WorldWideScience

Sample records for monoamine brain systems

  1. Exercise Benefits Brain Function: The Monoamine Connection

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Wei Lin; Yu-Min Kuo

    2013-01-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise on brain function have been demonstrated in animal models and in a growing number of clinical studies on humans. There are multiple mechanisms that account for the brain-enhancing effects of exercise, including neuroinflammation, vascularization, antioxidation, energy adaptation, and regulations on neurotrophic factors and neurotransmitters. Dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) are the three major monoamine neurotransmitters that are known...

  2. Imaging Monoamine Oxidase in the Human Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J. S.; Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G-J.; Logan, Jean

    1999-11-10

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies mapping monoamine oxidase in the human brain have been used to measure the turnover rate for MAO B; to determine the minimum effective dose of a new MAO inhibitor drug lazabemide and to document MAO inhibition by cigarette smoke. These studies illustrate the power of PET and radiotracer chemistry to measure normal biochemical processes and to provide information on the effect of drug exposure on specific molecular targets.

  3. The Use of Multiscale Molecular Simulations in Understanding a Relationship between the Structure and Function of Biological Systems of the Brain: The Application to Monoamine Oxidase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vianello, Robert; Domene, Carmen; Mavri, Janez

    2016-01-01

    HIGHLIGHTS Computational techniques provide accurate descriptions of the structure and dynamics of biological systems, contributing to their understanding at an atomic level.Classical MD simulations are a precious computational tool for the processes where no chemical reactions take place.QM calculations provide valuable information about the enzyme activity, being able to distinguish among several mechanistic pathways, provided a carefully selected cluster model of the enzyme is considered.Multiscale QM/MM simulation is the method of choice for the computational treatment of enzyme reactions offering quantitative agreement with experimentally determined reaction parameters.Molecular simulation provide insight into the mechanism of both the catalytic activity and inhibition of monoamine oxidases, thus aiding in the rational design of their inhibitors that are all employed and antidepressants and antiparkinsonian drugs. Aging society and therewith associated neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including depression, Alzheimer's disease, obsessive disorders, and Parkinson's disease, urgently require novel drug candidates. Targets include monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOs), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), and various receptors and transporters. For rational drug design it is particularly important to combine experimental synthetic, kinetic, toxicological, and pharmacological information with structural and computational work. This paper describes the application of various modern computational biochemistry methods in order to improve the understanding of a relationship between the structure and function of large biological systems including ion channels, transporters, receptors, and metabolic enzymes. The methods covered stem from classical molecular dynamics simulations to understand the physical basis and the time evolution of the structures, to combined QM, and QM/MM approaches to probe the chemical mechanisms of enzymatic

  4. The use of multiscale molecular simulations in understanding a relationship between the structure and function of biological systems of the brain: the application to monoamine oxidase enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vianello

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aging society and therewith associated neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric diseases, including depression, Alzheimer’s disease, obsessive disorders, and Parkinson’s disease, urgently require novel drug candidates. Targets include monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOs, acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, and various receptors and transporters. For rational drug design it is particularly important to combine experimental synthetic, kinetic, toxicological and pharmacological information with structural and computational work. This paper describes the application of various modern computational biochemistry methods in order to improve the understanding of a relationship between the structure and function of large biological systems including ion channels, transporters, receptors and metabolic enzymes. The methods covered stem from classical molecular dynamics simulations to understand the physical basis and the time evolution of the structures, to combined QM and QM/MM approaches to probe the chemical mechanisms of enzymatic activities and their inhibition. As an illustrative example, the later will focus on the monoamine oxidase family of enzymes, which catalyze the degradation of amine neurotransmitters in various parts of the brain, the imbalance of which is associated with the development and progression of a range of neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors that act mainly on MAO A are used in the treatment of depression, due to their ability to raise serotonin concentrations, while MAO B inhibitors decrease dopamine degradation and improve motor control in patients with Parkinson disease. Our results give strong support that both MAO isoforms, A and B, operate through the hydride transfer mechanism. Relevance of MAO catalyzed reactions and MAO inhibition in the context of neurodegeneration will be discussed.

  5. Brain Monoamine Oxidase-A Activity Predicts Trait Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Kriplani, Aarti; Logan, Jean; Tomasi, Dardo; Williams, Benjamin; Telang, Frank; Shumay, Elena; Biegon, Anat; Craig, Ian W.; Henn, Fritz; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    The genetic deletion of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A, an enzyme which breaks down the monoamine neurotransmitters norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine) produces aggressive phenotypes across species. Therefore, a common polymorphism in the MAO A gene (MAOA, MIM 309850, referred to as high or low based on transcription in non-neuronal cells) has been investigated in a number of externalizing behavioral and clinical phenotypes. These studies provide evidence linking the low MAOA genotype and violent behavior but only through interaction with severe environmental stressors during childhood. Here, we hypothesized that in healthy adult males the gene product of MAO A in the brain, rather than the gene per se, would be associated with regulating the concentration of brain amines involved in trait aggression. Brain MAO A activity was measured in-vivo in healthy non-smoking men with positron emission tomography using a radioligand specific for MAO A (clorgyline labeled with carbon 11). Trait aggression was measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ). Here we report for the first time that brain MAO A correlates inversely with the MPQ trait measure of aggression (but not with other personality traits) such that the lower the MAO A activity in cortical and subcortical brain regions the higher the self-reported aggression (in both MAOA genotype groups) contributing to more than a third of the variability. Since trait aggression is a measure used to predict antisocial behavior, these results underscore the relevance of MAO A as a neurochemical substrate of aberrant aggression. PMID:18463263

  6. The effects of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Fumiko; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Satoh Hisashi Kamimura, Kanako

    2007-03-22

    We developed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale method for determining the re-uptake and release of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine) using rat brain synaptosomes. These assays were then applied to study the effects of different kinds of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine re-uptake and release. The phenethylamine derivatives, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 2-methylamino-3,4-methylene-dioxy-propiophenone (methylone), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (BDB), and N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), had strong inhibitory effects on the re-uptake of dopamine, 5-HT and norepinephrine. 4-Fluoroamphetamine, methylone and BDB also strongly increased the release of the three monoamines, but MBDB increased 5-HT and norepinephrine release, but had little effect on dopamine release. However, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2) and 2,4,6-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-6), which are methoxylated phenethylamine derivatives, slightly influenced the re-uptake and release of monoamines. Alpha-metyltryptamine (AMT), a tryptamine derivative, was one of the strongest re-uptake inhibitors and releasers of the three monoamines. The tryptamine derivative, 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT), also strongly inhibited re-uptake and increased the release of the three monoamines. N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) inhibited monoamine re-uptake, but had a few effects on monoamine release. 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (3CPP) and 1-(methoxyphenyl)piperazine (4MPP), which are piperazine derivatives, inhibited monoamine re-uptake and accelerated their release. The results suggest that some designer drugs strongly act on the central nerve system to the same

  7. Monoamines tissue content analysis reveals restricted and site-specific correlations in brain regions involved in cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitoussi, A; Dellu-Hagedorn, F; De Deurwaerdère, P

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine (DA), noradrenalin (NA) and serotonin (5-HT) monoaminergic systems are deeply involved in cognitive processes via their influence on cortical and subcortical regions. The widespread distribution of these monoaminergic networks is one of the main difficulties in analyzing their functions and interactions. To address this complexity, we assessed whether inter-individual differences in monoamine tissue contents of various brain areas could provide information about their functional relationships. We used a sensitive biochemical approach to map endogenous monoamine tissue content in 20 rat brain areas involved in cognition, including 10 cortical areas and examined correlations within and between the monoaminergic systems. Whereas DA content and its respective metabolite largely varied across brain regions, the NA and 5-HT contents were relatively homogenous. As expected, the tissue content varied among individuals. Our analyses revealed a few specific relationships (10%) between the tissue content of each monoamine in paired brain regions and even between monoamines in paired brain regions. The tissue contents of NA, 5-HT and DA were inter-correlated with a high incidence when looking at a specific brain region. Most correlations found between cortical areas were positive while some cortico-subcortical relationships regarding the DA, NA and 5-HT tissue contents were negative, in particular for DA content. In conclusion, this work provides a useful database of the monoamine tissue content in numerous brain regions. It suggests that the regulation of these neuromodulatory systems is achieved mainly at the terminals, and that each of these systems contributes to the regulation of the other two.

  8. The effects of two chronic intermittent stressors on brain monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campmany, L; Pol, O; Armario, A

    1996-03-01

    The effects of chronic exposure (27 days) to two different stressors on brain monoaminergic activity was studied in adult male rats. The stressors used were restraint in tubes (RES) and immobilization in wooden boards (IMO). Both chronically stressed and stress naive (control) rats were subjected to 0, 15, and 60 min of the same stressor to which they were chronically exposed. Previous chronic exposure to either RES or IMO significantly reduced ACTH response to the same stressor. Monoaminergic response to these stressors was studied by measuring the levels of noradrenaline (NA), serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites: 3-methoxy,4-hydroxyphenyletileneglycol sulfate (MHPG-SO4) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), respectively. The regions studied were: pons plus medulla, midbrain, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and frontal cortex. Previous chronic exposure to the stressors induced only few changes in the resting levels of the monoamines and their metabolites. In addition, monoaminergic response to the same stressor to which they were chronically exposed was always similar in control and chronically stressed rats. These data indicate that brain NA and 5-HT metabolism is less sensitive than ACTH to the process of habituation to a repeated stressor, at least in the gross areas of the brain analyzed in the present study.

  9. Brain monoamine metabolism is altered in rats following spontaneous, long-distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, M; Svensson, T H; Thorén, P

    1987-06-01

    Brain monoamine metabolism in rats was studied during spontaneous, long-term running in a microprocessor-controlled wheel cage. Immediately after heavy spontaneous exercise, DOPA accumulation was decreased in dopamine-rich brain regions such as the limbic forebrain and corpus striatum, indicating a decreased rate of synthesis of dopamine in brain. In contrast, DOPA accumulation was increased in the noradrenaline-predominated region of the brain stem, indicating an increased synthesis of noradrenaline in this region. Alterations in brain monoamine metabolism were normalized in exercising animals analysed 24 h after the last running period. Changes in brain monoamine metabolism may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the clinically observed psychological effects of physical exercise.

  10. Chronic Effect of Aspartame on Ionic Homeostasis and Monoamine Neurotransmitters in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhilash, M; Alex, Manju; Mathews, Varghese V; Nair, R Harikumaran

    2014-05-28

    Aspartame is one of the most widely used artificial sweeteners globally. Data concerning acute neurotoxicity of aspartame is controversial, and knowledge on its chronic effect is limited. In the current study, we investigated the chronic effects of aspartame on ionic homeostasis and regional monoamine neurotransmitter concentrations in the brain. Our results showed that aspartame at high dose caused a disturbance in ionic homeostasis and induced apoptosis in the brain. We also investigated the effects of aspartame on brain regional monoamine synthesis, and the results revealed that there was a significant decrease of dopamine in corpus striatum and cerebral cortex and of serotonin in corpus striatum. Moreover, aspartame treatment significantly alters the tyrosine hydroxylase activity and amino acids levels in the brain. Our data suggest that chronic use of aspartame may affect electrolyte homeostasis and monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis dose dependently, and this might have a possible effect on cognitive functions.

  11. A glial variant of the vesicular monoamine transporter is required to store histamine in the Drosophila visual system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Romero-Calderón

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Unlike other monoamine neurotransmitters, the mechanism by which the brain's histamine content is regulated remains unclear. In mammals, vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs are expressed exclusively in neurons and mediate the storage of histamine and other monoamines. We have studied the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster in which histamine is the primary neurotransmitter released from photoreceptor cells. We report here that a novel mRNA splice variant of Drosophila VMAT (DVMAT-B is expressed not in neurons but rather in a small subset of glia in the lamina of the fly's optic lobe. Histamine contents are reduced by mutation of dVMAT, but can be partially restored by specifically expressing DVMAT-B in glia. Our results suggest a novel role for a monoamine transporter in glia that may be relevant to histamine homeostasis in other systems.

  12. Antidepressant Drugs Transactivate TrkB Neurotrophin Receptors in the Adult Rodent Brain Independently of BDNF and Monoamine Transporter Blockade

    OpenAIRE

    Tomi Rantamäki; Liisa Vesa; Hanna Antila; Antonio Di Lieto; Päivi Tammela; Angelika Schmitt; Klaus-Peter Lesch; Maribel Rios; Eero Castrén

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs) have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their ne...

  13. Methylphenidate and its ethanol transesterification metabolite ethylphenidate: brain disposition, monoamine transporters and motor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williard, Robin L; Middaugh, Lawrence D; Zhu, Hao-Jie B; Patrick, Kennerly S

    2007-02-01

    Ethylphenidate is formed by metabolic transesterification of methylphenidate and ethanol. Study objectives were to (a) establish that ethylphenidate is formed in C57BL/6 (B6) mice; (b) compare the stimulatory effects of ethylphenidate and methylphenidate enantiomers; (c) determine methylphenidate and ethylphenidate plasma and brain distribution and (d) establish in-vitro effects of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate on monoamine transporter systems. Experimental results were that: (a) coadministration of ethanol with the separate methylphenidate isomers enantioselectively produced l-ethylphenidate; (b) d and dl-forms of methylphenidate and ethylphenidate produced dose-responsive increases in motor activity with stimulation being less for ethylphenidate; (c) plasma and whole-brain concentrations were greater for ethylphenidate than methylphenidate and (d) d and DL-methylphenidate and ethylphenidate exhibited comparably potent low inhibition of the dopamine transporter, whereas ethylphenidate was a less potent norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. These experiments establish the feasibility of the B6 mouse model for examining the interactive effects of ethanol and methylphenidate. As reported for humans, concurrent exposure of B6 mice to methylphenidate and ethanol more readily formed l-ethylphenidate than d-ethylphenidate, and the l-isomers of both methylphenidate and ethylphenidate were biologically inactive. The observed reduced stimulatory effect of d-ethylphenidate relative to d-methylphenidate appears not to be the result of brain dispositional factors, but rather may be related to its reduced inhibition of the norepinephrine transporter, perhaps altering the interaction of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neural systems.

  14. Changes in free amino acid and monoamine concentrations in the chick brain associated with feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong V; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Domesticated chicks are precocial and therefore have relatively well-developed feeding behavior. The role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in food-intake regulation in chicks has been reported for decades. However, we hypothesized that nutrients and their metabolites in the brain may be involved in food intake in chicks because these animals exhibit a very frequent feeding pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the feeding behavior of chicks as well as the associated changes in free amino acid and monoamine concentrations in the chick brain. The feeding behavior of chicks was recorded continuously for 6 h. The next day, brain and blood samples were collected when the chicks either attempted to have food (hungry group) or turned food down (satiated group), in order to analyze the concentrations of the free amino acids and monoamines. We confirmed that the feeding behavior of neonatal chicks was characterized by short resting periods between very brief times spent on food intake. Several free amino acids in the mesencephalon were significantly lower in the satiated group than in the hungry group, while l-histidine and l-glutamine were significantly higher. Notably, there was no change in the free amino acid concentrations in other brain regions or plasma. As for monoamines, serotonin and norepinephrine were significantly lower in the mesencephalon of the hungry group compared with the satiated group, but 5 hydroxyindolacetic acid (5-HIAA) was higher. In addition, serotonin and norepinephrine levels were significantly higher in the brain stem of the hungry chicks compared with the satiated group, but levels of 5-HIAA and homovanillic acid were lower. Levels of both dopamine and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, were significantly higher in the diencephalon and telencephalon of the chicks in the hungry group. In conclusion, the changes in the free amino acids and monoamines in the brain may have some role in the feeding behavior of

  15. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui; He, Xin-Hua; Yuan, Li; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhang, Li-Ming; Yong, Zheng; Yu, Gang; Fan, Shi-Yong; Li, Yun-Feng; Zhong, Bo-Hua; Zhang, You-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5-20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  16. Effects of 071031B, a novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, on monoamine system in mice and rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study indicated that 071031B, a novel potential serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, showed robust antidepressant activity in multiple depression models, and could simultaneously inhibit 5-HT and NE reuptake in vitro. The present study was to evaluate the effects of 071031B on monoamine system in vivo, by using pharmacological models, including 5-HTP induced head-twitch test, yohimbine toxicity potentiation test, and reserpine induced hypothermia test, and determining monoamine transmitter levels in reserpine induced monoamine depletion model or chronic unpredictable stress (CUS model. Results in pharmacological models indicated that acute administration of 071031B at 5–20 mg/kg significantly enhanced 5-HTP induced head-twitch behavior, potentiated yohimbine induced lethal rate, and reversed reserpine induced hypothermia. Further monoamine assays demonstrated that acute or chronic administration of 071031B at 10 or 20 mg/kg increased 5-HT and/or NE levels in various brain regions in reserpine or CUS induced monoamine depletion models, respectively, without effect on DA and its metabolites. Our results revealed that 071031B produces potent inhibition of 5-HT and NE reuptake in vivo.

  17. Exposure to (12)C particles alters the normal dynamics of brain monoamine metabolism and behaviour in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg V; Belokopytova, Ksenia V; Bazyan, Ara S; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Narkevich, Viktor B; Ivanov, Aleksandr A; Severiukhin, Yury S; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Krasavin, Eugene A

    2016-09-01

    Planning of the deep-space exploration missions raises a number of questions on the radiation protection of astronauts. One of the medical concerns is associated with exposure of a crew to highly energetic particles of galactic cosmic rays. Among many other health disorders, irradiation with these particles has a substantial impact on the central nervous system (CNS). Although radiation damage to CNS has been addressed extensively during the last years, the mechanisms underlying observed impairments remain mostly unknown. The present study reveals neurochemical and behavioural alterations induced in rats by 1Gy of 500MeV/u (12)C particles with a relatively moderate linear energy transfer (10.6keV/μm). It is found that exposure to carbon ions leads to significant modification of the normal monoamine metabolism dynamics as well as the locomotor, exploratory, and anxiety-like behaviours during a two-month period. The obtained results indicate an abnormal redistribution of monoamines and their metabolites in different brain regions after exposure. The most pronounced impairments are detected in the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hypothalamus that illustrate the sensitivity of these brain regions to densely ionizing radiations. It is also shown that exposure to (12)C particles enhances the anxiety in animals and accelerates the age-related reduction in their exploratory capability. The observed monoamine metabolism pattern may indicate the presence of certain compensatory mechanisms being induced in response to irradiation and capable of partial restoration of monoaminergic systems' functions. Overall, these findings support a possibility of CNS damage by space-born particles of a relatively moderate linear energy transfer.

  18. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie Voigt; Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical d...... and is broadly applicable to monoamine measurements in cell cultures as well as brain biopsies from animal models used in preclinical neurochemistry....

  19. Carnosine: effect on aging-induced increase in brain regional monoamine oxidase-A activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-03-01

    Aging is a natural biological process associated with several neurological disorders along with the biochemical changes in brain. Aim of the present investigation is to study the effect of carnosine (0.5-2.5μg/kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) on aging-induced changes in brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) activity with its kinetic parameters. The results of the present study are: (1) The brain regional mitochondrial MAO-A activity and their kinetic parameters (except in Km of pons-medulla) were significantly increased with the increase of age (4-24 months), (2) Aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity including its Vmax were attenuated with higher dosages of carnosine (1.0-2.5μg/kg/day) and restored toward the activity that observed in young, though its lower dosage (0.5μg/kg/day) were ineffective in these brain regional MAO-A activity, (3) Carnosine at higher dosage in young rats, unlike aged rats significantly inhibited all the brain regional MAO-A activity by reducing their only Vmax excepting cerebral cortex, where Km was also significantly enhanced. These results suggest that carnosine attenuated the aging-induced increase of brain regional MAO-A activity by attenuating its kinetic parameters and restored toward the results of MAO-A activity that observed in corresponding brain regions of young rats.

  20. Parasite manipulation of brain monoamines in California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) by the trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J.C.; Korzan, W.J.; Carpenter, R.E.; Kuris, A.M.; Lafferty, K.D.; Summers, C.H.; Overli, O.

    2009-01-01

    California killifish (Fundulus parvipinnis) infected with the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis californiensis display conspicuous swimming behaviours rendering them more susceptible to predation by avian final hosts. Heavily infected killifish grow and reproduce normally, despite having thousands of cysts inside their braincases. This suggests that E. californiensis affects only specific locomotory behaviours. We hypothesised that changes in the serotonin and dopamine metabolism, essential for controlling locomotion and arousal may underlie this behaviour modification. We employed micropunch dissection and HPLC to analyse monoamine and monoamine metabolite concentrations in the brain regions of uninfected and experimentally infected fish. The parasites exerted density-dependent changes in monoaminergic activity distinct from those exhibited by fish subjected to stress. Specifically, E. californiensis inhibited a normally occurring, stress-induced elevation of serotonergic metabolism in the raphae nuclei. This effect was particularly evident in the experimentally infected fish, whose low-density infections were concentrated on the brainstem. Furthermore, high E. californiensis density was associated with increased dopaminergic activity in the hypothalamus and decreased serotonergic activity in the hippocampus. In conclusion, the altered monoaminergic metabolism may explain behavioural differences leading to increased predation of the infected killifish by their final host predators. ?? 2008 The Royal Society.

  1. Is fetal brain monoamine oxidase inhibition the missing link between maternal smoking and conduct disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baler, Ruben D; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene

    2008-05-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of preventable illness in the world today. Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) is a particularly insidious form because so many of its associated health effects befall the unborn child and produce behavioural outcomes that manifest themselves only years later. Among these are the associations between PCSE and conduct disorders, which have been mostly ascribed to the deleterious effects of nicotine on the fetal brain. Here we hypothesize that inhibition of brain monoamine oxidase (MAO) during fetal brain development, secondary to maternal cigarette smoking and in addition to nicotine, is a likely contributor to this association. MAOs play a central role in monoaminergic balance in the brain, and their inhibition during fetal development - but not during adult life - is known to result in an aggressive phenotype in laboratory animals. This paper provides theoretical and experimental support for the notion that cigarette smoke-induced inhibition of MAO in the fetal brain, particularly when it occurs in combination with polymorphisms in the MAOA gene that lead to lower enzyme concentration in the brain, may result in brain morphologic and functional changes that enhance the risk of irritability, poor self-control and aggression in the offspring. It also encourages research to evaluate whether the interaction of smoking exposure during fetal development and MAOA genotype increases the risk for conduct disorder over that incurred by mere fetal exposure to tobacco smoke.

  2. Regional brain monoamine concentrations and their alterations in bovine hypomagnesaemic tetany experimentally induced by a magnesium-deficient diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, M A; Young, P B; Hudson, A J; Davison, G; Kennedy, D G

    2000-12-01

    Monoamines are important brain neurotransmitters. An investigation was carried out to determine if hypomagnesaemic tetany was associated with alterations in regional brain monoamine concentrations in bovines. The results, established in cows with normal magnesium status, demonstrated that regional differences existed in the distribution and concentration of brain monoamines in the adult bovine, which were similar to those in other species. In magnesium-deficient cows, severe hypomagnesaemia and lowered cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) magnesium concentrations were associated with significant alterations in monoamine concentrations in some brain regions. Alterations in 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) concentrations in the corpus striatum, and dopamine (DA) in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum were recorded. These regions play an important role in both voluntary and involuntary motor function, and therefore these alterations may play a role in the aetiology of hypomagnesaemic tetany. However, there was no significant change in DA concentrations in the corpus striatum (the main dopaminergic region in the brain) associated with hypomagnesaemia. In addition, a significantly lower norepinephrine (NE) concentration in the corpus striatum of hypomagnesaemic animals was also recorded. Norephinephrine is generally excitatory and therefore lowered NE concentrations would be expected to result in depression rather than stimulation of motor function. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  3. [Electrical activity of the visual cortex under conditions of altered monoamine levels in the brain of animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, V V; Gal'chenko, A A; Deriugina, O N

    1990-01-01

    In experiments on 8 rabbits and 12 rats changes in electrograms of the visual cortex of alert animals were studied under photic stimulation in conditions of pharmacological action on monoamine (MA) brain systems. After injection of MA precursors (5-oxitriptophane and d, 1-dioxiphenylalanine) following phenomena were observed: a) decrease of the amplitude of the averaged evoked potentials to rhythmic photic stimuli (1-20 imp. sec.-1); b) an enhancement of fast (15-25 Hz) oscillations in the cortical spontaneous electrical activity and weakening and modification of the effects of the blockader of synthesis of MA-alpha-methyl-dioxiphenylalanine. Under light stimulation potentiation of MA precursors effects was observed in the frequency spectra of electrocorticograms. In the same conditions the specificity of action of cathecholamines precursor was revealed in the form of an increase of power of rhythms of 5-7 Hz and it; decrease in 2-3 Hz. Possible mechanisms of the revealed phenomena are discussed.

  4. Antidepressant drugs transactivate TrkB neurotrophin receptors in the adult rodent brain independently of BDNF and monoamine transporter blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. METHODOLOGY: In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a chemical-genetic TrkB(F616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf⁻/⁻ knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01, indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the

  5. The designer methcathinone analogs, mephedrone and methylone, are substrates for monoamine transporters in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-04-01

    The nonmedical use of 'designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study.

  6. The Designer Methcathinone Analogs, Mephedrone and Methylone, are Substrates for Monoamine Transporters in Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael H; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Sink, Jacqueline R; Shulgin, Alexander T; Daley, Paul F; Brandt, Simon D; Rothman, Richard B; Ruoho, Arnold E; Cozzi, Nicholas V

    2012-01-01

    The nonmedical use of ‘designer' cathinone analogs, such as 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone) and 3,4-methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone), is increasing worldwide, yet little information is available regarding the mechanism of action for these drugs. Here, we employed in vitro and in vivo methods to compare neurobiological effects of mephedrone and methylone with those produced by the structurally related compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine. In vitro release assays using rat brain synaptosomes revealed that mephedrone and methylone are nonselective substrates for plasma membrane monoamine transporters, similar to MDMA in potency and selectivity. In vivo microdialysis in rat nucleus accumbens showed that i.v. administration of 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg of mephedrone or methylone produces dose-related increases in extracellular dopamine and serotonin (5-HT), with the magnitude of effect on 5-HT being greater. Both methcathinone analogs were weak motor stimulants when compared with methamphetamine. Repeated administrations of mephedrone or methylone (3.0 and 10.0 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) caused hyperthermia but no long-term change in cortical or striatal amines, whereas similar treatment with MDMA (2.5 and 7.5 mg/kg, s.c., 3 doses) evoked robust hyperthermia and persistent depletion of cortical and striatal 5-HT. Our data demonstrate that designer methcathinone analogs are substrates for monoamine transporters, with a profile of transmitter-releasing activity comparable to MDMA. Dopaminergic effects of mephedrone and methylone may contribute to their addictive potential, but this hypothesis awaits confirmation. Given the widespread use of mephedrone and methylone, determining the consequences of repeated drug exposure warrants further study. PMID:22169943

  7. Evidence that the methylation state of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene predicts brain activity of MAO A enzyme in healthy men

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shumay, Elena; Logan, Jean; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S

    2012-01-01

    ...). PET brain imaging of monoamine oxidase A (MAO A)-an enzyme metabolizing neurotransmitters-revealed that MAO A levels vary widely between healthy men and this variability was not explained by the common MAOA genotype (VNTR genotype...

  8. Melanoma tumors alter proinflammatory cytokine production and monoamine brain function, and induce depressive-like behavior in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeña, Andrea; Vegas, Oscar; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Arregi, Amaia; Garmendia, Larraitz; Beitia, Garikoitz; Azpiroz, Arantza

    2014-10-01

    Depression is a commonly observed disorder among cancer patients; however, the mechanisms underlying the relationship between these disorders are not well known. We used an animal model to study the effects of tumor development on depressive-like behavior manifestation, proinflammatory cytokine expression, and central monoaminergic activity. Male OF1 mice were inoculated with B16F10 melanoma tumor cells and subjected to a 21-day behavioral evaluation comprising the novel palatable food (NPF) test and tail suspension test (TST). The mRNA expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), were measured in the hypothalamus and hippocampus and the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were measured in the blood plasma. We similarly determined the monoamine turnover in various brain areas. The tumors resulted in increasing the immobility in TST and the expression level of IL-6 in the hippocampus. These increases corresponded with a decrease in dopaminergic activity in the striatum and a decrease in serotonin turnover in the prefrontal cortex. Similarly, a high level of tumor development produced increases in the brain expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and plasma levels of IL-6. Our findings suggest that these alterations in inflammatory cytokines and monoaminergic system function might be responsible for the manifestation of depressive-like behaviors in tumor-bearing mice.

  9. Mild traumatic brain injury with social defeat stress alters anxiety, contextual fear extinction, and limbic monoamines in adult rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eDavies

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM, or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 hr after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes.

  10. Changes in Brain Monoamines Underlie Behavioural Disruptions after Zebrafish Diet Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Environmental Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignet, Caroline; Trenkel, Verena M.; Vouillarmet, Annick; Bricca, Giampiero; Bégout, Marie-Laure; Cousin, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Zebrafish were exposed through diet to two environmentally relevant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) mixtures of contrasted compositions, one of pyrolytic (PY) origin and one from light crude oil (LO). Monoamine concentrations were quantified in the brains of the fish after six month of exposure. A significant decrease in noradrenaline (NA) was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures, while a decrease in serotonin (5HT) and dopamine (DA) was observed only in LO-exposed fish. A decrease in metabolites of 5HT and DA was observed in fish exposed to both mixtures. Several behavioural disruptions were observed that depended on mixtures, and parallels were made with changes in monoamine concentrations. Indeed, we observed an increase in anxiety in fish exposed to both mixtures, which could be related to the decrease in 5HT and/or NA, while disruptions of daily activity rhythms were observed in LO fish, which could be related to the decrease in DA. Taken together, these results showed that (i) chronic exposures to PAHs mixtures disrupted brain monoamine contents, which could underlie behavioural disruptions, and that (ii) the biological responses depended on mixture compositions. PMID:28273853

  11. Radiochemistry devoted to the production of monoamine oxidase (MAO-A and MAO-B) ligands for brain imaging with positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersemans, Ken; Van Laeken, Nick; De Vos, Filip

    2013-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase (MAO) belongs to a family of flavin-containing integral enzymes that are present in the outer mitochondrial membrane in neurons and glial cells in the central nervous system. These enzymes catalyze the oxidative deamination of various neurotransmitters, biogenic amines, and xenobiotics, thereby influencing their availability and physiological activity in brain and body. Over the past decades, many potential positron emission tomography tracers have been put forward to visualize MAO in the brain with varying success, and recent publications on the topic illustrate the continuing interest in the field. The present review gives an overview of the compounds that have been put forward as possible MAO tracers in the brain and focuses on the radiochemical procedures that have been developed to produce them up till now. Relevant radioligands are grouped by the main radiochemical strategies that have been employed to synthesize them, and some interesting details and findings that are crucial to the radiosyntheses are provided.

  12. A new stress model, a scream sound, alters learning and monoamine levels in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Song, Tusheng; Hou, Ni; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Xiaoge; Zhang, Dianzeng; Wang, Lumin; Wang, Tao; Huang, Chen

    2014-01-17

    Most existing animal models for stress involve the simultaneous application of physical and psychological stress factors. In the current study, we described and used a novel psychological stress model (scream sound stress). To study the validity of it, we carried out acute and chronic scream sound stress. First, adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into white noise, stress and background groups. The white noise group and stress group were treated with white noise and scream sound for 4h in the morning respectively. Compared with white noise and background groups, exposure to acute scream sound increased corticosterone (CORT) level and decreased latency in Morris water maze (MWM) test. The levels of noradrenaline (NE), dopamine (DA), 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were altered in the striatum, hypothalamus and hippocampus of stress rats. Second, adult SD rats were randomly divided into background and stress groups, which were treated with scream sound for three weeks. Exposure to chronic scream sound suppressed body weight gain, increased corticosterone (CORT) level, influenced the morphology of adrenal gland, improved spleen and thymus indices, and decreased latency in MWM test. NE, DA, DOPAC, HVA and 5-HIAA levels were also altered in the brain of stress rats. Our results suggested that scream sound, as a novel stressor, facilitated learning ability, as well as altered monoamine levels in the rat brain. Moreover, scream sound is easy to apply and can be applied in more animals at the same time.

  13. Electrical activity of the visual cortex under conditions of change in the levels of monoamines in the brain of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borob'ev, V V; Gal'chenko, A A; Deryugina, O N

    1991-01-01

    The changes in the electrograms of the visual cortex of awake animals under the influence of light stimulation in conditions of a pharmacological effect on the monoamine (MA) systems of the brain were investigated in experiments on 8 rabbits and 12 rats. The following was found following the administration of MA precursors (5-hydroxytryptophan and d,l-dihydroxyphenylalanine): a) a decrease in the amplitude of the averaged evoked potentials in response to rhythmical light stimuli (1-20 pulses/sec); b) intensification of rapid (15-25 Hz) oscillations in the spontaneous electrical activity of the cortex, as well as attenuation and modification of the effects of the blocker of MA synthesis, a-methyl-dihydroxyphenylalanine. A potentiation of the MA precursors was observed with light stimulation in the frequency spectra of the electrocorticograms. The specific characteristics of the action of the catecholamine precursor were manifested in the same conditions in the form of an intensification of the power of the 5-7 Hz rhythms, and an attenuation of the power of the 2-3 Hz rhythms.

  14. Effect of short-time exposures to nickel and lead on brain monoamine oxidase from Danio rerio and Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senatori, Ornella; Setini, Andrea; Scirocco, Annunziata; Nicotra, Antonietta

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this work was to verify, in two small size freshwater teleosts Danio rerio and Poecilia reticulata, the effects of short-time exposures (24 and 72 h) to a sublethal dose (500 microg/L) of nickel and lead, on brain monoamine oxidase (MAO), an important neural enzyme. The 24-h treatment using both metals caused a strong reduction of MAO activity in D. rerio brain, whereas causing a slight MAO activity stimulation in P. reticulata brain. The same treatment in both species did not affect the brain MAO mRNA production as showed by RT-PCR. Extending the duration of treatment as far as 72 h, partly (D. rerio) or completely (P. reticulata) reversed the metal effects on brain MAO activity suggesting that mechanisms to neutralize the metals had been activated.

  15. Determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in a mouse brain microdialysate by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with gold nanoparticle-initiated chemiluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Na; Guo Jizhao; Liu Bo; Yu Yuqi [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Cui Hua, E-mail: hcui@ustc.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), JinZhai Road No: 96, 230026 Hefei, Anhui (China); Mao Lanqun; Lin Yuqing [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), 100080 Beijing (China)

    2009-07-10

    Our previous work showed that gold nanoparticles could trigger chemiluminescence (CL) between luminol and AgNO{sub 3}. In the present work, the effect of some biologically important reductive compounds, including monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites, reductive amino acids, ascorbic acid, uric acid, and glutathione, on the novel CL reaction were investigated for analytical purpose. It was found that all of them could inhibit the CL from the luminol-AgNO{sub 3}-Au colloid system. Among them, monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites exhibited strong inhibition effect. Taking dopamine as a model compound, the CL mechanism was studied by measuring absorption spectra during the CL reaction and the reaction kinetics via stopped-flow technique. The CL inhibition mechanism is proposed to be due to that these tested compounds competed with luminol for AgNO{sub 3} to inhibit the formation of luminol radicals and to accelerate deposition of Ag atoms on surface of gold nanoparticles, leading to a decrease in CL intensity. Based on the inhibited CL, a novel method for simultaneous determination of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites was developed by coupling high-performance liquid chromatography with this CL reaction. The new method was successfully applied to determine the compounds in a mouse brain microdialysate. Compared with the reported HPLC-CL methods, the proposed method is simple, fast, and could determine more analytes. Moreover, the limits of linear ranges for NE, E, and DA using the proposed method were one order of magnitude lower than the luminol system without gold nanoparticles.

  16. Inhibitory effect of acetylcholine on monoamine oxidase A and B activity in different parts of rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Mohamed Y; Osman, Hassan M Y

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholine (CAS 60-31-1, ACh), which is similar in its chemical structure to the carbamate aldicarb, was found to inhibit brain monoamine oxidase isoenzymes, namely MAO-A and B. The effect of ACh on both isoenzymes extracted from the whole brain of male albino rats and its different parts (frontal cortex, basal ganglia, cerebellum, pons and medulla oblongata) was studied. The results indicated that ACh inhibited MAO-A from the cerebellum and MAO-B from the basal ganglia more than MAO iso-enzymes from other brain parts. The inhibition was of the competitive type. It was also found that the enzyme inhibitor dissociation constants (Ki) and the affinity constants (Ki/Km) of MAO-A were higher than those of MAO-B.

  17. Monoamine concentrations changes in the PTU-induced hypothyroid rat brain and the ameliorating role of folic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tousson, E; Ibrahim, W; Arafa, N; Akela, M A

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are recognized as the key metabolic hormones that play a critical role in the development of central nervous system (CNS) throughout life. The present study was designed to determine the changes in brain monoamine concentrations in 6-n-propyl thiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroid rats, in addition to the ameliorating role of folic acid treatment. Fifty male albino rats were equally divided into five groups; first and second groups were the control and folic acid groups, respectively, while the third group was the hypothyroid group in which the rats received PTU in drinking water for 6 weeks. The fourth and fifth groups were co- and post-treated folic acid groups with hypothyroid rats, respectively. Our results revealed that serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations were significantly decreased in the hypothalamus and cortex, while it significantly increased in the hippocampus of hypothyroid rats when compared with control group. Serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations were decreased in hypothalamus and cortex in co- and post-treated folic acid groups with hypothyroid rats, while the concentration of dopamine were significantly increased in the hypothalamus and hippocampus of the hypothyroid rats and co-treated folic acid group with hypothyroid rats. In cortex, the dopamine concentration was significantly increased in hypothyroid rats and post-treated folic acid group with hypothyroid rats, while it significantly decreased in co-treated folic acid group with hypothyroid rats when compared with the control group. Also, our results revealed that, folic acid treatment was better if it is administered as an adjuvant after returning to the euthyroid state by withdrawing PTU from the drinking water.

  18. Frightening music triggers rapid changes in brain monoamine receptors: a pilot PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Chen, Qiaozhen; Du, Fenglei; Hu, Yanni; Chao, Fangfang; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-10-01

    Frightening music can rapidly arouse emotions in listeners that mimic those from actual life-threatening experiences. However, studies of the underlying mechanism for perceiving danger created by music are limited. We investigated monoamine receptor changes induced by frightening music using (11)C-N-methyl-spiperone ((11)C-NMSP) PET. Ten healthy male volunteers were included, and their psychophysiologic changes were evaluated. Compared with the baseline condition, listening to frightening music caused a significant decrease in (11)C-NMSP in the right and left caudate nuclei, right limbic region, and right paralimbic region; a particularly significant decrease in the right anterior cingulate cortex; but an increase in the right frontal occipital and left temporal lobes of the cerebral cortex. Transient fright triggers rapid changes in monoamine receptors, which decrease in the limbic and paralimbic regions but increase in the cerebral cortex.

  19. Mild closed head traumatic brain injury-induced changes in monoamine neurotransmitters in the trigeminal subnuclei of a rat model: mechanisms underlying orofacial allodynias and headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golam Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Our recent findings have demonstrated that rodent models of closed head traumatic brain injury exhibit comprehensive evidence of progressive and enduring orofacial allodynias, a hypersensitive pain response induced by non-painful stimulation. These allodynias, tested using thermal hyperalgesia, correlated with changes in several known pain signaling receptors and molecules along the trigeminal pain pathway, especially in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. This study focused to extend our previous work to investigate the changes in monoamine neurotransmitter immunoreactivity changes in spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis, pars interpolaris and nucleus tractus solitaries following mild to moderate closed head traumatic brain injury, which are related to tactile allodynia, touch-pressure sensitivity, and visceral pain. Our results exhibited significant alterations in the excitatory monoamine, serotonin, in spinal trigeminal nucleus oralis and pars interpolaris which usually modulate tactile and mechanical sensitivity in addition to the thermal sensitivity. Moreover, we also detected a robust alteration in the expression of serotonin, and inhibitory molecule norepinephrine in the nucleus tractus solitaries, which might indicate the possibility of an alteration in visceral pain, and existence of other morbidities related to solitary nucleus dysfunction in this rodent model of mild to moderate closed head traumatic brain injury. Collectively, widespread changes in monoamine neurotransmitter may be related to orofacial allodynhias and headache after traumatic brain injury.

  20. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rats disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone1-3

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgartner, Jeannine; Smuts, Cornelius M; Malan, Linda; Arnold, Myrtha; Yee, Benjamin K.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination, on brain monoamine pathways (by measuring monoamines and related gene expression) and spatial working and reference memory (by Morris water maze testing). Using a 2 × 2 design, male rats were fed...

  1. Development of radioiodinated ligands for exploration of brain monoamine oxidase by tomo-scintigraphy; Developpement de ligands radioactifs pour l'exploration des monoamines oxydases cerebrales en tomoscintigraphie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, H

    1996-07-01

    Monoamine oxidases, MAO, are important in the regulation of monoaminergic neuro-transmissions. The fluctuations in MAO activities has been observed in some psychiatric and neuro-degenerative diseases. Thus, quantification of cerebral MAO activity would be useful for diagnosis and the therapeutic follow-up of these disorders. With the object of doing an in vivo scintigraphic exploration of cerebral MAO by SPECT, we have undertaken to synthesize some radioiodinated MAO inhibitors. In the first part of this work, we have discussed the general properties of the monoamine oxidases and their inhibitors. In the second part we have described the scintigraphic methods. the ligands to be used for MAO exploration, and the radioiodination methods. At last in the third part, the development of three radioiodinated ligands has been presented: - [{sup 125}I]3-iodopargyline. In vivo results showed that, this radioligand blocked the cerebral MAO-B with moderate selectivity. However, complementary in vivo studies would be needed to define precisely its activity.- [{sup 125}I]Ro 16-6491. The cerebral fixation of this radioligand was in accordance with the MAO-B sites in the rat brains, but its fixation was too low for scintigraphic exploration in vivo with iodine-123. - [{sup 125}I]Ro 11-9900. In vivo studies of rat brains showed that the MAO-A sites were bound preferentially by this radioligand. The cerebral biodistribution of this ligand labelled with iodine-123 is considered for use in a model animal nearest to human pathology. (author)

  2. CT scanning of the brain and lumbar CSF monoamine metabolites in spinocerebellar degenerative disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hidenao; Kanazawa, Ichiro; Nakanishi, Takao; Kuramoto, Kenmei (Tsukuba Univ., Sakura, Ibaraki (Japan))

    1984-08-01

    Eight patients with parenchymatous cerebellar degeneration (PCD) group (3 with late cortical cerebellar atrophy and 5 with Holmes' hereditary ataxia), 14 with olivo-ponto-cerebellar atrophy (OPCA) group (4 with Shy-Drager syndrome, 6 with OPCA without family history and 4 with Menzel type SCS), 15 with Parkinson's disease and 44 control with other neurological diseases were studied. In all the spinocerebellar degenerative disorders (SCD) cases, CVI values corresponding to the cerebellar atrophy were definitely reduced. On the other hand, PVI values corresponding to the pontine atrophy were only significantly decreased in OPCA group. However, since there were several cases showing only questionable pontine atrophy, it seems difficult to clearly differentiate individual OPCA cases from other SCD cases on CT films alone. Concerning monoamine metabolites in CSF, it was noted that a significant reduction of HVA and total MHPG was found in the OPCA group. Among them, the patients with overt autonomic failure showed the lowest HVA level and the cases of Menzel type of SCD showed a slight reduction of HVA but an unexpected elevation of free MHPG values. The cases of Parkinson's disease showed a definite reduction of HVA. On the other hand, the cases of PCD group showed no significant difference against controls. 5-HIAA levels were not significantly different among the SCD subgroups.

  3. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Brain and Nervous System KidsHealth > For Parents > Brain and Nervous System Print ... brain is quite the juggler. Anatomy of the Nervous System If you think of the brain as a ...

  4. Vanillin-induced amelioration of depression-like behaviors in rats by modulating monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinyong; Xu, Hui; Liu, Yang; He, Haihui; Li, Guangwu

    2015-02-28

    Olfaction plays an important role in emotions in our daily life. Pleasant odors are known to evoke positive emotions, inducing relaxation and calmness. The beneficial effects of vanillin on depressive model rats were investigated using a combination of behavioral assessments and neurotransmitter measurements. Before and after chronic stress condition (or olfactory bulbectomy), and at the end of vanillin or fluoxetine treatment, body weight, immobility time on the forced swimming test and sucrose consumption in the sucrose consumption test were measured. Changes in these assessments revealed the characteristic phenotypes of depression in rats. Neurotransmitters were measured using ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography. Our results indicated that vanillin could alleviate depressive symptoms in the rat model of chronic depression via the olfactory pathway. Preliminary analysis of the monoamine neurotransmitters revealed that vanillin elevated both serotonin and dopamine levels in brain tissue. These results provide important mechanistic insights into the protective effect of vanillin against chronic depressive disorder via olfactory pathway. This suggests that vanillin may be a potential pharmacological agent for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

  5. Socially-mediated differences in brain monoamines in rainbow trout: effects of trace metal contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloman, Katherine A. [School of Biological Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: katherine.sloman@plymouth.ac.uk; Lepage, Olivier [Evolutionary Biology Centre, Department of Comparative Physiology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Rogers, Joseph T. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada); Wood, Chris M. [Department of Biology, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ont., L8S 4K1 (Canada); Winberg, Svante [Evolutionary Biology Centre, Department of Comparative Physiology, Uppsala University, Norbyvaegen 18A, SE-752 36 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2005-02-10

    Monoaminergic systems play a crucial role in linking behaviour and physiology. Here the physiological and behavioural effects of metal exposure in relation to monoaminergic systems were considered by exposing rainbow trout dyads, demonstrating stable dominance relationships, to cadmium or lead. Fish exposed to 4 {mu}g l{sup -1} cadmium accumulated more cadmium at the gill than fish held in control water. Fish exposed to 7 {mu}g l{sup -1} cadmium had higher gill, liver and kidney cadmium concentrations. No significant lead accumulation was seen after exposure to 46 {mu}g l{sup -1} for 48 h but exposure to 325 {mu}g l{sup -1} lead caused an increase in gill, liver and kidney lead concentrations. Brain accumulation of both cadmium and lead was only seen after exposure to the highest concentrations. Exposure to 4 or 7 {mu}g l{sup -1} cadmium, or 46 or 325 {mu}g l{sup -1} lead for 48 h did not disrupt established dominance hierarchies. As expected with this stable behavioural situation, in control pairs, animals of different social status displayed different physiological profiles. Subordinate fish had higher concentrations of circulating plasma cortisol and telencephalic 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) (5-HIAA/5-HT) ratios. However, these physiological profiles were affected by metal exposure, with a trend towards higher serotonergic activity in dominant fish. Dominants exposed to 325 {mu}g l{sup -1} lead had significantly higher hypothalamic 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios when compared with subordinates. The results demonstrate that if stable social hierarchies are established in control water they may not be affected by exposure to cadmium and lead although physiological changes may be evident.

  6. Differences in Monoamine Oxidase Activity in the Brain of Wistar and August Rats with High and Low Locomotor Activity: A Cytochemical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergutina, A V; Rakhmanova, V I

    2016-06-01

    Monoamine oxidase activity was quantitatively assessed by cytochemical method in brain structures (layers III and V of the sensorimotor cortex, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, hippocampal CA3 field) of rats of August line and Wistar population with high and low locomotor activity in the open fi eld test. Monoamine oxidase activity (substrate tryptamine) predominated in the nucleus accumbens of Wistar rats with high motor activity in comparison with rats with low locomotor activity. In August rats, enzyme activity (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) predominated in the hippocampus of animals with high motor activity. Comparison of August rats with low locomotor activity and Wistar rats with high motor activity (i.e. animals demonstrating maximum differences in motor function) revealed significantly higher activity of the enzyme (substrates tryptamine and serotonin) in the hippocampus of Wistar rats. The study demonstrates clear-cut morphochemical specificity of monoaminergic metabolism based on the differences in the cytochemical parameter "monoamine oxidase activity", in the studied brain structures, responsible for the formation and realization of goal-directed behavior in Wistar and August rats.

  7. Nonparallel changes in brain monoamines of pyridoxine-deficient growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakshinamurti, K; LeBlancq, W D; Herchl, R; Havlicek, V

    1976-11-23

    The effects of a large number of neurotropic drugs have been attributed to changes in the metabolism of 5-hydroxytryptamine. The aromatic amino acid decarboxylase considered to decarboxylate both dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan requires pyridoxal phosphate as coenzyme. Thus, in pyridoxine deficiency one would expect a decrease of serotonin as well as the catecholamines of the brain. In the present study we have found a very significant decrease in brain serotonin of the pyridoxine-deficient growing rat. However, the brain levels of norepinephrine and dopamine were not altered. This decrease in serotonin does not result from a decrease either in the brain level of trytophan or the activity of tryptophan hydroxylase. Increased degradation of serotonin measured by the levels of its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid is also excluded, thus suggesting the possibility that the decarboxylation of 5-hydroxytryptophan is decreased in pyridoxine deficiency.

  8. The new inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, M30, has a neuroprotective effect against dexamethasone-induced brain cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakevia Johnson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Stress detrimentally affects the brain and body and can lead to or be accompanied by depression. Although stress and depression may contribute to each other, the exact molecular mechanism underlying the effects is unclear. However, there is a correlation between stress and an increase in glucocorticoid secretion which causes a subsequent increase in monoamine oxidase (MAO activity during stress. Consequently, MAO inhibitors have been used as traditional antidepressant drugs. Cellular treatment with the synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (a cellular stressor, has been reported to markedly increase both MAO A and MAO B catalytic activities, as well as apoptosis. This study compares the neuroprotective abilities of M30 (a new generation inhibitor of both MAO A and MAO B with rasagiline (Azilect®, another new MAO B inhibitor and selegiline (Deprenyl®, a traditional MAO B inhibitor in the prevention of dexamethasone-induced brain cell death and MAO activity in human neuroblastoma cells, SH-SY5Y. M30 demonstrated the highest inhibitory effect on MAO A; however, M30 showed the lowest inhibitory effect on MAO B enzymatic activity in comparison to rasagiline and selegiline. Although, M30 exhibited the greatest neuroprotective effect by decreasing cell death rates and apoptotic DNA damage compared to rasagiline and selegiline, these neuroprotective effects of M30 were, overall, similar to rasagiline. Summarily, M30 has a generally greater impact on neuroprotection than the MAO B inhibitors, selegiline and rasagiline. Our results suggest that M30 may have great potential in alleviating disorders involving increases in both MAO A and MAO B, such as stress-induced disorders.

  9. Simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell cultures and in sub-regions of guinea pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Hansen, Stine N; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2016-08-15

    In the present paper, we describe a validated chromatographic method for the simultaneous quantification of monoamine neurotransmitters and their biogenic metabolites intracellularly and extracellularly in primary neuronal cell culture and in sub-regions of the guinea pig brain. Electrochemical detection provided limits of quantifications (LOQs) between 3.6 and 12nM. Within the linear range, obtained recoveries were from 90.9±9.9 to 120±14% and intra-day and inter-day precisions found to be less than 5.5% and 12%, respectively. The analytical method was applicable for quantification of intracellular and extracellular amounts of monoamine neurotransmitters and their metabolites in guinea pig frontal cortex and hippocampal primary neuronal cell cultures. Noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin were found to be in a range from 0.31 to 1.7pmol per 2 million cells intracellularly, but only the biogenic metabolites could be detected extracellularly. Distinct differences in monoamine concentrations were observed when comparing concentrations in guinea pig frontal cortex and cerebellum tissue with higher amounts of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in frontal cortex, as compared to cerebellum. The chemical turnover in frontal cortex tissue of guinea pig was for serotonin successfully predicted from the turnover observed in the frontal cortex cell culture. In conclusion, the present analytical method shows high precision, accuracy and sensitivity and is broadly applicable to monoamine measurements in cell cultures as well as brain biopsies from animal models used in preclinical neurochemistry.

  10. Early and long-term effects of low- and high-LET radiation on rat behavior and monoamine metabolism in different brain regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Oleg

    Space radiation is one of the factors representing a significant health risk to the astronauts during deep-space missions. A most harmful component of space radiation beyond the Earth's magnetosphere is the galactic cosmic rays which are composed of high-energy protons, α particles, and high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei. Recent studies performed at particle accelerators have revealed a significant impact of HZE nuclei on the central nervous system and, in particular, on the cognitive functions. However the exact molecular mechanisms behind the observed impairments remain mostly unclear. This research is focused on study of early and long-term effects of low- and high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation on the rat behavior and monoamine metabolism in the brain regions involved in behavior and motor control and form emotional and motivational states. Different groups of rats were whole-body exposed to 500 MeV/u (12) C particles (LET 10.6 keV/µm) available at the Nuclotron accelerator of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia) and to gamma rays at the equivalent dose of 1 Gy. An additional group of animals was sham-irradiated and considered as a control. The isolated brain regions have included the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and striatum where we determined the concentrations of noradrenalin, dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-doxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-methoxytyramine and serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The following effects were observed in the different periods after irradiation. 1 day after exposure to (12) C particles strong changes in the concentration of monoamines and their metabolites were observed in three structures, namely, the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus. However, significant changes were found in the prefrontal cortex and weaker changes were seen in the nucleus accumbens, whereas changes were insignificant in the hippocampus

  11. Changes in free amino acid and monoamine concentrations in the chick brain associated with feeding behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Phuong V; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S.; Nagasawa, Mao; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Domesticated chicks are precocial and therefore have relatively well-developed feeding behavior. The role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in food-intake regulation in chicks has been reported for decades. However, we hypothesized that nutrients and their metabolites in the brain may be involved in food intake in chicks because these animals exhibit a very frequent feeding pattern. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the feeding behavior of chicks as well as the associated change...

  12. Development of new brain imaging agents based upon nocaine-modafinil hybrid monoamine transporter inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musachio, John L; Hong, Jinsoo; Ichise, Masanori; Seneca, Nicholas; Brown, Amira K; Liow, Jeih-San; Halldin, Christer; Innis, Robert B; Pike, Victor W; He, Rong; Zhou, Jia; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2006-06-15

    11C-labeled (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]ethanol ([11C]5) and (+)-trans-2-[[(3R,4S)-4-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methylpiperidin-3-yl]methylsulfanyl]-1-(piperidin-1-yl)ethanone ([11C]6) were synthesized and evaluated as new imaging agents for the norepinephrine transporter (NET). [11C]5 and [11C]6 display high affinity for the NET in vitro (Ki = 0.94 and 0.68 nM, respectively) and significant selectivity over the dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporters (SERT). Because of their high affinity and favorable transporter selectivities we speculated that these ligands might serve as useful PET agents for imaging NET in vivo. Contrary to our expectations, both of these ligands provided brain images that were more typical of those shown by agents binding to the DAT.

  13. Chronic estradiol treatment decreases brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and monoamine levels in the amygdala--implications for behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Priya; Subramanian, Madhan; Nunez, Joseph L; Mohankumar, Sheba M J; Mohankumar, P S

    2014-03-15

    Changes in serum estradiol levels are associated with mood disorders in women. However, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Because alterations in Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and monoamine levels in the hippocampus and amygdala have been associated with anxiety disorders, we hypothesized that chronic treatment with a low dose of estradiol would cause anxiety-like disorder by altering BDNF and monoamine levels in these regions. To test this hypothesis, female rats were sham-implanted (Controls) or implanted with pellets that release estradiol-17β (E2) for 90-days at the rate of 20 ng/day. Animals underwent behavioral tests such as the open field test and elevated plus maze test at the end of treatment. Brains from these animals were frozen, sectioned and the hippocampus, central amygdala and caudate putamen were microdissected and analyzed for monoamine levels using HPLC. BDNF protein levels in these areas were measured using ELISA and BDNF mRNA levels were analyzed using RT-PCR. In the open field test, animals chronically treated with E2 displayed anxiety-like behavior that was marked by a decrease in the number of inner zone crossings and increase in the rate of defecation compared to controls. However, no behavioral changes were observed in the elevated plus maze test. Chronic E2 treatment also decreased BDNF protein and mRNA levels in the central amygdala that was accompanied by a reduction in dopamine levels. No changes were observed in the hippocampus and caudate putamen. These results suggest that BDNF and dopamine in the central amygdala might possibly mediate chronic E2-induced behavioral alterations.

  14. Sex-dependent maternal deprivation effects on brain monoamine content in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorente, Ricardo; O'Shea, Esther; Gutierrez-Lopez, M Dolores; Llorente-Berzal, Alvaro; Colado, María Isabel; Viveros, María-Paz

    2010-07-26

    Rats subjected to a single prolonged episode of maternal deprivation (MD) [24h, postnatal days 9-10] show, later in life, behavioural alterations that resemble specific signs of schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric signs including increased levels of impulsivity and an apparent difficulty to cope with stressful situations. Some of these behavioural modifications are observable in the periadolescent period. However there is no previous information regarding the possible underlying neurochemical correlates at this critical developmental period. In this study we have addressed the effects of MD on the levels of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and their respective metabolites in prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum, midbrain and cerebellum of male and female periadolescent Wistar rats. MD rats showed significantly increased levels of 5-HT in all regions studied with the exception of cerebellum. In addition, MD animals showed increased levels of DA in PFC as well as increased levels of DA and a decrease of DOPAC/DA and HVA/DA ratios in striatum. The effect of MD on the monoaminergic systems was in several cases sex-dependent.

  15. Monoamine theories of depression: historical impact on biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulinari, Shai

    2012-01-01

    Monoamine theories associate depression with reduced brain monoamine levels. These theories achieved broad popularity in the mid-1960s. The present article reviews the historical development of monoamine theories and their subsequent impact on biomedical research. Alleged divisions between West European and US researchers over competing versions of the theories are investigated using bibliometrics. Subsequently, the application of monoamine theories in the NIMH Collaborative Program on the Psychobiology of Depression is covered. The article argues that the impact of monoamine theories is best explained by the ability of researchers, governmental agencies, and pharmaceutical companies to invoke theories that advance various projects and agendas.

  16. Subclinical effects of groundwater contaminants. Pt. 4. Effects of repeated oral exposure to combinations of benzene and toluene on regional brain monoamine metabolism in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, G.C.; Parker, R.D.R. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (USA). Dept. of Biology); Sharma, R.P. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (USA). Dept. of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences)

    1990-11-01

    The effect of combined treatment with benzene and toluene on the endogenous concentrations of the catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA), the catecholamine metabolites vanillylmandelic acid (VMA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), and the indoleamine serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), were investigated in six discrete brain regions of CD-1 mice. Groups of male, adult mice were continuously exposed to benzene (166 mg/l), toluene (80 and 325 mg/l), and combinations of benzene + toluene (80 or 325 mg/l) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Benzene produced increases of NE in the hypothalamus, cortex, midbrain and medulla oblongata, DA in the hypothalamus and corpus striatum, and 5-HT in all dissected brain regions except cerebellum. Elevated levels of various monoamine metabolites were also observed in these brain areas. Toluene ingestion alone also significantly increased the concentrations of NE, DA, 5-HT, and their metabolites in several brain regions. Mice given the combined treatments exhibited raised regional neurochemical levels when compared to the untreated controls. Increased concentrations of biogenic amine metabolites in several brain regions were greater in the combined exposures of benzene and toluene than when either chemical was used alone. The findings were different from those observed on immune parameters using similar treatment protocols, where simultaneous exposure to toluene prevented the immunotoxic effects of benzene. (orig./MG).

  17. Effects of Electric Acupuncture on Monoamine Neurotransmitters in Brains of Newborn Rats with Cerebral Palsy%电针对新生脑性麻痹大鼠单胺类神经递质的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林世坚; 刘振寰; 潘佩光; 赵勇; 祁岩超

    2009-01-01

    objective to detect the content of monoamine neurotransmitters in hippocampus, cortex, basal nucleus and the brainstem of newborn rats with cerebral palsy, to observe the effects of acupuncture on monoamine neurotransmitters, and to explore the mechanism of acupuncture treatment to newborn rats with cerebral palsy. Methods using the method of hypoxic ischemic to make the model of newborn rats with cerebral palsy,decapitating brain after giving acupuncture treatment, separating the required brain regions, and detecting the content of monoamine neurotransmitters with speetrophotometer.Results Compared with the sham operation group, the content of dopamine (DA), 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in basal nucleus area of newborn rats with cerebral palsy, and norepinephrine (NE) in Brainstem area decreased significantly(P<0.05), which elevated ignificantly(P<0.05)afler acupuncture treatment. Conclusion it indicated that to improve the ontent of monoamine neurotransmitters in related brain areas may be one of the mechanisms in the acupuncture treatment of newborn rats with cerebral paraly.

