged and acidic (1.4H(+)), or a coordination (1.Zn(2+)) site. As a result, the system proved to be highly versatile, tunable, and interconvertible in solution by simple addition of protons, bases, or metal ions.

  9. Electrostatics of cell membrane recognition: structure and activity of neutral and cationic rigid push-pull rods in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, N; Gerard, D; Matile, S

    2001-03-21

    Design, synthesis, and structural and functional studies of rigid-rod ionophores of different axial electrostatic asymmetry are reported. The employed design strategy emphasized presence of (a) a rigid scaffold to minimize the conformational complexity, (b) a unimolecular ion-conducting pathway to minimize the suprastructural complexity and monitor the function, (c) an extended fluorophore to monitor structure, (d) variable axial rod dipole, and (e) variable terminal charges to create axial asymmetry. Studies in isoelectric, anionic, and polarized bilayer membranes confirmed a general increase in activity of uncharged rigid push-pull rods in polarized bilayers. The similarly increased activity of cationic rigid push-pull rods with an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that of alpha-helical bee toxin melittin (positive charge near negative axial dipole terminus) is shown by fluorescence-depth quenching experiments to originate from the stabilization of transmembrane rod orientation by the membrane potential. The reduced activity of rigid push-pull rods having an electrostatic asymmetry comparable to that in alpha-helical natural antibiotics (a positive charge near the positive axial dipole terminus) is shown by structural studies to originate from rod "ejection" by membrane potentials comparable to that found in mammalian plasma membranes. This structural evidence for cell membrane recognition by asymmetric rods is unprecedented and of possible practical importance with regard to antibiotic resistance.

  10. Addition, cycloaddition, and metathesis reactions of the cationic carbyne complexes [Cp(CO)[sub 2]Mn[triple bond]CCH[sub 2]R][sup +] and neutral vinylidene complexes Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=C=C(H)R (M = Mn, Re)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, M.R.; Mercando, L.A.; Kelley, C.; Geoffroy, G.L. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)); Nombel, P.; Lugan, N.; Mathieu, R. (Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination du CNRS, Toulouse (France)); Ostrander, R.L.; Owens-Waltermire, B.E.; Rheingold, A.L. (Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The cationic alkylidyne complexes [Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=VCCH[sub 2]R][sup +] (M = Re, R = H; M = Mn, R = H, Me, Ph) undergo facile deprotonation to give the corresponding neutral vinylidene complexes Cp(CO)[sub 2]M=C=C(H)R. For [Cp(CO)[sub 2]Re=VCCH[sub 3

  11. Actinide cation-cation complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoyer, Nancy Jane [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The +5 oxidation state of U, Np, Pu, and Am is a linear dioxo cation (AnO2+) with a formal charge of +1. These cations form complexes with a variety of other cations, including actinide cations. Other oxidation states of actinides do not form these cation-cation complexes with any cation other than AnO2+; therefore, cation-cation complexes indicate something unique about AnO2+ cations compared to actinide cations in general. The first cation-cation complex, NpO2+•UO22+, was reported by Sullivan, Hindman, and Zielen in 1961. Of the four actinides that form AnO2+ species, the cation-cation complexes of NpO2+ have been studied most extensively while the other actinides have not. The only PuO2+ cation-cation complexes that have been studied are with Fe3+ and Cr3+ and neither one has had its equilibrium constant measured. Actinides have small molar absorptivities and cation-cation complexes have small equilibrium constants; therefore, to overcome these obstacles a sensitive technique is required. Spectroscopic techniques are used most often to study cation-cation complexes. Laser-Induced Photacoustic Spectroscopy equilibrium constants for the complexes NpO2+•UO22+, NpO2+•Th4+, PuO2+•UO22+, and PuO2+•Th4+ at an ionic strength of 6 M using LIPAS are 2.4 ± 0.2, 1.8 ± 0.9, 2.2 ± 1.5, and ~0.8 M-1.

  12. Ion dynamics in cationic lipid bilayer systems in saline solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miettinen, Markus S; Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    mixture of cationic dimyristoyltrimethylammoniumpropane (DMTAP) and zwitterionic (neutral) dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) lipids. Using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, we address the effects of bilayer composition (cationic to zwitterionic lipid fraction) and of NaCl electrolyte...

  13. The relationship between gene expression of cationic and neutral amino acid transporters in the small intestine of chick embryos and chick breed, development, sex, and egg amino acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, P L; Li, X G; Wang, X Q; Zhang, D X; Shu, G; Luo, Q B

    2011-11-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the gene expression of cationic and neutral amino acid (AA) transporters in the small intestine of chick embryos with different genetic backgrounds [Wenshi Yellow-Feathered chick (WYFC) and White Recessive Rock chick (WRRC)]. The study also investigated the correlation between the abundance of AA transporter mRNA and the AA content of fertilized eggs. Intestinal samples were collected on embryonic d 9, 12, 14, 17, and 19 and the day of hatch. The results showed that, before incubation, the AA content of WRRC eggs was lower (P CAT-1 [solute carrier (SLC) family 7 member 1], CAT-4 (SLC family 7 member 4), rBAT (SLC family 3 member 1), y(+)LAT-1 (SLC family 7 member 7), y(+)LAT-2 (SLC family 7 member 6), LAT-4 (SLC family 43 member 2), and SNAT-2 (SLC family 38 member 2), as detected by real-time reverse transcriptase PCR, was greater (P CAT-1, CAT-4, y(+)LAT-2, and LAT-4 in WYFC and on CAT-4 and B(0)AT-1 (SLC family 6 member 19) mRNA expression in WRRC. In WYFC, only CAT-1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated (r = -0.68 to -0.84, P < 0.05) with all AA content. However, few correlations were detected between AA content and the mRNA expression of multiple transporters in WRRC. These findings provide a comprehensive profile of the temporal and spatial mRNA expression of AA transporters in the small intestine of chick embryos. Few correlations were detected between the AA content of the eggs and mRNA expression of specific AA transporters in the small intestine.

  14. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  15. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  16. Cationic Nitrogen Doped Helical Nanographenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Feng, Xinliang; Berger, Reinhard; Popov, Alexey A; Weigand, Jan J; Vincon, Ilka; Machata, Peter; Hennersdorf, Felix; Zhou, Youjia; Fu, Yubin

    2017-09-13

    Herein, we report on the synthesis of a series of novel cationic nitrogen doped nanographenes (CNDN) by rhodium catalyzed annulation reactions. This powerful method allows for the synthesis of cationic nanographenes with non-planar, axial chiral geometries. Single-crystal X-ray analysis reveals helical and cove-edged structures. Compared to their all-carbon analogues, the CNDN exhibit energetically lower lying frontier orbitals with a reduced optical energy gap and an electron accepting behavior. All derivatives show quasi reversible reductions in cyclic voltammetry. Depending on the number of nitrogen dopant, in situ spectroelectrochemistry proves the formation of neutral radicals (one nitrogen dopant) or radical cations (two nitrogen dopants) upon reduction. The developed synthetic protocol paves the way for the design and synthesis of expanded nanographenes or even graphene nanoribbons containing cationic nitrogen doping. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Biophysical characterization of complexes of DNA with mixtures of the neutral lipids 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-hexanoylamine or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-dodecanoylamine and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine in the presence of bivalent metal cations for DNA transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Michela; Mobbili, Giovanna; Placentino, Immacolata F; Smorlesi, Arianna; Bruni, Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Neutral lipids have received up to now a little attention as genetic material carriers, despite some valuable features, such as the absence of toxicity and the high stability in serum of their complexes with DNA. We have prepared two quaternary complexes of DNA and mixtures of 1, 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-hexanoylamine (6PE) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-dodecanoylamine (12PE) with DOPC in aqueous dispersions of bivalent metal cations (PE/DOPC-DNA-M(2+)). The aim was to evaluate the effect of the amide moiety on the transfection efficiency. These complexes form in a self-assembled manner, the DNA condensation being promoted by the metal cations. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis was used to determine the structure of the complexes, which exhibit the lamellar symmetry of the L(α)(c) phase. The size and surface charge of the complexes have also been measured, and promising results of DNA transfections in vitro have been reported. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  18. Different structural preference of Ag(I) and Au(I) in neutral and cationic luminescent heteropolynuclear platinum(II) complexes: Z (U)-shaped Pt2M2 type vs. trinuclear PtM2 type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Kazuki; Ueda, Misa; Higashitani, Ami; Nakao, Yoshihide; Arikawa, Yasuhiro; Horiuchi, Shinnosuke; Sakuda, Eri; Umakoshi, Keisuke

    2016-03-28

    The reactions of monocationic Pt(II) complexes bearing N^C chelate ligands and Me2pzH, [Pt(N^C)(Me2pzH)2]PF6 (N^C = 2-phenylpyridinate (ppy(-)), 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridinate (dfppy(-)), benzo[h]quinolinate (bzq(-)); Me2pzH = 3,5-dimethylpyrazole), with Ag(I) ions gave Z (or U)-shaped neutral tetranuclear Pt2Ag2 complexes [Pt2Ag2(N^C)2(Me2pz)4], while those with Au(I) ions gave neutral trinuclear PtAu2 complexes [PtAu2(N^C)(Me2pz)3]. On the contrary, the reactions of the dicationic Pt(II) complex bearing a N^N chelate ligand and Me2pzH, [Pt(bpy)(Me2pzH)2](PF6)2 (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine), with Ag(I) and Au(I) ions both gave Z (or U)-shaped dicationic tetranuclear Pt2M2 complexes, [Pt2M2(bpy)2(Me2pz)4](PF6)2 (M = Ag, Au). The structures of heteropolynuclear Pt(II) complexes were dominated by the nature of incorporated group 11 metal ions and the charge of complexes.

  19. Alkaline solution neutralization capacity of soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Sakanakura, Hirofumi; Matsuto, Toshihiko

    2010-10-01

    Alkaline eluate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration residue deposited in landfill alkalizes waste and soil layers. From the viewpoint of accelerating stability and preventing heavy metal elution, pH of the landfill layer (waste and daily cover soil) should be controlled. On the other hand, pH of leachate from existing MSW landfill sites is usually approximately neutral. One of the reasons is that daily cover soil can neutralize alkaline solution containing Ca(2+) as cation. However, in landfill layer where various types of wastes and reactions should be taken into consideration, the ability to neutralize alkaline solutions other than Ca(OH)(2) by soil should be evaluated. In this study, the neutralization capacities of various types of soils were measured using Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH solutions. Each soil used in this study showed approximately the same capacity to neutralize both alkaline solutions of Ca(OH)(2) and NaOH. The cation exchange capacity was less than 30% of the maximum alkali neutralization capacity obtained by the titration test. The mechanism of neutralization by the pH-dependent charge can explain the same neutralization capacities of the soils. Although further investigation on the neutralization capacity of the soils for alkaline substances other than NaOH is required, daily cover soil could serve as a buffer zone for alkaline leachates containing Ca(OH)(2) or other alkaline substances.

  20. Cationic and Neutral Cp*M(NO)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) Complexes of Molybdenum and Tungsten: Lewis-Acid-Induced Intramolecular C-H Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handford, Rex C; Wakeham, Russell J; Patrick, Brian O; Legzdins, Peter

    2017-03-20

    Treatment of CH2Cl2 solutions of Cp*M(NO)Cl2 (Cp* = η(5)-C5(CH3)5; M = Mo, W) first with 2 equiv of AgSbF6 in the presence of PhCN and then with 1 equiv of Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2 affords the yellow-orange salts [Cp*M(NO)(PhCN)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2)](SbF6)2 in good yields (M = Mo, W). Reduction of [Cp*M(NO)(PhCN)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2)](SbF6)2 with 2 equiv of Cp2Co in C6H6 at 80 °C produces the corresponding 18e neutral compounds, Cp*M(NO)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) which have been isolated as analytically pure orange-red solids. The addition of 1 equiv of the Lewis acid, Sc(OTf)3, to solutions of Cp*M(NO)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) at room temperature results in the immediate formation of thermally stable Cp*M(NO→Sc(OTf)3)(H)(κ(3)-(C6H4)PhPCH2CH2PPh2) complexes in which one of the phenyl substituents of the Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2 ligands has undergone intramolecular orthometalation. In a similar manner, addition of BF3 produces the analogous Cp*M(NO→BF3)(H)(κ(3)-(C6H4)PhPCH2CH2PPh2) complexes. In contrast, B(C6F5)3 forms the 1:1 Lewis acid-base adducts, Cp*M(NO→B(C6F5)3)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. Upon warming to 80 °C, Cp*Mo(NO→B(C6F5)3)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) converts cleanly to the orthometalated product Cp*Mo(NO→B(C6F5)3)(H)(κ(3)-(C6H4)PhPCH2CH2PPh2), but Cp*W(NO→B(C6F5)3)(κ(2)-Ph2PCH2CH2PPh2) generates a mixture of products whose identities remain to be ascertained. Attempts to extend this chemistry to include related Ph2PCH2PPh2 compounds have had only limited success. All new complexes have been characterized by conventional spectroscopic and analytical methods, and the solid-state molecular structures of most of them have been established by single-crystal X-ray crystallographic analyses.

  1. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms. Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  2. Cationized Carbohydrate Gas-Phase Fragmentation Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bythell, Benjamin J.; Abutokaikah, Maha T.; Wagoner, Ashley R.; Guan, Shanshan; Rabus, Jordan M.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation chemistry of cationized carbohydrates using a combination of tandem mass spectrometry, regioselective labeling, and computational methods. Our model system is D-lactose. Barriers to the fundamental glyosidic bond cleavage reactions, neutral loss pathways, and structurally informative cross-ring cleavages are investigated. The most energetically favorable conformations of cationized D-lactose were found to be similar. In agreement with the literature, larger group I cations result in structures with increased cation coordination number which require greater collision energy to dissociate. In contrast with earlier proposals, the B n -Y m fragmentation pathways of both protonated and sodium-cationized analytes proceed via protonation of the glycosidic oxygen with concerted glycosidic bond cleavage. Additionally, for the sodiated congeners our calculations support sodiated 1,6-anhydrogalactose B n ion structures, unlike the preceding literature. This affects the subsequent propensity of formation and prediction of B n /Y m branching ratio. The nature of the anomeric center (α/β) affects the relative energies of these processes, but not the overall ranking. Low-energy cross-ring cleavages are observed for the metal-cationized analytes with a retro-aldol mechanism producing the 0,2 A 2 ion from the sodiated forms . Theory and experiment support the importance of consecutive fragmentation processes, particularly for the protonated congeners at higher collision energies.

  3. Aggregate Formed by a Cationic Fluorescence Probe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN, Juan; SANG, Da-Yong; JI, Guo-Zhen

    2007-01-01

    The aggregation behavior of a cationic fluorescence probe 10-(4,7,10,13,16-pentaoxa-1-azacyclooctadecyl-methyl)anthracen-9-ylmethyl dodecanoate (1) was observed and studied by a fluorescence methodology in acidic and neutral conditions. By using the Py scale, differences between simple aggregates and micelles have been discussed. The stability of simple aggregates was discussed in terms of hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic repulsion. The absence of excimer emission of the anthrancene moiety of probe 1 in neutral condition was attributed to the photoinduced electron transfer mechanism instead of photodimerization.

  4. The distonic ion (·)CH 2CH 2CH (+)OH, keto ion CH 3CH 2CH=O (+·), enol ion CH 3CH=CHOH (+·), and related C 3H 6O (+·) radical cations. Stabilities and isomerization proclivities studied by dissociation and neutralization-reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polce, M J; Wesdemiotis, C

    1996-06-01

    Metastable ion decompositions, collision-activated dissociation (CAD), and neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry are utilized to study the unimolecular chemistry of distonic ion (·)CH2CH2CH(-)OH (2(+·)) and its enol-keto tautomers CH3CH=CHOH(-·) (1 (+·)) and CH3CH2CH=O (+·) (3(+·)). The major fragmentation of metastable 1(+·)-3(+·) is H(·) loss to yield the propanoyl cation, CH3CH2C≡O(+). This reaction remains dominant upon collisional activation, although now some isomeric CH2=CH-CH(+) OH is coproduced from all three precursors. The CAD and neutralization-reionization ((+)NR(+)) spectra of keto ion 3 (+·) are substantially different from those of tautomers 2(+·) and 1(+·). Hence, 3(+·) without sufficient energy for decomposition (i. e. , "stable" 3(+·)) does not isomerize to the ther-modynamically more stable ions 2(+·) or 1(+·), and the 1,4-H rearrangement H-CH2CH2CH=O(+·)(3 (+·)) → CH2CH2CH(+) O-H (2 (+·)) must require an appreciable critical energy. Although the fragment ion abundances in the (+) NR (+) (and CAD) spectra of 1 (+·) and 2 (+·) are similar, the relative and absolute intensities of the survivor ions (recovered C3H6O(+·) ions in the (+)NR(+) spectra) are markedly distinct and independent of the internal energy of 1 (+·) and 2 (+·). Furthermore, 1 (+·) and 2 (+·) show different MI spectra. Based on these data, distonic ion 2 (+·) does not spontaneously rearrange to enol ion 1 (+·) (which is the most stable C3H6O(+·) of CCCO connectivity) and, therefore, is separated from it by an appreciable barrier. In contrast, the molecular ions of cyclopropanol (4 (+·)) and allyl alcohol (5 (+·)) isomerize readily to 2 (+·), via ring opening and 1,2-H(-) shift, respectively. The sample found to generate the purest 2 (+·) is α-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone. Several other precursors that would yield 2 (+·) by a least-motion reaction cogenerate detectable quantities of enol ion 1 (+·), or the enol ion of acetone (CH2=C(CH3

  5. Cation exchange properties of zeolites in hyper alkaline aqueous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Leen; de Blochouse, Benny; Dom, Dirk; Vancluysen, Jacqueline; Snellings, Ruben; Martens, Johan A; Kirschhock, Christine E A; Maes, André; Breynaert, Eric

    2015-02-03

    Construction of multibarrier concrete based waste disposal sites and management of alkaline mine drainage water requires cation exchangers combining excellent sorption properties with a high stability and predictable performance in hyper alkaline media. Though highly selective organic cation exchange resins have been developed for most pollutants, they can serve as a growth medium for bacterial proliferation, impairing their long-term stability and introducing unpredictable parameters into the evolution of the system. Zeolites represent a family of inorganic cation exchangers, which naturally occur in hyper alkaline conditions and cannot serve as an electron donor or carbon source for microbial proliferation. Despite their successful application as industrial cation exchangers under near neutral conditions, their performance in hyper alkaline, saline water remains highly undocumented. Using Cs(+) as a benchmark element, this study aims to assess the long-term cation exchange performance of zeolites in concrete derived aqueous solutions. Comparison of their exchange properties in alkaline media with data obtained in near neutral solutions demonstrated that the cation exchange selectivity remains unaffected by the increased hydroxyl concentration; the cation exchange capacity did however show an unexpected increase in hyper alkaline media.

  6. What is Neutrality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, R.; van der Burg, W.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reinvestigates the question of liberal neutrality. We contend that current liberal discussions have been dominated - if not hijacked - by one particular interpretation of what neutrality could imply, namely, exclusive neutrality, that aims to exclude religious and cultural expressions

  7. Cation-cation interaction in neptunyl(V) compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krot, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saeki, Masakatsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The original manuscript was prepared by Professor N.N. Krot of Institute of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, in 1997. Saeki tried to translate that into Japanese and to add some new data since 1997. The contents include the whole picture of cation-cation interactions mainly in 5-valence neptunium compounds. Firstly, characteristic structures of neptunium are summarized of the cation-cation bonding in compounds. Secondly, it is mentioned how the cation-cation bonding affects physical and chemical properties of the compounds. Then, characterization-methods for the cation-cation bonding in the compounds are discussed. Finally, the cation-cation interactions in compounds of other actinide-ions are shortly reviewed. (author)

  8. Synthesis and Cation Complexation of Lariat Calix[4 ] crowns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zheng-Wei; JIN Chuan-Ming; LU Guo-Yuan

    2003-01-01

    @@ Calixcrowns carrying bridging polyethyleneoxy moieties on the lower rim, which combine calixarene and crown ether in a single molecule, are a novel class of host compounds which have attracted increasing attention because of their increased ability for selective complexation of cations and neutral molecules compared with crown ethers or cal ixarenes.

  9. Coordination Chemistry of Alkali and Alkaline-Earth Cations with Macrocyclic Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Bernard

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: (l) alkali and alkaline-earth cations in biology (considering naturally occurring lonophores, their X-ray structures, and physiochemical studies); (2) synthetic complexing agents for groups IA and IIA; and (3) ion transport across membranes (examining neutral macrobicyclic ligands as metal cation carriers, transport by anionic carriers,…

  10. Neutral Operator and Neutral Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingli Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the properties of the neutral operator (Ax(t=x(t−cx(t−δ(t, and by applying coincidence degree theory and fixed point index theory, we obtain sufficient conditions for the existence, multiplicity, and nonexistence of (positive periodic solutions to two kinds of second-order differential equations with the prescribed neutral operator.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of neutral and anionic carbonyl derivatives of palladium(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ara, Irene; Forniés, Juan; Martín, Antonio; Martín, L Francisco; Menjón, Babil; Miedes, Helvia

    2010-08-21

    The action of CO on the solvento-complexes cis-[PdR2(thf)2] [R = C6F5 (1), C6Cl5 (2)] at low temperature gives cis-[PdR2(CO)2] [R = C6F5 (3), C6Cl5 (4)] in good yield by simple replacement of the highly labile thf molecules. These are rare cases of Pd(II) dicarbonyl compounds, whose characterization relies on spectroscopic and analytic data. The crystal structure of the square-planar platinum homologue cis-[Pt(C6Cl5)2(CO)2] is also presented. CO can split the double bridging-system in the dinuclear species [{PdR2}2(mu-X)2]2- giving the homologous series of anionic monocarbonyl Pd(II) derivatives with formula [cis-PdR2X(CO)]- (5-10: R = C6F5, C6Cl5; X = Cl, Br, I), which were isolated (except for the R = C6F5 and X = I) and suitably characterized. Characterization includes the crystal and molecular structure of [PPh3Me][cis-Pd(C6F5)2Br(CO)] (6'). The anionic species [NBu4][cis-Pd(C6F5)2Cl(CO)] (5) reacts with neutral cis-[Pd(C6F5)2(CO)2] (3) under CO extrusion, affording the dinuclear derivative [NBu4][{Pd(C6F5)2(CO)}2(mu-Cl)] (11), which contains a single unsupported halide bridge (X-ray diffraction). Complex 11 can be considered as modelling a possible intermediate step in intermolecular CO substitution reactions that are easily undergone by Pd(II) halo carbonyl species.

  12. Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) is an astronaut training facility and neutral buoyancy pool operated by NASA and located at the Sonny Carter Training Facility,...

  13. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  14. A neutralization-reionization and reactivity mass spectrometry study of the generation of neutral hydroxymethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yawei; Crestoni, Maria Elisa; Fornarini, Simonetta; Mayer, Paul M

    2011-06-01

    Neutral hydroxymethylene HCOH is an important intermediate in several chemical reactions; however, it is difficult to observe due to its high reactivity. In this work, neutral hydroxymethylene and formaldehyde were generated by charge exchange neutralization of their respective ionic counterparts and then were reionized and detected as positive-ion recovery signals in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry in a magnetic sector instrument of BEE geometry. The reionized species were characterized by their subsequent collision-induced dissociation mass spectra. The transient hydroxymethylene neutral was observed to isomerize to formaldehyde with an experimental time span exceeding 13.9 µs. The vertical neutralization energy of the HCOH(+•) ion has also been assayed using charge transfer reactions between the fast ions and stationary target gases of differing ionization energy. The measured values match the result of ab initio calculations at the QCISD/6-311 + G(d,p) and CCSD(T)/6-311 + + G(3df,2p) levels of theory. Neutral hydroxymethylene was also produced by proton transfer from CH(2) OH(+) to a strong base such as pyridine, confirmed by appropriate isotopic labeling. There is a kinetic isotope effect (KIE) for H(+) versus D(+) transfer from the C atom of the hydroxymethyl cation of ∼3, consistent with a primary KIE of a nearly thermoneutral reaction.

  15. Photochemical generation, isomerization, and oxygenation of stilbene cation radicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, F.D.; Bedell, A.M.; Dykstra, R.E.; Elbert, J.E. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (USA)); Gould, I.R.; Farid, S. (Eastman Kodak Co., Rochester, NY (USA))

    1990-10-24

    The cation radicals of cis- and trans-stilbene and several of their ring-substituted derivatives have been generated in solution directly by means of pulsed-laser-induced electron transfer to singlet cyanoanthracenes or indirectly via electron transfer from biphenyl to the singlet cyanoanthracene followed by secondary electron transfer from the stilbenes to the biphenyl cation radical. Transient absorption spectra of the cis- and trans-stilbene cation radicals generated by secondary electron transfer are similar to those previously obtained in 77 K matrices. Quantum yields for radical ion-pair cage escape have been measured for direct electron transfer from the stilbenes to three neutral and one charged singlet acceptor. These values increase as the ion-pair energy increases due to decreased rate constants for radical ion-pair return electron transfer, in accord with the predictions of Marcus theory for highly exergonic electron transfer. Cage-escape efficiencies are larger for trans- vs cis-stilbene cation radicals, possibly due to the greater extent of charge delocalization in the planar trans vs nonpolar cis cation radicals. Cage-escape stilbene cation radicals can initiate a concentration-dependent one way cis- {yields} trans-stilbene isomerization reaction.

  16. Inactivation of Heparin by Cationically Modified Chitosan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Lorkowska-Zawicka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the ability of N-(2-hydroxypropyl-3-tri methylammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC, the cationically modified chitosan, to form biologically inactive complexes with unfractionated heparin and thereby blocking its anticoagulant activity. Experiments were carried out in rats in vivo and in vitro using the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT and prothrombin time (PT tests for evaluation of heparin anticoagulant activity. For the first time we have found that HTCC effectively neutralizes anticoagulant action of heparin in rat blood in vitro as well as in rats in vivo. The effect of HTCC on suppression of heparin activity is dose-dependent and its efficacy can be comparable to that of protamine-the only agent used in clinic for heparin neutralization. HTCC administered i.v. alone had no direct effect on any of the coagulation tests used. The potential adverse effects of HTCC were further explored using rat experimental model of acute toxicity. When administered i.p. at high doses (250 and 500 mg/kg body weight, HTCC induced some significant dose-dependent structural abnormalities in the liver. However, when HTCC was administered at low doses, comparable to those used for neutralization of anticoagulant effect of heparin, no histopathological abnormalities in liver were observed.

  17. The effect of organic acids on base cation leaching from the forest floor under six North American tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Geibe, C.; Holmstrom, S.; Lundstrom, U.S.; Breemen, van N.

    2001-01-01

    Organic acidity and its degree of neutralization in the forest floor can have large consequences for base cation leaching under different tree species. We investigated the effect of organic acids on base cation leaching from the forest floor under six common North American tree species. Forest floor

  18. The effect of organic acids on base cation leaching from the forest floor under six North American tree species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, F.A.; Geibe, C.; Holmstrom, S.; Lundstrom, U.S.; Breemen, van N.

    2001-01-01

    Organic acidity and its degree of neutralization in the forest floor can have large consequences for base cation leaching under different tree species. We investigated the effect of organic acids on base cation leaching from the forest floor under six common North American tree species. Forest floor

  19. Neutralization of English Consonants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞彬彬

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives a brief account of English consonant cluster's structure and phonetic features from the perspective of the definition and cause of neutralization of English consonants as well as their distinctive features and oppositions.It comes up with the final conclusion that neutralization exists in only thirteen English consonant clusters,among a large number of consonant clusters.

  20. Inhibition of Neutral red photolysis with different antioxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimpapa, Zlatan; Sofić, Emin; Sapcanin, Aida; Toromanović, Jasmin; Tahirović, Ismet

    2007-02-01

    Neutral red is a dye the azine structure which has been used as an acido-base indicator and a dye in histochemistry. In 1960 Goldhaber introduced Neutral red into the medium of resorbing bone cultures to localize the osteoclast in the living cultures. Using time-lapse microcinematography in order to follow the osteoclasts, he reported excellent contrast could be obtained with Neutral red due to the avidity of osteoclasts for this dye. Unfortunately, however, the photodynamic effect resulting from subsequent exposure of these cultures to light precluded this approach, and again in 1963. it was observed that the death of the osteoclasts was probably due to a photodynamic effect related to the dye in the cell, the presence of oxygen and the frequent exposure of light by our time-lapse photography. VIS and UV irradiation induced photolysis of Neutral red, and from Neutral red cation produced with photons a Neutral red radical. This Neutral red radical can be inhibited with action of an antioxidant, such as melatonin, glutathione, ascorbic acid, E vitamin, etc. We developed an assay with Neutral red photolysis which utilizes a VIS and UV irradiation technique for quantification the inhibition of photolysis with action of an antioxidant. In this method Neutral red acts double, as a free radical generator and as a photosensitizer.

  1. Computational study on Kerr constants of neutral and ionized gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M.; Kumada, A.; Hidaka, K.

    2015-08-01

    In order to quantitatively examine the measurement capability of Poisson's field using electro-optic Kerr-effect (EOKE), Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions are examined by means of first principle calculations. We have systematically computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules and ions of several molecular symmetry groups, with consistent theory level and basis sets. Computed Kerr constants of neutral molecules (N2, CO2, SF6, and CF3I) ranging across two orders of magnitudes are within 50% error of the experimental values, which are comparable to the scattering between experimental values itself. The results show that SF6 has smaller Kerr constant due to its high molecular symmetry compared to those of N2 and CO2. In contrast, CF3I has large Kerr constant due to its permanent dipole. Computed Kerr constants for anions are larger by two orders of magnitude than those of neutral molecules, probably due to the shielding effect. For cations, the opposite holds true; however, due to anisotropic polarizability, computed Kerr constants for some cations are comparable to neutral molecules, while others show smaller values. The ratio of Kerr constants of ions to those of neutral molecules are at most 102; EOKE is valid for measuring electric field in weakly ionized gas whose ionization degree is smaller than 10-3.

  2. The bisketene radical cation and its formation by oxidative ring-Opening of cyclobutenedione

    OpenAIRE

    Piech, Krzysztof; Bally, Thomas; Allen, Annette D.; Tidwell, Thomas T.

    2013-01-01

    Parent cyclobutenedione 1 was photolyzed and ionized in an Ar matrix at 10K. The bisketene 2 that results in both cases (in the form of its radical cation after ionization) was characterized by its IR spectrum and by high-level quantum chemical calculations. Experiment and theory show that the neutral bisketene has only a single conformation where the two ketene moieties are nearly perpendicular, whereas the radical cation is present in two stable planar conformations. The mechanism of the ri...

  3. Transition-Metal Hydride Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Shaw, Anthony P; Estes, Deven P; Norton, Jack R

    2016-08-10

    Transition-metal hydride radical cations (TMHRCs) are involved in a variety of chemical and biochemical reactions, making a more thorough understanding of their properties essential for explaining observed reactivity and for the eventual development of new applications. Generally, these species may be treated as the ones formed by one-electron oxidation of diamagnetic analogues that are neutral or cationic. Despite the importance of TMHRCs, the generally sensitive nature of these complexes has hindered their development. However, over the last four decades, many more TMHRCs have been synthesized, characterized, isolated, or hypothesized as reaction intermediates. This comprehensive review focuses on experimental studies of TMHRCs reported through the year 2014, with an emphasis on isolated and observed species. The methods used for the generation or synthesis of TMHRCs are surveyed, followed by a discussion about the stability of these complexes. The fundamental properties of TMHRCs, especially those pertaining to the M-H bond, are described, followed by a detailed treatment of decomposition pathways. Finally, reactions involving TMHRCs as intermediates are described.

  4. Reactions of the radical cations of methylated benzene derivatives in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehested, K.; Holcman, J.

    1978-03-23

    The radical cations of methylated benzene decompose in acid solution into the corresponding methylbenzyl radical and a proton. The rate constant for this reaction decreases by three orders of magnitude as the number of methyl groups increases from one to five. The rate constants can be correlated with the ionization potential of the parent compound. In neutral solution the reverse reaction to the acid-catalyzed OH adduct conversion occurs and the radical cations react with water to form the OH adduct. In slightly alkaline solution the radical cations of the higher methylated benzenes (n greater than or equal to 3) react with hydroxide ions forming the OH adduct.

  5. Aftertreatment of Conventional Direct Dyeings of Cotton with a Bis-reactive Cationic Fixing Agent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHARIF Saima; SAEED Ahmad; MUHAMMAD Naeem Khan; MUHAMMAD Fauz-uI-Azeem

    2009-01-01

    A his-reactive cationic fixing agent,ethylenebis[N-(2,3-epoxypropyl)-N,N-dimethylammonium chloride] has been used as an aftertreatment reagent to improve the wash fasmess of direct dyes on cotton.The effects of different pH conditions and concentrations on the effectiveness of this cationic fixing agent have been investigated.The results showed that aftertreatment at pH 11 produced dyeings with higher colour strength and better wash fastness than that at pH 7.In addition,the cationic agent at a low concentration was found to be more effective under both neutral and alkaline conditions.

  6. Closed-Shell Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations: A New Category of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, Douglas M.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Density functional theory has been employed to calculate the harmonic frequencies and intensities of a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) cations that explore both size and electronic structure effects of the infrared spectroscopic properties of these species. The sample extends the size range of PAH species considered to more than 50 carbon atoms and includes several representatives from each of two heretofore unexplored categories of PAH cations: (1) fully benzenoid PAH cations whose carbon skeleton is composed of an odd number of carbon atoms (C(sub odd) PAHs); and (2) protonated PAH cations (HPAH+). Unlike the radical electronic structures of the PAH cations that have been the subject of previous theoretical and experimental work, the species in these two classes have a closed-shell electronic configuration. The calculated spectra of circumcoronene, C54H18 in both neutral and (radical) cationic form are also reported and compared with those of the other species. Overall, the C(sub odd) PAHs spectra are dominated by strong CC stretching modes near 1600 cm(exp -1) and display spectra that are remarkably insensitive to molecular size. The HPAH+ species evince a more complex spectrum consistent with the added contributions of aliphatic modes and their generally lower symmetry. Finally, for both classes of closed-shell cations, the intensity of the aromatic CH stretching modes is found to increase with molecular size far out of proportion with the number of CH groups, approaching a value more typical of neutral PAHs for the largest species studied.

  7. Cationic polymers and porous materials

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Yu

    2017-04-27

    According to one or more embodiments, cationic polymers may be produced which include one or more monomers containing cations. Such cationic polymers may be utilized as structure directing agents to form mesoporous zeolites. The mesoporous zeolites may include micropores as well as mesopores, and may have a surface area of greater than 350 m2/g and a pore volume of greater than 0.3 cm3/g. Also described are core/shell zeolites, where at least the shell portion includes a mesoporous zeolite material.

  8. Synthetic cation-selective nanotube: Permeant cations chaperoned by anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Gordon, Dan; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2011-01-01

    The ability to design ion-selective, synthetic nanotubes which mimic biological ion channels may have significant implications for the future treatment of bacteria, diseases, and as ultrasensitive biosensors. We present the design of a synthetic nanotube made from carbon atoms that selectively allows monovalent cations to move across and rejects all anions. The cation-selective nanotube mimics some of the salient properties of biological ion channels. Before practical nanodevices are successfully fabricated it is vital that proof-of-concept computational studies are performed. With this in mind we use molecular and stochastic dynamics simulations to characterize the dynamics of ion permeation across a single-walled (10, 10), 36 Å long, carbon nanotube terminated with carboxylic acid with an effective radius of 5.08 Å. Although cations encounter a high energy barrier of 7 kT, its height is drastically reduced by a chloride ion in the nanotube. The presence of a chloride ion near the pore entrance thus enables a cation to enter the pore and, once in the pore, it is chaperoned by the resident counterion across the narrow pore. The moment the chaperoned cation transits the pore, the counterion moves back to the entrance to ferry another ion. The synthetic nanotube has a high sodium conductance of 124 pS and shows linear current-voltage and current-concentration profiles. The cation-anion selectivity ratio ranges from 8 to 25, depending on the ionic concentrations in the reservoirs.

  9. Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Maria Teresa; Lee, Jiwoong

    2017-01-01

    and KCN, are selectively bound to the catalyst, providing exceptionally high enantioselectivities for kinetic resolutions, elimination reactions (fluoride base), and Strecker synthesis (cyanide nucleophile). Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis was recently expanded to silicon-based reagents, enabling...... solvents, thus increasing their applicability in synthesis. The expansion of this concept to chiral polyethers led to the emergence of asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, where chiral counter anions are generated from metal salts, particularly using BINOL-based polyethers. Alkali metal salts, namely KF...

  10. Neutral particle lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craver, Barry Paul

    Neutral particle lithography (NPL) is a high resolution, proximity exposure technique where a broad beam of energetic neutral particles floods a stencil mask and transmitted beamlets transfer the mask pattern to resist on a substrate, such that each feature is printed in parallel, rather than in the serial manner of electron beam lithography. It preserves the advantages of ion beam lithography (IBL), including extremely large depth-of-field, sub-5 nm resist scattering, and the near absence of diffraction, yet is intrinsically immune to charge-related artifacts including line-edge roughness and pattern placement errors due to charge accumulation on the mask and substrate. In our experiments, a neutral particle beam is formed by passing an ion beam (e.g., 30 keV He+) through a high pressure helium gas cell (e.g., 100 mTorr) to convert the ions to energetic neutrals through charge transfer scattering. The resolution of NPL is generally superior to that of IBL for applications involving insulating substrates, large proximity gaps, and ultra-small features. High accuracy stepped exposures with energetic neutral particles, where magnetic or electrostatic deflection is impossible, have been obtained by clamping the mask to the wafer, setting the proximity gap with a suitable spacer, and mechanically inclining the mask/wafer stack relative to the beam. This approach is remarkably insensitive to vibration and thermal drift; nanometer scale image offsets have been obtained with +/-2 nm placement accuracy for experiments lasting over one hour. Using this nanostepping technique, linewidth versus dose curves were obtained, from which the NPL lithographic blur was determined as 4.4+/-1.4 nm (1sigma), which is 2-3 times smaller than the blur of electron beam lithography. Neutral particle lithography has the potential to form high density, periodic patterns with sub-10 nm resolution.

  11. Comparison of Cation Adsorption by Isostructural Rutile and Cassiterite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Rosenqvist, Jorgen K [ORNL; Predota, M. [University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL; Ridley, Moira K [ORNL; Kohli, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Zhang, Zhan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Cummings, Peter T [ORNL; Lvov, Serguei N. [Pennsylvania State University; Fedkin, Mark V [ORNL; Rodriguez-Santiago, V [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Kubicki, James D. [Pennsylvania State University; Bandura, Andrei V. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) Crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl2 in NaCl, and trace ZnCl2 in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite ( bulk 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb and Na on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl- binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb , Na , and especially Sr2 are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn2 are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn2 hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the cassiterite (110) surface. Hence, their removal upon inner-sphere cation binding is relatively more

  12. Comparison of cation adsorption by isostructural rutile and cassiterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machesky, Michael; Wesolowski, David; Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Předota, Milan; Vlcek, Lukas; Ridley, Moira; Kohli, Vaibhav; Zhang, Zhan; Fenter, Paul; Cummings, Peter; Lvov, Serguei; Fedkin, Mark; Rodriguez-Santiago, Victor; Kubicki, James; Bandura, Andrei

    2011-04-19

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl(2) in NaCl, and trace ZnCl(2) in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite (ε(bulk) ≈ 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb(+) and Na(+) on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl(-) binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb(+), Na(+), and especially Sr(2+) are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn(2+) are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn(2+) hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH(+) on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the cassiterite (110) surface. Hence, their removal upon inner

  13. Bleach Neutralizes Mold Allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at National Jewish Medical and Research Center have demonstrated that dilute bleach not only kills common household mold, but may also neutralize the mold allergens that cause most mold-related health complaints. The study, published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, is the first to test the effect on allergic…

  14. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  15. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  16. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goede, A.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy

  17. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chih-Jen [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Li, Zhaohui, E-mail: li@uwp.edu [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Geosciences, University of Wisconsin - Parkside, Kenosha, WI 53144 (United States); Jiang, Wei-Teh, E-mail: atwtj@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan [Department of Earth Sciences, National Cheng Kung University, 1 University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca{sup 2+} as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK{sub a2} (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d{sub 001}) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water.

  18. Cation exchange interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chih-Jen; Li, Zhaohui; Jiang, Wei-Teh; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan

    2010-11-15

    Exploring the interactions between antibiotics and soils/minerals is of great importance in resolving their fate, transport, and elimination in the environment due to their frequent detection in wastewater, river water, sewage sludge and soils. This study focused on determining the adsorption properties and mechanisms of interaction between antibiotic ciprofloxacin and montmorillonite (SAz-1), a swelling dioctahedral mineral with Ca(2+) as the main interlayer cation. In acidic and neutral aqueous solutions, a stoichiometric exchange between ciprofloxacin and interlayer cations yielded an adsorption capacity as high as 330 mg/g, corresponding to 1.0 mmol/g. When solution pH was above its pK(a2) (8.7), adsorption of ciprofloxacin was greatly reduced due to the net repulsion between the negatively charged clay surfaces and the ciprofloxacin anion. The uptake of ciprofloxacin expanded the basal spacing (d(001)) of montmorillonite from 15.04 to 17.23 A near its adsorption capacity, confirming cation exchange within the interlayers in addition to surface adsorption. Fourier transform infrared results further suggested that the protonated amine group of ciprofloxacin in its cationic form was electrostatically attracted to negatively charged sites of clay surfaces, and that the carboxylic acid group was hydrogen bonded to the basal oxygen atoms of the silicate layers. The results indicate that montmorillonite is an effective sorbent to remove ciprofloxacin from water. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Anion stripping as a general method to create cationic porous framework with mobile anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chengyu; Kudla, Ryan A; Zuo, Fan; Zhao, Xiang; Mueller, Leonard J; Bu, Xianhui; Feng, Pingyun

    2014-05-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with cationic frameworks and mobile anions have many applications from sensing, anion exchange and separation, to fast ion conductivity. Despite recent progress, the vast majority of MOFs have neutral frameworks. A common mechanism for the formation of neutral frameworks is the attachment of anionic species such as F(-) or OH(-) to the framework metal sites, neutralizing an otherwise cationic scaffolding. Here, we report a general method capable of converting such neutral frameworks directly into cationic ones with concurrent generation of mobile anions. Our method is based on the differential affinity between distinct metal ions with framework anionic species. Specifically, Al(3+) is used to strip F(-) anions away from framework Cr(3+) sites, leading to cationic frameworks with mobile Cl(-) anions. The subsequent anion exchange with OH(-) further leads to a porous network with mobile OH(-) anions. New materials prepared by anion stripping can undergo ion exchange with anionic organic dyes and also exhibit much improved ionic conductivity compared to the original unmodified MOFs.

  20. Studying the Chemistry of Cationized Triacylglycerols Using Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry and Density Functional Theory Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossert, J. Stuart; Herrera, Lisandra Cubero; Ramaley, Louis; Melanson, Jeremy E.

    2014-08-01

    Analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs), found as complex mixtures in living organisms, is typically accomplished using liquid chromatography, often coupled to mass spectrometry. TAGs, weak bases not protonated using electrospray ionization, are usually ionized by adduct formation with a cation, including those present in the solvent (e.g., Na+). There are relatively few reports on the binding of TAGs with cations or on the mechanisms by which cationized TAGs fragment. This work examines binding efficiencies, determined by mass spectrometry and computations, for the complexation of TAGs to a range of cations (Na+, Li+, K+, Ag+, NH4 +). While most cations bind to oxygen, Ag+ binding to unsaturation in the acid side chains is significant. The importance of dimer formation, [2TAG + M]+ was demonstrated using several different types of mass spectrometers. From breakdown curves, it became apparent that two or three acid side chains must be attached to glycerol for strong cationization. Possible mechanisms for fragmentation of lithiated TAGs were modeled by computations on tripropionylglycerol. Viable pathways were found for losses of neutral acids and lithium salts of acids from different positions on the glycerol moiety. Novel lactone structures were proposed for the loss of a neutral acid from one position of the glycerol moiety. These were studied further using triple-stage mass spectrometry (MS3). These lactones can account for all the major product ions in the MS3 spectra in both this work and the literature, which should allow for new insights into the challenging analytical methods needed for naturally occurring TAGs.

  1. Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Killian, T C; Gupta, P; Laha, S; Martinez, Y N; Mickelson, P G; Nagel, S B; Saenz, A D; Simien, C E; Killian, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas are formed by photoionizing laser-cooled atoms near the ionization threshold. Through the application of atomic physics techniques and diagnostics, these experiments stretch the boundaries of traditional neutral plasma physics. The electron temperature in these plasmas ranges from 1-1000 K and the ion temperature is around 1 K. The density can approach $10^{11}$ cm$^{-3}$. Fundamental interest stems from the possibility of creating strongly-coupled plasmas, but recombination, collective modes, and thermalization in these systems have also been studied. Optical absorption images of a strontium plasma, using the Sr$^+$ ${^2S_{1/2}} -> {^2P_{1/2}}$ transition at 422 nm, depict the density profile of the plasma, and probe kinetics on a 50 ns time-scale. The Doppler-broadened ion absorption spectrum measures the ion velocity distribution, which gives an accurate measure of the ion dynamics in the first microsecond after photoionization.

  2. Between detection and neutralization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, Mark Kamerer; Green, Mary Wilson; Adams, Douglas Glenn; Pritchard, Daniel Allison

    2005-08-01

    Security system analytical performance analysis is generally based on the probability of system effectiveness. The probability of effectiveness is a function of the probabilities of interruption and neutralization. Interruption occurs if the response forces are notified in sufficient time to engage the adversary. Neutralization occurs if the adversary attack is defeated after the security forces have actively engaged the adversary. Both depend upon communications of data. This paper explores details of embedded communications functions that are often assumed to be inconsequential. It is the intent of the authors to bring focus to an issue in security system modeling that, if not well understood, has the potential to be a deciding factor in the overall system failure or effectiveness.

  3. Gargamelle: neutral current event

    CERN Multimedia

    1973-01-01

    This event shows real tracks of particles from the 1200 litre Gargamelle bubble chamber that ran on the PS from 1970 to 1976 and on the SPS from 1976 to 1979. In this image a neutrino passes close to a nucleon and reemerges as a neutrino. Such events are called neutral curent, as they are mediated by the Z0 boson which has no electric charge.

  4. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of a homogeneous and silica supported homoleptic cationic tungsten(vi) methyl complex: application in olefin metathesis

    KAUST Repository

    Dey, Raju

    2016-08-19

    A method for the synthesis of a homogeneous cationic tungsten(VI)penta-methyl complex [(WMe5)(+)(C6F5)(3)BMe-] from neutral tungstenhexamethyl (WMe6) and a silica supported cationic tungstentetramethyl complex [( Si-O-)WMe4+ (C6F5)(3)BMe-] from a neutral silica supported tungstenpentamethyl complex [( Si-O-)WMe5] is described. In both cases a direct demethylation using the B(C6F5)(3) reagent was used. The aforesaid complexes were characterized by liquid or solid state NMR spectroscopy. Interestingly, the homogeneous cationic complex [(WMe5)(+)(C6F5)(3)BMe-] shows moderate activity whereas the supported cationic complex [( Si-O-)WMe4+(C6F5)(3)BMe-] exhibits good activity in olefin metathesis reactions.

  6. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG JiaGao; LUO XiaoMin; YAN XiuHua; LI Zhong; TANG Yun; JIANG HuaLiang; ZHU WeiLiang

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system, which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force, as being compared with the classical interac-tions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper, we present an overview of the typi-cal cation-π interactions in biological systems, the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions, as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  7. Research progress in cation-π interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cation-π interaction is a potent intermolecular interaction between a cation and an aromatic system,which has been viewed as a new kind of binding force,as being compared with the classical interactions(e.g. hydrogen bonding,electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions). Cation-π interactions have been observed in a wide range of biological contexts. In this paper,we present an overview of the typical cation-π interactions in biological systems,the experimental and theoretical investigations on cation-π interactions,as well as the research results on cation-π interactions in our group.

  8. Alkali metal-cationized serine clusters studied by sonic spray ionization tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanita, Sergio C; Sokol, Ewa; Cooks, R Graham

    2007-05-01

    Serine solutions containing salts of alkali metals yield magic number clusters of the type (Ser(4)+C)(+), (Ser(8)+C)(+), (Ser(12)+C)(+), and (Ser(17)+2C)(+2) (where C = Li(+), Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+)), in relative abundances which are strongly dependent on the cation size. Strong selectivity for homochirality is involved in the formation of serine tetramers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+). This is also the case for the octamers cationized by the smaller alkalis but there is a strong preference for heterochirality in the octamers cationized by the larger alkali cations. Tandem mass spectrometry shows that the octamers and dodecamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) dissociate mainly by the loss of Ser(4) units, suggesting that the neutral tetramers are the stable building blocks of the observed larger aggregates, (Ser(8)+C)(+) and (Ser(12)+C)(+). Remarkably, although the Ser(4) units are formed with a strong preference for homochirality, they aggregate further regardless of their handedness and, therefore, with a preference for the nominally racemic 4D:4L structure and an overall strong heterochiral preference. The octamers cationized by K(+), Rb(+), or Cs(+) therefore represent a new type of cluster ion that is homochiral in its internal subunits, which then assemble in a random fashion to form octamers. We tentatively interpret the homochirality of these tetramers as a consequence of assembly of the serine molecules around a central metal ion. The data provide additional evidence that the neutral serine octamer is homochiral and is readily cationized by smaller ions.

  9. Cationic Noncovalent Interactions: Energetics and Periodic Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M T; Armentrout, P B

    2016-05-11

    In this review, noncovalent interactions of ions with neutral molecules are discussed. After defining the scope of the article, which excludes anionic and most protonated systems, methods associated with measuring thermodynamic information for such systems are briefly recounted. An extensive set of tables detailing available thermodynamic information for the noncovalent interactions of metal cations with a host of ligands is provided. Ligands include small molecules (H2, NH3, CO, CS, H2O, CH3CN, and others), organic ligands (O- and N-donors, crown ethers and related molecules, MALDI matrix molecules), π-ligands (alkenes, alkynes, benzene, and substituted benzenes), miscellaneous inorganic ligands, and biological systems (amino acids, peptides, sugars, nucleobases, nucleosides, and nucleotides). Hydration of metalated biological systems is also included along with selected proton-based systems: 18-crown-6 polyether with protonated peptides and base-pairing energies of nucleobases. In all cases, the literature thermochemistry is evaluated and, in many cases, reanchored or adjusted to 0 K bond dissociation energies. Trends in these values are discussed and related to a variety of simple molecular concepts.

  10. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  11. The Weak Neutral Current

    CERN Document Server

    Erler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    This is a review of electroweak precision physics with particular emphasis on low-energy precision measurements in the neutral current sector of the electroweak theory and includes future experimental prospects and the theoretical challenges one faces to interpret these observables. Within the minimal Standard Model they serve as determinations of the weak mixing angle which are competitive with and complementary to those obtained near the Z-resonance. In the context of new physics beyond the Standard Model these measurements are crucial to discriminate between models and to reduce the allowed parameter space within a given model. We illustrate this for the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model with or without R-parity.

  12. Mod en neutral seksualitet!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leer, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    the paradigm”. This notion was presented at a series of lectures at Collège de France in 1977. Through a reading of Barthes’s autobiography, Roland Barthes par Roland Barthes (1975), the article demonstrates how Barthes in this text tries to outplay the paradigms that rules over the hegemonic understanding...... of gender and sexuality; also the fragmented text presents a vision of a sexual utopia, a neutral sexuality, that tries – like the queer theory – to go and think beyond a binary conception of gender and sexuality. Finally, it is suggested that we should start to think about a movement of “French queer...

