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Sample records for mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon

  1. Ultrafast Terahertz Conductivity of Photoexcited Nanocrystalline Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; MacDonald, A. Nicole; Hryciw, Aaron;

    2007-01-01

    The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described by a class......The ultrafast transient ac conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon films is investigated using time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy. While epitaxial silicon on sapphire exhibits a free carrier Drude response, silicon nanocrystals embedded in glass show a response that is best described...

  2. Photoacoustic study of nanocrystalline silicon produced by mechanical grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poffo, C.M. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario Trindade, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Lima, J.C. de, E-mail: fsc1jcd@fisica.ufsc.b [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Souza, S.M.; Triches, D.M. [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Universitario Trindade, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Grandi, T.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Campus Trindade, C.P. 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Biasi, R.S. de [Secao de Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais, Instituto Militar de Engenharia, 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-04-01

    Mechanical grinding (MG) was used to produce nanocrystalline silicon and its thermal and transport properties were investigated by photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy (PAS). The experimental results suggest that in as-milled nanocrystalline silicon for 10 h the heat transfer through the crystalline and interfacial components is similar, and after annealed at 470 {sup o}C the heat transfer is controlled by crystalline component.

  3. Tunable nonlinear absorption of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Y J; Oh, J I; Zheng, D Q; Su, W A; Shen, W Z

    2011-09-01

    Nonlinear absorption (NLA) of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) has been investigated through the open aperture Z-scan method for the photon energy of the incident irradiance slightly less than the bandgap of the sample. NLA responses have been observed to be highly sensitive to the wavelength and intensity of the incident irradiance as well as to the bandgap of the sample, indicating greatly tunable NLA of nc-Si:H. The band tail of nc-Si:H appears to play a crucial role in such NLA responses.

  4. Research Update: Phonon engineering of nanocrystalline silicon thermoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon thermoelectrics can be a solution to improve the cost-effectiveness of thermoelectric technology from both material and integration viewpoints. While their figure-of-merit is still developing, recent advances in theoretical/numerical calculations, property measurements, and structural synthesis/fabrication have opened up possibilities to develop the materials based on fundamental physics of phonon transport. Here, this is demonstrated by reviewing a series of works on nanocrystalline silicon materials using calculations of multiscale phonon transport, measurements of interfacial heat conduction, and synthesis from nanoparticles. Integration of these approaches allows us to engineer phonon transport to improve the thermoelectric performance by introducing local silicon-oxide structures.

  5. Nanocrystalline silicon prepared at high growth rate using helium dilution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Koyel Bhattacharya; Debajyoti Das

    2008-06-01

    Growth and optimization of the nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si : H) films have been studied by varying the electrical power applied to the helium diluted silane plasma in RF glow discharge. Wide optical gap and conducting intrinsic nanocrystalline silicon network of controlled crystalline volume fraction and oriented crystallographic lattice planes have been obtained at a reasonably high growth rate from helium diluted silane plasma, without using hydrogen. Improving crystallinity in the network comprising ∼ 10 nm Si-nanocrystallites and contributing optical gap widening, conductivity ascending and that obtained during simultaneous escalation of the deposition rate, promises significant technological impact.

  6. High deposition rate nanocrystalline silicon with enhanced homogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, A.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    High rate growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) brings additional challenges for the homogeneity in the growth direction, since the start-up effects affect a larger portion of the film, and the very high degree of depletion increases the influence of back diffusion from the inacti

  7. Research Update: Phonon engineering of nanocrystalline silicon thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro Shiomi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline silicon thermoelectrics can be a solution to improve the cost-effectiveness of thermoelectric technology from both material and integration viewpoints. While their figure-of-merit is still developing, recent advances in theoretical/numerical calculations, property measurements, and structural synthesis/fabrication have opened up possibilities to develop the materials based on fundamental physics of phonon transport. Here, this is demonstrated by reviewing a series of works on nanocrystalline silicon materials using calculations of multiscale phonon transport, measurements of interfacial heat conduction, and synthesis from nanoparticles. Integration of these approaches allows us to engineer phonon transport to improve the thermoelectric performance by introducing local silicon-oxide structures.

  8. Nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by laser-induced crystallization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅广生; 于威; 李社强; 侯海虹; 彭英才; 韩理

    2003-01-01

    The excimer laser-induced crystallization technique has been used to investigate the preparation of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) from amorphous silicon (α-Si) thin films on silicon or glass substrates. The α-Si films without hydrogen grown by pulsed-laser deposition are chosen as precursor to avoid the problem of hydrogen effluence during annealing.Analyses have been performed by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission-electron microscopy. Experimental results show that silicon nanocrystals can be formed through laser annealing. The growth characters of nc-Si are strongly dependent on the laser energy density. It is shown that the volume of the molten silicon predominates essentially the grain size of nc-Si, and the surface tension of the crystallized silicon is responsible for the mechanism of nc-Si growth.

  9. Light absorption engineering of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon by femtosecond laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, D Q; Ma, Y J; Xu, L; Su, W A; Ye, Q H; Oh, J I; Shen, W Z

    2012-09-01

    The light absorption coefficient of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon has been engineered to have a Gaussian distribution by means of absorption modification using a femtosecond laser. The absorption-modified sample exhibits a significant absorption enhancement of up to ∼700%, and the strong absorption does not depend on the incident light. We propose a model responsible for this interesting behavior. In addition, we present an optical limiter constructed through this absorption engineering method.

  10. Fabrication of High-Temperature-Stable Thermoelectric Generator Modules Based on Nanocrystalline Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, V.; Dehnen, M.; Chavez, R.; Engenhorst, M.; Stoetzel, J.; Petermann, N.; Hesse, K.; Huelser, T.; Spree, M.; Stiewe, C.; Ziolkowski, P.; Schierning, G.; Schmechel, R.

    2014-05-01

    High-temperature-stable thermoelectric generator modules (TGMs) based on nanocrystalline silicon have been fabricated, characterized by the Harman technique, and measured in a generator test facility at the German Aerospace Center. Starting with highly doped p- and n-type silicon nanoparticles from a scalable gas-phase process, nanocrystalline bulk silicon was obtained using a current-activated sintering technique. Electrochemical plating methods were employed to metalize the nanocrystalline silicon. The specific electrical contact resistance ρ c of the semiconductor-metal interface was characterized by a transfer length method. Values as low as ρ c cold-side temperature of 300°C.

  11. The structural characterisation of HWCVD-deposited nanocrystalline silicon films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibhu P. Swain

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si films were deposited by hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD in the presence of varying H2 concentrations and their structural and interfacial character investigated by X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline fraction was around 30–50% and the nc-Si crystallite size was in the range 20–35 nm. The SAXS results were analysed by Guinier plot, scaling factor, and correlation distance. The nc-Si grains displayed a mass fractal appearance, and the interfacial inhomogeneity distance was ~2 nm.

  12. Nanocrystalline silicon: lattice dynamics and enhanced thermoelectric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Tania; Stein, Niklas; Stroppa, Daniel G; Klobes, Benedikt; Koza, Michael Marek; Kudejova, Petra; Petermann, Nils; Wiggers, Hartmut; Schierning, Gabi; Hermann, Raphaël P

    2014-12-21

    Silicon has several advantages when compared to other thermoelectric materials, but until recently it was not used for thermoelectric applications due to its high thermal conductivity, 156 W K(-1) m(-1) at room temperature. Nanostructuration as means to decrease thermal transport through enhanced phonon scattering has been a subject of many studies. In this work we have evaluated the effects of nanostructuration on the lattice dynamics of bulk nanocrystalline doped silicon. The samples were prepared by gas phase synthesis, followed by current and pressure assisted sintering. The heat capacity, density of phonons states, and elastic constants were measured, which all reveal a significant, ≈25%, reduction in the speed of sound. The samples present a significantly decreased lattice thermal conductivity, ≈25 W K(-1) m(-1), which, combined with a very high carrier mobility, results in a dimensionless figure of merit with a competitive value that peaks at ZT≈ 0.57 at 973 °C. Due to its easily scalable and extremely low-cost production process, nanocrystalline Si prepared by gas phase synthesis followed by sintering could become the material of choice for high temperature thermoelectric generators.

  13. Melting and crystallization of nanocrystalline silicon microwires through rapid self-heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, G.; Cywar, A.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2009-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon microwires are self-heated through single, large amplitude, and microsecond voltage pulses. Scanning electron micrographs show very smooth wire surfaces after the voltage pulse compared to as-fabricated nanocrystalline texture. Voltage-pulse induced self-heating leads to significant conductance improvement, suggesting crystallization of the wires. The minimum resistivity during the pulse is extracted from wires of different dimensions as 75.0±4.6 μΩ cm, matching previously reported values for liquid silicon. Hence, nanocrystalline silicon microwires melt through self-heating during the voltage pulse and resolidify upon termination of the pulse, resulting in very smooth and less-resistive crystalline structures.

  14. Strong adhesion in nanocrystalline diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharda, T.; Umeno, M.; Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.

    2001-05-01

    Strong adhesion is shown to be achieved in the growth of smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films on silicon substrates at 600 °C using biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The strong adhesion is evident from the films sustaining compressive stress, which may be as high as 85 GPa. The substrates are bent spherically after deposition, however, films are not peeled off, in spite of having enormous in-plane stress. The strong adhesion may be a result of implanted carbon below the substrate surface with an optimized ion flux density in the initial stages of growth. The compressive stress in the films is shown to be generating from the graphitic and other nondiamond carbon impurities in the films. It was observed that the NCD grain size decreases with biasing hence increasing grain boundary area in the films accommodating more graphitic impurities, which in turn results in an increase in compressive stress in the films.

  15. Nanocomposites Based on Polyethylene and Nanocrystalline Silicon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkhov Anatoliy Aleksandrovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available High-strength polyethylene films containing 0.5-1.0 wt. % of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si were synthesized. Samples of nc-Si with an average core diameter of 7-10 nm were produced by plasmochemical method and by laser-induced decomposition of monosilane. Spectral studies revealed almost complete (up to ~95 % absorption of UV radiation in 200- 400 nm spectral region by 85 micron thick film if the nc-Si content approaches to 1.0 wt. %. The density function of particle size in the starting powders and polymer films containing immobilized silicon nanocrystallites were obtained using the modeling a complete profile of X-ray diffraction patterns, assuming spherical grains and the lognormal distribution. The results of X-ray analysis shown that the crystallite size distribution function remains almost unchanged and the crystallinity of the original polymer increases to about 10 % with the implantation of the initial nc-Si samples in the polymer matrix.

  16. Environmental life cycle assessment of roof-integrated flexible amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon solar cell laminate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Mohr; A. Meijer; M.A.J. Huijbregts; L. Reijnders

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an environmental life cycle assessment of a roof-integrated flexible solar cell laminate with tandem solar cells composed of amorphous silicon/nanocrystalline silicon (a-Si/nc-Si). The a-Si/nc-Si cells are considered to have 10% conversion efficiency. Their expected service life

  17. Synthesis of Silicon Nanocrystals in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with a grain size of at least less than 10 nm are widely recognized as one of the key materials in optoelectronic devices, electrodes of lithium battery, bio-medical labels. There is also important character that silicon is safe material to the environment and easily gets involved in existing silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. We explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for the efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles in a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using very high frequency (VHF = 144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with a volume of less than 1 μ-liter. Fundamental plasma parameters of VHF capacitively coupled microplasma were characterized by optical emission spectroscopy, showing electron density of approximately 1015 cm-3 and rotational temperature of 1500 K, respectively. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma has a capability of decomposing silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated atomic silicon vapor, followed by gas phase nucleation via three-body collision. The particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation process. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei was able to be favorably terminated in a short-residence time reactor. Micro Raman scattering spectrum showed that as-deposited particles were mostly amorphous silicon with small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrograph confirmed individual silicon nanocrystals of 3-15 nm size. Although those particles were not mono-dispersed, they were

  18. Silicon Nanocrystal Synthesis in Microplasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Okazaki, Ken

    Nanocrystalline silicon particles with grains smaller than 5 nm are widely recognized as a key material in optoelectronic devices, lithium battery electrodes, and bio-medical labels. Another important characteristic is that silicon is an environmentally safe material that is used in numerous silicon technologies. To date, several synthesis methods such as sputtering, laser ablation, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) based on low-pressure silane chemistry (SiH4) have been developed for precise control of size and density distributions of silicon nanocrystals. In this study, we explore the possibility of microplasma technologies for efficient production of mono-dispersed nanocrystalline silicon particles on a micrometer-scale, continuous-flow plasma reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Mixtures of argon, hydrogen, and silicon tetrachloride were activated using a very-high-frequency (144 MHz) power source in a capillary glass tube with volume of less than 1 μl. Fundamental plasma parameters of the microplasma were characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, which respectively indicated electron density of 1015 cm-3, argon excitation temperature of 5000 K, and rotational temperature of 1500 K. Such high-density non-thermal reactive plasma can decompose silicon tetrachloride into atomic silicon to produce supersaturated silicon vapor, followed by gas-phase nucleation via three-body collision: particle synthesis in high-density plasma media is beneficial for promoting nucleation processes. In addition, further growth of silicon nuclei can be terminated in a short-residence-time reactor. Micro-Raman scattering spectra showed that as-deposited particles are mostly amorphous silicon with a small fraction of silicon nanocrystals. Transmission electron micrography confirmed individual 3-15 nm silicon nanocrystals. Although particles were not mono-dispersed, they were well separated and not coagulated.

  19. High deposition rate nanocrystalline silicon with enhanced homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verkerk, Arjan; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud [Section Nanophotonics-Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    High rate growth of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) brings additional challenges for the homogeneity in the growth direction, since the start-up effects affect a larger portion of the film, and the very high degree of depletion increases the influence of back diffusion from the inactive region into the plasma zone. It was calculated that back diffusion plays a role in the regime for high deposition rate (4.5 nm/s) via the residence time for particles in the plasma and the corresponding diffusion length for silane from outside the plasma. The stabilization time for back diffusion was derived and found to be on the order of tens of seconds. Experiment showed that the incubation layer for nc-Si:H is very thick in films deposited at a high rate compared to films deposited in a regime of lower deposition rate. The use of a hydrogen plasma start greatly reduced this incubation layer. Further control of the crystalline fraction could be achieved via slight reduction of the degree of depletion via the silane flow. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  1. Influence of silicon dioxide capping layers on pore characteristics in nanocrystalline silicon membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chengzhu; Striemer, Christopher C; Gaborski, Thomas R; McGrath, James L; Fauchet, Philippe M

    2015-02-06

    Porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) membranes are a new class of membrane material with promising applications in biological separations. Pores are formed in a silicon film sandwiched between nm thick silicon dioxide layers during rapid thermal annealing. Controlling pore size is critical in the size-dependent separation applications. In this work, we systematically studied the influence of the silicon dioxide capping layers on pnc-Si membranes. Even a single nm thick top oxide layer is enough to switch from agglomeration to pore formation after annealing. Both the pore size and porosity increase with the thickness of the top oxide, but quickly reach a plateau after 10 nm of oxide. The bottom oxide layer acts as a barrier layer to prevent the a-Si film from undergoing homo-epitaxial growth during annealing. Both the pore size and porosity decrease as the thickness of the bottom oxide layer increases to 100 nm. The decrease of the pore size and porosity is correlated with the increased roughness of the bottom oxide layer, which hinders nanocrystal nucleation and nanopore formation.