  18. Duration of hexobarbital-induced sleep and monoamine oxidase activities in rat brain: Focus on the behavioral activity and on the free-radical oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseilikman, Vadim E; Kozochkin, Denis A; Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Tseilikman, Olga B; Misharina, Maria E; Nikitina, Anna A; Komelkova, Maria V; Lapshin, Maxim S; Kondashevskaya, Marina V; Lazuko, Svetlana S; Kusina, Oxana V; Sahabutdinov, Marat V

    2016-04-01

    The present study is focused on the relationship between monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and hepatic content of cytochrome P450 (CYP), which reflects the status of microsomal oxidation. For vital integrative evaluation of hepatic microsomal oxidation in rats, the hexobarbital sleep test was used, and content of CYP was measured in hepatic microsomes. Rats with short hexobarbital sleep time (SHST) had higher content of microsomal CYP than rats with long hexobarbital sleep time (LHST). Whole brain MAO-A and MAO-B activities, serotonin and carbonylated protein levels were higher in SHST than in LHST rats. MAO-A and MAO-B activities were higher in brain cortex of SHST rats; MAO-A activity was higher only in hypothalamus and medulla of LHST. The same brain regions of LHST rats had higher concentrations of carbonylated proteins and lipid peroxidation products than in SHST rats. MAO activity was correlated with microsomal oxidation phenotype. Rats with higher hepatic content of CYP had higher activities of MAO-A and MAO-B in the brain and higher plasma serotonin levels than rats with lower microsomal oxidation. In conclusion, data obtained in this study showed a correlation between MAO activity and microsomal oxidation phenotype.

  19. Effect of acute swim stress on plasma corticosterone and brain monoamine levels in bidirectionally selected DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains differing in fear recall and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Hanke, Joachim; Rose, Claudia; Walsh, Irene; Foley, Tara; Clarke, Gerard; Schwegler, Herbert; Cryan, John F; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz

    2014-12-01

    Stress-induced changes in plasma corticosterone and central monoamine levels were examined in mouse strains that differ in fear-related behaviors. Two DxH recombinant inbred mouse strains with a DBA/2J background, which were originally bred for a high (H-FSS) and low fear-sensitized acoustic startle reflex (L-FSS), were used. Levels of noradrenaline, dopamine, and serotonin and their metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) were studied in the amygdala, hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex, striatum, hypothalamus and brainstem. H-FSS mice exhibited increased fear levels and a deficit in fear extinction (within-session) in the auditory fear-conditioning test, and depressive-like behavior in the acute forced swim stress test. They had higher tissue noradrenaline and serotonin levels and lower dopamine and serotonin turnover under basal conditions, although they were largely insensitive to stress-induced changes in neurotransmitter metabolism. In contrast, acute swim stress increased monoamine levels but decreased turnover in the less fearful L-FSS mice. L-FSS mice also showed a trend toward higher basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels and an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin in the hypothalamus and brainstem 30 min after stress compared to H-FSS mice. Moreover, the dopaminergic system was activated differentially in the medial prefrontal cortex and striatum of the two strains by acute stress. Thus, H-FSS mice showed increased basal noradrenaline tissue levels compatible with a fear phenotype or chronic stressed condition. Low corticosterone levels and the poor monoamine response to stress in H-FSS mice may point to mechanisms similar to those found in principal fear disorders or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  20. A rapid and sensitive method for the analysis of brain monoamine neurotransmitters using ultra-fast liquid chromatography coupled to electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrot, Sandrine; Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Denoroy, Luc

    2011-12-15

    Electrochemical detection is often used to detect catecholamines and indolamines in brain samples that have been separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). This paper presents the transfer of an existing chromatographic method for the determination of monoamines in brain tissues using 5 μm granulometry HPLC columns to columns with a particle diameter less than 3 μm. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection, and stability of samples) for this new ultrafast high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. The separation of seven compounds, noradrenaline, dopamine and three of its metabolites, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, homovanillic acid, and 3-methoxytyramine, and serotonin and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid was analyzed using this UHPLC-electrochemical detection method. The final method, which was applied to brain tissue extracts from mice, rats, and cats, decreased analysis time by a factor of 4 compared to HPLC, while guaranteeing good analytical performance.

  1. Effect of Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide on intracerebral acetylcholinesterase and monoamine neurotransmitters in a D-galactose-induced aging brain mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingsan Miao; Jianlian Gao; Guangwei Zhang; Xiao Ma; Ying Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The most prominent characteristic of brain aging is decreased learning and memory ability. The functions of learning and memory are closely related to intracerebral acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) and monoamine neurotransmitter activity. Previous studies have shown that Schisandra chinensis potysaccharide has an anti-aging effect. OBJECTIVE: To explore the effects of Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide on AChE activity and monoamine neurotransmitter content, as well as learning and memory ability in a D-galactose-induced aging mouse brain model compared with the positive control drug Kangnaoling. DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Completely randomized, controlled experiment based on neurobiochemistry was performed at the Pharmacological Laboratory, Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine from September to December 2003.MATERIALS: Schisandra chinensis was purchased from Henan Provincial Medicinal Company. Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide was obtained by water extraction and alcohol precipitation. Kangnaoling pellets were provided by Liaoning Tianlong Pharmaceutical (batch No. 20030804;state drug permit No. H21023095). A total of 50 six-week-old Kunming mice were randomly divided into five groups: blank control, model, Kangnaoling, high and low dosage Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide groups, with 10 mice per group. METHODS: Mice in the blank control group were subcutaneously injected with 0.5 mL/20 g normal saline into the nape of the neck each day, while the remaining mice were subcutaneously injected with 5% D-galactose saline solution (0.5 mL/20 g) in the nape for 40 days to induce a brain aging model. On day 11, mice in the high and low dosage Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide groups were intragastrically infused with 20 mg/mL and 10 mg/mL Schisandra chinensis polysaccharide solution (0.2 mL/10 g), respectively. Mice from the Kangnaoling group were intragastrically infused with 35 mg/mL Kangnaoling suspension (0.2 mL/10 g), and the mice in the

  2. The new psychoactive substances 5-(2-aminopropyl)indole (5-IT) and 6-(2-aminopropyl)indole (6-IT) interact with monoamine transporters in brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marusich, Julie A; Antonazzo, Kateland R; Blough, Bruce E; Brandt, Simon D; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, use of psychoactive synthetic stimulants has grown rapidly. 5-(2-Aminopropyl)indole (5-IT) is a synthetic drug associated with a number of fatalities, that appears to be one of the newest 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) replacements. Here, the monoamine-releasing properties of 5-IT, its structural isomer 6-(2-aminopropyl)indole (6-IT), and MDMA were compared using in vitro release assays at transporters for dopamine (DAT), norepinephrine (NET), and serotonin (SERT) in rat brain synaptosomes. In vivo pharmacology was assessed by locomotor activity and a functional observational battery (FOB) in mice. 5-IT and 6-IT were potent substrates at DAT, NET, and SERT. In contrast with the non-selective releasing properties of MDMA, 5-IT displayed greater potency for release at DAT over SERT, while 6-IT displayed greater potency for release at SERT over DAT. 5-IT produced locomotor stimulation and typical stimulant effects in the FOB similar to those produced by MDMA. Conversely, 6-IT increased behaviors associated with 5-HT toxicity. 5-IT likely has high abuse potential, which may be somewhat diminished by its slow onset of in vivo effects, whereas 6-IT may have low abuse liability, but enhanced risk for adverse effects. Results indicate that subtle differences in the chemical structure of transporter ligands can have profound effects on biological activity. The potent monoamine-releasing actions of 5-IT, coupled with its known inhibition of MAO A, could underlie its dangerous effects when administered alone, and in combination with other monoaminergic drugs or medications. Consequently, 5-IT and related compounds may pose substantial risk for abuse and serious adverse effects in human users.

  3. (/sup 11/C)clorgyline and (/sup 11/C)-L-deprenyl and their use in measuring functional monoamine oxidase activity in the brain using positron emission tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1986-04-17

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging the activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase in the living body by using /sup 11/C-labeled enzyme inhibitors which bind irreversibly to an enzyme as a result of catalysis. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  4. Oxytocin-Induced Changes in Monoamine Level in Symmetric Brain Structures of Isolated Aggressive C57Bl/6 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, I V; Mikheev, V V; Marysheva, V V; Bychkov, E R; Proshin, S N

    2016-03-01

    Changes in activity of monoaminergic systems of the left and right brain hemispheres after administration of saline and oxytocin were studied in male C57Bl/6 mice subjected to social isolation. The concentrations of dopamine, norepinephrine, serotonin, and their metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic, homovanillic, and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acids were measured in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, olfactory tubercle, and striatum of the left and right brain hemispheres by HPLC. In isolated aggressive males treated intranasally with saline, the content of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid was significantly higher in the right hippocampus. Oxytocin reduces aggression caused by long-term social isolation, but has no absolute ability to suppress this type of behavior. Oxytocin reduced dopamine content in the left cortex and serotonin content in the right hippocampus and left striatum. Furthermore, oxytocin evened the revealed asymmetry in serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations in the hippocampus. At the same time, asymmetry in dopamine concentration appeared in the cortex with predominance of this transmitter in the right hemisphere. The data are discussed in the context of lateralization of neurotransmitter systems responsible for intraspecific aggression caused by long-term social isolation.

  5. Effect of monoamine nervous transmitter and neuropeptide Y in the aged rats with myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the mechanism of myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion in aged rats from the changes in Dopamine (DA), Noradrenalin (NE), Epinephrine(E) and Neuropeptide Y(NPY).METHODS: Young (5 months) and aged (20 months or more) rats were divided into model groups and normal control groups, respectively. We observed the following items in rats with 60 minute reperfusion after 30 minute brain ischemia: the pathological changed of myocardium, the activities of lactic dehydrrogenase(LDH), creatine phosphokinase(CPK), the contents of NE, DA, E, NPY. RESULTS:The CPK and LDH activities in the young model rats were higher than those in the young control rats was higher than that in the young control rats (P<0.05). The serum CPK activity in the aged control rats was higher than that in the young control rats (P<0.05). The myocardial CPK activity was higher in the aged model rats compared with the young molel rats (P<0.05) and was higher in aged control rats compared with the young control rats (P<0.01). The myocardial LDH activity was lower in the aged control rats than that in the young control rats (P<0.05) and aged model rats (P<0.01). The serum NE level, the level of NE and DA in the hypothalamus were higher obviously than those in the young control rats. The serum NE contents in the two model groups (young and aged) were higher respectively than the two control rats (young and aged). The following items’ contents were higher in the aged model rats than in the young model rats: serum NE, serum E, hypothalamus NE. The hypothalamus NE and E content was lower in the aged model rats than in te aged control rats. NPY level in the brain tissue was lower in the aged control rats than that in the young control rats and aged model rats (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The myocardial injury after brain ischemia-reperfusion was concerned with the enhanced excitability of sympathetic-adrenal system, espectially in the aged rats. However, the change in myocardial

  6. Effects of Yulangsan polysaccharide on monoamine neurotransmitters, adenylate cyclase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression in a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Liang; Renbin Huang; Xing Lin; Jianchun Huang; Zhongshi Huang; Huagang Liu

    2012-01-01

    The present study established a mouse model of depression induced by unpredictable chronic mild stress. The model mice were treated with Yulangsan polysaccharide (YLSPS; 150, 300 and 600 mg/kg) for 21 days, and compared with fluoxetine-treated and normal control groups. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunity and immunohistochemical staining showed that following treatment with YLSPS (300 and 600 mg/kg), monoamine neurotransmitter levels, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression were significantly elevated, and depression-like behaviors were improved. Open-field and novelty-suppressed feeding tests showed that mouse activity levels were increased and feeding latency was shortened following treatment. Our results indicate that YLSPS inhibits depression by upregulating monoamine neurotransmitters, prefrontal cortex adenylate cyclase activity and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.

  7. Effects of repeated low-dose exposure of the nerve agent VX on monoamine levels in different brain structures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziani, S; Christin, D; Daulon, S; Breton, P; Perrier, N; Taysse, L

    2014-05-01

    In a previous report, alterations of the serotonin metabolism were previously reported in mice intoxicated with repeated low doses of soman. In order to better understand the effects induced by repeated low-dose exposure to organophosphorus compounds on physiological and behavioural functions, the levels of endogenous monoamines (serotonin and dopamine) in different brain areas in mice intoxicated with sublethal dose of (O-ethyl-S-[2(di-isopropylamino) ethyl] methyl phosphonothioate) (VX) were analysed by HPLC method with electrochemical detection. Animals were injected once a day for three consecutive days with 0.10 LD50 of VX (5 μg/kg, i.p). Neither severe signs of cholinergic toxicity nor pathological changes in brain tissue of exposed animals were observed. Cholinesterase (ChE) activity was only inhibited in plasma (a maximum of 30% inhibition 24 h after the last injection of VX), but remained unchanged in the brain. Serotonin and dopamine (DA) metabolism appeared significantly modified. During the entire period of investigation, at least one of the three parameters investigated (i.e. DA and DOPAC levels and DOPAC/DA ratio) was modified. During the toxic challenge, an increase of the serotonin metabolism was noted in hippocampus (HPC), hypothalamus/thalamus, pons medulla and cerebellum (CER). This increase was maintained 4 weeks after exposure in HPC, pons medulla and CER whereas a decrease in cortex 3 weeks after the toxic challenge was observed. The lack of correlation between brain ChE activity and neurochemical outcomes points out to independent mechanisms. The involvement in possibly long-lasting behavioural disorders is discussed.

  8. Effects of taurine deficiency and chronic methanol administration on rat retina, optic nerve and brain amino acids and monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Quevedo, A; Obregón, F; Urbina, M; Roussó, T; Lima, L

    2003-08-01

    A chronic methanol (MeOH) intoxication scheme (2 g/kg/day ip for 2 weeks) was carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats, previously depleted of folates with methotrexate (MTX). beta-Alanine (beta-Ala), 5%, was also administered to some animals in the drinking water. Amino acids were determined in plasma, retina, optic nerve, hippocampus and posterior cortex by HPLC with fluorescence detection and monoamines in retina, hippocampus and posterior cortex by electrochemical detection. Beta-Ala administration reduced taurine (Tau) levels in plasma, hippocampus and posterior cortex, but not in retina and optic nerve. Aspartate (Asp) concentration in the optic nerve was increased in MTX-MeOH treated animals, and the administration of beta-Ala did not modify this elevation. The association of beta-Ala with MTX-MeOH produced an increase of threonine, and a decrease of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in the retina without modifying 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, whereas in the hippocampus an elevation of asparagine was observed. We conclude that, in the retina, beta-Ala in combination with MTX-MeOH increased serotonin and decreased dopamine (DA) turnover rate, and resulted in changes in the amino acid balance, that could affect glycinergic activity. On the other hand, in the hippocampus, Asp metabolism could be affected by Tau depletion with beta-Ala.

  9. Specific responses of monoamine neurotransmitters to various acute stressors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rongrong He; Guanyu Lin; Yifang Li; Keiich Abe; Xinsheng Yao; Hiroshi Kurihara

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the composition of histamine, serotonin and dopamine using high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection, and compared the changes in monoamine levels in plasma, the cortex and midbrain of mice exposed to acute stressors, such as blood-drawing stimulation or restraint. Results demonstrated that plasma histamine levels were markedly increased when mice were exposed to blood-drawing stimulation and restraint stress. However, serotonin levels decreased in plasma of mice treated with restraint stress, and dopamine levels in plasma had no significant response to the two acute stressors. The three monoamines (histamine, serotonin and dopamine) increased at different degrees in restraint mice, but not in brain regions of blood-drawing stressed mice. Results indicated that histaminergic, serotonergic or dopaminergic systems have their own specific response to different acute stressors.

  10. Concentrations of Monoamines and Their Metabolites in Blood Plasma and Some Brain Structures of Mice, Participated in a Space Flight on the Aircraft BION-M1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtemberg, Andrey; Kudrin, Vladimir

    The purpose of this work was to study the possible disturbances of monoamines concentration and their metabolites in some structures of mouse brain and blood plasma caused by the influence of space flight. The forty eight C57BL/6 mice were divided into the following groups : basal control - animals , which together with a group of space flight arrived at Baykonur and then were returned to Moscow; the first space flight group - animals who spent 30 days in space, BION-M1 - board and decapitated 12 hours after the landing; animal house control to the first space flight group; second space flight group - animals who spent 30 days in space, aboard the BION-M1, and then recovered at ground conditions for 7 days; animal house control to the second space flight group; space flight imitation group - spent 30 days on board at ground model of BION-M1; animal house control to the imitation group. In all animals concentration of HA, DA, 5 -HT and their metabolites DOPAC, HVA, 3 -MT, 5 - HIAA in plasma and in the prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus, striatum and hippocampus were studied. In the blood plasma of first space flight group the concentrations of DOPAC were significantly higher compared to animal house control. The most significant changes were observed in the second space flight group, in those animals which recovered after the flight. There was a significant increase in the concentration of HA and A in blood plasma relative to the basal control and increased concentration of HA and the DOPAC/DA ratio relative to the first space flight group. No significant changes were observed in the hippocampus. In the first space flight group there was observed an increase in concentration of HA and DOPAC in the hypothalamus relative to controls. Seven days after rest concentrations of monoamines and their metabolites were significantly enhanced relative to the control and the first space flight groups. In physiology and pharmacology there is a process called as withdrawal effect

  11. Interaction Between Brain Histamine and Serotonin, Norepinephrine, and Dopamine Systems: In Vivo Microdialysis and Electrophysiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Cremers, Thomas I H F; Westerink, Ben H C; Dremencov, Eliyahu

    2015-06-01

    Brain monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and histamine) play an important role in emotions, cognition, and pathophysiology and treatment of mental disorders. The interactions between serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine were studied in numerous works; however, histamine system received less attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between histamine and other monoamines, using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology. It was found that the inverse agonist of histamine-3 receptors, thioperamide, increased the firing activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Selective agonist of histamine-3 receptors, immepip, reversed thiperamide-induced stimulation of firing activity of dopamine neurons. The firing rates of serotonin and norpeinephrine neurons were not attenuated by immepip or thioperamide. Thioperamide robustly and significantly increased extracellular concentrations of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the rat prefrontal cortex and slightly increased norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. It can be concluded that histamine stimulates serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine transmission in the brain. Modulation of firing of dopamine neurons is a key element in functional interactions between histamine and other monoamines. Antagonists of histamine-3 receptors, because of their potential ability to stimulate monoamine neurotransmission, might be beneficial in the treatment of mental disorders.

  12. Histaminergic system in the cat hypothalamus with reference to type B monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J S; Kitahama, K; Fort, P; Panula, P; Denney, R M; Jouvet, M

    1993-04-15

    It is known that histamine (HA) and type B monoamine oxidase (MAO-B), an enzyme involved in its metabolism, are present in the posterior hypothalamus, but the sites where MAO-B intervenes in HA metabolism remain uncertain. The present study examined and compared the detailed distribution and morphology of neurons immunoreactive to HA (HA-ir) and MAO-B (MAO-B-ir) in the cat hypothalamus. HA-ir neurons were localized almost exclusively in the posterior hypothalamus with the largest group in the tuberomammillary nucleus and adjacent areas. MAO-B-ir staining was detected in the vast majority of HA-ir neurons, suggesting that the degradation of tele-methylhistamine (t-MHA), the direct metabolite of HA, may occur within these cells. Nevertheless, a few HA-ir cells showed no detectable or very weak MAO-B-ir labeling; a small group of neurons containing MAO-B alone was detected in the area dorsolateral to the caudal part of the arcuate nucleus. Numerous HA-ir axons and terminal-like structures were distributed unevenly in virtually all hypothalamic regions. One of their principal trajectories ascended through the ventrolateral part of the hypothalamus and rostrally formed an axon column, which ascended into the preoptic area and contributed fibers to the diagonal band of Broca and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. Other HA-ir axons passed laterally, dorsal to the zona incerta or ventrally through a narrow zone dorsal to the optic tract. Numerous long HA-ir axons coursed dorsomedially from the ventrolateral posterior hypothalamus to the dorsal hypothalamic area. Many are oriented vertically to the thalamus in the midline. MAO-B-ir axons and fibers were detectable throughout the hypothalamus and overlapped the areas distributing HA-ir fibers. They were, however, weaker in staining intensity and apparently fewer than the HA-ir fibers. MAO-B-ir glial cells were numerous in all hypothalamic structures rich in HA-ir fibers. These results suggest that the metabolism of t

  13. [Monoamines stimulations in experimental carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, I; Spuzić, I; Rakić, Lj

    1994-01-01

    Facts about the role of CNS monoamines in cancerogenesis have been accumulated for many years. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of interaction of psychoactive drug (Piracetam) and other treatments on survival time of tumour-bearing rats. 138 Wistar rats were used in the experiment. The animals were injected 1% 3--Methilcholantren suspension in 10% Tylose, s.c. under the dorsal skin of the neck in a dose of 3 mg/animal. Within 4-9 months after a single injection, the rats developed tumours at the site of injection. The surgical removal was performed when tumours reached the size of 1-3 cm. After surgical extirpation of tumours different groups of animals were treated by cyclophosphamide (s.c. one-time dose of 50 mg/kg for female and 100 mg/kg for male) or by psychoactive drug (Piracetam) administrated by GE tube 5 time/week, 100 mg/kg. Autopsy and histological examinations were carried out in all animals. Survival time (> 120 days) was the greatest in group B (Piracetam, after surgical removal of tumours) 81.2%, and group C (Cyclophosphamid, after surgical removal of tumours) 68.8% and in group A (only surgical removal of tumours) 50%. In group B the incidence of metastases was the smallest (87.1% of animals were without metastases), compared with group C (45.4% of animals were without metastases) and group A (27.3% of animals were without metastases). The diference is statistically significant. The mechanism of antineoplastic effect of Piracetam consisted of the interaction of influences both on metabolism of the Central nervous system and the tumour. Probably, it is the neurotransmitter modulation that had its effect on carcinogenesis not only by regulation/disregulation of brain homeostasis, but also via direct effect on intracellular processes during cell development and differentation.

  14. Maternal factors and monoamine changes in stress-resilient and susceptible mice: cross-fostering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Priya; Merali, Zul; Kolajova, Miroslava; Tannenbaum, Beth M; Anisman, Hymie

    2006-09-21

    Genetic factors influence stressor-provoked monoamine changes associated with anxiety and depression, but such effects might be moderated by early life experiences. To assess the contribution of maternal influences in determining adult brain monoamine responses to a stressor, strains of mice that were either stressor-reactive or -resilient (BALB/cByJ and C57BL/6ByJ, respectively) were assessed as a function of whether they were raising their biological offspring or those of the other strain. As adults, offspring were assessed with respect to stressor-provoked plasma corticosterone elevations and monoamine variations within discrete stressor-sensitive brain regions. BALB/cByJ mice demonstrated poorer maternal behaviors than C57BL/6ByJ dams, irrespective of the pups being raised. In response to a noise stressor, BALB/cByJ mice exhibited higher plasma corticosterone levels and elevated monoamine turnover in several limbic and hypothalamic sites. The stressor-provoked corticosterone increase in BALB/cByJ mice was diminished among males (but not females) raised by a C57BL/6ByJ dam. Moreover, increased prefrontal cortical dopamine utilization was attenuated among BALB/cByJ mice raised by a C57BL/6ByJ dam. These effects were asymmetrical as a C57BL/6ByJ mice raised by a BALB/cByJ dam did not exhibit increased stressor reactivity. It appears that stressors influence multiple neurochemical systems that have been implicated in anxiety and affective disorders. Although monoamine variations were largely determined by genetic factors, maternal influences contributed to stressor-elicited neurochemical changes in some regions, particularly dopamine activation within the prefrontal cortex.

  15. Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the left side; when you're listening to music, you're using the right side. It's believed that some people are more "right-brained" or "left-brained" while others are more "whole-brained," meaning they use both halves of their brain to the same degree. The outer layer of ...

  16. Long-term exposure to xenoestrogens alters some brain monoamines and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels in adult male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashwa M. Saied

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to examine the effect of long-term treatment with the phytoestrogen soy isoflavone [(SIF; 43 mg/kg body weight/day] and/or the plastics component bisphenol-A [(BPA; 3 mg/kg body weight/day] on some monoamines in the forebrain and both serum thyroid hormones and cortisol levels of adult rats. Significant increases in serotonin (5-HT and norepinephrine (NE level, and significant decreases in 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA level and 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio, were observed after treatment with SIF or BPA. Level of dopamine (DA was increased in SIF-treated group and decreased in BPA-treated group. Activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO was decreased in all treated groups. The level of serum thyroid hormones (fT3 and fT4 was increased after treatment with SIF and decreased after exposure to BPA, while cortisol level was increased in all treated groups. It may be concluded that long-term exposure to SIF or BPA disrupts monoamine levels in the forebrain of adult rats through alteration in the metabolic pathways of amines and disorders of thyroid hormones and cortisol levels.

  17. Expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor, activity-regulated cytoskeleton protein mRNA, and enhancement of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in rats after sub-chronic and chronic treatment with the triple monoamine re-uptake inhibitor tesofensine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Marianne H; Rosenbrock, Holger; Sams-Dodd, Frank; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2007-01-26

    The changes of gene expression resulting from long-term exposure to monoamine antidepressant drugs in experimental animals are key to understanding the mechanisms of action of this class of drugs in man. Many of these genes and their products are either relevant biomarkers or directly involved in structural changes that are perhaps necessary for the antidepressant effect. Tesofensine is a novel triple monoamine reuptake inhibitor that acts to increase noradrenaline, serotonin, and dopamine neurotransmission. This study was undertaken to examine the effect of sub-chronic (5 days) and chronic (14 days) administration of Tesofensine on the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and activity-regulated cytoskeleton protein (Arc) in the rat hippocampus. Furthermore, hippocampi from the same animals were used to investigate the effect on cell proliferation by means of Ki-67- and NeuroD-immunoreactivity. We find that chronic, but not sub-chronic treatment with Tesofensine increases BDNF mRNA in the CA3 region of the hippocampus (35%), and Arc mRNA in the CA1 of the hippocampus (65%). Furthermore, the number of Ki-67- and neuroD-positive cells increased after chronic, but not sub-chronic treatment. This study shows that Tesofensine enhances hippocampal gene expression and new cell formation indicative for an antidepressant potential of this novel drug substance.

  18. Effects of hexabromocyclododecane(HBCD) on monoamine neurotransmitters contents and monoamine oxidase activity of developmental rat brain%六溴环十二烷对发育期大鼠脑单胺类神经递质质量比及单胺氧化酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳; 冀秀玲; 赵文娟; 殷明; 蒋惠男; 张江

    2012-01-01

    .01). As for the monoamine oxidase, an increase trend can be found with MAO activity in the range of 10 to 100 μg/kg doses and significantly changed at the dose of 100 μg/kg(p <0.05) . When the dose is kept at a level of 300 (μg/kg, the trend is likely to drop, though not enough significantly. DA, NE and 5 ~ HT were found to play a important role in the learning, memory and moods in the rats' brain. Changing the contents of DA, 5 - HT, disorders can be found with the central nervous system with the rats when the developmental HBCD was exposed to the NE and MAO activities. Compared with the dose of 300 μg/kg, severe effects were detected on the neurotransmitters and MAO at a level of 10-100 μg/kg. it indicates that HBCD has the feature of low-dosage and high toxicity to the developmental rat brain. Furthermore, the exposure dosages of 10 - 100 μg/kg can only produce a mirror effect in comparison with the content of HBCD in the real environment. However, HBCD of the environmental exposure levels proves to produce neurotoxicity and have effect on the learning and memory system of the developmental rats. Thus, it can be said that this paper has provided an important reference in the study of the HBCD exposure and its effect on the public health in the environment, especially on children ' s healthy growth.

  19. Taltirelin improves motor ataxia independently of monoamine levels in rolling mouse nagoya, a model of spinocerebellar atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoka; Honda, Motoko; Kimura, Satoko; Tanabe, Mitsuo; Oda, Sen-ichi; Ono, Hideki

    2005-12-01

    To examine the relationship between motor ataxia and monoamine levels in the central nervous system, the contents and concentrations of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) in the cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord were measured in rolling mouse Nagoya (RMN), a murine model of spinocerebellar atrophy. The tissue weight of the cerebellum and spinal cord, but not that of the brain stem was significantly lower in RMN than in the control group. In RMN, the NA content of the brain stem and spinal cord, but not the cerebellum were decreased relative to the control, and the concentration of NA in the spinal cord was also lower, but not significant. The DA and 5-HT contents in each tissue did not differ from those of the control, but the concentrations of monoamines, except for DA, were elevated in the brain stem and spinal cord in RMN. In particular, the concentrations of NA, DA and 5-HT in the cerebellum were significantly increased in RMN. Repeated administration of tartilerin hydrate, an analog of thyrotropin-releasing hormone, improved the ataxia of RMN, and elicited no obvious changes in either monoamine content or concentration of cerebellum, brain stem and spinal cord. These results indicate that the concentration of DA, as well as NA and 5-HT, increased in the RMN cerebellum, and that tartilerin improves the motor function of these mice via mechanisms other than changes in the levels of NA, DA and 5-HT in the central nervous system.

  20. Your Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Your Brain & Nervous System KidsHealth > For Kids > Your Brain & Nervous System Print A A A What's in this article? ... the spinal cord and nerves — known as the nervous system — that let messages flow back and forth between ...

  1. Acupuncture Treatment Methods' Influence on the Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Correlative Diseases of Nervous System%针刺对单胺类神经递质及相关神经系统疾病的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈乐乐; 岳增辉; 朱小姗

    2011-01-01

    The monoamine neurotransmitter regulates mammal's nervous system function, the visceral function, stress reaction and exciting or soothing to the central nerve system. The results from the present investigation suggest that many diseases of nervous system like Stroke, Parkinson Disease, Dementia, Depression and Morphine Dependence are both related to the abnormity of the monoamine neurotransmitters. Acupuncture has the good therapeutic action on many diseases of nervous system by adjusting the level of monoamine neurotransmitters.%单胺类(monoamines)神经递质对哺乳动物的神经系统功能、内脏功能、应激反应,以及对中枢神经系统的兴奋或抑制起着协调作用.目前的研究表明,许多神经系统疾病如脑卒中、帕金森病、老年性痴呆、抑郁症及吗啡戒断均与单胺类神经递质的异常有关.而针刺通过调节单胺类神经递质的水平,对许多神经系统疾病具有较好的治疗作用.

  2. Fluorescent Probes for Analysis and Imaging of Monoamine Oxidase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dokyoung; Jun, Yong Woong; Ahn, Kyo Han [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monoamine oxidases catalyze the oxidative deamination of dietary amines and amine neurotransmitters, and assist in maintaining the homeostasis of the amine neurotransmitters in the brain. Dysfunctions of these enzymes can cause neurological and behavioral disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. To understand their physiological roles, efficient assay methods for monoamine oxidases are essential. Reviewed in this Perspective are the recent progress in the development of fluorescent probes for monoamine oxidases and their applications to enzyme assays in cells and tissues. It is evident that still there is strong need for a fluorescent probe with desirable substrate selectivity and photophysical properties to challenge the much unsolved issues associated with the enzymes and the diseases.

  3. Effect of aspartame on oxidative stress and monoamine neurotransmitter levels in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Salem, Neveen A; Hussein, Jihan Seid

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of the sweetener aspartame on oxidative stress and brain monoamines in normal circumstances and after intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg) in mice. Aspartame (0.625-45 mg/kg) was given via subcutaneous route at the time of endotoxin administration. Mice were euthanized 4 h later. Reduced glutathione (GSH), lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances; TBARS), and nitrite concentrations were measured in brain and liver. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and glucose were determined in brain. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were measured in liver. The administration of only aspartame (22.5 and 45 mg/kg) increased brain TBARS by 17.7-32.8%, decreased GSH by 25.6-31.6%, and increased TNF-α by 16.7-44%. Aspartame caused dose-dependent inhibition of brain serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, AST, ALT, or ALP. The administration of LPS increased nitrite in brain and liver by 26.8 and 37.1%, respectively; decreased GSH in brain and liver by 21.6 and 31.1%, respectively; increased brain TNF-α by 340.4%, and glucose by 39.9%, and caused marked increase in brain monoamines. LPS increased AST, ALT, and ALP in liver tissue by 84.4, 173.7, and 258.9%, respectively. Aspartame given to LPS-treated mice at 11.25 and 22.5 mg/kg increased brain TBARS by 15.5-16.9%, nitrite by 12.6-20.1%, and mitigated the increase in monoamines. Aspartame did not alter liver TBARS, nitrite, GSH, ALT, AST, or ALP. Thus, the administration of aspartame alone or in the presence of mild systemic inflammatory response increases oxidative stress and inflammation in the brain, but not in the liver.

  4. Involvement of the Cerebral Monoamine Neurotransmitters System in Antidepressant-Like Effects of a Chinese Herbal Decoction, Baihe Dihuang Tang, in Mice Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Li Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Baihe Dihuang Tang (BDT is a renowned Chinese herbal formula which is commonly used for treating patients with mental instability, absentmindedness, insomnia, deficient dysphoria, and other psychological diseases. These major symptoms closely associated with the depressive disorders. BDT was widely popular use for treating emotion-thought disorders for many years in China. In the present study, the antidepressant-like effect of BDT in mice was investigated by using the forced swim test (FST and the tail suspension test (TST. The underlying mechanism was explored by determining the effect of BDT on the level of cerebral monoamine neurotransmitters. BDT (9 and 18 g/kg, p.o. for 14 days administration significantly reduced the immobility time in both the FST and the TST without changing locomotion in the open field-test (OFT. Moreover, BDT treatment at the dose of 18 g/kg inhibited reserpine-induced ptosis. Meanwhile, BDT enhanced 5-HT and NA levels in mouse cerebrum as well as decreased the ratio of 5-HT compared to its metabolite, 5-HIAA, (turnover, 5-HIAA/5-HT after TST. The results demonstrated that the antidepressant-like effect of BDT is mediated, at least partially, via the central monoaminergic neurotransmitter system.

  5. Brain catalase in the streptozotocin-rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease treated with the iron chelator-monoamine oxidase inhibitor, M30.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofic, E; Salkovic-Petrisic, M; Tahirovic, I; Sapcanin, A; Mandel, S; Youdim, M; Riederer, P

    2015-04-01

    Low intracerebroventricular (icv) doses of streptozotocin (STZ) produce regionally specific brain neurochemical changes in rats that are similar to those found in the brain of patients with sporadic Alzheimer's disease (sAD). Since oxidative stress is thought to be one of the major pathologic processes in sAD, catalase (CAT) activity was estimated in the regional brain tissue of animals treated intracerebroventricularly with STZ and the multitarget iron chelator, antioxidant and MAO-inhibitor M30 [5-(N-methyl-N-propargylaminomethyl)-8-hydroxyquinoline]. Five-day oral pre-treatment of adult male Wistar rats with 10 mg/kg/day M30 dose was followed by a single injection of STZ (1 mg/kg, icv). CAT activity was measured colorimetrically in the hippocampus (HPC), brain stem (BS) and cerebellum (CB) of the control, STZ-, M30- and STZ + M30-treated rats, respectively, 4 weeks after the STZ treatment. STZ-treated rats demonstrated significantly lower CAT activity in all three brain regions in comparison to the controls (p iron chelators such as M30 might also have beneficial effects in this non-transgenic sAD model.

  6. On-line radiochemical assay for monoamine oxidase utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nissinen, E.; Linko-Loeppoenen SMae; Maennistoe P4

    1984-12-01

    A fast and sensitive assay for the determination of monoamine oxidase activity was developed. The method is based on the separation and quantitation of /sup 14/C-labeled assay products by high-performance liquid chromatography, which is interfaced directly into a flow-through radioactivity detector. This allows on-line quantitation of the radioactive compounds with picomole sensitivity. The method makes possible the complete separation and detection of the deaminated products of monoamine oxidase A and B substrates benzylamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine, respectively. This assay has been applied to the measurement of monoamine oxidase A and B activities in rat brain.

  7. The plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT): Structure, function, and role in organic cation disposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J

    2016-11-01

    Plasma membrane monoamine transporter (PMAT) is a new polyspecific organic cation transporter that transports a variety of biogenic amines and xenobiotic cations. Highly expressed in the brain, PMAT represents a major uptake2 transporter for monoamine neurotransmitters. At the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) barrier, PMAT is the principal organic cation transporter for removing neurotoxins and drugs from the CSF. Here I summarize our latest understanding of PMAT and its roles in monoamine uptake and xenobiotic disposition. © 2016 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. 一次力竭运动小鼠中枢单胺类神经递质的代谢特点%Brain Monoamines Neurotransmitters Metabolism Induced by a Prolonged Exhaustive Exercise in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽; 吴建忠; 岳明; 吕媛媛; 王德刚

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the metabolic changes of central monoamine neurotransmitters in the prolonged exhaustive exercise,in order for the central mechanism of sports fatigue to provide a laboratory basis.Method:The C57/BL mice were 4 months of age,and randomly divided them into the sedentary control group(SC)and exhausted swimming group(SE).After exhaustive swimming the cortex,hypothalamus,striatum,hippocampus, brainstem and cerebellum were collected immediately.The brain monoamines levels(NE,DA,DOPAC,5-HT,5-HIAA)were measured with HPLC. Result:In exhaustive group,the concentrations of NE in the cerebral cortex,hippocampus and brainstem were significantly increased compared with the sedentary control group(P<0.05),but the concentrations of NE in the hypothalamus,striatum and cerebellum had a decreasing tendency.The levels of DA in the hippocampus and brainstem were significantly increased compared to those in the sedentary control group(P<0.01),in the cortex and striatum only had a increasing tendency,but the concentrations of DA in the hypothalamus was significantly increased compared to that in the sedentary control group.The levels of DOPAC only were increased in the brainstem.The levels of 5-HT in all six brain loci of SE group were significantly increased compared with those of SC group(P<0.05),and the metabolic product 5-HIAA were significantly increased in the cerebral cortex,hypothalamus and cerebellum (P<0.05).Conclusion:Exercise results in a different activation degree of brain monoamine neurons in brain loci.Exercise-induced increased 5-HT and NE levels can be indicators of central fatigue.%目的:探讨力竭运动中枢单胺类神经递质的代谢变化特点,以期为运动疲劳的中枢机制提供一定实验室依据。方法:4月龄C57/BL小鼠,随机分为安静对照组(SC组)和一次性游泳力竭组(SE组)。力竭游泳即刻取材(皮层、下丘脑、纹状体、海马、脑干和小脑)六个脑区,高功率

  9. Age and Heat Stress Related Changes in Monoamine Contents and Cholinesterase Activity in Some Central Nervous System Regions of Albino Rat Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bahgat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The normal monoamine [norepinephrine (NE, epinephrine (E, dopamine (DA and serotonin (5-HT] contents and cholinestrase (chE activity were significantly and gradually increased with age progress between postnatal days 7 and 21 in cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata and spinal cord of rat newborns. The daily exposure of the newborns to 401C for 2 h induced deteriorated effects and the withdrawal period of 7 days failed to return these altered variables to normal levels. On the other hand, the high temperature exerted its most potent decreased effect on monoamine contents at 21 days old. This decrease may be attributed to the elevated activity of monoamine oxidase and/or the decreased activity of the key enzymes responsible for monoamine synthesis. The chE activity exhibited different effects in the tested CNS regions as a result of high temperature exposure; the enzyme activity was decreased markedly at days 7, 14 and 21 in cerebellum and medulla oblongata and lowered only at days 7 and 14 in cerebrum and at day 14 in spinal cord. The subsequent withdrawal for 7 days beyond day 21 produced marked weakening of effect of high temperature exposure on monoamine contents in all examined CNS regions except NE and 5-HT contents in cerebellum and DA level in medulla oblongata. In spite of this attenuation, the values recorded in the withdrawal group were still significantly lower than the normal levels. On the other hand, the chE activity became more deleteriously affected at day 28 in the treated CNS regions except in the medulla oblongata where it was profoundly ameliorated after the withdrawal period.

  10. Drug delivery systems from nose to brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ambikanandan; Kher, Gitanjali

    2012-09-01

    The treatment of brain disorders is particularly challenging due to the presence of a variety of formidable obstacles to deliver drugs selectively and effectively to the brain. Blood-brain-barrier (BBB) constitutes the major obstacle to the uptake of drugs into the brain following systemic administration. Intranasal delivery offers a non-invasive and convenient method to bypass the BBB and delivery of therapeutics directly to the brain. The review discusses the potential of intranasal route to deliver drugs to the brain, the mechanisms and pathways of direct nose to brain drug transport, the various factors influencing transnasal drug absorption, the conventional and novel intranasal drug delivery systems, the various intranasal drug delivery techniques and devices, and examples of brain drug transport that have been feasible in treating various brain disorders. Moreover, products on the market, investigational drugs, and the author's perceptions about the prospect of intranasal delivery for treating brain disorders are also been discussed.

  11. Monoamines, BDNF, Dehydroepiandrosterone, DHEA-Sulfate, and Childhood Depression—An Animal Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Malkesman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal levels of monoamines and DHEA in four main limbic brain regions were measured in prepubertal Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats (a putative animal model of childhood depression. Basal levels of “Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF” were also determined in two regions in the hippocampus, compared with Wistar strain controls. In the second phase, we examined the responsiveness of prepubertal WKY rats to different types of chronic antidepressant treatments: Fluoxetine, Desipramine, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS. WKY prepubertal rats exhibited different monoamine levels in the limbic system, reduced DHEA levels in the VTA and lower levels of BDNF in the hippocampus CA3 region compared to controls. In prepubertal WKY rats, only treatment with DHEAS produced a statistically significant decrease in immobility, compared to saline-administered controls in the forced swim test. Wistar controls were not affected by any antidepressant. The results imply that DHEA(S and BDNF may be involved in the pathophysiology and pharmacotherapy of childhood depression.

  12. Involvement of monoamines and proinflammatory cytokines in mediating the anti-stress effects of Panax quinquefolium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Naila; Tyagi, Ethika; Ahmad, Ausaf; Siripurapu, Kiran Babu; Lahiri, Shawon; Shukla, Rakesh; Palit, Gautam

    2008-05-08

    Panax quinquefolium (PQ) is well acclaimed in literature for its effects on central and peripheral nervous system. The present study explores the effects of PQ on stress induced changes of corticosterone level in plasma, monoamines (NA, DA and 5-HT) and interleukin (IL-2 and IL-6) levels in cortex and hippocampus regions of brain and also indicate their possible roles in modulating stress. Mice subjected to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS, for 7 days) showed significant increase in plasma corticosterone level and depletion of noradrenaline (NA), dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels in cortex and hippocampal regions along with an increased level of IL-2 and IL-6 in the same areas. Aqueous suspension of PQ was administered daily at a dose of 100 and 200mg/kg p.o. prior to the stress regimen and its effects on selected stress markers in plasma and brain was evaluated. PQ at a dose of 200mg/kg p.o. was found to be effective in normalizing the CUS induced elevation of plasma corticosterone and IL-2, IL-6 levels in brain. Moreover, it was significantly effective in reinstating the CUS induced depletion of NA, DA and 5-HT in hippocampus, while NA and 5-HT in cortex of brain. However, PQ at a dose of 100mg/kg p.o. was found ineffective in regulating any of these CUS induced changes. Present study provides an insight into the possible role of PQ on hyperactive HPA axis in the regulation of immediate stress effectors like corticosterone, cytokines and brain monoamines. In this study, PQ has emerged as a potential therapeutic in the cure of stress related disorders and needs to be evaluated in clinical studies to ascertain its efficacy.

  13. Lack of platelet monoamine oxidase activity in Cebus monkeys (Cebus albifrons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, R; Richardson, M A; Perumal, A S; Casey, D E

    1989-01-01

    1. Recent evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase (MAO) plays an important role modulating the extrapyramidal syndromes produced by neuroleptic drugs in both human and nonhuman primates. 2. To evaluate the possibility of using peripheral blood platelet MAO-B levels as indices of central nervous system MAO-B effects, we measured platelet MAO-B levels in Cebus monkeys that were previously tested with neuroleptics (N = 36) or drug naive (N = 6). 3. No platelet MAO-B was consistently detectable in these blood samples. 4. Thus platelet measures of MAO-B do not reliably reflect brain MAO-B function in nonhuman primates and do not offer a useful model for studying blood-brain MAO-B relationships.

  14. MONOAMINE OXIDASE: RADIOTRACER DEVELOPMENT AND HUMAN STUDIES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER,J.S.; LOGAN,J.; VOLKOW,N.D.; WANG,G.J.; MACGREGOR,R.R.; DING,Y.S.

    2000-09-28

    PET is uniquely capable of providing information on biochemical transformations in the living human body. Although most of the studies of monoamine oxidase (MAO) have focused on measurements in the brain, the role of peripheral MAO as a phase 1 enzyme for the metabolism of drugs and xenobiotics is gaining attention (Strolin Benedetti and Tipton, 1998; Castagnoli et al., 1997.). MAO is well suited for this role because its concentration in organs such as kidneys, liver and digestive organs is high sometimes exceeding that in the brain. Knowledge of the distribution of the MAO subtypes within different organs and different cells is important in determining which substrates (and which drugs and xenobiotics) have access to which MAO subtypes. The highly variable subtype distribution with different species makes human studies even more important. In addition, the deleterious side effects of combining MAO inhibitors with other drugs and with foodstuffs makes it important to know the MAO inhibitory potency of different drugs both in the brain and in peripheral organs (Ulus et al., 2000). Clearly PET can play a role in answering these questions, in drug research and development and in discovering some of the factors which contribute to the highly variable MAO levels in different individuals.

  15. Gene Expression of Serotonin and Dopamine Receptors and Monoamine Oxidase-A in the Brain of Dominant and Subordinate Pubertal Pigs Fed a ß-Adrenoreceptor Agonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggression is a major source of social stress and injuries, negatively affecting the health and well-being of those involved in the fight. The serotonergic and dopaminergic systems are widely implicated in aggression regulation in several animal species, but information on molecular mechanisms media...

  16. Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-21

    REPORT Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: We have met all of the milestones outlined in this...COVERED (From - To) 18-Sep-2006 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 17-Mar-2008 Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury Report...Manassero*, Justin Kim*, Maureen St Georges*, Nicole Esclamado* and Elizabeth Orwin. “Development of a Cell Delivery System for Traumatic Brain Injury Using

  17. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdev, Neil, E-mail: neil.vasdev@utoronto.ca; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-10-15

    Introduction: Imaging monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in the central nervous system with PET is an important goal for psychiatric studies. We here report an improved and automated radiosynthesis of N-(6-[{sup 18}F]-fluorohexyl)-N-methylpropargylamine ([{sup 18}F]FHMP; [{sup 18}F]-1), as well as the radiosynthesis of two new promising candidates for imaging cerebral MAO-B, namely, carbon-11-labeled 3-(4-[{sup 11}C]-methoxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one ([{sup 11}C]-2) and N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl)-N-[{sup 11}C]-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine ([{sup 11}C]-3). Methods: Fluorine-18-labeled 1 was prepared via a tosyloxy precursor in 29%{+-}5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to [{sup 18}F]-fluoride. Both carbon-11-labeled compounds were prepared with [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I using the 'LOOP' method in 11% and 18% uncorrected radiochemical yields, respectively, relative to starting [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2}. All radiotracers had specific activities >37 GBq/{mu}mol and were >98% radiochemically pure at end of synthesis (<40 min). All radiotracers were evaluated by ex vivo biodistribution studies in conscious rodents. Results: A major radioactive metabolite in the rodent brain was observed following administration of [{sup 18}F]-1. While [{sup 11}C]-2 had moderate brain penetration and good clearance from normal brain tissue, distribution of radioactivity in brain was indicative of free and nonspecific binding. Good brain uptake was observed with [{sup 11}C]-3 (0.8%-1.4% injected dose per gram at 5 min postinjection), binding appeared to be reversible and distribution conformed with regional distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. Preinjection of 3 or L-deprenyl showed a modest reduction (up to 25%) of brain activity. Conclusion: Carbon-11-labeled 3 was found to have the most favorable properties of the radiotracers evaluated; however, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to warrant further in vivo imaging studies. Alternative radiotracers for imaging MAO

  18. Possible involvement of cationic-drug sensitive transport systems in the blood-to-brain influx and brain-to-blood efflux of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Toyofumi; Fukami, Toshiro; Tomono, Kazuo

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the brain-to-blood efflux transport of amantadine across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The apparent in vivo efflux rate constant for [(3) H]amantadine from the rat brain (keff ) was found to be 1.53 × 10(-2) min(-1) after intracerebral microinjection using the brain efflux index method. The efflux of [(3) H]amantadine was inhibited by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+) ), a cationic neurotoxin, suggesting that amantadine transport from the brain to the blood across the BBB potentially involves the rat plasma membrane monoamine transporter (rPMAT). On the other hand, other selected substrates for organic cation transporters (OCTs) and organic anion transporters (OATs), as well as inhibitors of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), did not affect the efflux transport of [(3) H]amantadine. In addition, in vitro studies using an immortalized rat brain endothelial cell line (GPNT) showed that the uptake and retention of [(3) H]amantadine by the cells was not changed by the addition of cyclosporin, which is an inhibitor of P-gp. However, cyclosporin affected the uptake and retention of rhodamine123. Finally, the initial brain uptake of [(3) H]amantadine was determined using an in situ mouse brain perfusion technique. Notably, the brain uptake clearance for [(3) H]amantadine was significantly decreased with the co-perfusion of quinidine or verapamil, which are cationic P-gp inhibitors, while MPP(+) did not have a significant effect. It is thus concluded that while P-gp is not involved, it is possible that rPMAT and the cationic drug-sensitive transport system participate in the brain-to-blood efflux and the blood-to-brain influx of amantadine across the BBB, respectively.

  19. Dynamics of change of lipid and monoamine metabolisms and the blood coagulation system during experimental atherosclerosis caused by restriction of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.

    1980-01-01

    Shifts in lipid, catecholamine, and blood coagulation systems following various periods (1, 2, 3, and 4 months) of experimentally induced atherosclerosis were studied. The same indices were studied in the tissues of the myocardium, liver, and brain stem-reticular formation after decapitation of the animals at the end of the experiment. Periodic motion restriction caused an increase in blood beta-lipoproteins in the rabbits at the beginning of the experiment. An increase in general cholesterol content and a decrease in the lecithincholesterol index were established at the end of the experiment. Myocardial beta-lipoprotein and brain stem reticular formation general cholesterol contents were elevated; catecholamine content was increased at the end of the experiment. In the initial months, free adrenaline basically increased, while in later months blood adrenaline decreased and blood noradrenaline increased.

  20. Designing Modulators of Monoamine Transporters using Virtual Screening Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Valente Mortensen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-membrane monoamine transporters (MATs, including the serotonin (SERT, norepinephrine (NET and dopamine (DAT transporters, serve a pivotal role in limiting monoamine-mediated neurotransmission through the reuptake of their respective monoamine neurotransmitters. The transporters are the main target of clinically used psychostimulants and antidepressants. Despite the availability of several potent and selective MAT substrates and inhibitors the continuing need for therapeutic drugs to treat brain disorders involving aberrant monoamine signaling provides a compelling reason to identify novel ways of targeting and modulating the MATs. Designing novel modulators of MAT function have been limited by the lack of three dimensional structure information of the individual MATs. However, crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homologue of MATs, in a substrate-bound occluded, substrate-free outward-open, and an apo inward-open state and also with competitive and noncompetitive inhibitors have been determined. In addition, several structures of the drosophila DAT have also been resolved. Together with computational modeling and experimental data gathered over the past decade, these structures have dramatically advanced our understanding of several aspects of SERT, NET, and DAT transporter function, including some of the molecular determinants of ligand interaction at orthosteric substrate and inhibitor binding pockets. In addition progress has been made in the understanding of how allosteric modulation of MAT function can be achieved. Here we will review all the efforts up to date that has been made through computational approaches employing structural models of MATs to design small molecule modulators to the orthosteric and allosteric sites using virtual screening techniques.

  1. Designing modulators of monoamine transporters using virtual screening techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Ole V.; Kortagere, Sandhya

    2015-01-01

    The plasma-membrane monoamine transporters (MATs), including the serotonin (SERT), norepinephrine (NET) and dopamine (DAT) transporters, serve a pivotal role in limiting monoamine-mediated neurotransmission through the reuptake of their respective monoamine neurotransmitters. The transporters are the main target of clinically used psychostimulants and antidepressants. Despite the availability of several potent and selective MAT substrates and inhibitors the continuing need for therapeutic drugs to treat brain disorders involving aberrant monoamine signaling provides a compelling reason to identify novel ways of targeting and modulating the MATs. Designing novel modulators of MAT function have been limited by the lack of three dimensional structure information of the individual MATs. However, crystal structures of LeuT, a bacterial homolog of MATs, in a substrate-bound occluded, substrate-free outward-open, and an apo inward-open state and also with competitive and non-competitive inhibitors have been determined. In addition, several structures of the Drosophila DAT have also been resolved. Together with computational modeling and experimental data gathered over the past decade, these structures have dramatically advanced our understanding of several aspects of SERT, NET, and DAT transporter function, including some of the molecular determinants of ligand interaction at orthosteric substrate and inhibitor binding pockets. In addition progress has been made in the understanding of how allosteric modulation of MAT function can be achieved. Here we will review all the efforts up to date that has been made through computational approaches employing structural models of MATs to design small molecule modulators to the orthosteric and allosteric sites using virtual screening techniques. PMID:26483692

  2. Your Brain and Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want them to. So you can't dance — or kick a soccer ball — without your cerebrum. ... of the brain. It controls balance, movement, and coordination (how your muscles work together). Because of your ...

  3. Brain Prostheses as a Dynamic System (Immortalizing the Human Brain?)

    CERN Document Server

    Astakhov, Vadim

    2007-01-01

    Interest in development of brain prostheses, which might be proposed to recover mental functions lost due to neuron-degenerative disease or trauma, requires new methods in molecular engineering and nanotechnology to build artificial brain tissues. We develop a Dynamic Core model to analyze complexity of damaged biological neural network as well as transition and recovery of the system functionality due to changes in the system environment. We provide a method to model complexity of physical systems which might be proposed as an artificial tissue or prosthesis. Delocalization of Dynamic Core model is developed to analyze migration of mental functions in dynamic bio-systems which undergo architecture transition induced by trauma. Term Dynamic Core is used to define a set of causally related functions and Delocalization is used to describe the process of migration. Information geometry and topological formalisms are proposed to analyze information processes. A holographic model is proposed to construct dynamic e...

  4. Novel optical system for neonatal brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Shuoming; Nioka, Shoko; Chance, Britton; Anday, Endla; Ravishankar, Sudha; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    1999-03-01

    A highly portable, fast, safe and affordable imaging system that provides interpretable images of brain function in full- and pre-term neonates within a few seconds has been applied to neonates with normal and pathological states. We have used a uniquely sensitive optical tomography system, termed phased array, which has revealed significant functional responses, particularly to parietal stimulation in neonate brain. This system can indicate the blood concentration and oxygenation change during the parietal brain activation in full- and pre-term neonates. The preliminary clinical results, especially a longitudinal study of a cardiac arrest neonate, suggest a variety of future applications.

  5. Spontaneous recurrent seizures in rats: amino acid and monoamine determination in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalheiro, E A; Fernandes, M J; Turski, L; Naffah-Mazzacoratti, M G

    1994-01-01

    Rats subjected to structural brain damage induced by sustained convulsions triggered by systemic administration of pilocarpine (PILO) are a useful model for investigation of the mechanisms essential for seizure generation and spread in rodents. After PILO administration, three distinct phases are observed: (a) an acute period of 1-2 days' duration corresponding to a pattern of repetitive limbic seizures and status epilepticus; (b) a seizure-free (silent) period characterized by a progressive return to normal EEG and behavior of 4-44 days' duration; and (c) a period of spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS) starting 5-45 days after PILO administration and lasting throughout the animal's life. PILO (320-350 mg/kg intraperitoneally, i.p.) was administered to rats, and the content of hippocampal monoamines and amino acids was measured in the acute, silent, and SRS periods by liquid chromatography. Norepinephrine (NE) level was decreased during all periods whereas dopamine (DA) content was increased. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) was increased only in the acute period. Utilization rate measurement of monoamines showed increased NE consumption and decreased DA consumption during all phases. 5-HT utilization rate was increased only in the acute period. Amino acid content showed a decrease in aspartate (ASP) and glutamate (GLU) concentrations associated with increased gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) level during the acute period. The silent phase was characterized by a decrease in glycine (GLY) and GABA levels and an increase in GLU concentration. The SRS period showed an increase in all amino acid concentrations. These findings show important neurochemical changes in the course of establishment of an epileptic focus after brain damage induced by status epilepticus triggered by pilocarpine.

  6. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) disrupting effects of Glycyrrhiza glabra extract in mice: a possible role of monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Haidy E; Tadros, Mariane G; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B; Khalifa, Amani E

    2013-06-07

    Liquorice extract was reported to have nootropic and/or antiamnestic effects. Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle response is a multimodal, cross-species phenomenon used as a measure of sensorimotor gating. Previous studies indicated that liquorice/its constituents augmented mouse brain monoamine levels. Increased brain monoamines' transmission was suggested to underlie PPI disruption. However, the effect of antiamnestic dose(s) of the extract on PPI has not been investigated despite the coexistence of impaired memory and PPI deficit in some neurological disorders. The effect of administration of the antiamnestic dose of the extract (150 mg/kg for 7 days) was tested on PPI of acoustic startle response in mice. It resulted in PPI disruption and therefore its effect on monoamines' levels was investigated in a number of mouse brain areas involved in PPI response mediation. Results demonstrated that the extract antiamnestic dose augmented cortical, hippocampal and striatal monoamine levels. It was therefore concluded that liquorice extract (150 mg/kg)-induced PPI deficit was mediated through augmenting monoaminergic transmission in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. These findings can be further investigated in experimental models for autism, psychosis and Huntington's disease to decide the safety of using liquorice extract in ameliorating memory disturbance in disorders manifesting PPI deficit.

  7. Computational systems biology in cancer brain metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Huiming; Tan, Hua; Zhao, Weiling; Jin, Guangxu; Sharma, Sambad; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2016-01-01

    Brain metastases occur in 20-40% of patients with advanced malignancies. A better understanding of the mechanism of this disease will help us to identify novel therapeutic strategies. In this review, we will discuss the systems biology approaches used in this area, including bioinformatics and mathematical modeling. Bioinformatics has been used for identifying the molecular mechanisms driving brain metastasis and mathematical modeling methods for analyzing dynamics of a system and predicting optimal therapeutic strategies. We will illustrate the strategies, procedures, and computational techniques used for studying systems biology in cancer brain metastases. We will give examples on how to use a systems biology approach to analyze a complex disease. Some of the approaches used to identify relevant networks, pathways, and possibly biomarkers in metastasis will be reviewed into details. Finally, certain challenges and possible future directions in this area will also be discussed.

  8. Influence of parenting style on the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite levels in crossfostered and noncrossfostered female rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestripieri, Dario; McCormack, Kai; Lindell, Stephen G; Higley, J Dee; Sanchez, Mar M

    2006-11-25

    We investigated the association between variation in parenting style and the offspring's behaviour and CSF monoamine metabolite (5-HIAA, HVA, and MHPG) levels in rhesus monkeys. Study subjects were 25 two-year-old females reared by their biological mothers and 15 same-aged females that were crossfostered at birth and reared by unrelated mothers. Subjects that were rejected more by their mothers in the first 6 months of life engaged in more solitary play and had lower CSF concentrations of 5-HIAA than subjects that were rejected less. The relation between these variables was generally similar in crossfostered and noncrossfostered females. CSF levels of 5-HIAA were negatively correlated with rates of scratching, a behavioural indicator of anxiety. These results suggest that that early exposure to high rates of maternal rejection can result in higher anxiety later in life, and that this effect may be mediated by serotonergic mechanisms. Variation in maternal protectiveness did not affect offspring behaviour and neither protectiveness nor rejection affected CSF levels of HVA and MHPG. CSF levels of MHPG, however, were negatively correlated with solitary play behaviour and avoidance of other individuals, suggesting that individuals with lower CSF MHPG were more fearful and socially phobic than those with higher CSF MHPG. Taken together, these findings suggest that individual differences in anxiety and fearfulness in young rhesus monkeys are accounted for, at least in part, by variation in CSF levels of monoamine metabolites, and that the development of brain monoamine systems, particularly serotonin, can be affected by early exposure to variable maternal behaviour.

  9. Aging and brain rejuvenation as systemic events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Jill; Villeda, Saul A

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging were traditionally thought to be immutable, particularly evident in the loss of plasticity and cognitive abilities occurring in the aged central nervous system (CNS). However, it is becoming increasingly apparent that extrinsic systemic manipulations such as exercise, caloric restriction, and changing blood composition by heterochronic parabiosis or young plasma administration can partially counteract this age-related loss of plasticity in the aged brain. In this review, we discuss the process of aging and rejuvenation as systemic events. We summarize genetic studies that demonstrate a surprising level of malleability in organismal lifespan, and highlight the potential for systemic manipulations to functionally reverse the effects of aging in the CNS. Based on mounting evidence, we propose that rejuvenating effects of systemic manipulations are mediated, in part, by blood-borne 'pro-youthful' factors. Thus, systemic manipulations promoting a younger blood composition provide effective strategies to rejuvenate the aged brain. As a consequence, we can now consider reactivating latent plasticity dormant in the aged CNS as a means to rejuvenate regenerative, synaptic, and cognitive functions late in life, with potential implications even for extending lifespan. We review evidence of brain rejuvenation focusing on several systemic manipulations - exercise, caloric restriction, heterochronic parabiosis, and young plasma administration - and their ability to restore regenerative capacity, synaptic plasticity, and cognitive function in the brain.