  13. The Prowess of Photogenerated Amine Radical Cations in Cascade Reactions: From Carbocycles to Heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Scott A; Wang, Jiang; Zheng, Nan

    2016-09-20

    Cascade reactions represent a class of ideal organic reactions because they empower efficiency, elegance, and novelty. However, development of cascade reactions remains a daunting task for synthetic chemists. Radicals are known to be well suited for cascade reactions. Compared with widely used carbon-based radicals, nitrogen-based radicals, such as neutral aminyl radicals and protonated aminyl radicals (amine radical cations), are underutilized, although they are behind some notable synthetic methods such as the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction. The constraint on their usage is generally attributed to the limited number of available stable precursors. Since amine radical cations offer increased reactivity and selectivity in chemical transformations compared with neutral aminyl radicals, their generation is of utmost importance. Recently, a surge of reports has been revealed using visible light photoredox catalysis. It has been demonstrated that amines can act as an electron donor in a reductive quenching cycle while the amine itself is oxidized to the amine radical cation. Although a number of methods exist to generate amine radical cations, the photochemical formation of these species offers many practical advantages. In this Account, we discuss our journey to the development of annulation reactions with various π-bonds and electrophilic addition reactions to alkenes using photogenerated amine radical cations. Various carbocycles and heterocycles are produced by these reactions. In our annulation work, we first show that single electron photooxidation of cyclopropylanilines to the amine radical cations triggers ring opening of the strained carbocycle, producing distonic radical cations. These odd-electron species are shown to react with alkenes and alkynes to yield the corresponding cyclopentanes and cyclopentenes in an overall redox neutral process. Further development of this annulation reaction allows us to achieve the [4 + 2] annulation of cyclobutylanilines

  14. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuswandi, Bambang; Nuriman,; Verboom, Willem; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2006-01-01

    This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing

  15. Is /h/ phonetically neutral?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Michael P; Chen, Yang

    2009-11-01

    Use of /h/ in the phrase, 'Say /hVC/ again' has been tacitly assumed to provide a neutral phonetic context in which to study the articulatory characteristics of speech either preceding or following /h/ articulation. Yet, assessment of the stability or neutrality of /h/ has gone untested. The current study sought to determine whether articulation of /h/ differs according to sex and language accent, as well as to examine its influence on subsequent vowel articulation. Selected acoustic features of /hVC/ were measured in 40 speakers of American English (AE) and 40 speakers of Mandarin-accented English (MAE). Results of an analysis of /h/ duration revealed no sex differences within each language group, however considerable variation was found according to accented vs unaccented English. Clear sex differences were found for the production of /h/, occurring more often among male speakers regardless of language variety. Considerable variation in production of /h/ was found between language groups. Analysis of vowel formant frequencies immediately following /h/ articulation indicated minimal coarticulatory effects for both AE and MAE speakers. The present results appear to support the suggestion that /h/ is not exclusively sex-linked and may indeed vary according to non-biological factors. In spite of these variations, /h/ articulation appears to have a negligible influence on neighbouring vowel articulation.

  16. Heavy metal cations permeate the TRPV6 epithelial cation channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Gergely; Danko, Tamas; Bergeron, Marc J; Balazs, Bernadett; Suzuki, Yoshiro; Zsembery, Akos; Hediger, Matthias A

    2011-01-01

    TRPV6 belongs to the vanilloid family of the transient receptor potential channel (TRP) superfamily. This calcium-selective channel is highly expressed in the duodenum and the placenta, being responsible for calcium absorption in the body and fetus. Previous observations have suggested that TRPV6 is not only permeable to calcium but also to other divalent cations in epithelial tissues. In this study, we tested whether TRPV6 is indeed also permeable to cations such as zinc and cadmium. We found that the basal intracellular calcium concentration was higher in HEK293 cells transfected with hTRPV6 than in non-transfected cells, and that this difference almost disappeared in nominally calcium-free solution. Live cell imaging experiments with Fura-2 and NewPort Green DCF showed that overexpression of human TRPV6 increased the permeability for Ca(2+), Ba(2+), Sr(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and interestingly also for La(3+) and Gd(3+). These results were confirmed using the patch clamp technique. (45)Ca uptake experiments showed that cadmium, lanthanum and gadolinium were also highly efficient inhibitors of TRPV6-mediated calcium influx at higher micromolar concentrations. Our results suggest that TRPV6 is not only involved in calcium transport but also in the transport of other divalent cations, including heavy metal ions, which may have toxicological implications.

  17. Dynamic fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate dication by chloride ion in ionic and neutral micellar environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sunita; Varma Y, Tej Varma; Pant, Debi D.

    2014-04-01

    Fluorescence quenching of Quinine sulfate dication (QSD) by chloride-ion (Cl-) in micellar environments of anionic, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cationic, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and neutral, triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous phase has been investigated by time-resolved and steady- state fluorescence measurements. The quenching follows linear Stern-Volmer relation in micellar solutions and is dynamic in nature.

  18. Theoretical modeling of infrared emission from neutral and charged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. II.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakes, ELO; Tielens, AGGM; Bauschlicher, CW; Hudgins, DM; Allamandola, LJ

    2001-01-01

    The nature of the carriers of the interstellar infrared (IR) emission features between 3.3 and 12.7 mum is complex. We must consider emission from a family of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in a multiplicity of cationic charge states (+1, +2, +3, and so on), along with neutral and anionic P

  19. Cationic tungsten-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene complexes: highly active olefin metathesis catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schowner, Roman; Frey, Wolfgang; Buchmeiser, Michael R

    2015-05-20

    The synthesis, structure, and olefin metathesis activity of the first neutral and cationic W-oxo-alkylidene-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) catalysts are reported. Neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC catalysts can be prepared in up to 90% isolated yield. Depending on the ligands used, they possess either an octahedral (Oh) or trigonal bipyramidal ligand sphere. They can be activated with excess AlCl3 to form cationic olefin metathesis-active W-complexes; however, these readily convert into neutral chloro-complexes. Well-defined, stable cationic species can be prepared by stoichiometric substitution of one chloro ligand in the parent, neutral W-oxo-alkylidene-NHC complexes with Ag(MeCN)2B(Ar(F))4 or NaB(Ar(F))4; B(Ar(F))4 = B(3,5-(CF3)2-C6H3)4. They are highly active olefin metathesis catalysts, allowing for turnover numbers up to 10,000 in various olefin metathesis reactions including alkenes bearing nitrile, sec-amine, and thioether groups.

  20. Organic neutralization agents for neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M Y; McLafferty, F W

    1992-02-01

    Porter has shown that excited neutrals of specified internal energies can be prepared by neutralization of an ion beam with metal vapors of low ionization potential (IP). For specific problems in neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry, a metal with the desired IP value may not be available, or it may present experimental problems such as a high vaporization temperature, instrument contamination, or detector instability. The use of organic neutralization agents such as tetra-p-anisylethylene (IP = 6.0 eV) can minimize these problems (although cross sections for neutralization with these are a factor of 5 lower than those with metals), and can provide a much wider range of IP values. Their utility is demonstrated in the neutralization of C4H4 (+•) and CH8 (+•) ions to produce C4H4 and C4H8 of selected internal energies. However, for CH4 (+•) neutralization, the CH4 neutrals formed have a much lower internal energy than predicted, indicating that electron transfer from the neutralization agent predominantly produces its ions in excited states.

  1. Spectroscopy of neutral radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol, Aran; De, Subhadeep; Jungmann, Klaus; Wilschut, Hans; Willmann, Lorenz [KVI, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth atoms radium is uniquely sensitive towards parity and time reversal symmetry violations due to a large enhancement of an intrinsic permanent electric dipole moment of the nucleous or the electron. Furthermore, radium is sensitive to atomic parity violation and the nuclear anapole moment. To prepare such experiments spectroscopy of relevant atomic states need to be done. At a later stage we will build a neutral atom trap for radium. We have built an atomic beam of the short lived isotope {sup 225}Ra with a flux of several 10{sup 4} atoms/sec. We are preparing the laser spectroscopy using this beam setup. In the preparation for efficient laser cooling and trapping we have successfully trapped barium, which is similar in it's requirements for laser cooling. The techniques which we have developed with barium can be used to trap rare radium isotopes. We report on the progress of the experiments.

  2. Design, synthesis and antimicrobial properties of non-hemolytic cationic alpha-cyclopeptoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comegna, Daniela; Benincasa, Monica; Gennaro, Renato; Izzo, Irene; De Riccardis, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    The synthesis and screening of neutral and cationic, linear and cyclic peptoids (N-alkylglycine peptidomimetics) is described. Structure-activity relationship studies show that the in vitro activities of the tested peptoids depend on both cyclization and decoration with cationic groups. The most powerful N-lysine cyclopeptoid derivatives showed good antifungal activity against Candida albicans (ATCC90029 and L21) and Candida famata (SA550, Amph B-resistant) and low hemolytic activity. The effects of the cyclic peptoids on membrane permeabilization were evaluated by the propidium iodide exclusion assay.

  3. Neutral Evolution of Mutational Robustness

    CERN Document Server

    Van Nimwegen, E; Huynen, M; Nimwegen, Erik van; Crutchfield, James P.; Huynen, Martijn

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population's limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network's adjacency matrix. Moreover, the average number of neutral mutant neighbors per individual is given by the matrix spectral radius. This quantifies the extent to which populations evolve mutational robustness: the insensitivity of the phenotype to mutations. Since the average neutrality is independent of evolutionary parameters---such as, mutation rate, population size, and selective advantage---one can infer global statistics of neutral network topology using simple population data available from {\\it in vitro} or {\\it in vivo} evolution. Populations evolving on neutral networks of RNA secondary structures show excellent agreement with our theoretical predictions.

  4. Strange neutral currents in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ressell, M T; Aufderheide, M B; Bloom, S D; Resler, D A

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects on the nuclear neutral current Gamow-Teller (GT) strength of a finite contribution from a polarized strange quark sea. We perform nuclear shell model calculations of the neutral current GT strength for a number of nuclei likely to be present during stellar core collapse. We compare the GT strength when a finite strange quark contribution is included to the strength without such a contribution. As an example, the process of neutral current nuclear de-excitation via \

  5. Constraining the Europa Neutral Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Mitchell, Donald; mauk, Barry; Johnson, Robert E.; clark, george

    2016-10-01

    "Neutral tori" consist of neutral particles that usually co-orbit along with their source forming a toroidal (or partial toroidal) feature around the planet. The distribution and composition of these features can often provide important, if not unique, insight into magnetospheric particles sources, mechanisms and dynamics. However, these features can often be difficult to directly detect. One innovative method for detecting neutral tori is by observing Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENAs) that are generally considered produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between charged and neutral particles.Mauk et al. (2003) reported the detection of a Europa neutral particle torus using ENA observations. The presence of a Europa torus has extremely large implications for upcoming missions to Jupiter as well as understanding possible activity at this moon and providing critical insight into what lies beneath the surface of this icy ocean world. However, ENAs can also be produced as a result of charge exchange interactions between two ionized particles and in that case cannot be used to infer the presence of neutral particle population. Thus, a detailed examination of all possible source interactions must be considered before one can confirm that likely original source population of these ENA images is actually a Europa neutral particle torus. For this talk, we examine the viability that the Mauk et al. (2003) observations were actually generated from a neutral torus emanating from Europa as opposed to charge particle interactions with plasma originating from Io. These results help constrain such a torus as well as Europa source processes.

  6. Comparison of cation adsorption by isostructural rutile and cassiterite.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machesky, M.; Wesolowski, D.; Rosenqvist, J.; Predota, M.; Vlcek, L.; Ridley, M.; Kohli, V.; Zhang, Z.; Fenter, P.; Cummings, P.; Lvov, S.; Fedkin, M.; Rodriguez-Santiago, V.; Kupicki, J.; Bandura, A. (X-Ray Science Division); (Illinois State Water Survey); (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); (University of South Branisovska); (Texas Tech University); (Vanderbilt University); (The Pennsylvania State University); (St. Petersburg State University)

    2011-01-01

    Macroscopic net proton charging curves for powdered rutile and cassiterite specimens with the (110) crystal face predominant, as a function of pH in RbCl and NaCl solutions, trace SrCl{sub 2} in NaCl, and trace ZnCl{sub 2} in NaCl and Na Triflate solutions, are compared to corresponding molecular-level information obtained from static DFT optimizations and classical MD simulations, as well as synchrotron X-ray methods. The similarities and differences in the macroscopic charging behavior of rutile and cassiterite largely reflect the cation binding modes observed at the molecular level. Cation adsorption is primarily inner-sphere on both isostructural (110) surfaces, despite predictions that outer-sphere binding should predominate on low bulk dielectric constant oxides such as cassiterite ({epsilon}{sub bulk} {approx} 11). Inner-sphere adsorption is also significant for Rb{sup +} and Na{sup +} on neutral surfaces, whereas Cl{sup -} binding is predominately outer-sphere. As negative surface charge increases, relatively more Rb{sup +}, Na{sup +}, and especially Sr{sup 2+} are bound in highly desolvated tetradentate fashion on the rutile (110) surface, largely accounting for enhanced negative charge development relative to cassiterite. Charging curves in the presence of Zn{sup 2+} are very steep but similar for both oxides, reflective of Zn{sup 2+} hydrolysis (and accompanying proton release) during the adsorption process, and the similar binding modes for ZnOH{sup +} on both surfaces. These results suggest that differences in cation adsorption between high and low bulk dielectric constant oxides are more subtly related to the relative degree of cation desolvation accompanying inner-sphere binding (i.e., more tetradentate binding on rutile), rather than distinct inner- and outer-sphere adsorption modes. Cation desolvation may be favored at the rutile (110) surface in part because inner-sphere water molecules are bound further from and less tightly than on the

  7. CO2-neutral fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, A. P. H.

    2015-08-01

    The need for storage of renewable energy (RE) generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G) scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel cycle is

  8. CO2-neutral fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goede A. P. H.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for storage of renewable energy (RE generated by photovoltaic, concentrated solar and wind arises from the fact that supply and demand are ill-matched both geographically and temporarily. This already causes problems of overcapacity and grid congestion in countries where the fraction of RE exceeds the 20% level. A system approach is needed, which focusses not only on the energy source, but includes conversion, storage, transport, distribution, use and, last but not least, the recycling of waste. Furthermore, there is a need for more flexibility in the energy system, rather than relying on electrification, integration with other energy systems, for example the gas network, would yield a system less vulnerable to failure and better adapted to requirements. For example, long-term large-scale storage of electrical energy is limited by capacity, yet needed to cover weekly to seasonal demand. This limitation can be overcome by coupling the electricity net to the gas system, considering the fact that the Dutch gas network alone has a storage capacity of 552 TWh, sufficient to cover the entire EU energy demand for over a month. This lecture explores energy storage in chemicals bonds. The focus is on chemicals other than hydrogen, taking advantage of the higher volumetric energy density of hydrocarbons, in this case methane, which has an approximate 3.5 times higher volumetric energy density. More importantly, it allows the ready use of existing gas infrastructure for energy storage, transport and distribution. Intermittent wind electricity generated is converted into synthetic methane, the Power to Gas (P2G scheme, by splitting feedstock CO2 and H2O into synthesis gas, a mixture of CO and H2. Syngas plays a central role in the synthesis of a range of hydrocarbon products, including methane, diesel and dimethyl ether. The splitting is accomplished by innovative means; plasmolysis and high-temperature solid oxygen electrolysis. A CO2-neutral fuel

  9. The merits of neutral theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, David; Etienne, Rampal S.; McKane, Alan J.

    2006-01-01

    Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity has challenged the classic niche-based view of ecological community structure. Although there have been many attempts to falsify Hubbell's theory, we argue that falsification should not lead to rejection, because there is more to the theory than neutrality al

  10. The merits of neutral theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso, D.; Etienne, R.S.; McKane, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity has challenged the classic niche-based view of ecological community structure. Although there have been many attempts to falsify Hubbell's theory, we argue that falsification should not lead to rejection, because there is more to the theory than neutrality al

  11. Neutral evolution of mutational robustness.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nimwegen, E. van; Crutchfield, J.P.; Huynen, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    We introduce and analyze a general model of a population evolving over a network of selectively neutral genotypes. We show that the population's limit distribution on the neutral network is solely determined by the network topology and given by the principal eigenvector of the network's adjacency ma

  12. The Free Tricoordinated Silyl Cation Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čičak, H.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available As the importance and abundance of silicon in our environment is large, it has been thought that silicon might take the place of carbon in forming a host of similar compounds and silicon-based life. However, until today there is no experimental evidence for such a hypothesis and carbon is still unique among the elements in the vast number and variety of compounds it can form. Also, the corresponding derivatives of the two elements show considerable differences in their chemical properties.The essential debate concerning organosilicon chemistry relates to the existence of the free planar tricoordinated silyl cations in condensed phase (R3Si+, in analogy to carbocations (R3C+ which have been known and characterized as free species. Although silyl cations are thermodynamically more stable than their carbon analogs, they are very reactive due to their high inherent electrophilicity and the ability of hypervalent coordination. On the other hand, stabilization by inductive and hyperconjugative effects and larger steric effects of carbocations make them less sensitive to solvation or other environmental effects than silyl cations. Hence, observation of free silyl cations in the condensed phase proved extremely difficult and the actual problem is the question of the degree of the (remaining silyl cation character.The first free silyl cation, trimesitylsilyl cation, and in analogy with it tridurylsilyl cation, were synthesized by Lambert et al. Free silyl cations based on analogy to aromatic ions (homocyclopropenylium and tropylium have also been prepared. However, in these silyl cations the cationic character is reduced by internal π -conjugation. Čičak et al. prepared some silyl-cationic intermediates (Me3Si--CH≡CR+in solid state. With the help of quantum-mechanical calculations it was concluded that these adducts have much more silyl cation than carbocation character.

  13. The mechanism of kaolin clay flocculation by a cation-independent bioflocculant produced by Chryseobacterium daeguense W6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijie Liu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several novel cation-independent bioflocculants have been reported, which can avoid the secondary contamination caused by addition of cations. However, compared with cation-dependent bioflocculants, the flocculating mechanism of cation-independent bioflocculants is largely unknown. In this study, a cation-independent bioflocculant MBF-W6 produced by Chryseobacterium daeguense W6 was used as a model to investigate the flocculating mechanism. The results showed that the major flocculating component of MBF-W6 is a complex of proteins and polysaccharides. The zeta potential results indicated that kaolin clay particles were not precipitated due to charge neutralization and the bridging mediated by cations did not play a major role in the flocculating process. These results are consistent with the fact that MBF-W6 is a cation-independent bioflocculant. Further scanning electron microscopic observation showed that MBF-W6 induced flocs formed tight packed structure, suggesting that the kaolin clay particles maybe directly attached and bridged by bioflocculant MBF-W6. In addition, we also found out that Fe3+ ions inhibit the flocculating activity of MBF-W6 by affecting –COO− and –NH groups. Therefore this study can improve our understanding on flocculating mechanism of cation-independent bioflocculants.

  14. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations. 3. The Polyacenes Anthracene, Tetracene, and Pentacene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous, ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAH's) are thought to be responsible for a very common family of interstellar infrared emission bands. Unfortunately, very little infrared spectroscopic data are available on ionized PAH's. Here we present the near- and mid-infrared spectra of the polyacene cations anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene. We also report the vibrational frequencies and relative intensities of the pentacene anion. The cation bands corresponding to the CC modes are typically about 10-20 times more intense than those of the CH out-of-plane bending vibrations. For the cations the CC stretching and CH in-plane bending modes give rise to bands which are an order of magnitude stronger than for the neutral species, and the CH out-of-plane bends produce bands which are 3-20 times weaker than in the neutral species. This behavior is similar to that found for most other PAH cations. The most intense PAH cation bands fall within the envelopes of the most intense interstellar features. The strongest absorptions in the polyacenes anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene tend to group around 1400 / cm (between about 1340 and 1500 / cm) and near 1180 /cm, regions of only moderate interstellar emission. These very strong polyacene bands tend to fall in gaps in the spectra of the other PAH cations studied to date suggesting that while PAHs with polyacene structures may contribute to specific regions of the interstellar emission spectra, they are not dominant members of the interstellar PAH family.

  15. Infrared Spectroscopy of Matrix-Isolated Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Cations. 3; The Polyacenes Anthracene, Tetracence, and Pentacene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgins, D. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1995-01-01

    Gaseous, ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are thought to be responsible for a very common family of interstellar infrared emission bands. Unfortunately, very little infrared spectroscopic data are available on ionized PAHS. Here we present the near- and mid-infrared spectra of the polyacene cations anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene. We also report the vibrational frequencies and relative intensities of the pentacene anion. The cation bands corresponding to the CC modes are typically about 10-20 times more intense than those of the CH out-of-plane bending vibrations. For the cations the CC stretching and CH in-plane bending modes give rise to bands which are an order of magnitude stronger than for the neutral species, and the CH out-of-plane bends produce bands which are 3-20 times weaker than in the neutral species. This behavior is similar to that found for most other PAH cations. The most intense PAH cation bands fall within the envelopes of the most intense interstellar features. The strongest absorptions in the polyacenes anthracene, tetracene, and pentacene tend to group around 1400/cm (between about 1340 and 1500/cm) and near 1180/cm, regions of only moderate interstellar emission. These very strong polyacene bands tend to fall in gaps in the spectra of the other PAH cations studied to date suggesting that while PAHs with polyacene structures may contribute to specific regions of the interstellar emission spectra, they are not dominant members of the interstellar PAH family.

  16. Theoretical study of second-order hyperpolarizability for nitrogen radical cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazkar, Maryam; Romanov, Dmitri A.; Levis, Robert J.

    2015-05-01

    We report calculations of the static and dynamic hyperpolarizabilities of the nitrogen radical cation in doublet state. The electronic contributions were computed analytically using density functional theory and multi-configurational self-consistent field method with extended basis sets for non-resonant excitation. The open-shell electronic system of nitrogen radical cation provides negative second-order optical nonlinearity, suggesting that the hyperpolarizability coefficient, {{γ }(2)}, in the non-resonant regime is mainly composed of combinations of virtual one-photon transitions rather than two-photon transitions. The second-order optical properties of nitrogen radical cation have been calculated as a function of bond length starting with the neutral molecular geometry (S0 minimum) and stretching the N-N triple bond, reaching the ionic D0 relaxed geometry all the way toward dissociation limit, to investigate the effect of internuclear bond distance on second-order hyperpolarizability.

  17. Vibrational studies of benzene, pyridine, pyridine-N-oxide and their cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Srivastava, Mayuri; Yadav, R A

    2013-07-01

    IR and Raman spectra of pyridine and pyridine-N-oxide have been recorded and analyzed. The optimized molecular geometries, APT charges and vibrational characteristics for benzene, pyridine, pyridine-N-oxide and their cations have been computed using DFT method. Due to attachment of O atom at N site or removal of electron all the modes are affected in magnitudes. However, significant changes are noticed in their IR intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios of the Raman bands in going from pyridine to its N-oxide or in going from neutrals to their cations. It is interesting to note that in going from benzene to benzene cation charge redistribution takes place to reduce the symmetry from D6h to D2h. The calculated frequencies have been correlated with the experimental frequencies for the pyridine and pyridine-N-oxide molecules.

  18. The Antiparticles of Neutral Bosons

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Walton A

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of the ability to create and study antihydrogen, we think it is appropriate to consider the possibility that antiphotons might not be identical to photons. First of all, we will look at the experimental evidence concerning multiple neutral pions and multiple photons. Because of its internal structure, the neutral kaon is not identical to its antiparticle. We will consider internal structures for the neutral pion and photon for which the antiparticle differs from the particle. Interestingly, the antiphoton thus created from neutrinos does not interact with electrons because its neutrinos have the wrong helicity.

  19. Positional nystagmus showing neutral points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Numata, Tsutomu

    2004-01-01

    We encountered patients who had their static direction-changing positional nystagmus canceled at about 20-30 degrees yaw head rotation from the supine position. This nystagmus was also canceled when the head was rotated 180 degrees from this position. We call these head positions neutral points. At the neutral points, the cupula of the horizontal semicircular canal of the affected ear is positioned vertical to the gravitational plane and no deflection of the cupula occurs. The positional nystagmus observed (except the neutral points) was thought to occur due to a "heavy cupula" or "light cupula", which may be determined by the specific gravity of its endolymph.

  20. Afrikaans Syllabification Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilla Fick

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to English, automatic hyphenation by computer of Afrikaans words is a problem that still needs to be addressed, since errors are still often encountered in printed text. An initial step in this task is the ability to automatically syllabify words. Since new words are created continuously by joining words, it is necessary to develop an “intelligent” technique for syllabification. As a first phase of the research, we consider only the orthographic information of words, and disregard both syntactic and morphological information. This approach allows us to use machine-learning techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees that are known for their pattern recognition abilities. Both these techniques are trained with isolated patterns consisting of input patterns and corresponding outputs (or targets that indicate whether the input pattern should be split at a certain position, or not. In the process of compiling a list of syllabified words from which to generate training data for the  syllabification problem, irregular patterns were identified. The same letter patterns are split differently in different words and complete words that are spelled identically are split differently due to meaning. We also identified irregularities in and between  the different dictionaries that we used. We examined the influence range of letters that are involved in irregularities. For example, for their in agter-ente and vaste-rente we have to consider three letters to the left of r to be certain where the hyphen should be inserted. The influence range of the k in verstek-waarde and kleinste-kwadrate is four to the left and three to the right. In an analysis of letter patterns in Afrikaans words we found that the letter e has the highest frequency overall (16,2% of all letters in the word list. The frequency of words starting with s is the highest, while the frequency of words ending with e is the highest. It is important to

  1. Chiral DNA packaging in DNA-cationic liposome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidam, N J; Barenholz, Y; Minsky, A

    1999-09-03

    Recent studies have indicated that the structural features of DNA-lipid assemblies, dictated by the lipid composition and cationic lipid-to-DNA ratio, critically affect the efficiency of these complexes in acting as vehicles for cellular delivery of genetic material. Using circular dichroism we find that upon binding DNA, positively-charged liposomes induce a secondary conformational transition of the DNA molecules from the native B form to the C motif. Liposomes composed of positively-charged and neutral 'helper' lipids, found to be particularly effective as transfecting agents, induce - in addition to secondary conformational changes - DNA condensation into a left-handed cholesteric-like phase. A structural model is presented according to which two distinct, yet inter-related modes of DNA packaging coexist within such assemblies. The results underline the notion that subtle changes in the components of a supramolecular assembly may substantially modulate the interplay of interactions which dictate its structure and functional properties.

  2. Review on cation exchange selectivity coefficients for MX-80 bentonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, C.; Arcos, D.; Duro, L. [ENVIROS, Passeig de Rubi, 29-31, 08197 Valldoreix (Spain); Sellin, P. [SKB, Brahegatan 47, SE-102 40 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    effect of the S:L ratio and dry density on the value of the selectivity coefficients determined so far. From this analyses, it can be concluded that the calculated selectivity coefficients for Ca and Mg (K{sub Ca} and K{sub Mg}) increase linearly with the S:L ratio, following an equation of the type K{sub ex} = A x (S:L) (g dm{sup -3}) for a fixed solid dry density. Besides, the value of K{sub ex} decreases when increasing the dry density of bentonite. These effects can be related to osmosis. Indeed, the higher the density, the lower the pore size in the interlaminar space. This may increase anion exclusion effects and, therefore, difficult cation diffusion given that the solution must be kept electrically neutral. It must be also highlighted that ionic strength effects can be relevant in any cation exchange process and, therefore, the influence of this parameter on the value of K{sub ex} must also be assessed. (authors)

  3. Neutrality Versus Materiality: A Thermodynamic Theory of Neutral Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémi Tailleux

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a theory for constructing quasi-neutral density variables γ directly in thermodynamic space is formulated, which is based on minimising the absolute value of a purely thermodynamic quantity J n . Physically, J n has a dual dynamic/thermodynamic interpretation as the quantity controlling the energy cost of adiabatic and isohaline parcel exchanges on material surfaces, as well as the dependence of in-situ density on spiciness, in a description of water masses based on γ, spiciness and pressure. Mathematically, minimising | J n | in thermodynamic space is showed to be equivalent to maximising neutrality in physical space. The physics of epineutral dispersion is also reviewed and discussed. It is argued, in particular, that epineutral dispersion is best understood as the aggregate effect of many individual non-neutral stirring events (being understood here as adiabatic and isohaline events with non-zero buoyancy, so that it is only the net displacement aggregated over many events that is approximately neutral. This new view resolves an apparent paradox between the focus in neutral density theory on zero-buoyancy motions and the overwhelming evidence that lateral dispersion in the ocean is primarily caused by non-zero buoyancy processes such as tides, residual currents and sheared internal waves. The efficiency by which a physical process contributes to lateral dispersion can be characterised by its energy signature, with those processes releasing available potential energy (negative energy cost being more efficient than purely neutral processes with zero energy cost. The latter mechanism occurs in the wedge of instability, and its source of energy is the coupling between baroclinicity, thermobaricity, and density compensated temperature/salinity anomalies. Such a mechanism, which can only exist in a salty ocean, is speculated to be important for dissipating spiciness anomalies and neutral helicity. The paper also discusses potential

  4. PEGylation enhances tumor targeting of plasmid DNA by an artificial cationized protein with repeated RGD sequences, Pronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2004-05-31

    The objective of this study is to investigate feasibility of a non-viral gene carrier with repeated RGD sequences (Pronectin F+) in tumor targeting for gene expression. The Pronectin F+ was cationized by introducing spermine (Sm) to the hydroxyl groups to allow to polyionically complex with plasmid DNA. The cationized Pronectin F+ prepared was additionally modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) molecules which have active ester and methoxy groups at the terminal, to form various PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+. The cationized Pronectin F+ with or without PEGylation at different extents was mixed with a plasmid DNA of LacZ to form respective cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes. The plasmid DNA was electrophoretically complexed with cationized Pronectin F+ and PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, irrespective of the PEGylation extent, although the higher N/P ratio of complexes was needed for complexation with the latter Pronectin F+. The molecular size and zeta potential measurements revealed that the plasmid DNA was reduced in size to about 250 nm and the charge was changed to be positive by the complexation with cationized Pronectin F+. For the complexation with PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+, the charge of complex became neutral being almost 0 mV with the increasing PEGylation extents, while the molecular size was similar to that of cationized Pronectin F+. When cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes with or without PEGylation were intravenously injected to mice carrying a subcutaneous Meth-AR-1 fibrosarcoma mass, the PEG-introduced cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complex specifically enhanced the level of gene expression in the tumor, to a significantly high extent compared with the cationized Pronectin F+-plasmid DNA complexes and free plasmid DNA. The enhanced level of gene expression depended on the percentage of PEG introduced, the N/P ratio, and the plasmid DNA dose. A fluorescent microscopic study revealed that the

  5. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E McCoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4 assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  6. Neutral theory in community ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    One of the central goals of community ecology is to understand the forces that maintain species diversity within communities. The traditional niche-assembly theory asserts that species live together in a community only when they differ from one another in resource uses. But this theory has some difficulties in explaining the diversity often observed in specie-rich communities such as tropical forests. As an alternative to the niche theory, Hubbell and other ecologists introduced a neutral model. Hubbell argues that the number of species in a community is controlled by species extinction and immigration or speciation of new species. Assuming that all individuals of all species in a trophically similar com-munity are ecologically equivalent, Hubbell's neutral theory predicts two important statistical distributions. One is the asymptotic log-series distribution for the metacommunities under point mutation speciation, and the other is the zero-sum multinomial distribution for both local communities under dispersal limitation and metacommunities under random fission speciation. Unlike the niche-assembly theory, the neutral theory takes similarity in species and individuals as a starting point for investigating species diversity. Based on the fundamental processes of birth, death, dispersal and spe-ciation, the neutral theory provided the first mechanistic explanation of species abundance distribution commonly observed in natural communities. Since the publication of the neutral theory, there has been much discussion about it, pro and con. In this paper, we summarize recent progress in the assumption, prediction and speciation mode of the neutral theory, including progress in the theory itself, tests about the assumption of the theory, prediction and speciation mode at the metacommunity level. We also suggest that the most important task in the future is to bridge the niche-assembly theory and the neutral theory, and to add species differences to the neutral theory and

  7. Characterization of Highly Sulfonated SIBS Polymer Partially Neutralized With Mg(+2) Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    properties for chem-bio protective clothing. The major component of the triblock copolymer is polyisobutylene ( PIB ), which comprises 70% by weight of...the base polymer. The PIB gives the material low-temperature flexibility as well as excellent barrier properties. The polystyrene (PS) makes up 30...immiscibility of the two components results in a microphase separation where domains of PS are formed in the rubbery PIB matrix (5, 6). The fraction

  8. On the association of neutral and cationic tris(tetrathiafulvaleno)dodecadehydro[18]annulenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Christian Richard; Rue, Kasper Lincke; Christensen, Mikkel Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the first X-ray crystal structure of a tetrathiafulvalene-fused dehydroannulene with peripheral ethylthio substituents. In addition, we have subjected this compound to electrochemical and UV-Vis-NIR/ESR spectroelectrochemical studies to elucidate the degree to which the oxidised s...

  9. Vendor neutral archive in PACS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tapesh Kumar Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An archive is a location containing a collection of records, documents, or other materials of historical importance. An integral part of Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS is archiving. When a hospital needs to migrate a PACS vendor, the complete earlier data need to be migrated in the format of the newly procured PACS. It is both time and money consuming. To address this issue, the new concept of vendor neutral archive (VNA has emerged. A VNA simply decouples the PACS and workstations at the archival layer. This is achieved by developing an application engine that receives, integrates, and transmits the data using the different syntax of a Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM format. Transferring the data belonging to the old PACS to a new one is performed by a process called migration of data. In VNA, a number of different data migration techniques are available to facilitate transfer from the old PACS to the new one, the choice depending on the speed of migration and the importance of data. The techniques include simple DICOM migration, prefetch-based DICOM migration, medium migration, and the expensive non-DICOM migration. "Vendor neutral" may not be a suitable term, and "architecture neutral," "PACS neutral," "content neutral," or "third-party neutral" are probably better and preferred terms. Notwithstanding this, the VNA acronym has come to stay in both the medical IT user terminology and in vendor nomenclature, and radiologists need to be aware of its impact in PACS across the globe.

  10. Advancements in Anion Exchange Membrane Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturgeon, Matthew R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Long, Hai [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Park, Andrew M. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pivovar, Bryan S. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AME-FCs) are of increasingly popular interest as they enable the use of non-Pt fuel cell catalysts, the primary cost limitation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA) is the standard cation that has historically been utilized as the hydroxide conductor in AEMs. Herein we approach AEMs from two directions. First and foremost we study the stability of several different cations in a hydroxide solution at elevated temperatures. We specifically targeted BTMA and methoxy and nitro substituted BTMA. We've also studied the effects of adding an akyl spacer units between the ammonium cation and the phenyl group. In the second approach we use computational studies to predict stable ammonium cations, which are then synthesized and tested for stability. Our unique method to study cation stability in caustic conditions at elevated temperatures utilizes Teflon Parr reactors suitable for use under various temperatures and cation concentrations. NMR analysis was used to determine remaining cation concentrations at specific time points with GCMS analysis verifying product distribution. We then compare the experimental results with calculated modeling stabilities. Our studies show that the electron donating methoxy groups slightly increase stability (compared to that of BTMA), while the electron withdrawing nitro groups greatly decrease stability in base. These results give insight into possible linking strategies to be employed when tethering a BTMA like ammonium cation to a polymeric backbone; thus synthesizing an anion exchange membrane.

  11. Excited state dynamics of the astaxanthin radical cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarie, Sergiu; Förster, Ute; Gildenhoff, Nina; Dreuw, Andreas; Wachtveitl, Josef

    2010-07-01

    Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy in the visible and NIR and ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy were used to examine the excited state dynamics of astaxanthin and its radical cation. For neutral astaxanthin, two kinetic components corresponding to time constants of 130 fs (decay of the S 2 excited state) and 5.2 ps (nonradiative decay of the S 1 excited state) were sufficient to describe the data. The dynamics of the radical cation proved to be more complex. The main absorption band was shifted to 880 nm (D 0 → D 3 transition), showing a weak additional band at 1320 nm (D 0 → D 1 transition). We found, that D 3 decays to the lower-lying D 2 within 100 fs, followed by a decay to D 1 with a time constant of 0.9 ps. The D 1 state itself exhibited a dual behavior, the majority of the population is transferred to the ground state in 4.9 ps, while a small population decays on a longer timescale of 40 ps. Both transitions from D 1 were found to be fluorescent.

  12. Cation diffusion in the natural zeolite clinoptilolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, A.; White, K.J. [Science Research Institute, Chemistry Division, Cockcroft Building, University of Salford, Salford (United Kingdom)

    1999-12-14

    The natural zeolite clinoptilolite is mined commercially in many parts of the world. It is a selective exchanger for the ammonium cation and this has prompted its use in waste water treatment, swimming pools and in fish farming. It is also used to scavenge radioisotopes in nuclear waste clean-up. Further potential uses for clinoptilolite are in soil amendment and remediation. The work described herein provides thermodynamic data on cation exchange processes in clinoptilolite involving the NH{sub 4}, Na, K, Ca, and Mg cations. The data includes estimates of interdiffusion coefficients together with free energies, entropies and energies of activation for the cation exchanges studied. Suggestions are made as to the mechanisms of cation-exchanges involved.

  13. Stilbene dimer radical cations in the radiolyses of stilbenes and 1,2,3,4-tetraphenylcyclobutanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tojo, Sachiko; Morishima, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Akito; Majima, Tetsuro; Takamuku, Setsuo [Osaka Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Scientific and Industrial Research

    1995-03-01

    The reaction of the stilbene radical cation formed by pulse radiolysis or {gamma}-radiolyses is explained based on neutralization as well as the formation of a {pi}-type stilbene dimer radical cation ({pi}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}}), converting to the {sigma}-type St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} ({sigma}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}}). The r-1, c-2, t-3, t-4-tetraphenylcyclobutane radical cation generated in a rigid matrix at 77 K which converted to {sigma}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} upon warming. Both r-1, c-2, t-3, t-4- and r-1, t-2, c-3, t-4-tetraphenylcyclobutane radical cations underwent photochemical cycloreversion to {pi}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} upon irradiation at wavelengths longer than 390 nm at 77 K, and converted to {sigma}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} upon warming. It is suggested that {pi}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} has overlapping arrangements of {pi}-electrons, while {sigma}-St{sub 2}{sup +{center_dot}} has radical and cation centers on the 1- and 4-positions of the C{sub 4} linkage. (author).

  14. Carbamate-linked cationic lipids with different hydrocarbon chains for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jia; Yu, Shijun; Zhu, Jie; Zhi, Defu; Zhao, Yinan; Cui, Shaohui; Zhang, Shubiao

    2016-05-01

    A series of carbamate-linked cationic lipids containing saturated or unsaturated hydrocarbon chains and quaternary ammonium head were designed and synthesized. After recrystallization, carbamate-linked cationic lipids with high purity (over 95%) were obtained. The structures of these lipids were proved by IR spectrum, HR-ESI-MS, HPLC, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR. The liposomes were prepared by using these cationic lipids and neutral lipid DOPE. Particle size and zeta-potential were studied to show that they were suitable for gene transfection. The DNA-bonding ability of C12:0, C14:0 and C18:1 cationic liposomes was much better than others. The results of transfection showed that hydrophobic chains of these lipids have great effects on their transfection activity. The lipids bearing C12:0, C14:0 saturated chains or C18:1 unsaturated chain showed relatively higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity. So these cationic lipids could be used as non-viral gene carriers for further studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Differentiation of N-from C-protonated aniline by neutralization-reionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nold, M J; Wesdemiotis, C

    1996-10-01

    Amino- and ring-protonated aniline are distinguished in the gas phase by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. This method takes advantage of the dramatically different stabilities and reactivities of the neutralized forms of N- and C-protonated aniline, to ascertain thereby the specific protonation site(s). Fast atom bombardment ionization of aniline is found to yield primarily the anilinium cation (N-protonated tautomer). In contrast, chemical ionization with a variety of reagent gases is shown to generate mixtures in which the ring-protonated species predominates.

  16. Cationic Bolaamphiphiles for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Amelia Li Min; Lim, Alisa Xue Ling; Zhu, Yiting; Yang, Yi Yan; Khan, Majad

    2014-05-01

    Advances in medical research have shed light on the genetic cause of many human diseases. Gene therapy is a promising approach which can be used to deliver therapeutic genes to treat genetic diseases at its most fundamental level. In general, nonviral vectors are preferred due to reduced risk of immune response, but they are also commonly associated with low transfection efficiency and high cytotoxicity. In contrast to viral vectors, nonviral vectors do not have a natural mechanism to overcome extra- and intracellular barriers when delivering the therapeutic gene into cell. Hence, its design has been increasingly complex to meet challenges faced in targeting of, penetration of and expression in a specific host cell in achieving more satisfactory transfection efficiency. Flexibility in design of the vector is desirable, to enable a careful and controlled manipulation of its properties and functions. This can be met by the use of bolaamphiphile, a special class of lipid. Unlike conventional lipids, bolaamphiphiles can form asymmetric complexes with the therapeutic gene. The advantage of having an asymmetric complex lies in the different purposes served by the interior and exterior of the complex. More effective gene encapsulation within the interior of the complex can be achieved without triggering greater aggregation of serum proteins with the exterior, potentially overcoming one of the great hurdles faced by conventional single-head cationic lipids. In this review, we will look into the physiochemical considerations as well as the biological aspects of a bolaamphiphile-based gene delivery system.

  17. Interaction of a food-grade cationic surfactant (lauric arginate) with food-grade biopolymers (pectin, carrageenan, xanthan, alginate, dextran, and chitosan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnaud, Marieange; Weiss, Jochen; McClements, David J

    2010-09-08

    Lauric arginate (LAE) is a food-grade cationic surfactant that is a highly potent antimicrobial active against a wide range of food pathogens and spoilage organisms. In compositionally complex environments, the antimicrobial activity of cationic LAE is likely to be impacted by its interactions with other charged components. The purpose of this study was to characterize the interactions between cationic LAE and various food grade biopolymers with different charge characteristics: anionic (pectin, alginate, carrageenan, xanthan), neutral (dextran), and cationic (chitosan). Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and turbidity measurements were used to characterize surfactant-biopolymer interactions and the solubility of any aggregates formed. ITC and turbidity measurements suggested that no complex formation occurred between the cationic LAE and the cationic or neutral biopolymers, although the critical micelle concentration (cmc) of the surfactant was changed because of excluded volume effects. On the other hand, ITC measurements indicated a strong binding interaction between cationic LAE and anionic biopolymers. The amount of surfactant bound and the solubility of the aggregates formed depended strongly on biopolymer type. The results of this study have important implications for the application of LAE in compositionally complex systems.

  18. Combined use of chiral ionic liquid surfactants and neutral cyclodextrins: evaluation of ionic liquid head groups for enantioseparation of neutral compounds in capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yijin; Shamsi, Shahab A

    2014-09-19

    Cyclodextrins (CDs) are most commonly used chiral selectors in capillary electrophoresis (CE). Although the use of neutral CDs and its derivatives have shown to resolve plethora of charged enantiomers, they cannot resolve neutral enantiomers. The use of ionic liquids (ILs) surfactants forming successful complex with CDs present itself an opportunity to resolve neutral enantiomers. In this work, the effect of IL head groups and their complexation ability with heptakis (2,3,6-tri-O-methyl)-β-cyclodextrin (TM-β-CD) was studied for the separation of neutral enantiomers by CE. First, cationic IL type surfactants with different chiral head groups were synthesized. Physicochemical properties such as critical micelle concentration were determined by surface tension, whereas aggregation and polarity were determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The complexation ability of ILs with TM-β-CD was characterized in the gas phase by CE-mass spectrometry. The influence of the type of ILs head group and its concentration on chiral resolution, resolution per unit time and selectivity were investigated for four structurally diverse neutral compounds. The binding constants of the neutral analytes to the IL-CD complex were estimated by y-reciprocal method. The hydrophobicity of the side chain of the IL head group displayed significant effect on the binding constants and enantioseparations.

  19. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  20. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robert J.

    2001-07-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector.

  1. Neutral B meson flavor tagging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, R J

    2001-01-01

    We present an investigation of the use of net charge and kaon identification to tag the flavor of neutral B mesons. The net charge of the neutral B meson decay products is zero if all charged particles are used and slightly non-zero if only undiscriminated hadronic final states are used. The net charge of the kaons alone correctly tags the identity of the neutral meson in at least a third of all decays. We have parametrized the particle identification capability of several techniques, such as dE/dx in time projection chambers, LEP/SLC ring-imaging chambers and an enhanced BaBar DIRC. Using these parametrisations we compare the relative tagging power of each technique to that of an ideal detector. (8 refs).

  2. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  3. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  4. Monomer and dimer radical cations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tomi Nath

    2009-06-11

    Pulse radiolytic generation of monomeric and dimeric cations of benzene, toluene, and naphthalene in aqueous acid media at room temperature and their spectrophotometric characterization is discussed. Results presented include measurements of each aromatic's solubility in H(2)O-H(2)SO(4) and H(2)O-HClO(4) media over the acidity range pH 1 to H(0) -7.0, facile oxidative generation, and real-time identification of appropriate cationic transients with respective lambda(max) (nm) and epsilon (M(-1) cm(-1)) values measured as follows: C(6)H(6)(*+) (443, 1145 +/- 75), C(6)H(5)CH(3)(*+) (428, 1230 +/- 90), C(10)H(8)(*+) (381, 3650 +/- 225, and 687, 2210 +/- 160), (C(6)H(6))(2)(*+) (860, 2835 +/- 235), (C(6)H(5)CH(3))(2)(*+) (950, 1685 +/- 155), and (C(10)H(8))(2)(*+) (1040, 4170 +/- 320). Kinetic measurements reveal the respective formation rates of monomeric cations to be near-diffusion controlled, while the forward rate values for the dimeric species generation are marginally slower. The proton activity corrected pK(a) values are found to remain between -2.6 and -1.3 for the ArH(*+) species (C(6)H(6)(*+) most acidic, C(10)H(8)(*+) least acidic), while the pK(a) values of (ArH)(2)(*+) species vary from -5.0 to -3.0 ((C(6)H(6))(2)(*+) most acidic, (C(10)H(8))(2)(*+) least acidic). In H(0) -5 in aqueous H(2)SO(4), the respective stabilization energy of (C(6)H(6))(2)(*+), (C(6)H(5)CH(3))(2)(*+), and (C(10)H(8))(2)(*+) is estimated to be 16.6, 15.0, and 13.7 kcal mol(-1). Thus, the aqueous acid solution emerges as an alternative medium for typical radical-cationic studies, while offering compatibility for the deprotonated radical characterization near neutral pH.

  5. Analysis of immobilized artificial membrane retention factors for both neutral and ionic species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Michael H; Acree, William E; Fahr, Alfred; Liu, Xiangli

    2013-07-12

    Retention data on an immobilised artificial membrane have been taken from the work of Li et al. and from Liu et al., and have been correlated with a set of descriptors that includes descriptors for ionized species, that is anions from deprotonated acids and cations from protonated bases. Log k(IAM) values can be predicted for acids or bases that are partially ionized at the experimental pH and log k(IAM) values for acids and bases can be predicted as a function of the fraction present as the ionized species, equivalent to prediction as a function of pH. It is shown that anions reduce the value of log k(IAM) by about 1.1 log units but that cations have almost no effect by comparison to the neutral species. By comparison to non-polar solvents, carboxylate anions and protonated base cations are considerably stabilized by both water and the IAM phase to about 6-8 log units and so the rather small influence of anions (-1.1 log unit) and cations (-0.1 log unit) on log k(IAM) is due to substantial cancellation of these stabilization effects. Indeed, the effect of change of phase from water to IAM on the neutral species is at least as large as the effect of change of phase on the ionic species.

  6. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  7. Cation locations and dislocations in zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Luis James

    The focus of this dissertation is the extra-framework cation sites in a particular structural family of zeolites, chabazite. Cation sites play a particularly important role in the application of these sieves for ion exchange, gas separation, catalysis, and, when the cation is a proton, acid catalysis. Structural characterization is commonly performed through the use of powder diffraction and Rietveld analysis of powder diffraction data. Use of high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance, in the study of the local order of the various constituent nuclei of zeolites, complements well the long-range order information produced by diffraction. Recent developments in solid state NMR techniques allow for increased study of disorder in zeolites particularly when such phenomena test the detection limits of diffraction. These two powerful characterization techniques, powder diffraction and NMR, offer many insights into the complex interaction of cations with the zeolite framework. The acids site locations in SSZ-13, a high silica chabazite, and SAPO-34, a silicoaluminophosphate with the chabazite structure, were determined. The structure of SAPO-34 upon selective hydration was also determined. The insensitivity of X-rays to hydrogen was avoided through deuteration of the acid zeolites and neutron powder diffraction methods. Protons at inequivalent positions were found to have different acid strengths in both SSZ-13 and SAPO-34. Other light elements are incorporated into zeolites in the form of extra-framework cations, among these are lithium, sodium, and calcium. Not amenable by X-ray powder diffraction methods, the positions of such light cations in fully ion-exchanged versions of synthetic chabazite were determined through neutron powder diffraction methods. The study of more complex binary cation systems were conducted. Powder diffraction and solid state NMR methods (MAS, MQMAS) were used to examine cation site preferences and dislocations in these mixed-akali chabazites

  8. Traps for neutral radioactive atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Sprouse, G D; Grossman, J S; Orozco, L A; Pearson, M R

    2002-01-01

    We describe several methods for efficiently injecting a small number of radioactive atoms into a laser trap. The characteristics of laser traps that make them desirable for physics experiments are discussed and several different experimental directions are described. We describe recent experiments with the alkali element Fr and point to future directions of the neutral atom trapping program.

  9. Neutral Models with Generalised Speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haegeman, Bart; Etienne, Rampal S.

    Hubbell's neutral theory claims that ecological patterns such as species abundance distributions can be explained by a stochastic model based on simple assumptions. One of these assumptions, the point mutation assumption, states that every individual has the same probability to speciate. Etienne et

  10. Charge transfer from 2-aminopurine radical cation and radical anion to nucleobases: A pulse radiolysis study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manoj, P. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Mohan, H. [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Mittal, J.P. [Radiation Chemistry and Chemical Dynamics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Manoj, V.M. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Aravindakumar, C.T. [School of Chemical Sciences, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India)], E-mail: CT-Aravindakumar@rocketmail.com

    2007-01-08

    Pulse radiolysis study has been carried out to investigate the properties of the radical cation of 2-aminopurine (2AP) and the probable charge transfer from the radical cation and radical anion of 2AP to natural nucleobases in aqueous medium. The radical cation of 2AP was produced by the reaction of sulfate radical anion (SO{sub 4}{sup dot-}). The time resolved absorption spectra obtained by the reaction of SO{sub 4}{sup dot-} with 2AP at neutral pH have two distinct maxima at 380 and 470nm and is assigned to the formation of a neutral radical of the form 2AP-N{sup 2}(-H){sup dot} (k{sub 2}=4.7x10{sup 9}dm{sup 3}mol{sup -1}s{sup -1} at pH 7). This neutral radical is formed from the deprotonation reaction of a very short-lived radical cation of 2AP. The transient absorption spectra recorded at pH 10.2 have two distinct maxima at 400 and 480nm and is assigned to the formation of a nitrogen centered radical (2AP-N(9){sup dot}). As the hole transport from 2AP to guanine is a highly probable process, the reaction of SO{sub 4}{sup dot-} is carried out in the presence of guanosine, adenosine and inosine. The spectrum obtained in the presence of guanosine was significantly different from that in the absence and it showed prominent absorption maxima at 380 and 470nm, and a weak broad maximum centered around 625nm which match well with the reported spectrum of a neutral guanine radical (G(-H){sup dot}). The electron transfer reaction from the radical anion of 2AP to thymine (T), cytidine (Cyd) and uridine (Urd) was also investigated at neutral pH. Among the three pyrimidines, only the transient spectrum in the presence of T gave a significant difference from the spectral features of the electron adduct of 2AP, which showed a prominent absorption maximum at 340nm and this spectrum is similar to the electron adduct spectrum of T. The preferential reduction of thymine by 2AP{sup dot-} and the oxidation of guanosine by 2AP{sup dot+} clearly follow the oxidation

  11. Divalent cation shrinks DNA but inhibits its compaction with trivalent cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongu, Chika; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Chen, Ning; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2016-05-01

    Our observation reveals the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA 166 kbp) by fluorescence microscopy. It was found that divalent cations, Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. As the control experiment, we have confirmed the minimum effect of monovalent cation, Na(+) on the DNA higher-order structure. We interpret the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counterions. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we consider the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly charged polyelectrolyte, double-stranded DNA, by the 3+ cations. In contrast, the presence of 2+ cation decreases the gain of entropy contribution by the ion-exchange between monovalent and 3+ ions.