  2. Fabrication, Characterization, and Functionalization of Porous Nanocrystalline Silicon Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, David Z.

    Porous nanocrystalline silicon (pnc-Si) membranes are promising for a wide range of applications from biofiltration to use as a platform for cell culture. It is an order of magnitude thinner than any commercially available or experimentally fabricated membrane. Because the thickness of a pnc-Si membrane is between 15 nm and 30 nm, comparable to the size of molecules to be separated, mass transport through the membrane is greatly enhanced. The first part of this work focuses on the fabrication of pnc-Si. For applications involving separation and concentration of molecular species, it is crucial that a membrane passes certain species while rejecting others. One manner in which this can be achieved is by tuning the size and density of the pores by changing key fabrication conditions. These parameters are identified and a systematic study was performed to determine their effect on pore morphology. In the second part of this work, a phenomenological model for pore formation is presented based on empirical observations and prior studies on polycrystalline materials. Next, the structural, optical, and mechanical properties of pnc-Si are examined using an array of characterization tools. In the final part of this thesis, post-production methods for pore size control and functionalization are discussed. It is demonstrated that the hydraulic permeability of pnc-Si, in both the unmodified and modified forms, follows theoretical predications for transport through an ultrathin porous material. Additonally, nanoparticle and protein separations are presented as a demonstration of the potential use of pnc-Si membranes in biomedical research and industry.

  3. Nanocrystalline Silicon Carrier Collectors for Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells and Impact on Low-Temperature Device Characteristics

    KAUST Repository

    Nogay, Gizem

    2016-09-26

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells typically use stacks of hydrogenated intrinsic/doped amorphous silicon layers as carrier selective contacts. However, the use of these layers may cause parasitic optical absorption losses and moderate fill factor (FF) values due to a high contact resistivity. In this study, we show that the replacement of doped amorphous silicon with nanocrystalline silicon is beneficial for device performance. Optically, we observe an improved short-circuit current density when these layers are applied to the front side of the device. Electrically, we observe a lower contact resistivity, as well as higher FF. Importantly, our cell parameter analysis, performed in a temperature range from -100 to +80 °C, reveals that the use of hole-collecting p-type nanocrystalline layer suppresses the carrier transport barrier, maintaining FF s in the range of 70% at -100 °C, whereas it drops to 40% for standard amorphous doped layers. The same analysis also reveals a saturation onset of the open-circuit voltage at -100 °C using doped nanocrystalline layers, compared with saturation onset at -60 °C for doped amorphous layers. These findings hint at a reduced importance of the parasitic Schottky barrier at the interface between the transparent electrodes and the selective contact in the case of nanocrystalline layer implementation. © 2011-2012 IEEE.

  4. Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马智训; 廖显伯; 孔光临; 褚君浩

    2000-01-01

    Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2 matrix is systematically in-vestigated. it is found that the Raman spectra can be well fitted by 5 Lorentzian lines in the Raman shift range of 100-600 cm-1. The two-phonon scattering is also observed in the range of 600-1100 cM-1 The experimental results indicate that the silicon crystallites in the films consist of nanocrystalline phase and amorphous phase; both can contribute to the Raman scattering. Besides the red-shift of the first order optical phonon modes with the decreasing size of silicon nanocrystallites, we have also found an enhancement effect on the second order Raman scattering, and the size effect on their Raman shift.

  5. Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Raman scattering of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2 matrix is systematically investigated. It is found that the Raman spectra can be well fitted by 5 Lorentzian lines in the Raman shift range of 100-600 cm-1. The two-phonon scattering is also observed in the range of 600-1100 cm-1. The experimental results indicate that the silicon crystallites in the films consist of nanocrystalline phase and amorphous phase; both can contribute to the Raman scattering. Besides the red-shift of the first order optical phonon modes with the decreasing size of silicon nanocrystallites, we have also found an enhancement effect on the second order Raman scattering, and the size effect on their Raman shift.

  6. Thermal Conductivity of Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Silicon Films Prepared by Hot-Wire Chemical-Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemeth, William M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jugdersuren, B. [Sotera Defense Solutions, Inc.; Kearney, B. T. [Naval Research Laboratory; Queen, D. R. [Naval Research Laboratory; Metcalf, T. H. [Naval Research Laboratory; Culbertson, J. C. [Naval Research Laboratory; Chervin, C. N. [Naval Research Laboratory; Stroud, R. M. [Naval Research Laboratory; Wang, Q. [Formerly NREL; Liu, Xiao [Naval Research Laboratory

    2017-07-31

    We report 3..omega.. thermal conductivity measurements of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films from 85 to 300 K prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystallinity of the films is controlled by the hydrogen dilution during growth. The thermal conductivity of the amorphous silicon film is in agreement with several previous reports of amorphous silicon prepared by a variety of deposition techniques. The thermal conductivity of the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon film is 70% higher and increases 35% more after an anneal at 600 degrees C. They all have similarly weak temperature dependence. Structural analysis shows that the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon is approximately 60% crystalline, nanograins and grain boundaries included. The nanograins, averaging 9.1 nm in diameter in the as-grown film, are embedded in an amorphous matrix. The grain size increases to 9.7 nm upon annealing, accompanied by the disappearance of the amorphous phase. We extend the models of grain boundary scattering of phonons with two different non-Debye dispersion relations to explain our result of nanocrystalline silicon, confirming the strong grain size dependence of heat transport for nanocrystalline materials. However, the similarity in thermal conductivity between amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon suggests the heat transport mechanisms in both structures may not be as dissimilar as we currently understand.

  7. Thermal conductivity of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jugdersuren, B.; Kearney, B. T.; Queen, D. R.; Metcalf, T. H.; Culbertson, J. C.; Chervin, C. N.; Stroud, R. M.; Nemeth, W.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Xiao

    2017-07-01

    We report 3..omega.. thermal conductivity measurements of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films from 85 to 300 K prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystallinity of the films is controlled by the hydrogen dilution during growth. The thermal conductivity of the amorphous silicon film is in agreement with several previous reports of amorphous silicon prepared by a variety of deposition techniques. The thermal conductivity of the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon film is 70% higher and increases 35% more after an anneal at 600 degrees C. They all have similarly weak temperature dependence. Structural analysis shows that the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon is approximately 60% crystalline, nanograins and grain boundaries included. The nanograins, averaging 9.1 nm in diameter in the as-grown film, are embedded in an amorphous matrix. The grain size increases to 9.7 nm upon annealing, accompanied by the disappearance of the amorphous phase. We extend the models of grain boundary scattering of phonons with two different non-Debye dispersion relations to explain our result of nanocrystalline silicon, confirming the strong grain size dependence of heat transport for nanocrystalline materials. However, the similarity in thermal conductivity between amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon suggests the heat transport mechanisms in both structures may not be as dissimilar as we currently understand.

  8. Thermal conductivity of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugdersuren, B.; Kearney, B. T.; Queen, D. R.; Metcalf, T. H.; Culbertson, J. C.; Chervin, C. N.; Stroud, R. M.; Nemeth, W.; Wang, Q.; Liu, Xiao

    2017-07-01

    We report 3 ω thermal conductivity measurements of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films from 85 to 300 K prepared by hot-wire chemical-vapor deposition, where the crystallinity of the films is controlled by the hydrogen dilution during growth. The thermal conductivity of the amorphous silicon film is in agreement with several previous reports of amorphous silicon prepared by a variety of deposition techniques. The thermal conductivity of the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon film is 70% higher and increases 35% more after an anneal at 600 ∘C . They all have similarly weak temperature dependence. Structural analysis shows that the as-grown nanocrystalline silicon is approximately 60 % crystalline, nanograins and grain boundaries included. The nanograins, averaging 9.1 nm in diameter in the as-grown film, are embedded in an amorphous matrix. The grain size increases to 9.7 nm upon annealing, accompanied by the disappearance of the amorphous phase. We extend the models of grain boundary scattering of phonons with two different non-Debye dispersion relations to explain our result of nanocrystalline silicon, confirming the strong grain size dependence of heat transport for nanocrystalline materials. However, the similarity in thermal conductivity between amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon suggests the heat transport mechanisms in both structures may not be as dissimilar as we currently understand.

  9. Modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin film by a field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liming; Chen, Youping; Lee, James D

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the application of a multiscale field theory in modeling and simulation of boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon carbide (B-SiC). The multiscale field theory was briefly introduced. Based on the field theory, numerical simulations show that intergranular glassy amorphous films (IGFs) and nano-sized pores exist in triple junctions of the grains for nanocrystalline B-SiC. Residual tensile stress in the SiC grains and compressive stress on the grain boundaries (GBs) were observed. Under tensile loading, it has been found that mechanical response of 5 wt% boron-SiC exhibits five characteristic regimes. Deformation mechanism at atomic scale has been revealed. Tensile strength and Young's modulus of nanocrystalline SiC were accurately reproduced.

  10. Ferroelectric polarization in nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite thin films on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S B; Tofail, S A M; Kholkin, A L; Wojtaś, M; Gregor, M; Gandhi, A A; Wang, Y; Bauer, S; Krause, M; Plecenik, A

    2013-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone--a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics.

  11. Ferroelectric Polarization in Nanocrystalline Hydroxyapatite Thin Films on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. B.; Tofail, S. A. M.; Kholkin, A. L.; Wojtaś, M.; Gregor, M.; Gandhi, A. A.; Wang, Y.; Bauer, S.; Krause, M.; Plecenik, A.

    2013-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanocrystals in natural form are a major component of bone- a known piezoelectric material. Synthetic hydroxyapatite is widely used in bone grafts and prosthetic pyroelectric coatings as it binds strongly with natural bone. Nanocrystalline synthetic hydroxyapatite films have recently been found to exhibit strong piezoelectricity and pyroelectricity. While a spontaneous polarization in hydroxyapatite has been predicted since 2005, the reversibility of this polarization (i.e. ferroelectricity) requires experimental evidence. Here we use piezoresponse force microscopy to demonstrate that nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite indeed exhibits ferroelectricity: a reversal of polarization under an electrical field. This finding will strengthen investigations on the role of electrical polarization in biomineralization and bone-density related diseases. As hydroxyapatite is one of the most common biocompatible materials, our findings will also stimulate systematic exploration of lead and rare-metal free ferroelectric devices for potential applications in areas as diverse as in vivo and ex vivo energy harvesting, biosensing and electronics.

  12. Double stabilization of nanocrystalline silicon: a bonus from solvent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolyagin, Y. G.; Zakharov, V. N.; Yatsenko, A. V.; Paseshnichenko, K. A.; Savilov, S. V.; Aslanov, L. A., E-mail: aslanov.38@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Double stabilization of the silicon nanocrystals was observed for the first time by {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. The role of solvent, 1,2-dimethoxyethane (glyme), in formation and stabilization of silicon nanocrystals as well as mechanism of modification of the surface of silicon nanocrystals by nitrogen-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) was studied in this research. It was shown that silicon nanocrystals were stabilized by the products of cleavage of the C–O bonds in ethers and similar compounds. The fact of stabilization of silicon nanoparticles with NHC ligands in glyme was experimentally detected. It was demonstrated that MAS NMR spectroscopy is rather informative for study of the surface of silicon nanoparticles but it needs very pure samples.

  13. Growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, S W; Moon, J Y; Ahn, S S; Kim, H Y; Shin, D H

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using SiH sub 4 , CH sub 4 , and H sub 2 gases. The effects of gas mixing ratio (CH sub 4 /SiH sub 4), deposition temperature, and RF power on the film properties have been studied. The growth rate, refractive index, and the optical energy gap depends critically on the growth conditions. The dependence of the growth rate on the gas flow ratio is quite different from the results obtained for the growth using C sub 2 H sub 2 gas instead of CH sub 4. As the deposition temperature is increased from 300 .deg. C to 600 .deg. C, hydrogen and carbon content in the film decreases and as a result the optical gap decreases. At the deposition temperature of 600 .deg. C and RF power of 150 W, the film structure si nanocrystalline, As the result of the nanocrystallization the dark conductivity is greatly improved. The nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films may be used for large area optoelectronic devices...

  14. Electronic transport in mixed-phase hydrogenated amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienkes, Lee Raymond

    Interest in mixed-phase silicon thin film materials, composed of an amorphous semiconductor matrix in which nanocrystalline inclusions are embedded, stems in part from potential technological applications, including photovoltaic and thin film transistor technologies. Conventional mixed-phase silicon films are produced in a single plasma reactor, where the conditions of the plasma must be precisely tuned, limiting the ability to adjust the film and nanoparticle parameters independently. The films presented in this thesis are deposited using a novel dual-plasma co-deposition approach in which the nanoparticles are produced separately in an upstream reactor and then injected into a secondary reactor where an amorphous silicon film is being grown. The degree of crystallinity and grain sizes of the films are evaluated using Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction respectively. I describe detailed electronic measurements which reveal three distinct conduction mechanisms in n-type doped mixed-phase amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon thin films over a range of nanocrystallite concentrations and temperatures, covering the transition from fully amorphous to ~30% nanocrystalline. As the temperature is varied from 470 to 10 K, we observe activated conduction, multiphonon hopping (MPH) and Mott variable range hopping (VRH) as the nanocrystal content is increased. The transition from MPH to Mott-VRH hopping around 100K is ascribed to the freeze out of the phonon modes. A conduction model involving the parallel contributions of these three distinct conduction mechanisms is shown to describe both the conductivity and the reduced activation energy data to a high accuracy. Additional support is provided by measurements of thermal equilibration effects and noise spectroscopy, both done above room temperature (>300 K). This thesis provides a clear link between measurement and theory in these complex materials.

  15. Characterization of doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jin-Liang; Wu Er-Xing

    2007-01-01

    The B-and P-doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films (nc-Si:H) are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) .The microstructures of doped nc-Si:H films are carefully and systematically char acterized by using high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) ,Raman scattering,x-ray diffraction (XRD) ,Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) ,and resonant nucleus reaction (RNR) .The results show that as the doping concentration of PH3 increases,the average grain size (d) tends to decrease and the crystalline volume percentage (Xc) increases simultaneously.For the B-doped samples,as the doping concentration of B2H6 increases,no obvious change in the value of d is observed,but the value of Xc is found to decrease.This is especially apparent in the case of heavy B2H6 doped samples,where the films change from nanocrystalline to amorphous.