  10. Ciproxifan, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist, reversibly inhibits monoamine oxidase A and B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenow, S; Stasiak, A; Ramsay, R R; Stark, H

    2017-01-13

    Ciproxifan is a well-investigated histamine H3 receptor (H3R) inverse agonist/antagonist, showing an exclusively high species-specific affinity at rodent compared to human H3R. It is well studied as reference compound for H3R in rodent models for neurological diseases connected with neurotransmitter dysregulation, e.g. attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or Alzheimer's disease. In a screening for potential monoamine oxidase A and B inhibition ciproxifan showed efficacy on both enzyme isoforms. Further characterization of ciproxifan revealed IC50 values in a micromolar concentration range for human and rat monoamine oxidases with slight preference for monoamine oxidase B in both species. The inhibition by ciproxifan was reversible for both human isoforms. Regarding inhibitory potency of ciproxifan on rat brain MAO, these findings should be considered, when using high doses in rat models for neurological diseases. As the H3R and monoamine oxidases are all capable of affecting neurotransmitter modulation in brain, we consider dual targeting ligands as interesting approach for treatment of neurological disorders. Since ciproxifan shows only moderate activity at human targets, further investigations in animals are not of primary interest. On the other hand, it may serve as starting point for the development of dual targeting ligands.

  11. Quantitative distribution of monoamine oxidase A in brainstem monoamine nuclei is normal in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, G A; Farley, J T; Dilley, G E; Overholser, J C; Meltzer, H Y; Balraj, E K; Stockmeier, C A; Klimek, V

    1999-11-13

    An abnormal expression of noradrenergic proteins (e.g., tyrosine hydroxylase, norepinephrine transporters) in the locus coeruleus has recently been demonstrated in subjects with major depression and/or victims of suicide. Monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) is a key enzyme in the catabolism of biogenic amines and is expressed in brain noradrenergic neurons. In this study, the binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 to MAO-A was measured by quantitative autoradiography at multiple levels along the rostral-caudal axis of the noradrenergic locus coeruleus from subjects with major depression and age- and postmortem interval-matched control subjects who were psychiatrically normal. [3H]Ro41-1049 binding to MAO-A was unevenly distributed along the axis of the locus coeruleus, paralleling an uneven number of neuromelanin-containing (noradrenergic) neurons throughout the nucleus. Accordingly, there was a significant correlation between the number of neuromelanin-containing neurons per section and the specific binding of [3H]Ro41-1049 at any particular level of the locus coeruleus in control subjects (r(2)=0.25; pdepression (r(2)=0.14; pdepression to psychiatrically normal control subjects. These findings demonstrate that the pathophysiology of major depression is not likely to involve abnormalities in MAO-A.

  12. [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Rhun, É; Mateus, C; Mortier, L; Dhermain, F; Guillot, B; Grob, J-J; Lebbe, C; Thomas, M; Jouary, T; Leccia, M-T; Robert, C

    2015-02-01

    Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase).

  13. Brain barrier systems: a new frontier in metal neurotoxicological research

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Wei; Aschner, Michael; Ghersi-Egea, Jean-Francois

    2003-01-01

    The concept of brain barriers or a brain barrier system embraces the blood–brain interface, referred to as the blood–brain barrier, and the blood–cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) interface, referred to as the blood–CSF barrier. These brain barriers protect the CNS against chemical insults, by different complementary mechanisms. Toxic metal molecules can either bypass these mechanisms or be sequestered in and therefore potentially deleterious to brain barriers. Supportive evidence suggests that damag...

  14. Monoamine transporters: Insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie eGrouleff

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human monoamine transporters facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the monoamine transporters is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The monoamine transporters are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the monoamine transporters, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors.

  15. Structure and function of large-scale brain systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces the functional neuroanatomy of large-scale brain systems. Both the structure and functions of these brain networks are presented. All human behavior is the result of interactions within and between these brain systems. This system of brain function completely changes our understanding of how cognition and behavior are organized within the brain, replacing the traditional lesion model. Understanding behavior within the context of brain network interactions has profound implications for modifying abstract constructs such as attention, learning, and memory. These constructs also must be understood within the framework of a paradigm shift, which emphasizes ongoing interactions within a dynamically changing environment.

  16. Mapping how local perturbations influence systems-level brain dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; James A. Roberts; Cocchi, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The human brain exhibits a relatively stable spatiotemporal organization that supports brain function and can be manipulated via local brain stimulation. Such perturbations to local cortical dynamics are globally integrated by distinct neural systems. However, it remains unclear how and why local changes in neural activity affect large-scale system dynamics. Here, we briefly review empirical and computational studies addressing how localized perturbations affect brain activity. We then system...

  17. Process characterization of a monoamine oxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramesh, Hemalata; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    .e, on biocatalyst development (e.g. improvement of expression levels), process development (e.g. improved oxygen supply, product removal strategies) or biocatalyst stabilization (e.g. through immobilization or directed evolution). This paper presents a systematic method to identify the bottleneck of a potential...... biocatalytic process using a monoamine oxidase to synthesise an intermediate in the manufacture of a drug for treating Hepatitis C (Telaprevir)....

  18. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by esomeprazole

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Virtual screening of a library of drugs has suggested that esomeprazole, the S-enantiomer of omeprazole, may possess binding affinities for the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. Based on this finding, the current study examines the MAO inhibitory properties of esomeprazole. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, IC50 values for the inhibition of these enzymes by esomeprazole were experimentally determined. To examine the reversibility of MAO inhibition by esomepra...

  19. volBrain: an online MRI brain volumetry system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose V. Manjon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amount of medical image data produced in clinical and research settings is rapidly growing resulting in vast amount of data to analyze. Automatic and reliable quantitative analysis tools, including segmentation, allow to analyze brain development and to understand specific patterns of many neurological diseases. This field has recently experienced many advances with successful techniques based on non-linear warping and label fusion. In this work we present a novel and fully automatic pipeline for volumetric brain analysis based on multi-atlas label fusion technology that is able to provide accurate volumetric information at different levels of detail in a short time. This method is available through the volBrain online web interface (http://volbrain.upv.es, which is publically and freely accessible to the scientific community. Our new framework has been compared with current state-of-the-art methods showing very competitive results.

  20. Combined deficiency of iron and (n-3) fatty acids in male rates disrupts brain monoamine metabolism and produces greater memory deficits than iron deficiency or (n-3) fatty acid deficiency alone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumgartner, J.; Smuts, C.M.; Malan, L.; Arnold, M.; Yee, B.K.; Bianco, L.E.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Muller, M.R.; Langhans, W.; Hurrell, R.F.; Zimmermann, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    Deficiencies of iron (Fe) (ID) and (n-3) fatty acids (FA) [(n-3)FAD] may impair brain development and function through shared mechanisms. However, little is known about the potential interactions between these 2 common deficiencies. We studied the effects of ID and (n-3)FAD, alone and in combination

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of monoamine oxidase type B in rat’s peripheral nervous system%单胺氧化酶B在大鼠外周神经系统中的定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈强; 徐洋

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of monoamine oxidase type B (MAOB)in rat’s peripheral nerv-ous system to provide morphologic basis for further study about MAOB and the relationship between axon transporta-tion and nerve impulse transduction.Methods The present study used immunohistochemical method to observe the lo-calization of MAOB in rat’s peripheral nervous system.Results Light microscopy reveals that MAOB immunoreactivi-ty is presented in epithelium above the lamina propria and lamina propria of rat’s tongue.Electron microscopy reveals that MAOB immunoreactivity is found in the myelinated axons and unmyelinated axons.MAOB immunoreactivity is al-so observed in the Schwann cell.In these MAO-B-positive structures,MAOB immunohistochemical reaction products are found on and around the mitochondrial outer membrane.Conclusion The abundeant MAOB in rat’s peripheral nervous system indicates that MAO-B plays a critical role in axon transportation and nerve impulse transduction.%目的:研究单胺氧化酶 B(MAOB)在大鼠外周神经系统中的表达,为进一步研究 MAOB 与外周神经系统中轴突运输和神经传导的关系提供形态学依据。方法采用免疫组织化学的方法,通过光镜和电镜观察 MAOB 在大鼠外周神经系统中的分布。结果光镜下,MAOB 免疫反应阳性细胞分布在舌体的上皮及固有层中。电镜下, MAOB 免疫反应阳性细胞分布在大鼠舌体有髓鞘和无髓鞘轴突中。阳性物质分布于细胞质中,准确来说为线粒体外膜上。结论 MAOB 在大鼠外周神经系统轴突的表达,提示 MAOB 可能与轴突的运输和神经传导有着非常重要的作用。

  2. No changes in lymphocyte muscarinic receptors and platelet monoamine oxidase-B examined as surrogate central nervous system biomarkers in a Faroese children cohort prenatally exposed to methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coccini, Teresa; Manzo, Luigi; Debes, Frodi

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) and muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) are involved in the pathogenesis of neurotoxicity caused by methylmercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Blood samples from 7-year-old exposed children were analyzed for platelet M....../or PCB exposure, whereas these markers are significantly altered in sustained exposure scenarios, as shown by clinical studies in drug addicts or patients treated with psychopharmacological agents....

  3. Brain-Computer Interfacing for Intelligent Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Tan, Desney; Pfurtscheller, Gert; Brunner, Clemens; R. Millán, del José; Allison, Brandan; Graimann, Bernhard; Popescu, Florin; Blankertz, Benjamin; Müller, Klaus-R.

    2008-01-01

    Advances in cognitive neuroscience and brain-imaging technologies give us the unprecedented ability to interface directly with brain activity. These technologies let us monitor physical processes in the brain that correspond with certain forms of thought. Researchers have begun using these technolog

  4. Infrared Imaging System for Studying Brain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, Frederick; Mintz, Frederick; Gunapala, Sarath

    2007-01-01

    A proposed special-purpose infrared imaging system would be a compact, portable, less-expensive alternative to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) systems heretofore used to study brain function. Whereas a typical fMRI system fills a large room, and must be magnetically isolated, this system would fit into a bicycle helmet. The system would include an assembly that would be mounted inside the padding in a modified bicycle helmet or other suitable headgear. The assembly would include newly designed infrared photodetectors and data-acquisition circuits on integrated-circuit chips on low-thermal-conductivity supports in evacuated housings (see figure) arranged in multiple rows and columns that would define image coordinates. Each housing would be spring-loaded against the wearer s head. The chips would be cooled by a small Stirling Engine mounted contiguous to, but thermally isolated from, the portions of the assembly in thermal contact with the wearer s head. Flexible wires or cables for transmitting data from the aforementioned chips would be routed to an integrated, multichannel transmitter and thence through the top of the assembly to a patch antenna on the outside of the helmet. The multiple streams of data from the infrared-detector chips would be sent to a remote site, where they would be processed, by software, into a three-dimensional display of evoked potentials that would represent firing neuronal bundles and thereby indicate locations of neuronal activity associated with mental or physical activity. The 3D images will be analogous to current fMRI images. The data would also be made available, in real-time, for comparison with data in local or internationally accessible relational databases that already exist in universities and research centers. Hence, this system could be used in research on, and for the diagnosis of response from the wearer s brain to physiological, psychological, and environmental changes in real time. The images would also be

  5. The Effects of Monoamine Neurotransmitters and Their Receptors in the Brain on Exercise-Induced Central Fatigue under Heat Stress%热应激下脑内单胺类神经递质及其受体对运动性中枢疲劳影响的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张念云; 张蕴琨

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters such as Acetylcholine(Ach),norepinephrine(NE) and 5-hydroxytryptamine(5-HT) regulate body temperature in the hypothalamic,the regulation of receptor lies on the difference of its subtypes.In the high temperature environment,The Concentration of dopamine(DA),5-HT,NE Increased with the rise of brain and core body temperature.The active of 5-HTR2 increased body temperature,while The Active of 5-HTR1A reduced body temperature.In addition,DAR1 and DAR2 synergy to reduce body temperature.The changes of concetration and balance breakage in monoamine neurotransmitters is one of the important factors which caused central fatigue.The temperature of brain and core body increased in Heat stress conditions.The temperature of brain increased can cause central fatigue.The active of DA and NE Improved will inhibit central fatigue,and improve the exercise capacity under Heat stress conditions.However,5-HT can not do as DA and NE.%乙酰胆碱(Ach)、去甲肾上腺素(NE)和5-羟色胺(5-HT)等神经递质参与下丘脑的体温调节,其受体亚型的不同也有不同的调节作用。在高温环境中,多巴胺(DA)、5-HT、NE伴随大脑和核心体温的升高而增加。提高5-HTR2活性会引起体温升高,而提高5-HTR1A活性的则会引起体温降低,DAR1、DAR2两者协同作用于体温的降低。单胺类神经递质含量改变及平衡的破坏是导致运动性中枢疲劳发生的因素之一。热应激条件下机体大脑和核心温度升高,脑内热储备过多,导致中枢疲劳的发生,提高DA、NE的活性可抑制高温介导的中枢疲劳,改善热应激下运动能力,但未能证明在高温环境下长时间运动5-HT介导疲劳的特殊作用。

  6. The effect of venlafaxine on behaviour, body weight and striatal monoamine levels on sleep-deprived female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ricardo A; Cunha, Geanne M A; Borges, Karla Daisy M; de Bruin, Gabriela S; dos Santos-Filho, Emídio A; Viana, Glauce S B; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2004-11-01

    Partial sleep deprivation is clinically associated with fatigue, depressive symptoms and reduced memory. Previously, it has been demonstrated that venlafaxine, an atypical antidepressant, increases the levels of noradrenaline and serotonin in rat hippocampus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of venlafaxine on depression, anxiety, locomotor activity and memory in a model of REM sleep (REMs) deprivation in rats. We have also studied the influence of venlafaxine on monoamine levels in the striatum. Six groups of animals (N=20 each) were treated with saline or venlafaxine (1 or 10 mg/kg) during 10 days, submitted or not to REMs deprivation and studied with the forced swimming test of Porsolt (STP), plus-maze, passive avoidance and open-field tests right after sleep deprivation. Animals were also studied for passive avoidance 24 h later (rebound period). Brain samples for monoamine measurements were collected either immediately after REMs deprivation or after 24 h. Both REMs deprivation and venlafaxine showed an antidepressant effect. An anxiolytic effect was also observed after REMs deprivation. Previous treatment with venlafaxine blocked the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of REMs deprivation. REMs deprivation alone and treatment with venlafaxine 10 mg/kg increased locomotor activity, and this effect was inhibited by venlafaxine in REMs deprived rats. Both venlafaxine treatment and REMs deprivation induced weight loss. Venlafaxine treatment, but not REMs deprivation, induced an increase in striatal dopamine (DA) levels. The combination of REMs deprivation and venlafaxine treatment was associated with an increase in serotonin turnover 24 h after rebound sleep. In this study, venlafaxine treatment hindered most behavioral effects of REMs deprivation and was associated with an interference on dopamine and serotonin systems in the striatum.

  7. 右美沙芬对小鼠大脑5-羟色胺含量的影响%Influences of Dextromethorphan on Monoamine Neurotransmitter 5-HT in Mouse Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李迎春; 张久亮; 周莉红

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan. Methods By using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with fluorescent light detector, we detected the effect of dextromethorphan on the contents of five kinds of monamine neurotransmitters in mouse brain with codeine phosphate serving as a positive drug. Results The results indicated that the antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan was concerned with monanine neurotransmitter 5-HT. In the dextromethorphan group, 5-HT was 43. 50% higher than in the blank group (P<0.01) , and 5-HIAA was 35. 00% higher than in the blank group (P<0. 05). Dextromethorphan could increase the content of 5-HT in mouse brain to induce antitussive effects, while the antitussice effects of codeine phosphate had no relationship with serotonergic mechanisms. Conclusion The antitussive mechanism of dextromethorphan is related with the release of monanine neurotransmitter 5-HT in mouse brain.%目的 初步探讨右美沙芬通过增加小鼠脑部5-羟色胺(5-HT)的含量的镇咳机制.方法 采用反相高效液相-荧光检测(RP-HPLC-FLD)法,以磷酸可待因为对照药,测定右美沙芬对小鼠脑部5种单胺类神经递质含量的影响.结果 右美沙芬的镇咳机制与单胺类神经递质5-HT有关,右美沙芬组的5-HT含量比空白组增加了43.50%,差异有统计学意义(P <0.01),5-羟基吲哚乙酸(5-HIAA)含量比空白组增加35.00%,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 右美沙芬镇咳作用与小鼠脑部5-HT的释放有关.

  8. Brain oscillations and synchrony in neurocognitive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Driel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Brain activity is strongly oscillatory: the collective firing of populations of neurons waxes and wanes in a rhythmic manner. The spatiotemporal and frequency-band characteristics of these oscillations may reflect how the brain organizes its activity, in a local as well as large scale manner. But ho

  9. Piperidine-Based Nocaine/Modafinil Hybrid Ligands as Highly Potent Monoamine Transporter Inhibitors: Efficient Drug Discovery by Rational Lead Hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jia; He, Rong; Johnson, Kenneth M.; Ye, Yanping; Kozikowski, Alan P.

    2005-01-01

    Some piperidine-based nocaine/modafinil hybrid ligands have been designed, synthesized, and found to display an improved potency at all three monoamine transporters and particularly for DAT and/or NET. Some highly active and selective monoamine transporter inhibitors with low nanomolar to subnanomolar potency were identified. Ligands of this type may find important applications as positron emission tomography imaging tools and in the treatment of central nervous system disorders such as depression and sleep apnea. PMID:15537337

  10. Masking reveals parallel form systems in the visual brain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lo, Yu Tung; Zeki, Semir

    2014-01-01

    ...-selective cells of V1. In this psychophysical study, we undertook to test another hypothesis, namely that the brain's visual form system consists of multiple parallel systems and that complex forms are other than the sum of their parts...

  11. Effects of lamotrigine on PCP-evoked elevations in monoamine levels in the medial prefrontal cortex of freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Davide; Large, Charles H

    2011-12-01

    Lamotrigine is suggested to have potential as an add-on treatment for patients with schizophrenia. Supporting evidence comes from the efficacy of the drug in models of psychotic-like behaviour induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine (PCP). These drugs enhance levels of the monoamines in the cortex, which may contribute to their psychotomimetic effects. The ability of lamotrigine to prevent these neurochemical changes has not been examined. We studied PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin in the medial prefrontal cortex of awake rats using microdialysis. Rats were administered lamotrigine or vehicle, followed by PCP. Locomotor activity was also recorded before and after drug treatment. Lamotrigine did not have an influence on basal levels of the monoamines, but significantly reduced PCP-evoked overflow of dopamine and serotonin; PCP-evoked overflow of noradrenaline was also reduced by lamotrigine, but not to a significant degree. In contrast, PCP-induced hyperactivity was unaffected by lamotrigine. It is concluded that lamotrigine can modify PCP-evoked monoamine overflow in the cortex, consistent with an ability to prevent the psychotomimetic effects of NMDA receptor antagonists in rodents and humans. The dissociation between monoamine overflow and locomotor activity suggests the involvement of different brain circuits; relevance to the treatment of schizophrenia is also discussed.

  12. DNA cloning of human liver monoamine oxidase A and B: Molecular basis of differences in enzymatic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, A.W.J.; Lan, N.C.; Johnson, D.L.; Abell, C.W.; Bembenek, M.E.; Kwan, S.W.; Seeburg, P.H.; Shih, J.C. (Univ. of Heidelberg (West Germany))

    1988-07-01

    The monoamine oxidases play a vital role in the metabolism of biogenic amines in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Using oligonucleotide probes derived from three sequenced peptide fragments, the authors have isolated cDNA clones that encode the A and B forms of monoamine oxidase and have determined the nucleotide sequences of these cDNAs. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences shows that the A and B forms have subunit molecular weights of 59,700 and 58,800, respectively, and have 70% sequence identity. Both sequences contain the pentapeptide Ser-Gly-Gly-Cys-Tyr, in which the obligatory cofactor FAD is covalently bound to cysteine. Based on differences in primary amino acid sequences and RNA gel blot analysis of mRNAs, the A and B forms of monoamine oxidase appear to be derived from separate genes.

  13. Comparison of time-dependent effects of (+-methamphetamine or forced swim on monoamines, corticosterone, glucose, creatine, and creatinine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudelsky Gary A

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methamphetamine (MA use is a worldwide problem. Abusers can have cognitive deficits, monoamine reductions, and altered magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings. Animal models have been used to investigate some of these effects, however many of these experiments have not examined the impact of MA on the stress response. For example, numerous studies have demonstrated (+-MA-induced neurotoxicity and monoamine reductions, however the effects of MA on other markers that may play a role in neurotoxicity or cell energetics such as glucose, corticosterone, and/or creatine have received less attention. In this experiment, the effects of a neurotoxic regimen of (+-MA (4 doses at 2 h intervals on brain monoamines, neostriatal GFAP, plasma corticosterone, creatinine, and glucose, and brain and muscle creatine were evaluated 1, 7, 24, and 72 h after the first dose. In order to compare MA's effects with stress, animals were subjected to a forced swim test in a temporal pattern similar to MA administration [i.e., (30 min/session 4 times at 2 h intervals]. Results MA increased corticosterone from 1–72 h with a peak 1 h after the first treatment, whereas glucose was only increased 1 h post-treatment. Neostriatal and hippocampal monoamines were decreased at 7, 24, and 72 h, with a concurrent increase in GFAP at 72 h. There was no effect of MA on regional brain creatine, however plasma creatinine was increased during the first 24 h and decreased by 72 h. As with MA treatment, forced swim increased corticosterone more than MA initially. Unlike MA, forced swim reduced creatine in the cerebellum with no change in other brain regions while plasma creatinine was decreased at 1 and 7 h. Glucose in plasma was decreased at 7 h. Conclusion Both MA and forced swim increase demand on energy substrates but in different ways, and MA has persistent effects on corticosterone that are not attributable to stress alone.

  14. 人参、天麻等复方总提取物对血管性痴呆大鼠脑组织单胺递质含量的影响%Effect of compound total extract ginseng and tall gastrodia tuber on content of monoamine transmitters in brain tissue of rats with vascular dementia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高国丽; 车光升; 姜源; 董瑶

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During vascular dementia, ischemia, hypoxia, energy expenditure, abnormal metabolism of neurons, decrease of generation of Adenosine Triphosphate and disorder of ionic environment in and out of cells are observed in brain tissue, which can cause abnormal release of monoamine transmitter.OBJECTIVE: To probe into effect of shenma yizhi capsule on content of monoamine transmitter in brain tissue of rat models with vascular dementia induced by multiple cerebral infarction.DESIGN: Randomized controlled study.SETTING: Pathological and Physiological Department o Liaoning Basic Medical Institute.MATERIALS: Totally 96 Wistar rats of either gender,aged 8-12 months, weighing 270-500 g, were selected. METHODS: The experiment was completed in the Pathological and Physiological Department of Vocational-technical College, Liaoning College of Traditional Chinese Medicine from April to July 2001. All rats of either gender were divided into 6 groups with 16 in each group. Wistar rats in 5 groups were injected with cruor embolus in internal carotid artery to make animal model of vascular dementia induced by multiple cerebral infarction.After modeling, rats were randomly divided into 3.2 g/kg, 1.6 g/kg and 0.8 g/kg shenma yizhi capsule groups (shenma yizhi capsule was extracted from ginseng and tall gastrodia tuber with 2.7 g raw materials and provide by Xiyuan Hospital of Chinese Academy of Traditional Chinese Medicine),positive control group and dementia control group. Animals without modeling were regarded as normal control group. Rats in each dosage group were perfused with the corresponding dosage of shenma yizhi capsule; rats in positive control group were perfused with 1 mg/kg hydergine dihydroergotoxine; rats in dementia control group and normal control group were perfused with the same volume of saline solution. One week after modeling, rats were medicated once a day for 6 weeks. Content of monoamine transmitter was measured with high performance liquid

  15. Distinct effects of the serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors milnacipran and venlafaxine on rat pineal monoamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muneoka, Katsumasa; Kuwagata, Makiko; Ogawa, Tetsuo; Shioda, Seiji

    2015-06-17

    Monoamine systems are involved in the pathology and therapeutic mechanism of depression. The pineal gland contains large amounts of serotonin as a precursor for melatonin, and its activity is controlled by noradrenergic sympathetic nerves. Pineal diurnal activity and its release of melatonin are relevant to aberrant states observed in depression. We investigated the effects on pineal monoamines of serotonin-noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors, which are widely used antidepressants. Four days of milnacipran treatment led to an increase in noradrenaline and serotonin levels, whereas 4 days of venlafaxine treatment reduced 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid levels; both agents induced an increase in dopamine levels. Our data suggest that milnacipran increases levels of the precursor for melatonin synthesis by facilitating the noradrenergic regulation of pineal activity and that venlafaxine inhibits serotonin reuptake into noradrenergic terminals on the pineal gland.

  16. In-vivo human brain molecular imaging with a brain-dedicated PET/MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Zang Hee; Son, Young Don; Choi, Eun Jung; Kim, Hang Keun; Kim, Jeong Hee; Lee, Sang Yoon; Ogawa, Seiji; Kim, Young Bo

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the new-generation of ultra-high-resolution, brain-dedicated positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) systems have begun to provide many interesting insights into the molecular dynamics of the brain. First, the finely delineated structural information from ultra-high-field MRI can help us to identify accurate landmark structures, thereby making it easier to locate PET activation sites that are anatomically well-correlated with metabolic or ligand-specific organs in the neural structures in the brain. This synergistic potential of PET/MRI imaging is discussed in terms of neuroscience and neurological research from both translational and basic research perspectives. Experimental results from the hippocampus, thalamus, and brainstem obtained with (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose and (11)C-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile are used to demonstrate the potential of this new brain PET/MRI system.

  17. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  18. Totally Tubular: The Mystery behind Function and Origin of the Brain Ventricular System

    OpenAIRE

    Lowery, Laura Anne; Sive, Hazel

    2009-01-01

    A unique feature of the vertebrate brain is the brain ventricular system, a series of connected cavities which are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and surrounded by neuroepithelium. While CSF is critical for both adult brain function and embryonic brain development, neither development nor function of the brain ventricular system is fully understood. In this review, we discuss the mystery of why vertebrate brains have ventricles, and whence they originate. The brain ventricular system d...

  19. New Heuristics for Interfacing Human Motor System using Brain Waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Dosuky

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There are many new forms of interfacing human users to machines. We persevere here electric-mechanical form of interaction between human and machine. The emergence of brain-computer interface allows mind-to-movement systems. The story of the Pied Piper inspired us to devise some new heuristics for interfacing human motor system using brain waves, by combining head helmet and LumbarMotionMonitor. For the simulation we use java GridGain. Brain responses of classified subjects during training indicates that Probe can be the best stimulus to rely on in distinguishing between knowledgeable and not knowledgeable

  20. Organisation and functional role of the brain angiotensin system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Llorens-Cortes

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The discovery that all components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS are present in the brain led investigators to postulate the existence of a local brain RAS. Supporting this, angiotensin immunoreactive neurones have been visualised in the brain. Two major pathways were described: a forebrain pathway which connects circumventricular organs to the median preoptic nucleus, paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei, and a second pathway connecting the hypothalamus to the medulla oblongata. Blood-brain-barrier deficient circumventricular organs are rich in angiotensin II (Ang II receptors. By activating these receptors, circulating Ang II may act on central cardiovascular centres via angiotensinergic neurones, providing a link between peripheral and central Ang II systems. Among the effector peptides of the brain RAS, Ang II and angiotensin III (Ang III have the same affinity for type 1 and type 2 Ang II receptors. When injected into the brain, both peptides increase blood pressure (BP, water intake and pituitary hormone release and may modify learning and memory. Since Ang II is converted in vivo to Ang III, the nature of the true effector is unknown. This review summarises new insights into the predominant role of brain Ang III in the control of BP and underlines the fact that brain aminopeptidase A, the enzyme forming central Ang III, could constitute a putative central therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension.

  1. 17β-estradiol replacement in young, adult and middle-aged female ovariectomized rats promotes improvement of spatial reference memory and an antidepressant effect and alters monoamines and BDNF levels in memory- and depression-related brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Agata; Delattre, Ana Márcia; Pereira, Sofia I R; Carolino, Ruither G; Szawka, Raphael E; Anselmo-Franci, Janete A; Zanata, Sílvio M; Ferraz, Anete C

    2012-02-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that estrogens have a major impact on cognition, presenting neurotrophic and neuroprotective actions in regions involved in such function. In opposite, some studies indicate that certain hormone therapy regimens may provoke detrimental effects over female cognitive and neurological function. Therefore, we decided to investigate how estrogen treatment would influence cognition and depression in different ages. For that matter, this study assessed the effects of chronic 17β-estradiol treatment over cognition and depressive-like behaviors of young (3 months old), adult (7 months old) and middle-aged (12 months old) reproductive female Wistar rats. These functions were also correlated with alterations in the serotonergic system, as well as hippocampal BDNF. 17β-Estradiol treatment did not influence animals' locomotor activity and exploratory behavior, but it was able to improve the performance of adult and middle-aged rats in the Morris water maze, the latter being more responsive to the treatment. Young and adult rats displayed decreased immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting an effect of 17β-estradiol also over such depressive-like behavior. This same test revealed increased swimming behavior, triggered by serotonergic pathway, in adult rats. Neurochemical evaluations indicated that 17β-estradiol treatment was able to increase serotonin turnover rate in the hippocampus of adult rats. Interestingly, estrogen treatment increased BDNF levels from animals of all ages. These findings support the notion that the beneficial effects of 17β-estradiol over spatial reference memory and depressive-like behavior are evident only when hormone therapy occurs at early ages and early stages of hormonal decline. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased segregation of brain systems across the healthy adult lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Micaela Y; Park, Denise C; Savalia, Neil K; Petersen, Steven E; Wig, Gagan S

    2014-11-18

    Healthy aging has been associated with decreased specialization in brain function. This characterization has focused largely on describing age-accompanied differences in specialization at the level of neurons and brain areas. We expand this work to describe systems-level differences in specialization in a healthy adult lifespan sample (n = 210; 20-89 y). A graph-theoretic framework is used to guide analysis of functional MRI resting-state data and describe systems-level differences in connectivity of individual brain networks. Young adults' brain systems exhibit a balance of within- and between-system correlations that is characteristic of segregated and specialized organization. Increasing age is accompanied by decreasing segregation of brain systems. Compared with systems involved in the processing of sensory input and motor output, systems mediating "associative" operations exhibit a distinct pattern of reductions in segregation across the adult lifespan. Of particular importance, the magnitude of association system segregation is predictive of long-term memory function, independent of an individual's age.

  3. Analysis of microdialysate monoamines, including noradrenaline, dopamine and serotonin, using capillary ultra-high performance liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Barbara; Gifu, Elena-Patricia; Sandu, Ioana; Denoroy, Luc; Parrot, Sandrine

    2014-03-01

    Electrochemical methods are very often used to detect catecholamine and indolamine neurotransmitters separated by conventional reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The present paper presents the development of a chromatographic method to detect monoamines present in low-volume brain dialysis samples using a capillary column filled with sub-2μm particles. Several parameters (repeatability, linearity, accuracy, limit of detection) for this new ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method with electrochemical detection were examined after optimization of the analytical conditions. Noradrenaline, adrenaline, serotonin, dopamine and its metabolite 3-methoxytyramine were separated in 1μL of injected sample volume; they were detected above concentrations of 0.5-1nmol/L, with 2.1-9.5% accuracy and intra-assay repeatability equal to or less than 6%. The final method was applied to very low volume dialysates from rat brain containing monoamine traces. The study demonstrates that capillary UHPLC with electrochemical detection is suitable for monitoring dialysate monoamines collected at high sampling rate.

  4. Spatial learning, monoamines and oxidative stress in rats exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic field in combination with iron overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaroufi, Karima; Had-Aissouni, Laurence; Melon, Christophe; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh; Poucet, Bruno; Save, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of mobile phone technology over the last decade raises concerns about the impact of high frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on health. More recently, a link between EMF, iron overload in the brain and neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases has been suggested. Co-exposure to EMF and brain iron overload may have a greater impact on brain tissues and cognitive processes than each treatment by itself. To examine this hypothesis, Long-Evans rats submitted to 900 MHz exposure or combined 900 MHz EMF and iron overload treatments were tested in various spatial learning tasks (navigation task in the Morris water maze, working memory task in the radial-arm maze, and object exploration task involving spatial and non spatial processing). Biogenic monoamines and metabolites (dopamine, serotonin) and oxidative stress were measured. Rats exposed to EMF were impaired in the object exploration task but not in the navigation and working memory tasks. They also showed alterations of monoamine content in several brain areas but mainly in the hippocampus. Rats that received combined treatment did not show greater behavioral and neurochemical deficits than EMF-exposed rats. None of the two treatments produced global oxidative stress. These results show that there is an impact of EMF on the brain and cognitive processes but this impact is revealed only in a task exploiting spontaneous exploratory activity. In contrast, there are no synergistic effects between EMF and a high content of iron in the brain.

  5. 抑郁症单胺氧化酶A基因活性对表情识别脑功能的影响%Influence of monoamine oxidase A gene and brain function in the dynamic facial expression recognition in depressed patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐勇; 张婧; 姚志剑; 刘海燕; 卢青

    2011-01-01

    目的 应用影像基因组学的原理,探讨单胺氧化酶A基因串联重复序列多态性(MAOA-uVNTR)对抑郁症患者及健康对照不同面部表情识别过程中脑功能的影响.方法 28例抑郁症患者及33例性别比例、年限、受教育年限匹配的健康对照,应用聚合酶链式反应(PCR)技术扩增目的 基因,将61名受试者进行基因型分组,并利用1.5T功能核磁共振成像系统检测每个受试在识别喜悦、悲伤、及中性面部表情视频时的脑激活反应.结果 识别悲伤面部表情时,高活性基因型健康组较低活性基因型健康组左楔叶、左额下回、右额中回、左顶下小叶脑区激活显著增强(P<0.005,K≥10).识别喜悦面部表情时,高活性基因型患者组较低活性基因型患者组左右壳核、左中央后回,右颞上回、右丘脑、左梭状回脑区激活降低(P<0.005,K≥10).结论 高活性基因型与健康人群负性情绪识别的优先激活趋势及抑郁症患者正性情绪的抑制状态均存在关联性,该基因型可能是健康者罹患抑郁症的危险因素之一,同时部分导致该类患者情绪症状较为显著.%Objective To explore the impact of the variable number of tandem repeats of monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA-uVNTR) on the intensity of brain activation during the recognition of facial expression in patients with depression and healthy controls.Methods 28 cases of depression,as well as 33 healthy controls who were matched in gender, age and years of education were divided into different genotypes with the methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and 1.5% agarose gel electrophoresis separation.61 cases were scanned to compare the intensity of brain activation in the recognition of happy, sad and neutral facial expression.Results In healthy controls,cases with high-activity genotype showed increased activation in left cuneus,left inferior frontal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus and left inferior

  6. Alterations in Brain Monoamine Neurotransmitter Release at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Services Division F 02-295-2188 ISD/ADMIN/hNXRI )D FORM 1473,84 MAR 83 APR edition may oe used until exnausted. SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF TWIS PAGE All...ml) of the synaptosomal preparation con- taining 3.0 3.5 mg ml protein were incubated for Is mm Of [3H]serotonin from synaptosome fractions iso- 370...Brauer R"’. Beaser RW. Sheehan ME (1978) Role of mono- S~napsin I ( protein I1). a nerse terminal-specific phospho- amnine neurotransmnitters in the

  7. The role of the monoamine oxidase A gene in moderating the response to adversity and associated antisocial behavior: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buades-Rotger M

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Macià Buades-Rotger,1,2 David Gallardo-Pujol1,3 1Department of Personality, Faculty of Psychology, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; 2Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, Germany; 3Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behavior (IR3C, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain Abstract: Hereditary factors are increasingly attracting the interest of behavioral scientists and practitioners. Our aim in the present article is to introduce some state-of-the-art topics in behavioral genetics, as well as selected findings in the field, in order to illustrate how genetic makeup can modulate the impact of environmental factors. We focus on the most-studied polymorphism to date for antisocial responses to adversity: the monoamine oxidase A gene. Advances, caveats, and promises of current research are reviewed. We also discuss implications for the use of genetic information in applied settings. Keywords: behavioral genetics, antisocial behaviors, monoamine oxidase A

  8. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by furazolidone in the chicken and the influence of the alimentary flora thereon.

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, B. H.; Bartlet, A. L.

    1980-01-01

    1 The addition of furazolidone to the feed at the therapeutic level (0.04% w/w, 10 days) inhibited monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity by 47 to 72% in chicken duodenal mucosa, heart and brain, but in the liver the enzyme activity was unaffected by the treatment. 2 Furazolidone (200 mg/kg) administered by crop tube inhibited MAO activities in duodenal mucosa, liver, heart and brain. 3 Furazolidone (200 mg/kg) injected intramuscularly did not inhibit MAO activity in the chicken. 4 Pretreatment of ...

  9. Leflunomide, a Reversible Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél

    2016-01-01

    A screening study aimed at identifying inhibitors of the enzyme, monoamine oxidase (MAO), among clinically used drugs have indicated that the antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, is an inhibitor of both MAO isoforms. Leflunomide inhibits human MAO-A and MAO-B and exhibits IC50 values of 19.1 μM and 13.7 μM, respectively. The corresponding Ki values are 17.7 μM (MAO-A) and 10.1 μM (MAO-B). Dialyses of mixtures of the MAO enzymes and leflunomide show that inhibition of the MAOs by leflunomide is reversible. The principal metabolite of leflunomide, teriflunomide (A77 1726), in contrast is not an MAO inhibitor. This study concludes that, although leflunomide is only moderately potent as an MAO inhibitor, isoxazole derivatives may represent a general class of MAO inhibitors and this heterocycle may find application in MAO inhibitor design. In this respect, MAO inhibitors are used in the clinic for the treatment of depressive illness and Parkinson's disease, and are under investigation as therapy for certain types of cancer, Alzheimer's disease and age-related impairment of cardiac function.

  10. Monoamine transporters: insights from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouleff, Julie; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Koldsø, Heidi; Schiøtt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The human monoamine transporters (MATs) facilitate the reuptake of the neurotransmitters serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine from the synaptic cleft. Imbalance in monoaminergic neurotransmission is linked to various diseases including major depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. Inhibition of the MATs is thus an important strategy for treatment of such diseases. The MATs are sodium-coupled transport proteins belonging to the neurotransmitter/Na+ symporter (NSS) family, and the publication of the first high-resolution structure of a NSS family member, the bacterial leucine transporter LeuT, in 2005, proved to be a major stepping stone for understanding this family of transporters. Structural data allows for the use of computational methods to study the MATs, which in turn has led to a number of important discoveries. The process of substrate translocation across the membrane is an intrinsically dynamic process. Molecular dynamics simulations, which can provide atomistic details of molecular motion on ns to ms timescales, are therefore well-suited for studying transport processes. In this review, we outline how molecular dynamics simulations have provided insight into the large scale motions associated with transport of the neurotransmitters, as well as the presence of external and internal gates, the coupling between ion and substrate transport, and differences in the conformational changes induced by substrates and inhibitors. PMID:26528185

  11. Monoamine oxidase inhibitory activities of heterocyclic chalcones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minders, Corné; Petzer, Jacobus P; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2015-11-15

    Studies have shown that natural and synthetic chalcones (1,3-diphenyl-2-propen-1-ones) possess monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition activities. Of particular importance to the present study is a report that a series of furanochalcones acts as MAO-B selective inhibitors. Since the effect of heterocyclic substitution, other than furan (and more recently thiophene, piperidine and quinoline) on the MAO inhibitory properties of the chalcone scaffold remains unexplored, the aim of this study was to synthesise and evaluate further heterocyclic chalcone analogues as inhibitors of the human MAOs. For this purpose, heterocyclic chalcone analogues that incorporate pyrrole, 5-methylthiophene, 5-chlorothiophene and 6-methoxypyridine substitution were examined. Seven of the nine synthesised compounds exhibited IC50 values chalcones are reversible and competitive MAO inhibitors. 4h, however, may exhibit tight-binding to MAO-B, a property linked to its thiophene moiety. We conclude that high potency chalcones such as 4h represent suitable leads for the development of MAO-B inhibitors for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and possibly other neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The brain endocannabinoid system in the regulation of energy balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Denis; Guesdon, Benjamin; Timofeeva, Elena

    2009-02-01

    The role played by the endocannabinoid system in the regulation of energy balance is currently generating a great amount of interest among several groups of investigators. This interest in large part comes from the urgent need to develop anti-obesity and anti-cachexia drugs around target systems (such as the endocannabinoid system), which appears to be genuinely involved in energy balance regulation. When activated, the endocannabinoid system favors energy deposition through increasing energy intake and reducing energy expenditure. This system is activated in obesity and following food deprivation, which further supports its authentic function in energy balance regulation. The cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1), one of the two identified cannabinoid receptors, is expressed in energy-balance brain structures that are also able to readily produce or inactivate N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2AG), the most abundantly formed and released endocannabinoids. The brain action of endocannabinoid system on energy balance seems crucial and needs to be delineated in the context of the homeostatic and hedonic controls of food intake and energy expenditure. These controls require the coordinated interaction of the hypothalamus, brainstem and limbic system and it appears imperative to unravel those interplays. It is also critical to investigate the metabolic endocannabinoid system while considering the panoply of functions that the endocannabinoid system fulfills in the brain and other tissues. This article aims at reviewing the potential mechanisms whereby the brain endocannabinoid system influences the regulation energy balance.

  13. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  14. Binding Mode Selection Determines the Action of Ecstasy Homologs at Monoamine Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandtner, Walter; Stockner, Thomas; Hasenhuetl, Peter S; Partilla, John S; Seddik, Amir; Zhang, Yuan-Wei; Cao, Jianjing; Holy, Marion; Steinkellner, Thomas; Rudnick, Gary; Baumann, Michael H; Ecker, Gerhard F; Newman, Amy Hauck; Sitte, Harald H

    2016-01-01

    Determining the structural elements that define substrates and inhibitors at the monoamine transporters is critical to elucidating the mechanisms underlying these disparate functions. In this study, we addressed this question directly by generating a series of N-substituted 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs that differ only in the number of methyl substituents on the terminal amine group. Starting with 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine (MDDMA) and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N,N,N-trimethylamphetamine (MDTMA) were prepared. We evaluated the functional activities of the compounds at all three monoamine transporters in native brain tissue and cells expressing the transporters. In addition, we used ligand docking to generate models of the respective protein-ligand complexes, which allowed us to relate the experimental findings to available structural information. Our results suggest that the 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine analogs bind at the monoamine transporter orthosteric binding site by adopting one of two mutually exclusive binding modes. 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine adopt a high-affinity binding mode consistent with a transportable substrate, whereas MDDMA and MDTMA adopt a low-affinity binding mode consistent with an inhibitor, in which the ligand orientation is inverted. Importantly, MDDMA can alternate between both binding modes, whereas MDTMA exclusively binds to the low-affinity mode. Our experimental results are consistent with the idea that the initial orientation of bound ligands is critical for subsequent interactions that lead to transporter conformational changes and substrate translocation.

  15. Brain renin angiotensin system in cardiac hypertrophy and failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana eCampos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS is significantly involved in the roles of the endocrine RAS in cardiovascular regulation. Our studies indicate that the brain RAS participates in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis through sympathetic activation. Inhibition of sympathetic hyperactivity after myocardial infarction through suppression of the brain RAS appears beneficial. The brain RAS is involved in the modulation of circadian rhythms of arterial pressure, contributing to nondipping hypertension. We conclude that the brain RAS in pathophysiological states interacts synergistically with the chronically overactive RAS through a positive biofeedback in order to maintain a state of alert diseased conditions, such as cardiac hypertrophy and failure. Therefore, targeting brain RAS with drugs such as angiotensin converting inhibitors or receptor blockers having increased brain penetrability could be of advantage. These RAS-targeting drugs are first-line therapy for all heart failure patients. Since the RAS has both endocrine and local tissue components, RAS drugs are being developed to attain increased tissue penetrability and volume of distribution and consequently an efficient inhibition of both RAS components.

  16. Monoamine content during the reproductive cycle of Perna perna depends on site of origin on the Atlantic Coast of Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Mounia S; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe; Dellu-Hagedorn, Françoise; Lakhdar-Ghazal, Nouria; Benomar, Soumaya

    2015-09-09

    Bivalve molluscs such as Perna perna display temporal cycles of reproduction that result from the complex interplay between endogenous and exogenous signals. The monoamines serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline represent possible endocrine and neuronal links between these signals allowing the molluscs to modulate reproductive functions in conjunction with environmental constraints. Here, we report a disruption of the reproductive cycle of mussels collected from two of three sites along the Moroccan atlantic coast soiled by industrial or domestic waste. Using high pressure liquid chromatography, we show that the temporal pattern of monoamine content in the gonads, pedal and cerebroid ganglia varied throughout the reproductive cycle (resting, developing, maturing, egg-laying) of mussels from the unpolluted site. Marked modification of monoamine tissue content was found between sites, notably in noradrenaline content of the gonads. Discriminant statistics revealed a specific impact of mussel location on the temporal variations of noradrenaline and serotonin levels in gonads and cerebroid ganglia. Correlation analyses showed profound and temporal changes in the monoamine content between organs and ganglia, at the two sites where the reproduction was disrupted. We suggest that environmental constraints lead to profound changes of monoaminergic systems, which thereby compromises the entry of mussels into their reproductive cycle.

  17. Clearance systems in the brain-implications for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasoff-Conway, Jenna M; Carare, Roxana O; Osorio, Ricardo S; Glodzik, Lidia; Butler, Tracy; Fieremans, Els; Axel, Leon; Rusinek, Henry; Nicholson, Charles; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Frangione, Blas; Blennow, Kaj; Ménard, Joël; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wisniewski, Thomas; de Leon, Mony J

    2015-08-01

    Accumulation of toxic protein aggregates-amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau tangles-is the pathological hallmark of Alzheimer disease (AD). Aβ accumulation has been hypothesized to result from an imbalance between Aβ production and clearance; indeed, Aβ clearance seems to be impaired in both early and late forms of AD. To develop efficient strategies to slow down or halt AD, it is critical to understand how Aβ is cleared from the brain. Extracellular Aβ deposits can be removed from the brain by various clearance systems, most importantly, transport across the blood-brain barrier. Findings from the past few years suggest that astroglial-mediated interstitial fluid (ISF) bulk flow, known as the glymphatic system, might contribute to a larger portion of extracellular Aβ (eAβ) clearance than previously thought. The meningeal lymphatic vessels, discovered in 2015, might provide another clearance route. Because these clearance systems act together to drive eAβ from the brain, any alteration to their function could contribute to AD. An understanding of Aβ clearance might provide strategies to reduce excess Aβ deposits and delay, or even prevent, disease onset. In this Review, we describe the clearance systems of the brain as they relate to proteins implicated in AD pathology, with the main focus on Aβ.

  18. Roles of monoamine neurotransmitters in the mechanism of drug addiction%单胺类神经递质在药物成瘾中的作用机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨黎华; 白洁

    2015-01-01

    药物成瘾是一种慢性复发性大脑疾病,各种成瘾性药物通过作用于奖赏系统,最终引起神经递质释放的改变,产生奖赏效应。其中,单胺类神经递质5-羟色胺(5-hydroxytryptamine,5-HT)、去甲肾上腺素( noradrenergic,NE)和多巴胺( dopamine,DA)在药物成瘾中起到重要作用,该文就单胺类神经递质在药物成瘾中的作用及机制进行综述。%Drug addiction is a chronic recrudescent brain dis-ease. Various addictive drugs acting on the reward system result in rewarding effects through changes in neurotransmitter patholog-ical release. Among these monoamine neurotransmitters, 5-hydroxytryptamine, norepinephrine and dopamine play key roles in drug addiction. This paper reviews, from a comprehensive perspective, the roles which monoamine neurotransmitters play in the drug addiction and the process of getting addictive.

  19. Shared visual attention and memory systems in the Drosophila brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno van Swinderen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective attention and memory seem to be related in human experience. This appears to be the case as well in simple model organisms such as the fly Drosophila melanogaster. Mutations affecting olfactory and visual memory formation in Drosophila, such as in dunce and rutabaga, also affect short-term visual processes relevant to selective attention. In particular, increased optomotor responsiveness appears to be predictive of visual attention defects in these mutants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To further explore the possible overlap between memory and visual attention systems in the fly brain, we screened a panel of 36 olfactory long term memory (LTM mutants for visual attention-like defects using an optomotor maze paradigm. Three of these mutants yielded high dunce-like optomotor responsiveness. We characterized these three strains by examining their visual distraction in the maze, their visual learning capabilities, and their brain activity responses to visual novelty. We found that one of these mutants, D0067, was almost completely identical to dunce(1 for all measures, while another, D0264, was more like wild type. Exploiting the fact that the LTM mutants are also Gal4 enhancer traps, we explored the sufficiency for the cells subserved by these elements to rescue dunce attention defects and found overlap at the level of the mushroom bodies. Finally, we demonstrate that control of synaptic function in these Gal4 expressing cells specifically modulates a 20-30 Hz local field potential associated with attention-like effects in the fly brain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study uncovers genetic and neuroanatomical systems in the fly brain affecting both visual attention and odor memory phenotypes. A common component to these systems appears to be the mushroom bodies, brain structures which have been traditionally associated with odor learning but which we propose might be also involved in generating oscillatory brain activity

  20. Brain-machine interface circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zjajo, Amir

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a complete overview of significant design challenges in respect to circuit miniaturization and power reduction of the neural recording system, along with circuit topologies, architecture trends, and (post-silicon) circuit optimization algorithms. The introduced novel circuits for signal conditioning, quantization, and classification, as well as system configurations focus on optimized power-per-area performance, from the spatial resolution (i.e. number of channels), feasible wireless data bandwidth and information quality to the delivered power of implantable system.

  1. Behavioral and pharmacokinetic interactions between monoamine oxidase inhibitors and the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstadt, Adam L

    2016-04-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are often ingested together with tryptamine hallucinogens, but relatively little is known about the consequences of their combined use. We have shown previously that monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors alter the locomotor profile of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) in rats, and enhance its interaction with 5-HT2A receptors. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the mechanism for the interaction between 5-MeO-DMT and MAOIs, and to determine whether other behavioral responses to 5-MeO-DMT are similarly affected. Hallucinogens disrupt prepulse inhibition (PPI) in rats, an effect typically mediated by 5-HT2A activation. 5-MeO-DMT also disrupts PPI but the effect is primarily attributable to 5-HT1A activation. The present studies examined whether an MAOI can alter the respective contributions of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors to the effects of 5-MeO-DMT on PPI. A series of interaction studies using the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100,635 and the 5-HT2A antagonist MDL 11,939 were performed to assess the respective contributions of these receptors to the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT in rats pretreated with an MAOI. The effects of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of 5-MeO-DMT and its metabolism to bufotenine were assessed using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-selective reaction monitoring-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-SRM-MS/MS). 5-MeO-DMT (1mg/kg) had no effect on PPI when tested 45-min post-injection but disrupted PPI in animals pretreated with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline or the MAO-A/B inhibitor pargyline. The combined effect of 5-MeO-DMT and pargyline on PPI was antagonized by pretreatment with either WAY-100,635 or MDL 11,939. Inhibition of MAO-A increased the level of 5-MeO-DMT in plasma and whole brain, but had no effect on the conversion of 5-MeO-DMT to bufotenine, which was found to be negligible. The present results confirm that 5-MeO-DMT can disrupt PPI by

  2. Behavioral and Pharmacokinetic Interactions Between Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors and the Hallucinogen 5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstadt, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are often ingested together with tryptamine hallucinogens, but relatively little is known about the consequences of their combined use. We have shown previously that monoamine oxidase-A (MAO-A) inhibitors alter the locomotor profile of the hallucinogen 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) in rats, and enhance its interaction with 5-HT2A receptors. The goal of the present studies was to investigate the mechanism for the interaction between 5-MeO-DMT and MAOIs, and to determine whether other behavioral responses to 5-MeO-DMT are similarly affected. Hallucinogens disrupt prepulse inhibition (PPI) in rats, an effect typically mediated by 5-HT2A activation. 5-MeO-DMT also disrupts PPI but the effect is primarily attributable to 5-HT1A activation. The present studies examined whether an MAOI can alter the respective contributions of 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors to the effects of 5-MeO-DMT on PPI. A series of interaction studies using the 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 and the 5-HT2A antagonist MDL 11,939 were performed to assess the respective contributions of these receptors to the behavioral effects of 5-MeO-DMT in rats pretreated with an MAOI. The effects of MAO-A inhibition on the pharmacokinetics of 5-MeO-DMT and its metabolism to bufotenine were assessed using liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization–selective reaction monitoring–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-SRM-MS/MS). 5-MeO-DMT (1 mg/kg) had no effect on PPI when tested 45-min post-injection but disrupted PPI in animals pretreated with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline or the MAO-A/B inhibitor pargyline. The combined effect of 5-MeO-DMT and pargyline on PPI was antagonized by pretreatment with either WAY-100635 or MDL 11,939. Inhibition of MAO-A increased the level of 5-MeO-DMT in plasma and whole brain, but had no effect on the conversion of 5-MeO-DMT to bufotenine, which was found to be negligible. The present results confirm that 5-MeO-DMT can disrupt PPI

  3. Memory Systems and the Addicted Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Jarid; Packard, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    The view that anatomically distinct memory systems differentially contribute to the development of drug addiction and relapse has received extensive support. The present brief review revisits this hypothesis as it was originally proposed 20 years ago (1) and highlights several recent developments. Extensive research employing a variety of animal learning paradigms indicates that dissociable neural systems mediate distinct types of learning and memory. Each memory system potentially contributes unique components to the learned behavior supporting drug addiction and relapse. In particular, the shift from recreational drug use to compulsive drug abuse may reflect a neuroanatomical shift from cognitive control of behavior mediated by the hippocampus/dorsomedial striatum toward habitual control of behavior mediated by the dorsolateral striatum (DLS). In addition, stress/anxiety may constitute a cofactor that facilitates DLS-dependent memory, and this may serve as a neurobehavioral mechanism underlying the increased drug use and relapse in humans following stressful life events. Evidence supporting the multiple systems view of drug addiction comes predominantly from studies of learning and memory that have employed as reinforcers addictive substances often considered within the context of drug addiction research, including cocaine, alcohol, and amphetamines. In addition, recent evidence suggests that the memory systems approach may also be helpful for understanding topical sources of addiction that reflect emerging health concerns, including marijuana use, high-fat diet, and video game playing. PMID:26941660

  4. MEMORY SYSTEMS AND THE ADDICTED BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarid eGoodman

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The view that anatomically distinct memory systems differentially contribute to the development of drug addiction and relapse has received extensive support. The present brief review revisits this hypothesis as it was originally proposed twenty years ago (White, 1996 and highlights several recent developments. Extensive research employing a variety of animal learning paradigms indicates that dissociable neural systems mediate distinct types of learning and memory. Each memory system potentially contributes unique components to the learned behavior supporting drug addiction and relapse. In particular, the shift from recreational drug use to compulsive drug abuse may reflect a neuroanatomical shift from cognitive control of behavior mediated by the hippocampus/dorsomedial striatum toward habitual control of behavior mediated by the dorsolateral striatum (DLS. In addition, stress/anxiety may constitute a cofactor that facilitates DLS-dependent memory, and this may serve as a neurobehavioral mechanism underlying the increased drug use and relapse in humans following stressful life events. Evidence supporting the multiple systems view of drug addiction comes predominantly from studies of learning and memory that have employed as reinforcers addictive substances often considered within the context of drug addiction research, including cocaine, alcohol, and amphetamines. In addition, recent evidence suggests that the memory systems approach may also be helpful for understanding topical sources of addiction that reflect emerging health concerns, including marijuana use, high-fat diet, and video game playing.

  5. 381 Developing of a Computerized Brain Diagnosing System for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    (Pp. 381-396). Ogunsanwo O. D. - Department of Computer Science, Gate way ICT ... computerized brain diagnosing system that would be used in carrying out the .... on Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology are being built into photocopiers, ..... This aspect explores the techniques use for the design of interface, menus and.

  6. Effects of long-term exposure of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") on neuronal transmitter transport, brain immuno-regulatory systems and progression of experimental periodontitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Torbjørn; Bogen, Inger Lise; Haug, Kristin Huse; Fonnum, Frode; Opstad, Per-Kristian; Eide, Dag Marcus; Myhre, Oddvar

    2014-06-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of long-term exposure (4 weeks) to the widely used narcotic drug and putative neurotoxicant 3,4-methylenedioxymetamphetamine (MDMA; "ecstasy") on neuronal transmitter transport and progression of experimental periodontitis in male Wistar rats. The rats were exposed to MDMA (10mg/kg/day i.p.) or saline five days a week for four consecutive weeks. Exposure to MDMA induced a significant reduction in the synaptosomal reuptake of serotonin, while the uptake of dopamine was significantly increased 24h after the last injection of MDMA. In contrast, the synaptosomal uptake of noradrenaline and the vesicular uptake through the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 were not affected. In the experiments of periodontitis development, ligature-induced periodontitis was induced three days prior to MDMA administration. Compared to controls, MDMA-treated rats developed significantly more periodontitis. In conclusion, our results show that long-term exposure to MDMA affects the serotonergic and dopaminergic transport systems in the rat brain and increased the susceptibility to the psychosomatic ailment periodontitis following disturbances of brain immune-regulatory systems. These results are interesting with respect to recent research showing that changes in neurotransmitter signalling may alter the reactivity of brain-controlled immunoregulatory systems controlling pathogenic microorganisms colonizing mucosal surfaces.

  7. Institute for Brain and Neural Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-06

    Cooper. A Probabilistic Model For Cursive Handwriting Recognition Using Spatial Context. ICASSP, Vol. 5, pp. 201-204, 2005. Technical Reports: 47 21...application to recognition of on-line cursive script. In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems. Neskovic, P., Schuster, D., and Cooper, L. (2004...P., and Cooper, L. (2005c). A probabilistic model for cursive handwriting recognition using spatial context. In Proc. ICASSP. Wang, J., Neskovic, P

  8. The PennBMBI: Design of a General Purpose Wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xilin; Zhang, Milin; Subei, Basheer; Richardson, Andrew G; Lucas, Timothy H; Van der Spiegel, Jan

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a general purpose wireless Brain-Machine-Brain Interface (BMBI) system is presented. The system integrates four battery-powered wireless devices for the implementation of a closed-loop sensorimotor neural interface, including a neural signal analyzer, a neural stimulator, a body-area sensor node and a graphic user interface implemented on the PC end. The neural signal analyzer features a four channel analog front-end with configurable bandpass filter, gain stage, digitization resolution, and sampling rate. The target frequency band is configurable from EEG to single unit activity. A noise floor of 4.69 μVrms is achieved over a bandwidth from 0.05 Hz to 6 kHz. Digital filtering, neural feature extraction, spike detection, sensing-stimulating modulation, and compressed sensing measurement are realized in a central processing unit integrated in the analyzer. A flash memory card is also integrated in the analyzer. A 2-channel neural stimulator with a compliance voltage up to ± 12 V is included. The stimulator is capable of delivering unipolar or bipolar, charge-balanced current pulses with programmable pulse shape, amplitude, width, pulse train frequency and latency. A multi-functional sensor node, including an accelerometer, a temperature sensor, a flexiforce sensor and a general sensor extension port has been designed. A computer interface is designed to monitor, control and configure all aforementioned devices via a wireless link, according to a custom designed communication protocol. Wireless closed-loop operation between the sensory devices, neural stimulator, and neural signal analyzer can be configured. The proposed system was designed to link two sites in the brain, bridging the brain and external hardware, as well as creating new sensory and motor pathways for clinical practice. Bench test and in vivo experiments are performed to verify the functions and performances of the system.

  9. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqian Mao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG- based Brain Computer Interface (BCI, to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques.