  12. Next generation macrocyclic and acyclic cationic lipids for gene transfer: Synthesis and in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Abdul Khalique, Nada; Raju, Liji; Abdulhai, Mohamad; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2015-10-01

    Previously we reported the synthesis and in vitro evaluation of four novel, short-chain cationic lipid gene delivery vectors, characterized by acyclic or macrocyclic hydrophobic regions composed of, or derived from, two 7-carbon chains. Herein we describe a revised synthesis of an expanded library of related cationic lipids to include extended chain analogues, their formulation with plasmid DNA (pDNA) and in vitro delivery into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The formulations were evaluated against each other based on structural differences in the hydrophobic domain and headgroup. Structurally the library is divided into four sets based on lipids derived from two 7- or two 11-carbon hydrophobic chains, C7 and C11 respectively, which possess either a dimethylamine or a trimethylamine derived headgroup. Each set includes four cationic lipids based on an acyclic or macrocyclic, saturated or unsaturated hydrophobic domain. All lipids were co-formulated with the commercial cationic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC) in a 1:1 molar ratio, along with one of two distinct neutral co-lipids, cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) in an overall cationic-to-neutral lipid molar ratio of 3:2. Binding of lipid formulations with DNA, and packing morphology associated with the individual lipid-DNA complexes were characterized by gel electrophoresis and small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD), respectively. As a general trend, lipoplex formulations based on mismatched binary cationic lipids, composed of a shorter C7 lipid and the longer lipid EPC (C14), were generally associated with higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity than their more closely matched C11/EPC binary lipid formulation counterparts. Furthermore, the cyclic lipids gave transfection levels as high as or greater than their acyclic counterparts, and formulations with cholesterol exhibited higher transfection and lower cytotoxicity than those

  13. Instructed neutralization, spontaneous neutralization and prevented neutralization after an obsession-like thought.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van den Hout; M. Kindt; T. Weiland; M. Peters

    2002-01-01

    Building on 2 earlier experiments (S. Rachman et al [1996] and M. A. van den Hout [2001]) the present study investigated the effects of neutralizing the consequences of an obsession-like thought in healthy participants. Just like in the earlier studies, writing out and thinking of such a thought gen

  14. Drug carrier systems based on water-soluble cationic beta-cyclodextrin polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianshu; Xiao, Huining; Li, Jiehua; Zhong, YinPing

    2004-07-08

    This study was designed to synthesize, characterize and investigate the drug inclusion property of a series of novel cationic beta-cyclodextrin polymers (CPbetaCDs). Proposed water-soluble polymers were synthesized from beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD), epichlorohydrin (EP) and choline chloride (CC) through a one-step polymerization procedure by varying molar ratio of EP and CC to beta-CD. Physicochemical properties of the polymers were characterized with colloidal titration, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR), gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and aqueous solubility determination. The formation of naproxen/CPbetaCDs inclusion complexes was confirmed by NMR and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Cationic beta-CD polymers showed better hemolytic activities than parent beta-CD and neutral beta-CD polymer in hemolysis test. The morphological study of erythrocytes revealed a cell membrane invagination induced by the cationic groups. The effects of molecular weight and charge density of the polymers on their inclusion and release performance of naproxen were also investigated through phase-solubility and dissolution studies. It was found that the cationic beta-CD polymers with high molecular weight or low charge density exhibited better drug inclusion and dissolution abilities.

  15. Rocket Experiment For Neutral Upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, D. R.; Lessard, M.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the CHAMP satellite from 2004 show relatively small scale heating in the thermosphere. Several different mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The RENU 2 rocket mission includes a suite of 14 instruments which will acquire data to help understand processes involved in neutral upwelling in the cusp. Neutral, ion, and electron measurements will be made to provide an assessment of the upwelling process. SUPERDarn measurements of large- scale Joule heating in the cusp during overflight will also be acquired. Small-scale data which could possibly be associated with Alfvén waves, will be acquired using onboard electric field measurements. In-situ measurement of precipitating electrons and all other measurements will be used in thermodynamic and electrodynamic models for comparison to the observed upwelling.

  16. Optical Neutrality: Invisibility without Cloaking

    CERN Document Server

    Hodges, Reed; Durach, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We show that it is possible to design an invisible wavelength-sized metal-dielectric metamaterial object without evoking cloaking. Our approach is an extension of the neutral inclusion concept by Zhou and Hu [Phys.Rev.E 74, 026607 (2006)] to Mie scatterers. We demonstrate that an increase of metal fraction in the metamaterial leads to a transition from dielectric-like to metal-like scattering, which proceeds through invisibility or optical neutrality of the scatterer. Formally this is due to cancellation of multiple scattering orders, similarly to plasmonic cloaking introduced by Alu and Engheta [Phys.Rev.E 72, 016623 (2005)], but without introduction of the separation of the scatterer into cloak and hidden regions.

  17. Neutral Hydrogen in Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    McKay, N P F; Brough, S; Forbes, D A; Barnes, D G

    2002-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a study of the neutral hydrogen (HI) properties of an X-ray selected sample of nearby loose galaxy groups. This forms part of a multi-wavelength investigation (X-ray, optical and radio) of the formation and evolution of galaxies within a group environment. Some initial findings of an ATNF Parkes Multibeam wide-area neutral hydrogen imaging survey of 17 nearby galaxy groups include two new, potentially isolated clouds of HI in the NGC 1052 and NGC 5044 groups and significant amounts of HI within the group virial radii of groups NGC 3557 and IC 1459 - two groups with complex X-ray structures that suggest they may still be in the act of virialisation. Here we present ATCA high-resolution synthesis-imaging follow-up observations of the distribution and kinematics of HI in these four groups.

  18. Neutrality and the social contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J. Carroll

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the fact of moral disagreement, theories of state neutrality which rely on moral premises will have limited application, in that they will fail to motivate anyone who rejects the moral premises on which they are based. By contrast, contractarian theories can be consistent with moral scepticism, and can therefore avoid this limitation. In this paper, I construct a contractarian model which I claim is sceptically consistent and includes a principle of state neutrality as a necessary condition. The principle of neutrality which I derive incorporates two conceptions of neutrality (consequential neutrality and justificatory neutrality which have usually been thought of as distinct and incompatible. I argue that contractarianism gives us a unified account of these conceptions. Ultimately, the conclusion that neutrality can be derived without violating the constraint established by moral scepticism turns out to rely on an assumption of equal precontractual bargaining power. I do not attempt to defend this assumption here. If the assumption cannot be defended in a sceptically consistent fashion, then the argument for neutrality given here is claimed to be morally minimal, rather than fully consistent with moral scepticism. L’existence d’un désaccord sur les questions morales fait en sorte que les constructions théoriques de la neutralité de l’État se fondant sur des prémisses morales ne peuvent avoir qu’une application limitée, car elles échouent à motiver quiconque rejette ces prémisses fondatrices. Par opposition, les théories contractualistes peuvent s’accommoder d’un scepticisme moral et peuvent donc éviter cette limitation. Cet article développe un modèle contractualiste compatible avec le scepticisme et qui inclut comme condition nécessaire la neutralité de l’État. Le principe de neutralité que je dérive à partir de ce modèle incorpore deux conceptions de la neutralité, soit la neutralité des cons

  19. Investigation of DNA condensing properties of amphiphilic triblock cationic polymers by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidgi-Guigui, Nathalie; Guis, Christine; Brissault, Blandine; Kichler, Antoine; Leborgne, Christian; Scherman, Daniel; Labdi, Sid; Curmi, Patrick A

    2010-11-16

    Introduction of nucleic acids into cells is an important biotechnology research field which also holds great promise for therapeutic applications. One of the key steps in the gene delivery process is compaction of DNA into nanometric particles. The study of DNA condensing properties of three linear cationic triblock copolymers poly(ethylenimine-b-propylene glycol-b-ethylenimine), namely, LPEI(50)-PPG(36)-LPEI(50), LPEI(19)-PPG(36)-LPEI(19), and LPEI(14)-PPG(68)-LPEI(14), indicates that proper DNA condensation is driven by both the charge and the size of the respective cationic hydrophilic linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) and neutral hydrophobic poly(propylene glycol) (PPG) parts. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the interactions of the triblock copolymers with plasmid DNA at the single molecule level and to enlighten the mechanism involved in DNA condensation.

  20. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  1. Optimization of Neutral Atom Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shappirio, M.; Coplan, M.; Balsamo, E.; Chornay, D.; Collier, M.; Hughes, P.; Keller, J.; Ogilvie, K.; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01

    The interactions between plasma structures and neutral atom populations in interplanetary space can be effectively studied with energetic neutral atom imagers. For neutral atoms with energies less than 1 keV, the most efficient detection method that preserves direction and energy information is conversion to negative ions on surfaces. We have examined a variety of surface materials and conversion geometries in order to identify the factors that determine conversion efficiency. For chemically and physically stable surfaces smoothness is of primary importance while properties such as work function have no obvious correlation to conversion efficiency. For the noble metals, tungsten, silicon, and graphite with comparable smoothness, conversion efficiency varies by a factor of two to three. We have also examined the way in which surface conversion efficiency varies with the angle of incidence of the neutral atom and have found that the highest efficiencies are obtained at angles of incidence greater then 80deg. The conversion efficiency of silicon, tungsten and graphite were examined most closely and the energy dependent variation of conversion efficiency measured over a range of incident angles. We have also developed methods for micromachining silicon in order to reduce the volume to surface area over that of a single flat surface and have been able to reduce volume to surface area ratios by up to a factor of 60. With smooth micro-machined surfaces of the optimum geometry, conversion efficiencies can be increased by an order of magnitude over instruments like LENA on the IMAGE spacecraft without increase the instruments mass or volume.

  2. Neutral Naturalness with Bifundamental Gluinos

    CERN Document Server

    Gherghetta, Tony; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group $SU(3)_C$ and a separate $SU(3)_C'$ group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other non-colored states such as electroweakinos, $Z'$ bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  3. Neutral naturalness with bifundamental gluinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherghetta, Tony; Nguyen, Minh; Thomas, Zachary

    2016-12-01

    We study constraints on one-loop neutral naturalness at the LHC by considering gluon partners which are required to ameliorate the tuning in the Higgs mass-squared arising at two loops. This is done with a simple orbifold model of folded supersymmetry which not only contains color-neutral stops but also bifundamental gluinos that are charged under the Standard Model color group S U (3 )C and a separate S U (3 )C' group. The bifundamental gluinos reduce the Higgs mass tuning at two loops and maintain naturalness provided the gluinos are lighter than approximately 1.9 TeV for a 5 TeV cutoff scale. Limits from the LHC already forbid bifundamental gluinos below 1.4 TeV, and other noncolored states such as electroweakinos, Z' bosons and dark sector bound states may be probed at future colliders. The search for bifundamental gluinos therefore provides a direct probe of one-loop neutral naturalness that can be fully explored at the LHC.

  4. Magnetic Resonance Studies of Proton Loss from Carotenoid Radical Cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kispert, Lowell D [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Focsan, A Ligia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Konovalova, Tatyana A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lawrence, Jesse [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bowman, Michael K [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Molnar, Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deli, Jozsef [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-06-11

    Carotenoids, intrinsic components of reaction centers and pigment-protein complexes in photosynthetic membranes, play a photoprotective role and serve as a secondary electron donor. Before optimum use of carotenoids can be made in artificial photosynthetic systems, their robust nature in living materials requires extensive characterization of their electron transfer, radical trapping ability, stability, structure in and on various hosts, and photochemical behavior. Pulsed ENDOR and 2D-HYSCORE studies combined with DFT calculations reveal that photo-oxidation of natural zeaxanthin (I) and violaxanthin (II) on silica-alumina produces not only the carotenoid radical cations (Car•+) but also neutral radicals (#Car•) by proton loss from the methyl groups at positions 5 or 5', and possibly 9 or 9' and 13 or 13'. Notably, the proton loss favored in I at the 5 position by DFT calculations, is unfavorable in II due to the epoxide at the 5, 6 position. DFT calculations predict the isotropic methyl proton couplings of 8-10 MHz for Car•+ which agree with the ENDOR for carotenoid α-conjugated radical cations. Large α-proton hyperfine coupling constants (>10 MHz) determined from HYSCORE are assigned from the DFT calculations to neutral carotenoid radicals. Proton loss upon photolysis was also examined as a function of carotenoid polarity [Lycopene (III) versus 8'-apo-β-caroten-8'-al (IV)]; hydrogen bonding [Lutein (V) versus III]; host [silica-alumina versus MCM-41 molecular sieve]; and substituted metal in MCM-41. Loss of H+ from the 5(5'), 9(9') or 13(13') methyl positions has importance in photoprotection. Photoprotection involves nonphotochemical quenching (NPQ) in which 1Ch1* decays via energy transfer to the carotenoid which returns to the ground state by thermal dissipation; or via electron transfer to form a charge transfer state (I •+…Chl•-), lower in energy than 1Chl*. Formation of I •+ results in bond

  5. Types and Degrees of Vowel Neutrality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rebrus, Péter; Törkenczy, Miklós

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that neutrality in a harmony system is a gradient property since it is due to a vowel's participation in different patterns that are considered to be indicators of neutral behaviour in harmony...

  6. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  7. Plasma/Neutral-Beam Etching Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William; Cohen, Samuel; Cuthbertson, John; Manos, Dennis; Motley, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Energies of neutral particles controllable. Apparatus developed to produce intense beams of reactant atoms for simulating low-Earth-orbit oxygen erosion, for studying beam-gas collisions, and for etching semiconductor substrates. Neutral beam formed by neutralization and reflection of accelerated plasma on metal plate. Plasma ejected from coaxial plasma gun toward neutralizing plate, where turned into beam of atoms or molecules and aimed at substrate to be etched.

  8. Electroweak Chiral Lagrangian for Neutral Higgs Boson

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shun-Zhi; WANG Qing

    2008-01-01

    A neutral Higgs boson is added into the traditional electroweak chiral Lagrangian by writing down all possible high dimension operators. The matter part of the Lagrangian is investigated in detail. We find that if Higgs field dependence of Yukawa couplings can be factorized out, there will be no flavour changing neutral couplings; neutral Higgs can induce coupling between light and heavy neutrinos.

  9. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  10. Metalated Nitriles: Cation-Controlled Cyclizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Fraser F.; Wei, Yunjing; Liu, Wang; Zhang, Zhiyu

    2008-01-01

    Judicious choice of cation allows the selective cyclization of substituted γ-hydroxynitriles to trans- or cis-decalins and trans- or cis-bicyclo[5.4.0]-undecanes. The stereoselectivities are consistent with deprotonations generating two distinctly different metalated nitriles: an internally coordinated nitrile anion with BuLi, and a C-magnesiated nitrile with i-PrMgCl. Employing cations to control the geometry of metalated nitriles permits stereodivergent cyclizations with complete control over the stereochemistry of the quaternary, nitrile-bearing carbon. PMID:17579448

  11. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang-Yong; LIU Bo; SONG Zhi-Tang; FENG Song-Lin

    2009-01-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demon-strates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that sma//molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  12. Cation Effect on Copper Chemical Mechanical Polishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Yong; Liu, Bo; Song, Zhi-Tang; Feng, Song-Lin

    2009-02-01

    We examine the effect of cations in solutions containing benzotriazole (BTA) and H2O2 on copper chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). On the base of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and material removal rate (MRR) results, it is found that ammonia shows the highest MRR as well as good surface after CMP, while KOH demonstrates the worst performance. These results reveal a mechanism that small molecules with lone-pairs rather than molecules with steric effect and common inorganic cations are better for copper CMP process, which is indirectly confirmed by open circuit potential (OCP).

  13. Cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crivello, J.V.

    1992-10-01

    The objectives of this project are to design and synthesize novel monomers which orginate from renewable biological sources and to carry out their rapid, efficient, pollution-free and energy efficient cationic polymerization to useful products under the influence of ultraviolet light or heat. A summary of the results of the past year's research on cationically polymerizable monomers derived from renewable sources is presented. Three major areas of investigation corresponding to the different classes of naturally occurring starting materials were investigated; epoxidized terpenes and natural rubber and vinyl ethers from alcohols and carbohydrates.

  14. Cationic dialkylarylphosphates: a new family of bio-inspired cationic lipids for gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Corre, Stéphanie S; Belmadi, Nawal; Berchel, Mathieu; Le Gall, Tony; Haelters, Jean-Pierre; Lehn, Pierre; Montier, Tristan; Jaffrès, Paul-Alain

    2015-01-28

    In this work that aims to synthesize and evaluate new cationic lipids as vectors for gene delivery, we report the synthesis of a series of cationic lipids in which a phosphate functional group acts as a linker to assemble on a molecular scale, two lipid chains and one cationic polar head. The mono or dicationic moiety is connected to the phosphate group by an aryl spacer. In this work, two synthesis strategies were evaluated. The first used the Atherton-Todd coupling reaction to introduce a phenolic derivative to dioleylphosphite. The second strategy used a sequential addition of lipid alcohol and a phenolic derivative on POCl3. The two methods are efficient, but the latter allows larger yields. Different polar head groups were introduced, thus producing amphiphilic compounds possessing either one permanent (N-methyl-imidazolium, pyridinium, trimethylammonium) or two permanent cationic charges. All these cationic lipids were formulated as liposomal solutions and characterized (size and zeta potential). They formed stable liposomal solutions both in water (at pH 7.0) and in a weakly acidic medium (at pH 5.5). Finally, this new generation of cationic lipids was used to deliver DNA into various human-derived epithelial cells cultured in vitro. Compared with Lipofectamine used as a reference commercial lipofection reagent, some cationic dialkylarylphosphates were able to demonstrate potent gene transfer abilities, and noteworthily, monocationic derivatives were much more efficient than dicationic analogues.

  15. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewinski, P.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective j

  16. ORNL positive ion neutral beam program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whealton, J.H.; Haselton, H.H.; Barber, G.C.

    1978-01-01

    The neutral beam group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has constructed neutral beam generators for the ORMAK and PLT devices, is presently constructing neutral beam devices for the ISX and PDX devices, and is contemplating the construction of neutral beam systems for the advanced TNS device. These neutral beam devices stem from the pioneering work on ion sources of G. G. Kelley and O. B. Morgan. We describe the ion sources under development at this Laboratory, the beam optics exhibited by these sources, as well as some theoretical considerations, and finally the remainder of the beamline design.

  17. Cation Selectivity in Biological Cation Channels Using Experimental Structural Information and Statistical Mechanical Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Justin John; Peyser, Alexander; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Cation selective channels constitute the gate for ion currents through the cell membrane. Here we present an improved statistical mechanical model based on atomistic structural information, cation hydration state and without tuned parameters that reproduces the selectivity of biological Na+ and Ca2+ ion channels. The importance of the inclusion of step-wise cation hydration in these results confirms the essential role partial dehydration plays in the bacterial Na+ channels. The model, proven reliable against experimental data, could be straightforwardly used for designing Na+ and Ca2+ selective nanopores.

  18. Effect of synthetic cationic protein on mechanoexcitability of vagal afferent nerve subtypes in guinea pig esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaoyong; Ouyang, Ann

    2011-12-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by increased infiltration and degranulation of eosinophils in the esophagus. Whether eosinophil-derived cationic proteins regulate esophageal sensory nerve function is still unknown. Using synthetic cationic protein to investigate such effect, we performed extracellular recordings from vagal nodose or jugular neurons in ex vivo esophageal-vagal preparations with intact nerve endings in the esophagus. Nerve excitabilities were determined by comparing action potentials evoked by esophageal distensions before and after perfusion of synthetic cationic protein poly-L-lysine (PLL) with or without pretreatment with poly-L-glutamic acid (PLGA), which neutralized cationic charges of PLL. Perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials in esophageal nodose C fibers but increased their responses to esophageal distension. This potentiation effect lasted for 30 min after washing out of PLL. Pretreatment with PLGA significantly inhibited PLL-induced mechanohyperexcitability of esophageal nodose C fibers. In esophageal nodose Aδ fibers, perfusion with PLL did not evoke action potentials. In contrast to nodose C fibers, both the spontaneous discharges and the responses to esophageal distension in nodose Aδ fibers were decreased by perfusion with PLL, which can be restored after washing out PLL for 30-60 min. Pretreatment with PLGA attenuated PLL-induced decrease in spontaneous discharge and mechanoexcitability of esophageal nodose Aδ fibers. In esophageal jugular C fibers, PLL neither evoked action potentials nor changed their responses to esophageal distension. Collectively, these data demonstrated that synthetic cationic protein did not evoke action potential discharges of esophageal vagal afferents but had distinctive sensitization effects on their responses to esophageal distension.

  19. Increased localized delivery of piroxicam by cationic nanoparticles after intra-articular injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Rae; Ho, Myoung Jin; Kim, Sang Hyun; Cho, Ha Ra; Kim, Han Sol; Choi, Yong Seok; Choi, Young Wook; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Piroxicam (PRX), a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is prescribed to relieve postoperative and/or chronic joint pain. However, its oral administration often results in serious gastrointestinal adverse effects including duodenal ulceration. Thus, a novel cationic nanoparticle (NP) was explored to minimize the systemic exposure and increase the retention time of PRX in the joint after intra-articular (IA) injection, by forming micrometer-sized electrostatic clusters with endogenous hyaluronic acid (HA) in the synovial cavity. PRX-loaded NPs consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid), Eudragit RL, and polyvinyl alcohol were constructed with the following characteristics: particle size of 220 nm, zeta potential of 11.5 mV in phosphate-buffered saline, and loading amount of 4.0% (w/w) of PRX. In optical and hyperspectral observations, the cationic NPs formed more than 50 μm-sized aggregates with HA, which was larger than the intercellular gaps between synoviocytes. In an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC0–24 h) and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) of PRX after IA injection of the cationic NPs were <70% (P<0.05) and 60% (P<0.05), respectively, compared to those obtained from drug solution. Moreover, the drug concentration in joint tissue 24 h after dosing with the cationic NPs was 3.2-fold (P<0.05) and 1.8-fold (P<0.05) higher than that from drug solution and neutrally charged NPs, respectively. Therefore, we recommend the IA cationic NP therapy as an effective alternative to traditional oral therapy with PRX, as it increases drug retention selectively in the joint. PMID:27895468

  20. Neutralization of acidic raindrops on leaves of agricultural crop and boreal forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Adams, C.M.; Gaber, B.A.

    1986-10-01

    The abilities of foliage of selected agricultural crop and native boreal forest species to neutralize acidic raindrops were compared. The species differed widely in their responses. Neutralization was influenced to a large extent by leaf wettability and was poorly related with species' susceptibility to foliar injury from acid rain sprayings. Little neutralization of pH 3.0 droplets occurred on very waxy leaves, e.g. cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.), due to the small contact area between the leaf surface and raindrops. In contrast, on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) leaves, which are pubescent and easily wettable, neutralization was considerable. For all agricultural crop species examined, the pH of droplets drying on cotyledons was consistently higher than on the leaves. The pH values of raindrops were also higher when the foliage was injured by the acid rain, probably due to leakage of cellular contents. Among boreal forest species examined, bunchberry (Cornus canadensis L.) was particularly good at neutralizing natural acid rain, increasing the pH from 3.9 to 6.6 after 9 hr of foliar contact, while the response of other boreal species ranged from a final pH of 4.8 to 5.7 under the same conditions. Simulated raindrops on wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis L.) were never neutralized but increased in acidity as they evaporated. Chemical analyses of droplets collected from foliage showed calcium (Ca) and potassium (K) to be the major cations entering the neutralized droplets. Neutralization of acidic raindrops appears to occur through two processes; solubilization of alkaline dusts and exudates on the leaf surface, and ion exchange removal of H/sup +/ by the foliage. 14 references.

  1. Neutralization of acidic raindrops on leaves of agricultural crop and boreal forest species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, T.C.; Adams, C.M.; Gaber, B.A.

    1986-11-01

    The abilities of foliage of selected agricultural crop and native boreal forest species to neutralize acidic raindrops were compared. The species differed widely in their responses. Neutralization was influenced to a large extent by leaf wettability and was poorly related with species' susceptibility to foliar injury from acid rain sprayings. Little neutralization of pH 3.0 droplets occurred on very waxy leaves, e.g. cabbage (Brassica oleracea L.), due to the small contact area between the leaf surface and raindrops. In contrast, on sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) and radish (Raphanus sativus L.) leaves, which are pubescent and easily wettable, neutralization was considerable. For all agricultural crop species examined, the pH of droplets drying on cotyledons was consistently higher than on the leaves. The pH values of raindrops were also higher when the foliage was injured by the acid rain, probably due to leakage of cellular contents. Among boreal forest species examined, bunchberry (Cornus canadensis L.) was particularly good at neutralizing natural acid rain, increasing the pH from 3.9 to 6.6 after 9 hr of foliar contact, while the response of other boreal species ranged from a final pH of 4.8 to 5.7 under the same conditions. Simulated raindrops on wild sarsaparilla (Aralia nudicaulis L.) were never neutralized but increased in acidity as they evaporated. Chemical analyses of droplets collected from foliage showed calcium and potassium to be the major cations entering the neutralized droplets. Neutralization of acidic raindrops appears to occur through two processes: solubilization of alkaline dusts and exudates on the leaf surface, and ion exchange removal of H/sup +/ by the foliage. 14 refs.

  2. Controlled Cationic Polymerization of N-Vinylcarbazol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuyken, O.; Rieß, G.; Loontjens, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Cationic polymerization of N-Vinylcarbazol (NVC) was initiated with 1-iodo-1-(2-methylpropyloxy)ethane in the presence of N(n-Bu)4ClO4 and without addition of this activator. Furthermore, 1-chloro-1-(2-methylpropyloxy) ethane, with and without activator has been applied as initiator for NVC. These i

  3. Anionic/cationic complexes in hair care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Lenick, Tony

    2011-01-01

    The formulation of cosmetic products is always more complicated than studying the individual components in aqueous solution. This is because there are numerous interactions between the components, which make the formulation truly more than the sum of the parts. This article will look at interactions between anionic and cationic surfactants and offer insights into how to use these interactions advantageously in making formulations.

  4. Resonance raman studies of phenylcyclopropane radical cations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godbout, J.T.; Zuilhof, H.; Heim, G.; Gould, I.R.; Goodman, J.L.; Dinnocenzo, J.P.; Myers Kelley, A.

    2000-01-01

    Resonance Raman spectra of the radical cations of phenylcyclopropane and trans-1-phenyl-2-methylcyclopropane are reported. A near-UV pump pulse excites a photosensitizer which oxidizes the species of interest, and a visible probe pulse delayed by 35 ns obtains the spectrum of the radical ion. The tr

  5. Mixed cation effect in sodium aluminosilicate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Jonas; Smedskjær, Morten Mattrup; Mauro, John C.

    , network structure, and the resistances associated with the deformation processes in mixed cation glasses by partially substituting magnesium for calcium and calcium for lithium in sodium aluminosilicate glasses. We use Raman and 27Al NMR spectroscopies to obtain insights into the structural...

  6. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M...... alkali metal chlorides as well as BaCl2, NaBr and (CH3CH2CH2)(4)NBr were used to investigate the effects of both the ionic charge, size and shape. In 1: 1 electrolytes using small ions only three peaks are present: a sharp cathodic peak at ca. - 0.6 V vs, SCE representing both the insertion of cations...... complicating reproducibility when employing PPy(DBS) polymers as actuators. When the cation is doubly charged, it enters the film less readily, and anions dominate the mobility. Using a large and bulky cation switches the mechanism to apparently total anion motion. The changes in area of the three peaks...

  7. Cationic lipids and cationic ligands induce DNA helix denaturation: detection of single stranded regions by KMnO4 probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, T K; Gopal, Vijaya; Rao, N Madhusudhana

    2003-09-25

    Cationic lipids and cationic polymers are widely used in gene delivery. Using 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) as a cationic lipid, we have investigated the stability of the DNA in DOTAP:DNA complexes by probing with potassium permanganate (KMnO4). Interestingly, thymidines followed by a purine showed higher susceptibility to cationic ligand-mediated melting. Similar studies performed with other water-soluble cationic ligands such as polylysine, protamine sulfate and polyethyleneimine also demonstrated melting of the DNA but with variations. Small cations such as spermine and spermidine and a cationic detergent, cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, also rendered the DNA susceptible to modification by KMnO4. The data presented here provide direct proof for melting of DNA upon interaction with cationic lipids. Structural changes subsequent to binding of cationic lipids/ligands to DNA may lead to instability and formation of DNA bubbles in double-stranded DNA.

  8. Quantum mechanical investigations on the role of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates in organocatalyzed reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Pierre O., E-mail: pierre.hubin@unamur.be [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Jacquemin, Denis [Laboratoire CEISAM – UMR CNRS 6230, Université de Nantes, 2 rue de la Houssinière, BP92208, 44322 Nantes Cedex 3 (France); Institut Universitaire de France 103, Boulevard St Michel, 75005 Paris Cedex 5 (France); Leherte, Laurence; Vercauteren, Daniel P. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Informatique (PCI), Unité de Chimie Physique Théorique et Structurale, University of Namur, 61 rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • M06-2X functional is suitable to model key steps of proline-catalyzed reactions. • Investigation of the proline-catalyzed aldol reaction mechanism. • Influence of water molecules on the C–C bond formation step. • Mechanism for the reaction of proline-derived enamines with benzhydrylium cations. - Abstract: The proline-catalyzed aldol reaction is the seminal example of asymmetric organocatalysis. Previous theoretical and experimental studies aimed at identifying its mechanism in order to rationalize the outcome of this reaction. Here, we focus on key steps with modern first principle methods, i.e. the M06-2X hybrid exchange–correlation functional combined to the solvation density model to account for environmental effects. In particular, different pathways leading to the formation of neutral and negatively charged enamine intermediates are investigated, and their reactivity towards two electrophiles, i.e. an aldehyde and a benzhydrylium cation, are compared. Regarding the self-aldol reaction, our calculations confirm that the neutral enamine intermediate is more reactive than the negatively charged one. For the reaction with benzhydrylium cations however, the negatively charged enamine intermediate is more reactive.

  9. Synthesis and Preliminary Investigations of the siRNA Delivery Potential of Novel, Single-Chain Rigid Cationic Carotenoid Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip L. Leopold

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The success of nucleic acid delivery requires the development of safe and efficient delivery vectors that overcome cellular barriers for effective transport. Herein we describe the synthesis of a series of novel, single-chain rigid cationic carotenoid lipids and a study of their preliminary in vitro siRNA delivery effectiveness and cellular toxicity. The efficiency of siRNA delivery by the single-chain lipid series was compared with that of known cationic lipid vectors, 3β-[N-(N',N'-dimethylaminoethanecarbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphoethanolamine (EPC as positive controls. All cationic lipids (controls and single-chain lipids were co-formulated into liposomes with the neutral co-lipid, 1,2-dioleolyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE. Cationic lipid-siRNA complexes of varying (+/− molar charge ratios were formulated for delivery into HR5-CL11 cells. Of the five single-chain carotenoid lipids investigated, lipids 1, 2, 3 and 5 displayed significant knockdown efficiency with HR5-CL11 cells. In addition, lipid 1 exhibited the lowest levels of cytotoxicity with cell viability greater than 80% at all (+/− molar charge ratios studied. This novel, single-chain rigid carotenoid-based cationic lipid represents a new class of transfection vector with excellent cell tolerance, accompanied with encouraging siRNA delivery efficiency.

  10. Dendritic Cells Stimulated by Cationic Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitor, Micaela Tamara; Bergami-Santos, Patrícia Cruz; Cruz, Karen Steponavicius Piedade; Pinho, Mariana Pereira; Barbuto, José Alexandre Marzagão; De La Torre, Lucimara Gaziola

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy of cancer aims to harness the immune system to detect and destroy cancer cells. To induce an immune response against cancer, activated dendritic cells (DCs) must present tumor antigens to T lymphocytes of patients. However, cancer patients' DCs are frequently defective, therefore, they are prone to induce rather tolerance than immune responses. In this context, loading tumor antigens into DCs and, at the same time, activating these cells, is a tempting goal within the field. Thus, we investigated the effects of cationic liposomes on the DCs differentiation/maturation, evaluating their surface phenotype and ability to stimulate T lymphocytes proliferation in vitro. The cationic liposomes composed by egg phosphatidylcholine, 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium propane and 1,2-dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (50/25/25% molar) were prepared by the thin film method followed by extrusion (65 nm, polydispersity of 0.13) and by the dehydration-rehydration method (95% of the population 107 nm, polydispersity of 0.52). The phenotypic analysis of dendritic cells and the analysis of T lymphocyte proliferation were performed by flow cytometry and showed that both cationic liposomes were incorporated and activated dendritic cells. Extruded liposomes were better incorporated and induced higher CD86 expression for dendritic cells than dehydrated-rehydrated vesicles. Furthermore, dendritic cells which internalized extruded liposomes also provided stronger T lymphocyte stimulation. Thus, cationic liposomes with a smaller size and polydispersity seem to be better incorporated by dendritic cells. Hence, these cationic liposomes could be used as a potential tool in further cancer immunotherapy strategies and contribute to new strategies in immunotherapy.

  11. Independent adsorption of monovalent cations and cationic polymers at PE/PG lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, Daria A.; Nesterenko, Alexey M.; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Kondinskaia, Diana A.; Ermakov, Yuri A.; Gurtovenko, Andrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic cationic polymers constitute a wide class of polymeric biocides. Commonly their antimicrobial effect is associated to their interaction with bacterial membranes. In the present study we analyze the interaction of various cationic polymers with model bacterial membranes comprised of a mixture of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG). We describe a polymer-membrane interaction as a process of modification of the surface charge. It is well known that small monovalent inorganic cations (Na+, K+) cannot overcharge the surface of a bilayer containing anionic lipids. In contrast, polycations are able to overcharge anionic membranes and demonstrate a very large input to the electric field distribution at the membrane-water interface. We aimed here to study the electrostatic effects associated with the interaction of polycations of different types with a model lipid membrane whose composition closely resembles that of bacterial membranes (PE:PG = 1:4). Four different cationic polymers (polyvinylamine, polyallylamine, poly-L-lysine and polyethylenimine) were adsorbed at a model PE/PG bilayer in MD simulations. Adsorption of sodium cations was inspected separately for PE/PG bilayers of different composition and cation’s binding parameters were determined. From computational experiments and consequent theoretical analysis we concluded that sodium adsorption at anionic binding sites does not depend on the presence of polycations. Therefore, we hypothesize that antimicrobial activity of the studied cationic polymers should depend on the ionic composition of the medium.

  12. Sulfation and Cation Effects on the Conformational Properties of the Glycan Backbone of Chondroitin Sulfate Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, Christina E.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Chondroitin sulfate (CS) is one of several glycosaminoglycans that are major components of proteoglycans. A linear polymer consisting of repeats of the disaccharide -4GlcAβ1-3GalNAcβ1-, CS undergoes differential sulfation resulting in five unique sulfation patterns. Because of the dimer repeat, the CS glycosidic “backbone” has two distinct sets of conformational degrees of freedom defined by pairs of dihedral angles: (ϕ1, ψ1) about the β1-3 glycosidic linkage and (ϕ2, ψ2) about the β1-4 glycosidic linkage. Differential sulfation and the possibility of cation binding, combined with the conformational flexibility and biological diversity of CS, complicate experimental efforts to understand CS three-dimensional structures at atomic resolution. Therefore, all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations with Adaptive Biasing Force sampling of the CS backbone were applied to obtain high resolution, high precision free energies of CS disaccharides as a function of all possible backbone geometries. All ten disaccharides (β1-3 vs. β1-4 linkage x five different sulfation patterns) were studied; additionally, ion effects were investigated by considering each disaccharide in the presence of either neutralizing sodium or calcium cations. GlcAβ1-3GalNAc disaccharides have a single, broad, thermodynamically important free-energy minimum whereas GalNAcβ1-4GlcA disaccharides have two such minima. Calcium cations but not sodium cations bind to the disaccharides, and binding is primarily to the GlcA –COO− moiety as opposed to sulfate groups. This binding alters the glycan backbone thermodynamics in instances where a calcium cation bound to –COO− can act to bridge and stabilize an interaction with an adjacent sulfate group, whereas, in the absence of this cation, the proximity of a sulfate group to –COO− results in two like charges being both desolvated and placed adjacent to each other and is found to be destabilizing. In addition to providing

  13. Protonation sites in gaseous pyrrole and imidazole: a neutralization-reionization and ab initio study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, V Q; Turecek, F

    1996-10-01

    Mild gas-phase acids C4H9+ and NH4+ protonate pyrrole at C-2 and C-3 but not at the nitrogen atom, as determined by deuterium labeling and neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry. Proton affinities in pyrrole are calculated by MP2/6-311G(2d,p) as 866, 845 and 786 kJ mol-1 for protonation at C-2, C-3 and N, respectively. Vertical neutralization of protonated pyrrole generates bound radicals that in part dissociate by loss of hydrogen atoms. Unimolecular loss of hydrogen atom from C-2- and C-3-protonated pyrrole cations is preceded by proton migration in the ring. Protonation of gaseous imidazole is predicted to occur exclusively at the N-3 imine nitrogen to yield a stable aromatic cation. Proton affinities in imidazole are calculated as 941, 804, 791, 791 and 724 for the N-3, C-4, C-2, C-5 and N-1 positions, respectively. Radicals derived from protonated imidazole are only weakly bound. Vertical neutralization of N-3-protonated imidazole is accompanied by large Franck-Condon effects which deposit on average 183 kJ mol-1 vibrational energy in the radicals formed. The radicals dissociate unimolecularly by loss of hydrogen atom, which involves both direct N-H bond cleavage and isomerization to the more stable C-2 H-isomer. Potential energy barriers to isomerizations and dissociations in protonated pyrrole and imidazole isomers and their radicals were investigated by ab initio calculations.

  14. THE CATIONIC ADDITIVES USED IN COATED INK-JET PAPER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei Yu; Chuanshan Zhao; Kefu Chen

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of several different cationic additives on the viscosity 、zeta potential and printing properties of the ink-jet coating. The cationic additives have greatly improved sheet's gloss and printabilities.

  15. Bithiophene radical cation: Resonance Raman spectroscopy and molecular orbital calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grage, M.M.-L.; Keszthelyi, T.; Offersgaard, J.F.

    1998-01-01

    The resonance Raman spectrum of the photogenerated radical cation of bithiophene is reported. The bithiophene radical cation was produced via a photoinduced electron transfer reaction between excited bithiophene and the electron acceptor fumaronitrile in a room temperature acetonitrile solution a...

  16. $\\tau$ decays with neutral kaons

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Boeriu, O.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couchman, J.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; Davis, R.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, I.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2000-01-01

    The branching ratio of the tau lepton to a neutral K meson is measured from a sample of approximately 200,000 tau decays recorded by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies near the Z0 resonance. The measurement is based on two samples which identify one-prong tau decays with KL and KS mesons. The combined branching ratios are measured to be B(tau- -->pi- K0bar nutau) = (9.33+-0.68+-0.49)x10^-3 B(tau- -->pi- K0bar [>=1pi0] nutau) = (3.24+-0.74+-0.66)x10^-3 B(tau- -->K- K0bar [>=0pi0] nutau) = (3.30+-0.55+-0.39)x10^-3 where the first error is statistical and the second systematic.

  17. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Influence of the ionic liquid cation on the solvent extraction of trivalent rare-earth ions by mixtures of Cyanex 923 and ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Alok; Binnemans, Koen

    2015-01-21

    Trivalent rare-earth ions were extracted from nitric acid medium by the neutral phosphine oxide extractant Cyanex 923 into ionic liquid phases containing the bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide anion. Five different cations were considered: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium, methyltributylammonium, methyltrioctylammonium and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium. The extraction behavior of neodymium(iii) was investigated as a function of various parameters: pH, extractant concentration, concentration of the neodymium(iii) ion in the aqueous feed and concentration of the salting-out agent. The loading capacity of the ionic liquid phase was studied. The extraction efficiency increased with increasing pH of the aqueous feed solution. The extraction occurred for all ionic liquids via an ion-exchange mechanism and the extraction efficiency could be related to the solubility of the ionic liquid cation in the aqueous phase: high distribution ratios for hydrophilic cations and low ones for hydrophobic cations. Addition of nitrate ions to the aqueous phase resulted in an increase in extraction efficiency for ionic liquids with hydrophobic cations due to extraction of neutral complexes. Neodymium(iii) could be stripped from the ionic liquid phase by 0.5-1.0 M nitric acid solutions and the extracting phase could be reused. The extractability of other rare earths present in the mixture was compared for the five ionic liquids.

  19. Primary neutral helium in the heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Hans-Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Two years of neutral measurements by IBEX-Lo have yielded several direct observations of interstellar neutral helium and oxygen during preferred viewing seasons. Besides the interstellar signal, there are indications of the presence of secondary neutral helium and oxygen created in the heliosphere. Detailed modeling of these particle species is necessary to connect the measured fluxes to the pristine local interstellar medium while accounting for loss and production of neutral particles during their path through the heliosphere. In this contribution, global heliosphere models are coupled to analytic calculations of neutral trajectories to obtain detailed estimates of the neutral distribution function of primary interstellar helium atoms in the heliosphere, in particular in the inner heliosphere.

  20. Molecular clock on a neutral network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Alpan

    2007-09-28

    The number of fixed mutations accumulated in an evolving population often displays a variance that is significantly larger than the mean (the overdispersed molecular clock). By examining a generic evolutionary process on a neutral network of high-fitness genotypes, we establish a formalism for computing all cumulants of the full probability distribution of accumulated mutations in terms of graph properties of the neutral network, and use the formalism to prove overdispersion of the molecular clock. We further show that significant overdispersion arises naturally in evolution when the neutral network is highly sparse, exhibits large global fluctuations in neutrality, and small local fluctuations in neutrality. The results are also relevant for elucidating aspects of neutral network topology from empirical measurements of the substitution process.

  1. Production of sulfonated cation-exchangers from petroleum asphaltites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokonova, Yu.V.; Pol' kin, G.B.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Vinogradov, M.V.

    1982-02-10

    Continuing our studies of the preparation of products of practical value from asphaltite, a new by-product of oil refining, we obtained sulfonated cation-exchangers from a mixture of asphaltite and acid tar. It is shown that these cation-exchangers have good kinetic properties and are superior in thermal and thermohydrolytic stability to the commercial cation-exchange resin KU-2.

  2. Cationic lipids bearing succinic-based, acyclic and macrocyclic hydrophobic domains: Synthetic studies and in vitro gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, Amanda B; Khalique, Nada Abdul; Raju, Liji; Nicholson, David G; Larsen, Helge; Pungente, Michael D; Goldring, William P D

    2017-01-05

    In this communication we describe the construction of four succinic-based cationic lipids, their formulation with plasmid DNA (pDNA), and an evaluation of their in vitro gene delivery into Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO-K1) cells. The cationic lipids employed in this work possess either a dimethylamine or trimethylamine headgroup, and a macrocyclic or an acyclic hydrophobic domain composed of, or derived from two 16-atom, succinic-based acyl chains. The synthesized lipids and a co-lipid of neutral charge, either cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), were formulated in an overall 3:2 cationic-to-neutral lipid molar ratio, then complexed with plasmid DNA (pDNA). The relative transfection performance was evaluated via a comparison between matched versus mismatched formulations defined by the rigidity relationship between the lipids employed. Gel electrophoresis was used to characterize the binding of the lipid formulations with plasmid DNA and the relative degree of plasmid degradation using a DNase I degradation assay. Small angle X-ray diffraction (SAXD) was employed to characterize the packing morphology of the lipid-DNA complexes. In general, the succinic unit embedded within the hydrophobic domain of the cationic lipids was found to improve lipid hydration. The transfection assays revealed a general trend in which mismatched formulations that employed a rigid lipid combined with a non-rigid (or flexible) lipid, outperformed the matched formulations. The results from this work suggest that the design of the cationic lipid structure and the composition of the lipoplex formulation play key roles in governing the transfection performance of nonviral gene delivery agents.

  3. Progress in Cationic Waterborne Polyurethane%阳离子水性聚氨醋研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆金昌; 李仙尹; 欧朝霞; 陈麟

    2011-01-01

    This article has described the development of cationic waterborne polyurethane in aspects of advantages, disadvantages, mechanism of synthesis, the methods of synthesis and the raw materials for synthesis.The influencing factors on properties of cationic waterborne polyurethane were summarized, including the R[n (-NCO)∶n (-OH)]value of prepolymer, the content of hydrophilic chain extender, neutralizer and neutralization degree.Various modification methods for cationic waterborne polyurethane were also introduced,including modification with epoxy resin, hydroxy - terminated silane, polyacrylate and nano - particle.The applications of cationic waterborne polyurethane in coating of leather, adhesive and coating of textile were given, and the development trend of the cationic waterborne polyurethane was described.%介绍了阳离子水性聚氨酯的发展概况,包括阳离子水性聚氨酯的优点,目前存在的主要缺点,合成机理、合成方法及合成原料.简述了预聚物中K[n(-NCO):n(-OH)]值、亲水扩链剂的用量、中和剂的种类及中和度等因素对阳离子水性聚安醋性能的影响.概述了阳离子水性聚氨酷的各种改性方法,包括环氧树脂改性、羟基硅烷改性、丙烯酸酯改性、纳米粒子改性等.介绍了阳离子水性聚氨酯在皮革涂饰剂、胶粘剂、织物整理剂等方面的应用概况,并对其发展方向作了展望.

  4. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, Andrey K.; Domcke, Wolfgang; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    The Landau-Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs a recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Three different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn-Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; and relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs. Beyond 100 fs, the adiabatic electronic populations are nearly constant due to a dynamic equilibrium between the three states. The ultrafast nonradiative decay of the excited-state populations provides a qualitative explanation of the experimental evidence that the ammonia cation is nonfluorescent.

  5. Electronic structures of one-dimensional poly-fused selenophene radical cations: density functional theory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kawabata et al

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid density functional theory (DFT calculations have been carried out for neutral and radical cation species of a fused selenophene oligomer, denoted by Se(n, where n represents the number of selenophene rings in the oligomer, to elucidate the electronic structures at ground and low-lying excited states. A polymer of fused selenophene was also investigated using one-dimensional periodic boundary conditions (PBC for comparison. It was found that the reorganization energy of a radical cation of Se(n from a vertical hole trapping point to its relaxed structure is significantly small. Also, the reorganization energy decreased gradually with increasing n, indicating that Se(n has an effective intramolecular hole transport property. It was found that the radical cation species of Se(n has a low-energy band in the near-IR region, which is strongly correlated to hole conductivity. The relationship between the electronic states and intramolecular hole conductivity was discussed on the basis of theoretical calculations.

  6. Femtosecond pump-probe photoionization-photofragmentation spectroscopy of azobenzene cation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HO; JrWei

    2010-01-01

    We report the studies of ultrafast dynamics of azobenzene cations using femtosecond photoionization-photofragmentation spectroscopy. In our experiment,a femtosecond pump pulse first prepares an ensemble of azobenzene cations via photoionization of neutrals. A delayed probe pulse then brings the evolving ionic system to higher states that ultimately undergo ion fragmentation. The dynamics is followed by monitoring either the parent-ion depletion or fragment-ion formation as a function of the pump-probe delay time. The observed transients for azobenzene cations are characterized by a constant ion depletion modulated by a rapidly damped oscillatory signal with a period of about 1 ps. Theoretical calculations suggest that the oscillation arises from a vibration motion along the twisting inversion coordinate involving displacements in CNNC and phenyl-ring torsions. The oscillation is damped rapidly with a time constant of about 1.2 ps,suggesting that energy dissipation from the active mode to bath modes takes place on this time scale.

  7. CATION EXCHANGE CAPACITY OF DOMINANT SOIL TYPES IN THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Tomasic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on 18 locations and 11 dominant soil types in the Republic of Croatia including their evolution-genetic horizons. In total, 51 soil samples were examined. Analysis of soil was done by saturating patterns using barium chloride solution in three replications. Descriptive statistics of the analyzed data was conducted. Basic statistical parameters were calculated, and functional dependence between the base saturation (V% of analyzed soil samples and their pH was observed. The correlation coefficient (r between base saturation (V% and pH for all examined soils was r=0.79 (n=51; very strong correlation. For acid soils it was r=0.82 (n=17; very strong correlation, for neutral soils r=0.75 (n=8; very strong correlation, and finally for alkaline soils r=0.15 (n=26; very weak correlation. Cation exchange capacity values ranged from 2.39 cmol+*kg-1 to 33.8 cmol+*kg-1 depending on soil type, pH, organic content and other soil parameters. The content of exchangeable cations in the sum of basic cations ranged from: Ca2+ (16% - 94%, Mg2+ (2% - 41%, K+ (1% - 68% and Na+ (<0.01% also depending on soil type, depth, location and other physical and chemical soil parameters.

  8. Tetrathiafulvalene-based azine ligands for anion and metal cation coordination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awatef Ayadi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis and full characterization of two tetrathiafulvalene-appended azine ligands, namely 2-([2,2’-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene]-4-yl-6-((2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazonomethylpyridine (L1 and 5-([2,2’-bi(1,3-dithiolylidene]-4-yl-2-((2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazonomethylpyridine (L2 are described. The crystal structure of ligand L1 indicates that the ligand is completely planar with the presence of a strong intramolecular N3–H3···O1 hydrogen bonding. Titration experiments with inorganic anions showed that both ligands are suitable candidates for the sensing of fluoride anions. Ligand L2 was reacted with a Re(I cation to yield the corresponding rhenium tricarbonyl complex 3. In the crystal structure of the newly prepared electroactive rhenium complex the TTF is neutral and the rhenium cation is hexacoordinated. The electrochemical behavior of the three compounds indicates that they are promising for the construction of crystalline radical cation salts.

  9. Isothermal titration calorimetric analysis of the interaction between cationic lipids and plasmid DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, B A; Davis, A; Koe, G; Smith, J G; Middaugh, C R

    2001-02-01

    The effects of buffer and ionic strength upon the enthalpy of binding between plasmid DNA and a variety of cationic lipids used to enhance cellular transfection were studied using isothermal titration calorimetry at 25.0 degrees C and pH 7.4. The cationic lipids DOTAP (1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethyl ammonium propane), DDAB (dimethyl dioctadecyl ammonium bromide), DOTAP:cholesterol (1:1), and DDAB:cholesterol (1:1) bound endothermally to plasmid DNA with a negligible proton exchange with buffer. In contrast, DOTAP: DOPE (L-alpha-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine) (1:1) and DDAB:DOPE (1:1) liposomes displayed a negative enthalpy and a significant uptake of protons upon binding to plasmid DNA at neutral pH. These findings are most easily explained by a change in the apparent pKa of the amino group of DOPE upon binding. Complexes formed by reverse addition methods (DNA into lipid) produced different thermograms, sizes, zeta potentials, and aggregation behavior, suggesting that structurally different complexes were formed in each titration direction. Titrations performed in both directions in the presence of increasing ionic strength revealed a progressive decrease in the heat of binding and an increase in the lipid to DNA charge ratio at which aggregation occurred. The unfavorable binding enthalpy for the cationic lipids alone and with cholesterol implies an entropy-driven interaction, while the negative enthalpies observed with DOPE-containing lipid mixtures suggest an additional contribution from changes in protonation of DOPE.