  16. Optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon embedded in SiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马智训; 廖显伯; 孔光临; 褚君浩

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon embedded SiO2 matrix has been formed by annealing the a-SiOx films fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Absorption and photoluminescence spectra of the films have been studied in conjunction with micro-Raman scattering spectra. It is found that absorption presents an exponential dependence of absorption coefficient to photon energy in the range of 1.5—3.0 eV, and a sub-band appears in the range of 1.0—1.5 eV. The exponential absorption is due to the indirect band-to-band transition of electrons in silicon nanocrystallites, while the sub-band absorption is ascribed to transitions between surfaces and/or defect states of the silicon nanocrystallites. The existence of Stokes shift between absorption and photoluminescence suggests that the phonon-assisted luminescence would be enhanced due to the quantum confinement effects.

  17. Application of nano-crystalline silicon film in the fabrication of field-emission pressure sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖波; 陈旻; 孔德文; 张大成; 李婷

    2003-01-01

    A kind of filed-emission array pressure sensor is designed based on the quantum tunnel effect. The nano-crystalline silicon film is prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, with the grain dimension and thickness of the film 3-9 nm and 30-40 nm, respectively. The nano-crystal- line silicon film is introduced into the cathode cones of the sensor, functioning as the essential emission part. The silicon nano phase is analyzed by HREM and TED, the microstructure of the single emitter and emitters array is inspected by SEM, and the field emission characteristics of the device are studied by an HP4145B transistor tester. The experimental results show that the measured current density emitted from the effective area of the sensor can reach 53.5 A/m2 when the exterior electric field is 5.6×105 V/m.

  18. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ˜100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering—volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  19. Seed mediated synthesis of highly mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the presence of hydroquinone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Mutreja, Isha; Sykes, Peter

    2016-09-02

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being studied for several biomedical applications, including drug delivery, biomedical imaging, contrast agents and tumor targeting. The synthesis of nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution is critical for these applications. We report the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed AuNPs by a seed mediated approach, in the presence of tri-sodium citrate and hydroquinone (HQ). AuNPs with an average size of 18 nm were used for the synthesis of highly mono-dispersed nanocrystals of an average size 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm; but the protocol is not limited to these sizes. The colloidal gold was subjected to UV-vis absorbance spectroscopy, showing a red shift in lambda max wavelength, peaks at 518.47 nm, 526.37 nm, 535.73 nm, 546.03 nm and 556.50 nm for AuNPs seed (18 nm), 40 nm, 60 nm, 80 nm and ∼100 nm respectively. The analysis was consistent with dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy. Hydrodynamic diameters measured were 17.6 nm, 40.8 nm, 59.8 nm, 74.1 nm, and 91.4 nm (size by dynamic light scattering-volume %); with an average poly dispersity index value of 0.088, suggesting mono-dispersity in the size distribution, which was also confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. The advantage of a seed mediated approach is a multi-step growth of nanoparticle size that enables us to control the number of nanoparticles in the suspension, for size ranging from 24.5 nm to 95.8 nm. In addition, the HQ-based synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals allowed control of the particle size and size distribution by tailoring either the number of seeds, amount of gold precursor or reducing agent (HQ) in the final reaction mixture.

  20. Logic Gates and Ring Oscillators Based on Ambipolar Nanocrystalline-Silicon TFTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Subramaniam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si thin film transistors (TFTs are well suited for circuit applications that require moderate device performance and low-temperature CMOS-compatible processing below 250°C. Basic logic gate circuits fabricated using ambipolar nc-Si TFTs alone are presented and shown to operate with correct outputs at frequencies of up to 100 kHz. Ring oscillators consisting of nc-Si TFT-based inverters are also shown to operate at above 20 kHz with a supply voltage of 5 V, corresponding to a propagation delay of 5 V for several hours.

  1. From nanoparticles to nanocrystalline bulk: percolation effects in field assisted sintering of silicon nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwesig, D; Schierning, G; Theissmann, R; Stein, N; Petermann, N; Wiggers, H; Schmechel, R; Wolf, D E

    2011-04-01

    Nanocrystalline bulk materials are desirable for many applications as they combine mechanical strength and specific electronic transport properties. Our bottom-up approach starts with tailored nanoparticles. Compaction and thermal treatment are crucial, but usually the final stage sintering is accompanied by rapid grain growth which spoils nanocrystallinity. For electrically conducting nanoparticles, field activated sintering techniques overcome this problem. Small grain sizes have been maintained in spite of consolidation. Nevertheless, the underlying principles, which are of high practical importance, have not been fully elucidated yet. In this combined experimental and theoretical work, we show how the developing microstructure during sintering correlates with the percolation paths of the current through the powder using highly doped silicon nanoparticles as a model system. It is possible to achieve a nanocrystalline bulk material and a homogeneous microstructure. For this, not only the generation of current paths due to compaction, but also the disintegration due to Joule heating is required. The observed density fluctuations on the micrometer scale are attributed to the heat profile of the simulated powder networks.

  2. From nanoparticles to nanocrystalline bulk: percolation effects in field assisted sintering of silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwesig, D; Wolf, D E [Department of Physics and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Schierning, G; Theissmann, R; Stein, N; Petermann, N; Wiggers, H; Schmechel, R [Faculty of Engineering and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Nanocrystalline bulk materials are desirable for many applications as they combine mechanical strength and specific electronic transport properties. Our bottom-up approach starts with tailored nanoparticles. Compaction and thermal treatment are crucial, but usually the final stage sintering is accompanied by rapid grain growth which spoils nanocrystallinity. For electrically conducting nanoparticles, field activated sintering techniques overcome this problem. Small grain sizes have been maintained in spite of consolidation. Nevertheless, the underlying principles, which are of high practical importance, have not been fully elucidated yet. In this combined experimental and theoretical work, we show how the developing microstructure during sintering correlates with the percolation paths of the current through the powder using highly doped silicon nanoparticles as a model system. It is possible to achieve a nanocrystalline bulk material and a homogeneous microstructure. For this, not only the generation of current paths due to compaction, but also the disintegration due to Joule heating is required. The observed density fluctuations on the micrometer scale are attributed to the heat profile of the simulated powder networks.

  3. Electrochemical properties and applications of nanocrystalline, microcrystalline, and epitaxial cubic silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Nianjun; Zhang, Lei; Fuchs, Regina; Jiang, Xin

    2015-05-27

    Microstructures of the materials (e.g., crystallinitiy, defects, and composition, etc.) determine their properties, which eventually lead to their diverse applications. In this contribution, the properties, especially the electrochemical properties, of cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been engineered by controlling their microstructures. By manipulating the deposition conditions, nanocrystalline, microcrystalline and epitaxial (001) 3C-SiC films are obtained with varied properties. The epitaxial 3C-SiC film presents the lowest double-layer capacitance and the highest reversibility of redox probes, because of its perfect (001) orientation and high phase purity. The highest double-layer capacitance and the lowest reversibility of redox probes have been realized on the nanocrystalline 3C-SiC film. Those are ascribed to its high amount of grain boundaries, amorphous phases and large diversity in its crystal size. Based on their diverse properties, the electrochemical performances of 3C-SiC films are evaluated in two kinds of potential applications, namely an electrochemical capacitor using a nanocrystalline film and an electrochemical dopamine sensor using the epitaxial 3C-SiC film. The nanocrystalline 3C-SiC film shows not only a high double layer capacitance (43-70 μF/cm(2)) but also a long-term stability of its capacitance. The epitaxial 3C-SiC film shows a low detection limit toward dopamine, which is one to 2 orders of magnitude lower than its normal concentration in tissue. Therefore, 3C-SiC film is a novel but designable material for different emerging electrochemical applications such as energy storage, biomedical/chemical sensors, environmental pollutant detectors, and so on.

  4. Facile Synthesis of Mono-Dispersed Polystyrene (PS/Ag Composite Microspheres via Modified Chemical Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A modified method based on in situ chemical reduction was developed to prepare mono-dispersed polystyrene/silver (PS/Ag composite microspheres. In this approach; mono-dispersed PS microspheres were synthesized through dispersion polymerization using poly-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP as a dispersant at first. Then, poly-dopamine (PDA was fabricated to functionally modify the surfaces of PS microspheres. With the addition of [Ag(NH32]+ to the PS dispersion, [Ag(NH32]+ complex ions were absorbed and reduced to silver nanoparticles on the surfaces of PS-PDA microspheres to form PS/Ag composite microspheres. PVP acted both as a solvent of the metallic precursor and as a reducing agent. PDA also acted both as a chemical protocol to immobilize the silver nanoparticles at the PS surface and as a reducing agent. Therefore, no additional reducing agents were needed. The resulting composite microspheres were characterized by TEM, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, XRD, UV-Vis and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. The results showed that Ag nanoparticles (NPs were homogeneously immobilized onto the PS microspheres’ surface in the presence of PDA and PVP. PS/Ag composite microspheres were well formed with a uniform and compact shell layer and were adjustable in terms of their optical property.

  5. Mono-dispersed cross-linked polystyrene micro-spheres prepared by seed swelling polymerization method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongsha WANG; Yanjun LIU

    2008-01-01

    A two-step swelling procedure was adopted to synthesize mono-dispersed and highly cross-linked poly (St-divinylbenzene) particles with PSt micro-spheres (1.80 μmin diameter). The PSt micro-spheres were prepared by a dispersion polymerization method and used as seeds. The effects of monomer concentration, ratio of ethanol to water, swelling reagents, crosslinking reagents, swelling temper-ature and agitation speed on particle size were investigated in detail. The morphologies and size distributions of these micro-spheres were examined by SEM and particle size analysis (PSA). The Tg of the micro-spheres was measured by DSC. The results indicate that the particles (6.20 μm in diameter) exhibit excellent mono dispersed property and high crosslinking degree when the concentration of the swelling reagent was 25%, the concentration of the cross-linking reagents was 23%, the swelling temperature was 30℃ and the stirring speed was 150 r/min.

  6. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  7. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  8. Improving Memory Characteristics of Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Germanium Nonvolatile Memory Devices by Controlling Germanium Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jiwoong; Jang, Kyungsoo; Phu, Nguyen Thi Cam; Trinh, Thanh Thuy; Raja, Jayapal; Kim, Taeyong; Cho, Jaehyun; Kim, Sangho; Park, Jinjoo; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2016-05-01

    Nonvolatile memory (NVM) with silicon dioxide/silicon nitride/silicon oxynitride (ONO(n)) charge trap structure is a promising flash memory technology duo that will fulfill process compatibility for system-on-panel displays, down-scaling cell size and low operation voltage. In this research, charge trap flash devices were fabricated with ONO(n) stack gate insulators and an active layer using hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon germanium (nc-SiGe:H) films at a low temperature. In this study, the effect of the interface trap density on the performance of devices, including memory window and retention, was investigated. The electrical characteristics of NVM devices were studied controlling Ge content from 0% to 28% in the nc-SiGe:H channel layer. The optimal Ge content in the channel layer was found to be around 16%. For nc-SiGe:H NVM with 16% Ge content, the memory window was 3.13 V and the retention data exceeded 77% after 10 years under the programming condition of 15 V for 1 msec. This showed that the memory window increased by 42% and the retention increased by 12% compared to the nc-Si:H NVM that does not contain Ge. However, when the Ge content was more than 16%, the memory window and retention property decreased. Finally, this research showed that the Ge content has an effect on the interface trap density and this enabled us to determine the optimal Ge content.

  9. Formation and spectroscopic characterization of mono-dispersed CdSe nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Yan-Ming; Li Chao-Rong; Cao Li; Liu Rui-Bin; He Yu-Ping; Xie Si-Shen; Zou Bing-Suo

    2005-01-01

    In this article, mono-dispersed hexagonal structure CdSe nanocrystals with polyhedron shape were prepared by an open solvent thermal reaction. They show a discrete excitonic transition structure in the absorption spectra and the minimal photoluminescence (PL) peak full-width at half-maximum of 19nm. The PL quantum yield is about 60%. Transmission electron micrographs, high-resolution transmission electron micrographs, x-ray powder diffraction patterns, UV-vis absorption spectra and PL spectra were obtained for the as-prepared CdSe nanocrystals. The size of the CdSe nanocrystals can be tuned by changing the reaction temperature or time. Due to the improved synthesis method, a different growth mechanism of the CdSe nanocrystals is discussed.

  10. Stochastic quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon layers: The role of quantum dots, quantum wires and localized states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Porras, A., E-mail: aramirez@fisica.ucr.ac.cr [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia e Ingeniería de Materiales (CICIMA), Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); García, O. [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Escuela de Química, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Vargas, C. [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Corrales, A. [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Escuela de Química, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica); Solís, J.D. [Escuela de Física, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 11501 (Costa Rica)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • PL spectra of porous silicon samples have been studied using a stochastic model. • This model can deconvolute PL spectra into three components. • Quantum dots, quantum wires and localized states have been identified. • Nanostructure diameters are in the range from 2.2 nm to 4.0 nm. • Contributions from quantum wires are small compared to the others. - Abstract: Nanocrystallites of Silicon have been produced by electrochemical etching of crystal wafers. The obtained samples show photoluminescence in the red band of the visible spectrum when illuminated by ultraviolet light. The photoluminescence spectra can be deconvolved into three components according to a stochastic quantum confinement model: one band coming from Nanocrystalline dots, or quantum dots, one from Nanocrystalline wires, or quantum wires, and one from the presence of localized surface states related to silicon oxide. The results fit well within other published models.

  11. Modelling of grain boundary effects in nanocrystalline/multicrystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokh-Baroughi, Mahdi; Sivoththaman, Siva

    2006-07-01

    Heterojunction solar cells formed by nanocrystalline silicon films on fine-grained multicrystalline silicon substrates are simulated in the presence of grain boundaries. The effects of grain boundaries on the dark and illuminated current-voltage (I-V) characteristics and spectral response (SR) of heterojunction (HJ) solar cells are assessed using 1D and 2D device simulations. The grain boundary in fine-grained multicrystalline silicon is modelled in two ways: as a defective surface with continuous defect distribution throughout the bandgap, and as a hypothetical sheet with a certain recombination velocity for electrons and holes. The SR and I-V characteristics of HJs are exploited to characterize grain boundary effects on the photovoltaic properties of the solar cells and photodetectors. Simulation results show noticeable differences on the dark I-V and SR of on- and off-grain boundary HJs. Grain boundary effects become important when fine-grained multicrystalline substrates are used. Measurement results of tiny test structures fabricated on the grain boundary show consistently inferior dark I-V and SR characteristics compared to those fabricated away from the grain and allow us to quantify the recombination at the grain boundary.