  10. Progress in EEG-Based Brain Robot Interaction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengfan; Niu, Linwei; Xian, Bin; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Genshe

    2017-01-01

    The most popular noninvasive Brain Robot Interaction (BRI) technology uses the electroencephalogram- (EEG-) based Brain Computer Interface (BCI), to serve as an additional communication channel, for robot control via brainwaves. This technology is promising for elderly or disabled patient assistance with daily life. The key issue of a BRI system is to identify human mental activities, by decoding brainwaves, acquired with an EEG device. Compared with other BCI applications, such as word speller, the development of these applications may be more challenging since control of robot systems via brainwaves must consider surrounding environment feedback in real-time, robot mechanical kinematics, and dynamics, as well as robot control architecture and behavior. This article reviews the major techniques needed for developing BRI systems. In this review article, we first briefly introduce the background and development of mind-controlled robot technologies. Second, we discuss the EEG-based brain signal models with respect to generating principles, evoking mechanisms, and experimental paradigms. Subsequently, we review in detail commonly used methods for decoding brain signals, namely, preprocessing, feature extraction, and feature classification, and summarize several typical application examples. Next, we describe a few BRI applications, including wheelchairs, manipulators, drones, and humanoid robots with respect to synchronous and asynchronous BCI-based techniques. Finally, we address some existing problems and challenges with future BRI techniques. PMID:28484488

  11. Human pharmacology of ayahuasca: subjective and cardiovascular effects, monoamine metabolite excretion, and pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; Valle, Marta; Urbano, Gloria; Yritia, Mercedes; Morte, Adelaida; Barbanoj, Manel J

    2003-07-01

    The effects of the South American psychotropic beverage ayahuasca on subjective and cardiovascular variables and urine monoamine metabolite excretion were evaluated, together with the drug's pharmacokinetic profile, in a double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial. This pharmacologically complex tea, commonly obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi and Psychotria viridis, combines N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), an orally labile psychedelic agent showing 5-hydroxytryptamine2A agonist activity, with monoamine oxidase (MAO)-inhibiting beta-carboline alkaloids (harmine, harmaline, and tetrahydroharmine). Eighteen volunteers with prior experience in the use of psychedelics received single oral doses of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (0.6 and 0.85 mg of DMT/kg of body weight) and placebo. Ayahuasca produced significant subjective effects, peaking between 1.5 and 2 h, involving perceptual modifications and increases in ratings of positive mood and activation. Diastolic blood pressure showed a significant increase at the high dose (9 mm Hg at 75 min), whereas systolic blood pressure and heart rate were moderately and nonsignificantly increased. Cmax values for DMT after the low and high ayahuasca doses were 12.14 ng/ml and 17.44 ng/ml, respectively. Tmax (median) was observed at 1.5 h after both doses. The Tmax for DMT coincided with the peak of subjective effects. Drug administration increased urinary normetanephrine excretion, but, contrary to the typical MAO-inhibitor effect profile, deaminated monoamine metabolite levels were not decreased. This and the negligible harmine plasma levels found suggest a predominantly peripheral (gastrointestinal and liver) site of action for harmine. MAO inhibition at this level would suffice to prevent first-pass metabolism of DMT and allow its access to systemic circulation and the central nervous system.

  12. ”Ping-pong gaze” secondary to monoamine oxidase inhibitor overdose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Attaway

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An infrequent manifestation of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI toxicity is “ping-pong gaze” (PPG. We describe the case of a 26-year-old female who was found unresponsive after taking 40 tablets of phenelzine. On presentation to the hospital, her eyes were moving in characteristic “ping pong” fashion. After 6 hours her gaze terminated. The following day her neurologic exam was benign and she had no long-term sequelae. While the etiology of PPG is unknown, it is most often seen with irreversible structural brain damage. However, a detailed literature review revealed that previous cases of MAOI toxicity where the patient survived have all had complete neurologic recovery.

  13. Core and shell song systems unique to the parrot brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Harpøth, Solveig Walløe; Nedergaard, Signe

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning...... in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely...... species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities....

  14. Core and shell song systems unique to the parrot brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Harpøth, Solveig Walløe; Nedergaard, Signe;

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning...... in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely...... species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities....

  15. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Hansen, Solveig Walløe; Nedergaard, Signe;

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning...... in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely...... species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities....

  16. Totally tubular: the mystery behind function and origin of the brain ventricular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Laura Anne; Sive, Hazel

    2009-04-01

    A unique feature of the vertebrate brain is the ventricular system, a series of connected cavities which are filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and surrounded by neuroepithelium. While CSF is critical for both adult brain function and embryonic brain development, neither development nor function of the brain ventricular system is fully understood. In this review, we discuss the mystery of why vertebrate brains have ventricles, and whence they originate. The brain ventricular system develops from the lumen of the neural tube, as the neuroepithelium undergoes morphogenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying this ontogeny are described. We discuss possible functions of both adult and embryonic brain ventricles, as well as major brain defects that are associated with CSF and brain ventricular abnormalities. We conclude that vertebrates have taken advantage of their neural tube to form the essential brain ventricular system.

  17. Interaction between lexical and grammatical language systems in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2012-06-01

    This review concentrates on two different language dimensions: lexical/semantic and grammatical. This distinction between a lexical/semantic system and a grammatical system is well known in linguistics, but in cognitive neurosciences it has been obscured by the assumption that there are several forms of language disturbances associated with focal brain damage and hence language includes a diversity of functions (phoneme discrimination, lexical memory, grammar, repetition, language initiation ability, etc.), each one associated with the activity of a specific brain area. The clinical observation of patients with cerebral pathology shows that there are indeed only two different forms of language disturbances (disturbances in the lexical/semantic system and disturbances in the grammatical system); these two language dimensions are supported by different brain areas (temporal and frontal) in the left hemisphere. Furthermore, these two aspects of the language are developed at different ages during child's language acquisition, and they probably appeared at different historical moments during human evolution. Mechanisms of learning are different for both language systems: whereas the lexical/semantic knowledge is based in a declarative memory, grammatical knowledge corresponds to a procedural type of memory. Recognizing these two language dimensions can be crucial in understanding language evolution and human cognition.

  18. A Review of Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setare Amiri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing number of research activities and different types of studies in brain-computer interface (BCI systems show potential in this young research area. Research teams have studied features of different data acquisition techniques, brain activity patterns, feature extraction techniques, methods of classifications, and many other aspects of a BCI system. However, conventional BCIs have not become totally applicable, due to the lack of high accuracy, reliability, low information transfer rate, and user acceptability. A new approach to create a more reliable BCI that takes advantage of each system is to combine two or more BCI systems with different brain activity patterns or different input signal sources. This type of BCI, called hybrid BCI, may reduce disadvantages of each conventional BCI system. In addition, hybrid BCIs may create more applications and possibly increase the accuracy and the information transfer rate. However, the type of BCIs and their combinations should be considered carefully. In this paper, after introducing several types of BCIs and their combinations, we review and discuss hybrid BCIs, different possibilities to combine them, and their advantages and disadvantages.

  19. Interaction between lexical and grammatical language systems in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2012-06-01

    This review concentrates on two different language dimensions: lexical/semantic and grammatical. This distinction between a lexical/semantic system and a grammatical system is well known in linguistics, but in cognitive neurosciences it has been obscured by the assumption that there are several forms of language disturbances associated with focal brain damage and hence language includes a diversity of functions (phoneme discrimination, lexical memory, grammar, repetition, language initiation ability, etc.), each one associated with the activity of a specific brain area. The clinical observation of patients with cerebral pathology shows that there are indeed only two different forms of language disturbances (disturbances in the lexical/semantic system and disturbances in the grammatical system); these two language dimensions are supported by different brain areas (temporal and frontal) in the left hemisphere. Furthermore, these two aspects of the language are developed at different ages during child's language acquisition, and they probably appeared at different historical moments during human evolution. Mechanisms of learning are different for both language systems: whereas the lexical/semantic knowledge is based in a declarative memory, grammatical knowledge corresponds to a procedural type of memory. Recognizing these two language dimensions can be crucial in understanding language evolution and human cognition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A new microcontroller-based human brain hypothermia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapidere, Metin; Ahiska, Raşit; Güler, Inan

    2005-10-01

    Many studies show that artificial hypothermia of brain in conditions of anesthesia with the rectal temperature lowered down to 33 degrees C produces pronounced prophylactic effect protecting the brain from anoxia. Out of the methods employed now in clinical practice for reducing the oxygen consumption by the cerebral tissue, the most efficacious is craniocerebral hypothermia (CCH). It is finding even more extensive application in cardiovascular surgery, neurosurgery, neurorenimatology and many other fields of medical practice. In this study, a microcontroller-based designed human brain hypothermia system (HBHS) is designed and constructed. The system is intended for cooling and heating the brain. HBHS consists of a thermoelectric hypothermic helmet, a control and a power unit. Helmet temperature is controlled by 8-bit PIC16F877 microcontroller which is programmed using MPLAB editor. Temperature is converted to 10-bit digital and is controlled automatically by the preset values which have been already entered in the microcontroller. Calibration is controlled and the working range is tested. Temperature of helmet is controlled between -5 and +46 degrees C by microcontroller, with the accuracy of +/-0.5 degrees C.

  1. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot "core" song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the "shell" song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities.

  2. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F; Dorrestein, Gerry M; Brauth, Steven E; Durand, Sarah E; Jarvis, Erich D

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot "core" song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the "shell" song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities.

  3. Core and Shell Song Systems Unique to the Parrot Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Mukta; Walløe, Solveig; Nedergaard, Signe; Fridel, Emma E.; Dabelsteen, Torben; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bertelsen, Mads F.; Dorrestein, Gerry M.; Brauth, Steven E.; Durand, Sarah E.; Jarvis, Erich D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to imitate complex sounds is rare, and among birds has been found only in parrots, songbirds, and hummingbirds. Parrots exhibit the most advanced vocal mimicry among non-human animals. A few studies have noted differences in connectivity, brain position and shape in the vocal learning systems of parrots relative to songbirds and hummingbirds. However, only one parrot species, the budgerigar, has been examined and no differences in the presence of song system structures were found with other avian vocal learners. Motivated by questions of whether there are important differences in the vocal systems of parrots relative to other vocal learners, we used specialized constitutive gene expression, singing-driven gene expression, and neural connectivity tracing experiments to further characterize the song system of budgerigars and/or other parrots. We found that the parrot brain uniquely contains a song system within a song system. The parrot “core” song system is similar to the song systems of songbirds and hummingbirds, whereas the “shell” song system is unique to parrots. The core with only rudimentary shell regions were found in the New Zealand kea, representing one of the only living species at a basal divergence with all other parrots, implying that parrots evolved vocal learning systems at least 29 million years ago. Relative size differences in the core and shell regions occur among species, which we suggest could be related to species differences in vocal and cognitive abilities. PMID:26107173

  4. The dopaminergic system in the aging brain of Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E White

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila models of Parkinson’s disease are characterised by two principal phenotypes: the specific loss of dopaminergic neurons in the aging brain and defects in motor behavior. However, an age-related analysis of these baseline parameters in wildtype Drosophila is lacking. Here we analysed the dopaminergic system and motor behavior in aging Drosophila. Dopaminergic neurons in the adult brain can be grouped into bilateral symmetric clusters, each comprising a stereotypical number of cells. Analysis of TH>mCD8::GFP and cell type-specific MARCM clones revealed that dopaminergic neurons show cluster-specific, stereotypical projection patterns with terminal arborization in target regions that represent distinct functional areas of the adult brain. Target areas include the mushroom bodies, involved in memory formation and motivation, and the central complex, involved in the control of motor behavior, indicating that similar to the mammalian brain, dopaminergic neurons in the fly brain are involved in the regulation of specific behaviors. Behavioral analysis revealed that Drosophila show an age-related decline in startle-induced locomotion and negative geotaxis. Motion tracking however, revealed that walking activity and exploration behavior, but not centrophobism increase at late stages of life. Analysis of TH>Dcr2, mCD8::GFP revealed a specific effect of Dcr2 expression on walking activity but not on exploratory or centrophobic behavior, indicating that the siRNA pathway may modulate distinct dopaminergic behaviors in Drosophila. Moreover, dopaminergic neurons were maintained between early- and late life, as quantified by TH>mCD8::GFP and anti-TH labelling, indicating that adult onset, age-related degeneration of dopaminergic neurons does not occur in the aging brain of Drosophila. Taken together, our data establish baseline parameters in Drosophila for the study of Parkinson’s disease as well as other disorders affecting dopaminergic neurons

  5. Relationship of monoamine oxidase A binding to adaptive and maladaptive personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, A; Bagby, R M; Wilson, A A; Miler, L; Clark, M; Rusjan, P; Sacher, J; Houle, S; Meyer, J H

    2011-05-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is an important enzyme that metabolizes monoamines such as serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine in the brain. In prefrontal cortex, low MAOA binding is associated with aggression and high binding is associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) and also risk for recurrence of depressive episodes. In rodent models, low MAOA levels are associated with increased aggression and fear conditioning, and decreased social and exploratory investigative behaviors. Our objective was to measure MAOA binding in prefrontal cortex and concurrently evaluate a broad range of validated personality traits. We hypothesized that prefrontal MAOA binding would correlate negatively with angry-hostility, a trait related to aggression/anger, and positively with traits intuitively related to adaptive investigative behavior. Participants were aged 19-49 years, healthy and non-smoking. MAOA binding was measured with [11C]harmine positron emission tomography (PET) in prefrontal brain regions and personality traits were measured with the NEO Personality Inventory Revised (NEO PI-R). Prefrontal MAOA binding correlated negatively with angry-hostility (r=-0.515, p=0.001) and positively with deliberation (r=0.514, p=0.001). In a two-factor regression model, these facets explained 38% of variance in prefrontal MAOA binding. A similar relationship was found in prefrontal cortex subregions. We propose a new continuum describing the relationship between personality and MAOA: deliberate/thoughtful contrasting aggressive/impulsive. Additionally, the association between high MAOA binding and greater deliberation may explain why some people have moderately high levels of MAOA, although very high levels occur during MDD. In health, higher MAOA binding is associated with an adaptive personality facet.

  6. Pineal Proteins Upregulate Specific Antioxidant Defense Systems in the Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K. Bharti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine functions of the pineal affect a wide variety of glandular and nervous system processes. Beside melatonin (MEL, the pineal gland secretes and expresses certain proteins essential for various physiological functions. It has been suggested that the pineal gland may also have an antioxidant role due to secretory product other than MEL. Therefore, the present study was designed to study the effect of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis pineal proteins (PP on the antioxidant defense system in the brain of female rats. The twenty-four rats were taken in present study and were divided into four groups: control (0 day, control (28 day, vehicle control and buffalo PP. The PP was injected 100 µg/kg BW intraperitoneal (i.p. daily for 28 days. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, catalase (CAT, glutathione reductase (GR and reduced glutathione (GSH concentration and the levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO in the brain tissue were measured to assess the antioxidant systems. These enzymes protect from adverse effects of free radicals and help in amelioration of oxidative stress. Buffalo pineal proteins administration did not cause any effect on brain LPO, whereas GPx, GR and GSH were significantly (p < 0.05 decreased. However, SOD and CAT activities were increased to significant levels than the control in PP treated rats. Our study herein suggested that buffalo (Bubalus bubalis pineal proteins upregulates specific antioxidant defense systems and can be useful in control of various oxidative stress-induced neuronal diseases.

  7. The Potential of Systems Thinking in Teacher Reform as Theorized for the Teaching Brain Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The teaching brain is a dynamic system that is in constant interaction with the learning brain. If we fail to explore the teaching brain we will continue to design educational reform policies that ignore the most important lens in the classroom: the teachers'. Master teachers recognize their perspective and leverage their teaching brains to embody…

  8. Brain endocannabinoid system is involved in fluoxetine-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarate, Jon; Churruca, Itziar; Pascual, Jesús; Casis, Luis; Sallés, Joan; Echevarría, Enrique

    2008-06-01

    In order to describe the effects of chronic fluoxetine administration on the brain endocannabinoid system in lean and obese Zucker rats, brain immunostaining for the CB1 and CB1-phosphorylated cannabinoid receptors was carried out. Obese Zucker rats showed significantly increased the numbers of neural cells positively immunostained for the CB1-phosphorylated receptor in the striatum, compared to their lean litter-mates. Chronic fluoxetine administration decreased the number of neural cells immunostained for CB1-phosphorylated receptor in several striatal and hippocampal regions of obese Zucker rats, compared to controls treated with saline. In contrast, no change in CB1-phosphorylated receptor immunostaining was observed in fluoxetine-treated lean rats, with respect to controls. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of the hippocampal and striatal endocannabinoid receptor system in fluoxetine-induced anorexia in lean and obese Zucker rats.

  9. A primal analysis system of brain neurons data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Dong-Mei; Gao, Da-Qi; Yuan, Yu-Bo

    2014-01-01

    It is a very challenging work to classify the 86 billions of neurons in the human brain. The most important step is to get the features of these neurons. In this paper, we present a primal system to analyze and extract features from brain neurons. First, we make analysis on the original data of neurons in which one neuron contains six parameters: room type, X, Y, Z coordinate range, total number of leaf nodes, and fuzzy volume of neurons. Then, we extract three important geometry features including rooms type, number of leaf nodes, and fuzzy volume. As application, we employ the feature database to fit the basic procedure of neuron growth. The result shows that the proposed system is effective.

  10. Experimental research on the effect of the Chaiyue decoction against MDD model of rat behavior and brain monoamine neurotransmitters%柴越汤对抑郁症模型大鼠行为学和脑内单胺类神经递质影响的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽军; 张保伟

    2012-01-01

      目的:拟探讨柴越汤对慢性应激抑郁模型大鼠行为学和脑内单胺类神经递质影响,进而探讨其可能的作用及其机理.方法:采用孤养结合慢性轻度不可预见性应激复合造模法制备抑郁症模型,将60只雄性 Wistar 大鼠随机分成空白对照组、抑郁模型组、西药对照组、柴越汤组、小柴胡汤组和越鞠丸组.通过体重变化、糖水消耗和敞箱实验进行行为学评价,酶联免疫法测大鼠下丘脑神经递质5-HT和NE的变化,观察柴越汤对抑郁模型大鼠上述指标的影响.结果:21d造模和用药后发现模型组体重增长缓慢,治疗组体重较模型组体重明显增加(P<0.001);在敞箱实验中造模前各组大鼠行为学得分和糖水消耗百分比均无明显差异,造模和用药后发现模型组水平运动和垂直运动明显减少,治疗组能明显增加抑郁模型大鼠行为学得分和糖水消耗百分比与模型组比较均有统计学意义(P<0.001).酶联免疫法检测结果显示,与正常组比较模型组大鼠脑内5-HT、NE均明显下降有统计学意义(P<0.001),治疗组大鼠5-HT、NE均大于模型组,其中西药对照组、柴越汤组和越鞠丸组大鼠脑内5-HT、NE含量高于小柴胡汤组,有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论:柴越汤、小柴胡汤与越鞠丸对抑郁症具有良好的疗效,拆方后,小柴胡汤组、越鞠丸治疗抑郁症疗效较柴越汤略有下降.其作用机理可能与增加脑内5-HT、NE的含量,协调多种神经递质的失衡等有关.%  Objective:To investigate the effect of the Chaiyue decoction against MDD model of rat behavior and brain monoamine neurotransmitters, and provide the theory for clinical medication. Methods: All the groups except control group rats were induced and established the model of depression by isolated supporting and chronic unpredictable moderate intensity stimulation within the whole test. 60 healthy male

  11. Dedicated brain PET system of PET/MR for brain research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Li; Liu, Yaqiang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Wei, Qingyang; Xu, Tianpeng [Institute of Medical Physics, Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2015-05-18

    This work is to replace PET ring in human brain PET/MR system with a dedicated wearable PET insert, aimed at improving both patient feasibility and system performance for brain imaging. The designed PET/MR system includes two parts: the inside parts, including a radio frequency (RF) coil and PET ring, are mounted on patient’s head, and the outside part, a MR imager, is dependent of patient. The RF coil is the innermost layer, surrounded by an outer PET-ring layer. They are supported by a MRcompatible structure. And both RF coil and PET detectors are placed inside a standard clinical 3-T MR imager. From the design of the system we can infer that some advantages can be achieved. First, high sensitivity will be achieved with the same amount crystals as the PET ring is more close to region-of-interest area, at a reduced cost. Second, by using a 2-layer depth of interaction (DOI) detector, the parallax effect can be minimized. The resolution will benefit from short positron range caused by magnetic field and smaller ring diameter will also reduce the effect of non-collinearity. Thirdly, as the PET ring is mounted on head, impact of patient motion will be reduced.

  12. The heme oxygenase system and its functions in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maines, M D

    2000-05-01

    The heme oxygenase (HO) system was identified in the early 1970s as a distinct microsomal enzyme system that catalyzes formation of bile pigments (Maines and Kappas, 1974). Up to the early 1990s the system was considered only as a "molecular wrecking ball" (Lane, 1998) for degradation of the heme molecule and production of toxic waste products, CO and bile pigments. For those years, the HO system remained relatively unknown to the research community. In a rather short span of the past 10 years following the discovery of high levels of a second form of the enzyme, HO-2, in the brain, suggesting that "heme oxygenase in the brain has functions aside from heme degradation" (Sun et al., 1990); concomitant with finding that another toxic gas, NO, is a signal molecule for generation of cGMP (Ignarro et al., 1982), the system was propelled into main stream research. This propulsion was fueled by the realization of the multiple and diverse functions of heme degradation products. Heme oxygenase has now found relevance in all kinds of human pathophysiology ranging from stroke, cancer, multiple sclerosis, and malaria to transplantation and immune response. As it turns out, its potential benefits are mesmerizing investigators in diverse fields (Lane, 1998). The most recent findings with HO-2 being a hemoprotein and potentially an intracellular "sink" for NO (McCoubrey et al., 1997a; Ding et al., 1999), together with the discovery of the third form of the enzyme, HO-3 (McCoubrey et al., 1997b), are likely to insure the widespread interest in the enzyme system in the coming years. The present review is intended to highlight molecular properties of HO isozymes and their likely functions in the brain. Extended reviews of the system are found in Maines (1992, 1997).

  13. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kendra B Sewall

    Full Text Available Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM, because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA, because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  14. Song competition affects monoamine levels in sensory and motor forebrain regions of male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewall, Kendra B; Caro, Samuel P; Sockman, Keith W

    2013-01-01

    Male animals often change their behavior in response to the level of competition for mates. Male Lincoln's sparrows (Melospiza lincolnii) modulate their competitive singing over the period of a week as a function of the level of challenge associated with competitors' songs. Differences in song challenge and associated shifts in competitive state should be accompanied by neural changes, potentially in regions that regulate perception and song production. The monoamines mediate neural plasticity in response to environmental cues to achieve shifts in behavioral state. Therefore, using high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, we compared levels of monoamines and their metabolites from male Lincoln's sparrows exposed to songs categorized as more or less challenging. We compared levels of norepinephrine and its principal metabolite in two perceptual regions of the auditory telencephalon, the caudomedial nidopallium and the caudomedial mesopallium (CMM), because this chemical is implicated in modulating auditory sensitivity to song. We also measured the levels of dopamine and its principal metabolite in two song control nuclei, area X and the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), because dopamine is implicated in regulating song output. We measured the levels of serotonin and its principal metabolite in all four brain regions because this monoamine is implicated in perception and behavioral output and is found throughout the avian forebrain. After controlling for recent singing, we found that males exposed to more challenging song had higher levels of norepinephrine metabolite in the CMM and lower levels of serotonin in the RA. Collectively, these findings are consistent with norepinephrine in perceptual brain regions and serotonin in song control regions contributing to neuroplasticity that underlies socially-induced changes in behavioral state.

  15. Inhibitory effect of chlorpromazine on the syndrome of hyperactivity produced by L-tryptophan or 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine in rats treated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahame-Smith, D. G.

    1971-01-01

    1. The hyperactivity and hyperpyrexia produced by L-tryptophan in rats treated with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor was inhibited by chlorpromazine. 2. Chlorpromazine did not inhibit the increased rate of synthesis of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) produced by tryptophan loading. 3. Hyperactivity and hyperpyrexia were also produced by 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeODMT) in rats. Pretreatment with a monoamine oxidase inhibitor potentiated the hyperactivity response. Pretreatment of rats with p-chlorophenylalanine did not inhibit hyperactivity produced by 5-MeODMT. 4. Chlorpromazine inhibits hyperactivity caused by tryptophan or 5-MeODMT after monoamine oxidase inhibition either by competition with 5-HT or 5-MeODMT, respectively, at receptor sites or by physiological antagonism. PMID:4261561

  16. Computation and brain processes, with special reference to neuroendocrine systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toni, Roberto; Spaletta, Giulia; Casa, Claudia Della; Ravera, Simone; Sandri, Giorgio

    2007-01-01

    The development of neural networks and brain automata has made neuroscientists aware that the performance limits of these brain-like devices lies, at least in part, in their computational power. The computational basis of a. standard cybernetic design, in fact, refers to that of a discrete and finite state machine or Turing Machine (TM). In contrast, it has been suggested that a number of human cerebral activites, from feedback controls up to mental processes, rely on a mixing of both finitary, digital-like and infinitary, continuous-like procedures. Therefore, the central nervous system (CNS) of man would exploit a form of computation going beyond that of a TM. This "non conventional" computation has been called hybrid computation. Some basic structures for hybrid brain computation are believed to be the brain computational maps, in which both Turing-like (digital) computation and continuous (analog) forms of calculus might occur. The cerebral cortex and brain stem appears primary candidate for this processing. However, also neuroendocrine structures like the hypothalamus are believed to exhibit hybrid computional processes, and might give rise to computational maps. Current theories on neural activity, including wiring and volume transmission, neuronal group selection and dynamic evolving models of brain automata, bring fuel to the existence of natural hybrid computation, stressing a cooperation between discrete and continuous forms of communication in the CNS. In addition, the recent advent of neuromorphic chips, like those to restore activity in damaged retina and visual cortex, suggests that assumption of a discrete-continuum polarity in designing biocompatible neural circuitries is crucial for their ensuing performance. In these bionic structures, in fact, a correspondence exists between the original anatomical architecture and synthetic wiring of the chip, resulting in a correspondence between natural and cybernetic neural activity. Thus, chip "form

  17. Brain-computer interface after nervous system injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alexis; Adeli, Hojjat; Buford, John A

    2014-12-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) has proven to be a useful tool for providing alternative communication and mobility to patients suffering from nervous system injury. BCI has been and will continue to be implemented into rehabilitation practices for more interactive and speedy neurological recovery. The most exciting BCI technology is evolving to provide therapeutic benefits by inducing cortical reorganization via neuronal plasticity. This article presents a state-of-the-art review of BCI technology used after nervous system injuries, specifically: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, spinal cord injury, stroke, and disorders of consciousness. Also presented is transcending, innovative research involving new treatment of neurological disorders.

  18. Brain-computer interface systems: progress and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Brendan Z; Wolpaw, Elizabeth Winter; Wolpaw, Jonathan R

    2007-07-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) systems support communication through direct measures of neural activity without muscle activity. BCIs may provide the best and sometimes the only communication option for users disabled by the most severe neuromuscular disorders and may eventually become useful to less severely disabled and/or healthy individuals across a wide range of applications. This review discusses the structure and functions of BCI systems, clarifies terminology and addresses practical applications. Progress and opportunities in the field are also identified and explicated.

  19. General systems theory, brain organization, and early experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denenberg, V H

    1980-01-01

    Three hypothetical brain processes--interhemispheric coupling, hemispheric activation, and interhemispheric inhibition--are derived from an equation characterizing general systems theory. To investigate these processes, experimental rats were reared under differing early experience conditions. When adult, they had their right or left neocortex lesioned, had a sham operation, or were left undisturbed. Interhemispheric coupling was measured by means of a correlation coefficient between the right and left hemispheres. The presence of a significant positive correlation is taken as evidence of a negative feedback loop between the hemispheres. In one experimental population, in which rats did not receive any extra stimulation in infancy, the correlation was not significantly different from zero, thus implying that the two hemispheres were operating independently. In another population, in which rats had received handling stimulation in infancy, the correlation coefficient was significant (0.543), indicating that the hemispheres were coupled in a systems arrangement. The processes of hemispheric activation and interhemispheric inhibition were assessed by comparing the mean performance of the two unilateral lesion groups and the group with intact brain. The two rat populations had different forms of brain organizations as measured by these processes. These analyses show that the behavior of the isolated hemisphere cannot be directly extrapolated to the behavior of the connected hemisphere. If there is hemispheric coupling via a negative feedback loop or if there is interhemispheric inhibition, then the disconnected hemisphere may show behaviors that are not evident in the normal connected condition.

  20. CONTROL OF GLUTAMATE OXIDATION IN BRAIN AND LIVER MITOCHONDRIAL SYSTEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BALAZS, R

    1965-05-01

    1. Glutamate oxidation in brain and liver mitochondrial systems proceeds mainly through transamination with oxaloacetate followed by oxidation of the alpha-oxoglutarate formed. Both in the presence and absence of dinitrophenol in liver mitochondria this pathway accounted for almost 80% of the uptake of glutamate. In brain preparations the transamination pathway accounted for about 90% of the glutamate uptake. 2. The oxidation of [1-(14)C]- and [5-(14)C]-glutamate in brain preparations is compatible with utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either after the formation of alpha-oxoglutarate or after decarboxylation to form gamma-aminobutyrate. There is no indication of gamma-decarboxylation of glutamate. 3. The high respiratory control ratio obtained with glutamate as substrate in brain mitochondrial preparations is due to the low respiration rate in the absence of ADP: this results from the low rate of formation of oxaloacetate under these conditions. When oxaloacetate is made available by the addition of malate or of NAD(+), the respiration rate is increased to the level obtained with other substrates. 4. When the transamination pathway of glutamate oxidation was blocked with malonate, the uptake of glutamate was inhibited in the presence of ADP or ADP plus dinitrophenol by about 70 and 80% respectively in brain mitochondrial systems, whereas the inhibition was only about 50% in dinitrophenol-stimulated liver preparations. In unstimulated liver mitochondria in the presence of malonate there was a sixfold increase in the oxidation of glutamate by the glutamate-dehydrogenase pathway. Thus the operating activity of glutamate dehydrogenase is much less than the ;free' (non-latent) activity. 5. The following explanation is put forward for the control of glutamate metabolism in liver and brain mitochondrial preparations. The oxidation of glutamate by either pathway yields alpha-oxoglutarate, which is further metabolized. Since aspartate aminotransferase is

  1. Proteomics of the photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Rovsing, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain consists of (a) specialized photoreceptors in the retina, (b) a circadian generator located in the forebrain that contains "clock genes," (c) specialized nuclei in the forebrain involved in neuroendocrine secretion, and (d) the pineal gland....... The circadian generator is a nucleus, called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The neurons of this nucleus contain "clock genes," the transcription of which exhibits a circadian rhythm. Most circadian rhythms are generated by the neurons of this nucleus and, via neuronal and humoral connections, the SCN...... controls circadian activity of the brain and peripheral tissues. The endogenous oscillator of the SCN is each day entrained to the length of the daily photoperiod by light that reach the retina, and specialized photoreceptors transmit impulses to the SCN via the optic nerves. Mass screening for day...

  2. Nitrogen heterocycles as potential monoamine oxidase inhibitors: Synthetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pravin O. Patil

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review highlights the synthetic methods of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAO belonging to a group of nitrogen heterocycles such as pyrazoline, indole, xanthine, oxadiazole, benzimidazole, pyrrole, quinoxaline, thiazole and other related compounds (1990–2012. Moreover, it emphasizes salient findings related to chemical structures and the bioactivities of these heterocycles as MAO inhibitors. The aim of this review is to find out different methods for the synthesis of nitrogen containing heterocycles and their bioactivity related aspects as MAO inhibitors.

  3. A novel fluorogenic probe for monoamine oxidase assays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You You Lu; Yu Guang Wang; Bin Dai; Yi Qi Dai; Zhao Wang; Zheng Wei Fu; Qing Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Monoamine oxidase is flavoenzymes, widely distributed in mammals. It is well recognized that MAOs serve an important role in metabolism that they have close relationship with health .Along with the discoveries between MAOs and neurotic disease, more and more studies have been jumped in .In this paper, we design a new probe for assaying the activities of MAOs. The results showed that the probe [7-(3-aminopropoxy)coumarin] is simple, effective and sensitive for MAOB.

  4. Periodic properties of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Stanislav V; Zant, Janneke C; Karlstedt, Kaj; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Panula, Pertti

    2014-01-01

    Brain histamine is involved in the regulation of the sleep-wake cycle and alertness. Despite the widespread use of the mouse as an experimental model, the periodic properties of major markers of the mouse histaminergic system have not been comprehensively characterized. We analysed the daily levels of histamine and its first metabolite, 1-methylhistamine, in different brain structures of C57BL/6J and CBA/J mouse strains, and the mRNA level and activity of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in C57BL/6J mice. In the C57BL/6J strain, histamine release, assessed by in vivo microdialysis, underwent prominent periodic changes. The main period was 24 h peaking during the activity period. Additional 8 h periods were also observed. The release was highly positively correlated with active wakefulness, as shown by electroencephalography. In both mouse strains, tissue histamine levels remained steady for 24 h in all structures except for the hypothalamus of CBA/J mice, where 24-h periodicity was observed. Brain tissue 1-methylhistamine levels in both strains reached their maxima in the periods of activity. The mRNA level of histidine decarboxylase in the tuberomamillary nucleus and the activities of histidine decarboxylase and histamine-N-methyltransferase in the striatum and cortex did not show a 24-h rhythm, whereas in the hypothalamus the activities of both enzymes had a 12-h periodicity. These results show that the activities of histamine-metabolizing enzymes are not under simple direct circadian regulation. The complex and non-uniform temporal patterns of the histaminergic system of the mouse brain suggest that histamine is strongly involved in the maintenance of active wakefulness.

  5. Maze learning by a hybrid brain-computer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaohui; Zheng, Nenggan; Zhang, Shaowu; Zheng, Xiaoxiang; Gao, Liqiang; Su, Lijuan

    2016-09-01

    The combination of biological and artificial intelligence is particularly driven by two major strands of research: one involves the control of mechanical, usually prosthetic, devices by conscious biological subjects, whereas the other involves the control of animal behaviour by stimulating nervous systems electrically or optically. However, to our knowledge, no study has demonstrated that spatial learning in a computer-based system can affect the learning and decision making behaviour of the biological component, namely a rat, when these two types of intelligence are wired together to form a new intelligent entity. Here, we show how rule operations conducted by computing components contribute to a novel hybrid brain-computer system, i.e., ratbots, exhibit superior learning abilities in a maze learning task, even when their vision and whisker sensation were blocked. We anticipate that our study will encourage other researchers to investigate combinations of various rule operations and other artificial intelligence algorithms with the learning and memory processes of organic brains to develop more powerful cyborg intelligence systems. Our results potentially have profound implications for a variety of applications in intelligent systems and neural rehabilitation.

  6. The properties of B-form monoamine oxidase in mitochondria from monkey platelet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obata, Toshio; Aomine, Masahiro

    The present study was examined the effect of the properties of monkey platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) based on inhibitor sensitivity. Monkey platelet showed a high MAO activity with beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA) as substrate and a very low A-form MAO activity with 5 hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) as substrate. Moreover, monkey platelet MAO was sensitive to the drugs deprenyl as B-form MAO inhibitor and less sensitive to clorgyline and harmaline as A form MAO inhibitor with beta-PEA as the B-form MAO substrate. B-form MAO from monkey platelet was more stable against heat treatment at 55 degrees C than B-form MAO in brain. After digestion with trypsin at 37 degrees C for 4 hrs, it was found that MAO from platelet was inhibited about 70% with beta-PEA as substrate with brain. The tricyclic antidepressant imipramine and nortriptyline inhibited B-form MAO activity more potency than B-form MAO in brain. However, when the noncyclic antidepressant nomifensine was used, monkey platelet B-form MAO activities were less potently inhibited. All these reagents were noncompetitive inhibitors of B form MAO in monkey platelet. The present studies demonstrated that monkey platelet MAO is a single of B-form MAO and sensitive to tricyclic antidepressants.

  7. Concentration-dependent effects of cocaine on monoamine-induced constriction of cannulated, pressurized cerebral arteries from fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, M D; Madden, J A; Covert, R F; Hershenson, M B; Torgerson, L J

    1995-01-01

    Drugs, such as cocaine, which may alter monoamine neurotransmitter responsiveness, could adversely affect the regulation of cerebral vasculature. Cocaine exhibits at least two mechanisms that may alter vascular responsiveness: synaptic uptake inhibition, which may augment response to stimulation, and Na+ channel inhibition, which may attenuate response. To help elicit the concentration-dependent effects of cocaine, the effects of cocaine on monoamine neurotransmitter responsiveness were studied in vitro on fetal sheep cerebral arteries (120 days gestation). The changes in diameter of segments of cannulated, pressurized fetal sheep cerebral artery were measured with a videomicroscaler system. Cumulative concentration-response curves (10(-10) to 10(-4)M) were generated for two monoamines, norepinephrine and serotonin, alone and in the presence of cocaine (10(-5) or 10(-4)M). Cocaine caused concentration-dependent alteration of response. At 10(-4)M, cocaine attenuated mean maximal norepinephrine-induced vasoconstriction 46.2% (P < 0.05). At 10(-5)M, cocaine increased sensitivity to norepinephrine (log EC50 decreased -6.63 +/- 0.09 to -7.11 +/- 0.03) and to serotonin (log EC50 decreased -7.24 +/- 0.04 to -7.81 +/- 0.09) (P < 0.05). The higher concentration of cocaine (10(-4)M) did not significantly decrease log EC50 norepinephrine. Cocaine (10(-4)M) also attenuated the response to single doses of norepinephrine (10(-6)M) and serotonin (10(-6)M) by 26.5% and 40.0%, respectively (P < or = 0.05). It is concluded that cocaine has concentration-dependent effects on vasoconstriction of the fetal sheep cerebral artery in vitro. This cocaine-induced alteration of cerebral vascular responsiveness to monoamines may be important in the regulation of fetal cerebral blood flow.

  8. Iododerivative of pargyline: A potential tracer for the exploration of monoamine oxidase sites by SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lena, Isabelle; Ombetta, Jean-Edouard; Chalon, Sylvie; Dognon, Anne-Marie; Baulieu, Jean-Louis; Frangin, Yves; Garreau, Lucette; Besnard, Jean-Claude; Guilloteau, Denis

    1995-08-01

    Monoamine oxidases are important in the regulation of monoaminergic neurotransmission. An increase in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) has been observed in some neurodegenerative diseases, and therefore quantification of cerebral MAO B activity by SPECT would be useful for the diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up of these disorders. We have developed an iodinated derivative of pargyline, a selective inhibitor of MAO B, in order to explore this enzyme by SPECT. Stable bromo and iodo derivatives of pargyline were synthesized and chemically characterized. The radioiodinated ligand [{sup 125}I]-2-iodopargyline was obtained with high specific activity from the bromo precursor by nucleophilic exchange. Affinity and selectivity of 2-iodopargyline were tested in vitro. Biodistribution study of [{sup 125}I]-2-iodopargyline was performed in rats. Radioiodinated ligand were obtained in a no-carrier-added form. 2-iodopargyline has a higher in vitro affinity for MAO B than pargyline. However, the in vitro selectivity for MAO B was better for pargyline than for 2-iodopargyline. Ex vivo autoradiographic studies and in vivo saturation studies with selective inhibitors of MAO showed that the cerebral biodistribution of [{sup 125}I]-2-iodopargyline in the rat is consistent with high level binding to MAO B sites in the pineal gland and in the thalamus. In conclusion, 2-iodopargyline preferentially binds in vivo to MAO B sites with high affinity. However, its selectivity for MAO B in rats is not very high, whereas this ligand binds to a lesser extent to MAO A. It will be then of great value to evaluate the specificity of 2-iodopargyline in humans. This new ligand labeled with {sup 123}I should therefore be a suitable tool for SPECT exploration of MAO B in the human brain.

  9. The development of brain systems associated with successful memory retrieval of scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Ofen (Noa); X.J. Chai (Xiaoqian); K.D.I. Schuil (Karen); S. Whitfield-Gabrieli (Susan); J.D.E. Gabrieli (John D.)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractNeuroanatomical and psychological evidence suggests prolonged maturation of declarative memory systems in the human brain from childhood into young adulthood. Here, we examine functional brain development during successful memory retrieval of scenes in children, adolescents, and young

  10. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingying; Ying, Zhe; Noble, Emily; Zhao, Yuqi; Agrawal, Rahul; Mikhail, Andrew; Zhuang, Yumei; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhang, Qing; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Morselli, Marco; Orozco, Luz; Guo, Weilong; Kilts, Tina M; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Bin; Pellegrini, Matteo; Xiao, Xinshu; Young, Marian F; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Yang, Xia

    2016-05-01

    Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient-host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control) and hippocampus (cognitive processing) from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  11. Systems Nutrigenomics Reveals Brain Gene Networks Linking Metabolic and Brain Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingying Meng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nutrition plays a significant role in the increasing prevalence of metabolic and brain disorders. Here we employ systems nutrigenomics to scrutinize the genomic bases of nutrient–host interaction underlying disease predisposition or therapeutic potential. We conducted transcriptome and epigenome sequencing of hypothalamus (metabolic control and hippocampus (cognitive processing from a rodent model of fructose consumption, and identified significant reprogramming of DNA methylation, transcript abundance, alternative splicing, and gene networks governing cell metabolism, cell communication, inflammation, and neuronal signaling. These signals converged with genetic causal risks of metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders revealed in humans. Gene network modeling uncovered the extracellular matrix genes Bgn and Fmod as main orchestrators of the effects of fructose, as validated using two knockout mouse models. We further demonstrate that an omega-3 fatty acid, DHA, reverses the genomic and network perturbations elicited by fructose, providing molecular support for nutritional interventions to counteract diet-induced metabolic and brain disorders. Our integrative approach complementing rodent and human studies supports the applicability of nutrigenomics principles to predict disease susceptibility and to guide personalized medicine.

  12. PET study of cholinergic system in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinotoh, Hitoshi [Chiba Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-01-01

    Recently, we have developed a method to measure acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, a functional marker for cholinergic system, by positron emission tomography (PET) and carbon-11 labeled N-methyl-4-piperidyl acetate. Kinetic analysis of the radioactivity in the brain and the plasma yielded a rate constant ``k 3`` as an index of AChE activity. The ratios for the k 3 values for the cerebral cortex/thalamus/cerebellum/striatum found in healthy participants were 1/ 3/ 8/ 10, respectively, corresponding well with AChE activity ratios in the brain at necropsy (1/ 3/ 8/ 38), except for the striatum. In 23 healthy volunteers (age range: 24-89 years), there was no age-related decline of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex, suggesting AChE activity is preserved in aged cerebral cortex. In 11 patients with Alzheimer`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-24%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, suggesting a loss of ascending cholinergic system from the basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In 16 patients with Parkinson`s disease, there was a significant reduction (-18%) of k 3 values in the cerebral cortex. In 10 patients with progressive supra nuclear palsy, there was a significant reduction (-38%) of k 3 values in the thalamus. This technique is useful for investigating central cholinergic system in neuro degenerative disorders with dementia. (author)

  13. Antidepressant stimulation of CDP-diacylglycerol synthesis does not require monoamine reuptake inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboukhatwa Marwa A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that diverse antidepressant agents increase the cellular production of the nucleolipid CDP-diacylglycerol and its synthetic derivative, phosphatidylinositol, in depression-relevant brain regions. Pharmacological blockade of downstream phosphatidylinositide signaling disrupted the behavioral antidepressant effects in rats. However, the nucleolipid responses were resistant to inhibition by serotonin receptor antagonists, even though antidepressant-facilitated inositol phosphate accumulation was blocked. Could the neurochemical effects be additional to the known effects of the drugs on monoamine transmitter transporters? To examine this question, we tested selected agents in serotonin-depleted brain tissues, in PC12 cells devoid of serotonin transporters, and on the enzymatic activity of brain CDP-diacylglycerol synthase - the enzyme that catalyzes the physiological synthesis of CDP-diacylglycerol. Results Imipramine, paroxetine, and maprotiline concentration-dependently increased the levels of CDP-diacylglycerol and phosphatidylinositides in PC12 cells. Rat forebrain tissues depleted of serotonin by pretreatment with p-chlorophenylalanine showed responses to imipramine or maprotiline that were comparable to respective responses from saline-injected controls. With fluoxetine, nucleolipid responses in the serotonin-depleted cortex or hippocampus were significantly reduced, but not abolished. Each drug significantly increased the enzymatic activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase following incubations with cortical or hippocampal brain tissues. Conclusion Antidepressants probably induce the activity of CDP-diacylglycerol synthase leading to increased production of CDP-diacylglycerol and facilitation of downstream phosphatidylinositol synthesis. Phosphatidylinositol-dependent signaling cascades exert diverse salutary effects in neural cells, including facilitation of BDNF signaling and neurogenesis. Hence

  14. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyautdin, Renad; Khalin, Igor; Nafeeza, Mohd Ismail; Haron, Muhammad Huzaimi; Kuznetsov, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The protective properties of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs) in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS). As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review comprehensively discusses the functional morphology of the BBB and the challenges that must be overcome by drug-delivery systems and elaborates on the potential targets, mechanisms, and formulations to improve drug delivery to the CNS.

  15. Systems Biology, Neuroimaging, Neuropsychology, Neuroconnectivity and Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2016-01-01

    The patient who sustains a traumatic brain injury (TBI) typically undergoes neuroimaging studies, usually in the form of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In most cases the neuroimaging findings are clinically assessed with descriptive statements that provide qualitative information about the presence/absence of visually identifiable abnormalities; though little if any of the potential information in a scan is analyzed in any quantitative manner, except in research settings. Fortunately, major advances have been made, especially during the last decade, in regards to image quantification techniques, especially those that involve automated image analysis methods. This review argues that a systems biology approach to understanding quantitative neuroimaging findings in TBI provides an appropriate framework for better utilizing the information derived from quantitative neuroimaging and its relation with neuropsychological outcome. Different image analysis methods are reviewed in an attempt to integrate quantitative neuroimaging methods with neuropsychological outcome measures and to illustrate how different neuroimaging techniques tap different aspects of TBI-related neuropathology. Likewise, how different neuropathologies may relate to neuropsychological outcome is explored by examining how damage influences brain connectivity and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the dynamic changes that occur following TBI and how best to capture those pathologies via different neuroimaging methods. However, traditional clinical neuropsychological techniques are not well suited for interpretation based on contemporary and advanced neuroimaging methods and network analyses. Significant improvements need to be made in the cognitive and behavioral assessment of the brain injured individual to better interface with advances in neuroimaging-based network analyses. By viewing both neuroimaging and neuropsychological processes within a systems biology

  16. Synthesis and characterization of [{sup 125}I]N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-iodobenzamide as a selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafii, Hamid; Chalon, Sylvie; Ombetta, Jean-Edouard; Frangin, Yves; Garreau, Lucette; Dognon, Anne-Marie; Lena, Isabelle; Bodard, Sylvie; Vilar, Marie-Paule; Besnard, Jean-Claude; Guilloteau, Denis

    1995-07-01

    We described the radiosynthesis of an analog of Ro 16-6491, [{sup 125}I]N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-iodobenzamide, for SPECT exploration of the monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in human brain. The radiolabelling was carried out by nucleophilic exchange of the brominated precursor at solid-state phase in presence of ammonium sulphate. The radiochemical purity of radioiodinated product was higher than 95%. In comparison with Ro 16-6491, the in vitro studies showed a good selectivity of stable N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-iodobenzamide for MAO-B but a slightly lower affinity. Biodistribution studies in the rat showed a high and selective uptake of this compound in the pineal gland 1 h after i.v. injection. The cerebral uptake was low, but the coupling of [{sup 125}I]N-(2-aminoethyl)-4-iodobenzamide with a lipophilic radical to enhance the passage through the blood-brain barrier can be envisaged.

  17. Nanoscale drug delivery systems and the blood–brain barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyautdin R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Renad Alyautdin,1 Igor Khalin,2 Mohd Ismail Nafeeza,1 Muhammad Huzaimi Haron,1 Dmitry Kuznetsov31Faculty of Medicine, Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM, Sungai Buloh, Selangor, Malaysia; 2Faculty of Medicine and Defence Health, National Defence University of Malaysia (NDUM, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; 3Department of Medicinal Nanobiotechnologies, N. I. Pirogoff Russian State Medical University, Moscow, RussiaAbstract: The protective properties of the blood–brain barrier (BBB are conferred by the intricate architecture of its endothelium coupled with multiple specific transport systems expressed on the surface of endothelial cells (ECs in the brain's vasculature. When the stringent control of the BBB is disrupted, such as following EC damage, substances that are safe for peripheral tissues but toxic to neurons have easier access to the central nervous system (CNS. As a consequence, CNS disorders, including degenerative diseases, can occur independently of an individual's age. Although the BBB is crucial in regulating the biochemical environment that is essential for maintaining neuronal integrity, it limits drug delivery to the CNS. This makes it difficult to deliver beneficial drugs across the BBB while preventing the passage of potential neurotoxins. Available options include transport of drugs across the ECs through traversing occludins and claudins in the tight junctions or by attaching drugs to one of the existing transport systems. Either way, access must specifically allow only the passage of a particular drug. In general, the BBB allows small molecules to enter the CNS; however, most drugs with the potential to treat neurological disorders other than infections have large structures. Several mechanisms, such as modifications of the built-in pumping-out system of drugs and utilization of nanocarriers and liposomes, are among the drug-delivery systems that have been tested; however, each has its limitations and constraints. This review

  18. Kinetics of Inhibition of Monoamine Oxidase Using Cymbopogon martinii (Roxb.) Wats.: A Potential Antidepressant Herbal Ingredient with Antioxidant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacche, R N; Shaikh, R U; Chapole, S M; Jadhav, A D; Jadhav, S G

    2011-07-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the antioxidant activity and effect of Cymbopogon martinii (Roxb.) Wats. (Poaceae) leaves on the activity of monoamine oxidase and kinetics of enzyme inhibition. Ethanol extract of C. martinii and rat brain mitochondrial monoamine oxidase preparation ware used to study the kinetics of enzyme inhibition using double reciprocal Lineweaver-Burk plot. The DPPH was used as a source of free radical to evaluate antioxidant potential. It is observed that, the ethanolic extract of C. martinii inhibits the monoamine oxidase activity with competitive mode of inhibition. The V(max) (0.01 mM/min) remained constant while, K(m) varied from 21.00 ± 1.1, 43.33 ± 1.5 and 83.33 ± 1.4 mM for 100-500 μg/ml concentration of C. martinii. The K(i) values were calculated to be 90.00 ± 0.87, 75.00 ± 0.69, 68.18 ± 0.68 μg for 100-500 μg/ml concentration of C. martini. It also shows a significant DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazine) radical scavenging (IC(50) = 0.34 ± 0.05 mg/ml) and reducing activity (IC(50) = 0.70 ± 0.22 mg/ml). The C. martini can be considered as a possible source of MAO inhibitor used in the treatment of depression and other neurological disorders.

  19. Monoaminergic and histaminergic strategies and treatments in brain diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Di Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The monoaminergic systems are the target of several drugs for the treatment of mood, motor and cognitive disorders as well as neurological conditions. In most cases, advances have occurred through serendipity, except for Parkinson’s disease where the pathophysiology led almost immediately to the introduction of dopamine restoring agents. Extensive neuropharmacological studies first showed that the primary target of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytic drugs were specific components of the monoaminergic systems. Later, some dramatic side effects associated with older medicines were shown to disappear with new chemical compounds targeting the origin of the therapeutic benefit more specifically. The increased knowledge regarding the function and interaction of the monoaminergic systems in the brain resulting from in vivo neurochemical and neurophysiological studies indicated new monoaminergic targets that could achieve the efficacy of the older medicines with fewer side-effects. Yet, this accumulated knowledge regarding monoamines did not produce valuable treatments for diseases where no monoaminergic drug has been shown to be effective. Here, we emphasize the new therapeutic and monoaminergic-based strategies for the treatment of psychiatric diseases. We will consider three main groups of diseases, based on the evidence of monoamines involvement (schizophrenia, depression, obesity, the identification of monoamines in the diseases processes (Parkinson’s disease, addiction and the prospect of the involvement of monoaminergic mechanisms (epilepsy, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke. In most cases, the clinically available monoaminergic drugs induce widespread modifications of amine tone or excitability through neurobiological networks and exemplify the overlap between therapeutic approaches to psychiatric and neurological conditions. More recent developments that have resulted in improved drug specificity and responses will be discussed in

  20. Monoaminergic and Histaminergic Strategies and Treatments in Brain Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Sole, Montse; Unzeta, Mercedes; Tipton, Keith F.; Mück-Šeler, Dorotea; Bolea, Irene; Della Corte, Laura; Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Pivac, Nela; Smolders, Ilse J.; Stasiak, Anna; Fogel, Wieslawa A.; De Deurwaerdère, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The monoaminergic systems are the target of several drugs for the treatment of mood, motor and cognitive disorders as well as neurological conditions. In most cases, advances have occurred through serendipity, except for Parkinson's disease where the pathophysiology led almost immediately to the introduction of dopamine restoring agents. Extensive neuropharmacological studies first showed that the primary target of antipsychotics, antidepressants, and anxiolytic drugs were specific components of the monoaminergic systems. Later, some dramatic side effects associated with older medicines were shown to disappear with new chemical compounds targeting the origin of the therapeutic benefit more specifically. The increased knowledge regarding the function and interaction of the monoaminergic systems in the brain resulting from in vivo neurochemical and neurophysiological studies indicated new monoaminergic targets that could achieve the efficacy of the older medicines with fewer side-effects. Yet, this accumulated knowledge regarding monoamines did not produce valuable strategies for diseases where no monoaminergic drug has been shown to be effective. Here, we emphasize the new therapeutic and monoaminergic-based strategies for the treatment of psychiatric diseases. We will consider three main groups of diseases, based on the evidence of monoamines involvement (schizophrenia, depression, obesity), the identification of monoamines in the diseases processes (Parkinson's disease, addiction) and the prospect of the involvement of monoaminergic mechanisms (epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, stroke). In most cases, the clinically available monoaminergic drugs induce widespread modifications of amine tone or excitability through neurobiological networks and exemplify the overlap between therapeutic approaches to psychiatric and neurological conditions. More recent developments that have resulted in improved drug specificity and responses will be discussed in this review. PMID

  1. A nanoengineered peptidic delivery system with specificity for human brain capillary endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Linping; Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    The blood–brain-barrier (BBB) is a formidable obstacle for successful translocation of many drug molecules from the systemic circulation into the brain, and therefore a major challenge for neurotherapeutics. Nanoparticles may offer some opportunities for delivery of bioactive molecules into brain...

  2. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented. ...

  3. Evaluation of a Compact Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeyoung Shin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We realized a compact hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI system by integrating a portable near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS device with an economical electroencephalography (EEG system. The NIRS array was located on the subjects’ forehead, covering the prefrontal area. The EEG electrodes were distributed over the frontal, motor/temporal, and parietal areas. The experimental paradigm involved a Stroop word-picture matching test in combination with mental arithmetic (MA and baseline (BL tasks, in which the subjects were asked to perform either MA or BL in response to congruent or incongruent conditions, respectively. We compared the classification accuracies of each of the modalities (NIRS or EEG with that of the hybrid system. We showed that the hybrid system outperforms the unimodal EEG and NIRS systems by 6.2% and 2.5%, respectively. Since the proposed hybrid system is based on portable platforms, it is not confined to a laboratory environment and has the potential to be used in real-life situations, such as in neurorehabilitation.

  4. Brain systems involved in arithmetic with positive versus negative numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullick, Margaret M; Wolford, George

    2014-02-01

    Positive number arithmetic is based on combining and separating sets of items, with systematic differences in brain activity in specific regions depending on operation. In contrast, arithmetic with negative numbers involves manipulating abstract values worth less than zero, possibly involving different operation-activity relationships in these regions. Use of procedural arithmetic knowledge, including transformative rules like "minus a negative is plus a positive," may also differ by operand sign. Here, we examined whether the activity evoked in negative number arithmetic was similar to that seen in positive problems, using region of interest analyses (ROIs) to examine a specific set of brain regions. Negative-operand problems demonstrated a positive-like effect of operation in the inferior parietal lobule with more activity for subtraction than addition, as well as increased activity across operation. Interestingly, while positive-operand problems demonstrated the expected addition > subtraction activity difference in the angular gyrus, negative problems showed a reversed effect, with relatively more activity for subtraction than addition. Negative subtraction problems may be understood after translation to addition via rule, thereby invoking more addition-like activity. Whole-brain analyses showed increased right caudate activity for negative-operand problems across operation, indicating a possible overall increase in usage of procedural rules. Arithmetic with negative numbers may thus shows some operation-activity relationships similar to positive numbers, but may also be affected by strategy. This study examines the flexibility of the mental number system by exploring to what degree the processing of an applied usage of a difficult, abstract mathematical concept is similar to that for positive numbers.

  5. Neuronal monoamine reuptake inhibitors enhance in vitro susceptibility to chloroquine in resistant Plasmodium falciparum.

    OpenAIRE

    Coutaux, A F; Mooney, J. J.; Wirth, D. F.

    1994-01-01

    Chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was reversed in vitro by the neuronal monoamine reuptake inhibitors and antidepressants desipramine, sertraline, fluoxetine, and norfluoxetine but not by carbamazepine, an antiseizure and mood-stabilizing tricyclic drug resembling desipramine which only weakly inhibits neuronal monoamine reuptake. These findings have important clinical implications for drug combination therapy.

  6. Drug Delivery Systems, CNS Protection, and the Blood Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Present review highlights various drug delivery systems used for delivery of pharmaceutical agents mainly antibiotics, antineoplastic agents, neuropeptides, and other therapeutic substances through the endothelial capillaries (BBB for CNS therapeutics. In addition, the use of ultrasound in delivery of therapeutic agents/biomolecules such as proline rich peptides, prodrugs, radiopharmaceuticals, proteins, immunoglobulins, and chimeric peptides to the target sites in deep tissue locations inside tumor sites of brain has been explained. In addition, therapeutic applications of various types of nanoparticles such as chitosan based nanomers, dendrimers, carbon nanotubes, niosomes, beta cyclodextrin carriers, cholesterol mediated cationic solid lipid nanoparticles, colloidal drug carriers, liposomes, and micelles have been discussed with their recent advancements. Emphasis has been given on the need of physiological and therapeutic optimization of existing drug delivery methods and their carriers to deliver therapeutic amount of drug into the brain for treatment of various neurological diseases and disorders. Further, strong recommendations are being made to develop nanosized drug carriers/vehicles and noninvasive therapeutic alternatives of conventional methods for better therapeutics of CNS related diseases. Hence, there is an urgent need to design nontoxic biocompatible drugs and develop noninvasive delivery methods to check posttreatment clinical fatalities in neuropatients which occur due to existing highly toxic invasive drugs and treatment methods.

  7. Functional development of the brain's face-processing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haist, Frank; Anzures, Gizelle

    2017-01-01

    In the first 20 years of life, the human brain undergoes tremendous growth in size, weight, and synaptic connectedness. Over the same time period, a person achieves remarkable transformations in perception, thought, and behavior. One important area of development is face processing ability, or the ability to quickly and accurately extract extensive information about a person's identity, emotional state, attractiveness, intention, and numerous other types of information that are crucial to everyday social interaction and communication. Associating particular brain changes with specific behavioral and intellectual developments has historically been a serious challenge for researchers. Fortunately, modern neuroimaging is dramatically advancing our ability to make associations between morphological and behavioral developments. In this article, we demonstrate how neuroimaging has revolutionized our understanding of the development of face processing ability to show that this essential perceptual and cognitive skill matures consistently yet slowly over the first two decades of life. In this manner, face processing is a model system of many areas of complex cognitive development. WIREs Cogn Sci 2017, 8:e1423. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1423 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries.

  9. A peptide for targeted, systemic delivery of imaging and therapeutic compounds into acute brain injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Aman P.; Scodeller, Pablo; Hussain, Sazid; Joo, Jinmyoung; Kwon, Ester; Braun, Gary B.; Mölder, Tarmo; She, Zhi-Gang; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ranscht, Barbara; Krajewski, Stan; Teesalu, Tambet; Bhatia, Sangeeta; Sailor, Michael J.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major health and socio-economic problem, but no pharmacological agent is currently approved for the treatment of acute TBI. Thus, there is a great need for advances in this field. Here, we describe a short peptide (sequence CAQK) identified by in vivo phage display screening in mice with acute brain injury. The CAQK peptide selectively binds to injured mouse and human brain, and systemically injected CAQK specifically homes to sites of brain injury in mouse models. The CAQK target is a proteoglycan complex upregulated in brain injuries. Coupling to CAQK increased injury site accumulation of systemically administered molecules ranging from a drug-sized molecule to nanoparticles. CAQK-coated nanoparticles containing silencing oligonucleotides provided the first evidence of gene silencing in injured brain parenchyma by systemically administered siRNA. These findings present an effective targeting strategy for the delivery of therapeutics in clinical management of acute brain injuries. PMID:27351915

  10. Genetic KCa3.1-deficiency produces locomotor hyperactivity and alterations in cerebral monoamine levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Lykke Lambertsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The calmodulin/calcium-activated K(+ channel KCa3.1 is expressed in red and white blood cells, epithelia and endothelia, and possibly central and peripheral neurons. However, our knowledge about its contribution to neurological functions and behavior is incomplete. Here, we investigated whether genetic deficiency or pharmacological activation of KCa3.1 change behavior and cerebral monoamine levels in mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the open field test, KCa3.1-deficiency increased horizontal activity, as KCa3.1(-/- mice travelled longer distances (≈145% of KCa3.1(+/+ and at higher speed (≈1.5-fold of KCa3.1(+/+. Working memory in the Y-maze was reduced by KCa3.1-deficiency. Motor coordination on the rotarod and neuromuscular functions were unchanged. In KCa3.1(-/- mice, HPLC analysis revealed that turn-over rates of serotonin were reduced in frontal cortex, striatum and brain stem, while noradrenalin turn-over rates were increased in the frontal cortex. Dopamine turn-over rates were unaltered. Plasma catecholamine and corticosterone levels were unaltered. Intraperitoneal injections of 10 mg/kg of the KCa3.1/KCa2-activator SKA-31 reduced rearing and turning behavior in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice, while 30 mg/kg SKA-31 caused strong sedation in 50% of the animals of either genotypes. KCa3.1(-/- mice were hyperactive (≈+60% in their home cage and SKA-31-administration reduced nocturnal physical activity in KCa3.1(+/+ but not in KCa3.1(-/- mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: KCa3.1-deficiency causes locomotor hyperactivity and altered monoamine levels in selected brain regions, suggesting a so far unknown functional link of KCa3.1 channels to behavior and monoaminergic neurotransmission in mice. The tranquilizing effects of low-dose SKA-31 raise the possibility to use KCa3.1/KCa2 channels as novel pharmacological targets for the treatment of neuropsychiatric hyperactivity disorders.