  10. Comparing the gas-phase fragmentation reactions of protonated and radical cations of the tripeptides GXR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Sheena; O'Hair, Richard A. J.; McFadyen, W. David

    2004-05-01

    Electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry of methanolic solutions of mixtures of the copper salt (2,2':6',2''-terpyridine)copper(II) nitrate monohydrate ([Cu(II)(tpy)(NO3)2].H2O) and a tripeptide GXR (where X = 1 of the 20 naturally occurring amino acids) yielded [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions, which were then subjected to collision induced dissociation (CID). In all but one case (GRR), these [Cu(II)(tpy)(GXR)][radical sign]2+ ions fragment to form odd electron GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations with sufficient abundance to examine their gas-phase fragmentation reactions. The GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations undergo a diverse range of fragmentation reactions which depend on the nature of the side chain of X. Many of these reactions can be rationalized as arising from the intermediacy of isomeric distonic ions in which the charge (i.e. proton) is sequestered by the highly basic arginine side chain and the radical site is located at various positions on the tripeptide including the peptide back bone and side chains. The radical sites in these distonic ions often direct the fragmentation reactions via the expulsion of small radicals (to yield even electron ions) or small neutrals (to form radical cations). Both classes of reaction can yield useful structural information, allowing for example, distinction between leucine and isoleucine residues. The gas-phase fragmentation reactions of the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations are also compared to their even electron [GXR+H]+ and [GXR+2H]2+ counterparts. The [GXR+H]+ ions give fewer sequence ions and more small molecule losses while the [GXR+2H]2+ ions yield more sequence information, consistent with the [`]mobile proton model' described in previous studies. In general, all three classes of ions give complementary structural information, but the GXR[radical sign]+ radical cations exhibit a more diverse loss of small species (radicals and neutrals). Finally, links between these gas-phase results and key

  11. Asymmetric Aminalization via Cation-Binding Catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sang Yeon; Liu, Yidong; Oh, Joong Suk

    2017-01-01

    Asymmetric cation-binding catalysis, in principle, can generate "chiral" anionic nucleophiles, where the counter cations are coordinated within chiral environments. Nitrogen-nucleophiles are intrinsically basic, therefore, its use as nucleophiles is often challenging and limiting the scope...... of the reaction. Particularly, a formation of configurationally labile aminal centers with alkyl substituents has been a formidable challenge due to the enamine/imine equilibrium of electrophilic substrates. Herein, we report enantioselective nucleophilic addition reactions of potassium phthalimides to Boc......-protected alkyl- and aryl-substituted α-amido sulfones. In-situ generated imines smoothly reacted with the nitrogen nucleophiles to corresponding aminals with good to excellent enantioselectivitiy under mild reaction conditions. In addition, transformation of aminal products gave biologically relevant...

  12. The adjuvant mechanism of cationic dimethyldioctadecylammonium liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsholm, Karen Smith; Agger, Else Marie; Foged, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    Cationic liposomes are being used increasingly as efficient adjuvants for subunit vaccines but their precise mechanism of action is still unknown. Here, we investigated the adjuvant mechanism of cationic liposomes based on the synthetic amphiphile dimethyldioctadecylammonium (DDA). The liposomes...... concentrations. This efficient adsorption onto the liposomes led to an enhanced uptake of OVA by BM-DCs as assessed by flow cytometry and confocal fluorescence laser-scanning microscopy. This was an active process, which was arrested at 4 degrees and by an inhibitor of actin-dependent endocytosis, cytochalasin D....... In vivo studies confirmed the observed effect because adsorption of OVA onto DDA liposomes enhanced the uptake of the antigen by peritoneal exudate cells after intraperitoneal injection. The liposomes targeted antigen preferentially to antigen-presenting cells because we only observed a minimal uptake...

  13. Influenza virus antigenicity and broadly neutralizing epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air, Gillian M

    2015-04-01

    A vaccine formulation that would be effective against all strains of influenza virus has long been a goal of vaccine developers, but antibodies after infection or vaccination were seen to be strain specific and there was little evidence of cross-reactive antibodies that neutralized across subtypes. Recently a number of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies have been characterized. This review describes the different classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies and discusses the potential of their therapeutic use or for design of immunogens that induce a high proportion of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

  14. Microwave Diagnostics of Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ronghua Lu Li

    2010-01-01

    We suggest an approach for using microwave radiation in diagnostics of ultracold neutral plasma. Microwave scattering from ultracold neutral plasma is calculated . Simple formulations are get and indicate that the dipole radiation power of ultracold neutral plasma does not depend on density profile $n_e(r)$ and $\\omega$ when $\\omega\\gg\\omega_{pe0}$, but on the total electron number $N_e$. This method provides the information of $N_e$ and from which we can get the three body recombination rate of the plasma, which is extremely important in the researches of ultracold neutral plasma.

  15. On implicit abstract neutral nonlinear differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Eduardo, E-mail: lalohm@ffclrp.usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo, Departamento de Computação e Matemática, Faculdade de Filosofia Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto (Brazil); O’Regan, Donal, E-mail: donal.oregan@nuigalway.ie [National University of Ireland, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics (Ireland)

    2016-04-15

    In this paper we continue our developments in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) on the existence of solutions for abstract neutral differential equations. In particular we extend the results in Hernández and O’Regan (J Funct Anal 261:3457–3481, 2011) for the case of implicit nonlinear neutral equations and we focus on applications to partial “nonlinear” neutral differential equations. Some applications involving partial neutral differential equations are presented.

  16. Cation Permeability in Soybean Aleurone Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Noda, Hiroko; Fukuda, Mitsuru

    1998-01-01

    The permeation of water and ions into bean seeds is essential for processing and cooking of beans. The permeability of cations, K, Na, Ca, and Mg ions, into soybean seed tissue, especially aleurone layer, during water uptake was investigated to characterize the ion permeation into soybeans. Aleurone layers and seed coats contained relatively high concentration of endogenous K and Ca ions, and endogenous Ca ion, respectively. The amounts of Ca ion entered seed coats and aleurone layers were gr...

  17. Regulation of Cation Balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyert, Martha S.; Philpott, Caroline C.

    2013-01-01

    All living organisms require nutrient minerals for growth and have developed mechanisms to acquire, utilize, and store nutrient minerals effectively. In the aqueous cellular environment, these elements exist as charged ions that, together with protons and hydroxide ions, facilitate biochemical reactions and establish the electrochemical gradients across membranes that drive cellular processes such as transport and ATP synthesis. Metal ions serve as essential enzyme cofactors and perform both structural and signaling roles within cells. However, because these ions can also be toxic, cells have developed sophisticated homeostatic mechanisms to regulate their levels and avoid toxicity. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have characterized many of the gene products and processes responsible for acquiring, utilizing, storing, and regulating levels of these ions. Findings in this model organism have often allowed the corresponding machinery in humans to be identified and have provided insights into diseases that result from defects in ion homeostasis. This review summarizes our current understanding of how cation balance is achieved and modulated in baker’s yeast. Control of intracellular pH is discussed, as well as uptake, storage, and efflux mechanisms for the alkali metal cations, Na+ and K+, the divalent cations, Ca2+ and Mg2+, and the trace metal ions, Fe2+, Zn2+, Cu2+, and Mn2+. Signal transduction pathways that are regulated by pH and Ca2+ are reviewed, as well as the mechanisms that allow cells to maintain appropriate intracellular cation concentrations when challenged by extreme conditions, i.e., either limited availability or toxic levels in the environment. PMID:23463800

  18. Alkali Cation Chelation in Cold β-O-4 Tetralignol Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlase, Andrew F.; Dziekonski, Eric T.; Hopkins, John R.; Burke, Nicole L.; Kenttamaa, Hilkka I.; McLuckey, Scott A.; Zwier, Timothy S.

    2016-06-01

    Lignins are the second most abundant naturally occurring polymer class, contributing to about 30% of the organic carbon in the biosphere. Their primary function is to provide the structural integrity of plant cell walls and have recently come under consideration as a potential source of biofuels because they have an energy content similar to coal. Herein, we employ cold ion spectroscopy (UV action and IR-UV double resonance) to unravel the spectroscopic signatures of G-type alkali metal cationized (X = Li+, Na+, K+) lignin tetramers connected by β-O-4 linkages. The conformation-specific spectroscopy reveals a variety of conformers, each containing distinct infrared spectra in the OH stretching region building on recent studies on the neutral and alkali metal cationized β-O-4 dimers. Based on comparisons of our infrared spectra to density functional theory [M05-2X/6-31+G*] harmonic level calculations for structures derived from a Monte Carlo conformational search, the alkali metal ion is discovered to engage in M+-OH-O interactions as important motifs that determine the secondary structures of these complexes. This interaction disappears in the major conformer of the K+ adduct, suggesting a reemergence of a neutral dimer segment as the metal binding energy decreases. Chelation of the metal cation by oxygen lone pair(s) of nearby oxygens in the β-O-4 linkage is observed to be the predominant driving force for 3D structure around the charge site, relegating OH-O H-bonds as secondary stabilizing elements.

  19. Controlling chemistry with cations: photochemistry within zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, V; Shailaja, J; Kaanumalle, Lakshmi S; Sunoj, R B; Chandrasekhar, J

    2003-08-21

    The alkali ions present in the supercages of zeolites X and Y interact with included guest molecules through quadrupolar (cation-pi), and dipolar (cation-carbonyl) interactions. The presence of such interactions can be inferred through solid-state NMR spectra of the guest molecules. Alkali ions, as illustrated in this article, can be exploited to control the photochemical and photophysical behaviors of the guest molecules. For example, molecules that rarely phosphoresce can be induced to do so within heavy cation-exchanged zeolites. The nature (electronic configuration) of the lowest triplet state of carbonyl compounds can be altered with the help of light alkali metal ions. This state switch (n pi*-pi pi*) helps to bring out reactivity that normally remains dormant. Selectivity obtained during the singlet oxygen oxidation of olefins within zeolites illustrates the remarkable control that can be exerted on photoreactions with the help of a confined medium that also has active sites. The reaction cavities of zeolites, like enzymes, are not only well-defined and confined, but also have active sites that closely guide the reactant molecule from start to finish. The examples provided here illustrate that zeolites are far more useful than simple shape-selective catalysts.

  20. Limited data speaker identification

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H S Jayanna; S R Mahadeva Prasanna

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, the task of identifying the speaker using limited training and testing data is addressed. Speaker identification system is viewed as four stages namely, analysis, feature extraction, modelling and testing. The speaker identification performance depends on the techniques employed in these stages. As demonstrated by different experiments, in case of limited training and testing data condition, owing to less data, existing techniques in each stage will not provide good performance. This work demonstrates the following: multiple frame size and rate (MFSR) analysis provides improvement in the analysis stage, combination of mel frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC), its temporal derivatives $(\\Delta,\\Delta \\Delta)$, linear prediction residual (LPR) and linear prediction residual phase (LPRP) features provides improvement in the feature extraction stage and combination of learning vector quantization (LVQ) and gaussian mixture model – universal background model (GMM–UBM) provides improvement in the modelling stage. The performance is further improved by integrating the proposed techniques at the respective stages and combining the evidences from them at the testing stage. To achieve this, we propose strength voting (SV), weighted borda count (WBC) and supporting systems (SS) as combining methods at the abstract, rank and measurement levels, respectively. Finally, the proposed hierarchical combination (HC) method integrating these three methods provides significant improvement in the performance. Based on these explorations, this work proposes a scheme for speaker identification under limited training and testing data.

  1. Liberal Neutrality : Constructivist, not foundationalist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lendell Horne

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In defending the principle of neutrality, liberals have often appealed to a more general moral principle that forbids coercing persons in the name of reasons those persons themselves cannot reasonably be expected to share. Yet liberals have struggled to articulate a non-arbitrary, non-dogmatic distinction between the reasons that persons can reasonably be expected to share and those they cannot. The reason for this, I argue, is that what it means to “share a reason” is itself obscure. In this paper I articulate two different conceptions of what it is to share a reason; I call these conceptions “foundationalist” and “constructivist.” On the foundationalist view, two people “share” a reason just in the sense that the same reason applies to each of them independently. On this view, I argue, debates about the reasons we share collapse into debates about the reasons we have, moving us no closer to an adequate defense of neutrality. On the constructivist view, by contrast, “sharing reasons” is understood as a kind of activity, and the reasons we must share are just those reasons that make this activity possible. I argue that the constructivist conception of sharing reasons yields a better defense of the principle of neutrality. À travers leur défense du principe de neutralité, les libéraux ont souvent interpellé un principe moral plus général qui interdit de contraindre des personnes pour des raisons dont on ne peut raisonnablement attendre que ces personnes elles-mêmes les partagent. Les libéraux éprouvent cependant de la difficulté à articuler une distinction non-arbitraire et non-dogmatique entre les raisons dont on peut raisonnablement attendre que les personnes les partagent et celles dont on ne le peut pas. Je soutiens dans cet article que cette difficulté provient du fait que «partager une raison » est une notion obscure. Pour illustrer cela, je me pencherai sur deux conceptions distinctes de ce que veut dire

  2. Neutral Beams from Blazar Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoyan, Armen M.; Dermer, Charles D.

    2003-03-01

    We treat the production of neutrons, photons, and neutrinos through photomeson interactions of relativistic protons with ambient photons in the compact inner jets of blazars. Internal synchrotron and external isotropic radiation due to scattered optical/UV accretion-disk radiation are considered as target photon fields. Protons are assumed to be accelerated to a maximum energy limited by the size scale and magnetic field of the jet, and by competing energy losses. We characterize the conditions when the photomeson interactions of ultrarelativistic protons become effective, and show that the presence of the external radiation field makes possible strong energy losses for protons with energies Ep>~1015 eV. Without this component, effective energy losses of protons begin at Ep>~1018 eV, and would rapidly disappear with expansion of the blob. We develop a model describing the production and escape of neutrons from a comoving spherical blob, which continue to interact with the ambient external radiation field on the parsec-scale broad-line region (BLR). Neutrons may carry ~10% of the overall energy of the accelerated protons with Ep>~1015 eV outside the BLR. Ultra-high-energy gamma rays produced by photomeson interaction of neutrons outside the blob can also escape the BLR. The escaping neutrons, gamma rays, and neutrinos form a collimated neutral beam with a characteristic opening angle θ~1/Γ, where Γ is the bulk Lorentz factor of the inner jet. Energy and momentum is deposited in the extended jet from the decay of neutrons at distances ld(En)~(En/1017eV) kpc, and through pair-production attenuation of gamma rays with energies Eγ>~1015 eV which propagate to ~10-100 kpc distances. In this scenario, neutral beams of ultra-high-energy gamma rays and neutrons can be the reason for straight extended jets, such as in Pictor A. Fluxes of neutrinos detectable with kilometer-scale neutrino telescopes are predicted from flat-spectrum radio quasars such as 3C 279.

  3. Neutral and anionic superhalogen hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swierszcz, Iwona [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Anusiewicz, Iwona, E-mail: iwonaa@chem.univ.gda.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: The energy profile for the Na(OH){sub 2}{sup -} anionic hydroxide formation according to the NaOH+OH{sup -}{yields}Na(OH){sub 2}{sup -} reaction. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} The superhalogen hydroxides and their anions were studied at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. {yields} All anionic superhalogen hydroxides were found to be thermodynamically stable. {yields} The VDE values calculated for the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions exceed 4 eV in all cases. {yields} The largest VDEs were found for the Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.07 eV) and Ga(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.21 eV). - Abstract: The properties of superhalogen M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions and their M(OH){sub k+1} neutral parents (where M = Li, Na, K, Be, Mg, Ca, B, Al, Ga) were investigated at the ab initio CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,3pd)//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. All the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions and some of their M(OH){sub k+1} neutral parents (k is the maximal formal valence of M) were found to be thermodynamically stable against the fragmentations (OH, OH{sup -}, O{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O loss). The vertical electron detachment energies (VDE) of the M(OH){sub k+1}{sup -} anions were calculated with the OVGF method and using the 6-311++G(3df,3pd) basis sets. The VDE values calculated for the anions studied exceed 4 eV in all cases, whereas the largest values of the electron binding energies were found for the Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -} (6.07 eV) and Ga(OH){sub 4}{sup -} anions (6.21 eV). Finally, formation of most of the species considered was predicted to be spontaneous due to the lack of kinetic barriers for these processes and their thermodynamic favorability.

  4. Alkali cation specific adsorption onto fcc(111) transition metal electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J N; McCrum, I T; Janik, M J

    2014-07-21

    The presence of alkali cations in electrolyte solutions is known to impact the rate of electrocatalytic reactions, though the mechanism of such impact is not conclusively determined. We use density functional theory (DFT) to examine the specific adsorption of alkali cations to fcc(111) electrode surfaces, as specific adsorption may block catalyst sites or otherwise impact surface catalytic chemistry. Solvation of the cation-metal surface structure was investigated using explicit water models. Computed equilibrium potentials for alkali cation adsorption suggest that alkali and alkaline earth cations will specifically adsorb onto Pt(111) and Pd(111) surfaces in the potential range of hydrogen oxidation and hydrogen evolution catalysis in alkaline solutions.

  5. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E;

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...... of neutralizing antibodies to the primary virus isolates was detected 13-45 weeks after seroconversion. Emergence of escape virus with reduced sensitivity to neutralization by autologous sera was demonstrated. The patients subsequently developed neutralizing antibodies against the escape virus but after a delay...

  6. [Antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    titova, M E; Komolov, S A; Tikhomirova, N A

    2012-01-01

    The process of lipid peroxidation (LPO) in biological membranes of cells is carried out by free radical mechanism, a feature of which is the interaction of radicals with other molecules. In this work we investigated the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate, obtained by the cation-exchange chromatography on KM-cellulose from raw cow's milk, in vitro and in vivo. In biological liquids, which are milk, blood serum, fetal fluids, contains a complex of biologically active substances with a unique multifunctional properties, and which are carrying out a protective, antimicrobial, regenerating, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, regulatory and others functions. Contents of the isolate were determined electrophoretically and by its biological activity. Cationic whey protein isolate included lactoperoxidase, lactoferrin, pancreatic RNase, lysozyme and angeogenin. The given isolate significantly has an antioxidant effect in model experimental systems in vitro and therefore may be considered as a factor that can adjust the intensity of lipid oxidation. In model solutions products of lipid oxidation were obtained by oxidation of phosphatidylcholine by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of a source of iron. The composition of the reaction mixture: 0,4 mM H2O2; 50 mcM of hemin; 2 mg/ml L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine from soybean (Sigma, German). Lipid peroxidation products were formed during the incubation of the reaction mixture for two hours at 37 degrees C. In our studies rats in the adaptation period immediately after isolation from the nest obtained from food given orally native cationic whey protein isolate at the concentration three times higher than in fresh cow's milk. On the manifestation of the antioxidant activity of cationic whey protein isolate in vivo evidence decrease of lipid peroxidation products concentration in the blood of rats from the experimental group receipt whey protein isolate in dos 0,6 mg/g for more than 20% (pwhey protein isolate has an

  7. Cell volume-regulated cation channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Considering the enormous turnover rates of ion channels when compared to carriers it is quite obvious that channel-mediated ion transport may serve as a rapid and efficient mechanism of cell volume regulation. Whenever studied in a quantitative fashion the hypertonic activation of non-selective cation channels is found to be the main mechanism of regulatory volume increase (RVI). Some channels are inhibited by amiloride (and may be related to the ENaC), others are blocked by Gd(3) and flufenamate (and possibly linked to the group of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels). Nevertheless, the actual architecture of hypertonicity-induced cation channels remains to be defined. In some preparations, hypertonic stress decreases K(+) channel activity so reducing the continuous K(+) leak out of the cell; this is equivalent to a net gain of cell osmolytes facilitating RVI. The hypotonic activation of K(+) selective channels appears to be one of the most common principles of regulatory volume decrease (RVD) and, in most instances, the actual channels involved could be identified on the molecular level. These are BKCa (or maxi K(+)) channels, IK(Ca) and SK(Ca) channels (of intermediate and small conductance, respectively), the group of voltage-gated (Kv) channels including their Beta (or Kv ancilliary) subunits, two-pore K(2P) channels, as well as inwardly rectifying K(+) (Kir) channels (also contributing to K(ATP) channels). In some cells, hypotonicity activates non-selective cation channels. This is surprising, at first sight, because of the inside negative membrane voltage and the sum of driving forces for Na(+) and K(+) diffusion across the cell membrane rather favouring net cation uptake. Some of these channels, however, exhibit a P(K)/P(Na) significantly higher than 1, whereas others are Ca(++) permeable linking hypotonic stress to the activation of Ca(++) dependent ion channels. In particular, the latter holds for the group of TRPs which are specialised in the

  8. Spontaneous polarization of the neutral interface for valence asymmetric coulombic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Caprio, D; Holovko, M

    2009-02-19

    In this paper, we discuss the phenomenon of a spontaneous polarization of a neutral hard planar interface for valence asymmetric Coulombic systems. Within a field theoretical description, we account for the existence of nontrivial charge density and electric potential profiles. The analysis of the phenomenon shows that the effect is related to combinatorics in relation with the existence of the two independent species cations and anions. This simple and basic feature is related to the quantum mechanical properties of the system. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations data and are shown to be in very good agreement, which a fortiori justifies our physical interpretation.

  9. Cobalt-based layered double hydroxides as oxygen evolving electrocatalysts in neutral electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Wang, Gang; Li, Jian-Bao

    2012-06-01

    Co-M (M= Co, Ni, Fe, Mn) layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were successfully fabricated by a hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) pyrolysis method. Composite electrodes were made using a self-assembly fashion at inorganic/organic surface binder-free and were used to catalyze oxygen evolution reaction. Water oxidation can take place in neutral electrolyte operating with modest overpotential. The doping of other transitional metal cations affords mix valences and thus more intimate electronic interactions for reversible chemisorption of dioxygen molecules. The application of employing LDH materials in water oxidation process bodes well to facilitate future hydrogen utilization.

  10. Gum karaya based hydrogel nanocomposites for the effective removal of cationic dyes from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Hemant; Maity, Arjun; Ray, Suprakas Sinha

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable hydrogel nanocomposites (HNC) of gum karaya (GK) grafted with poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) incorporated silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC NPs) were synthesized using the in situ graft copolymerization method and tested for the adsorption of cationic dyes from aqueous solution. The structure and morphology of the HNC were characterized using different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The results showed that the surface area and porosity of the hydrogel polymer significantly increased after nanocomposite formation with SiC NPs. The HNC was employed for the removal of cationic dyes, i.e., malachite green (MG) and rhodamine B (RhB) from the aqueous solution. The HNC was found to remove 91% (MG) and 86% (RhB) of dyes with a polymer dose of 0.5 and 0.6 g l-1 in neutral medium, respectively. The adsorption process was found to be highly pH dependent and followed the pseudo-second-order rate model. The adsorption isotherm data fitted well with the Langmuir adsorption isotherm with a maximum adsorption capacity of 757.57 and 497.51 mg g-1 for MG and RhB, respectively. Furthermore, the HNC was demonstrated as a versatile adsorbent for the removal of both cationic and anionic dyes from the simulated wastewater. The HNC showed excellent regeneration capacity and was successfully used for the three cycles of adsorption-desorption. In summary, the HNC has shown its potential as an environment friendly and efficient adsorbent for the adsorption of cationic dyes from contaminated water.

  11. Electromembrane extraction of heavy metal cations followed by capillary electrophoresis with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubáň, Pavel; Strieglerová, Lenka; Gebauer, Petr; Boček, Petr

    2011-04-01

    Electromembrane extraction (EME) was used as an off-line sample pre-treatment method for the determination of heavy metal cations in aqueous samples using CE with capacitively coupled contactless conductivity detection (CE-C(4) D). A short segment of porous polypropylene hollow fibre was penetrated with 1-octanol and 0.5% v/v bis(2-ethylhexyl)phosphonic acid and constituted a low cost, single use, disposable supported liquid membrane, which selectively transported and pre-concentrated heavy metal cations into the fibre lumen filled with 100 mM acetic acid acceptor solution. Donor solutions were standard solutions and real samples dissolved in deionized water at neutral pH. At optimized EME conditions (penetration time, 5 s; applied voltage, 75 V; and stirring rate, 750 rpm), 15-42% recoveries of heavy metal cations were achieved for a 5 min extraction time. Repeatability of the EME pre-treatment was examined for six independent EME runs and ranged from 6.6 to 11.1%. Limits of detection for the EME-CE-C(4) D method ranged from 25 to 200 nM, resulting into one to two orders of magnitude improvement compared with CE-C(4) D without sample treatment. The developed EME sample pre-treatment procedure was applied to the analysis of heavy metal cations in tap water and powdered milk samples. Zinc in the real samples was identified and quantified in a background electrolyte solution consisting of 20 mM L-histidine and 30 mM acetic acid at pH 4.95 in about 3 min.

  12. Spectral properties and reactivity of diarylmethanol radical cations in aqueous solution. Evidence for intramolecular charge resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietti, Massimo; Lanzalunga, Osvaldo

    2002-04-19

    Spectral properties and reactivities of ring-methoxylated diarylmethane and diarylmethanol radical cations, generated in aqueous solution by pulse and gamma-radiolysis and by the one-electron chemical oxidant potassium 12-tungstocobalt(III)ate, have been studied. The radical cations display three bands in the UV, visible, and vis-NIR regions of the spectrum. The vis-NIR band is assigned to an intramolecular charge resonance interaction (CR) between the neutral donor and charged acceptor rings, as indicated by the observation that the relative intensity of the vis-NIR band compared to that of the UV and visible bands does not increase with increasing substrate concentration and that the position and intensity of this band is influenced by the ring-substitution pattern. In acidic solution (pH = 4), monomethoxylated diarylmethanol radical cations 1a.(+ -)1e.(+) decay by C(alpha)-H deprotonation [k = (1.7-1.9) x 10(4)s(-1)] through the intermediacy of a ketyl radical, which is further oxidized in the reaction medium to give the corresponding benzophenones, as evidenced by both time-resolved spectroscopic and product studies. With the dimethoxylated radical cation 2.(+), C(alpha)-H deprotonation is instead significantly slower (k = 6.7 x 10(2)s(-1)). In basic solution, 1a.(+)-1e.(+) undergo (-)OH-induced deprotonation from the alpha-OH group with k(OH.)approximately equal to 1.4 x 10(10)M(-1)s(-1), leading to a ketyl radical anion, which is oxidized in the reaction medium to the corresponding benzophenone.

  13. Mechanisms of Hemagglutinin Targeted Influenza Virus Neutralization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandenburg, Boerries; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap; Klaren, Vincent; Tang, Chan; Bujny, Miriam V.; Korse, Hans J.W.M.; Kwaks, Ted; Otterstrom, Jason J.; Juraszek, Jarek; Oijen, Antoine M. van; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have been identified which neutralize broad spectra of influenza A or B viruses. Here, we dissect the mechanisms by which such antibodies interfere with infectivity. We distinguish four mechanisms that link the conserved hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes of broadly neutralizing

  14. 32 CFR 644.323 - Neutral language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Neutral language. 644.323 Section 644.323 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal § 644.323 Neutral language. Wherever the words “man”, “men”, or their...

  15. "Unconventional" Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Against HIV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies are recognized to be one of the essential elements of the adaptive immune response that must be induced by an effective vaccine against HIV. However, only a limited number of antibodies have been identified to neutralize a broad range of primary isolates of HIV-1 and attempts to induce such antibodies by immunization were unsuccessful. The difficulties to generate such antibodies are mainly due to intrinsic properties of HIV-1 envelope spikes, such as high sequence diversity, heavy glycosylation, and inducible and transient nature of certain epitopes. In vitro neutralizing antibodies are identified using "conventional" neutralization assay which uses phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human PBMCs as target cells. Thus, in essence the assay evaluates HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells. Recently, several laboratories including us demonstrated that some monoclonal antibodies and HIV-1-specific polyclonal IgG purified from patient sera, although they do not have neutralizing activity when tested by the "conventional" neutralization assay, do exhibit potent and broad neutralizing activity in "unconventional" ways. The neutralizing activity of these antibodies and IgG fractions is acquired through post-translational modifications, through opsonization of virus particles into macrophages and immature dendritic cells (iDCs), or through expression of antibodies on the surface of HIV-1-susceptible cells. This review will focus on recent findings of this area and point out their potential applications in the development of preventive strategies against HIV.

  16. Ion-Neutral Coupling in Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between ions and neutrals in a partially ionized plasma are important throughout heliophysics, including near the solar surface in prominences. Understanding how ion-neutral coupling affects formation, support, structure, and dynamics of prominences will advance our physical understanding of magnetized systems involving a transition from a weakly ionized dense gas to a fully ionized tenuous plasma. We address the fundamental physics of prominence support, which is normally described in terms of a magnetic force on the prominence plasma that balances the solar gravitational force, and the implications for observations. Because the prominence plasma is only partially ionized, it is necessary to consider the support of the both the ionized and neutral components. Support of the neutrals is accomplished through a frictional interaction between the neutral and ionized components of the plasma, and its efficacy depends strongly on the degree of ionization of the plasma. More specifically, the frictional force is proportional to the relative flow of neutral and ion species, and for a sufficiently weakly ionized plasma, this flow must be relatively large to produce a frictional force that balances gravity. A large relative flow, of course, implies significant draining of neutral particles from the prominence. We evaluate the importance of this draining effect for a hydrogen-helium plasma, and consider the observational evidence for cross-field diffusion of neutral prominence material.

  17. Topologies for neutral functional differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    Bounded topologies are considered for functional differential equations of the neutral type in which present dynamics of the system are influenced by its past behavior. A special bounded topology is generated on a collection of absolutely continuous functions with essentially bounded derivatives, and an application to a class of nonlinear neutral functional differential equations due to Driver (1965) is presented.

  18. Neutralizing antibodies in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mirjam B Zeisel; Samira Fafi-Kremer; Isabel Fofana; Heidi Barth; Fran(c)oise Stoll-Keller; Michel Doffo(e)l; Thomas F Baumert

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major cause of hepatitis world-wide. The majority of infected individuals develop chronic hepatitis which can then progress to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Spontaneous viral clearance occurs in about 20%-30% of acutely infected individuals and results in resolution of infection without sequaelae. Both viral and host factors appear to play an important role for resolution of acute infection. A large body of evidence suggests that a strong, multispecific and long-lasting cellular immune response appears to be important for control of viral infection in acute hepatitis C. Due too the lack of convenient neutralization assays,the impact of neutralizing responses for control of viral infection had been less defined. In recent years, the development of robust tissue culture model systems for HCV entry and infection has finally allowed study of antibody-mediated neutralization and to gain further insights into viral targets of host neutralizing responses.In addition, detailed analysis of antibody-mediated neutralization in individual patients as well as cohorts with well defined viral isolates has enabled the study of neutralizing responses in the course of HCV infection and characterization of the impact of neutralizing antibodies for control of viral infection. This review will summarize recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of antibody-mediated neutralization and its impact for HCV pathogenesis.(C) 2007 The WJG Press. All rights reserved.

  19. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an 'exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, Rampal S.

    2007-01-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to d

  20. A neutral sampling formula for multiple samples and an `exact' test of neutrality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etienne, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    As the utility of the neutral theory of biodiversity is increasingly being recognized, there is also an increasing need for proper tools to evaluate the relative importance of neutral processes (dispersal limitation and stochasticity). One of the key features of neutral theory is its close link to d

  1. Hydrogen bonding in transient bifunctional hypervalent radicals by neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, S A; Tureček, F

    1995-11-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry is used to generate hypervalent 9-N-4 (ammonium) and 9-O-3 (oxonium) radicals derived from protonated α,ω-bis-(dimethylamino)alkanes and α,ω-dimethoxyalkanes, which exist as cyclic hydrogen-bonded structures in the gas phase. Collisional neutralization with dimethyl disulfide, trimethylamine, and xenon of the hydrogen-bonded onium cations followed by reionization with oxygen results in complete dissociation. Bond cleavages at the hypervalent nitrogen atoms are found to follow the order CH2-N>CH3-N>N-H, which differs from that in the monofunctional hydrogen-n-heptyldimethylammonium radical, which gives CH2-N>N-H>CH3-N. No overall stabilization through hydrogen bonding of the bifunctional hypervalent ammonium and oxonium radicals is observed. Subtle effects of ring size are found that tend to stabilize large ring structures and are attributed to intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  2. Influence of spin-orbit effects on structures and dielectric properties of neutral lead clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, D. A.; Shayeghi, A.; Johnston, R. L.; Schwerdtfeger, P.; Schäfer, R.

    2014-04-01

    Combining molecular beam electric deflection experiments and global optimization techniques has proven to be a powerful tool for resolving equilibrium structures of neutral metal and semiconductor clusters. Herein, we present electric molecular beam deflection experiments on PbN (N = 7-18) clusters. Promising structures are generated using the unbiased Birmingham Cluster Genetic Algorithm approach based on density functional theory. The structures are further relaxed within the framework of two-component density functional theory taking scalar relativistic and spin orbit effects into account. Quantum chemical results are used to model electric molecular beam deflection profiles based on molecular dynamics calculations. Comparison of measured and simulated beam profiles allows the assignment of equilibrium structures for the most cluster sizes in the examined range for the first time. Neutral lead clusters adopt mainly spherical geometries and resemble the structures of lead cluster cations apart from Pb10. Their growth pattern deviates strongly from the one observed for tin and germanium clusters.

  3. Interaction between alginates and manganese cations: identification of preferred cation binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerichs, N; Wingender, J; Flemming, H-C; Mayer, C

    2004-04-01

    Algal and bacterial alginates have been studied by means of 13C NMR spectroscopy in presence of paramagnetic manganese ions in order to reveal the nature of their interaction with bivalent cations. It is found that the mannuronate blocks bind manganese cations externally near their carboxylate groups, while guluronate blocks show the capability to integrate Mn2+ into pocket-like structures formed by adjacent guluronate residues. In alternating mannuronate-guluronate blocks, manganese ions preferentially locate in a concave structure formed by guluronate-mannuronate pairs. Partial acetylation of the alginate generally reduces its capability to interact with bivalent cations, however, the selectivity of the binding geometry is conserved. The results may serve as a hint for the better understanding of the alginate gelation in presence of calcium ions.

  4. Induction of morphogenesis in Geodermatophilus by inorganic cations and by organic nitrogenous cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, E E; Wolfe, R S

    1974-01-01

    Morphogenesis of Geodermatophilus strain 22-68 involves two stages, a motile rod (R form) and an irregularly shaped cluster of coccoid cells (C form). A variety of mono- and divalent cations have been found to induce R-form to C-form morphogenesis and to maintain the organism in the C form. Concentration optima for all cations exceeded 100 mM. Results indicated that uptake of cations was accompanied by extrusion of intracellular protons, causing an increase in intracellular pH. A variety of organic amines also induced morphogenesis. Organic amines were taken up in the dissociated free base form, causing the intracellular pH to rise. None of these compounds was utilized as a carbon or nitrogen source.

  5. Sensitive neutralization test for rubella antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, H; Albrecht, P; Krugman, S; Ennis, F A

    1979-01-01

    A modified rubella virus plaque neutralization test for measuring rubella antibody was developed based on the potentiation of the virus-antibody complex by heterologous anti-immunoglobulin. The test is highly sensitive, yielding titers on the average 50 to 100 times higher than the haemagglutination inhibition test or the conventional plaque neutralization test. The sensitivity of this enhanced neutralization test is somewhat limited by the existence of a prozone phenomenon which precludes testing of low-titered sera below a dilution of 1:16. No prozone effect was observed with cerebrospinal fluids. The specificity of the enhanced neutralization test was determined by seroconversion of individuals receiving rubella vaccine. Although the rubella hemagglutination inhibition test remains the test of choice in routine diagnostic and surveillance work, the enhanced rubella neutralization test is particularly useful in monitoring low-level antibody in the cerebrospinal fluid in patients with neurological disorders and in certain instances of vaccine failure. PMID:107192

  6. Shock acceleration in partially neutral plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Morlino, G; Blasi, P; Caprioli, D

    2010-01-01

    We present the non-linear theory of shock acceleration applied to SNRs expanding into partially neutral plasma. Using this theory we show how the Balmer lines detected from young SNRs can be used to test the efficiency of shocks in the production of cosmic rays. In particular we investigate the effect of charge-exchange between protons and neutral hydrogen occurring in the precursor formed ahead of the shock. In this precursor the CR pressure accelerate the ionized component of the plasma and a relative velocity between protons and neutral hydrogen is established. On the other hand the charge-exchange process tends to equilibrate ions and neutrals resulting in the heating of both components. We show that even when the shock converts only a few per cent of the total bulk kinetic energy into CRs, the heating is efficient enough to produce a detectable broadening of the narrow Balmer lines emitted by the neutral hydrogen.

  7. Zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy of tryptamine and the dissociation pathway of the singly hydrated cation cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Quanli; Knee, J L

    2012-09-14

    The relative ionization energies of tryptamine conformations are determined by zero kinetic energy photoelectron spectroscopy and photoionization efficiency measurements. The relative cationic conformational stabilities are compared to the published results for the neutral molecule. In the cation, the interaction strength changes significantly between amino group and either the phenyl or the pyrrole moiety of the indole chromophore where most of the positive charge is located, leading to different conformational structures and relative conformer energies in the cation. In particular, the measured adiabatic ionization potential of isomer B is 60,928 ± 5 cm(-1), at least 400 cm(-1) higher than any of the 6 other tryptamine isomers which all have ionization potentials within 200 cm(-1) of each other. In addition to the monomer, measurements were made on the A conformer of the tryptamine(+)-H(2)O complex including the ionization threshold and cation dissociation energy measured using a threshold photoionization fragmentation method. The water cluster exhibits an unexpectedly high ionization potential of 60,307 ± 100 cm(-1), close to the conformer A monomer of 60 320 ± 100 cm(-1). It also exhibits surprisingly low dissociation energy of 1750 ± 150 cm(-1) compared to other H-bonding involved cation-H(2)O complexes which are typically several thousands of wavenumbers higher. Quantum chemical calculations indicate that upon ionization the structure of the parent molecule in the water complex remains mostly unchanged due to the rigid intermolecular double hydrogen bonded water molecule bridging the monomer backbone and its side chain thus leading to the high ionization potential in the water cluster. The surprisingly low dissociation energy measured in the cationic water complex is attributed to the formation of a much more stable structural isomer H(+) in the exit channel.

  8. Cationic niosomes an effective gene carrier composed of novel spermine-derivative cationic lipids: effect of central core structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opanasopit, Praneet; Leksantikul, Lalita; Niyomtham, Nattisa; Rojanarata, Theerasak; Ngawhirunpat, Tanasait; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-Ek

    2017-05-01

    Cationic niosomes formulated from Span 20, cholesterol (Chol) and novel spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures (di(oxyethyl)amino, di(oxyethyl)amino carboxy, 3-amino-1,2-dioxypropyl and 2-amino-1,3-dioxypropyl) were successfully prepared for improving transfection efficiency in vitro. The niosomes composed of spermine cationic lipid with central core structure of di(oxyethyl)amino revealed the highest gene transfection efficiency. To investigate the factors affecting gene transfection and cell viability including differences in the central core structures of cationic lipids, the composition of vesicles, molar ratio of cationic lipids in formulations and the weight ratio of niosomes to DNA. Cationic niosomes composed of nonionic surfactants (Span20), cholesterol and spermine-based cationic lipids of multiple central core structures were formulated. Gene transfection and cell viability were evaluated on a human cervical carcinoma cell line (HeLa cells) using pDNA encoding green fluorescent protein (pEGFP-C2). The morphology, size and charge were also characterized. High transfection efficiency was obtained from cationic niosomes composed of Span20:Chol:cationic lipid at the molar ratio of 2.5:2.5:0.5 mM. Cationic lipids with di(oxyethyl)amino as a central core structure exhibited highest transfection efficiency. In addition, there was also no serum effect on transfection efficiency. These novel cationic niosomes may constitute a good alternative carrier for gene transfection.

  9. Estimating the stoichiometry of HIV neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Carsten; Regoes, Roland R

    2010-03-19

    HIV-1 virions infect target cells by first establishing contact between envelope glycoprotein trimers on the virion's surface and CD4 receptors on a target cell, recruiting co-receptors, fusing with the cell membrane and finally releasing the genetic material into the target cell. Specific experimental setups allow the study of the number of trimer-receptor-interactions needed for infection, i.e., the stoichiometry of entry and also the number of antibodies needed to prevent one trimer from engaging successfully in the entry process, i.e., the stoichiometry of (trimer) neutralization. Mathematical models are required to infer the stoichiometric parameters from these experimental data. Recently, we developed mathematical models for the estimations of the stoichiometry of entry [1]. In this article, we show how our models can be extended to investigate the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization. We study how various biological parameters affect the estimate of the stoichiometry of neutralization. We find that the distribution of trimer numbers-which is also an important determinant of the stoichiometry of entry-influences the estimated value of the stoichiometry of neutralization. In contrast, other parameters, which characterize the experimental system, diminish the information we can extract from the data about the stoichiometry of neutralization, and thus reduce our confidence in the estimate. We illustrate the use of our models by re-analyzing previously published data on the neutralization sensitivity [2], which contains measurements of neutralization sensitivity of viruses with different envelope proteins to antibodies with various specificities. Our mathematical framework represents the formal basis for the estimation of the stoichiometry of neutralization. Together with the stoichiometry of entry, the stoichiometry of trimer neutralization will allow one to calculate how many antibodies are required to neutralize a virion or even an entire population of

  10. Cation Exchange Capacity of Biochar: An urgent method modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munera, Jose; Martinsen, Vegard; Mulder, Jan; Tau Strand, Line; Cornelissen, Gerard

    2017-04-01

    A better understanding of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) values of biochar and its acid neutralizing capacity (ANC) is crucial when tailoring a single biochar for a particular soil and crop. Literature values for the CEC of biochar are surprisingly variable, commonly ranging from 5 to 50 cmol+/Kg even as high as 69 to 204 cmol+/Kg and often poorly reproducible, suggesting methodological problems. Ashes and very fine pores in biochar may complicate the analysis and thus compromise the results. Here, we modify and critically assess different steps in a common method for CEC determination in biochar and investigate how the measured CEC may be affected by slow cation diffusion from micro-pores. We modified the existing ammonium acetate (NH4-OAc) method (buffered at pH 7), based on displaced ammonium (NH4+) in potassium chloride (KCl) extracts after removing excess NH4-OAc with alcohol in batch mode. We used pigeon pea biochar (produced at 350 ˚C; particle size 0.5mm to 2mm) to develop the method and we tested its reproducibility in biochars with different ANC. The biochar sample (1.00g) was pH-adjusted to 7 after 2 days of equilibration, using hydrochloric acid (HCl), and washed with water until the conductivity of the water was removed the soluble ash component, while simultaneously allowing the NH4-OAc to buffer at pH 7. To assess the importance of diffusion limitation of replacing cations (NH4+ and K+) in micro-pores, we equilibrated the biochar with NH4-OAc for 1 and 7 days, and after washing with alcohol, for 1, 3 and 7 days with KCl. The effects of the washing volume of alcohol (15, 30 and 45 ml) and of the biochar to NH4OAc solution ratio (1:15, 1:30 and 1:45) were also tested. The CEC values were corrected for dry matter content and mass losses during the process. Results indicate that the measured CEC values of the modified method were highly reproducible and that 1 day shaking with NH4OAc and KCl is enough to saturate the exchange sites with NH4+ and

  11. Complex Macromolecular Architectures by Living Cationic Polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Alghamdi, Reem D.

    2015-05-01

    Poly (vinyl ether)-based graft polymers have been synthesized by the combination of living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers with other living or controlled/ living polymerization techniques (anionic and ATRP). The process involves the synthesis of well-defined homopolymers (PnBVE) and co/terpolymers [PnBVE-b-PCEVE-b-PSiDEGVE (ABC type) and PSiDEGVE-b-PnBVE-b-PSiDEGVE (CAC type)] by sequential living cationic polymerization of n-butyl vinyl ether (nBVE), 2-chloroethyl vinyl ether (CEVE) and tert-butyldimethylsilyl ethylene glycol vinyl ether (SiDEGVE), using mono-functional {[n-butoxyethyl acetate (nBEA)], [1-(2-chloroethoxy) ethyl acetate (CEEA)], [1-(2-(2-(t-butyldimethylsilyloxy)ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl acetate (SiDEGEA)]} or di-functional [1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol di(1-ethyl acetate) (cHMDEA), (VEMOA)] initiators. The living cationic polymerizations of those monomers were conducted in hexane at -20 0C using Et3Al2Cl3 (catalyst) in the presence of 1 M AcOEt base.[1] The PCEVE segments of the synthesized block terpolymers were then used to react with living macroanions (PS-DPE-Li; poly styrene diphenyl ethylene lithium) to afford graft polymers. The quantitative desilylation of PSiDEGVE segments by n-Bu4N+F- in THF at 0 °C led to graft co- and terpolymers in which the polyalcohol is the outer block. These co-/terpolymers were subsequently subjected to “grafting-from” reactions by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) of styrene to afford more complex macromolecular architectures. The base assisted living cationic polymerization of vinyl ethers were also used to synthesize well-defined α-hydroxyl polyvinylether (PnBVE-OH). The resulting polymers were then modified into an ATRP macro-initiator for the synthesis of well-defined block copolymers (PnBVE-b-PS). Bifunctional PnBVE with terminal malonate groups was also synthesized and used as a precursor for more complex architectures such as H-shaped block copolymer by “grafting-from” or

  12. Heart imaging with cationic complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, E.; Bushong, W.; Glavan, K.A.; Elder, R.C.; Sodd, V.J.; Scholz, K.L.; Fortman, D.L.; Lukes, S.J.

    1981-10-02

    The cationic technetium-99 complex trans-(99TC(dmpe)2Cl2)+, where dmpe is bis(1,2-dimethylphosphino)ethane or (CH3)2P-CH2-P(CH3)2, has been prepared and characterized by single-crystal, x-ray structural analysis. The technetium-99m analog, trans-(99mTc(dmpe) 2Cl2)+, has also been prepared and shown to yield excellent gamma-ray images of the heart. The purposeful design, characterization, and synthesis of this technetium-99m radiopharmaceutical represents a striking application of fundamental inorganic chemistry to a problem in applied nuclear medicine.

  13. Net Neutrality: Media Discourses and Public Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Quail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes media and public discourses surrounding net neutrality, with particular attention to public utility philosophy, from a critical perspective. The article suggests that further public education about net neutrality would be beneficial. The first portion of this paper provides a survey of the existing literature surrounding net neutrality, highlighting the contentious debate between market-based and public interest perspectives. In order to contextualize the debate, an overview of public utility philosophy is provided, shedding light on how the Internet can be conceptualized as a public good. Following this discussion, an analysis of mainstream media is presented, exploring how the media represents the issue of net neutrality and whether or not the Internet is discussed through the lens of public utility. To further examine how the net neutrality debate is being addressed, and to see the potential impacts of media discourses on the general public, the results of a focus group are reported and analyzed. Finally, a discussion assesses the implications of the net neutrality debate as presented through media discourses, highlighting the future of net neutrality as an important policy issue.

  14. Identical extraction behavior and coordination of trivalent or hexavalent f-element cations using ionic liquid and molecular solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocalia, Violina A; Jensen, Mark P; Holbrey, John D; Spear, Scott K; Stepinski, Dominique C; Rogers, Robin D

    2005-06-07

    The extraction of both UO2(2+) and trivalent lanthanide and actinide ions (Am3+, Nd3+, Eu3+) by dialkylphosphoric or dialkylphosphinic acids from aqueous solutions into the ionic liquid, 1-decyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide has been studied and compared to extractions into dodecane. Radiotracer partitioning measurements show comparable patterns of distribution ratios for both the ionic liquid/aqueous and dodecane/aqueous systems, and the limiting slopes at low acidity indicate the partitioning of neutral complexes in both solvent systems. The metal ion coordination environment, elucidated from EXAFS and UV-visible spectroscopy measurements, is equivalent in the ionic liquid and dodecane solutions with coordination of the uranyl cation by two hydrogen-bonded extractant dimers, and of the trivalent cations by three extractant dimers. This is the first definitive report of a system where both the biphasic extraction equilibria and metal coordination environment are the same in an ionic liquid and a molecular organic solvent.

  15. Neutral Supersymmetric Higgs Boson Searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Stephen Luke [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-07-01

    In some Supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model, including the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the coupling of Higgs bosons to b-quarks is enhanced. This enhancement makes the associated production of the Higgs with b-quarks an interesting search channel for the Higgs and Supersymmetry at D0. The identification of b-quarks, both online and offline, is essential to this search effort. This thesis describes the author's involvement in the development of both types of b-tagging and in the application of these techniques to the MSSM Higgs search. Work was carried out on the Level-3 trigger b-tagging algorithms. The impact parameter (IP) b-tagger was retuned and the effects of increased instantaneous luminosity on the tagger were studied. An extension of the IP-tagger to use the z-tracking information was developed. A new b-tagger using secondary vertices was developed and commissioned. A tool was developed to allow the use of large multi-run samples for trigger studies involving b-quarks. Offline, a neural network (NN) b-tagger was trained combining the existing offline lifetime based b-tagging tools. The efficiency and fake rate of the NN b-tagger were measured in data and MC. This b-tagger was internally reviewed and certified by the Collaboration and now provides the official b-tagging for all analyses using the Run IIa dataset at D0. A search was performed for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a b{bar b} pair and produced in association with one or more b-quarks. Limits are set on the cross-section times the branching ratio for such a process. The limits were interpreted in various MSSM scenarios. This analysis uses the NN b-tagger and was the first to use this tool. The analysis also relies on triggers using the Level-3 IP b-tagging tool described previously. A likelihood discriminant was used to improve the analysis and a neural network was developed to cross-check this technique. The result of the analysis has been submitted to PRL

  16. Arsenic and major cation hydrogeochemistry of the Central Victorian (Australia) surface waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khawar SULTAN; Kim DOWLING

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on the major cations(Ca, Mg, Na and K) and arsenic(As) compositions of surface waters collected from major creeks, rivers and lakes in Central Victoria (Australia). The surface waters were found to be neutral to alkaline (pH 6.7-9.4),oxidised (average redox potential (Eh) about 130 mV) and showed variable concentrations of dissolved ions (EC, about 51-4386 μS/cm). The concen- trations of dissolved major cations in surface waters were found to be in the order of Na>>Mg>Ca>K and in soils the contents of metals followed an order of abundance as: Ca>Mg>>K>Na. While Na was the least abundant in soils, it registered the highest dissolved cation in surface waters. Of the four major cations, the average concentration ofNa(98.7 mg/L) was attributed to the weathering of feldspars and atmospheric input. Relatively highly dissolved concentrations of Na and Mg compared with the world average values of rivers reflected the weathering of rock and soil minerals within the catchments.The As soil level is naturally high(linked to lithology) as reflected by high background soil values and mining operations are also considered to be a contributory factor. Under relatively alkaline-oxidative conditions low mobility of dissolved As (average about 7.9 μg/L) was observed in most of the surface waters with a few higher values(>15 μg/L) around a sewage disposal site and mine tailings.Arsenic in soils is slowly released into water under alkaline and/or lower Eh conditions. The efficient sink of Fe, Al and Mn oxides acts as a barrier against the As release under near neutral-oxidising conditions. High As content (average about 28.3 mg/kg) in soils was found to be associated with Fe-hydroxides as revealed by XRD and SEM analysis. The dissolved As concentration was found to be below the recommended maximum levels for recreational water in all surface waters(lakes and rivers) in the study area. Catchment lithology exerted the fundamental control on surface water chemistry

  17. Evaluation of smallpox vaccines using variola neutralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, Inger K; Davidson, Whitni B; Hughes, Christine M; Olson, Victoria A; Smith, Scott K; Holman, Robert C; Frey, Sharon E; Newman, Frances; Belshe, Robert B; Yan, Lihan; Karem, Kevin

    2009-08-01

    The search for a 'third'-generation smallpox vaccine has resulted in the development and characterization of several vaccine candidates. A significant barrier to acceptance is the absence of challenge models showing induction of correlates of protective immunity against variola virus. In this light, virus neutralization provides one of few experimental methods to show specific 'in vitro' activity of vaccines against variola virus. Here, we provide characterization of the ability of a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine to induce variola virus-neutralizing antibodies, and we provide comparison with the neutralization elicited by standard Dryvax vaccination.