  12. Charge storage characteristics of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon film prepared by rapid thermal annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhi-Gang; Long Shi-Bing; Liu Ming; Wang Cong-Shun; Jia Rui; Lv Jin; Shi Yi

    2007-01-01

    The early stages of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition were characterized by atomic force microscopy.To increase the density of nanocrystals in the nc-Si:H films,the films were annealed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA) at different temperatures and then analysed by Raman spectroscopy.It Was found that the recrystallization process of the film Was optimal at around 1000℃.The effects of different RTA conditions on charge storage were characterized by capacitance-voltage measurement.Experimental results show that nc-Si:H films obtained by RTA have good charge storage characteristics for nonvolatile memory.

  13. Transient Photoinduced Absorption in Ultrathin As-grown Nanocrystalline Silicon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lioutas Ch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe have studied ultrafast carrier dynamics in nanocrystalline silicon films with thickness of a few nanometers where boundary-related states and quantum confinement play an important role. Transient non-degenerated photoinduced absorption measurements have been employed to investigate the effects of grain boundaries and quantum confinement on the relaxation dynamics of photogenerated carriers. An observed long initial rise of the photoinduced absorption for the thicker films agrees well with the existence of boundary-related states acting as fast traps. With decreasing the thickness of material, the relaxation dynamics become faster since the density of boundary-related states increases. Furthermore, probing with longer wavelengths we are able to time-resolve optical paths with faster relaxations. This fact is strongly correlated with probing in different points of the first Brillouin zone of the band structure of these materials.

  14. Dynamics of polyelectrolyte adsorption and colloidal flocculation upon mixing studied using mono-dispersed polystyrene latex particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Lili; Cohen Stuart, Martien; Adachi, Yasuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of polyelectrolytes just after their encounter with the surface of bare colloidal particles is analyzed, using the flocculation properties of mono-dispersed polystyrene latex (PSL) particles. Applying a Standardized Colloid Mixing (SCM) approach, effects of ionic strength and

  15. Efficient visible luminescence of nanocrystalline silicon prepared from amorphous silicon films by thermal annealing and stain etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikulin Valery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Films of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si were prepared from hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H by using rapid thermal annealing. The formed nc-Si films were subjected to stain etching in hydrofluoric acid solutions in order to passivate surfaces of nc-Si. The optical reflectance spectroscopy revealed the nc-Si formation as well as the high optical quality of the formed films. The Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to estimate the mean size and volume fraction of nc-Si in the annealed films, which were about 4 to 8 nm and 44 to 90%, respectively, depending on the annealing regime. In contrast to as-deposited a-Si:H films, the nc-Si films after stain etching exhibited efficient photoluminescence in the spectral range of 600 to 950 nm at room temperature. The photoluminescence intensity and lifetimes of the stain etched nc-Si films were similar to those for conventional porous Si formed by electrochemical etching. The obtained results indicate new possibilities to prepare luminescent thin films for Si-based optoelectronics.

  16. High-rate deposition of nano-crystalline silicon thin films on plastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, E.; Guduru, V.; Cerqueira, F.; Alpuim, P. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Ribeiro, M. [Centro de Nanotecnologia e Materiais Tecnicos, Funcionais e Inteligentes (CeNTI), 4760-034 Vila Nova de Famalicao (Portugal); Bouattour, A. [Institut fuer Physikalische Elektronik (ipe), Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-03-15

    Nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) is commonly used in the bottom cell of tandem solar cells. With an indirect bandgap, nc-Si:H requires thicker ({proportional_to}1 {mu}m) films for efficient light harvesting than amorphous Si (a-Si:H) does. Therefore, thin-film high deposition rates are crucial for further cost reduction of highly efficient a-Si:H based photovoltaic technology. Plastic substrates allow for further cost reduction by enabling roll-to-roll inline deposition. In this work, high nc-Si:H deposition rates on plastic were achieved at low substrate temperature (150 C) by standard Radio-frequency (13.56 MHz) Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition. Focus was on the influence of deposition pressure, inter-electrode distance (1.2 cm) and high power coupled to the plasma, on the hydrogen-to-silane dilution ratios (HD) necessary to achieve the amorphous-to-nanocrystalline phase transition and on the resulting film deposition rate. For each pressure and rf-power, there is a value of HD for which the films start to exhibit a certain amount of crystalline fraction. For constant rf-power, this value increases with pressure. Within the parameter range studied the deposition rate was highest (0.38 nm/s) for nc-Si:H films deposited at 6 Torr, 700 mW/cm{sup 2} using HD of 98.5%. Decreasing the pressure to 3 Torr (1.5 Torr) and rf-power to 350 mW/cm{sup 2} using HD - 98.5% deposition rate is 0.12 nm/s (0.076 nm/s). Raman crystalline fraction of these films is 72, 62 and 53% for the 6, 3 and 1.5 Torr films, respectively (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Highly conductive boron doped micro/nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by VHF-PECVD for solar cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juneja, Sucheta; Sudhakar, S., E-mail: sudhakars@nplindia.org; Gope, Jhuma; Lodhi, Kalpana; Sharma, Mansi; Kumar, Sushil

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: AFM images of boron doped micro/nanocrystalline silicon films at different diborane gas flow. - Highlights: • High deposition rate of 10 Å/s was achieved for boron doped silicon films. • Wide range of optical band gap from 1.32 eV to 1.84 eV observed for the deposited films. - Abstract: Boron doped hydrogenated micro/nanocrystalline silicon (μc/nc-Si:H) thin films have been deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD) using silane (SiH{sub 4}) diluted in argon. Diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) was used as the dopant gas and deposition was carried out at substrate temperature of 200 °C. The diborane flow (F{sub B}) varied in the range 0.00–0.30. Here, we report the effects of B{sub 2}H{sub 6} doping on electronic, optical and structural properties of hydrogenated micro/nanocrystalline silicon films. The structural properties were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The doped micro/nano crystalline silicon films presented a crystallographic orientation preferentially in the (1 1 1) and (2 2 0) plane. We resolve the deposition parameters that lead to the formation of p-type micro/nanocrystalline silicon thin films with very high value of conductivity and lower optical band gap. Correlations between structural and electrical properties were also studied. Based on temperature dependent conductivity measurements, it has been observed that the room temperature dark conductivity varies in the range 1.45 × 10{sup −4} Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} to 2.02 Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1} for the B-doped films. Meanwhile, the corresponding value of activation energies decreased to 0.06 eV for the B-doped films, which indicates the doped μc/nc-Si films with high conductivity can be achieved and these films prove to be a very good candidate for application in amorphous and micro/nano crystalline silicon solar cells as a p-type window layer.

  18. Neutron irradiation and frequency effects on the electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, Elchin

    2016-09-01

    In this present work nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) has been irradiated with neutron flux (∼ 2 ×1013 ncm-2s-1) up to 20 hours at different periods. Electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles (∼18 nm) is comparatively analyzed before and after neutron irradiation. The frequency dependencies of electrical conductivity of 3C-SiC nanoparticles is reviewed at 100 K-400 K temperature range before and after irradiation. The measurements were carried out at 0.1 Hz-2.5 MHz frequency ranges and at different temperatures. Radiation-induced conductivity (RIC) was observed in the nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles after neutron irradiation and this conductivity study as a function of frequency are presented. The type of conductivity has been defined based on the interdependence between real and imaginary parts of electrical conductivity function. Based on the obtained results the mechanism behind the electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles is explained in detail.

  19. Microscopic Measurements of Electrical Potential in Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Yan, B.; Yue, G.; Sivec, L.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.; Tong, X.

    2012-04-01

    We report on a direct measurement of electrical potential and field profiles across the n-i-p junction of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells, using the nanometer-resolution potential imaging technique of scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM). It was observed that the electric field is nonuniform across the i layer. It is much higher in the p/i region than in the middle and the n/i region, illustrating that the i layer is actually slightly n-type. A measurement on a nc-Si:H cell with a higher oxygen impurity concentration shows that the nonuniformity of the electric field is much more pronounced than in samples having a lower O impurity, indicating that O is an electron donor in nc-Si:H materials. This nonuniform distribution of electric field implies a mixture of diffusion and drift of carrier transport in the nc-Si:H solar cells. The composition and structure of these nc-Si:H cells were further investigated by using secondary-ion mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. The effects of impurity and structural properties on the electrical potential distribution and solar cell performance are discussed.

  20. Passivation of nanocrystalline silicon photovoltaic materials employing a negative substrate bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chao; Xu, Hao; Liu, Hong; Li, Zhengping; Shen, Wenzhong

    2013-11-15

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) shows great promise in the application of third-generation thin film photovoltaic cells. However, the mixed-phase structure of nc-Si:H leads to many defects existing in this important solar energy material. Here we present a new way to passivate nc-Si:H films by tuning the negative substrate bias in plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Microstructures of the nc-Si:H films prepared under a negative bias from 0 to -300 V have been characterized using Raman, x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, and optical transmission techniques. A novel passivation effect on nc-Si:H films has been identified by the volume fraction of voids in nc-Si:H, together with the electrical properties obtained by electron spin resonance and effective minority lifetime measurements. The mechanism of the passivation effect has been demonstrated by infrared spectroscopy, which illustrates that the high-energy H atoms and ions accelerated by an appropriate bias of -180 V can form more hydrides along the grain boundaries and effectively prevent oxygen incursions forming further Si-O/Si interface dangling bonds in the nc-Si:H films. The detrimental influence of a bias over -180 V on the film quality due to the strong ion bombardment of species with excessively high energy has also been observed directly from the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy.

  1. Tuning oxygen impurities and microstructure of nanocrystalline silicon photovoltaic materials through hydrogen dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chao; Xu, Hao; He, Wei; Li, Zhengping; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    As a great promising material for third-generation thin-film photovoltaic cells, hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films have a complex mixed-phase structure, which determines its defectful nature and easy residing of oxygen impurities. We have performed a detailed investigation on the microstructure properties and oxygen impurities in the nc-Si:H thin films prepared under different hydrogen dilution ratio treatment by the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and optical transmission spectroscopy have been utilized to fully characterize the microstructure properties of the nc-Si:H films. The oxygen and hydrogen contents have been obtained from infrared absorption spectroscopy. And the configuration state of oxygen impurities on the surface of the films has been confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, indicating that the films were well oxidized in the form of SiO2. The correlation between the hydrogen content and the volume fraction of grain boundaries derived from the Raman measurements shows that the majority of the incorporated hydrogen is localized inside the grain boundaries. Furthermore, with the detailed information on the bonding configurations acquired from the infrared absorption spectroscopy, a full explanation has been provided for the mechanism of the varying microstructure evolution and oxygen impurities based on the two models of ion bombardment effect and hydrogen-induced annealing effect.

  2. Microstructural and photoluminescence characterisation of germanium and silicon-germanium nanocrystalline materials

    CERN Document Server

    Kartopu, G

    2003-01-01

    The discovery of the strong room temperature visible photoluminescence (PL) emission from porous Si in 1990 has been the catalyst for much of the recent study on the visible PL emitting semiconductor nanocrystalline materials. Silicon, an indirect bandgap semiconductor, in the form of nanoparticles is thought to emit strong visible light due to quantum confinement effects and, in the near future, will replace GaAs (and the other direct bandgap III-IV semiconductors) as for the light emitting devices such as lasers. On the other hand, mainly due to its much larger exciton Bohr radius, Ge, in the form of nanocrystals, is expected show more pronounced quantum confinement effects compared to Si nanocrystals. SiGe alloys also constitute a more attractive material than Si in terms of both industrial applications and fundamental research: the lifetime of the 'porous Si-like' PL of porous SiGe is observed to be approximately two orders of magnitude faster than that of porous Si. Moreover, the bandgap of Si-Ge alloys ...

  3. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  4. Hydrogenated Nanocrystalline Silicon Thin Films Prepared by Hot-Wire Method with Varied Process Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Waman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films were prepared by hot-wire method at low substrate temperature (200∘C without hydrogen dilution of silane (SiH4. A variety of techniques, including Raman spectroscopy, low angle X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and UV-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, were used to characterize these films for structural and optical properties. Films are grown at reasonably high deposition rates (>15 Å/s, which are very much appreciated for the fabrication of cost effective devices. Different crystalline fractions (from 2.5% to 63% and crystallite size (3.6–6.0 nm can be achieved by controlling the process pressure. It is observed that with increase in process pressure, the hydrogen bonding in the films shifts from Si–H to Si–H2 and (Si–H2n complexes. The band gaps of the films are found in the range 1.83–2.11 eV, whereas the hydrogen content remains <9 at.% over the entire range of process pressure studied. The ease of depositing films with tunable band gap is useful for fabrication of tandem solar cells. A correlation between structural and optical properties has been found and discussed in detail.

  5. Nanocrystalline silicon and silicon quantum dots formation within amorphous silicon carbide by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method controlling the Argon dilution of the process gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kole, Arindam; Chaudhuri, Partha, E-mail: erpc@iacs.res.in

    2012-11-01

    Structural and optical properties of the amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films deposited by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition method from a mixture of silane (SiH{sub 4}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) diluted in argon (Ar) have been studied with variation of Ar dilution from 94% to 98.4%. It is observed that nanocrystalline silicon starts to form within the a-SiC:H matrix by increasing the dilution to 96%. With further increase in Ar dilution to 98% formation of the silicon nanocrystals (nc-Si) with variable size is enhanced. The optical band gap (E{sub g}) of the a-SiC:H film decreases from 2.0 eV to 1.9 eV with increase in Ar dilution from 96% to 98% as the a-SiC:H films gradually become Si rich. On increasing the Ar dilution further to 98.4% leads to the appearance of crystalline silicon quantum dots (c-Si q-dots) of nearly uniform size of 3.5 nm. The quantum confinement effect is apparent from the sharp increase in the E{sub g} value to 2.6 eV. The phase transformation phenomenon from nc-Si within the a-SiC:H films to Si q-dot were further studied by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and the grazing angle X-ray diffraction spectra. A relaxation in the lattice strain has been observed with the formation of Si q-dots.

  6. Trace elements study of high purity nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using k0-INAA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, Elchin; Jazbec, Anze

    2017-07-01

    Silicon carbide (3C-SiC) nanoparticles have been irradiated by neutron flux (2×1013 n·cm-2·s-1) at TRIGA Mark II type research reactor. After neutron irradiation, the radioisotopes of trace elements in the nanocrystalline 3C-SiC were studied as time functions. The identification of isotopes which significantly increased the activity of the samples as a result of neutron radiation was carried out. Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC are synthesized by standard laser technique and the purity of samples was determined by the k0-based Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (k0-INAA) method. Trace elements concentration in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles were determined by the radionuclides of appropriate elements. The trace element isotopes concentration have been calculated in percentage according to k0-INAA method.