  11. BrainFrame: a knowledge visualization system for the neurosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Steven J.; Shaw, Chris D.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience has benefited from an explosion of new experimental techniques; many have only become feasible in the wake of improvements in computing speed and data storage. At the same time, these new computation-intensive techniques have led to a growing gulf between the data and the knowledge extracted from those data. That is, in the neurosciences there is a paucity of effective knowledge management techniques and an accelerating accumulation of experimental data. The purpose of the project described in the present paper is to create a visualization of the knowledge base of the neurosciences. At run-time, this 'BrainFrame' project accesses several web-based ontologies and generates a semantically zoomable representation of any one of many levels of the human nervous system.

  12. Improved Classification Methods for Brain Computer Interface System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Fang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Brain computer interface (BCI aims at providing a new communication way without brain’s normal output through nerve and muscle. The electroencephalography (EEG has been widely used for BCI system because it is a non-invasive approach. For the EEG signals of left and right hand motor imagery, the event-related desynchronization (ERD and event-related synchronization(ERS are used as classification features in this paper. The raw data are transformed by nonlinear methods and classified by Fisher classifier. Compared with the linear methods, the classification accuracy can get an obvious increase to 86.25%. Two different nonlinear transform were arised and one of them is under the consideration of the relativity of two channels of EEG signals. With these nonlinear transform, the performance are also stable with the balance of two misclassifications.

  13. The Human Nervous System: A Framework for Teaching and the Teaching Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The teaching brain is a new concept that mirrors the complex, dynamic, and context-dependent nature of the learning brain. In this article, I use the structure of the human nervous system and its sensing, processing, and responding components as a framework for a re-conceptualized teaching system. This teaching system is capable of responses on an…

  14. The Human Nervous System: A Framework for Teaching and the Teaching Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Vanessa

    2013-01-01

    The teaching brain is a new concept that mirrors the complex, dynamic, and context-dependent nature of the learning brain. In this article, I use the structure of the human nervous system and its sensing, processing, and responding components as a framework for a re-conceptualized teaching system. This teaching system is capable of responses on an…

  15. Importance of the brain Angiotensin system in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, John W; Harding, Joseph W

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) has become a major health problem affecting 1.5% of the world's population over 65 years of age. As life expectancy has increased so has the occurrence of PD. The primary direct consequence of this disease is the loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra and striatum. As the intensity of motor dysfunction increases, the symptomatic triad of bradykinesia, tremors-at-rest, and rigidity occur. Progressive neurodegeneration may also impact non-DA neurotransmitter systems including cholinergic, noradrenergic, and serotonergic, often leading to the development of depression, sleep disturbances, dementia, and autonomic nervous system failure. L-DOPA is the most efficacious oral delivery treatment for controlling motor symptoms; however, this approach is ineffective regarding nonmotor symptoms. New treatment strategies are needed designed to provide neuroprotection and encourage neurogenesis and synaptogenesis to slow or reverse this disease process. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met receptor system is a member of the growth factor family and has been shown to protect against degeneration of DA neurons in animal models. Recently, small angiotensin-based blood-brain barrier penetrant mimetics have been developed that activate this HGF/c-Met system. These compounds may offer a new and novel approach to the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  16. Treatment with the MAO-A inhibitor clorgyline elevates monoamine neurotransmitter levels and improves affective phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Miralles, Marta; Ooi, Jolene; Ferrari Bardile, Costanza; Tan, Liang Juin; George, Maya; Drum, Chester L; Lin, Rachel Yanping; Hayden, Michael R; Pouladi, Mahmoud A

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal monoamine oxidase A and B (MAO-A/B) activity and an imbalance in monoamine neurotransmitters have been suggested to underlie the pathobiology of depression, a major psychiatric symptom observed in patients with neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington disease (HD). Increased MAO-A/B activity has been observed in brain tissue from patients with HD and in human and rodent HD neural cells. Using the YAC128 mouse model of HD, we studied the effect of an irreversible MAO-A inhibitor, clorgyline, on the levels of select monoamine neurotransmitters associated with affective function. We observed a decrease in striatal levels of the MAO-A/B substrates, dopamine and norepinephrine, in YAC128 HD mice compared with wild-type mice, which was accompanied by increased anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour at five months of age. Treatment for 26 days with clorgyline restored dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine neurotransmitter levels in the striatum and reduced anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in YAC128 HD mice. This study supports a potential therapeutic use for MAO-A inhibitors in the treatment of depression and anxiety in patients with HD.

  17. 束缚应激所致小鼠脑区的神经递质和行为改变及运动干预效果%Restrained stress induced changes of brain monoamine neurotransmitters and behaviors of mice as well as exercise intervention effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马磊; 黄文英; 杨念恩; 肖晓玲; 孙飙; 康学军

    2015-01-01

    In order to probe into the effects of restrained stress on monoamine neurotransmitters and behaviors of mice as well as aerobic exercise intervention effects, the authors selected 80 1-month old C57BL/6 mice, randomly divided them into 4 groups: a control group (Control, n=20), a restrained stress group (Stress, n=20), an exercise group (Ex, n=20) and an exercise + restrained stress group (Stress + Ex, n=20), fed the control group in a calm con-dition, let the restrained stress group suffer restrained stress for 2 weeks, let the exercise group exercise on a tread-mill 2 hours a day, let the exercise + restrained stress group suffer restrained stress and exercise on a treadmill si-multaneously, and revealed the following findings: in the behavior experiment, the mice in the restrained stress group had significantly decreased social behaviors and significantly increased levels of anxiety and depression be-haviors (P<0.05), while exercise intervention could alleviate the effects of restrained stress on these behaviors. Bio-chemical indexes indicated as well that aerobic exercise effectively alleviated retrained stress induced changes of behaviors and monoamine neurotransmitters. Conclusion: restrained stress will cause changes of social communica-tion and emotion related behaviors, while exercise intervention will play an effective role of alleviation.%为了探讨束缚应激对小鼠神经递质、行为的影响及有氧运动的干预效果。选用1月龄C57BL/6小鼠80只,随机分为4组:控制组(Control,n=20只)、束缚应激组(Stress,n=20只)、运动组(Ex,n=20只)、运动束缚应激组(Stress+Ex,n=20只)。控制组安静饲养,束缚应激组进行2周的束缚应激,运动组每天进行2 h跑台锻炼,运动束缚应激组同时进行束缚应激和跑台锻炼。结果发现:行为试验中,束缚应激组小鼠社交行为显著下降、焦虑及抑郁行为水平发生显著上升(P<0.05),而运动

  18. Subchronic exposure to arsenic disturbed the biogenic amine neurotransmitter level and the mRNA expression of synthetase in mice brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Liu, X; Zhao, L; Hu, S; Li, S; Piao, F

    2013-06-25

    Little is known about the influence of arsenic (As) exposure on monoamine neurotransmitters and the underlying mechanisms, although arsenic toxicity on the central nervous system has been well documented. In the present study, the levels of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-HT were determined by high performance liquid chromatography in the cerebrum and cerebellum of mice exposed to 1, 2 and 4 ppm As2O3 through drinking water for 60 days. The ultra-structural change of vesicles in the synapses of mice brains was observed by transmission electron microscopy; the mRNA expressions of dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) as NE, DA and 5-HT synthetases were quantitatively assessed by real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. It was shown that the concentrations of NE, DA and 5-HT in the cerebrum or cerebellum of mice exposed to As were significantly lower than those in the control group. The number of synaptic vesicles significantly decreased in the brain of mice exposed to As. Moreover, the expressions of TH, TPH and DBH genes were significantly lower in the brains of mice exposed to As than those in the controls. These results suggested that subchronic exposure to As might decrease the concentrations of the three monoamine neurotransmitters in the mouse brain and downregulate TH, TPH and DBH gene expressions. It was also indicated that the decreased concentrations of the three monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain might be related to the down-regulated gene expressions of these synthetases by As.

  19. 2-acetylphenol analogs as potent reversible monoamine oxidase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Legoabe LJ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lesetja J Legoabe,1 Anél Petzer,1 Jacobus P Petzer1,21Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South AfricaAbstract: Based on a previous report that substituted 2-acetylphenols may be promising leads for the design of novel monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitors, a series of C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs (15 and related compounds (two were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of human MAO-A and MAO-B. Generally, the study compounds exhibited inhibitory activities against both MAO-A and MAO-B, with selectivity for the B isoform. Among the compounds evaluated, seven compounds exhibited IC50 values <0.01 µM for MAO-B inhibition, with the most selective compound being 17,000-fold selective for MAO-B over the MAO-A isoform. Analyses of the structure–activity relationships for MAO inhibition show that substitution on the C5 position of the 2-acetylphenol moiety is a requirement for MAO-B inhibition, and the benzyloxy substituent is particularly favorable in this regard. This study concludes that C5-substituted 2-acetylphenol analogs are potent and selective MAO-B inhibitors, appropriate for the design of therapies for neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease.Keywords: monoamine oxidase, MAO, inhibition, 2-acetylphenol, structure–activity relationship

  20. Continuous infusion of proinflammatory cytokines into the brain to study brain cytokine induced local and systemic immune effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöning, B; Elepfandt, P; Lanksch, W R; Volk, H D; Woiciechowsky, C

    1999-07-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are produced in the brain after various kinds of insult (ischemia, trauma, infection). In this process interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha are most important. These cytokines are key mediators of inflammation. Furthermore, these cytokines can act as neurotransmitters and develop direct effects on the central nervous system (CNS) including fever, sleep and stimulation of the neuroendocrine as well as sympathetic nervous system. Moreover, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha may also be involved in brain repair and regenerating processes. However, most of the data about the role of cytokines in the brain have been obtained from either in vitro studies or bolus injections into the brain parenchyma or cerebroventricular system. On the other hand, it is known that cytokines are released continuously into the brain after a cerebral insult over a period of 24 to 48 h. In order to further complete the knowledge about the interactions between neural and immune cells to overcome the primary insult and initiate repair and regeneration in the CNS, a new animal model of local inflammation reaction was established using chronic intracerebral infusion of rat recombinant cytokines.

  1. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-19

    To evaluate the trajectory of resilience during the first year following a moderate-severe TBI, factors associated with resilience at 3, 6 and 12-months post-injury, and changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N = 195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year post-injury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to non-minority status, absence of pre-injury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: A system disorder of the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas; Avanzini, Giuliano; Sander, Thomas; Schmitz, Bettina; Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The prevailing understanding of generalized epilepsy is shaped by the traditional definition that "the responsible neuronal discharge takes place, if not throughout the entire grey matter, then at least in the greater part of it and simultaneously on both sides". This view is no longer tenable since concurrent findings using multiple methods have accumulated to reveal the role of bilateral networks of distributed and selective cortical and subcortical structures in so-called generalized ictogenesis. Most of this research has been focused on juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), which today is commonly considered the archetypical syndrome of the idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Based upon recent research in the fields of clinical epileptology, neuropsychology and psychiatry, clinical neurophysiology, neuroimaging and epilepsy genetics this article, for the first time, unites these new findings into a comprehensive nosological view. Genetically determined dysfunctions of important cognitive systems like visuomotor coordination and linguistic communication appear now as key mechanisms of seizure generation in JME. This review suggests a new paradigm to consider JME as a system disorder of the brain analogous to other neurological system disorders.

  3. The brain's specialized systems for aesthetic and perceptual judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizu, T; Zeki, S

    2013-05-01

    We recorded brain activity when 21 subjects judged the beauty (aesthetic or affective judgment) and brightness (perceptual or cognitive judgment) of simultaneously presented paintings. Aesthetic judgments engaged medial and lateral subdivisions of the orbitofrontal cortex as well as subcortical stations associated with affective motor planning (globus pallidus, putamen-claustrum, amygdala, and cerebellar vermis), whereas the motor, premotor and supplementary motor areas, as well as the anterior insula and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, were engaged by both kinds of judgment. The results lead us to conclude: (i) that there is a functional specialization for judgment, with aesthetic judgments engaging distinct systems, in addition to those that they share with perceptual judgments; (ii) that the systems engaged by affective judgments are those in which activity correlates with polar experiences (e.g. love-hate, beauty-ugliness, and attraction-repulsion); and (iii) that there is also a functional specialization in the motor pathways, with aesthetic judgments engaging motor systems not engaged by perceptual judgments, in addition to those engaged by both kinds of judgment.

  4. Changes of monoamine nervous transmitter and free radical met abolism in aged rats with gastrointestinal injury after brain ischemia reper fusion%脑缺血再灌注胃肠损伤老龄大鼠单胺类神经递质 和自由基代谢的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建生; 赵君玫; 郭盛典; 李建国

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the mechanism of gastrointestinal injury after brain ischemia reperfusi on in aged rats from the changes of dopamine(DA),noradrenalin(NE),epinephrine(E) and the injury of free radical.Methods:Young(5months) and aged (20 months or more) rats were divided into young model group (YMG),young control group(YCG),aged model group (AMG),aged control group(ACG).The following items were measured in rats with 60 minute reperfusion after 30 minute brain ischemia:the pathological change of ga strointestinal tract:the activities of super-oxide dismutase(SOD),the contents of MDA,DA,NE,E. Results:The pathological change of gastrointestinal tract was found in the YMG and the AMG.The excitability of sympathetic-adrenal system was enhanced in the YMG and the AMG,this change in the AMG was serious compared w ith that in the YMG.The gastrointestinal MDA/SOD ratio was larger in the ACG and the YMG than that in the YCG.The stomach MDA/SOD ratio was larger in the AMG th an that in the ACG and the YMG.Conclusion: The gastrointestinal injury after brain ischemia rep erfusion in aged rats was correlated with the change of the enhanced excitabilit y of sympathetic-adrenal system and free radical injury.With aging these pathol ogical change were obvious and distinctive compared with that in the young rats.%目的:从多巴胺(DA)、去甲肾上腺素(NE)、肾上腺素(E)变化和自由基损伤方面揭示脑缺血再灌注胃肠损伤的机制。方法:青年(5月龄)和老龄(20月龄以上)大鼠均分为模型组和正常对照组,观察大鼠全脑缺血30 min再灌注60 min后胃肠损伤的病理改变和超氧化物岐化酶(SOD)的活性及丙二醛(MDA)、DA、NE、E含量。结果:青年和老龄模型组胃肠出现明显的病理改变。青年和老龄模型组交感-肾上腺系统兴奋性增强,其中老龄模型组较青年模型组大鼠严重。老龄对照组和青年模型组胃肠组织MDA/SOD比值高于青年对照组,

  5. Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-08-2-0017 TITLE: " Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER “ Kevlar Vest Protection Against Blast Overpressure Brain Injury: Systemic Contributions to Injury Etiology...traumatic brain injury (bTBI) is largely undefined. Along with reducing mortality, in preliminary experiments Kevlar vests significantly protected

  6. Comparative primate neurobiology and the evolution of brain language systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilling, James K

    2014-10-01

    Human brain specializations supporting language can be identified by comparing human with non-human primate brains. Comparisons with chimpanzees are critical in this endeavor. Human brains are much larger than non-human primate brains, but human language capabilities cannot be entirely explained by brain size. Human brain specializations that potentially support our capacity for language include firstly, wider cortical minicolumns in both Broca's and Wernicke's areas compared with great apes; secondly, leftward asymmetries in Broca's area volume and Wernicke's area minicolumn width that are not found in great apes; and thirdly, arcuate fasciculus projections beyond Wernicke's area to a region of expanded association cortex in the middle and inferior temporal cortex involved in processing word meaning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors: nature of their interaction with rabbit pancreatic islets to alter insluin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, J M; Chapman, B

    1975-12-01

    Using an in vitro rabbit pancreas system, we studied the effect of monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors on flucose-stimulated insulin secretion. We evaluated the effect of both brief (15 min) and prolonged (60 min) exposure of pancreas segments to non-hydrazine (harmine, alpha-methyltryptamine, tranylcypromine and pargyline) and hydrazine (phenelzine, nialamide, iproniazid) type MAO inhibitors. All of the hydrazine type MAO inhibitors potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Of the non-hydrazine inhibitors, only harmine and alpha-methyltryptamine potentiated glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Hydrazine, although not itself an MAO inhibitor, also potentiated insulin secretion. Sixty minutes of exposure to tranylcypromine or alpha-methyltryptamine caused a decrease in insulin secretion. These MAO inhibitors are primary amines and primary amines can inhibit insulin secretion. The dopamine (DA) or serotonin (5-HT) content of the B-cells was increased by incubating rabbit pancreas with L-3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-Dopa) or 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) for forty-five minutes prior to stimulation with glucose. Non-hydrazine MAO inhibitors increased dopamine inhibition of insulin secretion and either did not alter, or decreased serotonin inhibition of insulin secretion. Rabbit pancreatic islets were isolated using the collagenase digestion technique. The MAO activity of islet homogenates was determined using 5-HT and DA as substrates. Rabbit islet MAO has only one-tenth the specific activity against 5-HT (35 +/- 8.7 mumumoles/mg/min, M +/- SEM) that it has against DA (357 +/- 62.3 mumumoles/mg/min). This suggests that one reason that MAT inhibitors do not increase serotonin inhibition of insulin secretion is because MAO is not the major pathway for 5-HT inactivation in rabbit pancreatic islets. These studies suggest that MAO inhibitors alter insulin secretion, by both decreasing B-cell monoamine degradation and by mechanisms that do not involve MAO inhibition.

  8. Aerobic Exercise Does Not Predict Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor And Cortisol Alterations in Depressed Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamego, Murilo Khede; de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Paes, Flávia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Lattari, Eduardo; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    The pathophysiology of depression is related to neurobiological changes that occur in the monoamine system, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neurogenesis system and the neuroimmune system. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the research of the effects of exercise on brain function, with a special focus on its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), cortisol and other biomarkers. Thus, the aim of this study is to present a review investigating the acute and chronic effects of aerobic exercise on BDNF and cortisol levels in individuals with depression. It was not possible to establish an interaction between aerobic exercise and concentration of BDNF and cortisol, which may actually be the result of the divergence of methods, such as type of exercises, duration of the sessions, and prescribed intensity and frequency of sessions.

  9. Effects of K. Lysolecithin on Blood Levels of Monoamines in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this research, Lysolecithin - a substance made with 100% natural ingredients - was given to ICR mice as medication to measure its periodic effect on the noradrenalin (NA), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) levels of the brain. Both ICR and SAM mice were separated into two groups - control group and Lysolecithin (K. Lysolecithin: hydrolytic lysolecithin) medicated group, and given 1-week preparation period. The K. Lysolecithin group was given 500mg/kg of K. Lysolecithin at 0.2mL per dosage for 4 weeks, and the control group was given the same amount of dosage of water during the same period. NA, DA and 5-HT concentrations were measured from the blood before medication and 8 weeks / 12 weeks / 16 weeks after the first medication. For the SAM mice, 8 weeks after they were medicated with K .Lysolecithin, Morris Water Maze Test was conducted for 7 consecutive days and then the concentrations were measured by drawing blood from the heart. The K. Lysolecithin medicated group showed a tendency to have a statistically significant higher concentrations of 5-HT and NA in the blood. Also, periodic examination showed that the monoamine levels were highest in the 12th week and declined thereafter.

  10. Methadone, monoamine oxidase, and depression: opioid distribution and acute effects on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, C.A.; Kreek, M.J.; Raghunath, J.; Arns, P.

    1983-09-01

    Narcotic withdrawal is often accompanied by an atypical depression which responds to resumption of narcotics. It was hypothesized that methadone might exert its antidepressant effects through monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition. The current study examined /sub 3/H-methadone distribution in rat brain and effects on regional MAO activity with acute doses (2.5 mg/kg) which approximate those found during chronic methadone maintenance in man. Limbic areas (amygdala, basomedial hypothalamus, caudate-putamen, hippocampus, preoptic nucleus), as well as pituitary and liver were assayed for MAO activity and methadone concentration. MAO activities did not differ significantly in acute methadone or saline-treated cage-mates at 1 or 24 hr. The concentrations of methadone at 1 hr ranged between 17 and 223 ng/100 mg wet wt tissue in the preoptic nucleus and pituitary, respectively. No significant correlation was found between change in MAO activity (MAO methadone/MAO saline) and methadone concentration in any region at 1 or 24 hr. This study does not support the hypothesis that methadone acts as an antidepressant through MAO inhibition, at least not following acute administration of this exogenous opioid.

  11. Chemical and radiological effects of chronic ingestion of uranium in the rat brain: biochemical impairment of dopaminergic, serotonergic and cholinergic neuro-transmissions; Effets chimique et radiologique d'une ingestion chronique d'uranium sur le cerveau du rat. Effets sur les neurotransmissions dopaminergique, serotoninergique et cholinergique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussy, C

    2005-09-15

    Uranium is an environmental ubiquitous metal-trace element. It has both chemical and radiological toxicity. After chronic ingestion, uranium can distribute in any part of the body and accumulate in the brain. The aims of this study was 1) to determine and estimate the effects of uranium on dopaminergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems and 2) to measure the uranium amount in the brain, after chronic exposure by ingestion of depleted (D.U.) or enriched (E.U.) uranium during 1.5 to 18 months at 40 mg.L{sup -1} (40 ppm) in different rat brain areas. At any time of exposure, the results show that both the neurotransmission alterations and the uranium brain accumulation were moderate, area specific, time-evolutive and depended on uranium specific activity. After D.U. exposure, monoamine perturbations are chronic and progressive. On the contrary, monoamine alterations occurred only after long term of E.U. exposure. These mono-aminergic modifications are not always dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas. Moreover, although the cholinergic system was not affected at both 1.5 and 9 months of D.U. exposure, the alteration of ChE activity after E.U. exposure are both dependent on uranium accumulation in brain areas and on uranium specific activity. After E.U. exposure, cholinergic modification and uranium accumulation in hippocampus could partially explain the short-term memory disturbances which have been previously reported. (author)

  12. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Harald H; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects.

  13. Amphetamines, new psychoactive drugs and the monoamine transporter cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitte, Harald H.; Freissmuth, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In monoaminergic neurons, the vesicular transporters and the plasma membrane transporters operate in a relay. Amphetamine and its congeners target this relay to elicit their actions: most amphetamines are substrates, which pervert the relay to elicit efflux of monoamines into the synaptic cleft. However, some amphetamines act as transporter inhibitors. Both compound classes elicit profound psychostimulant effects, which render them liable to recreational abuse. Currently, a surge of new psychoactive substances occurs on a global scale. Chemists bypass drug bans by ingenuous structural variations, resulting in a rich pharmacology. A credible transport model must account for their distinct mode of action and link this to subtle differences in activity and undesired, potentially deleterious effects. PMID:25542076

  14. Low platelet monoamine oxidase activity in pathological gambling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, J.L. [Department of Psychiatry, Centro de Salud Mental, Parla Madrid (Spain); Saiz-Ruiz, J. [Department of Psychiatry and Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Hollander, E. [Department of Psychiatry, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Queens Hospital Center, New York (United States); Cesar, J. [Department of Haematology, Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid (Spain); Lopez-Ibor, J.J. Jr. [Department of Psychiatry, Hospital San Carlos, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain)

    1994-12-01

    Decreased platelet monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity has been reported in association with sensation-seeking personality type and in some mental disorders associated with a lack of impulse control. Pathological gambling itself has been related with both sensation-seeking and reduced impulse control. Platelet MAO activity was investigated in 15 DSM-III-R pathological gamblers from our outpatient clinic. Gamblers had a significantly lower platelet MAO activity than a group of 25 healthy controls. The range of MAO levels in gamblers was also significantly shorter than in controls. In controls, platelet MAO levels showed the previously described negative correlations with sensation-seeking scores but not in gamblers. The findings are consistent with previous studies showing an association of low platelet MAO activity with impulse control disorders and raise some interesting therapeutic alternatives for pathological gambling. (au) (40 refs.).

  15. Brain systems for assessing the affective value of faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Christopher P; Haxby, James V; Todorov, Alexander

    2011-06-12

    Cognitive neuroscience research on facial expression recognition and face evaluation has proliferated over the past 15 years. Nevertheless, large questions remain unanswered. In this overview, we discuss the current understanding in the field, and describe what is known and what remains unknown. In §2, we describe three types of behavioural evidence that the perception of traits in neutral faces is related to the perception of facial expressions, and may rely on the same mechanisms. In §3, we discuss cortical systems for the perception of facial expressions, and argue for a partial segregation of function in the superior temporal sulcus and the fusiform gyrus. In §4, we describe the current understanding of how the brain responds to emotionally neutral faces. To resolve some of the inconsistencies in the literature, we perform a large group analysis across three different studies, and argue that one parsimonious explanation of prior findings is that faces are coded in terms of their typicality. In §5, we discuss how these two lines of research--perception of emotional expressions and face evaluation--could be integrated into a common, cognitive neuroscience framework.

  16. Brain Malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most brain malformations begin long before a baby is born. Something damages the developing nervous system or causes it ... medicines, infections, or radiation during pregnancy interferes with brain development. Parts of the brain may be missing, ...

  17. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... How the brain develops How genes and the environment affect the brain The basic structure of the ...

  18. Brain region-specific perfluoroalkylated sulfonate (PFSA) and carboxylic acid (PFCA) accumulation and neurochemical biomarker Responses in east Greenland polar Bears (Ursus maritimus)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kathrine Eggers; Basu, Niladri; Letcher, Robert

    2015-01-01

    to bioaccumulate in lipid rich tissues of the brain among other tissues such as liver, and can reach high concentrations in top predators including the polar bear. PFCA and PFSA bioaccummulation in the brain has the potential to pose neurotoxic effects and therefore we conducted a study to investigate...... if variations in neurochemical transmitter systems i.e. the cholinergic, glutaminergic, dopaminergic and GABAergic, could be related to brain-specific bioaccumulation of PFASs in East Greenland polar bears. Nine brain regions from nine polar bears were analyzed for enzyme activity (monoamine oxidase (MAO...... regions, whereas GS activity was positively correlated with PFASs primarily in occipital lobe. Results from the present study support the hypothesis that PFAS concentrations in polar bears from East Greenland have exceeded the threshold limits for neurochemical alterations. It is not known whether...

  19. Pathological Fingerprints, Systems Biology and Biomarkers of Blast Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    895–920. King, N.S. (2008). PTSD and traumatic brain injury: folklore and fact? Brain Inj. 22, 1–5. Kleindienst, A., Hesse , F., Bullock, M.R., and...to traumatic brain injury in nonhuman primates. J. Trauma 62, 199–206. Vinores, S.A., Herman , M.M., Rubinstein, L.J., and Marangos, P.J. (1984...trauma in children. Neurology. 2009;72:609–616. 23. Vinores SA, Herman MM, Rubinstein LJ, Marangos PJ. Electron mi- croscopic localization of neuron

  20. Syntheses of 8-(phenoxymethyl)caffeine analogues and their evaluation as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase and as antagonists of the adenosine A2A receptor / Rozanne Harmse.

    OpenAIRE

    Harmse, Rozanne

    2013-01-01

    Background and rationale: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive, degenerative disorder of the central nervous system and is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. The loss of functional dopamine in the striatum is thought to be responsible for the typical symptoms of PD. Cardinal features of PD include bradykinesia, muscular rigidity, resting tremor and impairment of postural balance. This study focuses on the inhibition of monoamine oxida...

  1. A High-Resolution In Vivo Atlas of the Human Brain's Serotonin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Ganz, Melanie; Feng, Ling

    2017-01-01

    associations between protein expression and density at high detail. This new in vivo neuroimaging atlas of the 5-HT system not only provides insight in the human brain's regional protein synthesis, transport, and density, but also represents a valuable source of information for the neuroscience community......The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system modulates many important brain functions and is critically involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present a high-resolution, multidimensional, in vivo atlas of four of the human brain's 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4...... brain by comparing the 5-HT density across the atlas with data from the Allen Human Brain atlas and identified receptor- and transporter-specific associations that show the regional relation between the two measures. Together, these data provide unparalleled insight into the serotonin system...

  2. Antidepressant-like effect of hyperfoliatin, a polyisoprenylated phloroglucinol derivative from Hypericum perfoliatum (Clusiaceae) is associated with an inhibition of neuronal monoamines uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rego, Jean-Claude; Benkiki, Naïma; Chosson, Elizabeth; Kabouche, Zahia; Seguin, Elisabeth; Costentin, Jean

    2007-08-27

    This study investigated, in mice, the antidepressant like effect of hyperfoliatin, a prenylated phloroglucinol derivative isolated from the aerial parts of Hypericum perfoliatum, as well as its action on monoaminergic systems. In the forced-swimming test, hyperfoliatin dose-dependently reduced immobility time. Immobility was interpreted as an expression of "behavioural despair", which could be a component of depression syndrome. The effect of hyperfoliatin did not result from the stimulation of animal motor activity. Hyperfoliatin inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the [(3)H]-dopamine, [(3)H]-serotonin and [(3)H]-noradrenaline synaptosomal uptakes, but did not prevent the binding of specific ligands to the monoamine transporters. These data suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of hyperfoliatin on the forced-swimming test is probably associated to monoamine uptake inhibition, due to a mechanism of action different from that of known antidepressants.

  3. Using the endocannabinoid system as a neuroprotective strategy in perinatal hypoxic- ischemic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lara-Celador, I.; Go(n)i-de-Cerio, F.; Antonia Alvarez; Enrique Hilario

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important causes of brain injury in the neonatal period is a perinatal hypoxic- ischemic event. This devastating condition can lead to long-term neurological deficits or even death. After hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, a variety of specific cellular mechanisms are set in motion, triggering cell damage and finally producing cell death. Effective therapeutic treatments against this phenomenon are still unavailable because of complex molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. After a thorough understanding of the mechanism underlying neural plasticity following hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, various neuroprotective therapies have been developed for alleviating brain injury and improving long-term outcomes. Among them, the endocannabinoid system emerges as a natural system of neuroprotection. The endocannabinoid system modulates a wide range of physiological processes in mammals and has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in different paradigms of acute brain injury, acting as a natural neuroprotectant. The aim of this review is to study the use of different therapies to induce long-term therapeutic effects after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, and analyze the important role of the endocannabinoid system as a new neuroprotective strategy against perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.

  4. The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; Possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanderWerf, YD; DeJongste, MJL; terHorst, GJ

    1995-01-01

    The immune system mediates blood-brain barrier damage; possible implications for pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric illnesses. In this investigation the effects of immune activation on the brain are characterized In order to study this, we used a model for chronic immune activation, the myocardial

  5. Systems biology of human epilepsy applied to patients with brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sandeep; Shah, Aashit K; Barkmeier, Daniel T; Loeb, Jeffrey A

    2013-12-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of recurrent seizures that can be associated with a wide variety of acquired and developmental brain lesions. Current medications for patients with epilepsy can suppress seizures; they do not cure or modify the underlying disease process. On the other hand, surgical removal of focal brain regions that produce seizures can be curative. This surgical procedure can be more precise with the placement of intracranial recording electrodes to identify brain regions that generate seizure activity as well as those that are critical for normal brain function. The detail that goes into these surgeries includes extensive neuroimaging, electrophysiology, and clinical data. Combined with precisely localized tissues removed, these data provide an unparalleled opportunity to learn about the interrelationships of many "systems" in the human brain not possible in just about any other human brain disorder. Herein, we describe a systems biology approach developed to study patients who undergo brain surgery for epilepsy and how we have begun to apply these methods to patients whose seizures are associated with brain tumors. A central goal of this clinical and translational research program is to improve our understanding of epilepsy and brain tumors and to improve diagnosis and treatment outcomes of both.

  6. The small-world organization of large-scale brain systems and relationships with subcortical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Leonard F; Barker, Lauren A; Joyce, Arthur W; Hrin, Skip

    2014-01-01

    Brain structure and function is characterized by large-scale brain systems. However, each system has its own "small-world" organization, with sub-regions, or "hubs," that have varying degrees of specialization for certain cognitive and behavioral processes. This article describes this small-world organization, and the concepts of functional specialization and functional integration are defined and explained through practical examples. We also describe the development of large-scale brain systems and this small-world organization as a sensitive, protracted process, vulnerable to a variety of influences that generate neurodevelopmental disorders.

  7. Continuous blood pressure recordings simultaneously with functional brain imaging: studies of the glymphatic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zienkiewicz, Aleksandra; Huotari, Niko; Raitamaa, Lauri; Raatikainen, Ville; Ferdinando, Hany; Vihriälä, Erkki; Korhonen, Vesa; Myllylä, Teemu; Kiviniemi, Vesa

    2017-03-01

    The lymph system is responsible for cleaning the tissues of metabolic waste products, soluble proteins and other harmful fluids etc. Lymph flow in the body is driven by body movements and muscle contractions. Moreover, it is indirectly dependent on the cardiovascular system, where the heart beat and blood pressure maintain force of pressure in lymphatic channels. Over the last few years, studies revealed that the brain contains the so-called glymphatic system, which is the counterpart of the systemic lymphatic system in the brain. Similarly, the flow in the glymphatic system is assumed to be mostly driven by physiological pulsations such as cardiovascular pulses. Thus, continuous measurement of blood pressure and heart function simultaneously with functional brain imaging is of great interest, particularly in studies of the glymphatic system. We present our MRI compatible optics based sensing system for continuous blood pressure measurement and show our current results on the effects of blood pressure variations on cerebral brain dynamics, with a focus on the glymphatic system. Blood pressure was measured simultaneously with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) combined with an ultrafast functional brain imaging (fMRI) sequence magnetic resonance encephalography (MREG, 3D brain 10 Hz sampling rate).

  8. Systemic and Brain Pharmacokinetics of Perforin Inhibitor Prodrugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gynther, Mikko; Pickering, Darryl S; Spicer, Julie;

    2016-01-01

    We have recently reported that by converting a perforin inhibitor into an l-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)-utilizing prodrug its cellular uptake can be greatly increased. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vivo and brain pharmacokinetics of two perforin inhibitors and thei......We have recently reported that by converting a perforin inhibitor into an l-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1)-utilizing prodrug its cellular uptake can be greatly increased. The aim of the present study was to determine the in vivo and brain pharmacokinetics of two perforin inhibitors...... and their LAT1-utilizing prodrugs 1 and 2. In addition, the brain uptake mechanism and entry into primary mouse cortical neurons and astrocytes were evaluated. After 23 μmol/kg i.p. bolus injection, the prodrugs’ unbound area under the concentration curve in brain was 0.3 nmol/g × min, whereas the parent drugs...... transporting polypeptides, probenecid, decreased the brain concentrations to 352.4 ± 44.5 and 70.9 ± 7.0 pmol/g, respectively. In addition, in vitro uptake studies showed that at 100 μM prodrug 1 had 3.4-fold and 4.5-fold higher uptake rate into neurons and astrocytes, respectively, compared to its parent drug...

  9. Towards passive brain-computer interfaces: applying brain-computer interface technology to human-machine systems in general

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Thorsten O.; Kothe, Christian

    2011-04-01

    Cognitive monitoring is an approach utilizing realtime brain signal decoding (RBSD) for gaining information on the ongoing cognitive user state. In recent decades this approach has brought valuable insight into the cognition of an interacting human. Automated RBSD can be used to set up a brain-computer interface (BCI) providing a novel input modality for technical systems solely based on brain activity. In BCIs the user usually sends voluntary and directed commands to control the connected computer system or to communicate through it. In this paper we propose an extension of this approach by fusing BCI technology with cognitive monitoring, providing valuable information about the users' intentions, situational interpretations and emotional states to the technical system. We call this approach passive BCI. In the following we give an overview of studies which utilize passive BCI, as well as other novel types of applications resulting from BCI technology. We especially focus on applications for healthy users, and the specific requirements and demands of this user group. Since the presented approach of combining cognitive monitoring with BCI technology is very similar to the concept of BCIs itself we propose a unifying categorization of BCI-based applications, including the novel approach of passive BCI.

  10. Calibration of clinical cerebellar and deep brain stimulation systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, D L; Wright, G D; Renouf, F

    1981-01-01

    The increasing use of electrical stimulation of the brain for relief of pain, spasticity and epilepsy has introduced unfamiliar techniques into clinical neurological and neurosurgical practice. In view of the evidence that excessive levels of stimulation can damage brain tissue, it is of great importance to monitor the dose of stimulation. A review of recent clinical papers suggests that many centres do not measure the dose accurately, relying on arbitrary dial settings on external transmitters. This paper reviews that factors that affect the dose received by the patient and suggests methods of measuring them, at operation and subsequently, which should routinely be employed by clinicians implanting stimulators. Images PMID:6973614

  11. Brief Social Isolation in the Adolescent Wistar-Kyoto Rat Model of Endogenous Depression Alters Corticosterone and Regional Monoamine Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Reshma A; Sadananda, Monika

    2017-02-24

    The Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY) model has been suggested as a model of adult and adolescent depression though face, predictive and construct validities of the model to depression remain equivocal. The suitability of the WKY as a diathesis model that tests the double-hit hypothesis, particularly during critical periods of brain and behavioural development remains to be established. Here, effects of post-weaning social isolation were assessed during early adolescence (~30pnd) on behavioural despair and learned helplessness in the forced swim test (FST), plasma corticosterone levels and tissue monoamine concentrations in brain areas critically involved in depression, such as prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, striatum and hippocampus. Significantly increased immobility in the FST was observed in socially-isolated, adolescent WKY with a concomitant increase in corticosterone levels over and above the FST-induced stress. WKY also demonstrated a significantly increased release and utilization of dopamine, as manifested by levels of metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in nucleus accumbens, indicating that the large dopamine storage pool evident during adolescence induces greater dopamine release when stimulated. The serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid was also significantly increased in nucleus accumbens, indicating increased utilization of serotonin, along with norepinephrine levels which were also signficantly elevated in socially-isolated adolescent WKY. Differences in neurochemistry suggest that social or environmental stimuli during critical periods of brain and behavioural development can determine the developmental trajectories of implicated pathways.

  12. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier (BBB) damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain) and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury). This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement cascade.

  13. VERSATILITY OF THE COMPLEMENT SYSTEM IN NEUROINFLAMMATION, NEURODEGENERATION AND BRAIN HOMEOSTASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franca eOrsini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circulate in the bloodstream primed for activation. Moreover, brain cells can produce complement proteins and receptors. After acute brain injury, the rapid and uncontrolled activation of the complement leads to massive release of inflammatory anaphylatoxins, recruitment of cells to the injury site, phagocytosis and induction of blood brain barrier damage. Brain endothelial cells are particularly susceptible to complement-mediated effects, since they are exposed to both circulating and locally synthesized complement proteins. Conversely, during neurodegenerative disorders, complement factors play distinct roles depending on the stage and degree of neuropathology. In addition to the deleterious role of the complement, increasing evidence suggest that it may also play a role in normal nervous system development (wiring the brain and adulthood (either maintaining brain homeostasis or supporting regeneration after brain injury. This article represents a compendium of the current knowledge on the complement role in the brain, prompting a novel view that complement activation can result in either protective or detrimental effects in brain conditions that depend exquisitely on the nature, the timing and the degree of the stimuli that induce its activation. A deeper understanding of the acute, subacute and chronic consequences of complement activation is needed and may lead to new therapeutic strategies, including the ability of targeting selective step in the complement

  14. Nanowired Drug Delivery Across the Blood-Brain Barrier in Central Nervous System Injury and Repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Aruna; Menon, Preeti; Muresanu, Dafin F; Ozkizilcik, Asya; Tian, Z Ryan; Lafuente, José V; Sharma, Hari S

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a physiological regulator of transport of essential items from blood to brain for the maintenance of homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) within narrow limits. The BBB is also responsible for export of harmful or metabolic products from brain to blood to keep the CNS fluid microenvironment healthy. However, noxious insults to the brain caused by trauma, ischemia or environmental/chemical toxins alter the BBB function to small as well as large molecules e.g., proteins. When proteins enter the CNS fluid microenvironment, development of brain edema occurs due to altered osmotic balance between blood and brain. On the other hand, almost all neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic insults to the CNS and subsequent BBB dysfunction lead to edema formation and cell injury. To treat these brain disorders suitable drug therapy reaching their brain targets is needed. However, due to edema formation or only a focal disruption of the BBB e.g., around brain tumors, many drugs are unable to reach their CNS targets in sufficient quantity. This results in poor therapeutic outcome. Thus, new technology such as nanodelivery is needed for drugs to reach their CNS targets and be effective. In this review, use of nanowires as a possible novel tool to enhance drug delivery into the CNS in various disease models is discussed based on our investigations. These data show that nanowired delivery of drugs may have superior neuroprotective ability to treat several CNS diseases effectively indicating their role in future therapeutic strategies.

  15. Functional brain fluorescence plurimetry in rat by implantable concatenated CMOS imaging system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Haruta, Makito; Motoyama, Mayumi; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Ohta, Jun

    2014-03-15

    Measurement of brain activity in multiple areas simultaneously by minimally invasive methods contributes to the study of neuroscience and development of brain machine interfaces. However, this requires compact wearable instruments that do not inhibit natural movements. Application of optical potentiometry with voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye using an implantable image sensor is also useful. However, the increasing number of leads required for the multiple wired sensors to measure larger domains inhibits natural behavior. For imaging broad areas by numerous sensors without excessive wiring, a web-like sensor that can wrap the brain was developed. Kaleidoscopic potentiometry is possible using the imaging system with concatenated sensors by changing the alignment of the sensors. This paper describes organization of the system, evaluation of the system by a fluorescence imaging, and finally, functional brain fluorescence plurimetry by the sensor. The recorded data in rat somatosensory cortex using the developed multiple-area imaging system compared well with electrophysiology results.

  16. Relationships among the brain, the digestive system, and eating behavior: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pray, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    "On July 9-10, 2014, the Institute of Medicine's Food Forum hosted a public workshop to explore emerging and rapidly developing research on relationships among the brain, the digestive system, and eating behavior...

  17. Prenatal Alcohol Exposure Damages Brain Signal Transduction System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Chem. 279: 41807- 41814. 9 Available online at www.sciencedirect.com SCIENCE DIRECT @ ANALYTICAL BIOCHEMISTRY ACADEMIC PRESS Analytical Biochemistry...Mol Brain Res 40:177-187. frontal cortex. Neurobiol Learn Mem 76:151-182. Available online at www.sciencedirect.com PHARMACOLOGY SCIENCE DIRECT & BIOCHEMISTRY

  18. Brain systems for visual perspective taking and action perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Elisabetta; Ramsey, Richard; Conson, Massimiliano; Hamilton, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Taking another person's viewpoint and making sense of their actions are key processes that guide social behavior. Previous neuroimaging investigations have largely studied these processes separately. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine how the brain incorporates another person's viewpoint and actions into visual perspective judgments. Participants made a left-right judgment about the location of a target object from their own (egocentric) or an actor's visual perspective (altercentric). Actor location varied around a table and the actor was either reaching or not reaching for the target object. Analyses examined brain regions engaged in the egocentric and altercentric tasks, brain regions where response magnitude tracked the orientation of the actor in the scene and brain regions sensitive to the action performed by the actor. The blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response in dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) was sensitive to actor orientation in the altercentric task, whereas the response in right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) was sensitive to actor orientation in the egocentric task. Thus, dmPFC and right IFG may play distinct but complementary roles in visual perspective taking (VPT). Observation of a reaching actor compared to a non-reaching actor yielded activation in lateral occipitotemporal cortex, regardless of task, showing that these regions are sensitive to body posture independent of social context. By considering how an observed actor's location and action influence the neural bases of visual perspective judgments, the current study supports the view that multiple neurocognitive "routes" operate during VPT.

  19. Carnosine reverses the aging-induced down regulation of brain regional serotonergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Soumyabrata; Ghosh, Tushar K; Poddar, Mrinal K

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to study the role of carnosine, an endogenous dipeptide biomolecule, on brain regional (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and pons-medulla) serotonergic system during aging. Results showed an aging-induced brain region specific significant (a) increase in Trp (except cerebral cortex) and their 5-HIAA steady state level with an increase in their 5-HIAA accumulation and declination, (b) decrease in their both 5-HT steady state level and 5-HT accumulation (except cerebral cortex). A significant decrease in brain regional 5-HT/Trp ratio (except cerebral cortex) and increase in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratio were also observed during aging. Carnosine at lower dosages (0.5-1.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) didn't produce any significant response in any of the brain regions, but higher dosages (2.0-2.5μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days) showed a significant response on those aging-induced brain regional serotonergic parameters. The treatment with carnosine (2.0μg/Kg/day, i.t. for 21 consecutive days), attenuated these brain regional aging-induced serotonergic parameters and restored towards their basal levels that observed in 4 months young control rats. These results suggest that carnosine attenuates and restores the aging-induced brain regional down regulation of serotonergic system towards that observed in young rats' brain regions.

  20. Ropren(®) treatment reverses anxiety-like behavior and monoamines levels in gonadectomized rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotova, Julia; Soultanov, Vagif; Nikitina, Tamara; Roschin, Victor; Ordyan, Natalia; Hritcu, Lucian

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies indicated that reduced androgen levels may contribute to both physical and cognitive disorders in men, including Alzheimer's disease. New drug candidates for Alzheimer's disease in patients with androgen deficiency should ideally be able to act not only on multiple brain targets but also to correct impaired endocrine functions in hypogonadal men with Alzheimer's disease. Ropren(®) is one such candidate for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease in men with an imbalance of androgens. Accordingly, the aim of the current study was to examine the effects of long-term Ropren(®) administration (8.6mg/kg, orally, once daily, for 28 days) on the anxiety-like behavior and monoamines levels in the rat hippocampus using a β-amyloid (25-35) rat model of Alzheimer's disease following gonadectomy. Ropren(®) was administered to the gonadectomized (GDX) rats and GDX rats treated with testosterone propionate (TP, 0.5mg/kg, subcutaneous, once daily, for 28 days). Anxiety-like behavior was assessed in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and the light-dark test (LDT), locomotor and grooming activities were assessed in the open field test (OFT). Ropren(®) alone or in combination with TP-induced anxiolytic effects as evidenced in the EPM and in the LDT and increased locomotor activity in the OFT. Additionally, it was observed that dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) levels increased while 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA)/5-HT ratio in the hippocampus decreased. Our results indicate that Ropren(®) has a marked anxiolytic-like action due to an increase in the monoamines levels in the experimental rat model of Alzheimer's disease with altered levels of androgens.

  1. Selected chromone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2012-09-01

    A previous study has shown that a series of C6-benzyloxy substituted chromones exhibit high binding affinities for human monoamine oxidase (MAO) B. In an attempt to discover additional chromones with potent and selective MAO-B inhibitory potencies and to further examine the structure-activity relationships of MAO-B inhibition by chromones, the series was expanded with homologues containing polar functional groups on C3 of the chromone ring. The results demonstrate that 6-[(3-bromobenzyl)oxy]chromones containing acidic and aldehydic functional groups on C3 act as potent reversible MAO-B inhibitors with IC(50) values of 2.8 and 3.7 nM, respectively. Interestingly, a 2-hydroxy-2,3-dihydro-1-benzopyran-4-one derivative as well as open-ring 2-acetylphenol analogues of the chromones also were potent MAO-B inhibitors with IC(50) values ranging from 4 to 11 nM. Chromone derivatives containing the benzyloxy substituent on C5 of the chromone ring, however, exhibit MAO-B inhibition potencies that are several orders of magnitude weaker. High potency inhibitors of MAO-B may find application in the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Selected C7-substituted chromone derivatives as monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legoabe, Lesetja J; Petzer, Anél; Petzer, Jacobus P

    2012-12-01

    A series of C7-substituted chromone (1-benzopyran-4-one) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of recombinant human monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B. The chromones are structurally related to a series of C7-functionalized coumarin (1-benzopyran-2-one) derivatives which has been reported to act as potent MAO inhibitors. The results of the current study document that the chromones are highly potent reversible inhibitors of MAO-B with IC(50) values ranging from 0.008 to 0.370 μM. While the chromone derivatives also exhibit affinities for MAO-A, with IC(50) values ranging from 0.495 to 8.03 μM, they are selective for the MAO-B isoform. Structure-activity relationships (SAR) show that 7-benzyloxy substitution of chromone is suitable for MAO-B inhibition with tolerance for a variety of substituents and substitution patterns on the benzyloxy ring. It may be concluded that 7-benzyloxychromones are appropriate lead compounds for the design of reversible and selective MAO-B inhibitors. With the aid of modeling studies, potential binding orientations and interactions of selected chromone derivatives in the MAO-A and -B active sites are examined. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI Guided Brain Stimulation without the Use of a Neuronavigation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Vaghefi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A key issue in the field of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS is the accurate localization of scalp positions that correspond to targeted cortical areas. The current gold standard is to combine structural and functional brain imaging with a commercially available “neuronavigation” system. However, neuronavigation systems are not commonplace outside of specialized research environments. Here we describe a technique that allows for the use of participant-specific functional and structural MRI data to guide NIBS without a neuronavigation system. Surface mesh representations of the head were generated using Brain Voyager and vectors linking key anatomical landmarks were drawn on the mesh. Our technique was then used to calculate the precise distances on the scalp corresponding to these vectors. These calculations were verified using actual measurements of the head and the technique was used to identify a scalp position corresponding to a brain area localized using functional MRI.

  4. A REVIEW ON INFLUENCE OF MUSIC ON BRAIN ACTIVITY USING SIGNAL PROCESSING AND IMAGING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. ADALARASU,

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available As per clinical neuroscience, listening to music involves many brain activities and its study has advanced greatly in the last thirty years. Research shows that music has significant effect on our body and mind. Music has a positive effect on the hormone system and allows the brain to concentrate more easily and assimilate more information in less time, thereby boosting learning and information intake and thus augmenting cognitive skills. Studies have found that the silence between two musical notes triggers brain cells and neurons which are responsible for the development of sharp memory. Music at different pitches (for example, Madhyamavati, Sankarabarnam raga and so on elicits exceptionally emotions and is capable ofreliably affecting the mood of individuals, which in turn changes the brain activity. This article provides a brief overview of currently available signal processing and imaging techniques to study the influence of different music on human brain activity.

  5. Dietary omega-3 fatty acids modulate large-scale systems organization in the rhesus macaque brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, David S; Kroenke, Christopher D; Neuringer, Martha; Fair, Damien A

    2014-02-01

    Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for healthy brain and retinal development and have been implicated in a variety of neurodevelopmental disorders. This study used resting-state functional connectivity MRI to define the large-scale organization of the rhesus macaque brain and changes associated with differences in lifetime ω-3 fatty acid intake. Monkeys fed docosahexaenoic acid, the long-chain ω-3 fatty acid abundant in neural membranes, had cortical modular organization resembling the healthy human brain. In contrast, those with low levels of dietary ω-3 fatty acids had decreased functional connectivity within the early visual pathway and throughout higher-order associational cortex and showed impairment of distributed cortical networks. Our findings illustrate the similarity in modular cortical organization between the healthy human and macaque brain and support the notion that ω-3 fatty acids play a crucial role in developing and/or maintaining distributed, large-scale brain systems, including those essential for normal cognitive function.

  6. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...... in brain tissue of patients with ALF we investigated whether hyperammonemia could induce adenosine release in brain tissue. Since adenosine is a potent vasodilator and modulator of cerebral metabolism we furthermore studied the effect of adenosine receptor ligands on intracranial pressure (ICP......) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...

  7. The Prorenin and (Prorenin Receptor: New Players in the Brain Renin-Angiotensin System?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the brain renin-angiotensin (RAS system plays an essential role in the development of hypertension, mainly through the modulation of autonomic activities and vasopressin release. However, how the brain synthesizes angiotensin (Ang II has been a debate for decades, largely due to the low renin activity. This paper first describes the expression of the vasoconstrictive arm of RAS components in the brain as well as their physiological and pathophysiological significance. It then focus on the (prorenin receptor (PRR, a newly discovered component of the RAS which has a high level in the brain. We review the role of prorenin and PRR in peripheral organs and emphasize the involvement of brain PRR in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Some future perspectives in PRR research are heighted with respect to novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension and other cardiovascular diseases.

  8. The Second Brain: Is the Gut Microbiota a Link Between Obesity and Central Nervous System Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Repáraz, Javier; Kasper, Lloyd H

    2016-03-01

    The gut-brain axis is a bi-directional integrated system composed by immune, endocrine, and neuronal components by which the gap between the gut microbiota and the brain is significantly impacted. An increasing number of different gut microbial species are now postulated to regulate brain function in health and disease. The westernized diet is hypothesized to be the cause of the current obesity levels in many countries, a major socio-economical health problem. Experimental and epidemiological evidence suggest that the gut microbiota is responsible for significant immunologic, neuronal, and endocrine changes that lead to obesity. We hypothesize that the gut microbiota, and changes associated with diet, affect the gut-brain axis and may possibly contribute to the development of mental illness. In this review, we discuss the links between diet, gut dysbiosis, obesity, and immunologic and neurologic diseases that impact brain function and behavior.

  9. Development of the declarative memory system in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofen, Noa; Kao, Yun-Ching; Sokol-Hessner, Peter; Kim, Heesoo; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2007-09-01

    Brain regions that are involved in memory formation, particularly medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), have been identified in adults, but not in children. We investigated the development of brain regions involved in memory formation in 49 children and adults (ages 8-24), who studied scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Recognition memory for vividly recollected scenes improved with age. There was greater activation for subsequently remembered scenes than there was for forgotten scenes in MTL and PFC regions. These activations increased with age in specific PFC, but not in MTL, regions. PFC, but not MTL, activations correlated with developmental gains in memory for details of experiences. Voxel-based morphometry indicated that gray matter volume in PFC, but not in MTL, regions reduced with age. These results suggest that PFC regions that are important for the formation of detailed memories for experiences have a prolonged maturational trajectory.

  10. Studies of the brain cannabinoid system using positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatley, S.J.; Volkow, N.D.

    1995-10-01

    Studies using radiolabeled psychoactive drugs in conjunction with positron emission tomography (PET) have permitted the imaging of binding sites in the human brain. Similar studies of marijuana have been hampered by the unsuitability of radiolabeled THC for PET studies, and the current unavailability of other in vivo imaging agents for cannabinoid receptors. Recent developments in medicinal chemistry suggest that a PET radiotracer for cannabinoid receptors will soon become available. This chapter briefly reviews these developments, together with the results of PET studies of the effects of marijuana and other abused drugs on brain metabolism. It also reviews PET studies of cocaine binding sites, to demonstrate the kind of investigations that will be possible when a cannabinoid receptor PET radioligand becomes available.

  11. Systems Biology Approaches for Discovering Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Neuroscience , Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Silver Spring, Maryland. JOURNAL OF NEUROTRAUMA 30:1101–1116 (July 1, 2013) ª Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI...deficiency.117,118 Retired football players with a history of chronic mTBI (i.e., multiple concussions) have increased cognitive impairment and...financial interests exist. References 1. DeKosky, S.T., Ikonomovic, M.D., and Gandy S. (2010). Traumatic brain injury— football , warfare, and long-term

  12. Dissociation of Category-Learning Systems via Brain Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G Morrison

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging evidence has suggested that categories can often be learned via either an explicit rule-based mechanism critically dependent on medial temporal and prefrontal brain regions, or via an implicit information-integration mechanism relying on the basal ganglia. In this study, participants viewed sine-wave gratings (i.e., Gabor patches that varied on two dimensions and learned to categorize them via trial-by-trial feedback. Two different stimulus distributions were used; one was intended to encourage an explicit rule-based process and the other an implicit information-integration process. We monitored brain activity with scalp electroencephalography (EEG while each participant (1 passively observed stimuli represented of both distributions, (2 categorized stimuli from one distribution, and, one week later, (3 categorized stimuli from the other distribution. Categorization accuracy was similar for the two distributions. Subtractions of Event-Related Potentials (ERPs for correct and incorrect trials were used to identify neural differences in rule-based and information-integration categorization processes. We identified an occipital brain potential that was differentially modulated by categorization condition accuracy at an early latency (150 - 250 ms, likely reflecting the degree of holistic processing. A stimulus-locked late positive complex associated with explicit memory updating was modulated by accuracy in the rule-based, but not the information-integration task. Likewise, a feedback-locked P300 ERP associated with expectancy was correlated with performance only in the rule-based, but not the information-integration condition. These results provide additional evidence for distinct brain mechanisms supporting rule-based versus implicit information-integration category learning and use.

  13. Effects of developmental manganese, stress, and the combination of both on monoamines, growth, and corticosterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles V. Vorhees

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Developmental exposure to manganese (Mn or stress can each be detrimental to brain development. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to two housing conditions and Mn from postnatal day (P4–28. Within each litter two males and two females were assigned to the following groups: 0 (vehicle, 50, or 100 mg/kg Mn by gavage every other day. Half the litters were reared in cages with standard bedding and half with no bedding. One pair/group in each litter had an acute shallow water stressor before tissue collection (i.e., standing in shallow water. Separate litters were assessed at P11, 19, or 29. Mn-treated rats raised in standard cages showed no change in baseline corticosterone but following acute stress increased more than controls on P19; no Mn effects were seen on P11 or P29. Mn increased neostriatal dopamine in females at P19 and norepinephrine at P11 and P29. Mn increased hippocampal dopamine at P11 and P29 and 5-HT at P29 regardless of housing or sex. Mn had no effect on hypothalamic dopamine, but increased norepinephrine in males at P29 and 5-HT in males at all ages irrespective of rearing condition. Barren reared rats showed no or opposite effects of Mn, i.e., barren rearing + Mn attenuated corticosterone increases to acute stress. Barren rearing also altered the Mn-induced changes in dopamine and norepinephrine in the neostriatum, but not in the hippocampus. Barren rearing caused a Mn-associated increase in hypothalamic dopamine at P19 and P29 not seen in standard reared Mn-treated groups. Developmental Mn alters monoamines and corticosterone as a function of age, stress (acute and chronic, and sex.

  14. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  15. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... the basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  16. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions ... basic working unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function ...

  17. Modification of the striatal dopaminergic neuron system by carbon monoxide exposure in free-moving rats, as determined by in vivo brain microdialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Shuichi; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Kuriiwa, Fumi; Endo, Takahiko [Department of Forensic Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402 (Japan); Mukai, Toshiji [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-0015 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication in humans results in motor deficits, which resemble those in Parkinson's disease, suggesting possible disturbance of the central dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal system by CO exposure. In the present study, therefore, we explored the effects of CO exposure on the DAergic neuronal system in the striatum of freely moving rats by means of in vivo brain microdialysis. Exposure of rats to CO (up to 0.3%) for 40 min caused an increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels and a decrease in extracellular levels of its major metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the striatum depending on the CO concentration. Reoxygenation following termination of the CO exposure resulted in a decline of DA to the control level and an overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA to levels higher than the control. A monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) inhibitor, clorgyline, significantly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA and completely abolished the subsequent overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA. Tetrodotoxin, a Na{sup +} channel blocker, completely abolished both the CO-induced increase in DA and the overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. A DA uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, strongly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA without affecting the subsequent overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. Clorgyline further potentiated the effect of nomifensine on the CO-induced increase in DA, although a slight overshoot of DOPAC and HVA appeared. These findings suggest that (1) CO exposure may stimulate Na{sup +}-dependent DA release in addition to suppressing DA metabolism, resulting in a marked increase in extracellular DA in rat striatum, and (2) CO withdrawal and subsequent reoxygenation may enhance the oxidative metabolism, preferentially mediated by MAO-A, of the increased extracellular DA. In the light of the neurotoxicity of DA per se and reactive substances, such as quinones and activated oxygen species

  18. Functional and structural connectivity of the visual system in infants with perinatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhar, Stephanie L; Gozdas, Elveda; Tkach, Jean A; Harpster, Karen L; Schwartz, Terry L; Yuan, Weihong; Kline-Fath, Beth M; Leach, James L; Altaye, Mekibib; Holland, Scott K

    2016-07-01

    Infants with perinatal brain injury are at risk of later visual problems. Advanced neuroimaging techniques show promise to detect functional and structural alterations of the visual system. We hypothesized that infants with perinatal brain injury would have less brain activation during a visual functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task and reduced task-based functional connectivity and structural connectivity as compared with healthy controls. Ten infants with perinatal brain injury and 20 control infants underwent visual fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) during natural sleep with no sedation. Activation maps, functional connectivity maps, and structural connectivity were analyzed and compared between the two groups. Most infants in both groups had negative activation in the visual cortex during the fMRI task. Infants with brain injury showed reduced activation in the occipital cortex, weaker connectivity between visual areas and other areas of the brain during the visual task, and reduced fractional anisotropy in white matter tracts projecting to visual regions, as compared with control infants. Infants with brain injury sustained in the perinatal period showed evidence of decreased brain activity and functional connectivity during a visual task and altered structural connectivity as compared with healthy term neonates.