  18. Beyond ITER: Neutral beams for DEMO

    CERN Document Server

    McAdams, R

    2013-01-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, ITER is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the DEMO programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  19. Electronic absorptions of the benzylium cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Chalyavi, Nahid; Sanelli, Julian A.; Bieske, Evan J.

    2012-11-01

    The electronic transitions of the benzylium cation (Bz+) are investigated over the 250-550 nm range by monitoring the photodissociation of mass-selected C7H7+-Arn (n = 1, 2) complexes in a tandem mass spectrometer. The Bz+-Ar spectrum displays two distinct band systems, the S1←S0 band system extending from 370 to 530 nm with an origin at 19 067 ± 15 cm-1, and a much stronger S3←S0 band system extending from 270 to 320 nm with an origin at 32 035 ± 15 cm-1. Whereas the S1←S0 absorption exhibits well resolved vibrational progressions, the S3←S0 absorption is broad and relatively structureless. Vibronic structure of the S1←S0 system, which is interpreted with the aid of time-dependent density functional theory and Franck-Condon simulations, reflects the activity of four totally symmetric ring deformation modes (ν5, ν6, ν9, ν13). We find no evidence for the ultraviolet absorption of the tropylium cation, which according to the neon matrix spectrum should occur over the 260 - 275 nm range [A. Nagy, J. Fulara, I. Garkusha, and J. Maier, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 50, 3022 (2011)], 10.1002/anie.201008036.

  20. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  1. Cationic Antimicrobial Polymers and Their Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cationic compounds are promising candidates for development of antimicrobial agents. Positive charges attached to surfaces, particles, polymers, peptides or bilayers have been used as antimicrobial agents by themselves or in sophisticated formulations. The main positively charged moieties in these natural or synthetic structures are quaternary ammonium groups, resulting in quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs. The advantage of amphiphilic cationic polymers when compared to small amphiphilic molecules is their enhanced microbicidal activity. Besides, many of these polymeric structures also show low toxicity to human cells; a major requirement for biomedical applications. Determination of the specific elements in polymers, which affect their antimicrobial activity, has been previously difficult due to broad molecular weight distributions and random sequences characteristic of radical polymerization. With the advances in polymerization control, selection of well defined polymers and structures are allowing greater insight into their structure-antimicrobial activity relationship. On the other hand, antimicrobial polymers grafted or self-assembled to inert or non inert vehicles can yield hybrid antimicrobial nanostructures or films, which can act as antimicrobials by themselves or deliver bioactive molecules for a variety of applications, such as wound dressing, photodynamic antimicrobial therapy, food packing and preservation and antifouling applications.

  2. Xe-bearing hydrocarbon ions: Observation of Xe.acetylene+rad and Xe.benzene+rad radical cations and calculations of their ground state structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhong-hua; Attah, Isaac K.; Platt, Sean P.; Aziz, Saadullah G.; Kertesz, Miklos; El-Shall, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    This work reports evidence for novel types of Xe-bearing hydrocarbon radical cations. The Xe.acetylene+rad radical cation adduct is observed at nearly room temperature using the mass-selected drift cell technique. The irreversible addition of the Xe atom and the lack of back dissociation to HCCH+rad + Xe is consistent with the calculated binding energy of 0.85 eV to be contrasted with the metastable nature of the neutral Xe.acetylene adduct. The observed Xe.benzene+rad radical cation appears to be a weakly bound complex stabilized mainly by ion-induced dipole interaction consistent with a calculated binding energy in the range of 0.14-0.17 eV.

  3. Nature as a source of inspiration for cationic lipid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labas, Romain; Beilvert, Fanny; Barteau, Benoit; David, Stéphanie; Chèvre, Raphaël; Pitard, Bruno

    2010-02-01

    Synthetic gene delivery systems represent an attractive alternative to viral vectors for DNA transfection. Cationic lipids are one of the most widely used non-viral vectors for the delivery of DNA into cultured cells and are easily synthesized, leading to a large variety of well-characterized molecules. This review discusses strategies for the design of efficient cationic lipids that overcome the critical barriers of in vitro transfection. A particular focus is placed on natural hydrophilic headgroups and lipophilic tails that have been used to synthesize biocompatible and non-toxic cationic lipids. We also present chemical features that have been investigated to enhance the transfection efficiency of cationic lipids by promoting the escape of lipoplexes from the endosomal compartment and DNA release from DNA-liposome complexes. Transfection efficiency studies using these strategies are likely to improve the understanding of the mechanism of cationic lipid-mediated gene delivery and to help the rational design of novel cationic lipids.

  4. Mechanistic Investigation of Phosphate Ester Bond Cleavages of Glycylphosphoserinyltryptophan Radical Cations under Low-Energy Collision-Induced Dissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Quan; Hao, Qiang; Song, Tao; Siu, Chi-Kit; Chu, Ivan K.

    2013-04-01

    Under the conditions of low-energy collision-induced dissociation (CID), the canonical glycylphosphoserinyltryptophan radical cation having its radical located on the side chain of the tryptophan residue ([G p SW]•+) fragments differently from its tautomer with the radical initially generated on the α-carbon atom of the glycine residue ([G• p SW]+). The dissociation of [G• p SW]+ is dominated by the neutral loss of H3PO4 (98 Da), with backbone cleavage forming the [b2 - H]•+/y1 + pair as the minor products. In contrast, for [G p SW]•+, competitive cleavages along the peptide backbone, such as the formation of [G p SW - CO2]•+ and the [c2 + 2H]+/[z1 - H]•+ pair, significantly suppress the loss of neutral H3PO4. In this study, we used density functional theory (DFT) to examine the mechanisms for the tautomerizations of [G• p SW]+ and [G p SW]•+ and their dissociation pathways. Our results suggest that the dissociation reactions of these two peptide radical cations are more efficient than their tautomerizations, as supported by Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) modeling. We also propose that the loss of H3PO4 from both of these two radical cationic tautomers is preferentially charge-driven, similar to the analogous dissociations of even-electron protonated peptides. The distonic radical cationic character of [G• p SW]+ results in its charge being more mobile, thereby favoring charge-driven loss of H3PO4; in contrast, radical-driven pathways are more competitive during the CID of [G p SW]•+.

  5. Structure and Bonding in Small Neutral Alkali-Halide Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado, A; López, J M; Alonso, J A

    1997-01-01

    The structural and bonding properties of small neutral alkali-halide clusters (AX)n, with n less than or equal to 10, A=Li, Na, K, Rb and X=F, Cl, Br, I, are studied using the ab initio Perturbed Ion (aiPI) model and a restricted structural relaxation criterion. A trend of competition between rock-salt and hexagonal ring-like isomers is found and discussed in terms of the relative ionic sizes. The main conclusion is that an approximate value of r_C/r_A=0.5 (where r_C and r_A are the cationic and anionic radii) separates the hexagonal from the rock-salt structures. The classical electrostatic part of the total energy at the equilibrium geometry is enough to explain these trends. The magic numbers in the size range studied are n= 4, 6 and 9, and these are universal since they occur for all alkali-halides and do not depend on the specific ground state geometry. Instead those numbers allow for the formation of compact clusters. Full geometrical relaxations are considered for (LiF)n (n=3-7) and (AX)_3 clusters, an...

  6. Neutral Aggregation in Finite Length Genotype space

    CERN Document Server

    Houchmandzadeh, Bahram

    2016-01-01

    The advent of modern genome sequencing techniques allows for a more stringent test of the neutrality hypothesis of Evolution, where all individuals have the same fitness. Using the individual based model of Wright and Fisher, we compute the amplitude of neutral aggregation in the genome space, i.e., the probability PL,$\\Theta$,M (k) of finding two individuals at genetic distance k for a genome of size L and mutation and migration number $\\Theta$ and M. In well mixed populations, we show that for $\\Theta$ $\\ll$ L, neutral aggregation is the dominant force and most individuals are found at short genetic distances from each other. For $\\Theta$ $\\sim$ L/2 on the contrary, individuals are randomly dispersed in genome space. For a geographically dispersed population, the controlling parameter is a combination of mutation and migration numbers. The theory we develop can be used to test the neutrality hypothesis in various ecological and evolutionary systems.

  7. Synthesis and structure of neutral double helicate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU, Xun-Cheng; ZHOU, Zhi-Fen; ZHU, Shou-Rong; CHEN, Yun-Ti; LENG, Xue-Bing; WENG, Lin-Hong; LIN, Hua-Kuan

    2000-01-01

    A new approach to geaerating supramolecular architectures, based on easy-to-prepare sehiff base ligands, is described to gether with its application to the self-assembly of supramolecu lar neutral double helicates.

  8. Neutral thermospheric temperature from ion concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breig, E. L.; Donaldson, J. S.; Hanson, W. B.; Hoffman, J. H.; Power, R. A.; Kayser, D. C.; Spencer, N. W.; Wharton, L. E.

    1981-01-01

    A technique for extracting information on neutral temperature from in situ F region measurements of O(+) and H(+) ion concentrations is analyzed and evaluated. Advantage is taken of the condition of charge-exchange equilibrium of these species in the neighborhood of 320 km to infer the associated relative abundances of neutral oxygen and hydrogen. Results are shown to be generally consistent with other concurrent in situ measurements.

  9. The Framing of Network Neutrality Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perry, James

    The neutrality of the internet with regard to applications (e.g. search, social networking, email, to mention only three) has been central to innovation and growth in the knowledge-economy over the past two decades. Until recently, neutrality was built into the internet's design via its core stan...... with a critical analysis of their respective operational paradigms, the paper seeks to understand who is framing the debate, how they are doing so, and to what (systemic) effect....

  10. Γ-source Neutral Point Clamped Inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mo, Wei; Loh, Poh Chiang; Blaabjerg, Frede

    Transformer based Z-source inverters are recently proposed to achieve promising buck-boost capability. They have improved higher buck-boost capability, smaller size and less components count over Z-source inverters. On the other hand, neutral point clamped inverters have less switching stress...... and better output performance comparing with traditional two-level inverters. Integrating these two types of configurations can help neutral point inverters achieve enhanced votlage buck-boost capability....

  11. ITER neutral beam system US conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgalis, P.

    1990-09-01

    In this document we present the US conceptual design of a neutral beam system for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The design incorporates a barium surface conversion D{sup {minus}} source feeding a linear array of accelerator channels. The system uses a dc accelerator with electrostatic quadrupoles for strong focusing. A high voltage power supply that is integrated with the accelerator is presented as an attractive option. A gas neutralizer is used and residual ions exiting the neutralizer are deflected to water-cooled dumps. Cryopanels are located at the accelerator exit to pump excess gas from the source and the neutralizer, and in the ion dump cavity to pump re-neutralized ions and neutralizer gas. All the above components are packaged in compact identical, independent modules which can be removed for remote maintenance. The neutral beam system delivers 75 MW of DO at 1.3 MeV, into three ports with a total of 9 modules arranged in stacks of three modules per port . To increase reliability each module is designed to deliver up to 10 MW; this allows eight modules operating at partial capacity to deliver the required power in the event one module is out of service, and provides 20% excess capacity to improve availability. Radiation protection is provided by shielding and by locating critical components in the source and accelerator 46.5 m from the torus centerline. Neutron shielding in the drift duct and neutralizer provides the added feature of limiting conductance and thus reducing gas flow to and from the torus.

  12. Nitrogen-neutrality: a step towards sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leip, Adrian; Leach, Allison; Musinguzi, Patrick; Tumwesigye, Trust; Olupot, Giregon; Tenywa, John Stephen; Mudiope, Joseph; Hutton, Olivia; Cordovil, Claudia M. d. S.; Bekunda, Mateete; Galloway, James

    2014-11-01

    We propose a novel indicator measuring one dimension of the sustainability of an entity in modern societies: Nitrogen-neutrality. N-neutrality strives to offset Nr releases an entity exerts on the environment from the release of reactive nitrogen (Nr) to the environment by reducing it and by offsetting the Nr releases elsewhere. N-neutrality also aims to increase awareness about the consequences of unintentional releases of nitrogen to the environment. N-neutrality is composed of two quantified elements: Nr released by an entity (e.g. on the basis of the N footprint) and Nr reduction from management and offset projects (N offset). It includes management strategies to reduce nitrogen losses before they occur (e.g., through energy conservation). Each of those elements faces specific challenges with regard to data availability and conceptual development. Impacts of Nr releases to the environment are manifold, and the impact profile of one unit of Nr release depends strongly on the compound released and the local susceptibility to Nr. As such, N-neutrality is more difficult to conceptualize and calculate than C-neutrality. We developed a workable conceptual framework for N-neutrality which was adapted for the 6th International Nitrogen Conference (N2013, Kampala, November 2013). Total N footprint of the surveyed meals at N2013 was 66 kg N. A total of US 3050 was collected from the participants and used to offset the conference’s N footprint by supporting the UN Millennium Village cluster Ruhiira in South-Western Uganda. The concept needs further development in particular to better incorporate the spatio-temporal variability of impacts and to standardize the methods to quantify the required N offset to neutralize the Nr releases impact. Criteria for compensation projects need to be sharply defined to allow the development of a market for N offset certificates.

  13. Cationic lipids bearing succinic-based, acyclic and macrocyclic hydrophobic domains: synthetic studies and in vitro gene transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jubeli, Emile; Maginty, A. B.; Khalique, N. A.;

    2016-01-01

    a dimethylamine or trimethylamine headgroup, and a macrocyclic or an acyclic hydrophobic domain composed of, or derived from two 16-atom, succinic-based acyl chains. The synthesized lipids and a co-lipid of neutral charge, either cholesterol or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE), were formulated...... within the hydrophobic domain of the cationic lipids was found to improve lipid hydration. The transfection assays revealed a general trend in which mismatched formulations that employed a rigid lipid combined with a non-rigid (or flexible) lipid, outperformed the matched formulations. The results from...

  14. A Novel Category of Ionic Liquids Based on Diacetone Acrylamide Cation and Their Use as Esterification Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Qing-Hai; LU Bin; LI Jiang; YANG Xin; SHAN Yong-Kui

    2006-01-01

    A novel category of salts based on diacetone acrylamide cation (DA+) and the anions such as acetate (Ac-),trifluoroacetate (TF-), tetrafluoroborate (BF-), hexafluorophosphate (PF-), sulfate (SO-) and chloride (Cl-) were synthesized by usual neutralization of acids and bases at room temperature and characterized by IR, 1H NMR and elemental analysis (EA). The results show that these compounds possess the characteristic of ionic liquids. In addition, four of them, DABF, DACl, DASO and DAPF, were efficient catalysts for esterication of acetic acid with C1C6 alcohols and octanol.

  15. Neutral particle kinetics in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendler, M.; Heifetz, D.

    1986-05-01

    The theory of neutral particle kinetics treats the transport of mass, momentum, and energy in a plasma due to neutral particles which themselves are unaffected by magnetic fields. This transport affects the global power and particle balances in fusion devices, as well as profile control and plasma confinement quality, particle and energy fluxes onto device components, performance of pumping systems, and the design of diagnostics and the interpretation of their measurements. This paper reviews the development of analytic, numerical, and Monte Carlo methods of solving the time-independent Boltzmann equation describing neutral kinetics. These models for neutral particle behavior typically use adaptations of techniques developed originally for computing neutron transport, due to the analogy between the two phenomena, where charge-exchange corresponds to scattering and ionization to absorption. Progress in the field depends on developing multidimensional analytic methods, and obtaining experimental data for the physical processes of wall reflection, the neutral/plasma interaction, and for processes in fusion devices which are directly related to neutral transport, such as H/sub ..cap alpha../ emission rates, plenum pressures, and charge-exchange emission spectra.

  16. G3 Assisted Rational Design of Chemical Sensor Array Using Carbonitrile Neutral Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatimah Alias

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Combined computational and experimental strategies for the systematic design of chemical sensor arrays using carbonitrile neutral receptors are presented. Binding energies of acetonitrile, n-pentylcarbonitrile and malononitrile with Ca(II, Mg(II, Be(II and H+ have been investigated with the B3LYP, G3, CBS-QB3, G4 and MQZVP methods, showing a general trend H+ > Be(II > Mg(II > Ca(II. Hydrogen bonding, donor-acceptor and cation-lone pair electron simple models were employed in evaluating the performance of computational methods. Mg(II is bound to acetonitrile in water by 12.5 kcal/mol, and in the gas phase the receptor is more strongly bound by 33.3 kcal/mol to Mg(II compared to Ca(II. Interaction of bound cations with carbonitrile reduces the energies of the MOs involved in the proposed σ-p conjugated network. The planar malononitrile-Be(II complex possibly involves a π-network with a cationic methylene carbon. Fabricated potentiometric chemical sensors show distinct signal patterns that can be exploited in sensor array applications.

  17. Cation-π interaction of the univalent silver cation with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole: Experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polášek, Miroslav; Kvíčala, Jaroslav; Makrlík, Emanuel; Křížová, Věra; Vaňura, Petr

    2017-02-01

    By using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), it was proven experimentally that the univalent silver cation Ag+ forms with meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole (abbrev. 1) the cationic complex species 1·Ag+. Further, applying quantum chemical DFT calculations, four different conformations of the resulting complex 1·Ag+ were derived. It means that under the present experimental conditions, this ligand 1 can be considered as a macrocyclic receptor for the silver cation.

  18. Automated Facial Coding Software Outperforms People in Recognizing Neutral Faces as Neutral from Standardized Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eLewinski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about people’s accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge – automated facial coding (AFC software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90% was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%. I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e. smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  19. Automated facial coding software outperforms people in recognizing neutral faces as neutral from standardized datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinski, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about people's accuracy of recognizing neutral faces as neutral. In this paper, I demonstrate the importance of knowing how well people recognize neutral faces. I contrasted human recognition scores of 100 typical, neutral front-up facial images with scores of an arguably objective judge - automated facial coding (AFC) software. I hypothesized that the software would outperform humans in recognizing neutral faces because of the inherently objective nature of computer algorithms. Results confirmed this hypothesis. I provided the first-ever evidence that computer software (90%) was more accurate in recognizing neutral faces than people were (59%). I posited two theoretical mechanisms, i.e., smile-as-a-baseline and false recognition of emotion, as possible explanations for my findings.

  20. The properties of low energy neutral particles in a neutral beam source: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung-hoon, E-mail: physh@kaist.ac.k [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Suk Jae [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong-Seock [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, Mercer Street, New York, NY 10012 (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Application of a hyperthermal neutral beam source is one of the candidate methods of reducing plasma induced damage problems. The neutral beam is generated by vertical collisions between energetic ions and a reflector composed of metal. However, it is difficult to measure the neutral angle and energy distribution experimentally. We simulate the hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) generation using a molecular dynamics algorithm. In order to obtain a low energy neutral beam, ions with various energies are vertically projected onto the reflector surface. A rough surface structure that has been experimentally measured is used for a realistic simulation. The energy distributions are obtained and the ratio of energy of reflected neutral particles agrees with experimental data.

  1. Increased localized delivery of piroxicam by cationic nanoparticles after intra-articular injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SR

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sung Rae Kim,1 Myoung Jin Ho,2 Sang Hyun Kim,1 Ha Ra Cho,2 Han Sol Kim,2 Yong Seok Choi,2 Young Wook Choi,1 Myung Joo Kang2 1Division of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Chung-Ang University, Seoul, 2College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Cheonan, Chungnam, South Korea Abstract: Piroxicam (PRX, a potent nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is prescribed to relieve postoperative and/or chronic joint pain. However, its oral administration often results in serious gastrointestinal adverse effects including duodenal ulceration. Thus, a novel cationic nanoparticle (NP was explored to minimize the systemic exposure and increase the retention time of PRX in the joint after intra-articular (IA injection, by forming micrometer-sized electrostatic clusters with endogenous hyaluronic acid (HA in the synovial cavity. PRX-loaded NPs consisting of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, Eudragit RL, and polyvinyl alcohol were constructed with the following characteristics: particle size of 220 nm, zeta potential of 11.5 mV in phosphate-buffered saline, and loading amount of 4.0% (w/w of PRX. In optical and hyperspectral observations, the cationic NPs formed more than 50 µm-sized aggregates with HA, which was larger than the intercellular gaps between synoviocytes. In an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats, area under the plasma concentration–time curve (AUC0–24 h and maximum plasma concentration (Cmax of PRX after IA injection of the cationic NPs were <70% (P<0.05 and 60% (P<0.05, respectively, compared to those obtained from drug solution. Moreover, the drug concentration in joint tissue 24 h after dosing with the cationic NPs was 3.2-fold (P<0.05 and 1.8-fold (P<0.05 higher than that from drug solution and neutrally charged NPs, respectively. Therefore, we recommend the IA cationic NP therapy as an effective alternative to traditional oral therapy with PRX, as it increases drug retention selectively in the joint. Keywords: piroxicam

  2. Modelling of marine base cation emissions, concentrations and deposition in the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Werner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Base cations exert a large impact on various geochemical and geophysical processes both in the atmosphere and at the Earth surface. One of the essential roles of these compounds is impact on surface pH causing an increase in alkalinity and neutralizing the effects of acidity generated by sulphur and nitrogen deposition. During recent years anthropogenic emissions of base cations in the UK have decreased substantially, by about 70%, 78%, 75% and 48% for Na+, Mg2+, Ca2+ and K+, respectively, over the period 1990–2006. For the island regions, such as the UK, the main source of base cation particles is the aerosol produced from the sea surface. Here, the sea salt aerosol (SSA emissions are calculated with parameterisations proposed by Mårtensson et al. (2003 for ultra fine particles, Monahan et al. (1986 for fine particles and Smith and Harisson (1998 for coarse particles continuously with a 0.1 μm size step using WRF-modelled wind speed data at a 5 km × 5 km grid square resolution with a 3 h time step for two selected years 2003 and 2006. SSA production has been converted into base cation emissions, with the assumption that the chemical composition of the particle emitted from the sea surface is equal to the chemical composition of sea water, and used as input data in the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multi-pollutant Exchange Model (FRAME. FRAME model annual mean concentrations and total wet deposition at a 5 km × 5 km grid resolution, are compared with concentrations in air and wet deposition from the National Monitoring Network and measurements based estimates of UK deposition budget. The correlation coefficient for wet deposition achieves high values (R = 0.8 for Na+ and Mg2+, whereas for Ca2+ the correlation is poor (R < 0.3. Base cation concentrations are also represented well, with some overestimations on the west coast and underestimations in the

  3. Influence of Neutral Salts and pH on Exchangeable Acidity of Red Soil and Latosol Colloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the present work, the exchangeable acidity of a red soil colloid and a latosol colloid at different pH during reacting with four neutral salts was measured. The results show that the exchangeable acidity increased with increasing amounts of the neutral salts added, and the relation between them was almost linear. When the amount of the neutral salt added was lower than a certain value, the slope of the line was high, and the slope turned low when the amount exceeded that value, so there was a turning point in each line. The addition amounts of the neutral salts for the turning points were affected by the cation species of the neutral salts, but pH had less effect on them. After the turning points occurred, the exchangeable acidity of the red soil colloid still gradually increased with the addition amounts of the neutral salts, but that of the latosol colloid did not increase any more.The exchangeable acidity in NaClO4, KClO4 and NaCl solutions increased at first, and then decreased with increasing pH, that is to say, peak values appeared. The peak positions of the exchangeable acidity in relation to pH changed with neutral salt solutions and were affected by the surface characteristics of the soil colloids, but not affected by the amounts of the neutral salts added. The exchangeable acidity in the Ba(NO3)2 solution increased continuously with increasing pH. The exchangeable acidity of the red soil colloid was obviously larger than that of the latosol colloid.``

  4. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Anne-Marie; Dehlendorff, Christian; Vind, Anna C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD) library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We...... then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients...... with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any...

  5. Electron spectra of radical cations of heteroanalogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrushenko, K.B.; Turchaninov, V.K.; Vokin, A.I.; Ermikov, A.F.; Frolov, Yu.L.

    1985-12-01

    Radical cation spectra of indazole and benzothiophene in the visible region were obtained by laser photolysis during the reaction of photoexcited quinones with these compounds in acetonitrile. The charge transfer bands of the complexes of the test compounds with p-chloranil and 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane in dioxane were recorded on a Specord M-40. Photoelectron spectra were obtained on a ES-3201 electron spectrometer. The He(I) resonance band (21.21 eV) was used for excitation. Measurements were carried out in the 60-120/sup 0/C range. The energy scale was calibrated form the first ionization potentials of Ar (15.76 eV) and chlorobenzene (9.06 eV). The error in the determination of the ionization potentials for the first four photoelectron bands was 0.05 eV.

  6. Structural and cytotoxic studies of cationic thiosemicarbazones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinniah, Saravana Kumar; Sim, Kae Shin; Ng, Seik Weng; Tan, Kong Wai

    2017-06-01

    Schiff bases from the thiosemicarbazones family with variable N4 substituents are known to show enhanced growth inhibitory properties. In view of these facts and as a part of our continuous interest in cationic Schiff bases, we have developed several Schiff base ligands from (3-formyl-4-hydroxyphenyl)methyltriphenylphosphonium (T) in present study. The compounds were characterized by various spectroscopic methods (infrared spectra, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, HRESIMS and X-ray crystallography). Three of the N4 substituents, namely P(tsc)T, FP(tsc)T and EP(tsc)T exerted strong growth inhibitory properties by inhibiting the highly metastasis prostate cancer growth (PC-3). The thiosemicarbazone with ethylphenyl (EP) moiety displayed most potent activity against all cell lines tested. The MTT data obtained from analysis establishes that phenyl substituent enhances the growth inhibitory properties of the compound. The result affirms that EP(tsc)T would serve as a lead scaffold for rational anticancer agent development.

  7. Heart imaging with cationic complexes of technetium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutsch, E. (Univ. of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH); Bushong, W.; Glavan, K.A.; Elder, R.C.; Sodd, V.J.; Scholz, K.L.; Fortman, D.L.; Lukes, S.J.

    1981-10-02

    The cationic technetium-99 complex trans-(/sup 99/Tc(dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/)/sup +/, where dmpe is bis(1,2-dimethylphosphino)ethane or (CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/P-CH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/-P(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/, has been prepared and characterized by single-crystal, x-ray structural analysis. The technetium-99m analog, trans-(/sup 99m/Tc (dmpe)/sub 2/Cl/sub 2/)/sup +/, has also been prepared and shown to yield excellent gamma-ray images of the heart. The purposeful design, characterization, and synthesis of this technetium-99m radiopharmaceutical represents a striking application of fundamental inorganic chemistry to a problem in applied nuclear medicine.

  8. Retention of Cationic Starch onto Cellulose Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missaoui, Mohamed; Mauret, Evelyne; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur

    2008-08-01

    Three methods of cationic starch titration were used to quantify its retention on cellulose fibres, namely: (i) the complexation of CS with iodine and measurement of the absorbency of the ensuing blue solution by UV-vis spectroscopy; (ii) hydrolysis of the starch macromolecules followed by the conversion of the resulting sugars to furan-based molecules and quantifying the ensuing mixture by measuring their absorbance at a Ι of 490 nm, using the same technique as previous one and; finally (iii) hydrolysis of starch macromolecules by trifluoro-acetic acid and quantification of the sugars in the resulting hydrolysates by high performance liquid chromatography. The three methods were found to give similar results within the range of CS addition from 0 to 50 mg per g of cellulose fibres.

  9. Capturing dynamic cation hopping in cubic pyrochlores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks Hinojosa, Beverly; Asthagiri, Aravind; Nino, Juan C.

    2011-08-01

    In direct contrast to recent reports, density functional theory predicts that the most stable structure of Bi2Ti2O7 pyrochlore is a cubic Fd3¯m space group by accounting for atomic displacements. The displaced Bi occupies the 96g(x,x,z) Wyckoff position with six equivalent sites, which create multiple local minima. Using nudged elastic band method, the transition states of Bi cation hopping between equivalent minima were investigated and an energy barrier between 0.11 and 0.21 eV was determined. Energy barriers associated with the motion of Bi between equivalent sites within the 96g Wyckoff position suggest the presence of dielectric relaxation in Bi2Ti2O7.

  10. Hydration Structure of the Quaternary Ammonium Cations

    KAUST Repository

    Babiaczyk, Wojtek Iwo

    2010-11-25

    Two indicators of the hydropathicity of small solutes are introduced and tested by molecular dynamics simulations. These indicators are defined as probabilities of the orientation of water molecules\\' dipoles and hydrogen bond vectors, conditional on a generalized distance from the solute suitable for arbitrarily shaped molecules. Using conditional probabilities, it is possible to distinguish features of the distributions in close proximity of the solute. These regions contain the most significant information on the hydration structure but cannot be adequately represented by using, as is usually done, joint distance-angle probability densities. Our calculations show that using our indicators a relative hydropathicity scale for the interesting test set of the quaternary ammonium cations can be roughly determined. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Predicting Organic Cation Sorption Coefficients: Accounting for Competition from Sorbed Inorganic Cations Using a Simple Probe Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, William C; Goyetche, Reaha; Carter, Katherine; Medina, John; Vasudevan, Dharni; MacKay, Allison A

    2017-06-06

    With the increasing number of emerging contaminants that are cationic at environmentally relevant pH values, there is a need for robust predictive models of organic cation sorption coefficients (Kd). Current predictive models fail to account for the differences in the identity, abundance, and affinity of surface-associated inorganic exchange ions naturally present at negatively charged receptor sites on environmental solids. To better understand how organic cation sorption is influenced by surface-associated inorganic exchange ions, sorption coefficients of 10 organic cations (including eight pharmaceuticals and two simple probe organic amines) were determined for six homoionic forms of the aluminosilicate mineral, montmorillonite. Organic cation sorption coefficients exhibited consistent trends for all compounds across the various homoionic clays with sorption coefficients (Kd) decreasing as follows: Kd(Na(+)) > Kd(NH4(+)) ≥ Kd(K(+)) > Kd(Ca(2+)) ≥ Kd(Mg(2+)) > Kd(Al(3+)). This trend for competition between organic cations and exchangeable inorganic cations is consistent with the inorganic cation selectivity sequence, determined for exchange between inorganic ions. Such consistent trends in competition between organic and inorganic cations suggested that a simple probe cation, such as phenyltrimethylammonium or benzylamine, could capture soil-to-soil variations in native inorganic cation identity and abundance for the prediction of organic cation sorption to soils and soil minerals. Indeed, sorption of two pharmaceutical compounds to 30 soils was better described by phenyltrimethylammonium sorption than by measures of benzylamine sorption, effective cation exchange capacity alone, or a model from the literature (Droge, S., and Goss, K. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2013, 47, 14224). A hybrid approach integrating structural scaling factors derived from this literature model of organic cation sorption, along with phenyltrimethylammonium Kd values, allowed for

  12. The neutral species of the weak base trimethoprim is more toxic to willow trees (Salix viminalis) than the cation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikes, O.; Trapp, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium) as nitro......The acute toxicity of the veterinary antibiotic trimethoprim (TMP) to willow trees was tested at three different pH levels in hydroponic solutions with TMP concentrations of 1, 10, 100 or 1000 mg/L. The pH variation was achieved by using ammonium (pH 4.3, low) or nitrate (pH 6.4, medium...

  13. Neutral and cationic vanadium(III) alkyl and allyl complexes with a cyclopentadienyl-amine ancillary ligand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, GH; Beetstra, DJ; Meetsma, A; Hessen, B; Liu, Guohua; Beetstra, Dirk J.

    2004-01-01

    The (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl)cyclopentadienyI vanadium(III) complex [eta(5),eta(1)-C5H4(CH2)(2)-NMe2]VCl2(PMe3) (1), in which the pendant amine is coordinated to the metal center, was prepared by the reaction Of VCl3(PMe3)(2) with Li[C5H4(CH2)(2)NMe2] in THF. Reaction of 1 with 2 equiv of MeLi yields

  14. Mutual Neutralization of Atomic Rare-Gas Cations (Ne+, Ar+, Kr+, Xe+) with Atomic Halide Anions (Cl-, Br-, I-)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-07

    occur at intersections of the initial ionic potential curve and those describing the interaction between the atoms in their fi- nal states, as in...reactions, the halogen product is formed in excited states with sufficient energy to autoionize to form X+ + e−, Rg+ +X− → Rg +X∗, (3a) → Rg +X+ + e−. (3b...me- ters. The liquid reagents, CCl4 and CF2Br2, are purified via freeze-pump-thaw cycles prior to mixture preparation. The absolute electron density

  15. Antiviral effect of cationic compounds on bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mai Huong eChatain-Ly

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The antiviral activity of several cationic compounds - cetytrimethylammonium (CTAB, chitosan, nisin and lysozyme - was investigated on the bacteriophage c2 (DNA head and non-contractile tail infecting Lactococcus strains and the bacteriophage MS2 (F-specific RNA infecting E.coli. Firstly, these activities were evaluated in a phosphate buffer pH 7- 10 mM. The CTAB had a virucidal effect on the Lactococcus bacteriophages, but not on the MS2. After 1 min of contact with 0.125 mM CTAB, the c2 population was reduced from 6 log(pfu/mL to 1,5 log(pfu/mL and completely deactivated at 1 mM. On the contrary, chitosan inhibited the MS2 more than it did the bacteriophages c2. No antiviral effect was observed for the nisin or the lysozyme on bacteriophages after 1 min of treatment. A 1 and 2.5 log reduction was respectively observed for nisin and lysozyme when the treatment time increased (5 or 10 min. These results showed that the antiviral effect depended both on the virus and structure of the antimicrobial compounds. The antiviral activity of these compounds was also evaluated in different physico-chemical conditions and in complex matrices. The antiviral activity of CTAB was impaired in acid pH and with an increase of the ionic strength. These results might be explained by the electrostatic interactions between cationic compounds and negatively charged particles such as bacteriophages or other compounds in a matrix. Milk proved to be protective suggesting the components of food could interfere with antimicrobial compounds.

  16. Structure-activity correlation in transfection promoted by pyridinium cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi-Bahktar, P; Mendez-Campos, J; Raju, L; Khalique, N A; Jubeli, E; Larsen, H; Nicholson, D; Pungente, M D; Fyles, T M

    2016-03-21

    The efficiency of the transfection of a plasmid DNA encoding a galactosidase promoted by a series of pyridinium lipids in mixtures with other cationic lipids and neutral lipids was assessed in CHO-K1 cells. We identify key molecular parameters of the lipids in the mixture - clog P, lipid length, partial molar volume - to predict the morphology of the lipid-DNA lipoplex and then correlate these same parameters with transfection efficiency in an in vitro assay. We define a Transfection Index that provides a linear correlation with normalized transfection efficiency over a series of 90 different lipoplex compositions. We also explore the influence of the same set of molecular parameters on the cytotoxicity of the formulations.

  17. Hydrogenation of PAH cations: a first step towards H2 formation

    CERN Document Server

    Boschman, L; Cazaux, S; Schlathoelter, T; Hoekstra, R; Spaans, M; Gonzalez-Magana, O

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the universe. A large fraction of H2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms adsorbed on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), where formation rates depend crucially on the H sticking probability. We have experimentally studied PAH hydrogenation by exposing coronene cations, confined in a radiofrequency ion trap, to gas phase atomic hydrogen. A systematic increase of the number of H atoms adsorbed on the coronene with the time of exposure is observed. Odd coronene hydrogenation states dominate the mass spectrum up to 11 H atoms attached. This indicates the presence of a barrier preventing H attachment to these molecular systems. For the second and fourth hydrogenation, barrier heights of 72 +- 6 meV and 40 +- 10 meV, respectively are found which is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for the hydrogenation of neutral PAHs. Our experiments however prove that the barrier does not vanish for higher hydrogenation states. These results imply that PAH ...

  18. Role of extracellular cations in cell motility, polarity, and chemotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soll D

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available David R Soll1, Deborah Wessels1, Daniel F Lusche1, Spencer Kuhl1, Amanda Scherer1, Shawna Grimm1,21Monoclonal Antibody Research Institute, Developmental Studies, Hybridoma Bank, Department of Biology, University of Iowa, Iowa City; 2Mercy Medical Center, Surgical Residency Program, Des Moines, Iowa, USAAbstract: The concentration of cations in the aqueous environment of free living organisms and cells within the human body influence motility, shape, and chemotaxis. The role of extracellular cations is usually perceived to be the source for intracellular cations in the process of homeostasis. The role of surface molecules that interact with extracellular cations is believed to be that of channels, transporters, and exchangers. However, the role of Ca2+ as a signal and chemoattractant and the discovery of the Ca2+ receptor have demonstrated that extracellular cations can function as signals at the cell surface, and the plasma membrane molecules they interact with can function as bona fide receptors that activate coupled signal transduction pathways, associated molecules in the plasma membrane, or the cytoskeleton. With this perspective in mind, we have reviewed the cationic composition of aqueous environments of free living cells and cells that move in multicellular organisms, most notably humans, the range of molecules interacting with cations at the cell surface, the concept of a cell surface cation receptor, and the roles extracellular cations and plasma membrane proteins that interact with them play in the regulation of motility, shape, and chemotaxis. Hopefully, the perspective of this review will increase awareness of the roles extracellular cations play and the possibility that many of the plasma membrane proteins that interact with them could also play roles as receptors.Keywords: extracellular cations, chemotaxis, transporters, calcium, receptors

  19. Time-resolved imaging of laser-induced vibrational wave packets in neutral and ionic states of iodomethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakar, Y.; Kaderiya, B.; Zohrabi, M.; Pearson, W. L.; Ziaee, F.; Kananka Raju, P.; Ben-Itzhak, I.; Rolles, D.; Rudenko, A.

    2016-05-01

    Light-driven vibrational wave packets play an important role in molecular imaging and coherent control applications. Here we present the results of a pump-probe experiment characterizing laser-induced vibrational wave packets in both, neutral and ionic states of CH3 I (iodomethane), one of the prototypical polyatomic systems. Measuring yields and kinetic energies of all ionic fragments as a function of the time delay between two 25 fs, 800 nm pump and probe pulses, we map vibrational motion of the molecule, and identify the states involved by channel-resolved Fourier spectroscopy. In the Coulomb explosion channels we observe features with ~ 130 fs periodicity resulting from C-I symmetric stretch (ν3 mode) of the electronically excited cationic state. However the Fourier transform of the low-energy I+ ion yield produced by the dissociative ionization of CH3 I reveals the signatures of the same vibrational mode in the ground electronic states of both, neutral and cation, reflected in 65-70 fs oscillations. We observe the degeneration of the oscillatory structures from the cationic states within ~ 2 ps and discuss most likely reasons for this behavior. Supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U. S. DOE. K. R. P. and W. L. P. supported by NSF Award No. IIA-143049.

  20. The Effect of Hydration on the Cation-π Interaction Between Benzene and Various Cations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    VIKASH DHINDHWAL; N SATHYAMURTHY

    2016-10-01

    The effect of hydration on cation-π interaction in Mq+ BmWn (B = benzene; W = water; Mq+ =Na⁺, K⁺, Mg²⁺, Ca²⁺, Al³⁺, 0 ≤ n,m ≤ 4, 1≤ m + n ≤ 4) complexes has been investigated using ab initio quantum chemical methods. Interaction energy values computed at the MP2 level of theory using the 6-31G(d,p) basis set reveal a qualitative trend in the relative affinity of different cations for benzene and water in these complexes. The π–cloud thickness values for benzene have also been estimated for these systems.

  1. Spectroscopic parameters of the low-lying electronic states and laser cooling feasibility of NH+ cation and NH- anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Qing; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Wen-Wang

    2017-10-01

    The potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of 12Σ+, 22Σ+, 12Π and 22Π states of NH+ cation and NH- anion are calculated by using multi-reference configuration interaction method and large all-electron basis sets. Based on the obtained potential energy curves, the rotational and vibrational energy levels of the states are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation of nuclear movement. The calculated spectroscopic parameters for NH+ cation and NH- anion are in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental results. The spin orbit coupling effect of the 2Π states for both NH+ cation and NH- anion are calculated. The feasibility of laser cooling of the two molecules is examined by using the results of the molecular structure and spectroscopy. The highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors for the 12Π (v″ = 0) ↔ 12Σ+ (v‧ = 0) transition of NH+ and NH- are 0.821 and 0.999, while the radiative lifetimes of the 12Σ+ (v‧ = 0) state for the two molecules are 384 ns and 52.4 ns, respectively. The results indicate that NH+ cation and NH- anion are good candidate molecules for laser cooling. The cooling scheme via Sisyphus process for the NH+ cation and NH- anion are proposed in the paper. The laser wavelengths for the close cycles of the absorption and radiation are also determined. Unfortunately, the potential energy curve of the ground state of the neutral NH molecule shows that the auto-detachment of NH- anion is possible, implying the optical scheme of laser cooling for NH- anion is not easy to achieve in the experiment although it has larger Franck-Condon factor.

  2. Spectroscopic parameters of the low-lying electronic states and laser cooling feasibility of NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing-Qing; Yang, Chuan-Lu; Wang, Mei-Shan; Ma, Xiao-Guang; Liu, Wen-Wang

    2017-10-05

    The potential energy curves and transition dipole moments of 1(2)Σ(+), 2(2)Σ(+), 1(2)Π and 2(2)Π states of NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion are calculated by using multi-reference configuration interaction method and large all-electron basis sets. Based on the obtained potential energy curves, the rotational and vibrational energy levels of the states are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation of nuclear movement. The calculated spectroscopic parameters for NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion are in good agreement with available theoretical and experimental results. The spin orbit coupling effect of the (2)Π states for both NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion are calculated. The feasibility of laser cooling of the two molecules is examined by using the results of the molecular structure and spectroscopy. The highly diagonal Franck-Condon factors for the 1(2)Π (v″=0)↔1(2)Σ(+) (v'=0) transition of NH(+) and NH(-) are 0.821 and 0.999, while the radiative lifetimes of the 1(2)Σ(+) (v'=0) state for the two molecules are 384ns and 52.4ns, respectively. The results indicate that NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion are good candidate molecules for laser cooling. The cooling scheme via Sisyphus process for the NH(+) cation and NH(-) anion are proposed in the paper. The laser wavelengths for the close cycles of the absorption and radiation are also determined. Unfortunately, the potential energy curve of the ground state of the neutral NH molecule shows that the auto-detachment of NH(-) anion is possible, implying the optical scheme of laser cooling for NH(-) anion is not easy to achieve in the experiment although it has larger Franck-Condon factor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Composition-insensitive highly viscous wormlike micellar solutions formed in anionic and cationic surfactant systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramaki, Kenji; Iemoto, Suzuka; Ikeda, Naoaki; Saito, Keitaro

    2010-01-01

    We investigated phase behavior and rheological properties of aqueous micellar phase formed in water/cocoyl glutamate neutralized with triethanol amine (CGT-n)/hexadecyl trimethylammonium salt (CTAB or CTAC) systems, where n is a degree of neutralization. Micellar phase appears in wide composition range with respect to the surfactant mixing fraction in ternary phase diagrams at 25 degrees C. At high mixing fraction of cationic surfactant in the water/CGT-n/CTAB systems, one can observe a highly viscous micellar phase in which worm-like micelles are expected to form. Contrary to conventional systems in which worm-like micelles are formed, the zero-shear viscosity of the micellar solution in the water/CGT-n/CTAB system with n=1.2 increases with the addition of cationic cosurfactant and once decreases after a maximum, then increases again and decreases after the second maximum. At n=1.5 and 2, highly viscous solution is observed in the relatively wide range of surfactant mixing fraction instead of two maxima of the viscosity curve observed at n=1.2. In the case of CTAC instead of CTAB we can observe narrow composition range for the maximum viscosity. Frequency sweep measurements were performed on the highly viscous samples in the water/CGT-1.5/CTAB system. Typical viscoelastic behavior of worm-like micellar solutions is observed; i.e. the curves of storage (G') and loss (G") moduli make a crossover and the data points of G' and G" can be fitted to the Maxwell model. Relaxation time against the mixing fraction of two surfactants behaves similarly to the zero-shear viscosity change, whereas the plateau modulus continuously increases in the plateau region for the zero-shear viscosity curve.

  4. Ammonium Variational Trends and the Ammonia Neutralization Effect on Acid Rain over East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Chao; WANG Zi-Fa; Enagnon A. GBAGUIDI

    2010-01-01

    The distribution and variations of ammonium and the ammonia neutralization effect on acid rain were examined in East Asia during the period of 2000-05 using observed wet deposition data from the Acid Deposition Monitoring Network in East Asia (EANET). Observational trends show a high proportion of NH4+ in the total cations, with a six-year mean proportion of over 20% for continental and inland regions. The concentrations and deposition of NH4+ were higher in western China and Vietnam than in other regions. The annual variations in NH4+ concentration were smooth in most of the regions, except for southern China and Vietnam, where the NH4+ concentrations increased, and western China, where the NH4+ concentrations decreased. The neutralization factors (NFs) of NH4+ indicate that ammonia has a great neutralization capability toward acid rain, including for the regions with low NH4+ concentrations, such as Japan. The NFs were high in summer, with no obvious discrepancies between the northern and southern stations. However, the correlation coefficients between NH4+ concentrations and rain pH values imply that the ammonia neutralization effects on the pH values were distinct only at southern China and southern Japan stations. The neutralization of precipitation by ammonia was estimated by comparing the discrepancies between the observed pH values and the pH values calculated without ammonia consuming the H+ in NH4+. The results demonstrate that ammonia may increase annual mean pH values by 0.4-0.7 in southern China and by 0.15-0.25 in southern Japan.

  5. Effects of acidic and neutral biochars on properties and cadmium retention of soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fangjie; Dong, Zhaomin; Lamb, Dane; Naidu, Ravi; Bolan, Nanthi S; Ok, Yong Sik; Liu, Cuixia; Khan, Naser; Johir, M A H; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-08-01

    In this study, an acidic biochar and a neutral biochar were applied at 5 wt% into two soils for an 11-month incubation experiment. One Ferrosol soil (Ba) was slightly acidic with low organic matter and the other Dermosol soil (Mt) was slightly alkaline with high organic matter. The acidic (pH = 3.25) wood shaving (WS) biochar had no marked impact on nutrient levels, cation exchange capacity (CEC), pH and acid neutralization capacity (ANC) of either soil. By contrast, the neutral (pH = 7.00) chicken litter (CL) biochar significantly increased major soluble nutrients, pH, ANC of soil Ba. In terms of C storage, 87.9% and 69.5% WS biochar-C can be sequestrated as TOC by soil Ba and Mt, respectively, whereas only 24.0% of CL biochar-C stored in soil Ba and negligible amount in Mt as TOC. Biochars did not have significant effects on soil sorption capacity and sorption reversibility except that CL biochar increased sorption of soil Ba by around 25.4% and decreased desorption by around 50.0%. Overall, the studied acidic C rich WS biochar held little agricultural or remedial values but was favourable for C sequestration. The neutral mineral rich CL biochar may provide short-term agricultural benefit and certain sorption capacities of lower sorption capacity soils, but may be unlikely to result in heightened C sequestration in soils. This is the first study comprehensively examining functions of acidic and neutral biochars for their benefits as a soil amendment and suggests the importance of pre-testing biochars for target purposes prior to their large scale production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. How mobile are sorbed cations in clays and clay rocks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimmi, T; Kosakowski, G

    2011-02-15

    Diffusion of cations and other contaminants through clays is of central interest, because clays and clay rocks are widely considered as barrier materials for waste disposal sites. An intriguing experimental observation has been made in this context: Often, the diffusive flux of cations at trace concentrations is much larger and the retardation smaller than expected based on their sorption coefficients. So-called surface diffusion of sorbed cations has been invoked to explain the observations but remains a controversial issue. Moreover, the corresponding surface diffusion coefficients are largely unknown. Here we show that, by an appropriate scaling, published diffusion data covering a broad range of cations, clays, and chemical conditions can all be modeled satisfactorily by a surface diffusion model. The average mobility of sorbed cations seems to be primarily an intrinsic property of each cation that follows inversely its sorption affinity. With these surface mobilities, cation diffusion coefficients can now be estimated from those of water tracers. In pure clays at low salinities, surface diffusion can reduce the cation retardation by a factor of more than 1000.

  7. In vivo toxicity of cationic micelles and liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kristina Bram; Northeved, Helle; Ek, Pramod Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated toxicity of nanocarriers comprised of cationic polymer and lipid components often used in gene and drug delivery, formulated as cationic micelles and liposomes. Rats were injected intravenously with 10, 25 or 100 mg/kg and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h, or 24 h after the last...

  8. The solubility and properties of a purified ichthyocol in salt solutions of neutral pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALLOP, P M; SEIFTER, S; MEILMAN, E

    1957-07-25

    1. Purified citrate-extracted ichthyocol obtained from carp swim bladders has been further characterized with respect to its content of certain amino acids and carbohydrate substances. 2. The degree of solubilization or dispersion of ichthyocol by solutions of certain salts maintained in the range of neutral pH and at a temperature of 0-2 degrees C. has been determined. 3. While a number of salts of monovalent cations had no significant solubilizing effects on ichthyocol, ammonium chloride in a concentration of 1 M did cause solution of the protein. 4. Sodium thiosulfate in a range of concentrations caused the solubilization of ichthyocol but was most effective in an intermediate concentration of 0.25 M. 5. Several salts of divalent cations, in particular the chlorides of calcium, magnesium, and barium, and magnesium thiosulfate in concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 1 M caused the immediate and complete solubilization of the ichthyocol. 6. Solutions of ichthyocol in calcium chloride, magnesium chloride, and sodium thiosulfate buffered or adjusted to pH 7.0, were studied with respect to intrinsic viscosity of the protein, optical rotation, ultracentrifugal sedimentation, and reconstitution into fibers. It was found in each case that the original characteristics of the collagen, as determined previously in acid solution, were maintained when the protein was dissolved in salt solutions of neutral pH. No evidence of denaturation or gelatinization could be found when ichthyocol was solubilized under the stated conditions. 7. Collagen in neutral solution with sodium thiosulfate, calcium chloride, or magnesium chloride was not attacked by trypsin as determined viscometrically at 20.0 degrees C., but was rapidly degraded by a purified bacterial collagenase.

  9. Investigation on efficient adsorption of cationic dyes on porous magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Tong; Guo, Song; Zeng, Changfeng; Wang, Chongqing; Zhang, Lixiong

    2015-07-15

    We report here the preparation of porous magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres for efficient removal of cationic dyes by a simple polymerization-induced phase separation method. Characterizations by various techniques indicate that the microspheres show porous structures and magnetic properties. They can adsorb methylene blue with high efficiency, with adsorption capacity increasing from 263 to 1977 mg/g as the initial concentration increases from 5 to 300 mg/L. Complete removal of methylene blue can be obtained even at very low concentrations. The equilibrium data is well described by the Langmuir isotherm models, exhibiting a maximum adsorption capacity of 1990 mg/g. The adsorption capacity increases with increasing initial pH and reaches a maximum at pH 8, revealing an electrostatic interaction between the microspheres and the methylene blue molecules. The microspheres also show high adsorption capacities for neutral red and gentian violet of 1937 and 1850 mg/g, respectively, as well as high efficiency in adsorption of mixed-dye solutions. The dye-adsorbed magnetic polyacrylamide microspheres can be easily desorbed, and can be repeatedly used for at least 6 cycles without losing the adsorption capacity. The adsorption capacity and efficiency of the microspheres are much higher than those of reported adsorbents, which exhibits potential practical application in removing cationic dyes.