  7. Towards lightweight and flexible high performance nanocrystalline silicon solar cells through light trapping and transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Zachary R.

    This thesis investigates ways to enhance the efficiency of thin film solar cells through the application of both novel nano-element array light trapping architectures and nickel oxide hole transport/electron blocking layers. Experimental results independently demonstrate a 22% enhancement in short circuit current density (JSC) resulting from a nano-element array light trapping architecture and a ˜23% enhancement in fill factor (FF) and ˜16% enhancement in open circuit voltage (VOC) resulting from a nickel oxide transport layer. In each case, the overall efficiency of the device employing the light trapping or transport layer was superior to that of the corresponding control device. Since the efficiency of a solar cell scales with the product of JSC, FF, and VOC, it follows that the results of this thesis suggest high performance thin film solar cells can be realized in the event light trapping architectures and transport layers can be simultaneously optimized. The realizations of these performance enhancements stem from extensive process optimization for numerous light trapping and transport layer fabrication approaches. These approaches were guided by numerical modeling techniques which will also be discussed. Key developments in this thesis include (1) the fabrication of nano-element topographies conducive to light trapping using various fabrication approaches, (2) the deposition of defect free nc-Si:H onto structured topographies by switching from SiH4 to SiF 4 PECVD gas chemistry, and (3) the development of the atomic layer deposition (ALD) growth conditions for NiO. Keywords: light trapping, nano-element array, hole transport layer, electron blocking layer, nickel oxide, nanocrystalline silicon, aluminum doped zinc oxide, atomic layer deposition, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, electron beam lithography, ANSYS HFSS.

  8. Role of nanocrystalline ZnO coating on the stability of porous silicon formed on textured (1 0 0) Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Daisy; Sharma, Shailesh N.; Kharkwal, Aneeta; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kumar, Mahesh; Singh, Shiv Nath; Singh, Parakram Kumar; Mehdib, Syed Sazad; Husain, Mushahid

    2013-11-01

    In this study, a colloid of nanocrystalline ZnO particles prepared by chemical route is sprayed on porous silicon layers. Porosity and thickness of PS layers were estimated by gravimetric analysis. Upon adsorption of ZnO colloids on PS films, oxidation of nanocrystalline Si causes shrinkage of the Si-core due to the breaking of SiSi bonds resulting in a blue-shift in PL spectra. The PL blue-shift can also be related to SiO species or due to defects and the silica networks on which OH groups are absorbed due to ZnO incorporation as also supported by our Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) studies, respectively. From high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) studies, a better crystalline perfection and considerable reduction in stress/strain values were observed for PS/ZnO layers as compared to virgin PS layers. The changes in the chemical composition at the surface of PS upon adsorption of ZnO colloids as elucidated by FTIR and XPS studies could be responsible for different PL emission and lattice-mismatch characteristics. The improved stability properties of PS are attributed to the strong absorption/adsorption of ZnO into the highly porous vertical layers separating macroscopic domains of nanoporous silicon and the mechanism of light emission from PS/ZnO layers is discussed on the basis of proposed energy band gap diagram.

  9. Boron Doped Nanocrystalline Film with Improved Work Function as a Buffer Layer in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinjoo; Shin, Chonghoon; Park, Hyeongsik; Jung, Junhee; Lee, Youn-Jung; Bong, Sungjae; Dao, Vinh Ai; Balaji, Nagarajan; Yi, Junsin

    2015-03-01

    We investigated thin film silicon solar cells with boron doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon/ hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide [p-type nc-Si:H/a-SiOx:H] layer. First, we researched the bandgap engineering of diborane (B2H6) doped wide bandgap hydrogenated nanocryslline silicon (p-type nc-Si:H) films, which have excellent electrical properties of high dark conductivity, and low activation energy. The films prepared with lower doping ratio and higher hydrogen dilution ratio had higher optical gap (Eg), with higher dark conductivity (σ(d)), and lower activation energy (Ea). We controlled Eg from 2.10 eV to 1.75 eV, with σ(d) from 1.1 S/cm to 7.59 x 10(-3) S/cm, and Ea from 0.040 eV to 0.128 eV. Next, we focused on the fabrication of thin film silicon solar cells. By inserting p-type nc-Si:H film into the thin film silicon solar cells, we achieved a remarkable increase in the built-in potential from 0.803 eV to 0.901 eV. By forming p-type nc-Si:H film between SnO2:F/ZnO:Al (30 nm) and p-type a-SiOx:H layer, the solar cell properties of open circuit voltage (Voc), short circuit current density (Jsc), and efficiency (η) were improved by 3.7%, 9.2%, and 9.8%, respectively.

  10. Structural defects caused by a rough substrate and their influence on the performance of hydrogenated nano-crystalline silicon n-i-p solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo B.T.; Franken, Ronald H.; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-03-15

    We present a cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy study of a set of hydrogenated nano-crystalline silicon n-i-p solar cells deposited by hot-wire chemical vapour deposition on Corning glass substrates coated with ZnO-covered Ag layers with various surface roughnesses. Strip-like structural defects (voids and low-density areas) are observed in the silicon layers originating from micro-valleys of Ag grains. A correlation between the opening angles of the textured surface and the appearance of these strips was found. We propose that in order to grow high-quality hydrogenated nano-crystalline silicon absorber layers for solar cell applications, the morphology of the Ag surface is a critical property, and the micro-valleys at the ZnO surface with an opening angle smaller than around 110 should be avoided. (author)

  11. Doped nanocrystalline silicon oxide for use as (intermediate) reflecting layers in thin-film silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babal, P.

    2014-01-01

    In summary, this thesis shows the development and nanostructure analysis of doped silicon oxide layers. These layers are applied in thin-film silicon single and double junction solar cells. Concepts of intermediate reflectors (IR), consisting of silicon and/or zinc oxide, are applied in tandem cells

  12. H2/D2 exchange reaction on mono-disperse Pt clusters: enhanced activity from minute O2 concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedel, Jakob Nordheim; Rötzer, Marian David; Jørgensen, Mikkel;

    2016-01-01

    The H2/D2 exchange reaction was studied on mono-disperse Pt8 clusters in a μ-reactor. The chemical activity was studied at temperatures varying from room temperature to 180 °C using mass spectrometry. It was found that minute amounts of O2 in the gas stream increased the chemical activity...... significantly. XPS and ISS before and after reaction suggest little or no sintering during reaction. A reaction pathway is suggested based on DFT. H2 desorption is identified as the rate-limiting step and O2 is confirmed as the source of the increased activity. The binding energy of platinum atoms in a SiO2...... supported Pt8 cluster is found to be comparable to the interatomic binding energies of bulk platinum, underlining the stability of the model system....

  13. Effects of pressure and inter-electrode distance on deposition of nanocrystalline silicon under high pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yanchao; Verkerk, Arjan D.; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Section Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University (Netherlands); Goedheer, Wim J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    Pressure (p) and inter-electrode distance (d) are important parameters in the process of depositing hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (VHF PECVD). High quality nc-Si:H materials are normally deposited at high pressure (1 mbar < p < 7 mbar). However, systematic research on the combined effects of p and d is rare. In order to optimize nc-Si:H for solar cells, such effects are investigated for a silane-hydrogen discharge at high pressure conditions. All nc-Si:H layers were deposited at fixed hydrogen dilution ratio (H{sub 2}/SiH{sub 4}), power and frequency. With optical emission spectroscopy, direct images taken by a photo camera and by 1D SiH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasma simulation, three different series were analyzed to study the combined effects of p and d at high pressure. The effects on the crystalline ratio and the porosity of the deposited silicon layers were also investigated. When the p .d product is constant, the plasma sheath becomes relatively thinner when d increases. When p or d increases independently, the electron density decreases. All the above modifications can increase the deposition rate, but by different mechanisms. When nc-Si:H is deposited at a p.d product of 30 mbar.mm, compact material with high crystalline ratio is obtained (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Synthesis of nanocrystalline silicon thin films using the increase of the deposition pressure in the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Rath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured thin silicon-based films have been deposited using the hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD technique at the University of the Western Cape. A variety of techniques including optical and infrared spectroscopy, Raman scattering spectroscopy, X-rays diffraction (XRD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM have been used for characterisation of the films. The electrical measurements show that the films have good values of photoresponse, and the photocurrent remains stable after several hours of light soaking. This contribution will discuss the characteristics of the hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited using increased process chamber pressure at a fixed hydrogen dilution ratio in monosilane gas.

  15. Thermal post-deposition treatment effects on nanocrystalline hydrogenated silicon prepared by PECVD under different hydrogen flow rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Sana Ben; Meddeb, Hosny; Daik, Ridha; Othman, Afef Ben; Slama, Sonia Ben; Dimassi, Wissem; Ezzaouia, Hatem

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films were deposited on mono-crystalline silicon substrate by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) under different hydrogen flow rates followed by a thermal treatment in an infrared furnace at different temperature ranging from 300 to 900 °C. The investigated structural, morphological and optoelectronic properties of samples were found to be strongly dependent on the annealing temperature. Raman spectroscopy revealed that nc-Si:H films contain crystalline, amorphous and mixed structures as well. We find that post-deposition thermal treatment may lead to a tendency for structural improvement and a decrease of the disorder in the film network at moderate temperature under 500 °C. As for annealing at higher temperature up to 900 °C induces the recrystallization of the film which is correlated with the grain size and volume fraction in the layer. We demonstrate that high annealing temperature can lead to a decrease of silicon-hydrogen bonds corresponding to a reduction of the amorphous matrix in the layer promoting the formation of covalent Si-Si bonds. The effusion of the hydrogen from the grown film leads to increase its density and therefore induces a decrease in the thickness of the layer. For post-deposition thermal treatment in temperature range under 700 °C, the post-deposition anneal seems to be crucial for obtaining good passivation quality as expressed by a minority carrier lifetime of 17 μs, as it allows a significant reduction in defect states at the layer/substrate interface. While for a temperature higher than 900 °C, the lifetime reduction is obtained because of hydrogen effusion phenomenon, thus a tendency for crystallization in the grown film.

  16. Nanocrystalline ZnO film deposited by ultrasonic spray on textured silicon substrate as an anti-reflection coating layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sali, S., E-mail: samira_sali@yahoo.fr [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd, Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Houari Boumediene University (USTHB), Faculty of Physics, Algiers (Algeria); Boumaour, M. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd, Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria); Kechouane, M. [Houari Boumediene University (USTHB), Faculty of Physics, Algiers (Algeria); Kermadi, S.; Aitamar, F. [Silicon Technology Development Unit (UDTS), 02 Bd, Frantz FANON, B.P. 140, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-07-01

    A ZnO thin film was successfully synthesized on glass, flat surface and textured silicon substrates by chemical spray deposition. The textured silicon substrate was carried out using two solutions (NaOH/IPA and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}). Textured with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution, the sample surface exhibits uniform pyramids with an average height of 5 {mu}m. The properties and morphology of ZnO films were investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra revealed a preferred orientation of the ZnO nanocrystalline film along the c-axis where the low value of the tensile strain 0.26% was obtained. SEM images show that all films display a granular, polycrystalline morphology. The morphology of the ZnO layers depends dramatically on the substrate used and follows the contours of the pyramids on the substrate surface. The average reflectance of the textured surface was found to be around 13% and it decreases dramatically to 2.57% after deposition of a ZnO antireflection coating. FT-IR peaks arising from the bonding between Zn-O are clearly represented using a silicon textured surface. A very intense photoluminescence (PL) emission peak is observed for ZnO/textured Si, revealing the good quality of the layer. The PL peak at 380.5 nm (UV emission) and the high-intensity PL peak at 427.5 nm are observed and a high luminescence occurs when using a textured Si substrate.

  17. The effect of nanocrystalline silicon host on magnetic properties of encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitzer, P; Rumpf, K; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, R; Coffer, J L; Reissner, M

    2015-12-21

    The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay with the iron oxide nanoparticle size, plays a sensitive role. It is shown that Fe3O4 loaded porous silicon and SiNTs differ significantly in their magnetic behavior, especially the transition between superparamagnetic behavior and blocked state, due to host morphology-dependent magnetic interactions. Importantly, it is found that all investigated samples meet the magnetic precondition of possible biomedical applications of exhibiting a negligible magnetic remanence at room temperature.

  18. The effect of nanocrystalline silicon host on magnetic properties of encapsulated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granitzer, P.; Rumpf, K.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, R.; Coffer, J. L.; Reissner, M.

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay with the iron oxide nanoparticle size, plays a sensitive role. It is shown that Fe3O4 loaded porous silicon and SiNTs differ significantly in their magnetic behavior, especially the transition between superparamagnetic behavior and blocked state, due to host morphology-dependent magnetic interactions. Importantly, it is found that all investigated samples meet the magnetic precondition of possible biomedical applications of exhibiting a negligible magnetic remanence at room temperature.The purpose of this work is a detailed comparison of the fundamental magnetic properties of nanocomposite systems consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticle-loaded porous silicon as well as silicon nanotubes. Such composite structures are of potential merit in the area of magnetically guided drug delivery. For magnetic systems to be utilized in biomedical applications, there are certain magnetic properties that must be fulfilled. Therefore magnetic properties of embedded Fe3O4-nanoparticles in these nanostructured silicon host matrices, porous silicon and silicon nanotubes, are investigated. Temperature-dependent magnetic investigations have been carried out for four types of iron oxide particle sizes (4, 5, 8 and 10 nm). The silicon host, in interplay

  19. Self-assembled ultra-nanocrystalline silicon films with preferred crystallographic orientation for solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Amit; Das, Debajyoti

    2015-03-01

    Using low-pressure planar inductively coupled plasma CVD at 87% H2-dilution to the SiH4 plasma, nc-Si:H films are prepared that possess preferential growth along crystallographic orientation with I220/I111 > 1.2, bonded H-content of ∼5.5 at.%, a low microstructure factor of ∼0.56, along with a reasonably high σD ∼ 5.2 × 10-4 S cm-1, ΔE ∼ 143 meV and σPh ∼ 1.4 × 10-3 S cm-1. The growth of the nc-Si:H network has been optimized to a moderately high nanocrystallinity (∼68%), with an average grain size of ∼8 nm. The overall network comprises a significant fraction of ultra-nanocrystalline component, Xunc/Xnc ∼ 0.47, which are dominantly inhabited by the thermodynamically preferred crystallographic orientation that provides convenient electrical transport perpendicular to the film surface and subsequently could facilitate photovoltaic performance. The cross-sectional view of the fracture surface demonstrates columnar structures, closely correlated to the favored growth of the nanocrystallites along crystallographic orientation that retains direction perpendicular to the substrate surface. The underlying phenomena could be demonstrated as a consequence of preferential growth induced by high atomic H density present in the planar inductively coupled SiH4 plasma obtained via much lower H2-dilution compared to that realized in conventional capacitively coupled plasma-CVD. The nc-Si:H films with precise material properties as well as the allied low-pressure ICP-CVD growth process could be of significant use in further progress of nc-Si solar cells.