  19. High-throughput screening for monoamine oxidase-A and monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors using one-step fluorescence assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-mei GUANG; Guan-hua DU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To develop high-throughput screening (HTS) assays for monoamine oxidase (MAO)-A and MAO-B inhibitors. Methods: A fluorescence probe based method measuring MAO-A and MAO-B activity was established and optimized, with its sensitivity, stability and specificity evaluated. Reaction conditions including enzyme sources, substrate concentrations, incubation volume and reaction time in 384-well format were optimized to achieve sensitive and low consumptive goal. Results: In optimized conditions, dynamic parameters of MAO-A and MAO-B were obtained. The Km value of serotonin to MAO-A was 1.66 μmol/L, while that of benzylamine to MAO-B was 0.80 umol/L. The IC50 value of clorgyline to MAO-A was 2.99 nmol/L, and that of deprenyl to MAO-B was 7.04 nmol/L, matching those obtained from traditional spectrometric assays. Among tested samples, one compound exerted an inhibitory effect on MAO-A activity with IC50 as 0.36 μmol/L, and three compounds had an inhibitory effect on MAO-B activity with IC50 as 0.13,0.19, and 0.13 μmol/L. The Z' factor was 0.71±0.03 and 0.75±0.03 in MAO-A-inhibitor and MAO-B-inhibitor HTS system, respectively. Conclusion: The established assays can be well applied to MAO-A and MAO-B inhibitor screening with high quality, precision and reproducibility.

  20. Computer-Aided Diagnosis Systems for Brain Diseases in Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuo Yamashita

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the basics and recent researches of computer-aided diagnosis (CAD systems for assisting neuroradiologists in detection of brain diseases, e.g., asymptomatic unruptured aneurysms, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and multiple sclerosis (MS, in magnetic resonance (MR images. The CAD systems consist of image feature extraction based on image processing techniques and machine learning classifiers such as linear discriminant analysis, artificial neural networks, and support vector machines. We introduce useful examples of the CAD systems in the neuroradiology, and conclude with possibilities in the future of the CAD systems for brain diseases in MR images.

  1. Nanoparticles and blood-brain barrier: the key to central nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Alazne; Suárez-Merino, Blanca; Goñi-de-Cerio, Felipe

    2014-01-01

    Major central nervous system disorders represent a significant and worldwide public health problem. In fact, the therapeutic success of many pharmaceuticals developed to treat central nervous system diseases is still moderate, since the blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits the access of systemically administered compounds to the brain. Therefore, they require the application of a large total dose of a drug, and cause numerous toxic effects. The development of nanotechnological systems are useful tools to deliver therapeutics and/or diagnostic probes to the brain due to nanocarriers having the potential to improve the therapeutic effect of drugs and to reduce their side effects. This review provides a brief overview of the variety of carriers employed for central nervous system drug and diagnostic probes delivery. Further, this paper focuses on the novel nanocarriers developed to enhance brain delivery across the blood-brain barrier. Special attention is paid to liposomes, micelles, polymeric and lipid-based nanoparticles, dendrimers and carbon nanotubes. The recent developments in nanocarrier implementation through size/charge optimization and surface modifications (PEGylation, targeting delivery, and coating with surfactants) have been discussed. And a detailed description of the nanoscaled pharmaceutical delivery devices employed for the treatment of central nervous system disorders have also been defined. The aim of the review is to evaluate the nanotechnology-based drug delivery strategies to treat different central nervous system disorders.

  2. Regulation of Copper Transport Crossing Brain Barrier Systems by Cu-ATPases: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Jiang, Wendy; Monnot, Andrew Donald; Bates, Christopher Alexander; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cellular copper (Cu) homeostasis involves Cu-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), i.e., ATP7A and ATP7B. The question as to how these Cu-ATPases in brain barrier systems transport Cu, i.e., toward brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or blood, remained unanswered. This study was designed to characterize roles of Cu-ATPases in regulating Cu transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCB) and to investigate how exposure to toxic manganese (Mn) altered ...

  3. Role of histaminergic system in blood-brain barrier dysfunction associated with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañuelos-Cabrera, Ivette; Valle-Dorado, María Guadalupe; Aldana, Blanca Irene; Orozco-Suárez, Sandra Adela; Rocha, Luisa

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption has been associated with several acute and chronic brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. This represents a critical situation because damaged integrity of the BBB is related to the influx of immune mediators, plasma proteins and other outside elements from blood to the central nervous system (CNS) that may trigger a cascade of events that leads to neuroinflammation. In this review, evidence that mast cells and the release of factors such as histamine play an important role in the neuroinflammatory process associated with brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy is presented.

  4. [The processing of point clouds for brain deformation existing in image guided neurosurgery system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xufeng; Lin, Yixun; Song, Zhijian

    2008-08-01

    The finite element method (FEM) plays an important role in solving the brain deformation problem in the image guided neurosurgery system. The position of the brain cortex during the surgery provides the boundary condition for the FEM model. In this paper, the information of brain cortex is represented by the unstructured points and the boundary condition is achieved by the processing of unstructured points. The processing includes the mapping of texture, segmentation, simplification and denoising. The method of k-nearest clustering based on local surface properties is used to simplify and denoise the unstructured point clouds. The results of experiment prove the efficiency of point clouds processing.

  5. Histaminergic system in brain disorders: lessons from the translational approach and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baronio, Diego; Gonchoroski, Taylor; Castro, Kamila; Zanatta, Geancarlo; Gottfried, Carmem; Riesgo, Rudimar

    2014-01-01

    Histamine and its receptors were first described as part of immune and gastrointestinal systems, but their presence in the central nervous system and importance in behavior are gaining more attention. The histaminergic system modulates different processes including wakefulness, feeding, and learning and memory consolidation. Histamine receptors (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) belong to the rhodopsin-like family of G protein-coupled receptors, present constitutive activity, and are subjected to inverse agonist action. The involvement of the histaminergic system in brain disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, sleep disorders, drug dependence, and Parkinson's disease, is largely studied. Data obtained from preclinical studies point antagonists of histamine receptors as promising alternatives to treat brain disorders. Thus, clinical trials are currently ongoing to assess the effects of these drugs on humans. This review summarizes the role of histaminergic system in brain disorders, as well as the effects of different histamine antagonists on animal models and humans.

  6. Quantitative analysis of the brain-targeted delivery of drugs and model compounds using nano-delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovskaya, Luba; Stepensky, David

    2013-10-10

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents drugs' permeability into the brain and limits management of brain diseases. Specialized drug delivery systems (DDSs) are utterly required to overcome this barrier and to achieve efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain. For this purpose, drug-encapsulating nanoparticles or vesicles, drug conjugates and other types of DDSs are being developed by many research groups worldwide. However, efficiency of the brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting is usually presented in indirect and vague form and it is hard to quantitatively estimate it based on the reported data. We searched for the scientific papers that were published in 1970-2012 that reported delivery of drugs or model compounds to the brain following systemic administration of DDSs via parenteral routes and contained quantitative data on brain drug/DDS delivery and targeting efficiency. We identified 123 publications that matched the search criteria and analyzed their experimental settings, formulation types, analytical methods, and the claimed efficiencies of drug/DDS brain targeting (brain/plasma or brain/tissue concentration ratios) and brain accumulation (% of the administered dose that accumulated in the brain). Based on the outcomes of this analysis, we describe the major research trends, discuss the efficiencies of the different drug/DDS brain targeting approaches, and provide recommendations for quantitative assessment of brain-targeting DDSs in the appropriately designed studies. © 2013.

  7. Acquistion of High Resolution Electroencephalogram Systems for Advancing Brain-Machine Interaction Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-21

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The goal of this project is to acquire high performance Electroencephalogram (EEG) systems that enable real-time...measurement of human brain activities at high spatial-temporal resolution in both laboratory and real-life environments. Our long-term vision is to develop...state-of-the-art Biosemi Active Two EEG device to enable real-time measurement of brain 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13

  8. A Computer Aided Detection System for Cerebral Microbleeds in Brain MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Asl, Babak Ghafary

    2012-01-01

    Advances in MR technology have improved the potential for visualization of small lesions in brain images. This has resulted in the opportunity to detect cerebral microbleeds (CMBs), small hemorrhages in the brain that are known to be associated with risk of ischemic stroke and intracerebral bleeding. Currently, no computerized method is available for fully- or semi-automated detection of CMBs. In this paper, we propose a CAD system for the detection of CMBs to speed up visual analysis in popu...

  9. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by furazolidone in the chicken and the influence of the alimentary flora thereon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, B H; Bartlet, A L

    1980-01-01

    1 The addition of furazolidone to the feed at the therapeutic level (0.04% w/w, 10 days) inhibited monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity by 47 to 72% in chicken duodenal mucosa, heart and brain, but in the liver the enzyme activity was unaffected by the treatment. 2 Furazolidone (200 mg/kg) administered by crop tube inhibited MAO activities in duodenal mucosa, liver, heart and brain. 3 Furazolidone (200 mg/kg) injected intramuscularly did not inhibit MAO activity in the chicken. 4 Pretreatment of the chickens with intramuscular neomycin did not antagonize the inhibition of MAO activity produced by furazolidone (200 mg/kg, crop tube). 5 Pretreatment with neomycin by crop tube to suppress the alimentary flora significantly reduced the effect of furazolidone on MAO activity, suggesting that the drug was transformed by the alimentary flora to an active metabolite which subsequently inhibited MAO activity in other organs. 6 Furazolidone in the feed (0.04% w/w, 10 days) or administered by crop tube (200 mg/kg) had no effect on the activity of aminopyrine demethylase in chicken liver. 7 The activity of aspartate transaminase in plasma was unaffected by the addition of furazolidone to the feed (0.04% w/w, 10 days).

  10. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Duicu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM. Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1 Control (CTRL, valvular patients without CHD; (2 CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3 CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM.

  11. Monoamine oxidase A is highly expressed in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pei Chuan; Siddiqi, Imran N; Mottok, Anja; Loo, Eric Y; Wu, Chieh Hsi; Cozen, Wendy; Steidl, Christian; Shih, Jean Chen

    2017-10-01

    Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is a mitochondrial enzyme that catalyzes oxidative deamination of neurotransmitters and dietary amines and produces H2 O2 . It facilitates the progression of gliomas and prostate cancer, but its expression and functional relevance have not been studied in lymphoma. Here, we evaluated MAOA in 427 cases of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and in a spectrum of reactive lymphoid tissues by immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens. MAOA was expressed by Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in the majority of classical Hodgkin lymphomas (cHLs) (181/241; 75%), with 34.8% showing strong expression. Weak MAOA was also noted in a minority of primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphomas (8/47; 17%) and in a mediastinal gray-zone lymphoma. In contrast, no MAOA was found in non-neoplastic lymphoid tissues, nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL; 0/8) or any other non-Hodgkin lymphomas studied (0/123). MAOA was more common in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-negative compared to EBV-positive cHL (p Hodgkin-lymphoma-derived cell lines did not. The MAOA inhibitor clorgyline reduced the growth of L1236 cells and U-HO1 cells, and shRNA knockdown of MAOA reduced the growth of L1236 cells. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of MAOA increased the growth of MAOA-negative HDLM2 cells. Combined treatment with clorgyline and ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) was more effective in reducing cell growth than either regimen alone. In summary, MAOA is highly expressed in cHL and may reflect the distinct biology of this lymphoma. Further studies on the potential utility of MAOA as a diagnostic marker and therapeutic target are warranted. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Mesocorticolimbic monoamine correlates of methamphetamine sensitization and motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D Lominac

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (MA is a highly addictive psychomotor stimulant, with life-time prevalence rates of abuse ranging from 5-10% world-wide. Yet, a paucity of research exists regarding MA addiction vulnerability/resiliency and neurobiological mediators of the transition to addiction that might occur upon repeated low-dose MA exposure, more characteristic of early drug use. As stimulant-elicited neuroplasticity within dopamine neurons innervating the nucleus accumbens (NAC and prefrontal cortex (PFC is theorized as central for addiction-related behavioral anomalies, we used a multi-disciplinary research approach in mice to examine the interactions between sub-toxic MA dosing, motivation for MA and mesocorticolimbic monoamines. Biochemical studies of C57BL/6J (B6 mice revealed short- (1 day, as well as longer-term (21 days, changes in extracellular dopamine, DAT and/or D2 receptors during withdrawal from 10, once daily, 2 mg/kg MA injections. Follow-up biochemical studies conducted in mice selectively bred for high versus low MA drinking (respectively, MAHDR vs. MALDR mice, provided novel support for anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine as a correlate of genetic vulnerability to high MA intake. Finally, neuropharmacological targeting of NAC dopamine in MA-treated B6 mice demonstrated a bi-directional regulation of MA-induced place-conditioning. These results extend extant literature for MA neurotoxicity by demonstrating that even subchronic exposure to relatively low MA doses are sufficient to elicit relatively long-lasting changes in mesocorticolimbic dopamine and that drug-induced or idiopathic anomalies in mesocorticolimbic dopamine may underpin vulnerability/resiliency to MA addiction.

  13. 3-Coumaranone derivatives as inhibitors of monoamine oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Dyk AS

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Adriaan S Van Dyk,1,2 Jacobus P Petzer,1,2 Anél Petzer,1 Lesetja J Legoabe1 1Centre of Excellence for Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Pharmaceutical Chemistry, School of Pharmacy, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa Abstract: The present study examines the monoamine oxidase (MAO inhibitory properties of a series of 20 3-coumaranone [benzofuran-3(2H-one] derivatives. The 3-coumaranone derivatives are structurally related to series of α-tetralone and 1-indanone derivatives, which have recently been shown to potently inhibit MAO, with selectivity for MAO-B (in preference to the MAO-A isoform. 3-Coumaranones are similarly found to selectively inhibit human MAO-B with half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.004–1.05 µM. Nine compounds exhibited IC50<0.05 µM for the inhibition of MAO-B. For the inhibition of human MAO-A, IC50 values ranged from 0.586 to >100 µM, with only one compound possessing an IC50<1 µM. For selected 3-coumaranone derivatives, it is established that MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition are reversible since dialysis of enzyme–inhibitor mixtures almost completely restores enzyme activity. On the basis of the selectivity profiles and potent action, it may be concluded that the 3-coumaranone derivatives are suitable leads for the development of selective MAO-B inhibitors as potential treatment for disorders such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Keywords: benzofuran-3(2H-one, MAO, inhibition, reversible, competitive, Parkinson’s disease 

  14. The inhibition of monoamine oxidase by phenformin and pentamidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkhuizen, M; Petzer, A; Petzer, J P

    2014-09-01

    A computational study has suggested that phenformin, an oral hypoglycaemic drug, may bind to the active sites of the monoamine oxidase (MAO) A and B enzymes. The present study therefore investigates the MAO inhibitory properties of phenformin. Pentamidine, a structurally related diamidine compound, has previously been reported to be a MAO inhibitor and was included in this study as a reference compound. Using recombinant human MAO-A and MAO-B, this study finds that phenformin acts as a moderately potent MAO-A selective inhibitor with an IC50 value of 41 µM. Pentamidine, on the other hand, potently inhibits both MAO-A and MAO-B with IC50 values of 0.61 μM and 0.22 μM, respectively. An examination of the recoveries of the enzymatic activities after dilution and dialysis of the enzyme-inhibitor complexes shows that both compounds interact reversibly with the MAO enzymes. A kinetic analysis suggests that pentamidine acts as a competitive inhibitor with estimated Ki values of 0.41 μM and 0.22 μM for the inhibition of MAO-A and MAO-B, respectively. Phenformin also exhibited a competitive mode of MAO-A inhibition with an estimated Ki value of 65 µM. This study concludes that biguanide and amidine functional groups are most likely important structural features for the inhibition of the MAOs by phenformin and pentamidine, and compounds containing these and closely related functional groups should be considered as potential MAO inhibitors. Furthermore, the biguanide and amidine functional groups may act as useful moieties in the future design of MAO inhibitors.

  15. A survey of prescribing practices for monoamine oxidase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balon, R; Mufti, R; Arfken, C L

    1999-07-01

    A survey examined prescribing practices for monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and explored reasons for the widely noted decline in their use. A one-page questionnaire was sent in 1997 to 1,129 members of the Michigan Psychiatric Association. A total of 717 responses were received, for a response rate of 64 percent. Only data from the 573 psychiatrists who were currently practicing were used. Twelve percent of the respondents never prescribed MAOIs, 27 percent had not prescribed them for at least three years, and 17 percent had prescribed them from one to three years ago. Thirty percent of the respondents had prescribed an MAOI within the past three months, and 14 percent between three and 12 months ago. The most frequent reasons for not prescribing the drugs were side effects and interactions with other medications (46 percent), preference for other medications (30 percent), and dietary restrictions necessary for patients taking MAOIs (19 percent). Ninety-two percent of respondents believed that MAOIs were useful for atypical depression, 64 percent for major depression, 54 percent for melancholic depression, 56 percent for panic disorder, 44 percent for social phobia, 27 percent for dysthymia, 12 percent for obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 19 percent for posttraumatic stress disorder. However, only 2 percent said they would use MAOIs as their first-line treatment in atypical depression, and only 3 percent would use them a first-line treatment in social phobia. The results document the commonly held view that practicing psychiatrists believe MAOIs are efficacious but use them infrequently, primarily due to concerns about side effects and drug interactions.

  16. Have Changes in Systemic Treatment Improved Survival in Patients with Breast Cancer Metastatic to the Brain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carsten Nieder

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Newly developed systemic treatment regimens might lead to improved survival also in the subgroup of breast cancer patients that harbour brain metastases. In order to examine this hypothesis, a matched pairs analysis was performed that involved one group of patients, which were treated after these new drugs were introduced, and one group of patients, which were treated approximately 10 years earlier. The two groups were well balanced for the known prognostic factors age, KPS, extracranial disease status, and recursive partitioning analysis class, as well as for the extent of brain treatment. The results show that the use of systemic chemotherapy has increased over time, both before and after the diagnosis of brain metastases. However, such treatment was performed nearly exclusively in those patients with brain metastases that belonged to the prognostically more favourable groups. Survival after whole-brain radiotherapy has remained unchanged in patients without further active treatment. It has improved in prognostically better patients and especially patients that received active treatment, where the 1-year survival rates have almost doubled. As these patient groups were small, confirmation of the results in other series should be attempted. Nevertheless, the present results are compatible with the hypothesis that improved systemic therapy might contribute to prolonged survival in patients with brain metastases from breast cancer.

  17. Effect of ethanol on enkephalinergic opioid system of rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyayev, N.A.; Balakireva, N.N.; Brusov, O.S.; Panchenko, L.F.

    1983-10-13

    Specific binding of /sup 3/H-morphine and /sup 3/H-(D-Ala/sup 2/, D-Leu/sup 5/)-enkephalin (H-EN) with opiatic receptors was studied on white rats along with the content of Met- and Leu-enkephalin and the activity of enkephalinase in various brain segments after single dose (20% solution in 0.9% NaCl, IP; 1.5-4.5 g/kg body weight) and chronic injection (20% EtOH substituted for drinking water) of ethanol. The single injection of EtOH (1.5-4.5 g/kg) resulted in a depression of the specific binding of H-EN with opiate receptors. Doses of 1.5 and 2.5 g/kg led to a lower content of Leu-enkephalin in mid-brain but to an increase of Met-enkephalin; the 4.5 g/kg dose had no effect on the striatum. With chronic administration of EtOH, most of the values obtained on the experimental animals were similar to the control data. 23 references.

  18. A kinome wide screen identifies novel kinases involved in regulation of monoamine transporter function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorenpää, Anne Elina; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Jorgensen, Trine N.

    2016-01-01

    cells (CAD) and rat chromocytoma (PC12) cells. Whereas SIK3 likely transcriptionally regulated expression of the three transfected transporters, depletion of PKA C-α was shown to decrease SERT function. Depletion of PrKX caused decreased surface expression and function of DAT without changing protein...... levels, suggesting that PrKX stabilizes the transporter at the cell surface. Summarized, our data provide novel insight into kinome regulation of the monoamine transporters and identifies PrKX as a yet unappreciated possible regulator of monoamine transporter function....... in regulation of monoamine transporter function and surface expression. A primary screen in HEK 293 cells stably expressing DAT or SERT with siRNAs against 573 human kinases revealed 93 kinases putatively regulating transporter function. All 93 hits, which also included kinases previously implicated...

  19. Suppression of Brain Mast Cells Degranulation Inhibits Microglial Activation and Central Nervous System Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yiming; Zhou, Xiqiao; Qian, Yanning; Zhang, Shu

    2017-03-01

    Brain inflammation has a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, play an important role in brain inflammation, while brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury rather than microglia. Functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrated that site-directed injection of the "mast cell degranulator" compound 48/80 (C48/80) in the hypothalamus induced mast cell degranulation, microglial activation, and inflammatory factor production, which initiated the acute brain inflammatory response. "Mast cell stabilizer" disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn) inhibited this effect, including decrease of inflammatory cytokines, reduced microglial activation, inhibition of MAPK and AKT pathways, and repression of protein expression of histamine receptor 1 (H1R), histamine receptor 4 (H4R), protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in microglia. We also demonstrated that C48/80 had no effect on microglial activation in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. These results implicate that activated brain mast cells trigger microglial activation and stabilization of mast cell inhibits microglial activation-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS immune inflammation-related diseases.

  20. Report: Central nervous system (CNS) toxicity caused by metal poisoning: Brain as a target organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilani, Syeda Rubina; Zaidi, Syed Raza Ali; Batool, Madeeha; Bhatti, Amanat Ali; Durrani, Arjumand Iqbal; Mahmood, Zaid

    2015-07-01

    People relate the neural disorders with either inheritance or psychological violence but there might be some other reasons responsible for the ailment of people that do not have such a background. The present study explains the chronic effect of heavy toxic metals on nervous system. During experimentation, rabbits used as laboratory animals, were given test metals in their diet. Concentration of metals given to them in the diet was less than their tolerable dietary intake. Behavioral changes were observed during experimentation. Periodic increase in the metal concentration was seen in the blood sample of rabbits. They were slaughtered after a period of eight months of slow poisoning. Histological examination of brain tissues was performed. The brain samples were analyzed by Atomic absorption spectroscopy and Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry to find the retention of heavy metals in mammalian brain. Concentration of lead, mercury and cadmium in the blood samples of occupationally exposed people and patients with neurological disorders at the time of neurosurgery was determined by using the same techniques. During circulation, toxic metals passes through the nerve capillaries to settle down in the brain. Heavy metals cross the blood brain barrier and 'may retain themselves in it. Brain tumors and biopsy samples of patients with neurological disorder were also analyzed to relate neurotoxicity and heavy metal poisoning. Results obtained shows that lead, mercury and cadmium retain themselves in the brain for longer period of time and are one of the causes of neurotoxicity.

  1. The histaminergic system in the brain: structural characteristics and changes in hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panula, P; Karlstedt, K; Sallmen, T; Peitsaro, N; Kaslin, J; Michelsen, K A; Anichtchik, O; Kukko-Lukjanov, T; Lintunen, M

    2000-02-01

    Histaminergic neurons in adult vertebrate brain are confined to the posterior hypothalamic area, where they are comprised of scattered groups of neurons referred to as the tuberomammillary nucleus. Histamine regulates hormonal functions, sleep, food intake, thermoregulation and locomotor activity, for example. In the zebrafish, Danio rerio, histamine was detected only in the brain, where also the histamine synthesizing enzyme L-histidine decarboxylase (HDC) was expressed. It is possible that histamine has first evolved as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We established sensitive quantitative in situ hybridization methods for histamine H(1) and H(2) receptors and HDC, to study the modulation of brain histaminergic system under pathophysiological conditions. A transient increase in H(1) receptor expression was seen in the dentate gyrus and striatum after a single injection of kainic acid, a glutamate analog. H(1) antagonists are known to increase duration of convulsions, and increased brain histamine is associated with reduced convulsions in animal models of epilepsy. No HDC mRNA was detected in brain vessels by in situ hybridization, which suggests lack of histamine synthesis by brain endothelial cells. This was verified by lack of HDC mRNA in a rat brain endothelial cell line, RBE4 cells. Both H(1) and H(2) receptor mRNA was found in this cell line, and the expression of both receptors was downregulated by dexamethasone. The findings are in agreement with the concept that histamine regulates blood-brain barrier permeability through H(1) and H(2) receptor mediated mechanisms. Hibernation is characterized by a drastic reduction of central functions. The activity of most transmitter systems is maintained at a very low level. Surprisingly, histamine levels and turnover were clearly elevated in hibernating ground squirrels, and the density of histamine-containing fibers was higher than in euthermic animals. It is possible that histamine actively

  2. The Ventricular System of the Brain: Anatomy and Normal Variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratchko, Lindsay; Filatova, Irina; Agarwal, Amit; Kanekar, Sangam

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral ventricular system is intimately associated with the forebrain and brainstem. The ventricular system functions to produce and circulate cerebrospinal fluid, which plays an important role in mechanical protection and regulation of homeostasis in the central nervous system. This article discusses anatomy and neuroimaging of the ventricular system and highlights normal anatomical variations that may be mistaken for pathology. Applied surgical anatomy is reviewed with emphasis on operative approach and potential risk to adjacent central nervous system structures.

  3. Complex Dynamics in Physiological Systems: From Heart to Brain

    CERN Document Server

    Dana, Syamal K; Kurths, Jürgen

    2009-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics has become an important field of research in recent years in many areas of the natural sciences. In particular, it has potential applications in biology and medicine; nonlinear data analysis has helped to detect the progress of cardiac disease, physiological disorders, for example episodes of epilepsy, and others. This book focuses on the current trends of research concerning the prediction of sudden cardiac death and the onset of epileptic seizures, using the nonlinear analysis based on ECG and EEG data. Topics covered include the analysis of cardiac models and neural models. The book is a collection of recent research papers by leading physicists, mathematicians, cardiologists and neurobiologists who are actively involved in using the concepts of nonlinear dynamics to explore the functional behaviours of heart and brain under normal and pathological conditions. This collection is intended for students in physics, mathematics and medical sciences, and researchers in interdisciplinary areas...

  4. An ultrahigh resolution SPECT system for I-125 mouse brain imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, L.J. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States)], E-mail: ljmeng@umich.edu; Fu, G. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States); Roy, E.J.; Suppe, B. [Department of Pathology, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (United States); Chen, C.T. [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago (United States)

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents some initial experimental results obtained with a dual-head prototype single photon emission microscope system (SPEM) that is dedicated to mouse brain studies using I-125 labeled radiotracers. In particular, this system will be used for in vivo tacking of radiolabeled T cells in mouse brain. This system is based on the use of the intensified electron multiplying charge-coupled device (I-EMCCD) camera that offers the combination of an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution, a good signal-to-noise ratio, a large active area and a reasonable detection efficiency over an energy range between 27-140 keV. In this study, the dual-head SPEM system was evaluated using both resolution phantoms and a mouse with locally injected T cells labeled with I-125. It was demonstrated that for a relatively concentrated source object, the current dual-head SPEM system is capable of visualizing the tiny amount of radioactivity ({approx}12 nCi) carried by a very small number (<1000) of T cells. The current SPEM system design allows four or six camera heads to be installed in a stationary system configuration that offers a doubled or tripled sensitivity at a spatial resolution similar to that obtained with the dual-head system. This development would provide a powerful tool for in vivo and non-invasive tracking of radiolabeled T cells in mouse brain and potentially for other rodent brain imaging studies.

  5. An ultrahigh resolution SPECT system for I-125 mouse brain imaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, L. J.; Fu, G.; Roy, E. J.; Suppe, B.; Chen, C. T.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents some initial experimental results obtained with a dual-head prototype single photon emission microscope system (SPEM) that is dedicated to mouse brain studies using I-125 labeled radiotracers. In particular, this system will be used for in vivo tacking of radiolabeled T cells in mouse brain. This system is based on the use of the intensified electron multiplying charge-coupled device (I-EMCCD) camera that offers the combination of an excellent intrinsic spatial resolution, a good signal-to-noise ratio, a large active area and a reasonable detection efficiency over an energy range between 27-140 keV. In this study, the dual-head SPEM system was evaluated using both resolution phantoms and a mouse with locally injected T cells labeled with I-125. It was demonstrated that for a relatively concentrated source object, the current dual-head SPEM system is capable of visualizing the tiny amount of radioactivity (˜12 nCi) carried by a very small number (<1000) of T cells. The current SPEM system design allows four or six camera heads to be installed in a stationary system configuration that offers a doubled or tripled sensitivity at a spatial resolution similar to that obtained with the dual-head system. This development would provide a powerful tool for in vivo and non-invasive tracking of radiolabeled T cells in mouse brain and potentially for other rodent brain imaging studies.

  6. Compensatory strategies for acquired disorders of memory and planning: differential effects of a paging system for patients with brain injury of traumatic versus cerebrovascular aetiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fish, J; Manly, T; Emslie, H; Evans, J J; Wilson, B A

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of paging systems in compensating for everyday memory and planning problems after brain injury, including in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI...

  7. Discovery of New Chemical Entities for Old Targets: Insights on the Lead Optimization of Chromone-Based Monoamine Oxidase B (MAO-B) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Joana; Cagide, Fernando; Chavarria, Daniel; Silva, Tiago; Fernandes, Carlos; Gaspar, Alexandra; Uriarte, Eugenio; Remião, Fernando; Alcaro, Stefano; Ortuso, Francesco; Borges, Fernanda

    2016-06-23

    The discovery of new chemical entities endowed with potent, selective, and reversible monoamine oxidase B inhibitory activity is a clinically relevant subject. Therefore, a small library of chromone derivatives was synthesized and screened toward human monoamine oxidase isoforms (hMAO-A and hMAO-B). The structure-activity relationships studies strengthen the importance of the amide spacer and the direct linkage of carbonyl group to the γ-pyrone ring, along with the presence of meta and para substituents in the exocyclic ring. The most potent MAO-B inhibitors were N-(3'-chlorophenyl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-3-carboxamide (20) (IC50 = 403 pM) and N-(3',4'-dimethylphenyl)-4-oxo-4H-chromene-3-carboxamide (27) (IC50 = 669 pM), acting as competitive and noncompetitive reversible inhibitors, respectively. Computational docking studies provided insights into enzyme-inhibitor interactions and a rationale for the observed selectivity and potency. Compound 27 stands out due to its favorable toxicological profile and physicochemical properties, which pointed toward blood-brain barrier permeability, thus being a valid candidate for subsequent animal studies.

  8. A High-Resolution In Vivo Atlas of the Human Brain's Serotonin System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliveau, Vincent; Ganz, Melanie; Feng, Ling; Ozenne, Brice; Højgaard, Liselotte; Fisher, Patrick M; Svarer, Claus; Greve, Douglas N; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-01-04

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) system modulates many important brain functions and is critically involved in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, we present a high-resolution, multidimensional, in vivo atlas of four of the human brain's 5-HT receptors (5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT4) and the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT). The atlas is created from molecular and structural high-resolution neuroimaging data consisting of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans acquired in a total of 210 healthy individuals. Comparison of the regional PET binding measures with postmortem human brain autoradiography outcomes showed a high correlation for the five 5-HT targets and this enabled us to transform the atlas to represent protein densities (in picomoles per milliliter). We also assessed the regional association between protein concentration and mRNA expression in the human brain by comparing the 5-HT density across the atlas with data from the Allen Human Brain atlas and identified receptor- and transporter-specific associations that show the regional relation between the two measures. Together, these data provide unparalleled insight into the serotonin system of the human brain.

  9. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Hee [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E. [Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Lee, Yong Woo, E-mail: ywlee@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  10. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses. PMID:27651759

  11. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes:understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kjell Fuxe; Dasiel O Borroto-Escuela

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neu-rons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular lfuid and the cerebral spinal lfuid through diffusion and lfow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume trans-mission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  12. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjell Fuxe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  13. Volume transmission and receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes: understanding the role of new concepts for brain communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuxe, Kjell; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel O

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of the central monoamine neurons not only demonstrated novel types of brain stem neurons forming global terminal networks all over the brain and the spinal cord, but also to a novel type of communication called volume transmission. It is a major mode of communication in the central nervous system that takes places in the extracellular fluid and the cerebral spinal fluid through diffusion and flow of molecules, like neurotransmitters and extracellular vesicles. The integration of synaptic and volume transmission takes place through allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in heteroreceptor complexes. These heterocomplexes represent major integrator centres in the plasma membrane and their protomers act as moonlighting proteins undergoing dynamic changes and their structure and function. In fact, we propose that the molecular bases of learning and memory can be based on the reorganization of multiples homo and heteroreceptor complexes into novel assembles in the post-junctional membranes of synapses.

  14. Homeostasis of Microglia in the Adult Brain: Review of Novel Microglia Depletion Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisman, Ari; Ginhoux, Florent; Greter, Melanie; Bruttger, Julia

    2015-10-01

    Microglia are brain macrophages that emerge from early erythro-myeloid precursors in the embryonic yolk sac and migrate to the brain mesenchyme before the blood brain barrier is formed. They seed the brain, and proliferate until they have formed a grid-like distribution in the central nervous system that is maintained throughout lifespan. The mechanisms through which these embryonic-derived cells contribute to microglia homoeostasis at steady state and upon inflammation are still not entirely clear. Here we review recent studies that provided insight into the contribution of embryonically-derived microglia and of adult 'microglia-like' cells derived from monocytes during inflammation. We examine different microglia depletion models, and discuss the origin of their rapid repopulation after depletion and outline important areas of future research.

  15. Hierarchical random cellular neural networks for system-level brain-like signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Robert; Puljic, Marko

    2013-09-01

    Sensory information processing and cognition in brains are modeled using dynamic systems theory. The brain's dynamic state is described by a trajectory evolving in a high-dimensional state space. We introduce a hierarchy of random cellular automata as the mathematical tools to describe the spatio-temporal dynamics of the cortex. The corresponding brain model is called neuropercolation which has distinct advantages compared to traditional models using differential equations, especially in describing spatio-temporal discontinuities in the form of phase transitions. Phase transitions demarcate singularities in brain operations at critical conditions, which are viewed as hallmarks of higher cognition and awareness experience. The introduced Monte-Carlo simulations obtained by parallel computing point to the importance of computer implementations using very large-scale integration (VLSI) and analog platforms.

  16. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  17. A portable near infrared spectroscopy system for bedside monitoring of newborn brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosen Harel

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newborns with critical health conditions are monitored in neonatal intensive care units (NICU. In NICU, one of the most important problems that they face is the risk of brain injury. There is a need for continuous monitoring of newborn's brain function to prevent any potential brain injury. This type of monitoring should not interfere with intensive care of the newborn. Therefore, it should be non-invasive and portable. Methods In this paper, a low-cost, battery operated, dual wavelength, continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy system for continuous bedside hemodynamic monitoring of neonatal brain is presented. The system has been designed to optimize SNR by optimizing the wavelength-multiplexing parameters with special emphasis on safety issues concerning burn injuries. SNR improvement by utilizing the entire dynamic range has been satisfied with modifications in analog circuitry. Results and Conclusion As a result, a shot-limited SNR of 67 dB has been achieved for 10 Hz temporal resolution. The system can operate more than 30 hours without recharging when an off-the-shelf 1850 mAh-7.2 V battery is used. Laboratory tests with optical phantoms and preliminary data recorded in NICU demonstrate the potential of the system as a reliable clinical tool to be employed in the bedside regional monitoring of newborn brain metabolism under intensive care.

  18. Automatic Incubator-type Temperature Control System for Brain Hypothermia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaohua, Lu; Wakamatsu, Hidetoshi

    An automatic air-cooling incubator is proposed to replace the manual water-cooling blanket to control the brain tissue temperature for brain hypothermia treatment. Its feasibility is theoretically discussed as follows: First, an adult patient with the cooling incubator is modeled as a linear dynamical patient-incubator biothermal system. The patient is represented by an 18-compartment structure and described by its state equations. The air-cooling incubator provides almost same cooling effect as the water-cooling blanket, if a light breeze of speed around 3 m/s is circulated in the incubator. Then, in order to control the brain temperature automatically, an adaptive-optimal control algorithm is adopted, while the patient-blanket therapeutic system is considered as a reference model. Finally, the brain temperature of the patient-incubator biothermal system is controlled to follow up the given reference temperature course, in which an adaptive algorithm is confirmed useful for unknown environmental change and/or metabolic rate change of the patient in the incubating system. Thus, the present work ensures the development of the automatic air-cooling incubator for a better temperature regulation of the brain hypothermia treatment in ICU.

  19. Analysis of structure-function network decoupling in the brain systems of spastic diplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongha; Pae, Chongwon; Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Eun Sook; Cho, Sung-Rae; Um, Min-Hee; Lee, Seung-Koo; Oh, Maeng-Keun; Park, Hae-Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Manifestation of the functionalities from the structural brain network is becoming increasingly important to understand a brain disease. With the aim of investigating the differential structure-function couplings according to network systems, we investigated the structural and functional brain networks of patients with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy with periventricular leukomalacia compared to healthy controls. The structural and functional networks of the whole brain and motor system, constructed using deterministic and probabilistic tractography of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images and Pearson and partial correlation analyses of resting-state functional magnetic resonance images, showed differential embedding of functional networks in the structural networks in patients. In the whole-brain network of patients, significantly reduced global network efficiency compared to healthy controls were found in the structural networks but not in the functional networks, resulting in reduced structural-functional coupling. On the contrary, the motor network of patients had a significantly lower functional network efficiency over the intact structural network and a lower structure-function coupling than the control group. This reduced coupling but reverse directionality in the whole-brain and motor networks of patients was prominent particularly between the probabilistic structural and partial correlation-based functional networks. Intact (or less deficient) functional network over impaired structural networks of the whole brain and highly impaired functional network topology over the intact structural motor network might subserve relatively preserved cognitions and impaired motor functions in cerebral palsy. This study suggests that the structure-function relationship, evaluated specifically using sparse functional connectivity, may reveal important clues to functional reorganization in cerebral palsy. Hum Brain Mapp 38:5292-5306, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals

  20. Neuropsychological measures of attention and memory function in schizophrenia: relationships with symptom dimensions and serum monoamine activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Uwe

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some clinical symptoms or cognitive functions have been related to the overall state of monoamine activity in patients with schizophrenia, (e.g. inverse correlation of the dopamine metabolite HVA with delusions or visual-masking performance. However, profiles (as presented here of the relations of the activity of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin to neuropsychologic (dysfunctions in major patient sub-groups with their very different symptomatic and cognitive characteristics have not been reported. Methods Serum measures of dopamine, noradrenaline and serotonin turnover were examined by regression analyses for the prediction of performance on 10 neuropsychological measures reflecting left- and right-hemispheric and frontal-, parietal- and temporal-lobe function in 108 patients with schizophrenia and 63 matched controls. The neuropsychological battery included tests of verbal fluency, Stroop interference, trail-making, block-design, Mooney faces recognition, picture-completion, immediate and delayed visual and verbal recall. Paranoid and nonparanoid subgroups were based on ratings from the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS. Groups with high and low ratings of ideas-of-reference and thought-disorder were formed from a median split on the Scale for Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS. Results Verbal-fluency and Stroop-interference (left frontal and fronto-cingulate function were negatively associated with noradrenergic turnover in nonparanoid and thought-disordered patients. High dopamine turnover related to speeded trail-making (frontal modulation of set switching in those with many ideas-of-reference. In contrast, low dopamine turnover predicted poor recall in nonparanoid patients and those with little thought disorder. Serotonin metabolism did not independently contribute to the prediction any measure of cognitive performance. But, with regard to the relative activity between monoaminergic systems, increased

  1. Lipopolysaccharide increases degradation of central monoamines: an in vivo microdialysis study in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heesch, Floor; Prins, Jolanda; Konsman, Jan Pieter; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Westphal, Koen G C; Rybka, Joanna; Olivier, Berend; Kraneveld, Aletta D; Korte, S Mechiel

    2014-02-15

    Peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in rodents induces anhedonia, i.e. the inability to experience pleasure. Recently, we reported that serotonin transporter (SERT) function is required for LPS-induced anhedonia. Less is known about the effect of LPS on the biological activity of dopamine transporters (DAT) and norepinephrine transporters (NET). Therefore, in vivo microdialysis was performed in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex of C57BL6/J mice exposed to saline or LPS (133 µg/kg i.p.). To investigate the possible involvement of different monoamine transporters, the triple reuptake inhibitor DOV 216,303 or saline was i.p. injected 30 min before the saline/LPS injection. The dose of LPS, shown to decrease responding for brain stimulation reward in mice, significantly increased extracellular levels of monoamine metabolites (5-HIAA, DOPAC and HVA) in the nucleus accumbens and medial prefrontal cortex. Remarkably, DOV 216,303 abolished LPS-induced DOPAC and HVA formation in the nucleus accumbens, suggesting that LPS increases DAT activity in this brain area. DOV 216,303 also inhibited LPS-induced DOPAC and HVA formation in the medial prefrontal cortex. Since DAT density is very low in this brain structure, reuptake of DA predominantly takes place via NET, suggesting that LPS increases DAT and NET activity in the medial prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, DOV 216,303 pretreatment prevented LPS-induced 5-HIAA formation only in the medial prefrontal cortex, indicating that LPS increases prefrontal SERT activity. In conclusion, the present findings suggest that peripheral LPS increases DAT activity in the nucleus accumbens and increases NET and SERT activity in the medial prefrontal cortex of mice.

  2. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... related to changes in the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the nervous system. When the brain cannot ... their final destination. Chemical signals from other cells guide neurons in forming various brain structures. Neighboring neurons ...

  3. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  4. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the brain cannot effectively coordinate the billions of cells in the body, the results can affect many ... unit of the brain and nervous system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting ...

  5. Brain Basics

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... healthy people, and how normal brain development and function can go awry, leading to mental illnesses. Brain ... system. These cells are highly specialized for the function of conducting messages. A neuron has three basic ...

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor as a regulator of systemic and brain energy metabolism and cardiovascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Sarah M; Griffioen, Kathleen J; Wan, Ruiqian; Mattson, Mark P

    2012-08-01

    Overweight sedentary individuals are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and some neurological disorders. Beneficial effects of dietary energy restriction (DER) and exercise on brain structural plasticity and behaviors have been demonstrated in animal models of aging and acute (stroke and trauma) and chronic (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases) neurological disorders. The findings described later, and evolutionary considerations, suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in the integration and optimization of behavioral and metabolic responses to environments with limited energy resources and intense competition. In particular, BDNF signaling mediates adaptive responses of the central, autonomic, and peripheral nervous systems from exercise and DER. In the hypothalamus, BDNF inhibits food intake and increases energy expenditure. By promoting synaptic plasticity and neurogenesis in the hippocampus, BDNF mediates exercise- and DER-induced improvements in cognitive function and neuroprotection. DER improves cardiovascular stress adaptation by a mechanism involving enhancement of brainstem cholinergic activity. Collectively, findings reviewed in this paper provide a rationale for targeting BDNF signaling for novel therapeutic interventions in a range of metabolic and neurological disorders.

  7. The Smartphone Brain Scanner: A Portable Real-Time Neuroimaging System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stopczynski, Arkadiusz; Stahlhut, Carsten; Larsen, Jakob Eg

    2014-01-01

    Combining low-cost wireless EEG sensors with smartphones offers novel opportunities for mobile brain imaging in an everyday context. Here we present the technical details and validation of a framework for building multi-platform, portable EEG applications with real-time 3D source reconstruction....... The system – Smartphone Brain Scanner – combines an off-the-shelf neuroheadset or EEG cap with a smartphone or tablet, and as such represents the first fully portable system for real-time 3D EEG imaging. We discuss the benefits and challenges, including technical limitations as well as details of real...

  8. A map of brain neuropils and fiber systems in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris eBressan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A wide spectrum of occupied ecological niches and spectacular morphological adaptations make social insects a prime object for comparative neuroanatomical studies. Eusocial insects have evolved complex societies based on caste polyphenism. A diverse behavioral repertoire of morphologically distinct castes of the same species requires a high degree of plasticity in the central nervous system. We have analyzed the central brain neuropils and fiber tract systems of the worker of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior, a model for the study of social traits. Our analysis is based on whole mount preparations of adult brains labeled with an antibody against Drosophila-Synapsin, which cross-reacts strongly with synapses in Cardiocondyla. Neuropil compartments stand out as domains with a certain texture and intensity of the anti-Synapsin signal. By contrast, fiber tracts, which are composed of bundles of axons accompanied by glia and are devoid of synapses, appear as channels or sheaths with low anti-Synapsin signal. We have generated a digital 3D atlas of the Cardiocondyla brain neuropil. The atlas provides a reference for future studies of brain polymorphisms in distinct castes, brain development or localization of neurotransmitter systems.

  9. Immune System in the Brain: A Modulatory Role on Dendritic Spine Morphophysiology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Kurt Bitzer-Quintero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The central nervous system is closely linked to the immune system at several levels. The brain parenchyma is separated from the periphery by the blood brain barrier, which under normal conditions prevents the entry of mediators such as activated leukocytes, antibodies, complement factors, and cytokines. The myeloid cell lineage plays a crucial role in the development of immune responses at the central level, and it comprises two main subtypes: (1 resident microglia, distributed throughout the brain parenchyma; (2 perivascular macrophages located in the brain capillaries of the basal lamina and the choroid plexus. In addition, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, endothelial cells, and, to a lesser extent, neurons are implicated in the immune response in the central nervous system. By modulating synaptogenesis, microglia are most specifically involved in restoring neuronal connectivity following injury. These cells release immune mediators, such as cytokines, that modulate synaptic transmission and that alter the morphology of dendritic spines during the inflammatory process following injury. Thus, the expression and release of immune mediators in the brain parenchyma are closely linked to plastic morphophysiological changes in neuronal dendritic spines. Based on these observations, it has been proposed that these immune mediators are also implicated in learning and memory processes.

  10. Pediatric respiratory and systemic effects of chronic air pollution exposure: nose, lung, heart, and brain pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Henriquez-Roldán, Carlos; Barragán-Mejía, Gerardo; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderón, Rafael; Reed, William

    2007-01-01

    Exposures to particulate matter and gaseous air pollutants have been associated with respiratory tract inflammation, disruption of the nasal respiratory and olfactory barriers, systemic inflammation, production of mediators of inflammation capable of reaching the brain and systemic circulation of particulate matter. Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to significant amounts of ozone, particulate matter and associated lipopolysaccharides. MC dogs exhibit brain inflammation and an acceleration of Alzheimer's-like pathology, suggesting that the brain is adversely affected by air pollutants. MC children, adolescents and adults have a significant upregulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) in olfactory bulb and frontal cortex, as well as neuronal and astrocytic accumulation of the 42 amino acid form of beta -amyloid peptide (Abeta 42), including diffuse amyloid plaques in frontal cortex. The pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by brain inflammation and the accumulation of Abeta 42, which precede the appearance of neuritic plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, the pathological hallmarks of AD. Our findings of nasal barrier disruption, systemic inflammation, and the upregulation of COX2 and IL-1beta expression and Abeta 42 accumulation in brain suggests that sustained exposures to significant concentrations of air pollutants such as particulate matter could be a risk factor for AD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Organization of the histaminergic system in the brain of the turtle Chinemys reevesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, N; Panula, P; Yamatodani, A; Wada, H

    1990-07-01

    To accumulate phylogenetic information on the central histaminergic system, we investigated the histaminergic system in the brain of the Reeves turtle, Chinemys reevesii, using the indirect immunofluorescent method with antiserum against histamine. Histaminergic neuronal cell bodies were found exclusively in the posterior part of the ventral hypothalamus. Histaminergic varicose fibers innervated almost all parts of the turtle brain, but tended to be concentrated in several areas. Very dense innervation was observed in the medial part of the telencephalon, ventrolateral part of the hypothalamus, nucleus habenularis lateralis, and ventromedial part of the tegmentum. Medium density of innervation was seen in the olfactory bulb, nucleus medialis amygdalae, and tectum. Only a few fibers were detected in the lateral part of the telencephalon, dorsal part of the hypothalamus, thalamus, rhombencephalon, and spinal cord. The main ascending fibers were observed in the lateral part of the hypothalamus, sending dense fiber bundles to the cortices dorsomedialis and medialis and nucleus habenularis lateralis. Descending fibers appeared to run in the ventral tegmental area, passing through the dorsal and ventral parts of the midline of the brain stem to the spinal cord. These findings indicate that the general morphological features of the histaminergic system in the turtle brain are similar to those in the mammalian and frog brains.

  12. Stemming the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa: a systemic review of policy options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Zimbudzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Africa has been losing professionally trained health workers who are the core of the health system of this continent for many years. Faced with an increased burden of disease and coupled by a massive exodus of the health workforce, the health systems of many African nations are risking complete paralysis. Several studies have suggested policy options to reduce brain drain from Africa. The purpose of this paper is to review possible policies, which can stem the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa. A systemic literature review was conducted. Cinahl, Science Direct and PubMed databases were searched with the following terms: health professional brain drain from Africa and policies for reducing impact of brain drain from Africa. References were also browsed for relevant articles. A total of 425 articles were available for the study but only 23 articles met the inclusion criteria. The review identified nine policy options, which were being implemented in Africa, but the most common was task shifting which had success in several African countries. This review has demonstrated that there is considerable consensus on task shifting as the most appropriate and sustainable policy option for reducing the impact of health professional brain drain from Africa.

  13. A fast atlas-guided high density diffuse optical tomography system for brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xianjin; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Hao; Jiang, Huabei

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is an emerging functional brain imaging tool capable of assessing cerebral concentrations of oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) and deoxygenated hemoglobin (HbR) during brain activation noninvasively. As an extension of NIRS, diffuse optical tomography (DOT) not only shares the merits of providing continuous readings of cerebral oxygenation, but also has the ability to provide spatial resolution in the millimeter scale. Based on the scattering and absorption properties of nonionizing near-infrared light in biological tissue, DOT has been successfully applied in the imaging of breast tumors, osteoarthritis and cortex activations. Here, we present a state-of-art fast high density DOT system suitable for brain imaging. It can achieve up to a 21 Hz sampling rate for a full set of two-wavelength data for 3-D DOT brain image reconstruction. The system was validated using tissue-mimicking brain-model phantom. Then, experiments on healthy subjects were conducted to demonstrate the capability of the system.

  14. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  15. A dural lymphatic vascular system that drains brain interstitial fluid and macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspelund, Aleksanteri; Antila, Salli; Proulx, Steven T; Karlsen, Tine Veronica; Karaman, Sinem; Detmar, Michael; Wiig, Helge; Alitalo, Kari

    2015-06-29

    The central nervous system (CNS) is considered an organ devoid of lymphatic vasculature. Yet, part of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drains into the cervical lymph nodes (LNs). The mechanism of CSF entry into the LNs has been unclear. Here we report the surprising finding of a lymphatic vessel network in the dura mater of the mouse brain. We show that dural lymphatic vessels absorb CSF from the adjacent subarachnoid space and brain interstitial fluid (ISF) via the glymphatic system. Dural lymphatic vessels transport fluid into deep cervical LNs (dcLNs) via foramina at the base of the skull. In a transgenic mouse model expressing a VEGF-C/D trap and displaying complete aplasia of the dural lymphatic vessels, macromolecule clearance from the brain was attenuated and transport from the subarachnoid space into dcLNs was abrogated. Surprisingly, brain ISF pressure and water content were unaffected. Overall, these findings indicate that the mechanism of CSF flow into the dcLNs is directly via an adjacent dural lymphatic network, which may be important for the clearance of macromolecules from the brain. Importantly, these results call for a reexamination of the role of the lymphatic system in CNS physiology and disease.

  16. Effects of physical exercise on central nervous system functions: a review of brain region specific adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie A; Corrigan, Frances; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-01-01

    Pathologies of central nervous system (CNS) functions are involved in prevalent conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, and Parkinson's disease. Notable pathologies include dysfunctions of circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, central stress responses, and movement mediated by the basal ganglia. Although evidence suggests exercise may benefit these conditions, the neurobiological mechanisms of exercise in specific brain regions involved in these important CNS functions have yet to be clarified. Here we review murine evidence about the effects of exercise on discrete brain regions involved in important CNS functions. Exercise effects on circadian rhythm, central metabolism, cardiovascular function, stress responses in the brain stem and hypothalamic pituitary axis, and movement are examined. The databases Pubmed, Web of Science, and Embase were searched for articles investigating regional brain adaptations to exercise. Brain regions examined included the brain stem, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. We found evidence of multiple regional adaptations to both forced and voluntary exercise. Exercise can induce molecular adaptations in neuronal function in many instances. Taken together, these findings suggest that the regional physiological adaptations that occur with exercise could constitute a promising field for elucidating molecular and cellular mechanisms of recovery in psychiatric and neurological health conditions.

  17. The evolution of the complex sensory and motor systems of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaas, Jon H

    2008-03-18

    Inferences about how the complex sensory and motor systems of the human brain evolved are based on the results of comparative studies of brain organization across a range of mammalian species, and evidence from the endocasts of fossil skulls of key extinct species. The endocasts of the skulls of early mammals indicate that they had small brains with little neocortex. Evidence from comparative studies of cortical organization from small-brained mammals of the six major branches of mammalian evolution supports the conclusion that the small neocortex of early mammals was divided into roughly 20-25 cortical areas, including primary and secondary sensory fields. In early primates, vision was the dominant sense, and cortical areas associated with vision in temporal and occipital cortex underwent a significant expansion. Comparative studies indicate that early primates had 10 or more visual areas, and somatosensory areas with expanded representations of the forepaw. Posterior parietal cortex was also expanded, with a caudal half dominated by visual inputs, and a rostral half dominated by somatosensory inputs with outputs to an array of seven or more motor and visuomotor areas of the frontal lobe. Somatosensory areas and posterior parietal cortex became further differentiated in early anthropoid primates. As larger brains evolved in early apes and in our hominin ancestors, the number of cortical areas increased to reach an estimated 200 or so in present day humans, and hemispheric specializations emerged. The large human brain grew primarily by increasing neuron number rather than increasing average neuron size.

  18. Mitochondrial quality control systems sustain brain mitochondrial bioenergetics in early stages of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, R X; Correia, S C; Alves, M G; Oliveira, P F; Cardoso, S; Carvalho, C; Seiça, R; Santos, M S; Moreira, P I

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondria have a crucial role in the supply of energy to the brain. Mitochondrial alterations can lead to detrimental consequences on the function of brain cells and are thought to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several neurologic disorders. This study was aimed to evaluate mitochondrial function, fusion-fission and biogenesis and autophagy in brain cortex of 6-month-old Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rats, an animal model of nonobese type 2 diabetes (T2D). No statistically significant alterations were observed in mitochondrial respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation system. A significant decrease in the protein levels of OPA1, a protein that facilitates mitochondrial fusion, was observed in brain cortex of GK rats. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the protein levels of LC3-II and a significant increase in protein levels of mTOR phosphorylated at serine residue 2448 were observed in GK rats suggesting a suppression of autophagy in diabetic brain cortex. No significant alterations were observed in the parameters related to mitochondrial biogenesis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that during the early stages of T2D, brain mitochondrial function is maintained in part due to a delicate balance between mitochondrial fusion-fission and biogenesis and autophagy. However, future studies are warranted to evaluate the role of mitochondrial quality control pathways in late stages of T2D.

  19. One nose, one brain: contribution of the main and accessory olfactory system to chemosensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eMucignat

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The accessory olfactory system is present in most tetrapods. It is involved in the perception of chemical stimuli, being implicated also in the detection of pheromone. However, it is sensitive also to some common odorant molecules, which have no clear implication in intraspecific chemical communication. The accessory olfactory system may complement the main olfactory system, and may contribute different perceptual features to the construction of a unitary representation, which merges the different chemosensory qualities. Crosstalk between the main and accessory olfactory systems occurs at different levels of central processing, in brain areas where the inputs from the two systems converge. Interestingly, centrifugal projections from more caudal brain areas are deeply involved in modulating both main and accessory sensory processing. A high degree of interaction between the two systems may be conceived, and partial overlapping appears to occur in many functions. Therefore, the central chemosensory projections merge inputs from different organs to obtain a complex chemosensory picture.

  20. PLATO: data-oriented approach to collaborative large-scale brain system modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannon, Takayuki; Inagaki, Keiichiro; Kamiji, Nilton L; Makimura, Kouji; Usui, Shiro

    2011-11-01

    The brain is a complex information processing system, which can be divided into sub-systems, such as the sensory organs, functional areas in the cortex, and motor control systems. In this sense, most of the mathematical models developed in the field of neuroscience have mainly targeted a specific sub-system. In order to understand the details of the brain as a whole, such sub-system models need to be integrated toward the development of a neurophysiologically plausible large-scale system model. In the present work, we propose a model integration library where models can be connected by means of a common data format. Here, the common data format should be portable so that models written in any programming language, computer architecture, and operating system can be connected. Moreover, the library should be simple so that models can be adapted to use the common data format without requiring any detailed knowledge on its use. Using this library, we have successfully connected existing models reproducing certain features of the visual system, toward the development of a large-scale visual system model. This library will enable users to reuse and integrate existing and newly developed models toward the development and simulation of a large-scale brain system model. The resulting model can also be executed on high performance computers using Message Passing Interface (MPI).

  1. Ischemic Brain Injury Secondary to Severe Systemic Loxoscelism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Soape

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Systemic loxoscelism is a rare complication from the bite of spiders in the genus Loxosceles.These bites usually cause painful indurated skin reactions, including necrosis,and occasionally cause systemic complications, such as rhabdomyolysis, acute renalfailure, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. Our case had multiple systemiccomplications, including bilateral globus pallidus infarcts with right arm weakness.

  2. Acrylamide-functionalized graphene micro-solid-phase extraction coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography for the online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoting; Hu, Yufei; Li, Gongke; Zhang, Zhuomin

    2015-05-01

    Monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples are essential biomarkers for the diagnosis of neurological disorders. In this work, acrylamide-functionalized graphene adsorbent was successfully synthesized by a chemical functionalization method and was packed in a homemade polyether ether ketone micro column as a micro-solid-phase extraction unit. This micro-solid-phase extraction unit was directly coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography to form an online system for the separation and analysis of three monoamine acidic metabolites including homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in human urine and plasma. The online system showed high stability, permeability, and adsorption capacity toward target metabolites. The saturated extraction amount of this online system was 213.1, 107.0, and 153.4 ng for homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, respectively. Excellent detection limits were achieved in the range of 0.08-0.25 μg/L with good linearity and reproducibility. It was interesting that three targets in urine and plasma could be actually quantified to be 0.94-3.93 μg/L in plasma and 7.15-19.38 μg/L in urine. Good recoveries were achieved as 84.8-101.4% for urine and 77.8-95.1% for plasma with the intra- and interday relative standard deviations less than 9.3 and 10.3%, respectively. This method shows great potential for online analysis of trace monoamine acidic metabolites in biological samples.

  3. [The role of histaminergic system of the brain in the regulation of sleep-wakefulness cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval'zon, V M

    2013-01-01

    The structure, morphological and neurochemical bindings ofhistaminergic system of the brain as one of the most important mechanisms of waking maintenance, are regarded. The biochemistry of histamine turnover and histamine receptors are briefly described. The special role of the relation between histamine and orexin/hypocretin systems is stressed. Some examples of the responses on wakefulness-sleep cycle of the effects of experimental manipulations with the histaminergic system are given.

  4. Versatility of the complement system in neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and brain homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Franca; De Blasio, Daiana; Zangari, Rosalia; Zanier, Elisa R.; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia

    2014-01-01

    The immune response after brain injury is highly complex and involves both local and systemic events at the cellular and molecular level. It is associated to a dramatic over-activation of enzyme systems, the expression of proinflammatory genes and the activation/recruitment of immune cells. The complement system represents a powerful component of the innate immunity and is highly involved in the inflammatory response. Complement components are synthesized predominantly by the liver and circul...

  5. Locus coeruleus: From global projection system to adaptive regulation of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston-Jones, G; Waterhouse, B

    2016-08-15

    The brainstem nucleus locus coeruleus (LC) is a major source of norepinephrine (NE) projections throughout the CNS. This important property was masked in very early studies by the inability to visualize endogenous monoamines. The development of monoamine histofluorescence methods by Swedish scientists led to a plethora of studies, including a paper published in Brain Research by Loizou in 1969. That paper was highly cited (making it a focal point for the 50th anniversary issue of this journal), and helped to spark a large and continuing set of investigations to further refine our understating of the LC-NE system and its contribution to brain function and behavior. This paper very briefly reviews the ensuing advances in anatomical, physiological and behavioral aspects of the LC-NE system. Although its projections are ubiquitously present throughout the CNS, recent studies find surprising specificity within the organizational and operational domains of LC neurons. These and other findings lead us to expect that future work will unmask additional features of the LC-NE system and its roles in normative and pathological brain and behavioral processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue.