  10. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu, E-mail: yamamuro@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Solid State Physics, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan); Tyagi, Madhusudan [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-6102 (United States); Department of Materials Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2015-12-21

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (E{sub a}) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, E{sub a} increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  11. Quasielastic neutron scattering studies on glass-forming ionic liquids with imidazolium cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofu, Maiko; Tyagi, Madhusudan; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Miyazaki, Kyoko; Yamamuro, Osamu

    2015-12-21

    Relaxation processes for imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) were investigated by means of an incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering technique. In order to clarify the cation and anion effects on the relaxation processes, ten samples were measured. For all of the samples, we found three relaxations at around 1 ps, 10 ps, and 100 ps-10 ns, each corresponding to the alkyl reorientation, the relaxation related to the imidazolium ring, and the ionic diffusion. The activation energy (Ea) for the alkyl relaxation is insensitive to both anion and alkyl chain lengths. On the other hand, for the imidazolium relaxation and the ionic diffusion processes, Ea increases as the anion size decreases but is almost independent of the alkyl chain length. This indicates that the ionic diffusion and imidazolium relaxation are governed by the Coulombic interaction between the core parts of the cations (imidazolium ring) and the anions. This is consistent with the fact that the imidazolium-based ILs have nanometer scale structures consisting of ionic and neutral (alkyl chain) domains. It is also found that there is a clear correlation between the ionic diffusion and viscosity, indicating that the ionic diffusion is mainly associated with the glass transition which is one of the characteristics of imidazolium-based ILs.

  12. Nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation studied by surface hopping classical trajectory calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Andrey K; Lasser, Caroline; Trigila, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The Landau--Zener (LZ) type classical-trajectory surface-hopping algorithm is applied to the nonadiabatic nuclear dynamics of the ammonia cation after photoionization of the ground-state neutral molecule to the excited states of the cation. The algorithm employs the recently proposed formula for nonadiabatic LZ transition probabilities derived from the adiabatic potential energy surfaces. The evolution of the populations of the ground state and the two lowest excited adiabatic states is calculated up to 200 fs. The results agree well with quantum simulations available for the first 100 fs based on the same potential energy surfaces. Four different time scales are detected for the nuclear dynamics: Ultrafast Jahn--Teller dynamics between the excited states on a 5 fs time scale; fast transitions between the excited state and the ground state within a time scale of 20 fs; relatively slow partial conversion of a first-excited-state population to the ground state within a time scale of 100 fs; and nearly constant ...

  13. Interactions between fluorinated cationic guar gum and surfactants in the dilute and semi-dilute solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Li, Xiaorui; Li, Peizhi; Niu, Yuhua

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the fluorinated cationic guar gum (FCGG) and ionic surfactants including cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and sodium lauryl sulfate (SDS) were studied by light scattering, fluorescence spectroscopy, UV-spectrophotometer, (19)F NMR and dynamic rheometer, respectively. The FCGG is prepared with cationic guar gum, isophorone diisocyanate and 2,2,3,4,4,4-hexafluoro-1-butanol. The results show that, with the addition of the surfactants, the stretching degree of the FCGG chains is increased in the FCGG/CTAB solutions, while the dramatical shrinking of FCGG chain, the phase separation and the re-stretched macromolecules appear successively because of the electricity neutralization reaction in the FCGG/SDS system. The mixed hydrophobic domains in all solutions will be reinforced and then dismantled. The solution elasticity shows up the maximum value accordingly. The surfactants can be embedded in the micro-domains and then hinder the fluorinated segmental motions. The interactions between FCGG and SDS are much stronger than those between FCGG and CTAB.

  14. Nonclinical evaluation of novel cationically modified polysaccharide antidotes for unfractionated heparin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartlomiej Kalaska

    Full Text Available Protamine, the only registered antidote of unfractionated heparin (UFH, may produce a number of adverse effects, such as anaphylactic shock or serious hypotension. We aimed to develop an alternative UFH antidote as efficient as protamine, but safer and easier to produce. As a starting material, we have chosen generally non-toxic, biocompatible, widely available, inexpensive, and easy to functionalize polysaccharides. Our approach was to synthesize, purify and characterize cationic derivatives of dextran, hydroxypropylcellulose, pullulan and γ-cyclodextrin, then to screen them for potential heparin-reversal activity using an in vitro assay and finally examine efficacy and safety of the most active polymers in Wistar rat and BALB/c mouse models of experimentally induced arterial and venous thrombosis. Efficacy studies included the measurement of thrombus formation, activated partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, and anti-factor Xa activity; safety studies included the measurement of hemodynamic, hematologic and immunologic parameters. Linear, high molecular weight dextran substituted with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride groups at a ratio of 0.65 per glucose unit (Dex40-GTMAC3 is the most potent and the safest UFH inhibitor showing activity comparable to that of protamine while possessing lower immunogenicity. Cationic polysaccharides of various structures neutralize UFH. Dex40-GTMAC3 is a promising and potentially better UFH antidote than protamine.

  15. Nonclinical evaluation of novel cationically modified polysaccharide antidotes for unfractionated heparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaska, Bartlomiej; Kaminski, Kamil; Sokolowska, Emilia; Czaplicki, Dominik; Kujdowicz, Monika; Stalinska, Krystyna; Bereta, Joanna; Szczubialka, Krzysztof; Pawlak, Dariusz; Nowakowska, Maria; Mogielnicki, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Protamine, the only registered antidote of unfractionated heparin (UFH), may produce a number of adverse effects, such as anaphylactic shock or serious hypotension. We aimed to develop an alternative UFH antidote as efficient as protamine, but safer and easier to produce. As a starting material, we have chosen generally non-toxic, biocompatible, widely available, inexpensive, and easy to functionalize polysaccharides. Our approach was to synthesize, purify and characterize cationic derivatives of dextran, hydroxypropylcellulose, pullulan and γ-cyclodextrin, then to screen them for potential heparin-reversal activity using an in vitro assay and finally examine efficacy and safety of the most active polymers in Wistar rat and BALB/c mouse models of experimentally induced arterial and venous thrombosis. Efficacy studies included the measurement of thrombus formation, activated partial thromboplastin time, bleeding time, and anti-factor Xa activity; safety studies included the measurement of hemodynamic, hematologic and immunologic parameters. Linear, high molecular weight dextran substituted with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride groups at a ratio of 0.65 per glucose unit (Dex40-GTMAC3) is the most potent and the safest UFH inhibitor showing activity comparable to that of protamine while possessing lower immunogenicity. Cationic polysaccharides of various structures neutralize UFH. Dex40-GTMAC3 is a promising and potentially better UFH antidote than protamine.

  16. Cooling of isolated anthracene cations probed with photons of different wavelengths in the Mini-Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, M.; Bernard, J.; Chen, L.; Brédy, R.; Ortéga, C.; Joblin, C.; Cassimi, A.; Martin, S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a direct measurement of the Internal Energy Distribution (IED) shift rate of an initially hot polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular ensemble, anthracene cations (C14H10 +) . The ions were produced in an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring, the Mini-Ring. Laser pulses of two wavelengths were sent successively to merge the stored ion bunch at different storage times to enhance the neutral fragment yield due to fast laser induced dissociation. Using this technique, we have been able to determine directly the energy shift rate of the IED, without involving any theoretical simulation or any assumption on dissociation rates, cooling rates, or the initial IED. Theoretical energy shift rates have been estimated from the evolution of simulated IEDs by taking into account the effects of the unimolecular dissociation and two radiative decay mechanisms: the Poincaré fluorescence and the infrared vibrational emission. The comparison between the experimental results and the model provides new evidence of the important role of the Poincaré fluorescence in the overall cooling process of anthracene cations. Although in the short time range the commonly accepted intuition says that the cooling would result mostly from the dissociation of the hottest ions (depletion cooling), we demonstrate that the Poincaré fluorescence is the dominant contribution (about 85%) to the net cooling effect.

  17. Cyclopropenyl cation - the simplest Huckel's aromatic molecule - and its cyclic methyl derivatives in Titan's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Sittler, E. C.; Chornay, D.; Rowe, B. R.; Puzzarini, C.

    2013-10-01

    The recent measurements by Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) showed the presence of numerous carbocations and shed light on their composition in Titan's upper atmosphere. The present research identifies an important class of ion-molecule reactions proceeding via carbocation collision complexes, and its implications in the chemistry of Titan's thermosphere and ionosphere. An analysis (based on the kinetics and dynamics of the elementary chemical processes identified) of the Cassini measurements reveals the mechanism of formation of the three-membered Huckel aromatic rings-Cyclopropenyl cation and its cyclic methyl derivatives. For carbocations, a nonclassical three-carbon-center two-electron-bond structure is no longer a controversial topic in chemistry literature. Emphasis has been placed on a future coordinated effort of state-of-the-art laboratory experiments, quantum-chemical calculations, and astronomical ALMA and JWST observations including planetary in situ measurements at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths to elucidate the structure, energetics and dynamics of the compositions of carbocations detected by Cassini cationic mass spectrometry. The carbocation chemistry in Titan's upper atmosphere has a possible bearing on the organic chemistry and aromaticity in the atmosphere of primitive earth.

  18. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K S Pillai; Neethu Sundaresan; M Radhakrishnan Pillai; T Thomas; T J Thomas

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physicochemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li-DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  19. Investigations on the liquid crystalline phases of cation-induced condensed DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, C. K. S.; Sundaresan, Neethu; Radhakrishnan Pillai, M.; Thomas, T.; Thomas, T. J.

    2005-10-01

    Viral and nonviral condensing agents are used in gene therapy to compact oligonucleotides and plasmid DNA into nanostructures for their efficient transport through the cell membranes. Whereas viral vectors are best by the toxic effects on the immune system, most of the nonviral delivery vehicles are not effective for use in clinical system. Recent investigations indicate that the supramolecular organization of DNA in the condensed state is liquid crystalline. The present level of understanding of the liquid crystalline phase of DNA is inadequate and a thorough investigation is required to understand the nature, stability, texture and the influence of various environmental conditions on the structure of the phase. The present study is mainly concerned with the physico-chemical investigations on the liquid crystalline transitions during compaction of DNA by cationic species such as polyamines and metallic cations. As a preliminary to the above investigation, studies were conducted on the evolution of mesophase transitions of DNA with various cationic counterion species using polarized light microscopy. These studies indicated significant variations in the phase behaviour of DNA in the presence of Li and other ions. Apart from the neutralization of the charges on the DNA molecule, these ions are found to influence selectively the hydration sphere of DNA that in turn influences the induction and stabilization of the LC phases. The higher stability observed with the liquid crystalline phases of Li--DNA system could be useful in the production of nanostructured DNA. In the case of the polyamine, a structural specificity effect depending on the nature, charge and structure of the polyamine used has been found to be favoured in the crystallization of DNA.

  20. Anion and cation mixed-bed ion exchange for enhanced multidimensional separations of peptides and phosphopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Akira; Xu, Tao; Ruse, Cristian I; Wohlschlegel, James A; Yates, John R

    2007-05-15

    Shotgun proteomics typically uses multidimensional LC/MS/MS analysis of enzymatically digested proteins, where strong cation-exchange (SCX) and reversed-phase (RP) separations are coupled to increase the separation power and dynamic range of analysis. Here we report an on-line multidimensional LC method using an anion- and cation-exchange mixed bed for the first separation dimension. The mixed-bed ion-exchange resin improved peptide recovery over SCX resins alone and showed better orthogonality to RP separations in two-dimensional separations. The Donnan effect, which was enhanced by the introduction of fixed opposite charges in one column, is proposed as the mechanism responsible for improved peptide recovery by producing higher fluxes of salt cations and lower populations of salt anions proximal to the SCX phase. An increase in orthogonality was achieved by a combination of increased retention for acidic peptides and moderately reduced retention of neutral to basic peptides by the added anion-exchange resin. The combination of these effects led to approximately 100% increase in the number of identified peptides from an analysis of a tryptic digest of a yeast whole cell lysate. The application of the method to phosphopeptide-enriched samples increased by 94% phosphopeptide identifications over SCX alone. The lower pKa of phosphopeptides led to specific enrichment in a single salt step resolving acidic phosphopeptides from other phospho- and non-phosphopeptides. Unlike previous methods that use anion exchange to alter selectivity or enrich phosphopeptides, the proposed format is unique in that it works with typical acidic buffer systems used in electrospray ionization, making it feasible for online multidimensional LC/MS/MS applications.

  1. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARIA CARMONA-RIBEIRO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  2. Interactions between cationic liposomes and drugs or biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, A M

    2000-01-01

    Multiple uses for synthetic cationic liposomes composed of dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) bilayer vesicles are presented. Drugs or biomolecules can be solubilized or incorporated in the cationic bilayers. The cationic liposomes themselves can act as antimicrobial agents causing death of bacteria and fungi at concentrations that barely affect mammalian cells in culture. Silica particles or polystyrene microspheres can be functionalized by coverage with DODAB bilayers or phospholipid monolayers. Negatively charged antigenic proteins can be carried by the cationic liposomes which generate a remarkable immunoadjuvant action. Nucleotides or DNA can be physically adsorbed to the cationic liposomes to be transferred to mammalian cells for gene therapy. An overview of the interactions between DODAB vesicles and some biomolecules or drugs clearly points out their versatility for useful applications in a near future.

  3. Do Cation-π Interactions Exist in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kun-Sheng; WANG Guang-Yu; HE Jin-An

    2001-01-01

    Metal ions are essential to the structure and physiological functions of bacteriorhodopsin. Experimental evidence suggests the existence of specific cation binding to the negatively charged groups of Asp85 and Asp212 via an electrostatic interaction. However, only using electrostatic force is not enough to explain the role of the metal cations because the carboxylate of Asp85 is well known to be protonated in the M intermediate. Considering the presence of some aromatic amino acid residues in the vicinity of the retinal pocket, the existence of cation-π interactions between the metal cation and aromatic amino acid residues is suggested. Obviously, introduction of this kind of interaction is conducive to understanding the effects of the metal cations and aromatic amino acid residues inside the protein on the structural stability and proton pumping of bacteriorhodopsin.

  4. A NANOSCALE POLYNUCLEOTIDE-NEUTRAL LIPOSOME SELF-ASSEMBLIES FORMULATED FOR THERAPEUTIC GENE DELIVERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Süleymanoglu,

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Human gene therapy research is currently discouraging due to the lack of suitable delivery vehicles for nucleic acid transfer to affected cell types. There is an urgent need for optimized gene delivery tools capable of protecting the polynucleotide from degradation through its route from site of administration to gene expression. Besides difficulties arising during the preparation of the currently employed cationic lipids, their cytotoxicity has been an unavoidable hurdle. Some energetics issues related to preparation and use of self-assemblies formed between neutral lipid and polynucleotides with various conformation and size are presented. The divalent metal cation-governed adsorption, aggregation and adhesion between single- and double-stranded polynucleotides with multilamellar and unilamellar phosphatidylcholine vesicles was followed turbidimetrically. Thermotropic phase transitions of zwitterionic liposomes and their complexes with polynucleotides and calf thymus DNA with Ca2+ and Mg2+ is presented and compared to the previous data for various electrostatic lipid - nucleic acid complexes. Differential scanning microcalorimetric measurements of synthetic phosphatidylcholine vesicles and polynucleotides and their ternary complexes with inorganic cations were used to build the thermodynamic model of their structural transitions. The increased thermal stability of the phospholipid bilayers is achieved by affecting their melting transition temperature by nucleic acid induced electrostatic charge screening. Thermodynamic measurements give evidence for the stabilization of polynucleotide helices upon their association with liposomes in presence of divalent metal cations. It is thus possible to suggest this self-assembly as an improved formulation with further potential in gene therapy trials. Although the pharmacodynamical features of the zwitterionic lipid-metal ion-DNA nanocondensates remain to be tested in further transfection experiments, at

  5. Autologous HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies: emergence of neutralization-resistant escape virus and subsequent development of escape virus neutralizing antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Nielsen, C; Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development of ...... escape virus may be part of the explanation of the apparent failure of the immune system to control HIV infection.......The capacity of consecutive human sera to neutralize sequentially obtained autologous virus isolates was studied. HIV-1 was isolated three times over a 48-164-week period from three individuals immediately after seroconversion and from two individuals in later stages of infection. Development...

  6. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Matthew; Lazerson, Samuel A.

    2014-09-01

    With the advent of applied 3D fields in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous slowing down, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database. Elementary benchmark calculations are presented to verify the collisionless particle orbits, NBI model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields. Notice: this manuscript has been authored by Princeton University under Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466 with the US Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes.

  7. Species ages in neutral biodiversity models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Ryan A; O'Dwyer, James P

    2014-05-01

    Biogeography seeks to understand the mechanisms that drive biodiversity across long temporal and large spatial scales. Theoretical models of biogeography can be tested by comparing their predictions of quantities such as species ages against empirical estimates. It has previously been claimed that the neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography predicts species ages that are unrealistically long. Any improved theory of biodiversity must rectify this problem, but first it is necessary to quantify the problem precisely. Here we provide analytical expressions for species ages in neutral biodiversity communities. We analyse a spatially implicit metacommunity model and solve for both the zero-sum and non-zero-sum cases. We explain why our new expressions are, in the context of biodiversity, usually more appropriate than those previously imported from neutral molecular evolution. Because of the time symmetry of the spatially implicit neutral model, our expressions also lead directly to formulas for species persistence times and species lifetimes. We use our new expressions to estimate species ages of forest trees under a neutral model and find that they are about an order of magnitude shorter than those predicted previously but still unrealistically long. In light of our results, we discuss different models of biogeography that may solve the problem of species ages.

  8. Color-Neutral Superconducting Quark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Steiner, A W; Prakash, M; Steiner, Andrew W.; Reddy, Sanjay; Prakash, Madappa

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the consequences of enforcing local color neutrality on the color superconducting phases of quark matter by utilizing the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model supplemented by diquark and the t'Hooft six-fermion interactions. In neutrino free matter at zero temperature, color neutrality guarantees that the number densities of $u, d, {\\rm and} s$ quarks in the Color-Flavor-Locked (CFL) phase will be equal even with physical current quark masses. Electric charge neutrality follows as a consequence and without the presence of electrons. In contrast, electric charge neutrality in the less symmetric 2-flavor superconducting (2SC) phase with $ud$ pairing requires more electrons than the normal quark phase. The free energy density cost of enforcing color and electric charge neutrality in the CFL phase is lower than that in the 2SC phase, which favors the formation of the CFL phase. With increasing temperature and neutrino content, an unlocking transition occurs from the CFL phase to the 2SC phase with the order of...

  9. Accelerating neutral atoms on a Table top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, M.; Rajendran, Rajeev; Madhu, T.; Kpm, Rishad; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.

    2013-05-01

    Plasma accelerators driven by super strong laser fields couple unusually large energies to charged particles. Acceleration of neutral atoms from such strongly ionized plasmas have remained elusive. A laser based neutralizer can convert laser accelerated fast ion source to fast neutral atom source. We report a scheme to generate fast Argon atoms (up to 1 MeV) from an optical-field-ionized dense nano-cluster ensemble. Intense, ultrashort pulses ionize each atom in a Ar nanocluster to 8+ and coulomb explode ions to energies up to MeV. We show that in a dense cluster ensemble, the electrons that stream out of the focal volume collisionally excited clusters in the periphery of the focus to high lying Rydberg excited states and form a sheath of electronically excited clusters. Cross sections for reducing ions by charge transfer collisions are orders of magnitude larger with the electronically exited systems. Fast ions that stream through the excited cluster sheath are reduced to neutral atoms with no change in momentum. We show that the scheme can covert ions to neutral atoms with nearly 100% efficiency, transferring 8 electrons per atom in a few mm span of the supersonic jet.

  10. Structures and energetics of neutral and ionic silicon-germanium clusters: density functional theory and coupled cluster studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Siang; Chao, Sheng D

    2011-03-10

    We have calculated the structural and energetic properties of neutral and ionic (singly charged anionic and cationic) semiconductor binary silicon-germanium clusters Si(m)Ge(n) for s = m + n ≤ 12 using the density functional theory (DFT-B3LYP) and coupled cluster [CCSD(T)] methods with Pople's 6-311++G(3df, 3pd) basis set. Neutral and anionic clusters share similar ground state structures for s = 3-7, independent of the stoichiometry and atom locations, but start to deviate at s = 8. The relative energetic stability of the calculated ground state structures among possible isomers has been analyzed through a bond strength propensity model where the pair interactions of Si-Si, Si-Ge, and Ge-Ge are competing. Electron affinities, ionization potentials, energy gaps between the highest and lowest occupied molecular orbitals (HOMO-LUMO gaps), and cluster mixing energies were calculated and analyzed. Overall, for a fixed s, the vertical ionization potential increases as the number of silicon atoms m increases, while the vertical electron affinity shows a dip at m = 2. As s increases, the ionization potentials increase from s = 2 to s = 3 and then decrease slowly to s = 8. The mixing energies for neutral and ionic clusters are all negative, indicating that the binary clusters are more stable than pure elemental clusters. Except for s = 4 and 8, cationic clusters are more stable than anionic ones and, thus, are more likely to be observed in experiments.

  11. A Measurement of Coherent Neutral Pion Production in Neutrino Neutral Current Interactions in NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kullenberg, C T

    2009-01-01

    We present a study of exclusive neutral pion production in neutrino-nucleus Neutral Current interactions using data from the NOMAD experiment at the CERN SPS. The data correspond to $1.44 \\times 10^6$ muon-neutrino Charged Current interactions in the energy range $2.5 \\leq E_{\

  12. When neutral turns significant: brain dynamics of rapidly formed associations between neutral stimuli and emotional contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Bort, Carlos; Löw, Andreas; Wendt, Julia; Dolcos, Florin; Hamm, Alfons O; Weymar, Mathias

    2016-09-01

    The ability to associate neutral stimuli with motivationally relevant outcomes is an important survival strategy. In this study, we used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate brain dynamics of associative emotional learning when participants were confronted with multiple heterogeneous information. Participants viewed 144 different objects in the context of 144 different emotional and neutral background scenes. During each trial, neutral objects were shown in isolation and then paired with the background scene. All pairings were presented twice to compare ERPs in response to neutral objects before and after single association. After single pairing, neutral objects previously encoded in the context of emotional scenes evoked a larger P100 over occipital electrodes compared to objects that were previously paired with neutral scenes. Likewise, larger late positive potentials (LPPs) were observed over parieto-occipital electrodes (450-750 ms) for objects previously associated with emotional relative to neutral contexts. The LPP - but not P100 - enhancement was also related to subjective object/context binding. Taken together, our ERP data provide evidence for fast emotional associative learning, as reflected by heightened perceptual and sustained elaborative processing for neutral information previously encountered in emotional contexts. These findings could assist in understanding binding mechanisms in stress and anxiety, as well as in addiction and eating-related disorders. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. IRMPD Action Spectroscopy of Alkali Metal Cation-Cytosine Complexes: Effects of Alkali Metal Cation Size on Gas Phase Conformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, B.; Wu, R.R.; Polfer, N.C.; Berden, G.; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M.T.

    2013-01-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both simi

  14. The role of aspartate-235 in the binding of cations to an artificial cavity at the radical site of cytochrome c peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, M M; Trester, M L; Jensen, G M; McRee, D E; Goodin, D B

    1995-09-01

    The activated state of cytochrome c peroxidase, compound ES, contains a cation radical on the Trp-191 side chain. We recently reported that replacing this tryptophan with glycine creates a buried cavity at the active site that contains ordered solvent and that will specifically bind substituted imidazoles in their protonated cationic forms (Fitzgerald MM, Churchill MJ, McRee DE, Goodin DB, 1994, Biochemistry 33:3807-3818). Proposals that a nearby carboxylate, Asp-235, and competing monovalent cations should modulate the affinity of the W191G cavity for ligand binding are addressed in this study. Competitive binding titrations of the imidazolium ion to W191G as a function of [K+] show that potassium competes weakly with the binding of imidazoles. The dissociation constant observed for potassium binding (18 mM) is more than 3,000-fold higher than that for 1,2-dimethylimidazole (5.5 microM) in the absence of competing cations. Significantly, the W191G-D235N double mutant shows no evidence for binding imidazoles in their cationic or neutral forms, even though the structure of the cavity remains largely unperturbed by replacement of the carboxylate. Refined crystallographic B-values of solvent positions indicate that the weakly bound potassium in W191G is significantly depopulated in the double mutant. These results demonstrate that the buried negative charge of Asp-235 is an essential feature of the cation binding determinant and indicate that this carboxylate plays a critical role in stabilizing the formation of the Trp-191 radical cation.

  15. Anaerobic toxicity of cationic silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitipour, Alireza; Thiel, Stephen W. [Biomedical, Chemical, and Environmental Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Scheckel, Kirk G. [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Tolaymat, Thabet, E-mail: tolaymat.thabet@epa.gov [USEPA, Office of Research and Development, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-07-01

    The microbial toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) stabilized with different capping agents was compared to that of Ag{sup +} under anaerobic conditions. Three AgNPs were investigated: (1) negatively charged citrate-coated AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs), (2) minimally charged polyvinylpyrrolidone coated AgNPs (PVP-AgNPs) and (3) positively charged branched polyethyleneimine coated AgNPs (BPEI-AgNPs). The AgNPs investigated in this experiment were similar in size (10–15 nm), spherical in shape, but varied in surface charge which ranged from highly negative to highly positive. While, at AgNPs concentrations lower than 5 mg L{sup −1}, the anaerobic decomposition process was not influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles, there was an observed impact on the diversity of the microbial community. At elevated concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1} as silver), only the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity similar in magnitude to that of Ag{sup +}. Both citrate and PVP-AgNPs did not exhibit toxicity at the 100 mg L{sup −1} as measured by biogas evolution. These findings further indicate the varying modes of action for nanoparticle toxicity and represent one of the few studies that evaluate end-of-life management concerns with regards to the increasing use of nanomaterials in our everyday life. These findings also highlight some of the concerns with a one size fits all approach to the evaluation of environmental health and safety concerns associated with the use of nanoparticles. - Highlights: • At concentrations -1 the anaerobic decomposition process was not impacted. • An impact on the microbial community at concentrations -1 were observed. • At high concentrations (100 mg L{sup −1}), the cationic BPEI-AgNPs demonstrated toxicity. • Toxicity was demonstrated without the presence of oxidative dissolution of silver. • A one size fits all approach for the evaluation of NPs may not be accurate.

  16. Edge rotation from momentum transport by neutrals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omotani, JT; Newton, SL; Pusztai, I.; Fülöp, T.

    2016-11-01

    Due to their high cross field mobility, neutral atoms can have a strong effect on transport even at the low relative densities found inside the separatrix. We use a charge-exchange dominated model for the neutrals, coupled to neoclassical ions, to calculate momentum transport when it is dominated by the neutrals. We can then calculate self-consistently the radial electric field and predict the intrinsic rotation in an otherwise torque-free plasma. Using a numerical solver for the ion distribution to allow arbitrary collisionality, we investigate the effects of inverse aspect ratio and elongation on plasma rotation. We also calculate the rotation of a trace carbon impurity, to facilitate future comparison to experiments using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy diagnostics.

  17. Methods for neutralizing anthrax or anthrax spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Mark A; Vivekandanda, Jeevalatha; Holwitt, Eric A; Kiel, Johnathan L

    2013-02-26

    The present invention concerns methods, compositions and apparatus for neutralizing bioagents, wherein bioagents comprise biowarfare agents, biohazardous agents, biological agents and/or infectious agents. The methods comprise exposing the bioagent to an organic semiconductor and exposing the bioagent and organic semiconductor to a source of energy. Although any source of energy is contemplated, in some embodiments the energy comprises visible light, ultraviolet, infrared, radiofrequency, microwave, laser radiation, pulsed corona discharge or electron beam radiation. Exemplary organic semiconductors include DAT and DALM. In certain embodiments, the organic semiconductor may be attached to one or more binding moieties, such as an antibody, antibody fragment, or nucleic acid ligand. Preferably, the binding moiety has a binding affinity for one or more bioagents to be neutralized. Other embodiments concern an apparatus comprising an organic semiconductor and an energy source. In preferred embodiments, the methods, compositions and apparatus are used for neutralizing anthrax spores.

  18. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies for HIV Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Kathryn E; Barouch, Dan H

    2016-02-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies has long been considered a potential treatment modality for infectious diseases, including HIV. Early efforts to use antibodies to suppress HIV replication, however, were largely unsuccessful, as the antibodies that were studied neutralized only a relatively narrow spectrum of viral strains and were not very potent. Recent advances have led to the discovery of a large portfolio of human monoclonal antibodies that are broadly neutralizing across many HIV-1 subtypes and are also substantially more potent. These antibodies target multiple different epitopes on the HIV envelope, thus allowing for the development of antibody combinations. In this review, we discuss the application of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) for HIV treatment and HIV eradication strategies. We highlight bNAbs that target key epitopes, such as the CD4 binding site and the V2/V3-glycan-dependent sites, and we discuss several bNAbs that are currently in the clinical development pipeline.

  19. Neutral Delay and a Generalization of Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, Jayme

    2010-01-01

    The equations for the electromagnetic two-body problem are neutral-delay equations that for generic initial data have solutions with discontinuous derivatives. If one wants to use these neutral-delay equations with arbitrary initial data, solutions with discontinuous derivatives must be allowed. Surprisingly, this same neutrality is compatible with the recently developed variational method with mixed-type boundaries for the Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics. We show that two-body electromagnetic orbits with discontinuous velocities are physically necessary by showing that orbits with vanishing far-fields amost everywhere must have some discontinuous velocities on a few points. We generalize the Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics with the variational method to include all continuous trajectories, allowing piecewise-differentiable weak solutions represented by trajectories with fields defined almost everywhere (but on a set of points of zero measure where velocities jump). Along with this generalization we formulate...

  20. Using Neutral Network in Predicting Corporate Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huong G. Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the predictive power of three neutral network models: Multi-layer neural network, probabilistic neural network, and logistic regression model in predicting corporate failure. Basing on the database provided by The Corporate Scorecard Group (CSG, we combine financial ratios which deem to be significant predictors of corporate bankruptcy in many previous empirical studies to build our predictive models and test it against the holdout sample. On comparison of the results, we find that three models are good at predicting probability of corporate failure. Moreover, probabilistic neural network model outperforms the others. Therefore, neutral networks are useful and probabilistic neutral network is a promising tool for the prediction of corporate failure.

  1. Evidence for neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in neutrino interactions on hydrocarbon

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, J; Altinok, O; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Cai, T; Carneiro, M F; Chvojka, J; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Diaz, G A; Eberly, B; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Golan, T; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Salinas, C J Solano; Sanchez, S F; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    The MINERvA experiment observes an excess of events containing electromagnetic showers relative to the expectation from Monte Carlo simulations in neutral-current neutrino interactions with mean beam energy of 4.5 GeV on a hydrocarbon target. The excess is characterized and found to be consistent with neutral-current neutral pion production with a broad energy distribution peaking at 7 GeV and a total cross section of 0.26 +- 0.02 (stat) +- 0.08 (sys) x 10^{-39} cm^{2}. The angular distribution, electromagnetic shower energy, and spatial distribution of the energy depositions of the excess are consistent with expectations from neutrino neutral-current diffractive neutral pion production from hydrogen in the hydrocarbon target. These data comprise the first direct experimental observation and constraint for a reaction that poses an important background process in neutrino oscillation experiments searching for muon neutrino to electron neutrino oscillations.

  2. Delay-dependent robust stability for neutral systems with mixed discrete-and-neutral delays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong HE; Min WU; Jinhua SHE

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the problem of delay-dependent robust stability of neutral systems with different discrete-and-neutral delays and time-varying structured uncertainties.Some new criteria are presented,in which some free weighting matrices are used to express the relationships between the terms in the Leibniz-Newton formula.The criteria include the information on the size of both neutral-and-discrete delays.It is shown that the present results also include the results for identical discrete-and-neutral delays as special cases.A numerical example illustrates the improvement of the proposed methods over the previous methods and the influences between the discrete and neutral delays.

  3. Hydrogen motion in proton sponge cations: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbatenko, Yevhen; Vyboishchikov, Sergei F

    2011-04-18

    This work presents a study of intramolecular NHN hydrogen bonds in cations of the following proton sponges: 2,7-bis(trimethylsilyl)-1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (1), 1,6-diazabicyclo[4.4.4.]tetradecane (2), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzoselenophene (3), 1,9-bis(dimethylamino)dibenzothiophene (4), 4,5-bis(dimethylamino)fluorene (5), quino[7,8-h]quinoline (6) 1,2-bis(dimethylamino)benzene (7), and 1,12-bis(dimethylamino)benzo[c]phenantrene (8). Three different patterns were found for proton motion: systems with a single-well potential (cations 1-2), systems with a double-well potential and low proton transfer barrier, ΔEe (cations 3-5), and those with a double-well potential and a high barrier (cations 6-8). Tests of several density functionals indicate that the PBEPBE functional reproduces the potential-energy surface (PES) obtained at the MP2 level well, whereas the B3LYP, MPWB1K, and MPW1B95 functionals overestimate the barrier. Three-dimensional PESs were constructed and the vibrational Schrödinger equation was solved for selected cases of cation 1 (with a single-well potential), cation 4 (with a ΔEe value of 0.1 kcal mol(-1) at the MP2 level), and cations 6 (ΔEe = 2.4 kcal mol(-1)) and 7 (ΔEe=3.4 kcal mol(-1)). The PES is highly anharmonic in all of these cases. The analysis of the three-dimensional ground-state vibrational wave function shows that the proton is delocalized in cations 1 and 4, but is rather localized around the energy minima for cation 7. Cation 6 is an intermediate case, with two weakly pronounced maxima and substantial tunneling. This allows for classification of proton sponge cations into those with localized and those with delocalized proton behavior, with the borderline between them at ΔEe values of about 1.5 kcal mol(-1). The excited vibrational states of proton sponge cations with a low barrier can be described within the framework of a simple particle-in-a-box model. Each cation can be assigned an effective box width.

  4. 46 CFR 120.376 - Grounded distribution systems (Neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION Power Sources and Distribution Systems § 120.376 Grounded distribution systems... distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral grounded. (c) The neutral or each... generator is connected to the bus, except the neutral of an emergency power generation system must...

  5. Photoproduction of Neutral Pions off Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Crede, V; Wilson, A; Anisovich, A V; Bacelar, J C S; Bantes, R; Bartholomy, O; Bayadilov, D; Beck, R; Beloglazov, Y A; Castelijns, R; Dutz, H; Elsner, D; Ewald, R; Frommberger, F; Funke, Chr; Gregor, R; Gridnev, A; Gutz, E; Hillert, W; Hoffmeister, P; Jaegle, I; Junkersfeld, J; Kalinowsky, H; Kammer, S; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E; Kotulla, M; Krusche, B; Loehner, H; Lopatin, I V; Lugert, S; Menze, D; Mertens, T; Messchendorp, J G; Metag, V; Nanova, M; Nikonov, V A; Novinski, D; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Pant, L M; van Pee, H; Pfeiffer, M; Roy, A; Sarantsev, A V; Schadmand, S; Schmidt, C; Schmieden, H; Schoch, B; Shende, S; Sokhoyan, V; Suele, A; Sumachev, V V; Szczepanek, T; Thoma, U; Trnka, D; Varma, R; Walther, D; Wendel, Ch

    2011-01-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction $\\gamma p\\to p\\pi^0$ for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The $\\pi^0$ mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: $\\pi^0\\to\\gamma\\gamma$. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, $\\theta_{\\rm c.m.}<60^\\circ$. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances: $G_{17}$(2190), $D_{13}$(2080), and $D_{15}$(2070).

  6. Neutral BSM Higgs searches in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Lei; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    This paper summarizes the latest results of the neutral heavy BSM Higgs boson search, mainly based on data collected by the ATLAS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV in 2015 and 2016, with an integrated luminosity of 3.2-15.4 ${\\rm fb^{-1}}$. Fermionic, bosonic and di-Higgs final states have been investigated in a mass range from 200 GeV to 3000 GeV. No sign for a new heavy neutral resonance has been found in data so far, and stringent upper limits are reported.

  7. Carbon-neutral fuels and energy carriers

    CERN Document Server

    Muradov, Nazim Z

    2011-01-01

    Concerns over an unstable energy supply and the adverse environmental impact of carbonaceous fuels have triggered considerable efforts worldwide to find carbon-free or low-carbon alternatives to conventional fossil fuels. Carbon-Neutral Fuels and Energy Carriers emphasizes the vital role of carbon-neutral energy sources, transportation fuels, and associated technologies for establishing a sustainable energy future. Each chapter draws on the insight of world-renowned experts in such diverse fields as photochemistry and electrochemistry, solar and nuclear energy, biofuels and synthetic fuels, ca

  8. Photoproduction of neutral pions off protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crede, V.; Sparks, N.; Wilson, A.; Anisovich, A. V.; Bacelar, J. C. S.; Bantes, R.; Bartholomy, O.; Bayadilov, D.; Beck, R.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Castelijns, R.; Dutz, H.; Elsner, D.; Ewald, R.; Frommberger, F.; Funke, Chr.; Gregor, R.; Gridnev, A.; Gutz, E.; Hillert, W.; Hoffmeister, P.; Jaegle, I.; Junkersfeld, J.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kammer, S.; Klein, Frank; Klein, Friedrich; Klempt, E.; Kotulla, M.; Krusche, B.; Löhner, H.; Lopatin, I. V.; Lugert, S.; Menze, D.; Mertens, T.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Metag, V.; Nanova, M.; Nikonov, V. A.; Novinski, D.; Novotny, R.; Ostrick, M.; Pant, L. M.; van Pee, H.; Pfeiffer, M.; Roy, A.; Sarantsev, A. V.; Schadmand, S.; Schmidt, C.; Schmieden, H.; Schoch, B.; Shende, S.; Sokhoyan, V.; Süle, A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Szczepanek, T.; Thoma, U.; Trnka, D.; Varma, R.; Walther, D.; Wendel, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Photoproduction of neutral pions has been studied with the CBELSA/TAPS detector in the reaction γp→pπ0 for photon energies between 0.85 and 2.50 GeV. The π0 mesons are observed in their dominant neutral decay mode: π0→γγ. For the first time, the differential cross sections cover the very forward region, θc.m.<60∘. A partial-wave analysis of these data within the Bonn-Gatchina framework observes the high-mass resonances G17(2190), D13(2080), and D15(2070).

  9. Direct CP violation in neutral kaon decays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wojciech Wiślicki

    2004-03-01

    The final result of the NA48 experiment is presented and performed at the CERN SPS neutral kaon beams, on the direct CP violation parameter Re$('/)$, as measured from the decay rates of neutral kaons into two pions. The data collected in the years 1997-2001 yield the evidence for the direct CP violation with Re$('/)=(14.7± 2.2)× 10^{-4}$. Description of experimental method and systematics, comparison with the corresponding FNAL result and discussion of some implications for the theory are given.

  10. The influence of cationic lipid type on in-vitro release kinetic profiles of antisense oligonucleotide from cationic nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagigit, Tal; Nassar, Taher; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Lambert, Gregory; Benita, Simon

    2008-09-01

    Novel formulations of cationic nanoemulsions based on three different lipids were developed to strengthen the attraction of the polyanionic oligonucleotide (ODN) macromolecules to the cationic moieties on the oil nanodroplets. These formulations were developed to prolong the release of the ODN from the nanoemulsion under appropriate physiological dilutions as encountered in the eye following topical application. Increasing the concentration of the new cationic lipid exhibiting two cationic amine groups (AOA) in the emulsion from 0.05% to 0.4% did not alter markedly the particle size or zeta potential value of the blank cationic nanoemulsion. The extent of ODN association did not vary significantly when the initial concentration of ODN remained constant at 10 microM irrespective of the cationic lipid nature. However, the zeta potential value dropped consistently with the low concentrations of 0.05% and 0.1% of AOA in the emulsions suggesting that an electrostatic attraction occurred between the cationic lipids and the polyanionic ODN molecules at the o/w interface. Only the nanoemulsion prepared with N-[1-(2,3-dioleoyloxy)propyl]-N,N,N-trimethylammonium salts (DOTAP) remained physically stable over time. DOTAP cationic lipid nanoemulsion was the most efficient formulation capable of retaining the ODN despite the high dilution of 1:100 with simulated tear solution (STS). Less than 10% of the ODN was exchanged in contrast to 40-50% with the other cationic nanoemulsions. The in-vitro release kinetic behavior of ODN exchange with physiological anions present in the STS appears to be complex and difficult to characterize using mathematical fitting model equations. Further pharmacokinetic studies are needed to verify our kinetic assumptions and confirm the in-vitro ODN release profile from DOTAP cationic nanoemulsions.

  11. Faster photodegradation rate and higher dioxin yield of triclosan induced by cationic surfactant CTAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xianliang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Xie, Qing; Yang, Xianhai; Xiao, Jie; Xue, Weifeng; Chen, Jingwen

    2014-06-30

    Triclosan has received extensive attention as it has been frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Photolysis was found to be a major pathway governing the fate of triclosan in the aquatic environment. However, the effects of surfactants that usually coexist with triclosan, on the photodegradation of triclosan, are largely unknown. In this study, the effects of selected surfactants on the photodegradation of triclosan were investigated experimentally. The results show that anionic sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium dodecyl sulfate and neutral polyoxyethylene (20) sorbitan monooleate inhibit the photolysis of triclosan, whereas cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) significantly accelerates the photodegradation rate of triclosan. The interactions between the hydrophilic group of CTAB and anionic triclosan lead to the apparent decrease of pKa of triclosan from 8.4 to 6.1, which increase the fraction of anionic triclosan from 4% to 89% in neutral solution. A red shift in the UV-VIS absorption spectrum is exhibited, thus leading to the increased photodegradation rate of triclosan. The accelerations caused by CTAB were observed under xenon lamp and Hg lamp irradiances, as well as under natural sunlight. Effect of CTAB demonstrated pH dependence with significantly enhancement under pH 5∼9 and inhibition at pH=3. The presence of CTAB also increased the yield of 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin from the photolysis of triclosan about 7 times at pH=7.

  12. Repurposing Cationic Amphiphilic Antihistamines for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Ellegaard

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide. In search for new NSCLC treatment options, we screened a cationic amphiphilic drug (CAD library for cytotoxicity against NSCLC cells and identified several CAD antihistamines as inducers of lysosomal cell death. We then performed a cohort study on the effect of CAD antihistamine use on mortality of patients diagnosed with non-localized cancer in Denmark between 1995 and 2011. The use of the most commonly prescribed CAD antihistamine, loratadine, was associated with significantly reduced all-cause mortality among patients with non-localized NSCLC or any non-localized cancer when compared with use of non-CAD antihistamines and adjusted for potential confounders. Of the less frequently described CAD antihistamines, astemizole showed a similar significant association with reduced mortality as loratadine among patients with any non-localized cancer, and ebastine use showed a similar tendency. The association between CAD antihistamine use and reduced mortality was stronger among patients with records of concurrent chemotherapy than among those without such records. In line with this, sub-micromolar concentrations of loratadine, astemizole and ebastine sensitized NSCLC cells to chemotherapy and reverted multidrug resistance in NSCLC, breast and prostate cancer cells. Thus, CAD antihistamines may improve the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy.

  13. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CATIONIC POLYELECTROLYTE AND PULP FINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Orblin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Papermaking pulps are a mixture of fibres, fibre fragments, and small cells (parenchyma or ray cells, usually called pulp fines. The interactions between pulp fines and a cationic copolymer of acrylamide and acryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride were investigated based on solid-liquid isotherms prepared under different turbulence, and subsequent advanced surface characterization using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS. The surface charge and surface area of pulp fine substrates were measured by methylene blue sorption-XPS analysis and nitrogen adsorption combined with mercury porosimetry, respectively. The driving force behind polyelectrolyte adsorption was the amount of the surface anionic charge, whereas surface area appeared to be of less importance. Based on a comparison of solid-liquid and XPS sorption isotherms, different polyelectrolyte conformations were suggested, depending on the types of fines: A flatter conformation and partial cell-wall penetration of polyelectrolytes on kraft fines from freshly prepared pulp, and a more free conformation with extended loops and tails on lignocellulosic fines from recycled pulp. Additionally, ToF-SIMS imaging proved that recycled pulp fines contained residual de-inking chemicals (primarily palmitic acid salts that possibly hinder the electrostatic interactions with polyelectrolytes.

  14. Cation Defects and Conductivity in Transparent Oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Ferris, Kim F.; Owings, Robert R.

    2007-10-24

    High quality doped zinc oxide and mixed transition metal spinel oxide films have been deposited by means of sputter deposition from metal and metal oxide targets, and by spin casting from aqueous or alcoholic precursor solutions. Deposition conditions and post-deposition processing are found to alter cation oxidation states and their distributions in both oxide materials resulting in marked changes to both optical transmission and electrical response. For ZnO, partial reduction of the neat or doped material by hydrogen treatment of the heated film or by electrochemical processing renders the oxide n-type conducting. Continued reduction was found to diminish conductivity. In contrast, oxidation of the infrared transparent p-type spinel conductors typified by NiCo2O4 was found to increase conductivity. The disparate behavior of these two materials is caused in part by the sign of the charge carrier and by the existence of two different charge transport mechanisms that are identified as free carrier conduction and polaron hopping. While much work has been reported concerning structure/property relationships in the free carrier conducting oxides, there is a significantly smaller body of information on transparent polaron conductors. In this paper, we identify key parameters that promote conductivity in mixed metal spinel oxides and compare their behavior with that of the free carrier TCO’s.

  15. Radical Cations and Acid Protection during Radiolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce J. Mincher; Christopher A. Zarzana; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2016-09-01

    Ligand molecules for used nuclear fuel separation schemes are exposed to high radiation fields and high concentrations of acid. Thus, an understanding of the complex interactions between extraction ligands, diluent, and acid is critical to understanding the performance of a separation process. The diglycolamides are ligands with important structural similarities to CMPO; however, previous work has shown that their radiolytic degradation has important mechanistic differences from CMPO. The DGAs do not enjoy radioprotection by HNO3 and the kinetics of DGA radiolytic degradation are different. CMPO degrades with pseudo-zero-order kinetics in linear fashion with absorbed dose while the DGAs degrade in pseudo-first-order, exponential fashion. This suggests that the DGAs degrade by simple reaction with some product of direct diluent radiolysis, while CMPO degradation is probably multi-step, with a slow step that is not dependent on the CMPO concentration, and mitigated by HNO3. It is thus believed that radio-protection and the zero-order radiolytic degradation kinetics are related, and that these phenomena are a function of either the formation of strong acid complexes with CMPO and/or to the presence of the CMPO phenyl ring. Experiments to test both these hypotheses have been designed and partially conducted. This report summarizes findings related to these phenomena for FY16, in satisfaction of milestone M3FT-16IN030104053. It also reports continued kinetic measurements for the reactions of the dodecane radical cation with solvent extraction ligands.

  16. Competitive Effects of 2+ and 3+ Cations on DNA Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Tongu, C; Yoshikawa, Y; Zinchenko, A A; Chen, N; Yoshikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    By using single-DNA observation with fluorescence microscopy, we observed the effects of divalent and trivalent cations on the higher-order structure of giant DNA (T4 DNA with 166 kbp). It was found that divalent cations, such as Mg(2+) and Ca(2+), inhibit DNA compaction induced by a trivalent cation, spermidine (SPD(3+)). On the other hand, in the absence of SPD(3+), divalent cations cause the shrinkage of DNA. These experimental observations are inconsistent with the well-established Debye-Huckel scheme regarding the shielding effect of counter ions, which is given as the additivity of contributions of cations with different valences. We interpreted the competition between 2+ and 3+ cations in terms of the change in the translational entropy of the counter ions before and after the folding transition of DNA. For the compaction with SPD(3+), we considered the increase in translational entropy due to the ion-exchange of the intrinsic monovalent cations condensing on a highly-charged polyelectrolyte, double-st...

  17. Neutron diffraction investigations of kesterites: cation order and disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorr, Susan [Free University Berlin, Institute of Geological Sciences (Germany); Tovar, Michael [Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (Germany); Levcenco, Sergej; Napetrov, Alexander; Arushanov, Ernest [Academy of Sciences of Moldova Republic, Institute of Applied Physics, Chisinau (Moldova)

    2010-07-01

    The quaternary chalcogenides Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} have newly attracted attention as possible absorber materials in thin film solar cells. They crystallize in the kesterite type (space group I anti 4) or stannite type structure (space group I anti 42m), which are described as an ordered distribution of the cations on different structural sites. Cation disorder may cause site defects and hence influences the electronic properties of the material. Thus the degree of cation order/disorder plays a crucial role and was therefor in the focus of the presented investigations. A differentiation between the isoelectronic cations Cu{sup +} and Zn{sup 2+} is not possible using X-ray diffraction due to their similar scattering power. But their neutron scattering lengths are different, thus neutron diffraction opens the possibility to determine the cation distribution in these compounds. A simultaneous Rietveld analysis of neutron and X-ray powder diffraction data revealed that in dependence on the thermal history of the samples cation disorder appears. The correlation trend between cation order/disorder and the sample growth method (solid state synthesis, Bridgman method) are discussed.

  18. Atmospheric CO2 enrichment facilitates cation release from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L; Zhu, J; Chen, G; Zheng, X; Oh, N-H; Rufty, T W; Richter, D deB; Hu, S

    2010-03-01

    Atmospheric CO(2) enrichment generally stimulates plant photosynthesis and nutrient uptake, modifying the local and global cycling of bioactive elements. Although nutrient cations affect the long-term productivity and carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems, little is known about the effect of CO(2) enrichment on cation availability in soil. In this study, we present evidence for a novel mechanism of CO(2)-enhancement of cation release from soil in rice agricultural systems. Elevated CO(2) increased organic C allocation belowground and net H(+) excretion from roots, and stimulated root and microbial respiration, reducing soil redox potential and increasing Fe(2+) and Mn(2+) in soil solutions. Increased H(+), Fe(2+), and Mn(2+) promoted Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) release from soil cation exchange sites. These results indicate that over the short term, elevated CO(2) may stimulate cation release from soil and enhance plant growth. Over the long-term, however, CO(2)-induced cation release may facilitate cation losses and soil acidification, negatively feeding back to the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  19. Cations bind only weakly to amides in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okur, Halil I; Kherb, Jaibir; Cremer, Paul S

    2013-04-01

    We investigated salt interactions with butyramide as a simple mimic of cation interactions with protein backbones. The experiments were performed in aqueous metal chloride solutions using two spectroscopic techniques. In the first, which provided information about contact pair formation, the response of the amide I band to the nature and concentration of salt was monitored in bulk aqueous solutions via attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was found that molar concentrations of well-hydrated metal cations (Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Li(+)) led to the rise of a peak assigned to metal cation-bound amides (1645 cm(-1)) and a decrease in the peak associated with purely water-bound amides (1620 cm(-1)). In a complementary set of experiments, the effect of cation identity and concentration was investigated at the air/butyramide/water interface via vibrational sum frequency spectroscopy. In these studies, metal ion-amide binding led to the ordering of the adjacent water layer. Such experiments were sensitive to the interfacial partitioning of cations in either a contact pair with the amide or as a solvent separated pair. In both experiments, the ordering of the interactions of the cations was: Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Li(+) > Na(+) ≈ K(+). This is a direct cationic Hofmeister series. Even for Ca(2+), however, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the cation with the amide carbonyl oxygen was no tighter than ∼8.5 M. For Na(+) and K(+), no evidence was found for any binding. As such, the interactions of metal cations with amides are far weaker than the analogous binding of weakly hydrated anions.