  20. Hot wire CVD deposition of nanocrystalline silicon solar cells on rough substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongbo B.T., E-mail: h.li@uu.n [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Werf, Karine H.M. van der; Rath, Jatin K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2009-04-30

    In silicon thin film solar cell technology, frequently rough or textured substrates are used to scatter the light and enhance its absorption. The important issue of the influence of substrate roughness on silicon nanocrystal growth has been investigated through a series of nc-Si:H single junction p-i-n solar cells containing i-layers deposited with Hot-wire CVD. It is shown that silicon grown on the surface of an unoptimized rough substrate contains structural defects, which deteriorate solar cell performance. By introducing parameter v, voids/substrate area ratio, we could define a criterion for the morphology of light trapping substrates for thin film silicon solar cells: a preferred substrate should have a v value of less than around 1 x 10{sup -6}, correlated to a substrate surface rms value of lower than around 50 nm. Our Ag/ZnO substrates with rms roughness less than this value typically do not contain microvalleys with opening angles smaller than {approx} 110{sup o}, resulting in solar cells with improved output performance. We suggest a void-formation model based on selective etching of strained Si-Si atoms due to the collision of growing silicon film surface near the valleys of the substrate.

  1. Growth of Wide-Bandgap Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Films by HWCVD: Influence of Filament Temperature on Structural and Optoelectronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Himanshu S.; Yadav, Asha; Singh, Mukesh; Kumar, Shailendra; Agarwal, Pratima

    2015-03-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films have been deposited using a hot-wire chemical vapor deposition technique on quartz substrates with a mixture of silane, methane, and hydrogen gases as precursors at a reasonably high deposition rate of approximately 15 nm/min to 50 nm/min. The influence of the filament temperature ( T F) on the structural, optical, and electrical properties of the SiC film has been investigated using x-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible-near infrared transmission spectroscopy, and dark conductivity ( σ d) studies. Films deposited at low T F (1800°C to 1900°C) are amorphous in nature with high density of Si-Si bonds, whereas high- T F (≥2000°C) films are nanocrystalline embedded in an amorphous SiC matrix with higher concentration of Si-C bonds and negligible concentration of Si-Si bonds. The bandgap ( E g) varies from 2.5 eV to 3.1 eV and σ d (50°C) from ˜10-9 Ω-1 cm-1 to 10-1 Ω-1 cm-1 as T F is increased from 1900°C to 2200°C. This increase in E g and σ d is due to microstructural changes and unintentional oxygen doping of the films.

  2. Epitaxy of nanocrystalline silicon carbide on Si(111) at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verucchi, Roberto; Aversa, Lucrezia; Nardi, Marco V; Taioli, Simone; a Beccara, Silvio; Alfè, Dario; Nasi, Lucia; Rossi, Francesca; Salviati, Giancarlo; Iannotta, Salvatore

    2012-10-24

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has unique chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. A factor strongly limiting SiC-based technologies is the high-temperature synthesis. In this work, we provide unprecedented experimental and theoretical evidence of 3C-SiC epitaxy on silicon at room temperature by using a buckminsterfullerene (C(60)) supersonic beam. Chemical processes, such as C(60) rupture, are activated at a precursor kinetic energy of 30-35 eV, far from thermodynamic equilibrium. This result paves the way for SiC synthesis on polymers or plastics that cannot withstand high temperatures.

  3. Gas phase considerations for the growth of device quality nanocrystalline silicon at high rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rath, J.K.; Verkerk, A.D.; Liu, Y.; Brinza, M.; Goedheer, W.J.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    In order to increase industrial viability and to find niche markets, high deposition rate and low temperature depositions compared to standard deposition conditions are two recent trends in research areas concerning thin film silicon. In situ diagnostic tools to monitor gas phase conditions are usef

  4. Gas phase considerations for the growth of device quality nanocrystalline silicon at high rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.K. Rath,; Verkerk, A. D.; Liu, Y.; Brinza, M.; W. J. Goedheer,; Schropp, R. E. I.

    2009-01-01

    In order to increase industrial viability and to find niche markets, high deposition rate and low temperature depositions compared to standard deposition conditions are two recent trends in research areas concerning thin film silicon. In situ diagnostic tools to monitor gas phase conditions are usef

  5. Effect of Substrate Temperature on the Structural, Electrical and Optical Properties of Nanocrystalline Silicon Films in Hot-Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xiao-Song; ZHANG Shan-Shan; BAO Zhong; ZHANG Hong-Liang; CHEN Chang-Cheng; LIU Li-Xin; LIU Yan-Xia; XIE Er-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon films are deposited onto glass substrates at different substrate temperatures (140-400℃) by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition. The effect of substrate temperature on the structural properties are investigated. With an increasing substrate temperature, the Raman crystalline volume fraction increases, but decreases with a further increase. The maximum Raman crystalline volume fraction of the nanocrystalline silicon films is about 74% and also has the highest microstructural factor (R = 0.89) at a substrate temperature of 250 ℃. The deposition rate exhibits a contrary tendency to that of the crystalline volume fraction.The continuous transition of the film structures from columnar to agglomerated is observed at a substrate temperature of 300℃. The optical band gaps of the grown thin films declines (from 1.89 to 1.53eV) and dark electrical conductivity increases (from about 10-10 to about 10-6 S/cm) with the increasing substrate temperature.%@@ Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon fi1ms are deposited onto glass substrates at different substrate temperatures (140-400℃) by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition.The effect of substrate temperature on the structural properties are investigated.With an increasing substrate temperature, the Raman crystalline volume fraction increases, but decreases with a further increase.The maximum Raman crystalline volume fraction of the nanocrystalline silicon 61ms is about 74% and also has the highest microstructural factor (R = 0.89) at a substrate temperature of 250℃.The deposition rate exhibits a contrary tendency to that of the crystalline volume fraction.The continuous transition of the fi1m structures from columnar to agglomerated is observed at a substrate temperature of 300℃.The optical band gaps of the grown thin 61ms declines (from 1.89 to 1.53 eV) and dark electrical conductivity increases (from about 10-10 to about 10-6 S/cm) with the increasing substrate temperature.

  6. Very high frequency plasma deposited amorphous/nanocrystalline silicon tandem solar cells on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.

    2010-02-01

    The work in this thesis is to develop high quality intrinsic layers (especially nc-Si:H) for micromorph silicon tandem solar cells/modules on plastic substrates following the substrate transfer method or knows as the Helianthos procedure. Two objectives are covered in this thesis: (1) preliminary work on trial and optimization of single junction and tandem cells on glass substrate, (2) silicon film depositions on Al foil, and afterwards the characterization and development of these cells/modules on a plastic substrate. The first objective includes the development of suitable ZnO:Al TCO for nc Si:H single junction solar cells, fabrication of the aimed micromorph tandem solar cells on glass, and finally the optimization of the nc-Si:H i-layer for the depositions afterwards on Al foil. Chapter 3 addresses the improvement of texture etching of ZnO:Al by studying the HCl etching effect on ZnO:Al films sputter-deposited in a set substrate heater temperature series. With the texture-etched ZnO:Al front TCO, a single junction nc-Si:H solar cell was deposited with an initial efficiency of 8.33%. Chapter 4 starts with studying the light soaking and annealing effects on micromorph tandem solar cell. In the end, a highly stabilized bottom cell current limited tandem cell was made. The tandem shows an initial efficiency of 10.2%, and degraded only 6.9% after 1600 h of light soaking. In Chapter 5, the nc-Si:H i-layers were studied in 3 pressure and inter-electrode distance series. The correlations between plasma physics and the consequent i-layers’ properties are investigated. We show that the Raman crystalline ratio and porosity of the nc-Si:H layer have an interesting relation with the p•d product. By varying p and d, device quality nc-Si:H layer can be deposited at a high rate of 0.6 nm/s. These results in fact are a very important step for the second objective. The second objective is covered by the entire Chapter 6. All silicon layers are deposited on special aluminum

  7. Growth of boron doped hydrogenated nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films by Hot Wire-CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawbake, Amit [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Mayabadi, Azam; Waykar, Ravindra; Kulkarni, Rupali; Jadhavar, Ashok [School of Energy Studies, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Waman, Vaishali [Modern College of Arts, Science and Commerce, Shivajinagar, Pune 411 005 (India); Parmar, Jayesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai 400 005 (India); Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, IIT Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ma, Yuan‐Ron [Department of Physics, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien 97401, Taiwan (China); Devan, Rupesh; Pathan, Habib [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Jadkar, Sandesh, E-mail: sandesh@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • Boron doped nc-3C-SiC films prepared by HW-CVD using SiH{sub 4}/CH{sub 4}/B{sub 2}H{sub 6}. • 3C-Si-C films have preferred orientation in (1 1 1) direction. • Introduction of boron into SiC matrix retard the crystallanity in the film structure. • Film large number of SiC nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix. • Band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} (E{sub 04} > E{sub Tauc}) decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate. - Abstract: Boron doped nanocrystalline cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films have been prepared by HW-CVD using silane (SiH{sub 4})/methane (CH{sub 4})/diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) gas mixture. The influence of boron doping on structural, optical, morphological and electrical properties have been investigated. The formation of 3C-SiC films have been confirmed by low angle XRD, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis whereas effective boron doping in nc-3C-SiC have been confirmed by conductivity, charge carrier activation energy, and Hall measurements. Raman spectroscopy and HR-TEM analysis revealed that introduction of boron into the SiC matrix retards the crystallanity in the film structure. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and non contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) results signify that 3C-SiC film contain well resolved, large number of silicon carbide (SiC) nanocrystallites embedded in the a-Si matrix having rms surface roughness ∼1.64 nm. Hydrogen content in doped films are found smaller than that of un-doped films. Optical band gap values, E{sub Tauc} and E{sub 04} decreases with increase in B{sub 2}H{sub 6} flow rate.

  8. ENHANCED GROWTH RATE AND SILANE UTILIZATION IN AMORPHOUS SILICON AND NANOCRYSTALLINE-SILICON SOLAR CELL DEPOSITION VIA GAS PHASE ADDITIVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgeway, R G; Hegedus, S S; Podraza, N J

    2012-08-31

    Air Products set out to investigate the impact of additives on the deposition rate of both CSi and Si-H films. One criterion for additives was that they could be used in conventional PECVD processing, which would require sufficient vapor pressure to deliver material to the process chamber at the required flow rates. The flow rate required would depend on the size of the substrate onto which silicon films were being deposited, potentially ranging from 200 mm diameter wafers to the 5.7 m2 glass substrates used in GEN 8.5 flat-panel display tools. In choosing higher-order silanes, both disilane and trisilane had sufficient vapor pressure to withdraw gas at the required flow rates of up to 120 sccm. This report presents results obtained from testing at Air Products electronic technology laboratories, located in Allentown, PA, which focused on developing processes on a commercial IC reactor using silane and mixtures of silane plus additives. These processes were deployed to compare deposition rates and film properties with and without additives, with a goal of maximizing the deposition rate while maintaining or improving film properties.

  9. Artificial neural systems using memristive synapses and nano-crystalline silicon thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, Kurtis D.

    Future computer systems will not rely solely on digital processing of inputs from well-defined data sets. They will also be required to perform various computational tasks using large sets of ill-defined information from the complex environment around them. The most efficient processor of this type of information known today is the human brain. Using a large number of primitive elements (˜1010 neurons in the neocortex) with high parallel connectivity (each neuron has ˜104 synapses), brains have the remarkable ability to recognize and classify patterns, predict outcomes, and learn from and adapt to incredibly diverse sets of problems. A reasonable goal in the push to increase processing power of electronic systems would thus be to implement artificial neural networks in hardware that are compatible with today's digital processors. This work focuses on the feasibility of utilizing non-crystalline silicon devices in neuromorphic electronics. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) nanowire transistors with Schottky barrier source/drain junctions, as well as a-Si:H/Ag resistive switches are fabricated and characterized. In the transistors, it is found that the on-current scales linearly with the effective width W eff of the channel nanowire array down to at least 20 nm. The solid-state electrolyte resistive switches (memristors) are shown to exhibit the proper current-voltage hysteresis. SPICE models of similar devices are subsequently developed to investigate their performance in neural circuits. The resulting SPICE simulations demonstrate spiking properties and synaptic learning rules that are incredibly similar to those in biology. Specifically, the neuron circuits can be designed to mimic the firing characteristics of real neurons, and Hebbian learning rules are investigated. Finally, some applications are presented, including associative learning analogous to the classical conditioning experiments originally performed by Pavlov, and frequency and pattern

  10. First-principles and molecular dynamics study of thermoelectric transport properties of N-type silicon-based superlattice-nanocrystalline heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanguang; Gong, Xiaojing; Xu, Ben; Hu, Ming

    2017-08-01

    Electrical and thermal transport in silicon germanium superlattice nanostructures has received extensive attention from scientists for understanding carrier properties at the nanoscale, and the figure-of-merit (ZT) reported in such structures has inspired engineers to develop cost-effective waste heat recovery systems. In this paper, the thermoelectric transport properties of the silicon-based superlattice- and anti-superlattice-nanocrystalline heterostructures are systematically studied by first-principles and molecular dynamics simulations combined with the Boltzmann transport theory. The thermal conductivity, which is thought to be the essential bottleneck for bulk crystalline Si to gain a high ZT value, of such structures is found to be reduced by two orders of magnitude and reaches a level far below the amorphous limit of Si. This is achieved due to the extremely strong phonon-boundary scattering at both grain boundaries and Si-Ge interfaces, which will lead to the phonon mean free path being much smaller than the grain size (Casmir limit): for instance, the dominant phonons are in range of 0.5 to 3 nm for the heterostructures with a grain size of around 8 nm. Meanwhile, the power factor can be preserved at the level comparable to bulk crystalline because of the quantum confinement effect, which resulted from the conduction band minima converge, reduction of band gap, and the short mean free path of carriers. As a result, the ZT of such superlattice based nanomembranes can reach around 0.3 at room temperature, which is two orders of magnitude higher than the bulk crystalline case. The corresponding bulk superlattice-nanocrystalline heterostructures possess a ZT value of 0.5 at room temperature, which is superior to all other bulk silicon-based thermoelectrics. Our results here show that nanostructuring the superlattice structure can further decrease the thermal conductivity while keeping the electrical transport properties at the bulk comparable level, and

  11. A field-emission pressure sensor of nano-crystalline silicon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖波; 韩建保

    2001-01-01

    The prototype of a field-emission pressure sensor with a novel structure based on the quantum tunnel effect is designed and manufactured, where a cathode emitter array is fabricated on the same silicon plate as the sensible film. For an integrated structure, not only the alignment and vacuum bonding between the anode and cathode are easy to be realized, but also a fine sensibility is guaranteed. For example, the measured current density emitted from the effective area of the sensor can reach 53.5 A/m2 when the exterior electric field is 5.6 x 105 V/m. Furthermore, it is demonstrated by finite element method simulation that the reduction in sensor sensitivity caused by emitters on the sensible film is negligible. The difference between the maximum deflections of the sensible films with and without emitters under specified pressure is less than 0.4 %. Therefore, it can be concluded that the novel field-emission sensor structure is reasonable.