  6. Involvement of the endocannabinoid system in reward processing in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hell, Hendrika H; Jager, Gerry; Bossong, Matthijs G; Brouwer, Annelies; Jansma, J Martijn; Zuurman, Lineke; van Gerven, Joop; Kahn, René S; Ramsey, Nick F

    2012-02-01

    Disturbed reward processing in humans has been associated with a number of disorders, such as depression, addiction, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. The endocannabinoid (eCB) system has been implicated in reward processing in animals, but in humans, the relation between eCB functioning and reward is less clear. The current study uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the role of the eCB system in reward processing in humans by examining the effect of the eCB agonist Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on reward-related brain activity. Eleven healthy males participated in a randomized placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI study with administration of THC to challenge the eCB system. We compared anticipatory and feedback-related brain activity after placebo and THC, using a monetary incentive delay task. In this task, subjects are notified before each trial whether a correct response is rewarded ("reward trial") or not ("neutral trial"). Subjects showed faster reaction times during reward trials compared to neutral trials, and this effect was not altered by THC. THC induced a widespread attenuation of the brain response to feedback in reward trials but not in neutral trials. Anticipatory brain activity was not affected. These results suggest a role for the eCB system in the appreciation of rewards. The involvement of the eCB system in feedback processing may be relevant for disorders in which appreciation of natural rewards may be affected such as addiction.

  7. Reducing the Burden of Difficult-to-Treat Major Depressive Disorder: Revisiting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Culpepper, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Difficult-to-treat depression (eg, depression with atypical or anxious symptoms, treatment-resistant depression, or depression with frequent recurrence) is a challenging real-world health issue. This critical review of the literature focuses on monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) therapy and difficult-to-treat forms of depression.

  8. Effects of rhynchophylline on monoamine transmitters of striatum and hippocampus in cerebral ischemic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUYuan-Fu; XIEXiao-Long; WUQin; WENGuo-Rong; YANGSu-Fen; SHIJing-Shan

    2004-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of rhynchophylline ( Rhy on monoamine transmitters and its metabolites in striatum and hippocampus of cerebral ischemic rats. METItODS The cerebral ischemic injury of rat was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The extracellular fluid of striatum and hippocampus in cerebral ischemic rats was collected by using

  9. Monoamine Oxidase a Promoter Gene Associated with Problem Behavior in Adults with Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Michael E.; Srour, Ali; Hedges, Lora K.; Lightfoot, David A.; Phillips, John A., III; Blakely, Randy D.; Kennedy, Craig H.

    2009-01-01

    A functional polymorphism in the promoter of the gene encoding monoamine oxidase A has been associated with problem behavior in various populations. We examined the association of MAOA alleles in adult males with intellectual/developmental disabilities with and without established histories of problem behavior. These data were compared with a…

  10. Double-staining techniques allows electrophysiological identification of monoamine-containing neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, T E; Audesirk, G J

    1985-08-01

    Electrophysiological recording provides important evidence for positive identification of many neurons in gastropods. We describe a technique which combines intracellular recording and injection of a persistent, non-fluorescent dye (Fast Green) with subsequent histofluorescence treatment using a modification of the wholemount glyoxylic acid procedure developed by Barber (1983) to establish the presence or absence of monoamine transmitters in positively identified single gastropod neurons.

  11. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and polymorphisms in Monoamine oxidase A gene (MAOA): a revisit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groß, Maximilian; Bajanowski, Thomas; Vennemann, Mechtild; Poetsch, Micaela

    2014-01-01

    Literature describes multiple possible links between genetic variations in the neuroadrenergic system and the occurrence of sudden infant death syndrome. The X-chromosomal Monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) is one of the genes with regulatory activity in the noradrenergic and serotonergic neuronal systems and a polymorphism of the promoter which affects the activity of this gene has been proclaimed to contribute significantly to the prevalence of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in three studies from 2009, 2012 and 2013. However, these studies described different significant correlations regarding gender or age of children. Since several studies, suggesting associations between genetic variations and SIDS, were disproved by follow-up analysis, this study was conducted to take a closer look at the MAOA gene and its polymorphisms. The functional MAOA promoter length polymorphism was investigated in 261 SIDS cases and 93 control subjects. Moreover, the allele distribution of 12 coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the MAOA gene was examined in 285 SIDS cases and 93 controls by a minisequencing technique. In contrast to prior studies with fewer individuals, no significant correlations between the occurrence of SIDS and the frequency of allele variants of the promoter polymorphism could be demonstrated, even including the results from the abovementioned previous studies. Regarding the SNPs, three statistically significant associations were observed which had not been described before. This study clearly disproves interactions between MAOA promoter polymorphisms and SIDS, even if variations in single nucleotide polymorphisms of MAOA should be subjected to further analysis to clarify their impact on SIDS.

  12. Evaluation of a brain imaging system with combined parallel hole and pinhole collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiu [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ., Shanghai (China); Zeniya, Tsutomu; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Hidehiro [National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kudo, Hiroyuki [Tsukuba Univ. (Japan); Gullberg, Grant T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    This work evaluates the brain imaging system designed by the Department of Investigative Radiology at the National Cardiovascular Research Center - Research Institute in Osaka, Japan. As presented at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference at Knoxville, TN in 2010, the high resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager was developed for obtaining high resolution brain scans for various imaging diagnostic applications. The system was mounted with one large field of view detector imaging the whole brain and multiple smaller field of view high resolution detectors imaging small regions of the brain. The large field of view detector provides images without truncation that localize areas of particular diagnostic interest and provide support information for the reconstruction of high resolution regions of interest (ROIs) from high resolution truncated projections obtained with the small field of view detectors. At the IEEE conference, the authors suggested a geometry which achieved high resolution reconstruction of the brain with a small pinhole aperture. The work presented in this paper simulates the camera with larger pinholes and shows that the camera has accurate quantitation and fine resolution for the interior reconstruction problem. (orig.)

  13. Fluorescence laminar optical tomography for brain imaging: system implementation and performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimipour, Mehdi; Sheikhzadeh, Mahya; Baumgartner, Ryan; Cullen, Patrick K.; Helmstetter, Fred J.; Chang, Woo-Jin; Pashaie, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    We present our effort in implementing a fluorescence laminar optical tomography scanner which is specifically designed for noninvasive three-dimensional imaging of fluorescence proteins in the brains of small rodents. A laser beam, after passing through a cylindrical lens, scans the brain tissue from the surface while the emission signal is captured by the epi-fluorescence optics and is recorded using an electron multiplication CCD sensor. Image reconstruction algorithms are developed based on Monte Carlo simulation to model light-tissue interaction and generate the sensitivity matrices. To solve the inverse problem, we used the iterative simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique. The performance of the developed system was evaluated by imaging microfabricated silicon microchannels embedded inside a substrate with optical properties close to the brain as a tissue phantom and ultimately by scanning brain tissue in vivo. Details of the hardware design and reconstruction algorithms are discussed and several experimental results are presented. The developed system can specifically facilitate neuroscience experiments where fluorescence imaging and molecular genetic methods are used to study the dynamics of the brain circuitries.

  14. The brain as a distributed intelligent processing system: an EEG study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Freitas da Rocha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Various neuroimaging studies, both structural and functional, have provided support for the proposal that a distributed brain network is likely to be the neural basis of intelligence. The theory of Distributed Intelligent Processing Systems (DIPS, first developed in the field of Artificial Intelligence, was proposed to adequately model distributed neural intelligent processing. In addition, the neural efficiency hypothesis suggests that individuals with higher intelligence display more focused cortical activation during cognitive performance, resulting in lower total brain activation when compared with individuals who have lower intelligence. This may be understood as a property of the DIPS. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In our study, a new EEG brain mapping technique, based on the neural efficiency hypothesis and the notion of the brain as a Distributed Intelligence Processing System, was used to investigate the correlations between IQ evaluated with WAIS (Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and WISC (Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, and the brain activity associated with visual and verbal processing, in order to test the validity of a distributed neural basis for intelligence. CONCLUSION: The present results support these claims and the neural efficiency hypothesis.

  15. A High Density Electrophysiological Data Analysis System for a Peripheral Nerve Interface Communicating with Individual Neurons in the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-14

    of-the-art instrumentation to communicate with individual neurons in the brain and the peripheral nervous system. The major theme of the research is...Nerve Interface Communicating with Individual Neurons in the Brain The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author...Communicating with Individual Neurons in the Brain Report Title The high density electrophysiological data acquisition system obtained through this

  16. A breakthrough in neuroscience needs a "Nebulous Cartesian System" Oscillations, quantum dynamics and chaos in the brain and vegetative system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başar, Erol; Güntekin, Bahar

    2007-04-01

    The Cartesian System is a fundamental conceptual and analytical framework related and interwoven with the concept and applications of Newtonian Dynamics. In order to analyze quantum processes physicist moved to a Probabilistic Cartesian System in which the causality principle became a probabilistic one. This means the trajectories of particles (obeying quantum rules) can be described only with the concept of cloudy wave packets. The approach to the brain-body-mind problem requires more than the prerequisite of modern physics and quantum dynamics. In the analysis of the brain-body-mind construct we have to include uncertain causalities and consequently multiple uncertain causalities. These multiple causalities originate from (1) nonlinear properties of the vegetative system (e.g. irregularities in biochemical transmitters, cardiac output, turbulences in the vascular system, respiratory apnea, nonlinear oscillatory interactions in peristalsis); (2) nonlinear behavior of the neuronal electricity (e.g. chaotic behavior measured by EEG), (3) genetic modulations, and (4) additional to these physiological entities nonlinear properties of physical processes in the body. The brain shows deterministic chaos with a correlation dimension of approx. D(2)=6, the smooth muscles approx. D(2)=3. According to these facts we propose a hyper-probabilistic approach or a hyper-probabilistic Cartesian System to describe and analyze the processes in the brain-body-mind system. If we add aspects as our sentiments, emotions and creativity to this construct, better said to this already hyper-probabilistic construct, this "New Cartesian System" is more than hyper-probabilistic, it is a nebulous system, we can predict the future only in a nebulous way; however, despite this chain of reasoning we can still provide predictions on brain-body-mind incorporations. We tentatively assume that the processes or mechanisms of the brain-body-mind system can be analyzed and predicted similar to the

  17. Molecular dialogues between the ischemic brain and the peripheral immune system: Dualistic roles in injury and repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chengrui; Shi, Yejie; Li, Peiying; Hu, Xiaoming; Gan, Yu; Stetler, Ruth A.; Leak, Rehana K.; Gao, Yanqin; Sun, Bao-Liang; Zheng, Ping; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Immune and inflammatory responses actively modulate the pathophysiological processes of acute brain injuries such as stroke. Soon after the onset of stroke, signals such as brain-derived antigens, danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), cytokines, and chemokines are released from the injured brain into the systemic circulation. The injured brain also communicates with peripheral organs through the parasympathetic and sympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system. Many of these diverse signals not only activate resident immune cells in the brain, but also trigger robust immune responses in the periphery. Peripheral immune cells then migrate toward the site of injury and release additional cytokines, chemokines, and other molecules, causing further disruptive or protective effects in the ischemic brain. Bidirectional communication between the injured brain and the peripheral immune system is now known to regulate the progression of stroke pathology as well as tissue repair. In the end, this exquisitely coordinated crosstalk helps determine the fate of animals after stroke. This article reviews the literature on ischemic brain-derived signals through which peripheral immune responses are triggered, and the potential impact of these peripheral responses on brain injury and repair. Pharmacological strategies and cell-based therapies that target the dialogue between the brain and peripheral immune system show promise as potential novel treatments for stroke. PMID:24374228

  18. Experience-Dependent Brain Development as a Key to Understanding the Language System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Gert

    2016-04-01

    An influential view of the nature of the language system is that of an evolved biological system in which a set of rules is combined with a lexicon that contains the words of the language together with a representation of their context. Alternative views, usually based on connectionist modeling, attempt to explain the structure of language on the basis of complex associative processes. Here, I put forward a third view that stresses experience-dependent structural development of the brain circuits supporting language as a core principle of the organization of the language system. In this view, embodied in a recent neuroconstructivist neural network of past tense development and processing, initial domain-general predispositions enable the development of functionally specialized brain structures through interactions between experience-dependent brain development and statistical learning in a structured environment. Together, these processes shape a biological adult language system that appears to separate into distinct mechanism for processing rules and exceptions, whereas in reality those subsystems co-develop and interact closely. This view puts experience-dependent brain development in response to a specific language environment at the heart of understanding not only language development but adult language processing as well.

  19. Insulin modulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function and impulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; Drukarch, Benjamin; De Vries, Taco J; Hogenboom, François; Schetters, Dustin; Pattij, Tommy

    2011-01-26

    Because insulin acutely enhances the function of dopamine transporters, the tyrosine kinase receptors activated by this hormone may modulate transporter-dependent neurochemical and behavioral effects of psychoactive drugs. In this respect, we examined the effects of insulin on exocytotic monoamine release and the efficacy of the monoamine transporter blocker cocaine in rat nucleus accumbens. Whereas insulin reduced electrically evoked exocytotic [(3)H]dopamine release in nucleus accumbens slices, the hormone potentiated the release-enhancing effect of cocaine thereon. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 abolished these effects, indicating the involvement of insulin receptors. Similar insulin effects were observed on the release of [(3)H]norepinephrine in nucleus accumbens slices, but not on that of [(3)H]serotonin, and were also apparent in medial prefrontal cortex slices. As might then be expected, insulin also potentiated the dopamine and norepinephrine release-enhancing effects of the selective monoamine uptake inhibitors GBR12909 and desmethylimipramine, respectively. In subsequent behavioral experiments, we investigated the role of insulin in motor impulsivity that depends on monoamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Intracranial administration of insulin in the nucleus accumbens alone reduced premature responses in the five-choice serial reaction time task and enhanced the stimulatory effect of peripheral cocaine administration on impulsivity, resembling the observed neurochemical effects of the hormone. In contrast, cocaine-induced locomotor activity remained unchanged by intra-accumbal insulin application. These data reveal that insulin presynaptically regulates cocaine-sensitive monoamine transporter function in the nucleus accumbens and, as a consequence, impulsivity. Therefore, insulin signaling proteins may represent targets for the treatment of inhibitory control deficits such as addictive behaviors.

  20. GPR40/FFAR1 deficient mice increase noradrenaline levels in the brain and exhibit abnormal behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuka Aizawa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The free fatty acid receptor 1 (GPR40/FFAR1 is a G protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by long chain fatty acids. We have previously demonstrated that activation of brain GPR40/FFAR1 exerts an antinociceptive effect that is mediated by the modulation of the descending pain control system. However, it is unclear whether brain GPR40/FFAR1 contributes to emotional function. In this study, we investigated the involvement of GPR40/FFAR1 in emotional behavior using GPR40/FFAR1 deficient (knockout, KO mice. The emotional behavior in wild and KO male mice was evaluated at 9–10 weeks of age by the elevated plus-maze test, open field test, social interaction test, and sucrose preference test. Brain monoamines levels were measured using LC–MS/MS. The elevated plus-maze test and open field tests revealed that the KO mice reduced anxiety-like behavior. There were no differences in locomotor activity or social behavior between the wild and KO mice. In the sucrose preference test, the KO mice showed reduction in sucrose preference and intake. The level of noradrenaline was higher in the hippocampus, medulla oblongata, hypothalamus and midbrain of KO mice. Therefore, these results suggest that brain GPR40/FFAR1 is associated with anxiety- and depression-related behavior regulated by the increment of noradrenaline in the brain.

  1. MicroRNA-142 reduces monoamine oxidase A expression and activity in neuronal cells by downregulating SIRT1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrita Datta Chaudhuri

    Full Text Available Aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRs has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative disorders. In HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND, miR-142 was found to be upregulated in neurons and myeloid cells in the brain. We investigated the downstream effects of chronic miR-142 upregulation in neuronal cells by comparing gene expression in stable clones of the human neuroblastoma cell line BE(2M17 expressing miR-142 to controls. Microarray analysis revealed that miR-142 expression led to a reduction in monoamine oxidase (MAO A mRNA, which was validated by qRT-PCR. In addition to the mRNA, the MAOA protein level and enzyme activity were also reduced. Examination of primary human neurons revealed that miR-142 expression indeed resulted in a downregulation of MAOA protein level. Although MAOA is not a direct target of miR-142, SIRT1, a key transcriptional upregulator of MAOA is, thus miR-142 downregulation of MAOA expression is indirect. MiR-142 induced decrease in MAOA expression and activity may contribute to the changes in dopaminergic neurotransmission reported in HAND.

  2. Alteration of behavior and monoamine levels attributable to Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 in germ-free mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Hsien; Chuang, Hsiao-Li; Huang, Yen-Te; Wu, Chien-Chen; Chou, Geng-Ting; Wang, Sabrina; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2016-02-01

    Probiotics, defined as live bacteria or bacterial products, confer a significant health benefit to the host, including amelioration of anxiety-like behavior and psychiatric illnesses. Here we administered Lactobacillus plantarum PS128 (PS128) to a germ-free (GF) mouse model to investigate the impact of the gut-brain axis on emotional behaviors. First, we demonstrated that chronic administration of live PS128 showed no adverse effects on physical health. Then, we found that administration of live PS128 significantly increased the total distance traveled in the open field test and decreased the time spent in the closed arm in the elevated plus maze test, whereas the administration of PS128 had no significant effects in the depression-like behaviors of GF mice. Also, chronic live PS128 ingestion significantly increased the levels of both serotonin and dopamine in the striatum, but not in the prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. These results suggest that the chronic administration of PS128 is safe and could induce changes in emotional behaviors. The behavioral changes are correlated with the increase in the monoamine neurotransmitters in the striatum. These findings suggest that daily intake of the L. plantarum strain PS128 could improve anxiety-like behaviors and may be helpful in ameliorating neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Explorative investigation of biomarkers of brain damage and coagulation system activation in clinical stroke differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Undén, Johan; Strandberg, Karin; Malm, Jan

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A simple and accurate method of differentiating ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is potentially useful to facilitate acute therapeutic management. Blood measurements of biomarkers of brain damage and activation of the coagulation system may potentially serve as novel...... diagnostic tools for stroke subtypes. METHODS: Ninety-seven stroke patients were prospectively investigated in a multicenter design with blood levels of brain biomarkers S100B, neuron specific enolase (NSE), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) as well as a coagulation biomarker, activated protein C......: This exploratory study indicated that blood levels of biomarkers GFAP and APC-PCI, prior to neuroimaging, may rule out ICH in a mixed stroke population....

  4. Pharmacokinetic interactions between monoamine oxidase A inhibitor harmaline and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine, and the impact of CYP2D6 status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi-Ling; Shen, Hong-Wu; Mager, Donald E; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2013-05-01

    5-Methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT or street name "5-MEO") is a newer designer drug belonging to a group of naturally occurring indolealkylamines. Our recent study has demonstrated that coadministration of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) inhibitor harmaline (5 mg/kg) increases systemic exposure to 5-MeO-DMT (2 mg/kg) and active metabolite bufotenine. This study is aimed at delineating harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT pharmacokinetic (PK) interactions at multiple dose levels, as well as the impact of CYP2D6 that affects harmaline PK and determines 5-MeO-DMT O-demethylation to produce bufotenine. Our data revealed that inhibition of MAO-A-mediated metabolic elimination by harmaline (2, 5, and 15 mg/kg) led to a sharp increase in systemic and cerebral exposure to 5-MeO-DMT (2 and 10 mg/kg) at all dose combinations. A more pronounced effect on 5-MeO-DMT PK was associated with greater exposure to harmaline in wild-type mice than CYP2D6-humanized (Tg-CYP2D6) mice. Harmaline (5 mg/kg) also increased blood and brain bufotenine concentrations that were generally higher in Tg-CYP2D6 mice. Surprisingly, greater harmaline dose (15 mg/kg) reduced bufotenine levels. The in vivo inhibitory effect of harmaline on CYP2D6-catalyzed bufotenine formation was confirmed by in vitro study using purified CYP2D6. Given these findings, a unified PK model including the inhibition of MAO-A- and CYP2D6-catalyzed 5-MeO-DMT metabolism by harmaline was developed to describe blood harmaline, 5-MeO-DMT, and bufotenine PK profiles in both wild-type and Tg-CYP2D6 mouse models. This PK model may be further employed to predict harmaline and 5-MeO-DMT PK interactions at various doses, define the impact of CYP2D6 status, and drive harmaline-5-MeO-DMT pharmacodynamics.

  5. Regulation of Copper Transport Crossing Brain Barrier Systems by Cu-ATPases: Effect of Manganese Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue; Zhang, Yanshu; Jiang, Wendy; Monnot, Andrew Donald; Bates, Christopher Alexander; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of cellular copper (Cu) homeostasis involves Cu-transporting ATPases (Cu-ATPases), i.e., ATP7A and ATP7B. The question as to how these Cu-ATPases in brain barrier systems transport Cu, i.e., toward brain parenchyma, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), or blood, remained unanswered. This study was designed to characterize roles of Cu-ATPases in regulating Cu transport at the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCB) and to investigate how exposure to toxic manganese (Mn) altered the function of Cu-ATPases, thereby contributing to the etiology of Mn-induced parkinsonian disorder. Studies by quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), Western blot, and immunocytochemistry revealed that both Cu-ATPases expressed abundantly in BBB and BCB. Transport kinetic studies by in situ brain infusion and ventriculo-cisternal (VC) perfusion in Sprague Dawley rat suggested that the BBB was a major site for Cu entry into brain, whereas the BCB was a predominant route for Cu efflux from the CSF to blood. Confocal evidence showed that the presence of excess Cu or Mn in the choroid plexus cells led to ATP7A relocating toward the apical microvilli facing the CSF, but ATP7B toward the basolateral membrane facing blood. Mn exposure inhibited the production of both Cu-ATPases. Collectively, these data suggest that Cu is transported by the BBB from the blood to brain, which is mediated by ATP7A in brain capillary. By diffusion, Cu ions move from the interstitial fluid into the CSF, where they are taken up by the BCB. Within the choroidal epithelial cells, Cu ions are transported by ATP7B back to the blood. Mn exposure alters these processes, leading to Cu dyshomeostasis-associated neuronal injury. PMID:24614235

  6. Synthetic and Natural Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors as Potential Lead Compounds for Effective Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Ashish; Srivastava, Amit K; Singour, Pradeep K; Gouda, Panchanan

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAO-A and B) play a critical role in the metabolism of intracellular neurotransmitters of the central nervous system. For decades, MAO inhibitors have proven their clinical efficacy as potential drug targets for several neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. Use of first generation non selective MAO inhibitors as neuropsychiatric drugs elicited several side effects like hypertensive crisis and cheese reaction. Therefore their use is now limited due to non-selectivity towards MAO isoforms and inhibition of metabolizing enzymes like cytochrome P450. Development of selective and specific MAO inhibitors like moclobemide, toloxatone improves their efficacy as disease-modifying effects in monotherapy as well as adjunctive therapy. Recently a lot of research has been done to elucidate the pharmacological potential of medicinal plants and their isolated bioactive constituents having MAO inhibitory activity. Herbs containing MAO inhibitors are extensively used for the development of potent synthetic drugs and as safe and effective alternatives to the available synthetic drugs in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases such as depression, Parkinson and Alzheimer's. In several diseases like Parkinson natural MAO inhibitors prevented the neuron denaturalization by their dual action via enhancing neurotransmission of dopamine as well as lowering the generation of free radicals and toxins. Currently development of selective MAO inhibitors is still under study to achieve more effective therapies by using Computer Aided Drug Designing, Ligand-based models and structure-activity hypothesis. These approaches also facilitate understanding the interaction of newly designed molecule with MAO enzymes and the rationalization of probable mechanisms of action.

  7. Carrier-mediated release of monoamines induced by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist DMPP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szász, Bernadett K; Mayer, Aliz; Zsilla, Gabriella; Lendvai, Balázs; Vizi, E Sylvester; Kiss, János P

    2005-09-01

    We have previously shown that dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) increases the release of noradrenaline (NA) from rat hippocampal slices via two distinct mechanisms: a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated exocytosis and a carrier-mediated release induced by the reversal of NA transporters. Our aim was to investigate whether other monoaminergic systems are also affected by the multiple actions of DMPP. In our experiments DMPP dose-dependently increased the release of dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) from rat striatal and hippocampal slices, respectively. The dual effect was observed, however, only in case of DA at a lower DMPP concentration (30 microM), where the response was partly inhibited by mecamylamine, TTX and Ca2+-free medium (nAChR-mediated exocytosis) while the other part of the response was blocked only by the DA uptake inhibitor nomifensine (carrier-mediated release). In contrast, the DMPP-evoked 5-HT release and the DA release induced by high concentration DMPP was not inhibited by nicotinic antagonists, TTX and Ca2+-free medium but only by selective uptake inhibitors. In addition, DMPP dose-dependently inhibited the [3H]DA and [3H]5-HT uptake in striatal and hippocampal synaptosome preparation with an IC50 of 3.18 and 0.49 microM, respectively. Our data show that DMPP interacts with monoamine transporters and induces a substantial carrier-mediated release of DA and 5-HT, therefore caution is needed for the interpretation of data, when this drug is used as a nAChR agonist.

  8. Evaluation of the effects of methylprednisolone pulse therapy in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus with brain involvement by Tc-99m HMPAO brain SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, S.S.; Kao, C.H. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan); Huang, W.S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Tri-Service General Hospital, Taipei (Taiwan); Chen, J.J.H. [Section of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, China Medicine University Hospital, Taichung (Taiwan); Chang, C.P. [Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua (Taiwan); Wang, J.J. [Department of Medical Research, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan (Taiwan)

    2004-07-01

    Methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT) was introduced to avoid life-threatening complications in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with brain manifestations; however, the efficacy of MPT in SLE patients with brain involvement is still uncertain and needs to be objectively evaluated. We enrolled 15 female SLE patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations in this study. All patients had normal brain MRI and abnormal brain HMPAO-SPECT findings. Follow-up HMPAO-SPECT studies were conducted 2 weeks after MPT. Serum levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA) and anti-ribosomal P antibodies (anti-P) were measured before and after MPT. Before MPT, 7 patients were positive for ACA and 7 patients were positive for anti-P. After MPT, none of the 15 patients demonstrated positive serologic findings or neuropsychiatric manifestations. Based on the follow up brain HMPAO-SPECT images following MPT, 13 patients showed disappearance of the perfusion defects and 2 patients showed partial recovery of rCBF. Brain HMPAO-SPECT imaging is a logical and objective tool for measuring the effects of MPT in SLE patients with brain involvement by determining of changes in rCBF. (orig.)

  9. Delivery of circulating lipoproteins to specific neurons in the Drosophila brain regulates systemic insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brankatschk, Marko; Dunst, Sebastian; Nemetschke, Linda; Eaton, Suzanne

    2014-10-02

    The Insulin signaling pathway couples growth, development and lifespan to nutritional conditions. Here, we demonstrate a function for the Drosophila lipoprotein LTP in conveying information about dietary lipid composition to the brain to regulate Insulin signaling. When yeast lipids are present in the diet, free calcium levels rise in Blood Brain Barrier glial cells. This induces transport of LTP across the Blood Brain Barrier by two LDL receptor-related proteins: LRP1 and Megalin. LTP accumulates on specific neurons that connect to cells that produce Insulin-like peptides, and induces their release into the circulation. This increases systemic Insulin signaling and the rate of larval development on yeast-containing food compared with a plant-based food of similar nutritional content.

  10. Screening of Toll-like receptors expression in multiple system atrophy brains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Winge, Kristian; Agander, Tina Klitmøller

    2013-01-01

    their deregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. Multiple system atrophy (MSA) together with Parkinson's disease belongs to a diverse group of neurodegenerative conditions termed α-synucleinopathies. MSA is a fatal late onset disease characterized by the presence of α-synuclein positive glial cytoplasmic...... inclusions in oligodendrocytes. α-Synuclein can act as a danger-associated molecular pattern and alter TLR expression thereby activating inflammatory responses in the brain. In this study, using real-time PCR, we assessed the expression of TLRs (TLR1-10) in selected areas of MSA brains (substantia nigra......, striatum, cerebral cortex, and nucleus dentatus) in comparison with normal controls. We show evidence for increased levels of mRNA-encoding hTLR-3, hTLR-4, and hTLR-5 in substantia nigra, striatum, cerebral cortex, and nucleus dentatus from MSA brains versus normal controls. The levels of expression of h...

  11. Topography of cerebral monoamine transporter availability in families with SCA2 mutations: a voxel-wise [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scherfler, Christoph; Boesch, Sylvia M.; Seppi, Klaus; Wenning, Gregor K.; Poewe, Werner [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Neurology, Innsbruck (Austria); Donnemiller, Eveline; Virgolini, Irene [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Weirich-Schwaiger, Helga [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Biology and Human Genetics, Innsbruck (Austria); Goebel, Georg [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2006-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the monoamine transporter status of dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine throughout the brain in spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). To this end, nine patients were studied with [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT. Data were compared with ten age-matched healthy control subjects and ten patients with young-onset Parkinson's disease (YOPD), matched for age. Parametric SPECT images of the specific-to-non-displaceable equilibrium partition coefficient (V{sub 3}{sup ''}), which is proportional to the receptor density (B{sub max}), were generated. In order to objectively localise focal changes in {beta}-CIT uptake throughout the brain volume without having to make an a priori hypothesis as to their location, statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was applied to SPECT images. Data clusters revealed by SPM, showing significant differences in V{sub 3}{sup ''} values between groups, were transformed onto the individual V{sub 3}{sup ''} image to obtain mean regional uptake values. Both SCA2 and YOPD patients showed significant decreases in striatal [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT uptake when compared with controls. However, in SCA2 patients, additional reductions in caudate/anterior putamen, midbrain and pons [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT uptake were localised with SPM. Voxel-wise analysis of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT SPECT revealed more widespread decline of monoamine transporter availability in SCA2 than in YOPD, reflecting differences in the underlying pathology. We suggest that the quantification of midbrain and pons [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT signal is likely to improve the diagnostic accuracy in patients presenting with clinical features of both SCA2 and YOPD at initial investigation. (orig.)

  12. Characterization of a cell-free protein synthesizing system isolated from rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajagopalan, L.E.; Harper, A.E.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have characterized a cell-free preparation from rat brain that can initiate translation of endogenous mRNAs in vitro and maintain protein synthesis for at least 90 minutes at an optimum temperature of 37C. The essential component of this system is a postmitochondrial supernate (PMS) obtained by centrifuging a whole brain homogenate at 10,000 x g for 10 minutes at 4C. In the presence of phosphocreatine (PC), ATP and GTP there is active incorporation of (TVS)methionine into trichloroacetic acid precipitable protein. Incorporation is sensitive to the concentrations of PC, magnesium and potassium ions and spermidine and is inhibited 50-60% in the presence of 7-methylguanosine 5'-monophosphate, a specific inhibitor of polypeptide chain initiation. The proteolysis of brain protein that occurs when the system is incubated for more than 60 min. can be minimized by adding bovine serum albumin. The addition of 3.0 mM 5'-guanylimidodiphosphate a non-hydrolyzable analog of GTP, blocks incorporation entirely. The phosphocreatine requirement for maintaining an optimum endogenous concentration of GTP is lowered from 10.0 mM to 5.0 mM in the presence of 2.0 mM NADPH. The system that initiates protein synthesis in vitro can be used to study changes in brain protein synthesis as a result of various treatments, and the mechanisms underlying such changes.

  13. Obesity at conception programs the opioid system in the offspring brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissom, Nicola M; Lyde, Randolph; Christ, Lori; Sasson, Isaac E; Carlin, JesseLea; Vitins, Alexa P; Simmons, Rebecca A; Reyes, Teresa M

    2014-03-01

    Maternal obesity during pregnancy increases the risk for offspring obesity, in part through effects on the developing brain. Previous research has shown that perinatal consumption of highly palatable foods by the mother can influence the development of offspring taste preferences and alter gene expression within the central nervous system (CNS) reward system. Opioids stimulate consumption of both fats and carbohydrates, and overconsumption of these energy dense foods increases the risk for obesity. What has remained unclear is whether this risk can be transmitted to the offspring before gestation or if it is wholly the gestational exposure that affects offspring brain development. Utilizing an embryo transfer experimental design, 2-cell embryos were obtained from obese or control dams, and transferred to obese or control gestational carriers. Expression of the mu-opioid receptor (MOR), preproenkephalin (PENK), and the dopamine transporter was evaluated in the hypothalamus and reward circuitry (ventral tegmental area, prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens) in adult and late embryonic brains. Obesity before pregnancy altered expression levels of both MOR and PENK, with males relatively more affected than females. These data are the first to demonstrate that obesity at conception, in addition to during gestation, can program the brain reward system.

  14. Effect of Heavy Ion Brain Radiation on Nerve-immune System Regulation Mechanism in Rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Ying-qi; WANG; Xiao; KONG; Fu-quan; SUI; Li; LEI; Run-hong; MA; Hong; DENG; Yu-lin; LI; Qiang

    2013-01-01

    High-dose ionizing irradiation can cause extensive injuries in susceptible tissues.Blood,nervous and immune systems are highly radiation-sensitive.While the nerve-immune system regulation of radiationdamage in the relevant research is rare.So the brain injury model that rats were subjected to 15 Gy of head irradiation was built.By detecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis(HPA axis)changes,the

  15. A brain leptin-renin angiotensin system interaction in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilzendeger, Aline M.; Morgan, Donald A.; Brooks, Leonard; Dellsperger, David; Liu, Xuebo; Grobe, Justin L.; Rahmouni, Kamal; Sigmund, Curt D.

    2012-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system, leptin, and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) have been implicated in obesity-associated hypertension. There is increasing evidence for the presence of both leptin and angiotensin II receptors in several key brain cardiovascular and metabolic control regions. We tested the hypothesis that the brain RAS plays a facilitatory role in the sympathetic nerve responses to leptin. In rats, intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of losartan (5 μg) selectively inhibited increases in renal and brown adipose tissue (BAT) sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) produced by leptin (10 μg ICV) but did not reduce the SNA responses to corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) or the melanocortin receptor agonist MTII. In mice with deletion of angiotensin II type-1a receptors (AT1aR−/−), increases in renal and BAT SNA induced by leptin (2 μg ICV) were impaired whereas SNA responses to MTII were preserved. Decreases in food intake and body weight with ICV leptin did not differ in AT1aR−/− vs. AT1aR+/+ mice. ICV leptin in rats increased AT1aR and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) mRNA in the subfornical organ and AT1aR mRNA in the arcuate nucleus, suggesting leptin-induced upregulation of the brain RAS in specific brain regions. To evaluate the role of de novo production of brain angiotensin II in SNA responses to leptin, we treated rats with captopril (12.5 μg ICV). Captopril attenuated leptin effects on renal and BAT SNA. In conclusion, these studies provide evidence that the brain RAS selectively facilitates renal and BAT sympathetic nerve responses to leptin while sparing effects on food intake. PMID:22610169

  16. The novel trisubstituted pyran derivative D-142 has triple monoamine reuptake inhibitory activity and exerts potent antidepressant-like activity in rodents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Aloke K.; Gopishetty, Bhaskar; Gogoi, Sanjib; Ali, Solav; Zhen, Juan; Reith, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    Major depression disorder is a significant health problem with 10-20% of all adults suffering from this disease. The underlying causes of depression are still unclear and 15% of depressed patients are resistant to all known therapies. Monoamine therapies have so far been the most successful approach for treating depression. Triple monoamine reuptake inhibitors have recently been implicated in generation of potent antidepressant activity while possibly exhibiting a low side-effect profile in addition to treating anhedonia. The additional, previously under-appreciated involvement of dopaminergic systems in depression prompted our efforts to develop novel asymmetric trisubstituted and disubstituted pyran derivatives as triple reuptake inhibitors. One of the lead compounds, D-142, exhibited uptake inhibition (Ki) values of 29.3 nM, 14.7 nM and 37.4 nM for norepinephrine, serotonin and dopamine transporters, respectively. Its affinity for serotonin transporter was comparable to fluoxetine , a well known SSRI. In the rat forced swimming test, compound D-142 exhibited potent antidepressant activity in the dose range tested (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and was far more efficacious than the reference compound imipramine. In the mouse tail suspension test, compound D-142 reduced immobility in a dose (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) dependent manner, indicating a potent antidepressant effect. In locomotor activity tests, compound D-142 did not exhibit any stimulation in the same dose ranges. In the extended CNS receptors screening assay this molecule exhibited little or no non-specific interaction in the CNS, indicating high specificity for monoamine transporters. These results advance D-142 as a potential potent antidepressant. PMID:21963455

  17. Breast cancer brain metastases responding to lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line primary systemic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergen, Elisabeth S; Berghoff, Anna S; Rudas, Margaretha; Preusser, Matthias; Bartsch, Rupert

    2015-06-01

    Brain metastases (BM) are diagnosed in up to 40% of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Standard treatment includes local approaches such as whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), radiosurgery, and neurosurgery. The landscape trial established primary systemic therapy as an effective and safe alternative to WBRT in selected patients with Her2-positive BM. We aim to further focus on the role of systemic therapy in oligosymptomatic patients by presenting this case report. We report on a 50-year-old patient diagnosed with multiple BM 5 years after early breast cancer diagnosis. As the patient was asymptomatic and had a favorable diagnosis-specific GPA score, she received primary systemic treatment with T-DM1. She achieved partial remission within the brain for eight treatment cycles and then progressed despite stable extracranial disease. As the patient remained asymptomatic and refused WBRT, we decided upon trastuzumab, lapatinib plus capecitabine as second-line therapy. Another partial remission of BM was observed; to date, she has received 11 treatment cycles without any sign of disease progression. In this case, WBRT was delayed by at least 14 months, again indicating the activity of systemic treatment in BM. Apparently, in selected patients, BM can be controlled with multiple lines of systemic therapy similar to extracranial disease. Further investigation of systemic treatment approaches is therefore warranted.

  18. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Faisal Siddiqui

    Full Text Available A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT, principal component analysis (PCA, and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%. Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities

  19. An Automated and Intelligent Medical Decision Support System for Brain MRI Scans Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Muhammad Faisal; Reza, Ahmed Wasif; Kanesan, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    A wide interest has been observed in the medical health care applications that interpret neuroimaging scans by machine learning systems. This research proposes an intelligent, automatic, accurate, and robust classification technique to classify the human brain magnetic resonance image (MRI) as normal or abnormal, to cater down the human error during identifying the diseases in brain MRIs. In this study, fast discrete wavelet transform (DWT), principal component analysis (PCA), and least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) are used as basic components. Firstly, fast DWT is employed to extract the salient features of brain MRI, followed by PCA, which reduces the dimensions of the features. These reduced feature vectors also shrink the memory storage consumption by 99.5%. At last, an advanced classification technique based on LS-SVM is applied to brain MR image classification using reduced features. For improving the efficiency, LS-SVM is used with non-linear radial basis function (RBF) kernel. The proposed algorithm intelligently determines the optimized values of the hyper-parameters of the RBF kernel and also applied k-fold stratified cross validation to enhance the generalization of the system. The method was tested by 340 patients' benchmark datasets of T1-weighted and T2-weighted scans. From the analysis of experimental results and performance comparisons, it is observed that the proposed medical decision support system outperformed all other modern classifiers and achieves 100% accuracy rate (specificity/sensitivity 100%/100%). Furthermore, in terms of computation time, the proposed technique is significantly faster than the recent well-known methods, and it improves the efficiency by 71%, 3%, and 4% on feature extraction stage, feature reduction stage, and classification stage, respectively. These results indicate that the proposed well-trained machine learning system has the potential to make accurate predictions about brain abnormalities from the

  20. The brain norepinephrine system, stress and cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Valentino, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to psychosocial stress has adverse effects on cardiovascular health, however the stress-sensitive neurocircuitry involved remains to be elucidated. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system position it to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on cardiovascular dysfunction produced by social stress and a major theme highlighted is that differences in coping strategy determine individual differences in social stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. The establishment of different coping strategies and cardiovascular vulnerability during repeated social stress has recently been shown to parallel a unique plasticity in LC afferent regulation, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC. This contrasting regulation of the LC would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The advances described suggest new directions for developing treatments and/or strategies for decreasing stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  1. Foods and food constituents that affect the brain and human behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    Until recently, it was generally believed that brain function was usually independent of day-to-day metabolic changes associated with consumption of food. Although it was acknowledged that peripheral metabolic changes associated with hunger or satiety might affect brain function, other effects of foods on the brain were considered unlikely. However, in 1971, Fernstrom and Wurtman discovered that under certain conditions, the protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of a meal could affect the concentration of a particular brain neurotransmitter. That neurotransmitter, serotonin, participates in the regulation of a variety of central nervous system (CNS) functions including sleep, pain sensitivity, aggression, and patterns of nutrient selection. The activity of other neurotransmitter systems has also been shown to be, under certain conditions, affected by dietary constituents which are given either as ordinary foods or in purified form. For example, the CNS turnover of two catecholamine neurotransmitters, dopamine and norepinephrine, can be altered by ingestion of their amino acid precursor, tyrosine, when neurons that release these monoamines are firing frequently. Similarly, lecithin, a dietary source of choline, and choline itself have been shown to increase the synthesis of acetylcholine when cholinergic neurons are very active. It is possible that other neurotransmitters could also be affected by precursor availability or other, as yet undiscovered peripheral factors governed by food consumption. The effects of food on neurotransmitters and behavior are discussed.

  2. Binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine (AV-133) to the vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsao, H.-H. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-J. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Juang, J.-H. [Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Chung Gung University and Chung Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Skovronsky, Daniel M. [Avid Radiopharmaceuticals, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Yen, T.-C. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chang Gung University and Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Wey, S.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Kung, M.-P. [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)], E-mail: kungmp@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2010-05-15

    The vesicular monoamine transporter type 2 (VMAT2) is highly expressed in pancreatic {beta}-cells and thus has been proposed to be a potential target for measuring {beta}-cell mass (BCM) by molecular imaging. C-11- and F-18-labeled tetrabenazine derivatives targeting VMAT2 have shown some promising results as potential biomarkers for BCM. In the present study, we examined the binding characteristics of 9-fluoropropyl-(+)-dihydrotetrabenzazine ([{sup 18}F]AV-133), a potential PET tracer for BCM imaging, in rat pancreas and rat brain. Methods: Pancreatic exocrine cells and pancreatic islet cells were isolated and purified from Sprague-Dawley rats. Membrane homogenates, prepared from both pancreatic exocrine and islet cells as well as from brain striatum and hypothalamus regions, were used for in vitro binding studies. In vitro and ex vivo autoradiography studies with [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were performed on rat brain and rat pancreas sections. Immunohistochemistry studies were performed to confirm the distribution of VMAT2 on islet {beta}-cells. Results: Excellent binding affinities of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 were observed in rat striatum and hypothalamus homogenates with K{sub d} values of 0.19 and 0.25 nM, respectively. In contrast to single-site binding observed in rat striatum homogenates, rat islet cell homogenates showed two saturable binding sites (site A: K{sub d}=6.76 nM, B{sub max}=60 fmol/mg protein; site B: K{sub d}=241 nM, B{sub max}=1500 fmol/mg protein). Rat exocrine pancreas homogenates showed only a single low-affinity binding site (K{sub d}=209 nM), which was similar to site B in islet cells. In vitro autoradiography of [{sup 18}F]AV-133 using frozen sections of rat pancreas showed specific labeling of islets, as evidenced by co-localization with anti-insulin antibody. Ex vivo VMAT2 pancreatic autoradiography in the rat, however, was not successful, in contrast to the excellent ex vivo autoradiography of VMAT2 binding sites in the brain. In vivo/ex vivo islet

  3. Write, read and answer emails with a dry 'n' wireless brain-computer interface system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinegger, Andreas; Deckert, Lisa; Halder, Sebastian; Barry, Norbert; Faller, Josef; Käthner, Ivo; Hintermüller, Christoph; Wriessnegger, Selina C; Kübler, Andrea; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2014-01-01

    Brain-computer interface (BCI) users can control very complex applications such as multimedia players or even web browsers. Therefore, different biosignal acquisition systems are available to noninvasively measure the electrical activity of the brain, the electroencephalogram (EEG). To make BCIs more practical, hardware and software are nowadays designed more user centered and user friendly. In this paper we evaluated one of the latest innovations in the area of BCI: A wireless EEG amplifier with dry electrode technology combined with a web browser which enables BCI users to use standard webmail. With this system ten volunteers performed a daily life task: Write, read and answer an email. Experimental results of this study demonstrate the power of the introduced BCI system.

  4. Integrating Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Data into the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Research Informatics Systems PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cynthia Harrison -Felix, PhD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Craig Hospital Englewood, CO 80113...Cynthia Harrison -Felix, PhD;Gale Whiteneck, PhD; Jennifer Coker, MPH 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: gale@craighospital.org; jcoker...PARTICIPANTS & OTHER COLLABORATING ORGANIZATIONS What individuals have worked on the project? Name: Cynthia Harrison -Felix, PhD Project Role

  5. Brain, mind, body and society: autonomous system in robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Motomu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper I examine the issues related to the robot with mind. To create a robot with mind aims to recreate neuro function by engineering. The robot with mind is expected not only to process external information by the built-in program and behave accordingly, but also to gain the consciousness activity responding multiple conditions and flexible and interactive communication skills coping with unknown situation. That prospect is based on the development of artificial intelligence in which self-organizing and self-emergent functions have been available in recent years. To date, controllable aspects in robotics have been restricted to data making and programming of cognitive abilities, while consciousness activities and communication skills have been regarded as uncontrollable aspects due to their contingency and uncertainty. However, some researchers of robotics claim that every activity of the mind can be recreated by engineering and is therefore controllable. Based on the development of the cognitive abilities of children and the findings of neuroscience, researchers have attempted to produce the latest artificial intelligence with autonomous learning systems. I conclude that controllability is inconsistent with autonomy in the genuine sense and autonomous robots recreated by engineering cannot be autonomous partners of humans.

  6. Development of image and information management system for Korean standard brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon Cheol; Choi, Do Young; Tack, Gye Rae; Sohn, Jin Hun

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish a reference for image acquisition for completing a standard brain for diverse Korean population, and to develop database management system that saves and manages acquired brain images and personal information of subjects. 3D MP-RAGE (Magnetization Prepared Rapid Gradient Echo) technique which has excellent Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) as well as reduces image acquisition time was selected for anatomical image acquisition, and parameter values were obtained for the optimal image acquisition. Using these standards, image data of 121 young adults (early twenties) were obtained and stored in the system. System was designed to obtain, save, and manage not only anatomical image data but also subjects' basic demographic factors, medical history, handedness inventory, state-trait anxiety inventory, A-type personality inventory, self-assessment depression inventory, mini-mental state examination, intelligence test, and results of personality test via a survey questionnaire. Additionally this system was designed to have functions of saving, inserting, deleting, searching, and printing image data and personal information of subjects, and to have accessibility to them as well as automatic connection setup with ODBC. This newly developed system may have major contribution to the completion of a standard brain for diverse Korean population since it can save and manage their image data and personal information.

  7. From animal model to human brain networking: dynamic causal modeling of motivational systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonen, Tal; Admon, Roee; Podlipsky, Ilana; Hendler, Talma

    2012-05-23

    An organism's behavior is sensitive to different reinforcements in the environment. Based on extensive animal literature, the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposes three separate neurobehavioral systems to account for such context-sensitive behavior, affecting the tendency to react to punishment, reward, or goal-conflict stimuli. The translation of animal findings to complex human behavior, however, is far from obvious. To examine whether the neural networks underlying humans' motivational processes are similar to those proposed by the RST model, we conducted a functional MRI study, in which 24 healthy subjects performed an interactive game that engaged the different motivational systems using distinct time periods (states) of punishment, reward, and conflict. Crucially, we found that the different motivational states elicited activations in brain regions that corresponded exactly to the brain systems underlying RST. Moreover, dynamic causal modeling of each motivational system confirmed that the coupling strengths between the key brain regions of each system were enabled selectively by the appropriate motivational state. These results may shed light on the impairments that underlie psychopathologies associated with dysfunctional motivational processes and provide a translational validity for the RST.

  8. Tenoxicam modulates antioxidant redox system and lipid peroxidation in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naziroğlu, Mustafa; Uğuz, Abdulhadi Cihangir; Gokçimen, Alpaslan; Bülbül, Metin; Karatopuk, Dilek Ulusoy; Türker, Yasin; Cerçi, Celal

    2008-09-01

    We investigated effects of two doses of Tenoxicam, a type 2 cyclooxygenase inhibitor, administration on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant redox system in cortex of the brain in rats. Twenty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups. First group was used as control. 10 and 20 mg/kg body weight Tenoxicam were intramuscularly administrated to rats constituting the second and third groups for 10 days, respectively. Both dose of Tenoxicam administration resulted in significant increase in the glutathione peroxidase activity, reduced glutathione and vitamins C and E of cortex of the brain. The lipid peroxidation levels in the cortex of the brain were significantly decreased by the administration. Vitamin A and beta-carotene concentration was not affected by the administration. There was no statistical difference in all values between 10 and 20 mg Tenoxicam administrated groups. In conclusion, treatment of brain with 10 and 20 mg Tenoxicam has protective effects on the oxidative stress by inhibiting free radical and supporting antioxidant redox system.

  9. Problematic internet use is associated with structural alterations in the brain reward system in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altbäcker, Anna; Plózer, Enikő; Darnai, Gergely; Perlaki, Gábor; Horváth, Réka; Orsi, Gergely; Nagy, Szilvia Anett; Bogner, Péter; Schwarcz, Attila; Kovács, Norbert; Komoly, Sámuel; Clemens, Zsófia; Janszky, József

    2016-12-01

    Neuroimaging findings suggest that excessive Internet use shows functional and structural brain changes similar to substance addiction. Even though it is still under debate whether there are gender differences in case of problematic use, previous studies by-passed this question by focusing on males only or by using gender matched approach without controlling for potential gender effects. We designed our study to find out whether there are structural correlates in the brain reward system of problematic Internet use in habitual Internet user females. T1-weighted Magnetic Resonance (MR) images were collected in 82 healthy habitual Internet user females. Structural brain measures were investigated using both automated MR volumetry and voxel based morphometry (VBM). Self-reported measures of problematic Internet use and hours spent online were also assessed. According to MR volumetry, problematic Internet use was associated with increased grey matter volume of bilateral putamen and right nucleus accumbens while decreased grey matter volume of orbitofrontal cortex (OFC). Similarly, VBM analysis revealed a significant negative association between the absolute amount of grey matter OFC and problematic Internet use. Our findings suggest structural brain alterations in the reward system usually related to addictions are present in problematic Internet use.

  10. Automatic control system of brain temperature by air-surface cooling for therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsuki, T

    2013-01-01

    An automatic control system of brain temperature by air-surface cooling was developed for therapeutic hypothermia, which is increasingly recommended for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy after cardiac arrest and neonatal asphyxia in several guidelines pertinent to resuscitation. Currently, water-surface cooling is the most widespread cooling method in therapeutic hypothermia. However, it requires large electric power for precise control and also needs water-cooling blankets which have potential for compression of patients by its own weight and for water leakage in ICU. Air-surface cooling does not have such problems and is more suitable for clinical use than water-surface cooling, because air has lower specific heat and density as well as the impossibility of the contamination in ICU by its leakage. In the present system, brain temperature of patients is automatically controlled by suitable adjustment of the temperature of the air blowing into the cooling blankets. This adjustment is carried out by the regulation of mixing cool and warm air using proportional control valves. The computer in the developed control apparatus suitably calculates the air temperature and rotation angle of the valves every sampling time on the basis of the optimal-adaptive control algorithm. Thus, the proposed system actualizes automatic control of brain temperature by the inputting only the clinically desired temperature of brain. The control performance of the suggested system was verified by the examination using the mannequin in substitution for an adult patient. In the result, the control error of the head temperature of the mannequin was 0.12 °C on average in spite of the lack of the production capacity of warm air after the re-warming period. Thus, this system serves as a model for the clinically applied system.

  11. In vitro screening of psychoactive drugs by [(35)S]GTPgammaS binding in rat brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Ryouichi; Nagai, Fumiko; Ogata, Akio; Satoh, Kanako

    2007-12-01

    We constructed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale determination method of the psychoactive drugs that acted directly on the monoamine receptor by measuring the activation of [(35)S]guanosine-5'-O-(3-thio)-triphosphate binding to guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). This method can simultaneously measure the effects of three monoamines, namely dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE), in rat brain membranes using a 96-well microplate. Activation of D(1) and D(2) receptors in striatal membranes by DA as well as 5-HT and NEalpha(2) receptors in cortical membranes could be measured. Of 12 tested phenethylamines, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), and 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I) stimulated G protein binding. The other phenethylamines did not affect G protein binding. All 7 tryptamines tested stimulated G protein binding with the following rank order of potency; 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diallyltryptamine (5-MeO-DALT)>5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT)>or=5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT)>5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT)>N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT)>or=alpha-methyltryptamine (AMT). This assay system was able to designate psychoactive drugs as prohibited substances in accordance with criteria set forth by the Tokyo Metropolitan government.

  12. Regulation of Brain Glucose Metabolic Patterns by Protein Phosphorlyation and Drug Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    Suppl3 (2006) SI49-55. 64 15 Hoffmann, P.C., Toon, R., Kleinman, J. and Heller , A., The association of lesion- induced reductions in brain monoamines with...Lipska, B.K., Deep-Soboslay, A, Weickert, C.S., Hyde, TM., Martin, e.E., Herman , M.M. and Kleinman, IE., Critical factors in gene expression in

  13. The MAO A genotype does not modulate resting brain metabolism in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Kriplani, Aarti; Pradhan, Kith; Ma, Jim Yeming; Logan, Jean; Williams, Benjamin; Craig, Ian W.; Telang, Frank; Tomasi, Dardo; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the monoamine-oxidase-A gene has been associated with volumetric changes in corticolimbic regions with differences in their response to relevant emotional tasks. Here we show no changes in baseline regional brain metabolism as a function of genotype indicating that, unchallenged, corticolimbic activity is not modulated by the MAOA genotype. PMID:18706791

  14. Tissue concentration of systemically administered antineoplastic agents in human brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Arati; Grossman, Stuart A.; Blakeley, Jaishri O.

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain-barrier (BBB) limits the penetration of many systemic antineoplastic therapies. Consequently, many agents may be used in clinical studies and clinical practice though they may not achieve therapeutic levels within the tumor. We sought to compile the currently available human data on antineoplastic drug concentrations in brain and tumor tissue according to BBB status. A review of the literature was conducted for human studies providing concentrations of antineoplastic agents in blood and metastatic brain tumors or high-grade gliomas. Studies were considered optimal if they reported simultaneous tissue and blood concentration, multiple sampling times and locations, MRI localization, BBB status at sampling site, tumor histology, and individual subject data. Twenty-Four studies of 19 compounds were included. These examined 18 agents in contrast-enhancing regions of high-grade gliomas, with optimal data for 2. For metastatic brain tumors, adequate data was found for 9 agents. Considerable heterogeneity was found in the measurement value, tumor type, measurement timing, and sampling location within and among studies, limiting the applicability of the results. Tissue to blood ratios ranged from 0.054 for carboplatin to 34 for mitoxantrone in high-grade gliomas, and were lowest for temozolomide (0.118) and etoposide (0.116), and highest for mitoxantrone (32.02) in metastatic tumors. The available data examining the concentration of antineoplastic agents in brain and tumor tissue is sparse and limited by considerable heterogeneity. More studies with careful quantification of antineoplastic agents in brain and tumor tissue is required for the rational development of therapeutic regimens. PMID:21400119

  15. Alleviation of ischemia-induced brain edema by activation of the central histaminergic system in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisawa, Yumi; Adachi, Naoto; Liu, Keyue; Arai, Tatsuru; Nagaro, Takumi

    2008-09-01

    We have reported that facilitation of central histaminergic activity prevents the development of ischemia-induced brain injury. Since cerebral edema is a major cause of brain damage, we studied effects on brain edema of postischemic administration of L-histidine, a precursor of histamine, and thioperamide, a histamine H(3)-receptor antagonist, both of which enhance central histaminergic activity. Focal cerebral ischemia for 2 h was provoked by transient occlusion of the right middle cerebral artery in rats, and the water content and infarct size were determined 24 h after reperfusion. Changes in the extracellular concentration of histamine were examined in the striatum by a microdialysis procedure, and effects of these compounds were evaluated. Repeated administration of L-histidine (1000 mg/kg x 2, i.p.), immediately and 6 h after reperfusion, reduced the increase in the water contents in ischemic regions. Simultaneous administration of thioperamide (5 mg/kg, s.c.) with L-histidine (1000 mg/kg, i.p.) completely prevented edema formation and alleviated brain infarction, although a single dose of L-histidine, immediately after reperfusion, showed no benefits. The striatal histamine level was gradually increased after reperfusion as well as during ischemia. Simultaneous administration of thioperamide with L-histidine markedly increased the brain histamine concentration, and the value increased up to 230% of that in the saline group 5 - 6 h after reperfusion. L-Histidine alone did not affect the increase in the histamine output after ischemia. These findings suggest that further activation of the central histaminergic system after initiation of cerebral ischemia prevents development of ischemia-induced brain edema.

  16. Expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in rat blood, heart and brain during induced systemic hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septelia I. Wanandi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia results in an increased generation of ROS. Until now, little is known about the role of MnSOD - a major endogenous antioxidant enzyme - on the cell adaptation response against hypoxia. The aim of this study was to  determine the MnSOD mRNA expression and levels of specific activity in blood, heart and brain of rats during induced systemic hypoxia.Methods: Twenty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to systemic hypoxia in an hypoxic chamber (at 8-10% O2 for 0, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. The mRNA relative expression of MnSOD was analyzed using Real Time RT-PCR. MnSOD specific activity was determined using xanthine oxidase inhibition assay.Results: The MnSOD mRNA relative expression in rat blood and heart was decreased during early induced systemic hypoxia (day 1 and increased as hypoxia continued, whereas the mRNA expression in brain was increased since day 1 and reached its maximum level at day 7. The result of MnSOD specific activity during early systemic hypoxia was similar to the mRNA expression. Under very late hypoxic condition (day 21, MnSOD specific activity in blood, heart and brain was significantly decreased. We demonstrate a positive correlation between MnSOD mRNA expression and specific activity in these 3 tissues during day 0-14 of induced systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, mRNA expression and specific activity levels in heart strongly correlate with those in blood.Conclusion: The MnSOD expression at early and late phases of induced systemic hypoxia is distinctly regulated. The MnSOD expression in brain differs from that in blood and heart revealing that brain tissue can  possibly survive better from induced systemic hypoxia than heart and blood. The determination of MnSOD expression in blood can be used to describe its expression in heart under systemic hypoxic condition. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:27-33Keywords: MnSOD, mRNA expression, ROS, specific activity, systemic hypoxia

  17. Distinct pharmacological properties and distribution in neurons and endocrine cells of two isoforms of the human vesicular monoamine transporter.

    OpenAIRE

    Erickson, J.D.; Schafer, M K; Bonner, T I; Eiden, L. E.; Weihe, E.

    1996-01-01

    A second isoform of the human vesicular monoamine transporter (hVMAT) has been cloned from a pheochromocytoma cDNA library. The contribution of the two transporter isoforms to monoamine storage in human neuroendocrine tissues was examined with isoform-specific polyclonal antibodies against hVMAT1 and hVMAT2. Central, peripheral, and enteric neurons express only VMAT2. VMAT1 is expressed exclusively in neuroendocrine, including chromaffin and enterochromaffin, cells. VMAT1 and VMAT2 are coexpr...