  20. Oxaliplatin targeting to angiogenic vessels by PEGylated cationic liposomes suppresses the angiogenesis in a dorsal air sac mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Lila, Amr; Suzuki, Takuya; Doi, Yusuke; Ishida, Tatsuhiro; Kiwada, Hiroshi

    2009-02-20

    Oxaliplatin (trans-l-diaminocyclohexane oxalatoplatinum, l-OHP) is a third-generation platinum analogue with proven anti-tumor activity against many tumor cell lines, however it does not show sufficient anti-tumor activity in vivo when used alone. In order to overcome this problem and to achieve an anti-angiogenic therapy with l-OHP, the drug was encapsulated into PEG-coated cationic liposomes, which were designed to target the newly formed vessels, and its anti-angiogenic activity was evaluated in an in vivo mouse dorsal air sac (DAS) assay. For the DAS assay, chambers filled with tumor cells were implanted underneath the dorsal skin. l-OHP encapsulated in PEG-coated cationic liposomes (5 mg/kg mice) was intravenously injected once on day 1, 2, 3 or 4 after chamber implantation. On the fifth day after chamber implantation, animals were sacrificed and tumor-angiogenesis was evaluated. Liposome-encapsulated l-OHP completely suppressed angiogenesis in the skin when it was administered day 3 after chamber implantation. Under similar experimental conditions, neither l-OHP encapsulated in PEG-coated neutral liposomes, nor free l-OHP, nor "empty" (no drug containing) PEG-coated cationic liposomes showed such strong suppressive effect. The present study suggests that the liposomal formulation of l-OHP, which targeted to angiogenic vessels, has a remarkable in vivo anti-angiogenic activity and the formulation may become a promising novel approach to achieve anti-angiogenic therapy.

  1. Calibration of the sodium base cation dominance index of weathering for the River Dee catchment in north-east Scotland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutter, M. [Aberdeen Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Plant and Soil Science; Smart, R.; Cresser, M. [York Univ. (United Kingdom). Environmental Dept.

    2002-07-01

    Previously the dominance of base cations by Na{sup +} in river water in upland catchments with low weathering rates and influenced by marine-derived aerosols has been suggested as a quantitative index of weathering rate upstream of the sampling point. Using data for 59 sites from a study of the River Dee catchment in NE Scotland, the index has been fully calibrated against catchment weathering rates and net alkalinity production, derived through input output budget methods, for both upland and agricultural catchments and over a wide range of parent materials. It is shown that the relationship between Na{sup +} dominance and weathering rate is logarithmic, rather than linear as initially suggested. The excellent correlations highlight the potential use of this Na{sup +} dominance index for the direct quantification of catchment susceptibility to acidification at fine spatial resolution, using a few simple and inexpensive measurements. Stronger correlations were observed between the % Na{sup +} dominance and net annual flux of alkalinity than between % Na{sup +} dominance and weathering rate derived from summation of base cation fluxes. This demonstrates the importance of mechanisms controlling the transport of base cations out of catchments, namely in association with organic matter and with anthropogenically derived SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. These processes are shown to reduce the residual alkalinity derived through weathering. The partial neutralization of organic acidity by internally generated alkalinity has implications in the context of using the mass balance approach for setting critical loads for catchments. (Author)

  2. Resonance Rayleigh scattering spectral characteristics of interaction of nucleic acids with some cationic surfactantsand their analytical applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Shaopu(刘绍璞); HU; Xiaoli(胡小莉); LUO; Hongqun(罗红群); FAN; Li(范莉)

    2002-01-01

    In near neutral medium, the resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) intensities of an alone cationic surfactant and nucleic acid are very weak. However, when they combine with each other to form a complex, the RRS intensity of the solution is enhanced greatly. In this paper the reactions of five cationic surfactants with nucleic acids have been studied. The results show that the reaction conditions and RRS spectral characteristics of these reactions are similar, but their sensitivities are obviously different. Among them, the sensitivity of cetyldimethyl benzylammonium chloride (CDBAC) with an aryl and large molecular weight is the highest, while that of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) without aryl and with small molecular weight is the lowest. The detection limits for ctDNA and yRNA of the former are 6.6 and 29.4 ng@mL?1, while that of the latter are 13.3 and 53.6 ng@mL?1. The method has better selectivity and can be applied to the determination of trace amounts of nucleic acids. Furthermore, it is discovered in the investigation that not only the RRS intensity is related to the structure and molecular weight of the cationic surfactants, but also the change of the RRS intensity is closely related to the conformational change of nucleic acid. Therefore, the RRS method can be expanded to become a useful way to study the nucleic acid conformation.

  3. THE EFFECT OF CHARGE AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS ON LASER TONER AGGLOMERATION UNDER ALKALINE PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Jiang,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory-scale agglomeration experiments followed by image analysis were used to evaluate the effectiveness of different cationic surfactants on the 1-octadecanol agglomeration of a negatively charged laser toner. Various types of surfactants with different geometric structures were investigated. It was found that this toner became agglomerated under neutral pulping conditions, but it did not agglomerate under alkaline conditions at all. A small amount of the cationic surfactant compensated for the agglomeration disruption caused by the negative surface charge of the toner and made this toner agglomerate very well. These cationic surfactants consist of a chemical structure of C12 to C18 saturated alkyl hydrophobic chains. The positive charge of these surfactants played the major role in alleviating agglomeration disruption. Additionally, an extra phenol group on these surfactants contributed only minor advantages for toner agglomeration in the presence of 1-octadecanol. The best co-agglomeration performance occurred within a very narrow range of similar total positive charge densities based on the total toner weight. It was also found that this positive charge effect could not be applied to the chemical compounds of high molecular weight polymeric materials.

  4. Competitive Solvation of the Imidazolium Cation by Water and Methanol

    CERN Document Server

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2014-01-01

    Imidazolium-based ionic liquids are widely used in conjunction with molecular liquids for various applications. Solvation, miscibility and similar properties are of fundamental importance for successful implementation of theoretical schemes. This work reports competitive solvation of the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation by water and methanol. Employing molecular dynamics simulations powered by semiempirical Hamiltonian (electronic structure level of description), the local structure nearly imidazolium cation is described in terms of radial distribution functions. Although water and methanol are chemically similar, water appears systematically more successful in solvating the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation. This result fosters construction of future applications of the ternary ion-molecular systems.

  5. Infrared Spectroscopic Study for the Hydrated Clusters of Pentane Cation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tomoya; Matsuda, Yoshiyuki; Fujii, Asuka

    2016-06-01

    We performed infrared predissociation spectroscopy of size-selected pentane-water cluster cations, [pentane-(H2O)n]+, n=1-3, generated through the vacuum-ultraviolet photoionization. In the infrared spectra of the di- and tri-hydrated clusters, there appear broad features which spread to the lower frequency region from 2800 cm-1. These broad features are assigned to vibrations of a proton, which is transferred from CH of the pentane cation to the water molecules. These results indicate that the pentane cation has high proton donor ability. We will discuss these results based on theoretical conputations.

  6. Cation Transport in Polymer Electrolytes: A Microscopic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, A.; Heuer, A.

    2007-06-01

    A microscopic theory for cation diffusion in polymer electrolytes is presented. Based on a thorough analysis of molecular dynamics simulations on poly(ethylene) oxide with LiBF4, the mechanisms of cation dynamics are characterized. Cation jumps between polymer chains can be identified as renewal processes. This allows us to obtain an explicit expression for the lithium ion diffusion constant DLi by invoking polymer-specific properties such as the Rouse dynamics. This extends previous phenomenological and numerical approaches. In particular, the chain length dependence of DLi can be predicted and compared with experimental data. This dependence can be fully understood without referring to entanglement effects.

  7. Electrostatic charge confinement using bulky tetraoctylammonium cation and four anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Nadezhda A.; Chaban, Vitaly V.

    2016-04-01

    Thanks to large opposite electrostatic charges, cations and anions establish strong ionic bonds. However, applications of ionic systems - electrolytes, gas capture, solubilization, etc. - benefit from weaker non-covalent bonds. The common approaches are addition of cosolvents and delocalization of electron charge density via functionalization of ions. We report fine tuning of closest-approach distances, effective radii, and cation geometry by different anions using the semi-empirical molecular dynamics simulations. We found that long fatty acid chains employed in the tetraalkylammonium cation are largely inefficient and new substituents must be developed. The reported results foster progress of task-specific ionic liquids.

  8. Pyridine radical cation and its fluorine substituted derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondybey, V.E.; English, J.H.; Shiley, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The spectra and relaxation of the pyridine cation and of several of its fluorinated derivatives are studied in low temperature Ne matrices. The ions are generated by direct photoionization of the parent compounds. Of the compounds studied, laser induced → and → fluorescence is observed only for the 2, 6‐difluoropyridine cation. The analysis of the spectrum indicates that the ion is planar both in the and states. The large variety in the spectroscopic and relaxation behavior of fluoropyridine radical cations is explained in terms of their electronic structure and of the differential shifts of the individual electronic states caused by the fluorine substitution.

  9. Cationic starches on cellulose surfaces. A study of polyelectrolyte adsorption.

    OpenAIRE

    Steeg, van der, P.A.H.

    1992-01-01

    Cationic starches are used on a large scale in paper industry as wet-end additives. They improve dry strength. retention of fines and fillers, and drainage. Closure of the white water systems in the paper mills hase increased the concentration of detrimental substances. This might be the reason for the poor retention of cationic starches observed in the last few years.The purpose of the research described in this thesis was to obtain a better understanding of the adsorption of cationic starch...

  10. Spatial calibration of a tokamak neutral beam diagnostic using in situ neutral beam emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrystal, C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Burrell, K. H.; Pace, D. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Neutral beam injection is used in tokamaks to heat, apply torque, drive non-inductive current, and diagnose plasmas. Neutral beam diagnostics need accurate spatial calibrations to benefit from the measurement localization provided by the neutral beam. A new technique has been developed that uses in situ measurements of neutral beam emission to determine the spatial location of the beam and the associated diagnostic views. This technique was developed to improve the charge exchange recombination (CER) diagnostic at the DIII-D tokamak and uses measurements of the Doppler shift and Stark splitting of neutral beam emission made by that diagnostic. These measurements contain information about the geometric relation between the diagnostic views and the neutral beams when they are injecting power. This information is combined with standard spatial calibration measurements to create an integrated spatial calibration that provides a more complete description of the neutral beam-CER system. The integrated spatial calibration results are very similar to the standard calibration results and derived quantities from CER measurements are unchanged within their measurement errors. The methods developed to perform the integrated spatial calibration could be useful for tokamaks with limited physical access.

  11. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    CERN Document Server

    Kubis, S

    2006-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  12. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  13. Neutron production by neutral beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkner, K.H.; Massoletti, D.J.; McCaslin, J.B.; Pyle, R.V.; Ruby, L.

    1979-11-01

    Neutron yields, from interactions of multiampere 40- to 120-keV deuterium beams with deuterium atoms implanted in copper targets, have been measured in order to provide input data for shielding of neutral-deuterium beam facilities for magnetic fusion experiments.

  14. Development of KSTAR Neutral Beam Heating System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, B. H.; Song, W. S.; Yoon, B. J. (and others)

    2007-10-15

    The prototype components of a neutral beam injection (NBI) system have been developed for the KSTAR, and a capability of the manufactured components has been tested. High power ion source, acceleration power supply, other ion source power supplies, neutralizer, bending magnet for ion beam separation, calorimeter, and cryo-sorption pump have been developed by using the domestic technologies and tested for a neutral beam injection of 8 MW per beamline with a pulse duration of 300 seconds. The developed components have been continuously upgraded to achieve the design requirements. The development technology of high power and long pulse neutral beam injection system has been proved with the achievement of 5.2 MW output for a short pulse length and 1.6 MW output for a pulse length of 300 seconds. Using these development technologies, the domestic NB technology has been stabilized under the development of high power ion source, NB beamline components, high voltage and current power supplies, NB diagnostics, NB system operation and control.

  15. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  16. Linear Sweep Voltammetry of Adsorbed Neutral Red.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    E. Creager, G. T. Marks, D. A. Aikens and H. H. Richtol Prepared for Publication in Journal of Electroanalytical Chemistry Rensselaer Polytechnic... Electroanalytical Chemistry It. KEY WORDS (Continue oun reverse side It necessary mid Ideneliy by block ntaibor) Neutral Red, cyclic voltammetry, adsorbed dye 20

  17. The LIPSS search for light neutral bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei Afanasev; Oliver K. Baker; Kevin Beard; George Biallas; James Boyce; Minarni Minarni; Roopchan Ramdon; Michelle D. Shinn; Penny Slocum

    2009-07-01

    An overview is presented of the LIPSS experimental search for very light neutral bosons using laser light from Jefferson Lab's Free Electron Laser. This facility provides very high power beams of photons over a large optical range, particularly at infrared wavelengths. Data has been collected in several experimental runs during the course of the past three years, most recently in the Fall of 2009.

  18. Intraprostatic injection of neutralized zinc in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahim, M.S.; Wang, M.; Sutcu, M.F.; Fahim, Z.; Safron, J.A.; Ganjam, V.K. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (United States) Xian Medical University (China))

    1991-03-11

    Zinc has been implicated in steroid endocrinology of the prostate gland. The conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by 5{alpha}-reductase enzyme is believed to express androgenic responses in the prostate. To note the effect of neutralized zinc on the prostate, 50 sexually mature rats, weighing 325 {plus minus} 20 grams, were divided into 5 groups as follows: (1) control, (2) sham, (3) castrated, (4) injected intraprostatically with 10 mg. neutralized zinc, and (5) injected intraprostatically with 20 mg. neutralized zinc. Results in the treated groups indicated significant reduction of prostate weights, 12% and 53% and histologically normal prostate; no significant change in weight and histological structure of testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicles; significant reduction in 5{alpha}-reductase activity and total protein and DNA concentrations in prostate tissue; and no significant effect on progeny of treated animals. These results suggest that direct application of neutralized zinc to the prostate offers a new modality for treatment of prostatitis without affecting spermatogenesis and testosterone production.

  19. A storage ring for neutral molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crompvoets, F.M.H.

    2005-01-01

    Time-varying inhomogeneous electric fields can be used to manipulate the motion of neutral molecules in phase-space, i.e., position-momentum space, via their electric dipole moment. A theoretical background is given on the motion of the molecules in phase-space. As the forces exerted on the

  20. Atomic Structure Calculations for Neutral Oxygen

    OpenAIRE

    Norah Alonizan; Rabia Qindeel; Nabil Ben Nessib

    2016-01-01

    Energy levels and oscillator strengths for neutral oxygen have been calculated using the Cowan (CW), SUPERSTRUCTURE (SS), and AUTOSTRUCTURE (AS) atomic structure codes. The results obtained with these atomic codes have been compared with MCHF calculations and experimental values from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) database.

  1. Absence of neutral alkali atoms in rhodizite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnay, G.; Thorpe, A.N.; Senftle, F.E.; Sioda, R.

    1966-01-01

    The formula CsB12Be4Al4O28 has been proposed by others for the mineral rhodizite. Electron-spin-resonance and magnetic susceptibility measurements prove the absence of neutral cesium atoms. An ionic formula CsB11Be4Al4O 26(OH)2is proposed.

  2. Neutrino emissivity under neutral kaon condensation

    OpenAIRE

    Kubis, Sebastian

    2005-01-01

    Neutrino emissivity from neutron star matter with neutral kaon condensate is considered. It is shown that a new cooling channel is opened, and what is more, all previously known channels acquire the greater emissivity reaching the level of the direct URCA cycle in normal matter.

  3. If It's Neutral, It's Not Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strate, Lance

    2012-01-01

    Taking a media ecology perspective, this article argues that technology cannot be neutral, because it is a form of change, and it has an inherent bias based on the properties of its materials and methods. Additionally, the application of a technology is an intrinsic part of the technology itself, as is technique, instructions, software, or…

  4. Results on intense beam focusing and neutralization from the neutralized beam experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, P.K.; Yu, S.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Anders, A.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Greenway, W.G.; Logan, B.G.; Waldron, W.L.; Vanecek, D.L.; Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Davidson, R.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Gilson, E.P.; Sefkow, A.B.; Sharp, W.M.

    2003-10-31

    We have demonstrated experimental techniques to provide active neutralization for space-charge dominated beams as well as to prevent uncontrolled ion beam neutralization by stray electrons. Neutralization is provided by a localized plasma injected from a cathode arc source. Unwanted secondary electrons produced at the wall by halo particle impact are suppressed using a radial mesh liner that is positively biased inside a beam drift tube. We present measurements of current transmission, beam spot size as a function of axial position, beam energy and plasma source conditions. Detailed comparisons with theory are also presented.

  5. Compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer with Ion Drifts, Temperatures and Neutral Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalidis, Nikolaos

    2016-07-01

    In situ measurements of atmospheric neutral and ion composition and density, temperatures, ion drifts and neutral winds, are in high demand to study the dynamics of the ionosphere-theremosphere-mesosphere system. This paper presents a compact Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS) with impended ion drifts and temperature, and neutral winds capability for in situ measurements of ions and neutrals H, He, N, O, N2, O2. The mass resolution M/dM is approximately 10 at an incoming energy range of 0-20eV. The goal is to resolve ion drifts in the range 0 to 3000m/sec with a resolution better than 50m/sec, and neutral winds in the range of 0 to 1000m/sec with similar resolution. For temperatures the goal is to cover a dynamic range of 0 to 5000K. The INMS is based on front end optics for ions and neutrals, pre acceleration, gated time of flight, top hat ESA, MCP detectors and compact electronics. The instrument is redundant for ions and neutrals with the ion and neutral sensor heads on opposite sides and with full electronics in the middle. The ion front end includes RPA for temperature scanning and neutral front end includes angular modulation and thermionic ionization and ion blocking grids. The electronics include fast electric gating, TOF electronics, TOF binning and C&DH digital electronics. The data package includes 400 mass bins each for ions and neutrals and key housekeeping data for instrument health and calibration. The data sampling can be commanded from 0.1 to 10 sec with 1sec nominal setting. The instrument has significant onboard storage capability and a data compression scheme. The mass spectrometer version of the instrument has been flown on the Exocube mission. The instrument occupied 1.5U volume, weighed only 560 g and required nominal power of 1.6W The ExoCube mission was designed to acquire global knowledge of in-situ densities of [H], [He], [O] and H+, He+, O+ in the upper ionosphere and lower exosphere in combination with incoherent scatter radar and

  6. Study of Cobalt(III) Corrole as the Neutral Ionophore for Nitrite and Nitrate Detection via Polymeric Membrane Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Si; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2013-12-01

    Cobalt(III) 5, 10, 15-tris(4-tert-butylphenyl) corrole was synthesized and incorporated into plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes and studied as a neutral carrier ionophore via potentiometry. This cobalt(III) complex has binding affinity to nitrite, and the resulting membrane electrode yields reversible and Nernstian response toward nitrite. Enhanced nitrite selectivity is observed over other anions, including lipophilic anions such as thiocyanate and perchlorate when an appropriate amount of lipophilic cationic sites are added to the membrane phase. Detection limit to nitrite is ca. 5 µM. Using tributylphosphate as the plasticizer with the cobalt(III) corrole species yields electrodes with enhanced nitrate selectivity.

  7. Endomembrane Cation Transporters and Membrane Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sze, Heven [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics

    2017-04-01

    Multicellular, as well as unicellular, organisms have evolved mechanisms to regulate ion and pH homeostasis in response to developmental cues and to a changing environment. The working hypothesis is that the balance of fluxes mediated by diverse transporters at the plasma membrane and in subcellular organelles determines ionic cellular distribution, which is critical for maintenance of membrane potential, pH control, osmolality, transport of nutrients, and protein activity. An emerging theme in plant cell biology is that cells respond and adapt to diverse cues through changes of the dynamic endomembrane system. Yet we know very little about the transporters that might influence the operation of the secretory system in plants. Here we focus on transporters that influence alkali cation and pH homeostasis, mainly in the endomembrane/ secretory system. The endomembrane system of eukaryote cells serves several major functions: i) sort cargo (e.g. enzymes, transporters or receptors) to specific destinations, ii) modulate the protein and lipid composition of membrane domains through remodeling, and iii) determine and alter the properties of the cell wall through synthesis and remodeling. We had uncovered a novel family of predicted cation/H+ exchangers (CHX) and K+ efflux antiporters (KEA) that are prevalent in higher plants, but rare in metazoans. We combined phylogenetic and transcriptomic analyses with molecular genetic, cell biological and biochemical studies, and have published the first reports on functions of plant CHXs and KEAs. CHX studied to date act at the endomembrane system where their actions are distinct from the better-studied NHX (Na/K-H+ exchangers). Arabidopsis thaliana CHX20 in guard cells modulate stomatal opening, and thus is significant for vegetative survival. Other CHXs ensure reproductive success on dry land, as they participate in organizing pollen walls, targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule or promoting

  8. Novel cationic polyelectrolyte coatings for capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duša, Filip; Witos, Joanna; Karjalainen, Erno; Viitala, Tapani; Tenhu, Heikki; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2016-01-01

    The use of bare fused silica capillary in CE can sometimes be inconvenient due to undesirable effects including adsorption of sample or instability of the EOF. This can often be avoided by coating the inner surface of the capillary. In this work, we present and characterize two novel polyelectrolyte coatings (PECs) poly(2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl trimethylammonium iodide) (PMOTAI) and poly(3-methyl-1-(4-vinylbenzyl)-imidazolium chloride) (PIL-1) for CE. The coated capillaries were studied using a series of aqueous buffers of varying pH, ionic strength, and composition. Our results show that the investigated polyelectrolytes are usable as semi-permanent (physically adsorbed) coatings with at least five runs stability before a short coating regeneration is necessary. Both PECs showed a considerably decreased stability at pH 11.0. The EOF was higher using Good's buffers than with sodium phosphate buffer at the same pH and ionic strength. The thickness of the PEC layers studied by quartz crystal microbalance was 0.83 and 0.52 nm for PMOTAI and PIL-1, respectively. The hydrophobicity of the PEC layers was determined by analysis of a homologous series of alkyl benzoates and expressed as the distribution constants. Our result demonstrates that both PECs had comparable hydrophobicity, which enabled separation of compounds with log Po/w > 2. The ability to separate cationic drugs was shown with β-blockers, compounds often misused in doping. Both coatings were also able to separate hydrolysis products of the ionic liquid 1,5-diazabicyclo[4.3.0]non-5-ene acetate at highly acidic conditions, where bare fused silica capillaries failed to accomplish the separation.

  9. IRMPD action spectroscopy of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes: effects of alkali metal cation size on gas phase conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Wu, R R; Polfer, N C; Berden, G; Oomens, J; Rodgers, M T

    2013-10-01

    The gas-phase structures of alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes generated by electrospray ionization are probed via infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. IRMPD action spectra of five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes exhibit both similar and distinctive spectral features over the range of ~1000-1900 cm(-1). The IRMPD spectra of the Li(+)(cytosine), Na(+)(cytosine), and K(+)(cytosine) complexes are relatively simple but exhibit changes in the shape and shifts in the positions of several bands that correlate with the size of the alkali metal cation. The IRMPD spectra of the Rb(+)(cytosine) and Cs(+)(cytosine) complexes are much richer as distinctive new IR bands are observed, and the positions of several bands continue to shift in relation to the size of the metal cation. The measured IRMPD spectra are compared to linear IR spectra of stable low-energy tautomeric conformations calculated at the B3LYP/def2-TZVPPD level of theory to identify the conformations accessed in the experiments. These comparisons suggest that the evolution in the features in the IRMPD action spectra with the size of the metal cation, and the appearance of new bands for the larger metal cations, are the result of the variations in the intensities at which these complexes can be generated and the strength of the alkali metal cation-cytosine binding interaction, not the presence of multiple tautomeric conformations. Only a single tautomeric conformation is accessed for all five alkali metal cation-cytosine complexes, where the alkali metal cation binds to the O2 and N3 atoms of the canonical amino-oxo tautomer of cytosine, M(+)(C1).

  10. Synthesis and characterization of the first 2 d neptunyl structure stabilized by side-on cation-cation interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Miro, Pere; Ma, Dongxia; Cramer, Christopher J.; Gagliardi, Laura [Department of Chemistry, Supercomputing Institute and Chemical Theory Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sigmon, Ginger E.; Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2013-02-25

    A new 2 D sheet structure containing a side-on cation-cation interaction (CCI) has been synthesized and characterized. Unprecedentedly, no chelating ligands between the cations are present. The nature of the side-on interaction and ligand effects has been explored by using a variety of quantum chemical methods. The spin-orbit-coupled ground state mixes singlet, triplet, and quintet-pure spin states. (Copyright copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Cation-Cation Interactions in [(UO2)2(OH)n](4-n) Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odoh, Samuel O.; Govind, Niranjan; Schreckenbach, Georg; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2013-10-07

    The structures and bonding of gas-phase [(UO2)2(OH)n]4-n (n=2-6) complexes have been studied using density functional theory (DFT), MP2 and CCSD(T) methods with particular emphasis on ground state structures featuring cation-cation interactions (CCIs) between the uranyl groups. An interesting trend is observed in the stabilities of members of this series of complexes. The structures of [(UO2)2(OH)2]2+, [(UO2)2(OH)4] and [(UO2)2(OH)6]2- featuring CCIs are found at higher energies (by 3-20 kcal/mol) in comparison to their conventional μ2-dihydroxo structures. In contrast, the CCI structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- are respectively almost degenerate with and lower in energy than the structures with the μ2-dihydroxo format. The origin of this trend lies in the ‘symmetry’-based need to balance the coordination numbers and effective atomic charges of each uranium center. The calculated IR vibrational frequencies provide signature probes that can be used in differentiating the lowenergy structures and in experimentally confirming the existence of the structures featuring CCIs. Analysis of the bonding in the structures of [(UO2)2(OH)3]+ and [(UO2)2(OH)5]- shows that the CCIs and bridging hydroxo between the dioxo-uranium units are mainly electrostatic in nature.

  12. Isomerization of propargyl cation to cyclopropenyl cation: Mechanistic elucidations and effects of lone pair donors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zodinpuia Pachuau; Kiew S Kharnaior; R H Duncan Lyngdoh

    2013-03-01

    This ab initio study examines two pathways (one concerted and the other two-step) for isomerization of the linear propargyl cation to the aromatic cyclopropenyl cation, also probing the phenomenon of solvation of this reaction by simple lone pair donors (NH3, H2O, H2S and HF) which bind to the substrate at two sites. Fully optimized geometries at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level were used, along with single point QCISD(T)/6-311+G(d,p) and accurate G3 level calculations upon the DFT optimized geometries. For the unsolvated reaction, the two-step second pathway is energetically favoured over the one-step first pathway. Lone pair donor affinity for the various C3H$^{+}_{3}$ species follows the uniform order NH3 > H2S>H2O>HF. The activation barriers for the solvated isomerizations decrease in the order HF>H2O>H2S>NH3 for both pathways. The number of lone pairs on the donor heteroatom as well as the heteroatom electronegativity are factors related to both these trends. Compared to the unsolvated cases, the solvated reactions have transition states which are usually ‘later’ in position along the reaction coordinate, validating the Hammond postulate.

  13. Cation binding to 15-TBA quadruplex DNA is a multiple-pathway cation-dependent process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnikov, Roman V; Sponer, Jiri; Rassokhina, Olga I; Kopylov, Alexei M; Tsvetkov, Philipp O; Makarov, Alexander A; Golovin, Andrey V

    2011-12-01

    A combination of explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation (30 simulations reaching 4 µs in total), hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics approach and isothermal titration calorimetry was used to investigate the atomistic picture of ion binding to 15-mer thrombin-binding quadruplex DNA (G-DNA) aptamer. Binding of ions to G-DNA is complex multiple pathway process, which is strongly affected by the type of the cation. The individual ion-binding events are substantially modulated by the connecting loops of the aptamer, which play several roles. They stabilize the molecule during time periods when the bound ions are not present, they modulate the route of the ion into the stem and they also stabilize the internal ions by closing the gates through which the ions enter the quadruplex. Using our extensive simulations, we for the first time observed full spontaneous exchange of internal cation between quadruplex molecule and bulk solvent at atomistic resolution. The simulation suggests that expulsion of the internally bound ion is correlated with initial binding of the incoming ion. The incoming ion then readily replaces the bound ion while minimizing any destabilization of the solute molecule during the exchange.

  14. Proton Affinities of Cationic Carbone Adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) (A=Halogen, Hydrogen, Methyl) and Unusual Electronic Structures of the Cations and Dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petz, Wolfgang; Kuzu, Istemi; Frenking, Gernot; Andrada, Diego M; Neumüller, Bernhard; Fritz, Maximilian; Münzer, Jörn E

    2016-06-13

    This work reports the syntheses and the first crystal structures of the cationic carbone adducts [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [BrC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and the protonated dication [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , which are derived from the carbone C(PPh3 )2 . Quantum chemical calculations and bonding analyses were carried out for the series of cations [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) , where A=H, Me, F, Cl, Br, I. The bonding analysis suggests that the cations are best described as phosphane complexes L→(CA)(+) ←L (L=PPh3 ), which are related to the neutral borylene adducts L→(BA)←L (L=cyclic carbene; A=H, aryl) that were recently isolated. The carbone adducts [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) possess a π electron lone pair at carbon and they can easily be protonated to the dications [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) . The calculations of the dications indicate that the molecules are best represented as complexes L→(CHA)(2+) ←L (L=PPh3 ) where a carbene dication is stabilized by the ligands. The central carbon atom in the cations and even in the dications carries a negative partial charge, which is larger than the negative charge at fluorine. There is also the peculiar situation in which the carbon-fluorine bonds in [FC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [FC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) exhibit the expected polarity with the negative end at fluorine, but the carbon atom has a larger negative charge than fluorine. Given the similarity of carbodiphosphorane C(PPh3 )2 and carbodicarbene C(NHC)2 , we expect that analogous compounds [AC(NHC)2 ](+) and [AC(H)(NHC)2 ](2+) with similar features as [AC(PPh3 )2 ](+) and [AC(H)(PPh3 )2 ](2+) can be isolated.

  15. DFT study on the cycloreversion of thietane radical cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R; Pérez-Ruiz, Raúl; Argüello, Juan E; Miranda, Miguel A

    2011-06-01

    The molecular mechanism of the cycloreversion (CR) of thietane radical cations has been analyzed in detail at the UB3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. Results have shown that the process takes place via a stepwise mechanism leading to alkenes and thiobenzophenone; alternatively, formal [4+2] cycloadducts are obtained. Thus, the CR of radical cations 1a,b(•+) is initiated by C2-C3 bond breaking, giving common intermediates INa,b. At this stage, two reaction pathways are feasible involving ion molecule complexes IMCa,b (i) or radical cations 4a,b(•+) (ii). Calculations support that 1a(•+) follows reaction pathway ii (leading to the formal [4+2] cycloadducts 5a). By contrast, 1b(•+) follows pathway i, leading to trans-stilbene radical cation (2b(•+)) and thiobenzophenone.

  16. CATION-EXCHANGE SOLID-PHASE AND LIQUID-LIQUID ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    cation exchange-solid phase extraction (SCX-SPE) was investigated as an .... Stock solutions, with a concentration of 1.00 mg/mL were prepared ... Johannesburg, South Africa) connected to a vacuum pump (Vacuubrand, GMBH, Germany).

  17. Degradation Mechanism of Cationic Red X-GRL by Ozonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Rong ZHAO; Xin Hua XU; Hui Xiang SHI; Da Hui WANG

    2003-01-01

    The degradation mechanism of Cationic Red X-GRL was investigated when the intermediates, the nitrate ion and the pH were analyzed in the ozonation. The degradation of the Cationic Red X-GRL includes the de-auxochrome stage, the decolour stage, and the decomposition of fragment stage. During the degradation process, among the six nitrogen atoms of Cationic Red X-GRL, one is transferred into a nitrate ion, one becomes the form of an amine compound, and the rest four are transformed into two molecules of nitrogen. In the course of the ozonation of Cationic Red X-GRL, the direct attack of ozone is the main decolour effect.

  18. Silica surfaces lubrication by hydrated cations adsorption from electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donose, Bogdan C; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Higashitani, Ko

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption of hydrated cations on hydrophilic surfaces has been related to a variety of phenomena associated with the short-range interaction forces and mechanisms of the adhesive contact between the surfaces. Here we have investigated the effect of the adsorption of cations on the lateral interaction. Using lateral force microscopy (LFM), we have measured the friction force between a silica particle and silica wafer in pure water and in electrolyte solutions of LiCl, NaCl, and CsCl salts. A significant lubrication effect was demonstrated for solutions of high electrolyte concentrations. It was found that the adsorbed layers of smaller and more hydrated cations have a higher lubrication capacity than the layers of larger and less hydrated cations. Additionally, we have demonstrated a characteristic dependence of the friction force on the sliding velocity of surfaces. A mechanism for the observed phenomena based on the microstructures of the adsorbed layers is proposed.

  19. Cationic polymers for successful flocculation of marine microalgae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lam, 't G.P.; Vermuë, M.H.; Olivieri, G.; Broek, van den L.A.M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Kleinegris, D.M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Flocculation of microalgae is a promising technique to reduce the costs and energy required for harvesting microalgae. Harvesting marine microalgae requires suitable flocculants to induce the flocculation under marine conditions. This study demonstrates that cationic polymeric flocculants can be

  20. Infrared spectrum of the chloromethylene hydroperoxide cation in solid argon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mohua; Zhou, Mingfei

    2013-07-01

    Infrared spectrum of the chloromethylene hydroperoxide cation, HC(Cl)OOH+ in solid argon is reported. The cation is produced by co-condensation of dichloromethane and dioxygen mixtures with high-frequency discharged argon at 4 K followed by visible light excitation. On the basis of isotopic substitutions as well as quantum chemical frequency calculations, absorptions at 3452.7, 3052.0, 1499.6, 976.9, 855.4 and 956.1 cm-1 are assigned to the O-H, C-H, Cdbnd O, C-Cl and O-O stretching and out-of-plane CH wagging vibrations of the chloromethylene hydroperoxy cation. The cation was predicted to have a singlet ground state with planar Cs symmetry.

  1. Condensation of nonstochiometric DNA/polycation complexes by divalent cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Vladimir; Trubetskoy, Vladimir; Wolff, Jon A

    2006-12-15

    This study found that divalent cations induced the further condensation of partially condensed DNA within nonstochiometric polycation complexes. The addition of a few mmol of a divalent cation such as calcium reduced by half the inflection point at which DNA became fully condensed by poly-L-lysine (PLL) and a variety of other polycations. The effect on DNA condensation was initially observed using a new method, which is based on the concentration-dependent self-quenching of fluorescent moieties (e.g., rhodamine) covalently linked to the DNA backbone at relatively high densities. Additional analyses, which employed ultracentrifugation, dynamic light scattering, agarose gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy, confirmed the effect of divalent cations. These results provide an additional accounting of the process by which divalent cations induce greater chromatin compaction that is based on the representation of chromatin fibers as a nonstoichiometric polyelectrolyte complex. They also offer a new approach to assemble nonviral vectors for gene therapy.

  2. Methylene blue (cationic dye) adsorption into Salvadora persica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methylene blue (cationic dye) adsorption into Salvadora persica stems ash. ... African Journal of Biotechnology. Journal Home · ABOUT ... Abstract. Methylene blue (MB) is the most commonly used substance for dyeing cotton, wood and silk.

  3. The covalently bound HNC dimer ion HN dbnd C dbnd C dbnd NH rad + has a kinetically stable neutral counterpart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobst, Karl J.; Ruzni Hanifa, M.; Terlouw, Johan K.

    2008-09-01

    Neutralization-reionization mass spectrometry (NRMS) and computational chemistry (CBS-QB3/APNO methods) have been used to show that HN dbnd C dbnd C dbnd NH (ethenediimine) and its isomer H 2N-C-C tbnd N (aminocyanocarbene) are generated as kinetically stable molecules in the rarefied gas-phase by one electron reduction of their ionic precursors. One route to the very stable ion HN dbnd C dbnd C dbnd NH involves loss of HC tbnd N from the hydrogen-bridged radical cation [HN tbnd C ⋯HN-C-C tbnd N ] via a remarkable quid-pro-quo catalysis in which both the ion and the neutral undergo isomerization.

  4. NMR determination of Electrophorus electricus acetylcholinesterase inhibition and reactivation by neutral oximes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Xavier Soares, Sibelle Feitosa; Vieira, Andréia Aguiar; Delfino, Reinaldo Teixeira; Figueroa-Villar, José Daniel

    2013-09-15

    Neurotoxic organophosphorus compounds (OPs), which are used as pesticides and chemical warfare agents lead to more than 700,000 intoxications worldwide every year. The main target of OPs is the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an enzyme necessary for the control of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh). The control of ACh function is performed by its hydrolysis with AChE, a process that can be completely interrupted by inhibition of the enzyme by phosphylation with OPs. Compounds used for reactivation of the phosphylated AChE are cationic oximes, which usually possess low membrane and hematoencephalic barrier permeation. Neutral oximes possess a better capacity for hematoencephalic barrier permeation. NMR spectroscopy is a very confident method for monitoring the inhibition and reactivation of enzymes, different from the Ellman test, which is the common method for evaluation of inhibition and reactivation of AChE. In this work (1)H NMR was used to test the effect of neutral oximes on inhibition of AChE and reactivation of AChE inhibited with ethyl-paraoxon. The results confirmed that NMR is a very efficient method for monitoring the action of AChE, showing that neutral oximes, which display a significant AChE inhibition activity, are potential drugs for Alzheimer disease. The NMR method showed that a neutral oxime, previously indicated by the Ellman test as better in vitro reactivator of AChE inhibited with paraoxon than pralidoxime (2-PAM), was much less efficient than 2-PAM, confirming that NMR is a better method than the Ellman test. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Mechanistic and comparative studies of melatonin and classic antioxidants in terms of their interactions with the ABTS cation radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-xian; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Manchester, Lucien C; Poeggeler, Burkhard; Lopez-Burillo, Silvia; Mayo, Juan C; Sainz, Rosa M; Reiter, Russel J

    2003-05-01

    Melatonin and classic antioxidants possess the capacity to scavenge ABTSb+ with IC50s of 4, 11, 15.5, 15.5, 17 and 21 microm for melatonin, glutathione, vitamin C, trolox, NADH and NADPH, respectively. In terms of scavenging ABTSb+, melatonin exhibits a different profile than that of the classic antioxidants. Classic antioxidants scavenge one or less ABTSb+, while each melatonin molecule can scavenge more than one ABTSb+, probably with a maximum of four. Classic antioxidants do not synergize when combined in terms of scavenging ABTSb+. However, a synergistic action is observed when melatonin is combined with any of the classic antioxidants. Cyclic voltammetry indicates that melatonin donates an electron at the potential of 715 mV. The scavenging mechanism of melatonin on ABTSb+ may involve multiple-electron donations via intermediates through a stepwise process. Intermediates including the melatoninyl cation radical, the melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-hydroxymelatonin (cyclic 3-OHM) and N1-acetyl-N2-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) seem to participate in these reactions. More interestingly, the pH of the solution dramatically modifies the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while pH changes have no measurable influence on the scavenging activity of classic antioxidants. An acidic pH markedly reduces the ABTSb+ scavenging capacity of melatonin while an increased pH promotes the interaction of melatonin and ABTSb+. The major melatonin metabolites that develop when melatonin interacts with ABTSb+ are cyclic 3-OHM and AFMK. Cyclic 3-OHM is the intermediate between melatonin and AFMK, and cyclic 3-OHM also has the ability to scavenge ABTSb+. Melatonin and the metabolites which are generated via the interaction of melatonin with ABTSb+, i.e. the melatoninyl cation radical, melatoninyl neutral radical and cyclic 3-OHM, all scavenge ABTSb+. This unique cascade action of melatonin, in terms of scavenging, increases its efficiency to neutralized ABTSb+; this

  6. The Effect of Sulfonation and Neutralization on the Dynamics of Zn Neutralized Sulfonated Polystyrene Ionomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castagna, Alicia; Wang, Wenqin; Winey, Karen I.; Runt, James

    2011-03-01

    The effect of sulfonation and neutralization levels on structure and dynamics of Zn neutralized sulfonated polystyrene (SPS) ionomers were investigated using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray scattering, and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy. STEM and X-ray scattering revealed the presence of spherical aggregates 2 nm in diameter. Successful fitting of the scattering data to the Kinning-Thomas modified hard sphere model revealed that aggregate size is independent of degree of sulfonation and neutralization level, and that aggregate composition becomes increasingly ionic with increasing neutralization. Two segmental relaxations were identified in dielectric loss spectra corresponding to cooperative motion of chain segments in the unrestricted matrix and motions of chain segments restricted by aggregates. A Maxwell-Wagner-Sillars interfacial polarization process was revealed, with relaxation times that were in good agreement with predictions from a simple model of dispersed ionic spheres.

  7. Competition by meperidine for the organic cation renal excretory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acara, M; Gessner, T; Trudnowski, R J

    1981-07-01

    Renal tubular excretory transport of meperidine was studied using the Sperber preparation in chickens. When urine samples from infused and uninfused kidneys were analyzed for meperidine by gas chromatography, meperidine was always present in greater amounts in the urine from the infused kidney, demonstrating active tubular excretion. Meperidine at an infusion rate of 1 mumole/min, also inhibited the excretion of the organic cations choline and acetylcholine, indicating occupation of the renal organic cation excretory system in the chicken.

  8. Mercury release from deforested soils triggered by base cation enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farella, N. [Institut des sciences de l' environnement, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3P8 (Canada)]. E-mail: nicolinafarella@yahoo.ca; Lucotte, M. [Institut des sciences de l' environnement, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3P8 (Canada)]. E-mail: lucotte.marc_michel@uqam.ca; Davidson, R. [Institut des sciences de l' environnement, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, CP 8888 Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3P8 (Canada) and Biodome de Montreal, 4777 Pierre-De Coubertin, Montreal (Quebec), HIV 1B3 (Canada)]. E-mail: rdavidson@ville.montreal.qc.ca; Daigle, S. [Institut de recherche en biologie vegetale, 4101 Sherbrooke est, Montreal (Quebec), H1X 2B2 (Canada)]. E-mail: daigles@magellan.umontreal.ca

    2006-09-01

    The Brazilian Amazon has experienced considerable colonization in the last few decades. Family agriculture based on slash-and-burn enables millions of people to live in that region. However, the poor nutrient content of most Amazonian soils requires cation-rich ashes from the burning of the vegetation biomass for cultivation to be successful, which leads to forest ecosystem degradation, soil erosion and mercury contamination. While recent studies have suggested that mercury present in soils was transferred towards rivers upon deforestation, little is known about the dynamics between agricultural land-use and mercury leaching. In this context, the present study proposes an explanation that illustrates how agricultural land-use triggers mercury loss from soils. This explanation lies in the competition between base cations and mercury in soils which are characterized by a low adsorption capacity. Since these soils are naturally very poor in base cations, the burning of the forest biomass suddenly brings high quantities of base cations to soils, destabilizing the previous equilibrium amongst cations. Base cation enrichment triggers mobility in soil cations, rapidly dislocating mercury atoms. This conclusion comes from principal component analyses illustrating that agricultural land-use was associated with base cation enrichment and mercury depletion. The overall conclusions highlight a pernicious cycle: while soil nutrient enrichment actually occurs through biomass burning, although on a temporary basis, there is a loss in Hg content, which is leached to rivers, entering the aquatic chain, and posing a potential health threat to local populations. Data presented here reflects three decades of deforestation activities, but little is known about the long-term impact of such a disequilibrium. These findings may have repercussions on our understanding of the complex dynamics of deforestation and agriculture worldwide.

  9. Focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations and biological anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Lee, Sang Wook; Lee, Jun-Seok; Chang, Young-Tae; Hong, Jong-In

    2013-09-09

    A focused fluorescent probe library for metal cations was developed by combining metal chelators and picolinium/quinolinium moieties as combinatorial blocks connected through a styryl group. Furthermore, metal complexes derived from metal chelators having high binding affinities for metal cations were used to construct a focused probe library for phosphorylated biomolecules. More than 250 fluorescent probes were screened for identifying an ultraselective probe for dTTP.

  10. Migration of Cations and Anions in Amorphous Polymer Electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.Stolwijk; S.H.Obeidi; M.Wiencierz

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Polymer electrolytes are used as ion conductors in batteries and fuel cells.Simple systems consist of a polymer matrix complexing an inorganic salt and are fully amorphous at the temperatures of interest.Both cations and anions are mobile and contribute to charge transport.Most studies on polymer electrolytes use the electrical conductivity to characterize the ion mobility.However,conductivity measurements cannot discriminate between cations and anions.This paper reports some recent results fr...

  11. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF HYDROPHOBIC AND CATIONIC MONTMORILLONITE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W. Liu; Y. Ni; H. Xiao

    2004-01-01

    Hydrophilic and cationic montmorillonite is desirable for pitch control in the pulp and paper industry. In this paper, polyaminoamide - epichlorohydrin (PAE)modified montmorillonite was prepared. The modified montmorillonite was characterized using X-ray diffraction, FTIR and thermal gravimetric analysis. The amount of PAE intercalated and cationic charge densities of the modified montmorillonite were determined. Finally, it was found that both the solution and melt-intercalated samples with different charge densities exhibited strong interactions with dispersed colloidal rosin acid.

  12. Aspects of nonviral gene therapy: correlation of molecular parameters with lipoplex structure and transfection efficacy in pyridinium-based cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Paria; Jubeli, Emile; Raju, Liji; Khalique, Nada Abdul; Almeer, Ahmed; Allam, Hebatalla; Manaa, Maryem Al; Larsen, Helge; Nicholson, David; Pungente, Michael D; Fyles, Thomas M

    2014-01-30

    This study seeks correlations between the molecular structures of cationic and neutral lipids, the lipid phase behavior of the mixed-lipid lipoplexes they form with plasmid DNA, and the transfection efficacy of the lipoplexes. Synthetic cationic pyridinium lipids were co-formulated (1:1) with the cationic lipid 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC), and these lipids were co-formulated (3:2) with the neutral lipids 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol. All lipoplex formulations exhibited plasmid DNA binding and a level of protection from DNase I degradation. Composition-dependent transfection (beta-galactosidase and GFP) and cytotoxicity was observed in Chinese hamster ovarian-K1 cells. The most active formulations containing the pyridinium lipids were less cytotoxic but of comparable activity to a Lipofectamine 2000™ control. Molecular structure parameters and partition coefficients were calculated for all lipids using fragment additive methods. The derived shape parameter values correctly correlated with observed hexagonal lipid phase behavior of lipoplexes as derived from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. A transfection index applicable to hexagonal phase lipoplexes derived from calculated parameters of the lipid mixture (partition coefficient, shape parameter, lipoplex packing) produced a direct correlation with transfection efficiency.

  13. Synthesis and characterisation of cationically modified phospholipid polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew L; Berwick, James; Davies, Martyn C; Roberts, Clive J; Wang, Jin-Hai; Small, Sharon; Dunn, Anthony; O'Byrne, Vincent; Redman, Richard P; Jones, Stephen A

    2004-07-01

    Phospholipid-like copolymers based on 2-(methacryloyloxyethyl) phosphorylcholine were synthesised using monomer-starved free radical polymerisation methods and incorporating cationic charge in the form of the choline methacrylate monomer in amounts varying from 0 to 30 wt%, together with a 5 wt% silyl cross-linking agent in order to render them water-insoluble once thermally cured. Characterisation using a variety of techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, high-pressure liquid chromatography and gel permeation chromatography showed the cationic monomer did not interfere with the polymerisation and that the desired amount of charge had been incorporated. Gravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry methods were used to evaluate the water contents of polymer membranes cured at 70 degrees C, which was seen to increase with increasing cation content, producing materials with water contents ranging from 50% to 98%. Surface plasmon resonance indicated that the coatings swelled rapidly in water, the rate and extent of swelling increasing with increasing cation level. Dynamic contact angle showed that coatings of all the polymers possessed a hydrophobic surface when dry in air, characteristic of the alkyl chains expressed at the surface (>100 degrees advancing angle). Rearrangement of the hydrophilic groups to the surface occurred once wet, to produce highly wettable surfaces with a decrease in advancing angle with increasing cation content. Atomic force microscopy showed all polymer films to be smooth with no features in topographical or phase imaging. Mechanical properties of the dry films were also unaffected by the increase in cation content.

  14. Modulatory role of bivalent cations on reward system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechifor, M; Chelărescu, D

    2008-01-01

    Bivalent cations (Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn etc.) modulate activity of reward system (RS). At physiologic levels they may influence all components of RS. There are influenced behavioral reactions at physiological stimuli and all essential elements of drug dependence (compulsive intake of substance, craving, reinforcement, withdrawal syndrom, relapse and reinstatement of intake) The fact that some cations (e.g. calcium) enhance some of the aspects of drug dependence and others (e.g. magnesium, zinc) decrease intensity of this process show that ratio between intra- and extracellular in the brain of these cations is important for the function of RS. Among actions of different cations at the level of RS there are important differences. Their mecahanism of action are common in part and specific in other. It is important the fact that modulatory action appear at physiologic cation concentrations (that could be reached at therapeutic doses). Modulatory action is related to ratio between concetrations of different bivalent cations and is exerted both in normal or pathologic conditions.

  15. Complexation Between Cationic Diblock Copolymers and Plasmid DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Seyoung; Reineke, Theresa; Lodge, Timothy

    Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA), as polyanions, can spontaneously bind with polycations to form polyelectrolyte complexes. When the polycation is a diblock copolymer with one cationic block and one uncharged hydrophilic block, the polyelectrolyte complexes formed with plasmid DNA (pDNA) are often colloidally stable, and show great promise in the field of polymeric gene therapy. While the resulting properties (size, stability, and toxicity to biological systems) of the complexes have been studied for numerous cationic diblocks, the fundamentals of the pDNA-diblock binding process have not been extensively investigated. Herein, we report how the cationic block content of a diblock influences the pDNA-diblock interactions. pDNA with 7164 base pairs and poly(2-deoxy-2-methacrylamido glucopyranose)-block-poly(N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide) (PMAG-b-PAEMA) are used as the model pDNA and cationic diblock, respectively. To vary the cationic block content, two PMAG-b-PAEMA copolymers with similar PMAG block lengths but distinct PAEMA block lengths and a PAEMA homopolymer are utilized. We show that the enthalpy change from pDNA-diblock interactions is dependent on the cationic diblock composition, and is closely associated with both the binding strength and the pDNA tertiary structure.

  16. Tunable states of interlayer cations in two-dimensional materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K.; Numata, K. [Department of Environmental Sciences, Tokyo Gakugei University, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501 (Japan); Dai, W. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy Materials Chemistry (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Hunger, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology, University of Stuttgart, 70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-03-31

    The local state of cations inside the Ångstrom-scale interlayer spaces is one of the controlling factors for designing sophisticated two-dimensional (2D) materials consisting of 2D nanosheets. In the present work, the molecular mechanism on how the interlayer cation states are induced by the local structures of the 2D nanosheets is highlighted. For this purpose, the local states of Na cations in inorganic 2D materials, in which the compositional fluctuations of a few percent are introduced in the tetrahedral and octahedral units of the 2D nanosheets, were systematically studied by means of {sup 23}Na magic-angle-spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and {sup 23}Na multiple-quantum MAS (MQMAS) NMR spectroscopy. In contrast with an uniform distribution of Na cations expected so far, various well-defined cation states sensitive to the local structures of the 2D nanosheets were identified. The tunability of the interlayer cation states along with the local structure of the 2D nanosheets, as the smallest structural unit of the 2D material, is discussed.