  12. PECVD法制备纳米晶硅薄膜的研究进展%Research Progress on Nanocrystalline Silicon Thin Films Prepared by PECVD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何佳; 邱海宁; 郑祺

    2012-01-01

    简要介绍了纳米晶硅薄膜的微结构表征方法,重点讨论了PECVD制备方法中工艺参数对薄膜结构的影响,并探讨了氢在薄膜形成和生长中的作用.通过优化氢稀释率、衬底温度、反应气压、激励功率和激发频率等工艺参数可提高纳米晶硅薄膜的晶化率并改善薄膜质量.结合喇曼光谱、X射线衍射谱、傅里叶红外光谱和高分辨透射电镜等表征方法可深入研究薄膜形成机理,对进一步探索薄膜光电特性有重要意义.分析了等离子体化学气相沉积(PECVD)制备方法中各工艺参数对薄膜质量和沉积速率的影响,指出其存在的问题,并探寻了今后的研究方向.%The measurement methods to characterize the nanocrystalline silicon thin film micro-structure are introduced with the emphasis on the discussion of the influence of the plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process parameters on the thin film microstructure, and the effects of the hydrogen on the formation and growth of nanocrystalline silicon thin films are presented. The crystalline fraction and other properties of the nanocrystalline silicon thin films can be improved by optimizing the process parameters, such as the hydrogen dilution, substrate temperature, reaction pressure, driving power and excitation frequency. The film formation mechanism can be obtained by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrum, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscope and other characterize methods, which is significant for the further study of the photoelectric properties of the films. The effects of the process parameters of the PECVD method on the film quality and deposition rate are analyzed. The limitations of the PECVD method and the development tendency in the future are presented.

  13. Effects of neutral particle beam on nano-crystalline silicon thin films, with application to thin film transistor backplane for flexible active matrix organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin Nyoung; Song, Byoung Chul; Lee, Dong Hyeok [Dept. of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Suk Jae; Lee, Bonju [National Fusion Research Institute, 52, Yuseong-Gu, Deajeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, MunPyo, E-mail: goodmoon@korea.ac.kr [Dept. of Display and Semiconductor Physics, Korea University, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-01

    A novel deposition process for nano-crystalline silicon (nc-Si) thin films was developed using neutral beam assisted chemical vapor deposition (NBaCVD) technology for the application of the thin film transistor (TFT) backplane of flexible active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED). During the formation of a nc-Si thin film, the energetic particles enhance nano-sized crystalline rather microcrystalline Si in thin films. Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) affects the crystallinity in two ways: (1) NPB energy enhances nano-crystallinity through kinetic energy transfer and chemical annealing, and (2) heavier NPB (such as Ar) induces damage and amorphization through energetic particle impinging. Nc-Si thin film properties effectively can be changed by the reflector bias. As increase of NPB energy limits growing the crystalline, the performance of TFT supports this NPB behavior. The results of nc-Si TFT by NBaCVD demonstrate the technical potentials of neutral beam based processes for achieving high stability and reduced leakage in TFT backplanes for AMOLEDs.

  14. Investigation of the agglomeration and amorphous transformation effects of neutron irradiation on the nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using TEM and SEM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseynov, Elchin M., E-mail: elchin.h@yahoo.com [Department of Nanotechnology and Radiation Material Science, National Nuclear Research Center, Inshaatchilar pr. 4, AZ 1073 Baku (Azerbaijan); Institute of Radiation Problems of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, B.Vahabzade 9, AZ 1143 Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles irradiated by neutron flux during 20 h in TRIGA Mark II light water pool type research reactor. Silicon carbide nanoparticles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) devices before and after neutron irradiation. The agglomeration of nanoparticles was studied comparatively before and after neutron irradiation. After neutron irradiation the amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles was analyzed in TEM device. Neutron irradiation defects in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles and other effects investigated by TEM device. The effect of irradiation on the crystal structure of the nanomaterial was studied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron diffraction patterns (EDP) analysis.

  15. Investigation of the agglomeration and amorphous transformation effects of neutron irradiation on the nanocrystalline silicon carbide (3C-SiC) using TEM and SEM methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseynov, Elchin M.

    2017-04-01

    Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC particles irradiated by neutron flux during 20 h in TRIGA Mark II light water pool type research reactor. Silicon carbide nanoparticles were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) devices before and after neutron irradiation. The agglomeration of nanoparticles was studied comparatively before and after neutron irradiation. After neutron irradiation the amorphous layer surrounding the nanoparticles was analyzed in TEM device. Neutron irradiation defects in the 3C-SiC nanoparticles and other effects investigated by TEM device. The effect of irradiation on the crystal structure of the nanomaterial was studied by selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and electron diffraction patterns (EDP) analysis.

  16. Gas doping ratio effects on p-type hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon thin films grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, P.Q. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: robt@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhou, Z.B. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)], E-mail: zbzhou@sjtu.edu.cn; Chan, K.Y. [Thin Film Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya 63100, Selangor (Malaysia); Tang, D.Y.; Cui, R.Q.; Dou, X.M. [Solar Energy Institute, Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2008-12-30

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) grown by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) has recently drawn significant attention in the area of thin-film large area optoelectronics due to possibility of high deposition rate. We report on the effects of diborane (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}) doping ratio on the microstructural and optoelectrical properties of the p-type nc-Si:H thin films grown by HWCVD at low substrate temperature of 200 deg. C and with high hydrogen dilution ratio of 98.8%. An attempt has been made to elucidate the boron doping mechanism of the p-type nc-Si:H thin films deposited by HWCVD and the correlation between the B{sub 2}H{sub 6} doping ratio, crystalline volume fraction, optical band gap and dark conductivity.

  17. Optimization of Si:H films at the onset of nanocrystallinity for applications in silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Subhashis; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    The Si:H films at the onset of nanocrystallinity has proved to be an extremely useful material for stable a-Si:H based solar cells. In the present work it has been targeted to grow the improved a-Si:H matrix at the onset of nanocrystallization at a high growth rate. By optimizing the electrode separation in the RF glow discharge reactor and the effective gas pressure in the plasma, a significantly conducting (σD ˜10-5 S.cm-1), optically absorbing, low H-content (CH ˜2.2 at%) Si:H material at the onset of nanocrystallinity (XC ˜53%) has been obtained at a relatively high growth rate (rd = 102 Å/min), suitable for the desired technological applications.

  18. An investigation on the effect of high partial pressure of hydrogen on the nanocrystalline structure of silicon carbide thin films prepared by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daouahi, Mohsen; Omri, Mourad; Kerm, Abdul Ghani Yousseph; Al-Agel, Faisal Abdulaziz; Rekik, Najeh

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study reported in this paper is to investigate the role of the high partial pressure of hydrogen introduced during the growth of nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films (nc-SiC:H). For this purpose, we report the preparation as well as spectroscopic studies of four series of nc-SiC:H obtained by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering at high partial pressure of hydrogen by varying the percentage of H2 in the gas mixture from 70% to 100% at common substrate temperature (TS=500°C). The effects of the dilution on the structural changes and the chemical bonding of the different series have been studied using Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy. For this range of hydrogen dilution, two groups of films were obtained. The first group is characterized by the dominance of the crystalline phase and the second by a dominance of the amorphous phase. This result confirms the multiphase structure of the grown nc-SiC:H thin films by the coexistence of the SiC network, carbon-like and silicon-like clusters. Furthermore, infrared results show that the SiC bond is the dominant absorption peak and the carbon atom is preferentially bonded to silicon. The maximum value obtained of the crystalline fraction is about 77%, which is relatively important compared to other results obtained by other techniques. In addition, the concentration of CHn bonds was found to be lower than that of SiHn for all series. Raman measurements revealed that the crystallization occurs in all series even at 100% H2 dilution suggesting that high partial pressure of hydrogen favors the formation of silicon nanocrystallites (nc-Si). The absence of both the longitudinal acoustic band and the transverse optical band indicate that the crystalline phase is dominant.

  19. Optical and structural properties of nanocrystalline silicon potential well structure fabricated by cat-chemical vapor deposition at 200 degrees C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sin-Young; Keum, Ki-Su; Song, Tae-Ho; Hong, Wan-Shick

    2013-11-01

    We attempted to fabricate multi-layer, thin film structures by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (Cat-CVD) at a low temperature (200 degrees C). A 5-10-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) layer was positioned asymmetrically between two silicon nitride (SINx) layers. The compositions of the SiNx layers were varied between silicon-rich and nitrogen-rich. Each layer was deposited continuously in the Cat-CVD chamber without post-annealing. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) revealed that the nc-Si layer grew in columns on the surface of the bottom SiNx layer, and the columnar structure extended up to a few nanometers of the top SiNx layer. In photoluminescence (PL) spectra, the overall intensity increased with the thickness of the nc-Si layer, but the primary peak position changed more sensitively relative to the composition of the SiNx layers. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis was observed only when 10-nm-thick nc-Si layers were inserted between the nitrogen-rich silicon nitride (NRSN) layers. Under a bias voltage of 5 V, the current in the sample with a 10-nm-thick nc-Si layer was higher by at least two orders of magnitude than that in the sample with a 5-nm-thick nc-Si layer. The I-V curve was fitted well using both the Fowler-Nordheim and the Poole-Frenkel models for electric fields of magnitudes greater than 1.1 MV/cm, thereby implying that both mechanisms contribute to the increase in the leakage current.

  20. FEM numerical analysis of excimer laser induced modification in alternating multi-layers of amorphous and nano-crystalline silicon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J.C., E-mail: jconde@uvigo.es [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain); Martin, E. [Dpto. Mecanica, Maquinas, Motores Termicos y Fluidos, Universidade de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain); Stefanov, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain); Alpuim, P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal); Chiussi, S. [Dpto. Fisica Aplicada, Universidade de Vigo, Rua Maxwell s/n, Campus Universitario Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer nc-Si:H is a material with growing importance for a large-area of nano-electronic, photovoltaic or biomedical devices. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UV-ELA technique causes a rapid heating that provokes the H{sub 2} desorption from the Si surface and bulk material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Next, diffusion of P doped nc-Si films and eventually, for high energy densities would be possible to reach the melting point. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These multilayer structures consisting of thin alternating a-Si:H(10 nm) and n-doped nc-Si:H(60 nm) films deposited on SiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer To optimize parameters involved in this processing, FEM numerical analysis of multilayer structures have been performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The numerical results are compared with exhaustive characterization of the experimental results. - Abstract: UV excimer laser annealing (UV-ELA) is an alternative annealing process that, during the last few years, has gained enormous importance for the CMOS nano-electronic technologies, with the ability to provide films and alloys with electrical and optical properties to fit the desired device performance. The UV-ELA of amorphous (a-) and/or doped nano-crystalline (nc-) silicon films is based on the rapid (nanoseconds) formation of temperature profiles caused by laser radiation that is absorbed in the material and lead to crystallisation, diffusion in solid or even in liquid phase. To achieve the desired temperature profiles and to optimize the parameters involved in the processing of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) films with the UV-ELA, a numerical analysis by finite element method (FEM) of a multilayer structure has been performed. The multilayer structures, consisting of thin alternating a-Si:H(10 nm) and n-doped nc-Si:H(60 nm) layers, deposited on a glass substrate, has also been experimentally analyzed. Temperature profiles caused by 193 nm radiation with 25

  1. Unravelling a simple method for the low temperature synthesis of silicon nanocrystals and monolithic nanocrystalline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka-Hyun; Johnson, Erik V.; Kazanskii, Andrey G.; Khenkin, Mark V.; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present new results on the plasma processing and structure of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) thin films. pm-Si:H thin films consist of a low volume fraction of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon matrix with medium range order, and they possess this morphology as a significant contribution to their growth comes from the impact on the substrate of silicon clusters and nanocrystals synthesized in the plasma. Quadrupole mass spectrometry, ion flux measurements, and material characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy all provide insight on the contribution to the growth by silicon nanocrystals during PECVD deposition. In particular, cross-section TEM measurements show for the first time that the silicon nanocrystals are uniformly distributed across the thickness of the pm-Si:H film. Moreover, parametric studies indicate that the best pm-Si:H material is obtained at the conditions after the transition between a pristine plasma and one containing nanocrystals, namely a total gas pressure around 2 Torr and a silane to hydrogen ratio between 0.05 to 0.1. From a practical point of view these conditions also correspond to the highest deposition rate achievable for a given RF power and silane flow rate.

  2. Unravelling a simple method for the low temperature synthesis of silicon nanocrystals and monolithic nanocrystalline thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ka-Hyun; Johnson, Erik V.; Kazanskii, Andrey G.; Khenkin, Mark V.; Roca i Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present new results on the plasma processing and structure of hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) thin films. pm-Si:H thin films consist of a low volume fraction of silicon nanocrystals embedded in a silicon matrix with medium range order, and they possess this morphology as a significant contribution to their growth comes from the impact on the substrate of silicon clusters and nanocrystals synthesized in the plasma. Quadrupole mass spectrometry, ion flux measurements, and material characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy all provide insight on the contribution to the growth by silicon nanocrystals during PECVD deposition. In particular, cross-section TEM measurements show for the first time that the silicon nanocrystals are uniformly distributed across the thickness of the pm-Si:H film. Moreover, parametric studies indicate that the best pm-Si:H material is obtained at the conditions after the transition between a pristine plasma and one containing nanocrystals, namely a total gas pressure around 2 Torr and a silane to hydrogen ratio between 0.05 to 0.1. From a practical point of view these conditions also correspond to the highest deposition rate achievable for a given RF power and silane flow rate. PMID:28091562

  3. Electrical Characterization of Printed Nanocrystalline Silicon Films, Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00241

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, D.