  18. Changes in the mitochondrial antioxidant systems in neurodegenerative diseases and acute brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkiewicz, Joanna; Albrecht, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Oxidative and nitrosative stress (ONS) contributes to the pathogenesis of most brain maladies, and the magnitude of ONS is related to the ability of cellular antioxidants to neutralize the accumulating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). While the major ROS/RNS scavengers and regenerators of bio-oxidized molecules, superoxide dysmutases (SODs), glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx) and peroxiredoxin (Prx), are distributed in all cellular compartments. This review specifically focuses on the role of the systems operating in mitochondria. There is a growing consensus that the mitochondrial SOD isoform - SOD2 and GSH are critical for the cellular antioxidant defense. Variable changes of the expression or activities of one or more of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems have been documented in the brains derived from human patients and/or in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease), cerebral ischemia, toxic brain cell damage associated with overexposure to mercury or excitotoxins, or hepatic encephalopathy. In many cases, ambiguity of the responses of the different antioxidant systems in one and the same disease needs to be more conclusively evaluated before the balance of the changes is viewed as beneficial or detrimental. Modulation of the mitochondrial antioxidant systems may in the future become a target of antioxidant therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Selectionist models of perceptual and motor systems and implications for functionalist theories of brain function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeke, George N.; Sporns, Olaf

    1990-06-01

    Functionalism is at present widely accepted as a working basis for cognitive science and artificial intelligence. This view holds that psychological phenomena can be adequately described in terms of functional processes carried out in the brain, and that these processes can be understood independently of the detailed structure and mode of development of the brain. In the functionalist view, the brain is analogous to a computer; both can properly be described at the level of symbolic representations and algorithms. However, an analysis of the structure, development, and evolution of the brain makes it highly unlikely that it could be a Turing machine or that brain algorithms could be either acquired by experience in the world or transmitted between generations. An alternative view is that the brain is a selective system in which two different domains of stochastic variation, the world and neural repertoires, become mapped onto each other in an individual, historical manner. Neural systems capable of such mapping can generalize and can deal with novelty in an open-ended environment. Several models have been constructed to test these ideas, including automata of a new kind that can recognize and associate patterns of sensory input by selective mechanisms. In an approach called synthetic neural modelling, the environment, the phenotype, and the nervous system of such an automaton are integrated into a single computer model. One example is Darwin III, a sessile “creature” with an eye and a multi-jointed arm having a sense of touch; its environment consists of simple shapes moving on a featureless background; its nervous system consists of some 50 000 cells of 50 different kinds connected by about 620 000 synaptic junctions. Darwin III can be trained to track moving objects with its eye, to reach out and touch objects with its arm, to categorize objects according to combinations of visual and tactile cues, and to respond in a positive or negative way to such objects

  20. [Research of controlling of smart home system based on P300 brain-computer interface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinjia; Yang, Chengjie

    2014-08-01

    Using electroencephalogram (EEG) signal to control external devices has always been the research focus in the field of brain-computer interface (BCI). This is especially significant for those disabilities who have lost capacity of movements. In this paper, the P300-based BCI and the microcontroller-based wireless radio frequency (RF) technology are utilized to design a smart home control system, which can be used to control household appliances, lighting system, and security devices directly. Experiment results showed that the system was simple, reliable and easy to be populirised.

  1. Systemic platelet dysfunction is the result of local dysregulated coagulation and platelet activation in the brain in a rat model of isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploplis, Victoria A; Donahue, Deborah L; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra J; MorenoCaffaro, Maria; Sheets, Patrick; Thomas, Scott G; Walsh, Mark; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-10-01

    Coagulopathy after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been extensively reported. Clinical studies have identified a strong relationship between diminished platelet-rich thrombus formation, responsiveness to adenosine diphosphate agonism, and severity of TBI. The mechanisms that lead to platelet dysfunction in the acute response to TBI are poorly understood. The development of a rodent model of TBI that mimics the coagulopathy observed clinically has recently been reported. Using immunohistochemical techniques and thromboelastography platelet mapping, the current study demonstrated that the expression of coagulation (tissue factor and fibrin) and platelet activation (P-selectin) markers in the injured brain paralleled the alteration in systemic platelet responsiveness to the agonists, adenosine diphosphate and arachodonic acid. Results of this study demonstrate that local procoagulant changes in the injured brain have profound effects on systemic platelet function.

  2. Brain-targeting study of stearic acid–grafted chitosan micelle drug-delivery system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie YT

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Yi-Ting Xie, Yong-Zhong Du, Hong Yuan, Fu-Qiang HuCollege of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, ChinaPurpose: Therapy for central nervous system disease is mainly restricted by the blood–brain barrier. A drug-delivery system is an effective approach to overcome this barrier. In this research, the potential of polymeric micelles for brain-targeting drug delivery was studied.Methods: Stearic acid–grafted chitosan (CS-SA was synthesized by hydrophobic modification of chitosan with stearic acid. The physicochemical characteristics of CS-SA micelles were investigated. bEnd.3 cells were chosen as model cells to evaluate the internalization ability and cytotoxicity of CS-SA micelles in vitro. Doxorubicin (DOX, as a model drug, was physically encapsulated in CS-SA micelles. The in vivo brain-targeting ability of CS-SA micelles was qualitatively and quantitatively studied by in vivo imaging and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis, respectively. The therapeutic effect of DOX-loaded micelles in vitro was performed on glioma C6 cells.Results: The critical micelle concentration of CS-SA micelles with 26.9% ± 1.08% amino substitute degree was 65 µg/mL. The diameter and surface potential of synthesized CS-SA micelles in aqueous solution was 22 ± 0.98 nm and 36.4 ± 0.71 mV, respectively. CS-SA micelles presented excellent cellular uptake ability on bEnd.3 cells, the IC50 of which was 237.6 ± 6.61 µg/mL. DOX-loaded micelles exhibited slow drug-release behavior, with a cumulative release up to 72% within 48 hours in vitro. The cytotoxicity of DOX-loaded CS-SA micelles against C6 was 2.664 ± 0.036 µg/mL, compared with 0.181 ± 0.066 µg/mL of DOX • HCl. In vivo imaging results indicated that CS-SA was able to transport rapidly across the blood–brain barrier and into the brain. A maximum DOX distribution in brain of 1.01%/g was observed 15 minutes after administration and maintained above 0.45%/g within 1 hour

  3. Efficacy, safety, and patient preference of monoamine oxidase B inhibitors in the treatment of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley J Robottom

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Bradley J RobottomDepartment of Neurology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Parkinson's disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disease and the most treatable. Treatment of PD is symptomatic and generally focuses on the replacement or augmentation of levodopa. A number of options are available for treatment, both in monotherapy of early PD and to treat complications of advanced PD. This review focuses on rasagiline and selegiline, two medications that belong to a class of antiparkinsonian drugs called monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B inhibitors. Topics covered in the review include mechanism of action, efficacy in early and advanced PD, effects on disability, the controversy regarding disease modification, safety, and patient preference for MAO-B inhibitors.Keywords: monoamine oxidase inhibitors, rasagiline, selegiline, Parkinson's disease, efficacy, safety

  4. Desmodeleganine, a new alkaloid from the leaves of Desmodium elegans as a potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Kang-Kang; Yang, Zhong-Duo; Shi, Dan-Feng; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Ming-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Desmodeleganine (1), a new potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor, along with three known alkaloids, bufotenin (2), hydroxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine N(12)-oxide (3), 2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-N, and N-dimethylethylamine (4) were isolated from the leaves of Desmodium elegans. Their structures were elucidated by IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectra. 1 showed strong monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 13.92 ± 1.5 μM, when the IC50 value of iproniazid as a standard was 6.5 ± 0.5 μM. The molecular modeling was also performed to explore the binding mode of compounds 1, 2 at the active site of MAO-A and MAO-B.

  5. The standard-based open workflow system in GeoBrain (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, L.; Yu, G.; Zhao, P.; Deng, M.

    2013-12-01

    GeoBrain is an Earth science Web-service system developed and operated by the Center for Spatial Information Science and Systems, George Mason University. In GeoBrain, a standard-based open workflow system has been implemented to accommodate the automated processing of geospatial data through a set of complex geo-processing functions for advanced production generation. The GeoBrain models the complex geoprocessing at two levels, the conceptual and concrete. At the conceptual level, the workflows exist in the form of data and service types defined by ontologies. The workflows at conceptual level are called geo-processing models and cataloged in GeoBrain as virtual product types. A conceptual workflow is instantiated into a concrete, executable workflow when a user requests a product that matches a virtual product type. Both conceptual and concrete workflows are encoded in Business Process Execution Language (BPEL). A BPEL workflow engine, called BPELPower, has been implemented to execute the workflow for the product generation. A provenance capturing service has been implemented to generate the ISO 19115-compliant complete product provenance metadata before and after the workflow execution. The generation of provenance metadata before the workflow execution allows users to examine the usability of the final product before the lengthy and expensive execution takes place. The three modes of workflow executions defined in the ISO 19119, transparent, translucent, and opaque, are available in GeoBrain. A geoprocessing modeling portal has been developed to allow domain experts to develop geoprocessing models at the type level with the support of both data and service/processing ontologies. The geoprocessing models capture the knowledge of the domain experts and are become the operational offering of the products after a proper peer review of models is conducted. An automated workflow composition has been experimented successfully based on ontologies and artificial

  6. Brain Volume Reductions within Multiple Cognitive Systems in Male Preterm Children at Age Twelve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesler, Shelli R.; Reiss, Allan L.; Vohr, Betty; Watson, Christa; Schneider, Karen C.; Katz, Karol H.; Maller-Kesselman, Jill; Silbereis, John; Constable, R. Todd; Makuch, Robert W.; Ment, Laura R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To more precisely examine regional and subregional microstructural brain changes associated with preterm birth. Study design We obtained brain volumes from 29 preterm children, age 12 years, with no ultrasound scanning evidence of intraventricular hemorrhage or cystic periventricular leukomalacia in the newborn period, and 22 age- and sex-matched term control subjects. Results Preterm male subjects demonstrated significantly lower white matter volumes in bilateral cingulum, corpus callosum, corticospinal tract, prefrontal cortex, superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi compared with term male subjects. Gray matter volumes in prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and temporal lobe also were significantly reduced in preterm male subjects. Brain volumes of preterm female subjects were not significantly different from those of term female control subjects. Voxel-based morphometry results were not correlated with perinatal variables or cognitive outcome. Higher maternal education was associated with higher cognitive performance in preterm male subjects. Conclusions Preterm male children continue to demonstrate abnormal neurodevelopment at 12 years of age. However, brain morphology in preterm female children may no longer differ from that of term female children. The neurodevelopmental abnormalities we detected in preterm male subjects appear to be relatively diffuse, involving multiple neural systems. The relationship between aberrant neurodevelopment and perinatal variables may be mediated by genetic factors, environmental factors, or both reflected in maternal education level. PMID:18346506

  7. An MR Brain Images Classifier System via Particle Swarm Optimization and Kernel Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated abnormal brain detection is extremely of importance for clinical diagnosis. Over last decades numerous methods had been presented. In this paper, we proposed a novel hybrid system to classify a given MR brain image as either normal or abnormal. The proposed method first employed digital wavelet transform to extract features then used principal component analysis (PCA to reduce the feature space. Afterwards, we constructed a kernel support vector machine (KSVM with RBF kernel, using particle swarm optimization (PSO to optimize the parameters C and σ. Fivefold cross-validation was utilized to avoid overfitting. In the experimental procedure, we created a 90 images dataset brain downloaded from Harvard Medical School website. The abnormal brain MR images consist of the following diseases: glioma, metastatic adenocarcinoma, metastatic bronchogenic carcinoma, meningioma, sarcoma, Alzheimer, Huntington, motor neuron disease, cerebral calcinosis, Pick’s disease, Alzheimer plus visual agnosia, multiple sclerosis, AIDS dementia, Lyme encephalopathy, herpes encephalitis, Creutzfeld-Jakob disease, and cerebral toxoplasmosis. The 5-folded cross-validation classification results showed that our method achieved 97.78% classification accuracy, higher than 86.22% by BP-NN and 91.33% by RBF-NN. For the parameter selection, we compared PSO with those of random selection method. The results showed that the PSO is more effective to build optimal KSVM.

  8. Flybrain neuron database: a comprehensive database system of the Drosophila brain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinomiya, Kazunori; Matsuda, Keiji; Oishi, Takao; Otsuna, Hideo; Ito, Kei

    2011-04-01

    The long history of neuroscience has accumulated information about numerous types of neurons in the brain of various organisms. Because such neurons have been reported in diverse publications without controlled format, it is not easy to keep track of all the known neurons in a particular nervous system. To address this issue we constructed an online database called Flybrain Neuron Database (Flybrain NDB), which serves as a platform to collect and provide information about all the types of neurons published so far in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster. Projection patterns of the identified neurons in diverse areas of the brain were recorded in a unified format, with text-based descriptions as well as images and movies wherever possible. In some cases projection sites and the distribution of the post- and presynaptic sites were determined with greater detail than described in the original publication. Information about the labeling patterns of various antibodies and expression driver strains to visualize identified neurons are provided as a separate sub-database. We also implemented a novel visualization tool with which users can interactively examine three-dimensional reconstruction of the confocal serial section images with desired viewing angles and cross sections. Comprehensive collection and versatile search function of the anatomical information reported in diverse publications make it possible to analyze possible connectivity between different brain regions. We analyzed the preferential connectivity among optic lobe layers and the plausible olfactory sensory map in the lateral horn to show the usefulness of such a database.

  9. The Morphogenic Mapping of the Brain and the Design of the Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sheesley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the discovery of a geometrical algorithm that provides a coherent step by step mechanical account of the structure of the nervous system, including the vertebrate brain, the spinal cord, the vertebral column, and the spinal nerves. The morphology of these organs and the observed steps of neural development are well described, consequent of centuries of study. But morphogenesis, the origin and cause of these forms, has not been studied since the last half of the nineteenth century. Neurology does not teach how the brain gained its shape, nor have any causative theories of brain formation been published in recent times. This paper proposes a hypothetical construction based on the discovery of a simple algorithm which generates topologically the form of the brain, the spinal cord, and the vertebral column by the deformation of a gridded segmented sphere by the inversion of its surface. The hypothetical model is in close analogy with nature: the blastula is a segmented gridded sphere which results from the subdivision of the egg. The first step of embryogenesis is gastrulation, where blastula is pressed to enter its own interior, pulling the surface inside out, forming the embryo.

  10. A topological approach unveils system invariances and broken symmetries in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, Arturo; Peters, James F

    2016-05-01

    Symmetries are widespread invariances underscoring countless systems, including the brain. A symmetry break occurs when the symmetry is present at one level of observation but is hidden at another level. In such a general framework, a concept from algebraic topology, namely, the Borsuk-Ulam theorem (BUT), comes into play and sheds new light on the general mechanisms of nervous symmetries. The BUT tells us that we can find, on an n-dimensional sphere, a pair of opposite points that have the same encoding on an n - 1 sphere. This mapping makes it possible to describe both antipodal points with a single real-valued vector on a lower dimensional sphere. Here we argue that this topological approach is useful for the evaluation of hidden nervous symmetries. This means that symmetries can be found when evaluating the brain in a proper dimension, although they disappear (are hidden or broken) when we evaluate the same brain only one dimension lower. In conclusion, we provide a topological methodology for the evaluation of the most general features of brain activity, i.e., the symmetries, cast in a physical/biological fashion that has the potential to be operationalized. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Radiotherapy and systemic chemotherapy for brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito; Minakuchi, Kazuo; Akae, Mayuko [Osaka Prefectural Habikino Hospital (Japan)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Systemic chemotherapy has been performed for brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer based on the idea that the blood-brain-barrier may not function in the tumor tissue. In order to elucidate the role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in this situation, a retrospective study was performed. Response rates to radiotherapy and chemotherapy were 55% and 31%, respectively. The median survival times (MST) of radiotherapy alone, chemotherapy alone and combined therapy were 1.6, 4.0 and 6.1 months, respectively, and there were significant differences between radiotherapy alone and combined therapy and between chemotherapy alone and combined therapy. Forty-nine percent of patients who were treated with radiotherapy alone, 63% with chemotherapy alone and 42% with combined therapy died of brain metastasis. The MST of the patients with no prior therapy, relapsed patients whose response to the initial chemotherapy was CR and relapsed patients whose response were PR, were 6.1, 6.1 and 3.3 months, respectively. In the former 2 groups, the presence of brain metastasis is not considered to be a contraindication for chemotherapy. However, chemotherapy should be combined with radiotherapy since relative poor survival and high frequency of death due to tumor were observed when treated with chemotherapy alone, and radiotherapy is considered to be useful as a palliative treatment because of its high response rate and low toxicity. (author)

  12. Primary lymphoma of the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brain lymphoma; Cerebral lymphoma; Primary lymphoma of the central nervous system; Lymphoma - brain ... The cause of primary brain lymphoma is not known. People with a weakened immune system are at high risk for primary lymphoma of the brain. ...

  13. Interacting noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems shift human brain activation patterns during encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Stegeren, Anda H; Roozendaal, Benno; Kindt, Merel; Wolf, Oliver T; Joëls, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Emotionally arousing experiences are usually well retained, an effect that depends on the release of adrenal stress hormones. Animal studies have shown that corticosterone and noradrenaline - representing the two main stress hormone systems - act in concert to enhance memory formation by actions involving the amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we test whether interactions between these two stress hormone systems also affect human memory formation as well as the associated pattern of brain activation. To this end, forty-eight male human subjects received hydrocortisone, yohimbine or both before presentation of emotional and neutral pictures. Activity in the amygdala, hippocampus and PFC was monitored with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) during encoding of these stimuli, when hormonal levels were elevated. Memory performance was tested 1 week later. We investigated whether an increased level of one of the two hormone systems would lead to differential effects compared to the combined application of the drugs on brain activation and memory performance. We report that the application of cortisol led to an overall enhancing effect on recognition memory, with no significant additional effect of yohimbine. However, during encoding the brain switched from amygdala/hippocampus activation with either hormone alone, to a strong deactivation of prefrontal areas under the influence of the combination of both exogenous hormones. Although we did not find evidence that exogenous stimulation of the noradrenergic and corticosteroid systems led to significant interaction effects on memory performance in this experiment, we conclude that stress hormone levels during encoding did differentially determine the activation pattern of the brain circuits here involved.

  14. The circadian timing system in the brain of the fifth larval instar of Rhodnius prolixus (hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe; Terry, Katherine L; Steel, Colin G H

    2010-04-15

    The brain of larval Rhodnius prolixus releases neurohormones with a circadian rhythm, indicating that a clock system exists in the larval brain. Larvae also possess a circadian locomotor rhythm. The present paper is a detailed analysis of the distribution and axonal projections of circadian clock cells in the brain of the fifth larval instar. Clock cells are identified as neurons that exhibit circadian cycling of both PER and TIM proteins. A group of eight lateral clock neurons (LNs) in the proximal optic lobe also contain pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) throughout their axons, enabling their detailed projections to be traced. LNs project to the accessory medulla and thence laterally toward the compound eye and medially into a massive area of arborizations in the anterior protocerebrum. Fine branches radiate from this area to most of the protocerebrum. A second group of clock cells (dorsal neurons [DNs]), situated in the posterior dorsal protocerebrum, are devoid of PDF. The DNs receive two fine axons from the LNs, indicating that clock cells throughout the brain are integrated into a timing network. Two axons of the LNs cross the midline, presumably coordinating the clock networks of left and right sides. The neuroarchitecture of this timing system is much more elaborate than any previously described for a larval insect and is very similar to those described in adult insects. This is the first report that an insect timing system regulates rhythmicity in both the endocrine system and behavior, implying extensive functional parallels with the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Systemic PaO2 oscillations cause mild brain injury in a pig model

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Klaus U.; Johannes, Amelie; Brückner, Melanie; Thomas, Rainer; Matthews, Stephan; Frauenknecht, Katrin; Leukel, Petra; Mazur, Johanna; Poplawski, Alicia; Muellenbach, Ralf; Sommer, Clemens J.; Thal, Serge C.; Engelhard, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Systemic PaO2 oscillations occur during cyclic recruitment and derecruitment of atelectasis in acute respiratory failure and might harm brain tissue integrity. DESIGN: Controlled animal study. SETTING: University research laboratory. SUBJECTS: Adult anesthetized pigs. INTERVENTIONS: Pigs were randomized to a control group (anesthesia and extracorporeal circulation for 20 hr with constant PaO2, n = 10) or an oscillation group (anesthesia and extracorporeal circulation for 20 hr with...

  16. A new system for cutting brain tissue preserving vessels: water jet cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, A J; Nowak, G; Rentzsch, O; Arnold, H; Diebold, J; Baretton, G

    1989-01-01

    The water jet cutting system allows transaction and dissection of biological structures with little bleeding. Structures of higher tissue rigidity remain unchanged while softer tissues are mechanically dissected. In brain tissue, all vessels larger than 20 microns are left intact after the passage of the jet stream with a pressure of up to 5 bar, and therefore vessels can be isolated selectively from the surrounding tissue. Oedema is present adjacent to the cut and no increase of temperature occurs.

  17. Altered monoamine and acylcarnitine metabolites in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects with depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a frequent comorbidity in HIV infection that has been associated with worse treatment outcomes and increased mortality. Recent studies suggest that increased innate immune activation and tryptophan catabolism are associated with higher risk of depression in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms leading to depression remain poorly understood. Methods The severity of depressive symptoms was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory or Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Untargeted metabolomic profiling of plasma from 104 subjects (68 HIV-positive and 36 HIV-negative) across three independent cohorts was performed using liquid or gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was by Bioplex array. Bioinformatic analysis was performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results Decreased monoamine metabolites (phenylacetate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate) and acylcarnitines (propionylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, isovalerylcarnitine, 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine) in plasma distinguished depressed subjects from controls in HIV-positive and HIV-negative cohorts, and these alterations correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HIV-positive subjects, acylcarnitines and other markers of mitochondrial function correlated inversely with tryptophan catabolism, a marker of IFN responses, suggesting inter-relationships between inflammatory pathways, tryptophan catabolism, and metabolic alterations associated with depression. Altered metabolites mapped to pathways involved in monoamine metabolism, mitochondrial function, and inflammation, suggesting a model in which complex relationships between monoamine metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics contribute to biological mechanisms involved in depression that may be augmented by inflammation during HIV infection. Conclusions Integrated approaches targeting inflammation, monoamine metabolism, and mitochondrial pathways may be important for

  18. Genetic studies of two inherited human phenotypes : Hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Balciuniene, Jorune

    2001-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of genetic factors underlying two inherited human phenotypes: hearing loss and monoamine oxidase activity. Non-syndromic hearing loss segregating in a Swedish family was tested for linkage to 13 previously reported candidate loci for hearing disabilities. Linkage was found to two loci: DFNA12 (llq22-q24) and DFNA2 (lp32). A detailed analysis of the phenotypes and haplotypes shared by the affected individuals supported the hypothesis of digenic inheri...

  19. Synthesis, inhibition and binding of simple non-nitrogen inhibitors of monoamine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Mikkel Due; Boye, Søren Valdgård; Nielsen, Erik Holm; Willumsen, Jeanette; Sinning, Steffen; Wiborg, Ove; Bols, Mikael

    2007-06-15

    A series of simple truncated analogues of phenyl tropanes, 2-arylcycloalk-1-enyl carboxylic acid methylesters, were prepared and investigated for their activity towards the dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine transporters. The compounds were prepared from cyclic ketoesters, which were converted to enolic triflates and reacted with arylboronates using the Suzuki coupling. For comparison the corresponding piperidines were also made and investigated. The new compounds inhibit monoamine-transporters with Ki values ranging from 0.1 to 1000 microM.

  20. A Measure for Brain Complexity: Relating Functional Segregation and Integration in the Nervous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tononi, Giulio; Sporns, Olaf; Edelman, Gerald M.

    1994-05-01

    In brains of higher vertebrates, the functional segregation of local areas that differ in their anatomy and physiology contrasts sharply with their global integration during perception and behavior. In this paper, we introduce a measure, called neural complexity (C_N), that captures the interplay between these two fundamental aspects of brain organization. We express functional segregation within a neural system in terms of the relative statistical independence of small subsets of the system and functional integration in terms of significant deviations from independence of large subsets. C_N is then obtained from estimates of the average deviation from statistical independence for subsets of increasing size. C_N is shown to be high when functional segregation coexists with integration and to be low when the components of a system are either completely independent (segregated) or completely dependent (integrated). We apply this complexity measure in computer simulations of cortical areas to examine how some basic principles of neuroanatomical organization constrain brain dynamics. We show that the connectivity patterns of the cerebral cortex, such as a high density of connections, strong local connectivity organizing cells into neuronal groups, patchiness in the connectivity among neuronal groups, and prevalent reciprocal connections, are associated with high values of C_N. The approach outlined here may prove useful in analyzing complexity in other biological domains such as gene regulation and embryogenesis.

  1. Towards Effective Non-Invasive Brain-Computer Interfaces Dedicated to Gait Rehabilitation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Castermans

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, significant progress has been made in the field of walk rehabilitation. Motor cortex signals in bipedal monkeys have been interpreted to predict walk kinematics. Epidural electrical stimulation in rats and in one young paraplegic has been realized to partially restore motor control after spinal cord injury. However, these experimental trials are far from being applicable to all patients suffering from motor impairments. Therefore, it is thought that more simple rehabilitation systems are desirable in the meanwhile. The goal of this review is to describe and summarize the progress made in the development of non-invasive brain-computer interfaces dedicated to motor rehabilitation systems. In the first part, the main principles of human locomotion control are presented. The paper then focuses on the mechanisms of supra-spinal centers active during gait, including results from electroencephalography, functional brain imaging technologies [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, positron-emission tomography (PET, single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT] and invasive studies. The first brain-computer interface (BCI applications to gait rehabilitation are then presented, with a discussion about the different strategies developed in the field. The challenges to raise for future systems are identified and discussed. Finally, we present some proposals to address these challenges, in order to contribute to the improvement of BCI for gait rehabilitation.

  2. Monoamine fluctuations during the reproductive cycle of the Pacific lion's paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, J Armando; Maeda-Martínez, Alfonso N; Croll, Roger P; Acosta-Salmón, Héctor

    2009-11-01

    The Pacific lion's paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus has been one of the most important commercial species of mollusc in the Baja California peninsula in Mexico since 1990. This species is a functional hermaphrodite with tropical and sub-tropical distributions and experiences wide annual temperature oscillations influencing its physiological functions. We determined norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin (5-HT) concentrations in different organs (female and male gonads, digestive gland, adductor muscle, gill, mantle, and foot) of N. subnodosus, at 6 reproductive stages (resting, initial, maturing, mature, partially spent and fully spent). Monoamine concentrations were determined by HPLC fitted with an electrochemical detector. Results indicated that monoamine concentrations increased during maturing stage, peaked at mature stage and declined after spawning. NE concentrations were higher than the rest of monoamines followed by DA, and 5-HT. NE was present in all organs at all reproductive stages. DA concentrations were higher in the gill and digestive gland during all stages. 5-HT was only detectable in the male gonadic portion at all stages except at spent stage. NE was the most abundant neurotransmitter found in the female gonad of N. subnodosus, while 5-HT was the most abundant neurotransmitter found in the male gonad. Furthermore, these two neurotransmitters accumulated in the respective gonad tissues during the initial reproductive stages I to IV and then declined after spawning (stages V and VI). This suggests that this species utilized different neurotransmitters specific for each gender and that this utilization was related to the reproductive cycle.

  3. Cognitive abnormalities and hippocampal alterations in monoamine oxidase A and B knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chanpreet; Bortolato, Marco; Bali, Namrata; Godar, Sean C; Scott, Anna L; Chen, Kevin; Thompson, Richard F; Shih, Jean C

    2013-07-30

    The monoamine oxidase isoenzymes (MAOs) A and B play important roles in the homeostasis of monoaminergic neurotransmitters. The combined deficiency of MAO A and B results in significantly elevated levels of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine), norepinephrine, dopamine, and β-phenylethylamine; in humans and mice, these neurochemical changes are accompanied by neurodevelopmental perturbations as well as autistic-like responses. Ample evidence indicates that normal levels of monoamines in the hippocampus, amygdala, frontal cortex, and cerebellum are required for the integrity of learning and memory. Thus, in the present study, the cognitive status of MAO A/B knockout (KO) mice was examined with a wide array of behavioral tests. In comparison with male wild-type littermates, MAO A/B KO mice exhibited abnormally high and overgeneralized fear conditioning and enhanced eye-blink conditioning. These alterations were accompanied by significant increases in hippocampal long-term potentiation and alterations in the relative expression of NMDA glutamate receptor subunits. Our data suggest that chronic elevations of monoamines, because of the absence of MAO A and MAO B, cause functional alterations that are accompanied with changes in the cellular mechanisms underlying learning and memory. The characteristics exhibited by MAO A/B KO mice highlight the potential of these animals as a useful tool to provide further insight into the molecular bases of disorders associated with abnormal monoaminergic profiles.

  4. Altered serous levels of monoamine neurotransmitter metabolites in patiens with refractory and non-refractory depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guiqing Zhang; Yanxia Zhang; Jianxia Yang; Min Hu; Yueqi Zhang; Xia Liang

    2012-01-01

    The study examined plasma metabolite changes of monoamine neurotransmitters in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) and non-TRD before and after therapy. All 30 TRD and 30 non-TRD patients met the diagnostic criteria for a depressive episode in accordance with the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision. Before treatment, and at 4, 6, and 8 weeks after treatment, the plasma metabolite products of monoamine neurotransmitters in TRD group, including 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol and homovanillic acid, were significantly lower than those in the non-TRD group. After two types of anti-depressive therapy with 5-serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, combined with psychotherapy, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores were significantly reduced in both groups of patients, and the serous levels of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl ethylene glycol were significantly increased. In contrast, the homovanillic acid level exhibited no significant change. The levels of plasma metabolite products of peripheral monoamine neurotransmitters in depressive patients may predict the degree of depression and the therapeutic effects of treatment.

  5. Antidepressant activity: contribution of brain microdialysis in knock-out mice to the understanding of BDNF/5-HT transporter/5-HT autoreceptor interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain M Gardier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Why antidepressants vary in terms of efficacy is currently unclear. Despite the leadership of Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of depression, the precise neurobiological mechanisms involved in their therapeutic action are poorly understood. A better knowledge of molecular interactions between monoaminergic system, pre- and post-synaptic partners, brain neuronal circuits and regions involved may help to overcome limitations of current treatments and to identify new therapeutic targets. Intracerebral in vivo microdialysis (ICM already provided important information about the brain mechanism of action of antidepressants first in anesthetized rats in the early 90s, and since then in conscious wild-type or knockout mice. The principle of ICM is based on the balance between release of neurotransmitters (e.g., monoamines, and re-uptake by selective transporters (e.g., SERT for serotonin 5-HT. Complementary to electrophysiology, this technique reflects presynaptic monoamines release and intrasynaptic events corresponding to ≈ 80% of whole brain tissue content. The inhibitory role of serotonergic autoreceptors infers that they limit somatodendritic and nerve terminal 5-HT release. It has been proposed that activation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor sub-types limit the antidepressant-like activity of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRI. This hypothesis is based partially on results obtained in ICM experiments performed in naïve, non-stressed Rodents. The present review will first remind the principle and methodology of ICM performed in mice. The crucial need of developing animal models that display anxiety and depression-like behaviors, neurochemical and brain morphological phenotypes reminiscent of these mood disorders in Human, will be underlined. Recently developed genetic mouse models have been generated to independently manipulate 5-HT1A auto and hetero-receptors and ICM helped to clarify the role of the

  6. Acupuncture, the Limbic System, and the Anticorrelated Networks of the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Kathleen K.S.; Marina, Ovidiu; Liu, Jing; Rosen, Bruce R.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the mechanism of acupuncture action was revolutionized by the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Over the past decade, our fMRI studies of healthy subjects have contributed substantially to elucidating the central effect of acupuncture on the human brain. These studies have shown that acupuncture stimulation, when associated with sensations comprising deqi, evokes deactivation of a limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, which encompasses the limbic system, as well as activation of somatosensory brain regions. These networks closely match the default mode network and the anti-correlated task-positive network described in the literature. We have also shown that the effect of acupuncture on the brain is integrated at multiple levels, down to the brainstem and cerebellum. Our studies support the hypothesis that the effect of acupuncture on the brain goes beyond the effect of attention on the default mode network or the somatosensory stimulation of acupuncture needling. The amygdala and hypothalamus, in particular, show decreased activation during acupuncture stimulation that is not commonly associated with default mode network activity. At the same time, our research shows that acupuncture stimulation needs to be done carefully, limiting stimulation when the resulting sensations are very strong or when sharp pain is elicited. When acupuncture induced sharp pain, our studies show that the deactivation was attenuated or reversed in direction. Our results suggest that acupuncture mobilizes the functionally anti-correlated networks of the brain to mediate its actions, and that the effect is dependent on the psychophysical response. In this work we also discuss multiple avenues of future research, including the role of neurotransmitters, the effect of different acupuncture techniques, and the potential clinical application of our research findings to disease states including chronic pain, major depression, schizophrenia, autism, and Alzheimer

  7. Neuroticism modulates brain visuo-vestibular and anxiety systems during a virtual rollercoaster task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccelli, Roberta; Indovina, Iole; Staab, Jeffrey P; Nigro, Salvatore; Augimeri, Antonio; Lacquaniti, Francesco; Passamonti, Luca

    2017-02-01

    Different lines of research suggest that anxiety-related personality traits may influence the visual and vestibular control of balance, although the brain mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. To our knowledge, this is the first functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study that investigates how individual differences in neuroticism and introversion, two key personality traits linked to anxiety, modulate brain regional responses and functional connectivity patterns during a fMRI task simulating self-motion. Twenty-four healthy individuals with variable levels of neuroticism and introversion underwent fMRI while performing a virtual reality rollercoaster task that included two main types of trials: (1) trials simulating downward or upward self-motion (vertical motion), and (2) trials simulating self-motion in horizontal planes (horizontal motion). Regional brain activity and functional connectivity patterns when comparing vertical versus horizontal motion trials were correlated with personality traits of the Five Factor Model (i.e., neuroticism, extraversion-introversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness). When comparing vertical to horizontal motion trials, we found a positive correlation between neuroticism scores and regional activity in the left parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC). For the same contrast, increased functional connectivity between the left PIVC and right amygdala was also detected as a function of higher neuroticism scores. Together, these findings provide new evidence that individual differences in personality traits linked to anxiety are significantly associated with changes in the activity and functional connectivity patterns within visuo-vestibular and anxiety-related systems during simulated vertical self-motion. Hum Brain Mapp 38:715-726, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Coculture system with an organotypic brain slice and 3D spheroid of carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Dehghani, Faramarz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-10-09

    Patients with cerebral metastasis of carcinomas have a poor prognosis. However, the process at the metastatic site has barely been investigated, in particular the role of the resident (stromal) cells. Studies in primary carcinomas demonstrate the influence of the microenvironment on metastasis, even on prognosis(1,2). Especially the tumor associated macrophages (TAM) support migration, invasion and proliferation(3). Interestingly, the major target sites of metastasis possess tissue-specific macrophages, such as Kupffer cells in the liver or microglia in the CNS. Moreover, the metastatic sites also possess other tissue-specific cells, like astrocytes. Recently, astrocytes were demonstrated to foster proliferation and persistence of cancer cells(4,5). Therefore, functions of these tissue-specific cell types seem to be very important in the process of brain metastasis(6,7). Despite these observations, however, up to now there is no suitable in vivo/in vitro model available to directly visualize glial reactions during cerebral metastasis formation, in particular by bright field microscopy. Recent in vivo live imaging of carcinoma cells demonstrated their cerebral colonization behavior(8). However, this method is very laborious, costly and technically complex. In addition, these kinds of animal experiments are restricted to small series and come with a substantial stress for the animals (by implantation of the glass plate, injection of tumor cells, repetitive anaesthesia and long-term fixation). Furthermore, in vivo imaging is thus far limited to the visualization of the carcinoma cells, whereas interactions with resident cells have not yet been illustrated. Finally, investigations of human carcinoma cells within immunocompetent animals are impossible(8). For these reasons, we established a coculture system consisting of an organotypic mouse brain slice and epithelial cells embedded in matrigel (3D cell sphere). The 3D carcinoma cell spheres were placed directly next to

  9. A system architecture for sharing de-identified, research-ready brain scans and health information across clinical imaging centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, Ann L; van Erp, Theo G M; Kesselman, Carl; D'Arcy, Mike; Sobell, Janet; Keator, David; Dahm, Lisa; Murry, Jim; Law, Meng; Hasso, Anton; Ames, Joseph; Macciardi, Fabio; Potkin, Steven G

    2012-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of brain disorders increasingly relies on the costly collection of large standardized brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets. Moreover, the clinical interpretation of brain scans benefits from compare and contrast analyses of scans from patients with similar, and sometimes rare, demographic, diagnostic, and treatment status. A solution to both needs is to acquire standardized, research-ready clinical brain scans and to build the information technology infrastructure to share such scans, along with other pertinent information, across hospitals. This paper describes the design, deployment, and operation of a federated imaging system that captures and shares standardized, de-identified clinical brain images in a federation across multiple institutions. In addition to describing innovative aspects of the system architecture and our initial testing of the deployed infrastructure, we also describe the Standardized Imaging Protocol (SIP) developed for the project and our interactions with the Institutional Review Board (IRB) regarding handling patient data in the federated environment.

  10. Real-Time Brain-Computer Interface System Based on Motor Imagery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tie-Jun Liu; Ping Yang; Xu-Yong Peng; Yu Huang; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) real-time system based on motor imagery translates the user's motor intention into a real-time control signal for peripheral equipments.A key problem to be solved for practical applications is real-time data collection and processing.In this paper,a real-time BCI system is implemented on computer with electroencephalogram amplifier.In our implementation,the on-line voting method is adopted for feedback control strategy,and the voting results are used to control the cursor horizontal movement.Three subjects take part in the experiment.The results indicate that the best accuracy is 90%.

  11. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    with a DLP projector and a CCD camera is set up on a model of the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT). Methods to reconstruct 3D point clouds of simple surfaces based on phase-shifting interferometry (PSI) are demonstrated. The projector and camera are calibrated using a simple stereo vision procedure......Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light...

  12. Hybrid EEG-EOG brain-computer interface system for practical machine control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsawad, Yunyong; Wongsawat, Yodchanan; Parnichkun, Manukid

    2010-01-01

    Practical issues such as accuracy with various subjects, number of sensors, and time for training are important problems of existing brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. In this paper, we propose a hybrid framework for the BCI system that can make machine control more practical. The electrooculogram (EOG) is employed to control the machine in the left and right directions while the electroencephalogram (EEG) is employed to control the forword, no action, and complete stop motions of the machine. By using only 2-channel biosignals, the average classification accuracy of more than 95% can be achieved.

  13. Functional genomics of the brain: uncovering networks in the CNS using a systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Genevieve

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is undoubtedly the most complex human organ system in terms of its diverse functions, cellular composition, and connections. Attempts to capture this diversity experimentally were the foundation on which the field of neurobiology was built. Until now though, techniques were either painstakingly slow or insufficient in capturing this heterogeneity. In addition, the combination of multiple layers of information needed for a complete picture of neuronal diversity from the epigenome to the proteome requires an even more complex compilation of data. In this era of high-throughput genomics though, the ability to isolate and profile neurons and brain tissue has increased tremendously and now requires less effort. Both microarrays and next-generation sequencing have identified neuronal transcriptomes and signaling networks involved in normal brain development, as well as in disease. However, the expertise needed to organize and prioritize the resultant data remains substantial. A combination of supervised organization and unsupervised analyses are needed to fully appreciate the underlying structure in these datasets. When utilized effectively, these analyses have yielded striking insights into a number of fundamental questions in neuroscience on topics ranging from the evolution of the human brain to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Future studies will incorporate these analyses with behavioral and physiological data from patients to more efficiently move toward personalized therapeutics.

  14. Systems Biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gastone eCastellani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of omic sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non invasive techniques such as imaging, Functional Magnetic Resonance and Electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an alphabet derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals.

  15. Implementation of nonlinear registration of brain atlas based on piecewise grid system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Gu, Lixu; Xu, Jianrong

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a multi-step registration method of brain atlas and clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) data based on Thin-Plate Splines (TPS) and Piecewise Grid System (PGS) is presented. The method can help doctors to determine the corresponding anatomical structure between patient image and the brain atlas by piecewise nonlinear registration. Since doctors mostly pay attention to particular Region of Interest (ROI), and a global nonlinear registration is quite time-consuming which is not suitable for real-time clinical application, we propose a novel method to conduct linear registration in global area before nonlinear registration is performed in selected ROI. The homogenous feature points are defined to calculate the transform matrix between patient data and the brain atlas to conclude the mapping function. Finally, we integrate the proposed approach into an application of neurosurgical planning and guidance system which lends great efficiency in both neuro-anatomical education and guiding of neurosurgical operations. The experimental results reveal that the proposed approach can keep an average registration error of 0.25mm in near real-time manner.

  16. Systems biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Gastone; Intrator, Nathan; Remondini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of “omic” sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non-invasive techniques such as imaging, functional magnetic resonance and electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an “alphabet” derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals. PMID:25206359

  17. Systems biology and brain activity in neuronal pathways by smart device and advanced signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Gastone; Intrator, Nathan; Remondini, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary biomedicine is producing large amount of data, especially within the fields of "omic" sciences. Nevertheless, other fields, such as neuroscience, are producing similar amount of data by using non-invasive techniques such as imaging, functional magnetic resonance and electroencephalography. Nowadays a big challenge and a new research horizon for Systems Biology is to develop methods to integrate and model this data in an unifying framework capable to disentangle this amazing complexity. In this paper we show how methods from genomic data analysis can be applied to brain data. In particular the concept of pathways, networks and multiplex are discussed. These methods can lead to a clear distinction of various regimes of brain activity. Moreover, this method could be the basis for a Systems Biology analysis of brain data and for the integration of these data in a multivariate and multidimensional framework. The feasibility of this integration is strongly dependent from the feature extraction method used. In our case we used an "alphabet" derived from a multi-resolution analysis that is capable to capture the most relevant information from these complex signals.

  18. Primo Vascular System in the Subarachnoid Space of a Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Ho Moon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Recently, a novel circulatory system, the primo vascular system (PVS, was found in the brain ventricles and in the central canal of the spinal cord of a rat. The aim of the current work is to detect the PVS along the transverse sinuses between the cerebrum and the cerebellum of a mouse brain. Materials and Methods. The PVS in the subarachnoid space was analyzed after staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI and phalloidin in order to identify the PVS. With confocal microscopy and polarization microscopy, the primo vessel underneath the sagittal sinus was examined. The primo nodes under the transversal sinuses were observed after peeling off the dura and pia maters of the brain. Results. The primo vessel underneath the superior sagittal sinus was observed and showed linear optical polarization, similarly to the rabbit and the rat cases. The primo nodes were observed under the left and the right transverse sinuses at distances of 3,763 μm and 5,967 μm. The average size was 155 μm × 248 μm. Conclusion. The observation of primo vessels was consistent with previous observations in rabbits and rats, and primo nodes under the transverse sinuses were observed for the first time in this work.

  19. The Brain's concepts: the role of the Sensory-motor system in conceptual knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallese, Vittorio; Lakoff, George

    2005-05-01

    Concepts are the elementary units of reason and linguistic meaning. They are conventional and relatively stable. As such, they must somehow be the result of neural activity in the brain. The questions are: Where? and How? A common philosophical position is that all concepts-even concepts about action and perception-are symbolic and abstract, and therefore must be implemented outside the brain's sensory-motor system. We will argue against this position using (1) neuroscientific evidence; (2) results from neural computation; and (3) results about the nature of concepts from cognitive linguistics. We will propose that the sensory-motor system has the right kind of structure to characterise both sensory-motor and more abstract concepts. Central to this picture are the neural theory of language and the theory of cogs, according to which, brain structures in the sensory-motor regions are exploited to characterise the so-called "abstract" concepts that constitute the meanings of grammatical constructions and general inference patterns.

  20. Effects of heavy ion radiation on the brain vascular system and embryonic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T. C.; Tobias, C. A.

    Using neonatal rats as a model system, we investigated the response of the brain vascular system to ionizing radiation and found that distinct petechial hemorrages developed in the cerebral cortex within a few hours after irradiation, reached a maximum about 13 to 24 hours, and decreased exponentially with time. No brain hemorrhage was found in neonatal rats 12 days after irradiation. Our experimental results indicate that a dose of a few hundred rad of X rays can induce a significant number of hemorrhages in the brain, and the number of lesions increases exponentially with dose. Heavy ions induce more hemorrhages than X rays for a given dose, and the RBE for 670 MeV/u neon particles ranges from about 2.0 for low doses to about 1.4 for high doses. A histological study on the hemorrhages indicates that a large number of red blood cells leak from the blood vessels. The radiation-induced hemorrhages may be a result of some capillary membrane damages or reproductive death of some blood vessel epithelial cells. The fast onset of hemorrhage after irradiation suggests that some membrane damage may be involved. The effect of heavy-ion radiation on the embryonic development was studied with energetic iron particles. Pregnant mice were whole-body irradiated with 600 MeV/u iron particles on day 6 of gestation and were sacrificed 12 days after irradiation. Various physical abnormalities were observed, and embryos irradiated with 1 rad iron particles showed retardation of body development.

  1. Neurotransmitter Systems in a Mild Blast Traumatic Brain Injury Model: Catecholamines and Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Lizan; Arborelius, Ulf P; Yoshitake, Takashi; Kehr, Jan; Hökfelt, Tomas; Risling, Mårten; Agoston, Denes

    2015-08-15

    Exposure to improvised explosive devices can result in a unique form of traumatic brain injury--blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). At the mild end of the spectrum (mild bTBI [mbTBI]), there are cognitive and mood disturbances. Similar symptoms have been observed in post-traumatic stress disorder caused by exposure to extreme psychological stress without physical injury. A role of the monoaminergic system in mood regulation and stress is well established but its involvement in mbTBI is not well understood. To address this gap, we used a rodent model of mbTBI and detected a decrease in immobility behavior in the forced swim test at 1 d post-exposure, coupled with an increase in climbing behavior, but not after 14 d or later, possibly indicating a transient increase in anxiety-like behavior. Using in situ hybridization, we found elevated messenger ribonucleic acid levels of both tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase 2 in the locus coeruleus and the dorsal raphe nucleus, respectively, as early as 2 h post-exposure. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis 1 d post-exposure primarily showed elevated noradrenaline levels in several forebrain regions. Taken together, we report that exposure to mild blast results in transient changes in both anxiety-like behavior and brain region-specific molecular changes, implicating the monoaminergic system in the pathobiology of mbTBI.

  2. Context, emotion, and the strategic pursuit of goals: Interactions among multiple brain systems controlling motivated behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron J Gruber

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Motivated behaviour exhibits properties that change with experience and partially dissociate among a number of brain structures. Here, we review evidence from rodent experiments demonstrating that multiple brain systems acquire information in parallel and either cooperate or compete for behavioural control. We propose a conceptual model of systems interaction wherein a ventral emotional memory network involving ventral striatum, amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex triages behavioural responding to stimuli according to their associated affective outcomes. This system engages autonomic and postural responding (avoiding, ignoring, approaching in accordance with associated stimulus valence (negative, neutral, positive, but does not engage particular operant responses. Rather, this emotional system suppresses or invigorates actions that are selected through competition between goal-directed control involving dorsomedial striatum and habitual control involving dorsolateral striatum. The hippocampus provides contextual specificity to the emotional system, and provides an information rich input to the goal-directed system for navigation and discriminations involving ambiguous contexts, complex sensory configurations, or temporal ordering. The rapid acquisition and high capacity for episodic associations in the emotional system may unburden the more complex goal-directed system and reduce interference in the habit system from processing contingencies of neutral stimuli. Interactions among these systems likely involve inhibitory mechanisms and neuromodulation in the basal ganglia to form a dominant response strategy. Innate traits, training methods, and task demands contribute to the nature of these interactions, which can include incidental learning in non-dominant systems. Addition of these features to reinforcement learning models of decision making may better align theoretical predictions with behavioural and neural

  3. Context, emotion, and the strategic pursuit of goals: interactions among multiple brain systems controlling motivated behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Aaron J; McDonald, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Motivated behavior exhibits properties that change with experience and partially dissociate among a number of brain structures. Here, we review evidence from rodent experiments demonstrating that multiple brain systems acquire information in parallel and either cooperate or compete for behavioral control. We propose a conceptual model of systems interaction wherein a ventral emotional memory network involving ventral striatum (VS), amygdala, ventral hippocampus, and ventromedial prefrontal cortex triages behavioral responding to stimuli according to their associated affective outcomes. This system engages autonomic and postural responding (avoiding, ignoring, approaching) in accordance with associated stimulus valence (negative, neutral, positive), but does not engage particular operant responses. Rather, this emotional system suppresses or invigorates actions that are selected through competition between goal-directed control involving dorsomedial striatum (DMS) and habitual control involving dorsolateral striatum (DLS). The hippocampus provides contextual specificity to the emotional system, and provides an information rich input to the goal-directed system for navigation and discriminations involving ambiguous contexts, complex sensory configurations, or temporal ordering. The rapid acquisition and high capacity for episodic associations in the emotional system may unburden the more complex goal-directed system and reduce interference in the habit system from processing contingencies of neutral stimuli. Interactions among these systems likely involve inhibitory mechanisms and neuromodulation in the striatum to form a dominant response strategy. Innate traits, training methods, and task demands contribute to the nature of these interactions, which can include incidental learning in non-dominant systems. Addition of these features to reinforcement learning models of decision-making may better align theoretical predictions with behavioral and neural correlates in

  4. Nuclear STAT3 translocation in guinea pig and rat brain endothelium during systemic challenge with lipopolysaccharide and interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Christoph; Voss, Thilo; Matsumura, Kiyoshi; Korte, Stefan; Gerstberger, Rüdiger; Roth, Joachim; Hübschle, Thomas

    2005-10-10

    During systemic inflammation, cytokines are released by immune-competent cells into the circulation, which in turn signal the brain to mediate brain-controlled signs of illness. Cytokine-responsive brain cells can be mapped by histological analysis of cytokine-induced transcription factors or transcription factor-associated molecules revealing different cell phenotypes that respond to activation of the immune system. Critical sites mediating cytokine-dependent immuneffector functions can be divided into two groups, one group of responding cells situated along a tight blood-brain barrier (BBB), and a second cell group in structures with an open BBB, e.g., the sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs). Previous reports from our group suggest that activation of the signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT3) during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation is mediated by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and occurs in astrocytes of the rat CVOs. Here we show in the guinea pig a time-dependent marked LPS-induced STAT3 activation within astrocytes and endothelial cells of the CVOs, within astrocytes located in brain structures with a functional BBB and within the brain endothelium of the entire brain. In addition, systemic treatment of rats with either rat recombinant IL-6 or LPS induced STAT3 activation in brain endothelial cells in a similar way as observed in the guinea pig brain, stressing the involvement of IL-6 in this phenomenon in a more generalized way. The STAT3-activated brain cells are located in critical target structures mediating cytokine action during LPS-induced inflammation. STAT3-controlled transcriptional activation with yet unknown cell-specific functional consequences seems to be involved in this process. (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Frameless Stereotactic Insertion of Viewsite Brain Access System with Microscope-Mounted Tracking Device for Resection of Deep Brain Lesions: Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Tim; Chakraborty, Shamik; Lall, Rohan; Fanous, Andrew A; Boockvar, John; Langer, David J

    2017-02-04

    The surgical management of deep brain tumors is often challenging due to the limitations of stereotactic needle biopsies and the morbidity associated with transcortical approaches. We present a novel microscopic navigational technique utilizing the Viewsite Brain Access System (VBAS) (Vycor Medical, Boca Raton, FL, USA) for resection of a deep parietal periventricular high-grade glioma as well as another glioma and a cavernoma with no related morbidity. The approach utilized a navigational tracker mounted on a microscope, which was set to the desired trajectory and depth. It allowed gentle continuous insertion of the VBAS directly to a deep lesion under continuous microscopic visualization, increasing safety by obviating the need to look up from the microscope and thus avoiding loss of trajectory. This technique has broad value for the resection of a variety of deep brain lesions.

  6. The mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-aldehyde dehydrogenase pathway: a potential site of action of daidzin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, N; Li, D J; Li, J; Keung, W M

    2000-11-02

    Recent studies showed that daidzin suppresses ethanol intake in ethanol-preferring laboratory animals. In vitro, it potently and selectively inhibits the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). Further, it inhibits the conversion of monoamines such as serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) into their respective acid metabolites, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in isolated hamster or rat liver mitochondria. Studies on the suppression of ethanol intake and inhibition of 5-HIAA (or DOPAC) formation by six structural analogues of daidzin suggested a potential link between these two activities. This, together with the finding that daidzin does not affect the rates of mitochondria-catalyzed oxidative deamination of these monoamines, raised the possibility that the ethanol intake-suppressive (antidipsotropic) action of daidzin is not mediated by the monoamines but rather by their reactive biogenic aldehyde intermediates such as 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde (5-HIAL) and/or 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) which accumulate in the presence of daidzin. To further evaluate this possibility, we synthesized more structural analogues of daidzin and tested and compared their antidipsotropic activities in Syrian golden hamsters with their effects on monoamine metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria using 5-HT as the substrate. Effects of daidzin and its structural analogues on the activities of monoamine oxidase (MAO) and ALDH-2, the key enzymes involved in 5-HT metabolism in the mitochondria, were also examined. Results from these studies reveal a positive correlation between the antidipsotropic activities of these analogues and their abilities to increase 5-HIAL accumulation during 5-HT metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria. Daidzin analogues that potently inhibit ALDH-2 but have no or little effect on MAO are most antidipsotropic, whereas those that also potently inhibit MAO exhibit little, if

  7. A bidirectional brain-machine interface connecting alert rodents to a dynamical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Fabio; Semprini, Marianna; Mussa Ivaldi, Ferdinando A; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel experimental framework that implements a bidirectional brain-machine interface inspired by the operation of the spinal cord in vertebrates that generates a control policy in the form of a force field. The proposed experimental set-up allows connecting the brain of freely moving rats to an external device. We tested this apparatus in a preliminary experiment with an alert rat that used the interface for acquiring a food reward. The goal of this approach to bidirectional interfaces is to explore the role of voluntary neural commands in controlling a dynamical system represented by a small cart moving on vertical plane and connected to a water/pellet dispenser.

  8. Brain metastases as site of first and isolated recurrence of breast cancer: the role of systemic therapy after local treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwińska, Anna

    2016-10-01

    The role of systemic treatment was assessed after local therapy for breast cancer patients who developed central nervous system (CNS) metastases as a first and isolated recurrence. Subjects were 128 breast cancer patients with brain metastases as the first and isolated site of recurrence that were selected from 673 consecutive breast cancer patients with brain metastases treated at the same institution. Median survival from brain metastases in patients with and without systemic treatment after local therapy was respectively 15 and 4 months (p systemic treatment after local therapy, was respectively 22 and 7 months (p = 0.003). Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that good performance status, solitary brain metastasis and systemic therapy undertaken after local treatment were factors which prolonged survival. However patient survival was adversely affected by those having leptomeningeal metastasis associated with brain parenchymal lesions. Systemic therapy, undertaken after local treatment improved survival in those patients with breast cancer and brain metastases as the site of first and isolated recurrence. Further study is required in order to fully establish the role of systemic treatment for this patient group.

  9. Biological characteristics of brain natriuretic peptide and its association with central nervous system diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yubao Huang; Changxiang Yan; Chunjiang Yu

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explain the mechanisms of tuhe synthesis, secretion and regulation of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and analyze its role in central nervous system diseases.DATA SOURCES: An online search of Pubmed was undertaken to identify articles related to BNP published in English from January 1990 to February 2007 by using the Key words of "brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), central nervous system, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain edema, epilepsy". Other articles were searched in China Hospital Knowledge Database (CHKD) by concrete name of journals and title of articles.STUDY SELECTION: The collected articles were primarily screened, those about BNP and its association with central nervous system diseases were selected, whereas the obviously irrelative ones excluded, and the full-texts of the other literatures were searched manually.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 96 articles were collected, 40 of them were enrolled, and the other 56 were excluded due to repetitive studies or reviews.DATA SYNTHESIS: At present, there are penetrating studies on BNP in the preclinical medicine and clinical medicine of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, and the investigative outcomes have been gradually applied in clinical practice, and satisfactory results have been obtained. However, the application of BNP in diagnosing and treating central nervous system diseases is still at the experimental phase without -outstanding outcomes, thus the preclinical and clinical studies should be enhanced.CONCLUSION: As a kind of central medium or modulator, BNP plays a certain role in the occurrence,development and termination of central nervous system diseases, the BNP level in serum has certain changing law in AH,brainedema,epilepsy,etc., but the specific mechanisms are unclear.

  10. Satiety factor oleoylethanolamide recruits the brain histaminergic system to inhibit food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provensi, Gustavo; Coccurello, Roberto; Umehara, Hayato; Munari, Leonardo; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Nosi, Daniele; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Moles, Anna; Blandina, Patrizio; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2014-08-01

    Key factors driving eating behavior are hunger and satiety, which are controlled by a complex interplay of central neurotransmitter systems and peripheral stimuli. The lipid-derived messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is released by enterocytes in response to fat intake and indirectly signals satiety to hypothalamic nuclei. Brain histamine is released during the appetitive phase to provide a high level of arousal in anticipation of feeding, and mediates satiety. However, despite the possible functional overlap of satiety signals, it is not known whether histamine participates in OEA-induced hypophagia. Using different experimental settings and diets, we report that the anorexiant effect of OEA is significantly attenuated in mice deficient in the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC-KO) or acutely depleted of histamine via interocerebroventricular infusion of the HDC blocker α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH). α-FMH abolished OEA-induced early occurrence of satiety onset while increasing histamine release in the CNS with an H3 receptor antagonist-increased hypophagia. OEA augmented histamine release in the cortex of fasted mice within a time window compatible to its anorexic effects. OEA also increased c-Fos expression in the oxytocin neurons of the paraventricular nuclei of WT but not HDC-KO mice. The density of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in other brain regions that receive histaminergic innervation and participate in the expression of feeding behavior was comparable in OEA-treated WT and HDC-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that OEA requires the integrity of the brain histamine system to fully exert its hypophagic effect and that the oxytocin neuron-rich nuclei are the likely hypothalamic area where brain histamine influences the central effects of OEA.

  11. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI. A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the distinct but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  12. A P300-based brain computer interface system for words typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Faraz; Han, Hee-Sok; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2014-02-01

    P300 is an event related potential of the brain in response to oddball events. Brain Computer Interface (BCI) utilizing P300 is known as a P300 BCI system. A conventional P300 BCI system for character spelling is composed of a paradigm that displays flashing characters and a classification scheme which identifies target characters. To type a word a user has to spell each character of the word: this spelling process is slow and it can take several minutes to type a word. In this study, we propose a new word typing scheme by integrating a word suggestion mechanism with a dictionary search into the conventional P300-based speller. Our new P300-based word typing system consists of an initial character spelling paradigm, a dictionary unit to give suggestions of possible words and the second word selection paradigm to select a word out of the suggestions. Our proposed methodology reduces typing time significantly and makes word typing easy via a P300 BCI system. We have tested our system with ten subjects and our results demonstrate an average word typing time of 1.91 min whereas the conventional took 3.36 min for the same words.

  13. Integrated system for point cloud reconstruction and simulated brain shift validation using tracked surgical microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Clements, Logan W.; Luo, Ma; Narasimhan, Saramati; Thompson, Reid C.; Dawant, Benoit M.; Miga, Michael I.

    2017-03-01

    Intra-operative soft tissue deformation, referred to as brain shift, compromises the application of current imageguided surgery (IGS) navigation systems in neurosurgery. A computational model driven by sparse data has been used as a cost effective method to compensate for cortical surface and volumetric displacements. Stereoscopic microscopes and laser range scanners (LRS) are the two most investigated sparse intra-operative imaging modalities for driving these systems. However, integrating these devices in the clinical workflow to facilitate development and evaluation requires developing systems that easily permit data acquisition and processing. In this work we present a mock environment developed to acquire stereo images from a tracked operating microscope and to reconstruct 3D point clouds from these images. A reconstruction error of 1 mm is estimated by using a phantom with a known geometry and independently measured deformation extent. The microscope is tracked via an attached tracking rigid body that facilitates the recording of the position of the microscope via a commercial optical tracking system as it moves during the procedure. Point clouds, reconstructed under different microscope positions, are registered into the same space in order to compute the feature displacements. Using our mock craniotomy device, realistic cortical deformations are generated. Our experimental results report approximately 2mm average displacement error compared with the optical tracking system. These results demonstrate the practicality of using tracked stereoscopic microscope as an alternative to LRS to collect sufficient intraoperative information for brain shift correction.

  14. Systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport pharmacokinetic model for remoxipride after intravenous and intranasal administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jasper; Ploeger, Bart A; van der Graaf, Piet H; Danhof, Meindert; de Lange, Elizabeth C M

    2011-12-01

    Intranasal (IN) administration could be an attractive mode of delivery for drugs targeting the central nervous system, potentially providing a high bioavailability because of avoidance of a hepatic first-pass effect and rapid onset of action. However, controversy remains whether a direct transport route from the nasal cavity into the brain exists. Pharmacokinetic modeling is proposed to identify the existence of direct nose-to-brain transport in a quantitative manner. The selective dopamine-D2 receptor antagonist remoxipride was administered at different dosages, in freely moving rats, by the IN and intravenous (IV) route. Plasma and brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration-time profiles were obtained and simultaneously analyzed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling. Brain ECF/plasma area under the curve ratios were 0.28 and 0.19 after IN and IV administration, respectively. A multicompartment pharmacokinetic model with two absorption compartments (nose-to-systemic and nose-to-brain) was found to best describe the observed pharmacokinetic data. Absorption was described in terms of bioavailability and rate. Total bioavailability after IN administration was 89%, of which 75% was attributed to direct nose-to brain transport. Direct nose-to-brain absorption rate was slow, explaining prolonged brain ECF exposure after IN compared with IV administration. These studies explicitly provide separation and quantitation of systemic and direct nose-to-brain transport after IN administration of remoxipride in the r