  17. Computer simulation of alkali metal cation-montmorillonite hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Fang-Ru Chou [Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States); Skipper, N.T. [Univ. College, London (United Kingdom); Sposito, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Molecular structure in the interlayers of Li-, Na-, or K-Wyoming montmorillonite with one, two, or three adsorbed water layers was investigated for the first time by concurrent Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, based on the Matsouka-Clementi-Yoshimine, (MCY) model of water-water interactions. Calculated layer spacings, as well as interlayer-species self-diffusion coefficients, were in good agreement with available experimental data. Inner-sphere surface complexes of the cations with tetrahedral charge sites were observed for all hydrates, whereas outer-sphere surface complexes of the cations with octahedral charge sites, found also in the one-layer hydrate, tended to dissociate from the clay mineral basal planes into a diffuse layer in the two- and three-layer hydrates. Differences in the interlayer water structure among the hydrates mainly reflected cation solvation, although some water molecules were entrapped within cavities in the montmorillonite surface. All of the interlayer cation and water species exchanged on the time scale (0.2 ns) of the MD simulations. Comparisons with results obtained using, instead of the MCY model, the TIP4P model for water-water, cation-water, and cation-clay interactions indicated that layer spacings and interlayer species mobilities tend to be under-predicted by the TIP4P model.

  18. Current chemical concepts of acids and bases and their application to anionic ("acid") and cationic ("basic") dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchtler, H; Meloan, S N; Spencer, M

    1985-01-01

    In biomedical studies, dyes are divided into "acid" and "basic" dyes. This classification cannot be reconciled with current chemical definitions of acids and bases. Brönsted-Lowry acids are compounds that can donate protons; bases are proton acceptors. The definition of acids and bases is independent of the electric charge, i.e. acids and bases can be neutral, anionic or cationic. Reactions between acids and bases result in formation of new acid-base pairs. Lewis acids and bases do not depend on a particular element, but are characterized by their electronic configurations. Lewis bases are electron donors; Lewis acids are electron acceptors. This classification is also unrelated to the electric charge. Lewis acids and bases interact by formation of coordinate covalent bonds. In histochemistry and histology, dyes containing -SO3-, -COO- and/or -O- groups are classified as "acid" dyes. However, such compounds are electron pair donors and hence Brönsted-Lowry and Lewis anionic bases. Dyes carrying a positive charge are termed "basic" dyes. Chemically, many cationic dyes are Lewis acids because they can add a base, e.g. OH-, acetate, halides. The hypothesis that transformation of -NH2 into ammonium groups imparts "basic" properties to dyes is untenable; ammonium groups are proton donors and hence acids. Furthermore, conversion of an amino into an ammonium group blocks a lone electron pair and the color of the dye changes drastically, e.g. from violet to green and yellow. It appears therefore highly unlikely that ammonium groups are responsible for binding of cationic ("basic") dyes. In histochemistry, it is usually not of critical importance whether anionic or cationic dyes are chemically acids or bases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Research on Stress Neutral Layer Offset in the Straightening Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailian Gui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The stress neutral layer offset is analyzed by theoretical and numerical calculation methods. In traditional straightening theory, the stress neutral layer was consistent with the geometric central layer. However, there is a phenomenon that the stress neutral layer has some offset with the geometric neutral layer. This offset is a very important factor for improving the precision of the straightening force. The formula of the stress neutral layer offset is obtained by a theoretical method and the change law is given by numerical calculation method. The neutral layer offset theory provides the theoretical basis for establishing the model of straightening force precisely.

  20. Generation and characterization of dihydroxycarbene, HO-C-OH, by neutralization/reionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedmann, F A; Cai, J; Wesdemiotis, C

    1994-10-01

    Dihydroxycarbene is produced in the gas phase by neutralization of the HO-C-OH+. radical cation which is formed by dissociative electron ionization of oxalic acid. Reionization approximately 0.3 microseconds later shows that HO-C-OH can survive intact and, thus, exists as a stable species with appreciable barriers for dissociation or rearrangement to formic acid (HCOOH). Within the time scale of the experiment, a small fraction of the carbene decomposes to H2O+CO. Comparison of the experimental results with ab initio theory shows that the dissociating HO-C-OH molecules are generated in the electronically excited triplet state, while the large amount of surviving carbene molecules is formed in the singlet ground state.

  1. On exponential stabilizability of linear neutral systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusser Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we deal with linear neutral functional differential systems. Using an extended state space and an extended control operator, we transform the initial neutral system in an infinite dimensional linear system. We give a sufficient condition for admissibility of the control operator B , conditions under which operator B can be acceptable in order to work with controllability and stabilizability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for exact controllability are provided; in terms of a gramian of controllability N ( μ . Assuming admissibility and exact controllability, a feedback control law is defined from the inverse of the operator N ( μ in order to stabilize exponentially the closed loop system. In this case, the semigroup generated by the closed loop system has an arbitrary decay rate.

  2. Net Neutrality and Quality of Service

    CERN Document Server

    Altman, Eitan; Wong, Sulan; Xu, Manjesh Kumar Hanawal 'and' Yuedong

    2011-01-01

    2010 has witnessed many public consultations around the world concerning Net neutrality. A second legislative phase that may follow, could involve various structural changes in the Internet. The status that the Internet access has in Europe as a universal service evolves as the level of quality of service (QoS) to be offered improves. If guarantees on QoS are to be imposed, as requested by several economic actors, it would require introducing new indicators of quality of services, as well as regulation legislation and monitoring of the offered levels of QoS. This tendency in Europe may change the nature of the Internet from a best effort network to, perhaps, a more expensive one, that offers guaranteed performance. This paper presents an overview of the above issues as well as an overview of recent research on net-neutrality, with an emphasis on game theoretical approaches.

  3. Quasi-neutral theory of epidemic outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar A Pinto

    Full Text Available Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for "accidental pathogens" which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way.

  4. A new approach to entangling neutral atoms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deutsch, Ivan H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Biedermann, Grant W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed a new approach to entangling neutral atoms with a Rydberg-dressed interaction. Entangling neutral atoms is an essential key of quantum technologies such as quantum computation, many-body quantum simulation, and high-precision atomic sensors . The demonstrated Rydberg-dressed protocol involves adiabatically imposing a light shift on the ground state by coupling an excited Rydberg state with a tuned laser field. Using this technique, we have demonstrated a strong and tunable dipole - dipole interaction between two individually trapped atoms with energy shifts of order 1 MHz, which has been challenging to achieve in other protocols . During this program, we experimentally demonstrated Bell-state entanglement and the isomorphism to the Jaynes - Cumming model of a Rydberg-dressed two-atom system. Our theoretical calculations of a CPHASE quantum logic gate and arbitrary Dicke state quantum control in this system encourage further work.

  5. Neutral Heavy Leptons and Electroweak Baryogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Hernández, Pilar

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the possibility that baryogenesis occurs during the weak phase transition in a minimal extension of the Standard Model which contains extra neutral leptons and conserves total lepton number. The necessary CP-violating phases appear in the leptonic Yukawa couplings. We compute the CP-asymmetries in both the neutral and the charged lepton fluxes reflected on the bubble wall. Using present experimental bounds on the mixing angles and Standard Model estimates for the parameters related to the scalar potential, we conclude that it seems unlikely to produce the observed baryon to entropy ratio within this type of models. We comment on the possibility that the constraints on the mixings might be naturally relaxed due to small finite temperature effects.

  6. Quasi-Neutral Theory of Epidemic Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Oscar A.; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Some epidemics have been empirically observed to exhibit outbreaks of all possible sizes, i.e., to be scale-free or scale-invariant. Different explanations for this finding have been put forward; among them there is a model for “accidental pathogens” which leads to power-law distributed outbreaks without apparent need of parameter fine tuning. This model has been claimed to be related to self-organized criticality, and its critical properties have been conjectured to be related to directed percolation. Instead, we show that this is a (quasi) neutral model, analogous to those used in Population Genetics and Ecology, with the same critical behavior as the voter-model, i.e. the theory of accidental pathogens is a (quasi)-neutral theory. This analogy allows us to explain all the system phenomenology, including generic scale invariance and the associated scaling exponents, in a parsimonious and simple way. PMID:21760930

  7. Sorption of the organic cation metoprolol on silica gel from its aqueous solution considering the competition of inorganic cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Susann; Schaffer, Mario; Börnick, Hilmar; Licha, Tobias; Worch, Eckhard

    2014-05-01

    Systematic batch experiments with the organic monovalent cation metoprolol as sorbate and the synthetic material silica gel as sorbent were conducted with the aim of characterizing the sorption of organic cations onto charged surfaces. Sorption isotherms for metoprolol (>99% protonated in the tested pH of around 6) in competition with mono- and divalent inorganic cations (Na(+), NH4(+), Ca(2+), and Mg(2+)) were determined in order to assess their influence on cation exchange processes and to identify the role of further sorptive interactions. The obtained sorption isotherms could be described well by an exponential function (Freundlich isotherm model) with consistent exponents (about 0.8). In general, a decreasing sorption of metoprolol with increasing concentrations in inorganic cations was observed. Competing ions of the same valence showed similar effects. A significant sorption affinity of metoprolol with ion type dependent Freundlich coefficients KF,0.77 between 234.42 and 426.58 (L/kg)(0.77) could still be observed even at very high concentrations of competing inorganic cations. Additional column experiments confirm this behavior, which suggests the existence of further relevant interactions beside cation exchange. In subsequent batch experiments, the influence of mixtures with more than one competing ion and the effect of a reduced negative surface charge at a pH below the point of zero charge (pHPZC ≈ 2.5) were also investigated. Finally, the study demonstrates that cation exchange is the most relevant but not the sole mechanism for the sorption of metoprolol on silica gel.

  8. Does the cation really matter? The effect of modifying an ionic liquid cation on an SN2 process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Eden E L; Yau, Hon Man; Hawker, Rebecca R; Croft, Anna K; Harper, Jason B

    2013-09-28

    The rate of reaction of a Menschutkin process in a range of ionic liquids with different cations was investigated, with temperature-dependent kinetic data giving access to activation parameters for the process in each solvent. These data, along with molecular dynamics simulations, demonstrate the importance of accessibility of the charged centre on the cation and that the key interactions are of a generalised electrostatic nature.

  9. Deterministic nanoassembly: Neutral or plasma route?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Keidar, M.; Xu, S.

    2006-07-01

    It is shown that, owing to selective delivery of ionic and neutral building blocks directly from the ionized gas phase and via surface migration, plasma environments offer a better deal of deterministic synthesis of ordered nanoassemblies compared to thermal chemical vapor deposition. The results of hybrid Monte Carlo (gas phase) and adatom self-organization (surface) simulation suggest that higher aspect ratios and better size and pattern uniformity of carbon nanotip microemitters can be achieved via the plasma route.

  10. Using Neutral Network in Predicting Corporate Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Huong G. Nguyen

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the predictive power of three neutral network models: Multi-layer neural network, probabilistic neural network, and logistic regression model in predicting corporate failure. Basing on the database provided by The Corporate Scorecard Group (CSG), we combine financial ratios which deem to be significant predictors of corporate bankruptcy in many previous empirical studies to build our predictive models and test it against the holdout sample. On comparison of the results...

  11. Neutralizing antibodies to Haemophilus ducreyi cytotoxin.

    OpenAIRE

    Lagergård, T; Purvén, M

    1993-01-01

    Neutralizing antibodies against cytotoxin produced by Haemophilus ducreyi bacteria were studied in rabbits by an assay employing HEp-2 cells and diluted crude cytotoxin preparations from the organism. Antisera to 12 different H. ducreyi strains were prepared by immunization of rabbits with bacterial sonicates combined with Freund's adjuvant. The antibody response during infection with H. ducreyi was studied in two groups of rabbits which were infected with five live strains by either single o...

  12. Molecular clock in neutral protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilke Claus O

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A frequent observation in molecular evolution is that amino-acid substitution rates show an index of dispersion (that is, ratio of variance to mean substantially larger than one. This observation has been termed the overdispersed molecular clock. On the basis of in silico protein-evolution experiments, Bastolla and coworkers recently proposed an explanation for this observation: Proteins drift in neutral space, and can temporarily get trapped in regions of substantially reduced neutrality. In these regions, substitution rates are suppressed, which results in an overall substitution process that is not Poissonian. However, the simulation method of Bastolla et al. is representative only for cases in which the product of mutation rate μ and population size Ne is small. How the substitution process behaves when μNe is large is not known. Results Here, I study the behavior of the molecular clock in in silico protein evolution as a function of mutation rate and population size. I find that the index of dispersion decays with increasing μNe, and approaches 1 for large μNe . This observation can be explained with the selective pressure for mutational robustness, which is effective when μNe is large. This pressure keeps the population out of low-neutrality traps, and thus steadies the ticking of the molecular clock. Conclusions The molecular clock in neutral protein evolution can fall into two distinct regimes, a strongly overdispersed one for small μNe, and a mostly Poissonian one for large μNe. The former is relevant for the majority of organisms in the plant and animal kingdom, and the latter may be relevant for RNA viruses.

  13. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  14. Neutral Color Semitransparent Microstructured Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eperon, Giles E.

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Neutralization of H- at Nanostructured Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreshkov, Boyan; Thumm, Uwe

    2006-05-01

    The charge transfer rates and the neutralization probabilities for hydrogen anions colliding with nanostructured (vicinal) surfaces are obtained by direct numerical integration of the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for the motion of the active electron in the field of the projectile-surface compound. The electronic structure of the surface is calculated from a Thomas-Fermi - von Weizsaecker statistical model with local density approximation for the exchange-correlation energy. In fixed-ion approximation, the decay rate of the electronic state of the anion in front of the surface is obtained by projecting the density of states of the collision system onto the unperturbed projectile level. The ion neutralization probability is calculated from this static width within a rate equation approach for a set of broken-straight-line collision trajectories for kinetic energies of 1 keV. The dependence of decay rates and neutralization probabilities on the surface morphology and the scattering trajectories, and a comparison of our numerical results with the experiments will be discussed.

  16. The Low Energy Neutral Imager (LENI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westlake, J. H.; Mitchell, D. G.; Clark, G. B.; Brandt, P. C.; Hoffer, E.

    2016-12-01

    To achieve breakthroughs in the areas of heliospheric and magnetospheric energetic neutral atom (ENA) imaging a new class of instruments is required. We present a high angular resolution ENA imager concept aimed at the suprathermal plasma populations with energies between 0.5 and 20 keV. This instrument is intended for high-spatial resolution ENA imaging of suprathermal plasmas. This technique could be used to understand the spatial and temporal structure of the heliospheric boundary recently revealed by Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) instrumentation and the Cassini Ion and Neutral Camera (INCA). The instrument is also well suited to characterize magnetospheric ENA emissions from low-altitude ENAs produced by precipitation of magnetospheric ions into the terrestrial upper atmosphere, or from energetic tails of ion outflow, or from the magnetosheath where solar wind protons are neutralized by charge exchange, or from the ring-current region. We present a new technique utilizing ultra-thin carbon foils, 2D collimation using a curved microchannel plate, and a novel electron optical design to produce high-angular resolution (≤2°) and high-sensitivity (≥ 10-3 cm2 sr/pixel) ENA imaging in the 0.5-20 keV energy range.

  17. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, John; Nitz, D.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the rare earth species, the spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are some of the most complex. Like other rare earth species, Ce has many lines in the visible which are suitable for elemental abundance studies. Recent work on Ce II transition probabilities [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I for future studies using such lines from astrophysical sources. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2500 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442 and NSF Grant CTS0613277. [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  18. A focus reduction neutralization assay for hepatitis C virus neutralizing antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wychowski Czeslaw

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aim The role of humoral immunity in hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is poorly understood. Nevertheless, there is increasing interest in characterizing the neutralizing antibodies in the serum of HCV-infected patients. Focus reduction assays have been widely used to evaluate neutralizing antibody responses against a range of non-cytopathic viruses. Based on the recent development of a HCV cell culture system using the genotype 2 JFH-1-strain, we developed a focus reduction assay for HCV-neutralizing antibodies. Methods The focus reduction assay was based on a standard microneutralization assay in which immunostained foci on tissue culture plates are counted. The neutralizing anti-HCV antibodies titers of purified serum immunoglobulin samples from seventy-seven individuals were determined using a 50% focus reduction neutralization assay. Each titer was determined as the log value of the reciprocal antibody dilution that reduced the number of viral foci by 50%. IgG antibodies were first purified from each serum in order to avoid the facilitating effect of HDL on HCV entry. Results The assay's cut-off using an ELISA and RNA HCV-negative samples was found to be 1.25 log, corresponding to a dilution of 1:18. The assay was compared with a commercial HCV ELISA and exhibited specificity and sensitivity values of 100% and 96.5%, respectively, and good reproducibility (with intra-assay and inter-assay coefficients of variation of 6.7% and 12.6%, respectively. The assay did not show any cross-reactivity with anti-HIV, anti-HBs or heterophile antibody-positive samples. The neutralizing antibodies titers were 2.13 log (1:134 for homologous samples from HCV genotype 2 infected patients harboring the same genotype as JFH-1 and 1.93 log (1:85 for heterologous samples from patients infected by genotypes other than type 2. These results confirm the presence of broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies already reported using the HCV pseudoparticles

  19. Cation Uptake and Allocation by Red Pine Seedlings under Cation-Nutrient Stress in a Column Growth Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhenqing; Balogh-Brunstad, Zsuzsanna; Grant, Michael R.; Harsh, James B.; Gill, Richard; Thomashow, Linda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stacks, Daryl; Letourneau, Melissa; Keller, Chester K.

    2014-01-10

    Background and Aims Plant nutrient uptake is affected by environmental stress, but how plants respond to cation-nutrient stress is poorly understood. We assessed the impact of varying degrees of cation-nutrient limitation on cation uptake in an experimental plant-mineral system. Methods Column experiments, with red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) seedlings growing in sand/mineral mixtures, were conducted for up to nine months under a range of Ca- and K-limited conditions. The Ca and K were supplied from both minerals and nutrient solutions with varying Ca and K concentrations. Results Cation nutrient stress had little impact on carbon allocation after nine months of plant growth and K was the limiting nutrient for biomass production. The Ca/Sr and K/Rb ratio results allowed independent estimation of dissolution incongruency and discrimination against Sr and Rb during cation uptake processes. The fraction of K in biomass from biotite increased with decreasing K supply from nutrient solutions. The mineral anorthite was consistently the major source of Ca, regardless of nutrient treatment. Conclusions Red pine seedlings exploited more mineral K in response to more severe K deficiency. This did not occur for Ca. Plant discrimination factors must be carefully considered to accurately identify nutrient sources using cation tracers.

  20. Lack of association between a cationic protein and a cationic fluorosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macakova, Lubica; Nordstierna, Lars; Karlsson, Göran; Blomberg, Eva; Furó, István

    2007-01-16

    Surface tension, 19F and 1H NMR spectroscopy, and cryotransmission electron microscopy are used to characterize the state of association in aqueous solutions of a fluorosurfactant CF3(CF2)nSO2NH(CH2)3-4N(CH3)3+ I- (n = 8, 6) with and without lysozyme added. In the absence of lysozyme, we find monomers, small aggregates, and large vesicles to coexist, with the individual fluorosurfactant molecules exchanging slowly (>1 ms) among those states. When both lysozyme and fluorosurfactant are present in the solution, they have no measurable influence on the physical state of the other. In contrast, a hydrogenated cationic surfactant with the same headgroup, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, is shown to associate to lysozyme.

  1. Cation selectivity by the CorA Mg2+ channel requires a fully hydrated cation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moomaw, Andrea S; Maguire, Michael E

    2010-07-27

    The CorA Mg(2+) channel is the primary uptake system in about half of all bacteria and archaea. However, the basis for its Mg(2+) selectivity is unknown. Previous data suggested that CorA binds a fully hydrated Mg(2+) ion, unlike other ion channels. The crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CorA shows a homopentamer with two transmembrane segments per monomer connected by a short periplasmic loop. This highly conserved loop, (281)EFMPELKWS(289) in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium CorA, is the only portion of the channel outside of the cell, suggesting a role in cation selectivity. Mutation of charged residues in the loop, E281 and K287, to any of several amino acids had little effect, demonstrating that despite conservation electrostatic interactions with these residues are not essential. While mutation of the universally conserved E285 gave a minimally functional channel, E285A and E285K mutants were the most functional, again indicating that the negative charge at this position is not a determining factor. Several mutations at K287 and W288 behaved anomalously in a transport assay. Analysis indicated that mutation of K287 and W288 disrupts cooperative interactions between distinct Mg(2+) binding sites. Overall, these results are not compatible with electrostatic interaction of the Mg(2+) ion with the periplasmic loop. Instead, the loop appears to form an initial binding site for hydrated Mg(2+), not for the dehydrated cation. The loop residues may function to accelerate dehydration of the before entry of Mg(2+) into the pore of the channel.

  2. Dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppae, J.

    2012-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles have various climate effects and adverse health effects, which both depend on the size and number concentration of the particles. Freshly-formed particles are not large enough to impact neither health nor climate and they are most susceptible to removal by collisions with larger pre-existing particles. Consequently, the knowledge of both the formation and the growth rate of particles are crucially important when assessing the health and climate effects of atmospheric new particle formation. The purpose of this thesis is to increase our knowledge of the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles with a specific interest towards the particle growth rate and processes affecting the aerosol charging state. A new model, Ion-UHMA, which simulates the dynamics of neutral and charged particles, was developed for this purpose. Simple analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the growth rate due to various processes were derived and used to study the effects of charged particles on the growth rate. It was found that the growth rate of a freshly-formed particle population due to condensation and coagulation could be significantly increased when a considerable fraction of the particles are charged. Finally, recent data-analysis methods that have been applied to the aerosol charging states obtained from the measurements were modified for a charge asymmetric framework. The methods were then tested on data obtained from aerosol dynamics simulations. The methods were found to be able to provide reasonable estimates on the growth rate and proportion of particles formed via ion-induced nucleation, provided that the growth rate is high enough and that the charged particles do not grow much more rapidly than the neutral ones. A simple procedure for estimating whether the methods are suitable for analysing data obtained in specific conditions was provided. In this thesis, the dynamics of neutral and charged aerosol particles were studied in

  3. Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 111 Ground Levels and Ionization Energies for the Neutral Atoms (Web, free access)   Data for ground state electron configurations and ionization energies for the neutral atoms (Z = 1-104) including references.

  4. Asymptotical Properties for Parabolic Systems of Neutral Type

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CUI Bao-tong; HAN Mao-an

    2005-01-01

    Asymptotical properties for the solutions of neutral parabolic systems with Robin boundary conditions were analyzed by using the inequality analysis. The oscillations problems for the neutral parabolic systems were considered and some oscillation criteria for the systems were established.

  5. High-performance cation-exchange chromatofocusing of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Xuezhen; Frey, Douglas D

    2003-03-28

    Chromatofocusing using high-performance cation-exchange column packings, as opposed to the more commonly used anion-exchange column packings, is investigated with regard to the performance achieved and the range of applications possible. Linear or convex gradients in the range from pH 2.6 to 9 were formed using a variety of commercially available column packings that provide a buffering capacity in different pH ranges, and either polyampholytes or simple mixtures having a small number (three or fewer) of buffering species as the elution buffer. The resolutions achieved using cation-exchange or anion-exchange chromatofocusing were in general comparable, although for certain pairs of proteins better resolution could be achieved using one type of packing as compared to the other, evidently due to the way electrostatic charges are distributed on the protein surface. Several chromatofocusing methods were investigated that take advantage of the acid-base properties of commercially available cation-exchange column packings. These include the use of gradients with a composite shape, the use of very low pH ranges, and the use of elution buffers containing a single buffering species. The advantages of chromatofocusing over ion-exchange chromatography using a salt gradient at constant pH were illustrated by employing the former method and a cation-exchange column packing to separate beta-lactoglobulins A and B, which is a separation reported to be impossible using the latter method and a cation-exchange column packing. Trends in the apparent isoelectric points determined using cation- and anion-exchange chromatofocusing were interpreted using applicable theories. Results of this study indicate that cation-exchange chromatofocusing is a useful technique which is complementary to anion-exchange chromatofocusing and isoelectric focusing for separating proteins at both the analytical and preparative scales.

  6. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Published in 2001, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography (UNTB) emphasizes the importance of stochastic processes in ecological community structure, and has challenged the traditional niche-based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species abundance distribution (SAD). Here, we synthesize the large body of work on neutral theory in the context of the species abundance distribution, with a particular focus on integrating ideas from neutral theory with traditional niche theory. First, we summarize the basic tenets of neutral theory; both in general and in the context of SADs. Second, we explore the issues associated with neutral theory and the SAD, such as complications with fitting and model comparison, the underlying assumptions of neutral models, and the difficultly of linking pattern to process. Third, we highlight the advances in understanding of SADs that have resulted from neutral theory and models. Finally, we focus consideration on recent developments aimed at unifying neutral- and niche-based approaches to ecology, with a particular emphasis on what this means for SAD theory, embracing, for instance, ideas of emergent neutrality and stochastic niche theory. We put forward the argument that the prospect of the unification of niche and neutral perspectives represents one of the most promising future avenues of neutral theory research.

  7. Modelling the neutralisation process in neutral beam injectors

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Niall J.

    2009-01-01

    High power neutral beams currently play an important role in heating, fuelling and diagnosing magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas. At the Joint European Torus (JET) in Oxfordshire, England, the formation of such a beam involves passing a positive ion beam through a neutral gas target wherein beam electron-capture collisions result in a neutral beam component. The subsequent beam injection into the fusion plasma requires the sole use of this neutral component, since the charged ...

  8. Single neutral pion production by charged-current $\\bar{\

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Bercellie, A; Bodek, A; Bravar, A; Brooks, W K; Butkevich, A; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Carneiro, M F; Christy, M E; Chvojka, J; da Motta, H; Devan, J; Dytman, S A; Díaz, G A; Eberly, B; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kordosky, M; Le, T; Maher, E; Manly, S; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Miller, J; Morfín, J G; Mousseau, J; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Osta, J; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Rakotondravohitra, L; Ramirez, M A; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Schmitz, D W; Sobczyk, J T; Salinas, C J Solano; Tagg, N; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Yepes-Ramirez, H; Zavala, G; Zhang, D; Ziemer, B P

    2015-01-01

    Single neutral pion production via muon antineutrino charged-current interactions in plastic scintillator (CH) is studied using the \\minerva detector exposed to the NuMI low-energy, wideband antineutrino beam at Fermilab. Measurement of this process constrains models of neutral pion production in nuclei, which is important because the neutral-current analog is a background for $\\bar{\

  9. 46 CFR 183.376 - Grounded distribution systems (neutral grounded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... propulsion, power, lighting, or distribution system having a neutral bus or conductor must have the neutral..., circuit breaker, or fuse in the neutral conductor of the bus-tie feeder connecting the emergency... that aluminum grounding conductors must not be used....

  10. Antibody function in neutralization and protection against HIV-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hessell, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to induce neutralizing antibodies is generally thought to be of great importance for vaccine efficacy. In HIV-1 research this quality has been elusive as the HIV-1 virus has evolved multiple mechanisms to evade neutralizing antibodies. This thesis traces studies with four broadly neutral

  11. Influence of Neutralization Attitude in Academic Dishonesty among Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chan Ling; Othman, Jamilah; D'Silva, Jeffrey Lawrence; Omar, Zoharah

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature had proposed that individuals tend to use neutralization to motivate their decisions to engage in deviant behaviours. This indicated that even though students have strong motivations not to cheat may do so anyway after employing neutralizing strategies. Hence, this study attempted to examine the role of neutralization in…

  12. 29 CFR 1207.3 - Compensation of neutrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Compensation of neutrals. 1207.3 Section 1207.3 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) NATIONAL MEDIATION BOARD ESTABLISHMENT OF SPECIAL ADJUSTMENT BOARDS § 1207.3 Compensation of neutrals. (a) Neutrals appointed by the National Mediation Board. All...

  13. Cyclen-based cationic lipids for highly efficient gene delivery towards tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Dong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene therapy has tremendous potential for both inherited and acquired diseases. However, delivery problems limited their clinical application, and new gene delivery vehicles with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency are greatly required. METHODS: In this report, we designed and synthesized three amphiphilic molecules (L1-L3 with the structures involving 1, 4, 7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen, imidazolium and a hydrophobic dodecyl chain. Their interactions with plasmid DNA were studied via electrophoretic gel retardation assays, fluorescent quenching experiments, dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. The in vitro gene transfection assay and cytotoxicity assay were conducted in four cell lines. RESULTS: Results indicated that L1 and L3-formed liposomes could effectively bind to DNA to form well-shaped nanoparticles. Combining with neutral lipid DOPE, L3 was found with high efficiency in gene transfer in three tumor cell lines including A549, HepG2 and H460. The optimized gene transfection efficacy of L3 was nearly 5.5 times more efficient than that of the popular commercially available gene delivery agent Lipofectamine 2000™ in human lung carcinoma cells A549. In addition, since L1 and L3 had nearly no gene transfection performance in normal cells HEK293, these cationic lipids showed tumor cell-targeting property to a certain extent. No significant cytotoxicity was found for the lipoplexes formed by L1-L3, and their cytotoxicities were similar to or slightly lower than the lipoplexes prepared from Lipofectamine 2000™. CONCLUSION: Novel cyclen-based cationic lipids for effective in vitro gene transfection were founded, and these studies here may extend the application areas of macrocyclic polyamines, especially for cyclen.

  14. Neutral theory and the species abundance distribution: recent developments and prospects for unifying niche and neutral perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matthews, Thomas J; Whittaker, Robert J

    2014-01-01

    ...‐based view of ecology. While neutral models have since been applied to a broad range of ecological and macroecological phenomena, the majority of research relating to neutral theory has focused exclusively on the species...

  15. Independent Generation and Reactivity of Thymidine Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huabing; Taverna Porro, Marisa L; Greenberg, Marc M

    2017-10-10

    Thymidine radical cation (1) is produced by ionizing radiation and has been invoked as an intermediate in electron transfer in DNA. Previous studies on its structure and reactivity have utilized thymidine as a precursor, which limits quantitative product analysis because thymidine is readily reformed from 1. In this investigation, radical cation 1 is independently generated via β-heterolysis of a pyrimidine radical generated photochemically from an aryl sulfide. Thymidine is the major product (33%) from 1 at pH 7.2. Diastereomeric mixtures of thymidine glycol and the corresponding 5-hydroxperoxides resulting from water trapping of 1 are formed. Significantly lower yields of products such as 5-formyl-2'-deoxyuridine that are ascribable to deprotonation from the C5-methyl group of 1 are observed. Independent generation of the N3-methyl analogue of 1 (NMe-1) produces considerably higher yields of products derived from water trapping, and these products are formed in much higher yields than those attributable to the C5-methyl group deprotonation in NMe-1. N3-Methyl-thymidine is, however, the major product and is produced in as high as 70% yield when the radical cation is produced in the presence of excess thiol. The effects of exogenous reagents on product distributions are consistent with the formation of diffusively free radical cations (1, NMe-1). This method should be compatible with producing radical cations at defined positions within DNA.

  16. Ionization behavior of amino lipids for siRNA delivery: determination of ionization constants, SAR, and the impact of lipid pKa on cationic lipid-biomembrane interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingtao; Fan, Haihong; Levorse, Dorothy A; Crocker, Louis S

    2011-03-01

    Ionizable amino lipids are being pursued as an important class of materials for delivering small interfering RNA (siRNA) therapeutics, and research is being conducted to elucidate the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these lipids. The pK(a) of cationic lipid headgroups is one of the critical physiochemical properties of interest due to the strong impact of lipid ionization on the assembly and performance of these lipids. This research focused on developing approaches that permit the rapid determination of the relevant pK(a) of the ionizable amino lipids. Two distinct approaches were investigated: (1) potentiometric titration of amino lipids dissolved in neutral surfactant micelles; and (2) pH-dependent partitioning of a fluorescent dye to cationic liposomes formulated from amino lipids. Using the approaches developed here, the pK(a) values of cationic lipids with distinct headgroups were measured and found to be significantly lower than calculated values. It was also found that lipid-lipid interaction has a strong impact on the pK(a) values of lipids. Lysis of model biomembranes by cationic lipids was used to evaluate the impact of lipid pK(a) on the interaction between cationic lipids and cell membranes. It was found that cationic lipid-biomembrane interaction depends strongly on lipid pK(a) and solution pH, and this interaction is much stronger when amino lipids are highly charged. The presence of an optimal pK(a) range of ionizable amino lipids for siRNA delivery was suggested based on these results. The pK(a) methods reported here can be used to support the SAR screen of cationic lipids for siRNA delivery, and the information revealed through studying the impact of pK(a) on the interaction between cationic lipids and cell membranes will contribute significantly to the design of more efficient siRNA delivery vehicles.

  17. Raman and IR studies and DFT calculations of the vibrational spectra of 2,4-Dithiouracil and its cation and anion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Yadav, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    Raman and FTIR spectra of solid 2,4-Dithiouracil (DTU) at room temperature have been recorded. DFT calculations were carried out to compute the optimized molecular geometries, GAPT charges and fundamental vibrational frequencies along with their corresponding IR intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios of the Raman bands for the neutral DTU molecule and its cation (DTU+) and anion (DTU-) using the Gaussian-03 software. Addition of one electron leads to increase in the atomic charges on the sites N1 and N3 and decrease in the atomic charges on the sites S8 and S10. Due to ionization of DTU molecule, the charge at the site C6 decreases in the cationic and anionic radicals of DTU as compared to its neutral species. As a result of anionic radicalization, the C5sbnd C6 bond length increases and loses its double bond character while the C4sbnd C5 bond length decreases. In the case of the DTU+ ion the IR and Raman band corresponding to the out-of-phase coupled Nsbnd H stretching mode is strongest amongst the three species. The anionic DTU radical is found to be the most stable. The two NH out-of-plane bending modes are found to originate due to out-of-phase and in-phase coupling of the two NH bonds in the anion and cation contrary to the case of the neutral DTU molecule in which the out-of-plane bending motions of the two NH bonds are not coupled.

  18. Hydration of cations: a key to understanding of specific cation effects on aggregation behaviors of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutter, Jacob C; Wu, Tsung-yu; Zhang, Yanjie

    2013-09-05

    This work reports results from the interactions of a series of monovalent and divalent cations with a triblock copolymer, poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO). Phase transition temperatures of the polymer in the presence of chloride salts with six monovalent and eight divalent cations were measured using an automated melting point apparatus. The polymer undergoes a two-step phase transition, consisting of micellization of the polymer followed by aggregation of the micelles, in the presence of all the salts studied herein. The results suggest that hydration of cations plays a key role in determining the interactions between the cations and the polymer. The modulation of the phase transition temperature of the polymer by cations can be explained as a balance between three interactions: direct binding of cations to the oxygen in the polymer chains, cations sharing one water molecule with the polymer in their hydration layer, and cations interacting with the polymer via two water molecules. Monovalent cations Na(+), K(+), Rb(+), and Cs(+) do not bind to the polymer, while Li(+) and NH4(+) and all the divalent cations investigated including Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), and Cd(2+) bind to the polymer. The effects of the cations correlate well with their hydration thermodynamic properties. Mechanisms for cation-polymer interactions are discussed.

  19. Universal threshold law for ion-neutral-neutral three-body recombination

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ríos, Jesús

    2015-01-01

    A very recently method for classical trajectory calculations for three-body collision [J. P\\'{e}rez-R\\'{i}os, S. Ragole, J. Wang and C. H. Greene, J. Chem. Phys. {\\bf 140}, 044307 (2014)] has been applied to describe ion-neutral-neutral ternary processes for low energy collisions: 0.1 mK - 10 mK. As a result, a threshold law for the three-body recombination cross section is obtained and corroborated both, experimentally and numerically. The derived threshold law predicts the formation of weakly bound dimers, with binding energies comparable to the collision energy of the collisional partners. In this low energy range, this analysis predicts that molecular ions should dominate over molecular neutrals as the most products formed.

  20. CO2-neutral cities. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg [Netherlands]; CO2-neutrale steden. Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard, Tilburg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roos, J.; Braber, K.; Voskuilen, Th.; Manders, H.; Rovers, V.

    2007-11-16

    The three Dutch cities of Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard and Tilburg asked BuildDesk to undertake a survey of the options for realizing a CO2 neutral energy supply in their cities. In principle, this entails direct energy consumption for living, working (incl. industry) and mobility. With the developed 'Road maps towards CO2 neutral' each city holds their own guideline with which they can suit the action to the word. [mk]. [Dutch] De drie steden Apeldoorn, Heerhugowaard en Tilburg hebben BuildDesk de opdracht gegeven een verkenning uit te voeren naar de mogelijkheid om een CO2-neutrale energievoorziening in hun stad te realiseren. Daarbij gaat het in principe om het directe energiegebruik voor wonen, werken (incl. industrie) en mobiliteit. Met de ontwikkelde 'Roadmaps naar CO2-neutraal' heeft elke stad een eigen richtsnoer in handen waarmee ze actief de daad bij het woord kan voegen.

  1. Exploring potential Pluto-generated neutral tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Howard T.; Hill, Matthew; KollMann, Peter; McHutt, Ralph

    2015-11-01

    The NASA New Horizons mission to Pluto is providing unprecedented insight into this mysterious outer solar system body. Escaping molecular nitrogen is of particular interest and possibly analogous to similar features observed at moons of Saturn and Jupiter. Such escaping N2 has the potential of creating molecular nitrogen and N (as a result of molecular dissociation) tori or partial toroidal extended particle distributions. The presence of these features would present the first confirmation of an extended toroidal neutral feature on a planetary scale in our solar system. While escape velocities are anticipated to be lower than those at Enceladus, Io or even Europa, particle lifetimes are much longer in Pluto’s orbit because as a result of much weaker solar interaction processes along Pluto’s orbit (on the order of tens of years). Thus, with a ~248 year orbit, Pluto may in fact be generating an extended toroidal feature along it orbit.For this work, we modify and apply our 3-D Monte Carlo neutral torus model (previously used at Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury) to study/analyze the theoretical possibility and scope of potential Pluto-generated neutral tori. Our model injects weighted particles and tracks their trajectories under the influence of all gravitational fields with interactions with other particles, solar photons and Pluto collisions. We present anticipated N2 and N tori based on current estimates of source characterization and environmental conditions. We also present an analysis of sensitivity to assumed initial conditions. Such results can provide insight into the Pluto system as well as valuable interpretation of New Horizon’s observational data.

  2. Synthetic gauge potentials for ultracold neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ju; Spielman, I. B.

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic gauge fields for ultracold neutral atoms—engineered using the interaction between laser fields and the atoms’ internal ‘spin’ degrees of freedom—provide promising techniques for generating the large (synthetic) magnetic fields required to reach the fractional quantum Hall (FQH) limit in quantum gases, bosonic or fermionic alike. Because neutral atoms can move in a nearly disorder-free environment and they have extremely simple contact interactions, the resulting FQH states would be revealed in their most essential form. Moreover, bosonic FQH states represent a new frontier and have never been seen in any setting. Going beyond electromagnetism's conventional scalar gauge field, it is possible to create more general non-Abelian gauge potentials. When these are spatially uniform, they are equivalent to spin-orbit coupling familiar in material systems, and can lead to cold atom analogs of topological insulators and topological superconductors. In this tutorial, we introduce basic concepts underlying these gauge fields, making connections to the Aharonov-Bohm phase and geometric phase. We focus on the system of neutral atoms ‘dressed’ by multiple laser beams, where the eigenstates of the resulting Hamiltonian are known as dressed states. Synthetic gauge potentials arise from the unitary transformation required to express these dressed states in terms of the laser-free eigenstates. We discuss stability of laser-dressed atoms corresponding to the adiabatic condition and the probability of non-adiabatic transitions. Adopting both the semiclassical and quantum mechanical approaches, we demonstrate they agree in the suitable limit. We also analyze using both the conventional adiabatic picture and exact picture, where the kinetic energy is neglected in the former and retained in the latter picture.

  3. Change of pH during excess sludge fermentation under alkaline, acidic and neutral conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Peng, Yongzhen; Liu, Ye; Jin, Baodan; Wang, Bo; Wang, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    The change in pH during excess sludge (ES) fermentation of varying sludge concentrations was investigated in a series of reactors at alkaline, acidic, and neutral pHs. The results showed that the changes were significantly affected by fermentative conditions. Under different conditions, pH exhibited changing profiles. When ES was fermented under alkaline conditions, pH decreased in a range of (10±1). At the beginning of alkaline fermentation, pH dropped significantly, at intervals of 4h, 4h, and 5h with sludge concentrations of 8665.6mg/L, 6498.8mg/L, and 4332.5mg/L, then it would become moderate. However, under acidic conditions, pH increased from 4 to 5. Finally, under neutral conditions pH exhibited a decrease then an increase throughout entire fermentation process. Further study showed short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), ammonia nitrogen and cations contributed to pH change under various fermentation conditions. This study presents a novel strategy based on pH change to predict whether SCFAs reach their stable stage.

  4. THE EFFECT OF OFFSET PRINTING INK ON LASER TONER INK AGGLOMERATION UNDER NEUTRAL PULPING CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Xie,

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available 1-octadecanol is known to be a highly effective agglomerating agent for laser toner ink. However, the office waste paper used in the actual production often contains various types of inks. The effect of the offset ink and types of surfactants with different charge characteristics were studied relative to the agglomeration of the laser toner ink under neutral pulping conditions. It was found that the addition of a small amount of the offset ink printed waste paper was beneficial for the agglomeration of the laser toner ink. The optimal percentage of addition is 12.5% to 25%. The offset printed ink had a positive charge of 0.001±0.0005 mEq/g when the offset ink was treated by 70˚C water at neutral conditions. Addition of a proper amount of cationic surfactant was beneficial to improve the agglomeration at any ratio of the mixed laser printed and offset waste papers. When the percentage of offset waste paper was less than 50%, the addition of anionic surfactant and nonionic surfactant was harmful for agglomeration, and there was no significant effect at higher offset content.

  5. Laser Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy of Neutral and Ionized Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Cosmic Simulation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejaoui, Salma; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar; Sciamma O'Brien, Ella; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules are considered the best carriers to account for the ubiquitous infrared emission bands. PAHs have also been proposed as candidates to explain the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), a series of absorption features seen on the interstellar extinction curve and are plausible carriers for the extended red emission (ERE), a photoluminescent process associated with a wide variety of interstellar environments. Extensive efforts have been devoted over the past two decades to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAH molecules and ions in space. Absorption spectra of PAH molecules and ions trapped in solid matrices have been compared to the DIBs. Absorption spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have also been measured under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. The purpose of this study is to provide a new dimension to the existing spectroscopic database of neutral and single ionized PAHs that is largely based on absorption spectra by adding emission spectroscopy data. The measurements are based on the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique and are performed with the Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) of the COSmIC laboratory facility at NASA Ames laboratory. The PDN generates a plasma in a free supersonic jet expansion to simulate the physical and the chemical conditions in interstellar environments. We focus, here, on the fluorescence spectra of large neutral PAHs and their cations where there is a lack of fluorescence spectroscopy data. The astronomical implications of the data (e.g., ERE) are examined.

  6. Evidence of neutral radical induced analyte ion transformations in APPI and near-VUV APLI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Hendrik; Funcke, Valerie; Lorenz, Matthias; Brockmann, Klaus J; Benter, Thorsten; O'Brien, Rob

    2009-10-01

    We report on the reactions of neutral radical species [OH, Cl, O(3P), H], generated in a typical atmospheric pressure ionization (API) source upon irradiation of the sample gases with either 193 nm laser radiation or 124 nm VUV light, the latter commonly used in atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI). The present investigations focus on the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pyrene as representative of the aromatic compound class. Experimental results are supported by computational methods: simple kinetic models are used to estimate the temporal evolution of the concentrations of reactants, intermediates, and final products, whereas density functional theory (DFT) energy calculations are carried out to further elucidate the proposed reaction pathways. The neutral radicals are generated upon photolysis of background water and oxygen always present in appreciable mixing ratios in typical API sources. Substantial amounts of oxygenated analyte product ions are observed using both techniques. In contrast, upon atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) with 248 nm radiation, oxygenated products are virtually absent. In addition, kinetic data evaluation yielded a bimolecular rate constant of k = (1.9 +/- 0.9) x 10(-9) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1) for the reaction of the pyrene radical cation with OH radicals.

  7. Molecular clips and tweezers hosting neutral guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardouin-Lerouge, Marie; Hudhomme, Piétrick; Sallé, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Intense current interest in supramolecular chemistry is devoted to the construction of molecular assemblies displaying controlled molecular motion associated to recognition. On this ground, molecular clips and tweezers have focused an increasing attention. This tutorial review points out the recent advances in the construction of always more sophisticated molecular clips and tweezers, illustrating their remarkably broad structural variety and focusing on their binding ability towards neutral guests. A particular attention is brought to recent findings in dynamic molecular tweezers whose recognition ability can be regulated by external stimuli. Porphyrin-based systems will not be covered here as this very active field has been recently reviewed.

  8. Neutral zone and oral submucous fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaista Afroz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral submucous fibrosis is a premalignant condition in which rigidity of the lip, tongue, and palate results in reduced mouth opening and tongue movement. Limited mouth opening, mucosal rigidity, and reduced salivary flow makes prosthodontic procedures difficult in these patients and affects the stability, retention, and the support of removable prostheses. The burning sensation in the mouth that these patients experience reduces the tolerance to prostheses. We report a case of oral submucous fibrosis where the conventional neutral zone technique with certain modifications was utilized to rehabilitate a completely edentulous patient with this condition.

  9. Scientists Explain Catalysis Neutralizing Car's Tail Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The neutralization of the car's tail gas is a problem of practical importance in the eyes of both experimental and theoretical physicists. Recently, a group of CAS scientists join hands with the Queen's University of Belfast in the UK to make advances in exploring the process of CO oxidation in a bid to reduce the air pollution caused by the car's exhaust gas. The work has been supported by the "National 973Program" and the CAS Foundation for Overseas Studies. On March 4,its result was published by the Internet edition of the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

  10. SPARQL Assist Language-Neutral Query Composer

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Luke; Wilkinson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    SPARQL query composition is difficult for the lay-person or even the experienced bioinformatician in cases where the data model is unfamiliar. Established best-practices and internationalization concerns dictate that semantic web ontologies should use terms with opaque identifiers, further complicating the task. We present SPARQL Assist: a web application that addresses these issues by providing context-sensitive type-ahead completion to existing web forms. Ontological terms are suggested using their labels and descriptions, leveraging existing XML support for internationalization and language-neutrality.

  11. Threshold Neutral Pion Photoproduction on the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Blin, Astrid Hiller; Ledwig, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The neutral pion photoproduction on the proton near threshold has a very small scattering cross section when compared to the charged channels, which in ChPT is explained by strong cancellations between the lowest order pieces. Therefore it is very sensitive to higher-order corrections of chiral perturbation theory. We perform a fully covariant calculation up to chiral order p^3 and we investigate the effect of the inclusion of the Delta(1232) resonance as an explicit degree of freedom. We show that the convergence improves, leading to a much better agreement with data at a wide range of energies.

  12. ABOUT TAX NEUTRALITY AND NON-DISCRIMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Dan Morar

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxpayers are required to pay taxes to the state budget by virtue of their position subject to the state, the latter in its capacity as sovereign person of public law. This quality gives them the right to impose against taxpayers by administrative means known, or sometimes with justice, respecting a certain extent the principles and traditions specific to tax. Principles of neutrality and non-discrimination are relevant in terms of describing the relations between public authorities and taxpayers. Although taxpayers are divided into official and legal persons, in fact individuals are those who support the ultimate tax burden.

  13. Neutral wind results from TIMED Doppler interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killeen, T.; Gablehouse, R.; Gell, D.; Johnson, R.; Niciejewski, R.; Ortland, D.; Wu, Q.; Skinner, W.; Solomon, S.; Kafkalidis, J.

    2003-04-01

    Since the launch of the NASA Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite in December 2001, the TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI) has been collecting lower thermosphere and mesospheric data for over a year. After adjustments to the spectral sampling scheme and operational mode, the instrument has been optimized. Efforts have also been made to improve the instrument performance. Preliminary neutral winds from O2 (0-0) have been analyzed. Tidal features and their seasonal variation are shown clearly in the wind data, which are quantitatively consistent with model prediction. We will report our progress on these efforts.

  14. Targets for a Neutral Kaon Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, Christopher [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A secondary beam of neutral Kaons is under consideration for Hall D at Jefferson Lab to perform spectroscopic studies of hyperons produced by K 0 L particles scattering from proton and deuteron targets. The proposed physics program would utilize the GlueX detector package currently installed in Hall D. This contribution looks at potential targets for use in the new facility, paying close attention to the existing infrastructure of GlueX and Hall D. Unpolarized cryotargets of liquid hydrogen and deuerium, as well as polarized solid targets of protons and deuterons are examined.

  15. Framework for identification of neutral B mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a method for the study of CP-violating asymmetries in tagged states of neutral B mesons with arbitrary coherence properties. A set of time-dependent measurements is identified which completely specifies the density matrix of the initial state in a two-component space with basis vectors B0 and B¯ 0, and permits a determination of phases in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. For a given tagging configuration, the measurement of decays both to flavor eigenstates and to CP eigenstates provides the necessary information.

  16. Framework for Identification of Neutral B Mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Gronau, Michael; Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    1994-01-01

    We introduce a method for the study of CP-violating asymmetries in tagged states of neutral $B$ mesons with arbitrary coherence properties. A set of time-dependent measurements is identified which completely specifies the density matrix of the initial state in a two-component space with basis vectors $B^0$ and $\\overline B^0$, and permits a determination of phases in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. For a given tagging configuration, the measurement of decays both to flavor eigenstates and to CP eigenstates provides the necessary information.

  17. Large neutral amino acids in daily practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahring, Kirsten Kiær

    2010-01-01

    At the Kennedy Centre for Phenylketonuria, Denmark, large neutral amino acids (LNAAs) are being used to treat adult and adolescent patients who are nonadherent to dietary treatment for phenylketonuria (PKU). At the start of treatment, a patient must undergo dietary analysis and regular blood...... sampling to measure plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations. The aim of this analysis and treatment is that the patient receives 25-30% of the daily protein requirement from LNAA supplementation and the remaining 70-75% from natural, low-phenylalanine proteins (although some patients have difficulties...

  18. Toxic emissions and devaluated CO2-neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    with a climate policy whose goals of CO2-reduction were made operational by green-wash. Arguments are given for the devaluation of CO2- neutrality in case of burning wood. Alternative practices as storing C in high quality wood products and/or leaving wood in the forest are recommended. A counter......-productive effect of dioxin formation in the cooling phase of wood burning appliances has been registered akin to de-novo-synthesis in municipal solid waste incinerators. Researchers, regulators and the public are, however, still preoccupied by notions of oven design and operation parameters, assuming that dioxin...

  19. Neutral atomic carbon in dense molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Betz, A. L.; Boreiko, R. T.; Goldhaber, D. M.

    1988-01-01

    The 370 micron 3P2-3P1 fine-structure line of neutral carbon was detected in seven sources: OMC 1, NGC 2024, S140, W3, DR 21, M17, and W51. Simultaneous analysis of J = 2-1 data and available observations of the J = 1-0 line make it possible to deduce optical depths and excitation temperatures for these lines. These data indicate that both C I lines are likely to be optically thin, and that the ratio of C I to CO column densities in these clouds is typically about 0.1.

  20. Controllability Problem of Fractional Neutral Systems: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Babiarz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The following article presents recent results of controllability problem of dynamical systems in infinite-dimensional space. Generally speaking, we describe selected controllability problems of fractional order systems, including approximate controllability of fractional impulsive partial neutral integrodifferential inclusions with infinite delay in Hilbert spaces, controllability of nonlinear neutral fractional impulsive differential inclusions in Banach space, controllability for a class of fractional neutral integrodifferential equations with unbounded delay, controllability of neutral fractional functional equations with impulses and infinite delay, and controllability for a class of fractional order neutral evolution control systems.