    2011-05-01

    This CRADA helped Innovalight characterize and quantify their ink-based selective emitter technology. Controlled localized doping of selective emitter structures via Innovalight Silicon Ink technology was demonstrated. Both secondary ion mass spectrometry and scanning capacitance microscopy revealed; abrupt lateral dopant profiles at ink-printed boundaries. Uniform doping of iso- and pyramidal surfaces was also verified using scanning electron microscopy dopant contrast imaging.

  4. Influence of an External Magnetic Field on the Growth of Nanocrystalline Silicon Films Grown by MF Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junhua Gao; Lin Zhang; Jinquan Xiao; Jun Gong; Chao Sun; Lishi Wen

    2012-01-01

    The effects of an external magnetic field originating from two solenoid coils on the magnetic field configuration, plasma state of a dual unbalanced magnetron sputter system and the structure of nanocrystalline Si films were examined. Numerical simulations of the magnetic field configuration showed that increasing the coil current significantly changed the magnetic field distribution between the substrate and targets. The saturated ion current density Ji in the substrate position measured by using a circular flat probe increased from 0.18 to 0.55 mA/cm2 with the coil current ranging from 0 to 6 A. X-ray diffraction and Raman results revealed that increasing the ion density near the substrate would benefit crystallization of films and the preferential growth along [lI1] orientation. From analysis of the surface morphology and the microstructure of Si films grown under different plasma conditions, it is found that with increasing the Ji, the surface of the film was smoothed and the alteration in the surface roughness was mainly correlated to the localized surface diffusion of the deposited species and the crystallization behavior of the films.

  5. Implantation of silicon dioxide-based nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and pure phase beta-tricalciumphosphate bone substitute granules in caprine muscle tissue does not induce new bone formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanaati Shahram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoinductive bone substitutes are defined by their ability to induce new bone formation even at heterotopic implantation sites. The present study was designed to analyze the potential osteoinductivity of two different bone substitute materials in caprine muscle tissue. Materials and methods One gram each of either a porous beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP or an hydroxyapatite/silicon dioxide (HA/SiO2-based nanocrystalline bone substitute material was implanted in several muscle pouches of goats. The biomaterials were explanted at 29, 91 and 181 days after implantation. Conventional histology and special histochemical stains were performed to detect osteoblast precursor cells as well as mineralized and unmineralized bone matrix. Results Both materials underwent cellular degradation in which tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells and TRAP-negative multinucleated giant cells were involved. The ß-TCP was completely resorbed within the observation period, whereas some granules of the HA-groups were still detectable after 180 days. Neither osteoblasts, osteoblast precursor cells nor extracellular bone matrix were found within the implantation bed of any of the analyzed biomaterials at any of the observed time points. Conclusions This study showed that ß-TCP underwent a faster degradation than the HA-based material. The lack of osteoinductivity for both materials might be due to their granular shape, as osteoinductivity in goat muscle has been mainly attributed to cylindrical or disc-shaped bone substitute materials. This hypothesis however requires further investigation to systematically analyze various materials with comparable characteristics in the same experimental setting.

  6. Growth, microstructure, and infrared-ultraviolet optical conductivity of La(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3) nanocrystalline films on silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W W; Hu, Z G; Li, Y W; Zhu, M; Zhu, Z Q; Chu, J H

    2010-03-01

    La(0.5)Sr(0.5)CoO(3) (LSCO) nanocrystalline (nc) films have been directly grown on silicon wafers under different substrate temperatures by pulsed laser deposition. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicate that the films are polycrystalline with the pure perovskite phase at higher substrate temperatures. The columnar growth formation with the nanocrystalline structure in the films has been confirmed by microscopy experiments. Infrared-ultraviolet optical properties of the LSCO films have been investigated with the aid of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE). Dielectric function in the photon energy range of 1.1-3.1 eV (400-1100 nm) has been extracted by reproducing the experimental data with a Lorentz oscillator model. It is found that the real part is decreased from 4.7 to -0.7 at the near-infrared region with increasing substrate temperature. The optical conductivity shows a different variation trend for the lower and higher growth temperatures, respectively. Note that the films deposited above 650 degrees C exhibit the well-defined metallic phase behavior. The discrepancies could be mainly ascribed to different crystalline structure and surface morphology. The present results may be crucial for future applications of ferromagnetic-based optoelectronic and spin-electronic devices.

  7. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  8. Controlling the quality of nanocrystalline silicon made by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition by using a reverse H2 profiling technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Franken, R.H.; Stolk, R.L.; van der Werf, C.H.M.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen profiling, i.e., decreasing the H2 dilution during deposition, is a well-known technique to maintain a proper crystalline ratio of the nanocrystalline (nc-Si:H) absorber layers of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor-deposited (PECVD) thin film solar cells. With this technique a large increase in

  9. Steps towards silicon optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Starovoytov, A

    1999-01-01

    nanostructure fabrication. Thus, this thesis makes a dual contribution to the chosen field: it summarises the present knowledge on the possibility of utilising optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon in silicon-based electronics, and it reports new results within the framework of the subject. The main conclusion is that due to its promising optoelectronic properties nanocrystalline silicon remains a prospective competitor for the cheapest and fastest microelectronics of the next century. This thesis addresses the issue of a potential future microelectronics technology, namely the possibility of utilising the optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon for optoelectronic circuits. The subject is subdivided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction. It formulates the oncoming problem for microelectronic development, explains the basics of Integrated Optoelectronics, introduces porous silicon as a new light-emitting material and gives a brief review of other competing light-emitting material syst...

  10. Microwave assisted synthesis of nanocrystalline Fe-phosphates electrode materials and their electrochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D H; Kang, J W; Jung, I O; Im, J S; Kim, E J; Song, S J; Lee, J S; Kim, J

    2008-10-01

    LiFePO4 nanocrystalline particles were synthesized using microwave assisted polyol process within a fast reaction time of 20 minutes without any further heating as a post step. The synthesized LiFePO4 nanocrystalline particles showed mono-dispersed rod and orthorhombic-like shapes with a size of 60 approximately 180 nm. The refined X-ray diffraction pattern of the sample was indexed well to the olivine crystal structure (space group: Pnma) without any impurity phases. The LiFePO4 nanocrystalline particles show a capacity of 161 mAh/g in a voltage range of 2.5-4.2 V with a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2 without any observable capacity fading in extended cycles of 100th. A cyclic voltammetry analysis exhibits distinctly sharp peaks corresponding to the typical LiFePO4/FePO4 redox couples and demonstrates a good reversibility of the sample.

  11. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Richard W.; Nieman, G. William; Weertman, Julia R.

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  12. CROSS-DISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Large Storage Window in a-SiNx/nc-Si/a-SiNx Sandwiched Structure for Nanocrystalline Silicon Floating Gate Memory Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Huang, Jian; Ding, Hong-Lin; Zhang, Xian-Gao; Yu, Lin-Wei; Huang, Xin-Fan; Li, Wei; Chen, Kun-Ji

    2008-07-01

    An a-SiNx/nanocrystalline silicon [(nc-Si)/a-SiNx] sandwiched structure is fabricated in a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) system at low temperature (250° C). The nc-Si layer is fabricated from a hydrogen-diluted silane mixture gas by using a layer-by-layer deposition technique. Atom force microscopy measurement shows that the density of nc-Si is about 2 × 1011 cm-2. By the pretreatment of plasma nitridation, low density of interface states and high-quality interface between the Si substrate and a-SiNx insulator layer are obtained. The density of interface state at the midgap is calculated to be 1 × 1010 cm-2eV-1 from the quasistatic and high frequency C - V data. The charging and discharging property of nc-Si quantum dots is studied by capacitance-voltage (C - V) measurement at room temperature. An ultra-large hysteresis is observed in the C - V characteristics, which is attributed to storage of the electrons and holes into the nc-Si dots. The long-term charge-loss process is studied and ascribed to low density of interface states at SiNx/Si substrate.

  13. Technology development of the nano-crystalline silicon thin film materials%纳米晶硅薄膜材料的技术发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴大维; 吴越侠; 唐志斌

    2012-01-01

    The recent development of the nano - crystalline silicon thin film material is reviewed in this paper. Some ideas is proposed to promote advances of the silicon thin film solar cells. In this paper, we make come discussions on the development of silicon thin film solar cells and predict the prospect of latest ones.%本文综述了硅基薄膜材料的发展历程;提出了一些促进硅基薄膜电池技术进步的思路;并对硅 基薄膜电池的发展进行了有益的探讨,对最新的硅基薄膜太阳能电池作了展望.

  14. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  15. Effect of surface modified silicon carbide particles with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and nanocrystalline spinel ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} on mechanical and damping properties of the composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Subhash; Pal, Kaushik, E-mail: pl_kshk@yahoo.co.in

    2015-09-17

    In our proof-of-concept studies, pure aluminium metal matrix composites reinforced with alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and nanocrystalline spinel zinc aluminate (ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) coated silicon carbide (SiC) particles were fabricated by stir casting. Initially, we presented the results of an investigation on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and spinel ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} coating layer on SiC particles of sub-micron size via facile sol–gel method. The amount and coverage of different coating crystals on SiC surface were studied through X-ray energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDX) analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Further, adequate dispersion, de-agglomeration and stability of coated SiC particles were investigated through Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and elemental mapping of aluminium metal matrix composites. The room temperature mechanical properties and thermal cyclic damping behaviour of the composites were examined. The obtained results indicate that coating of SiC has a significant influence on the damping and mechanical properties and the resulting composite (ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} coated SiC/Al) exhibited 60% higher stiffness (storage modulus) and 3.6 times increase in tensile strength, and 3.5 times increase in hardness respectively as compared to the pure aluminium. This is attributed to stabilization of the tailored SiC particles and improved interface bonding between coated particles and matrix.

  16. Influence of hydrogen dilution on structural, electrical and optical properties of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funde, A.M.; Bakr, Nabeel Ali; Kamble, D.K. [School of Energy Studies, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Hawaldar, R.R.; Amalnerkar, D.P. [Center for Materials for Electronics Technology (C-MET), Panchawati, Pune 411 008 (India); Jadkar, S.R. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind Road, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) thin films were deposited from pure silane (SiH{sub 4}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas mixture by conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PE-CVD) method at low temperature (200 C) using high rf power. The structural, optical and electrical properties of these films are carefully and systematically investigated as a function of hydrogen dilution of silane (R). Characterization of these films with low angle X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy revealed that the crystallite size in the films tends to decrease and at same time the volume fraction of crystallites increases with increase in R. The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic analysis showed at low values of R, the hydrogen is predominantly incorporated in the nc-Si:H films in the mono-hydrogen (Si-H) bonding configuration. However, with increasing R the hydrogen bonding in nc-Si:H films shifts from mono-hydrogen (Si-H) to di-hydrogen (Si-H{sub 2}) and (Si-H{sub 2}){sub n} complexes. The hydrogen content in the nc-Si:H films decreases with increase in R and was found less than 10 at% over the entire studied range of R. On the other hand, the Tauc's optical band gap remains as high as 2 eV or much higher. The quantum size effect may responsible for higher band gap in nc-Si:H films. A correlation between electrical and structural properties has been found. For optimized deposition conditions, nc-Si:H films with crystallite size {proportional_to}7.67 nm having good degree of crystallinity ({proportional_to}84%) and high band gap (2.25 eV) were obtained with a low hydrogen content (6.5 at%). However, for these optimized conditions, the deposition rate was quite small (1.6 Aa/s). (author)

  17. Study on the fabrication of back surface reflectors in nano-crystalline silicon thin-film solar cells by using random texturing aluminum anodization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kang Sik; Jang, Eunseok; Cho, Jun-Sik; Yoo, Jinsu; Park, Joo Hyung; Byungsung, O.

    2015-09-01

    In recent decades, researchers have improved the efficiency of amorphous silicon solar cells in many ways. One of the easiest and most practical methods to improve solar-cell efficiency is adopting a back surface reflector (BSR) as the bottom layer or as the substrate. The BSR reflects the incident light back to the absorber layer in a solar cell, thus elongating the light path and causing the so-called "light trapping effect". The elongation of the light path in certain wavelength ranges can be enhanced with the proper scale of BSR surface structure or morphology. An aluminum substrate with a surface modified by aluminum anodizing is used to improve the optical properties for applications in amorphous silicon solar cells as a BSR in this research due to the high reflectivity and the low material cost. The solar cells with a BSR were formed and analyzed by using the following procedures: First, the surface of the aluminum substrate was degreased by using acetone, ethanol and distilled water, and it was chemically polished in a dilute alkali solution. After the cleaning process, the aluminum surface's morphology was modified by using a controlled anodization in a dilute acid solution to form oxide on the surface. The oxidized film was etched off by using an alkali solution to leave an aluminum surface with randomly-ordered dimple-patterns of approximately one micrometer in size. The anodizing conditions and the anodized aluminum surfaces after the oxide layer had been removed were systematically investigated according to the applied voltage. Finally, amorphous silicon solar cells were deposited on a modified aluminum plate by using dc magnetron sputtering. The surfaces of the anodized aluminum were observed by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy. The total and the diffuse reflectances of the surface-modified aluminum sheets were measured by using UV spectroscopy. We observed that the diffuse reflectances increased with increasing anodizing voltage. The

  18. Resolving the nanostructure of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited nanocrystalline SiOx layers for application in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingsporn, M.; Kirner, S.; Villringer, C.; Abou-Ras, D.; Costina, I.; Lehmann, M.; Stannowski, B.

    2016-06-01

    Nanocrystalline silicon suboxides (nc-SiOx) have attracted attention during the past years for the use in thin-film silicon solar cells. We investigated the relationships between the nanostructure as well as the chemical, electrical, and optical properties of phosphorous, doped, nc-SiO0.8:H fabricated by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructure was varied through the sample series by changing the deposition pressure from 533 to 1067 Pa. The samples were then characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, Raman spectroscopy, aberration-corrected high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, selected-area electron diffraction, and a specialized plasmon imaging method. We found that the material changed with increasing pressure from predominantly amorphous silicon monoxide to silicon dioxide containing nanocrystalline silicon. The nanostructure changed from amorphous silicon filaments to nanocrystalline silicon filaments, which were found to cause anisotropic electron transport.

  19. Creating bulk nanocrystalline metal.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredenburg, D. Anthony (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Saldana, Christopher J. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Gill, David D.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Roemer, Timothy John (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Yang, Pin

    2008-10-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanostructured materials offer unique microstructure-dependent properties that are superior to coarse-grained materials. These materials have been shown to have very high hardness, strength, and wear resistance. However, most current methods of producing nanostructured materials in weapons-relevant materials create powdered metal that must be consolidated into bulk form to be useful. Conventional consolidation methods are not appropriate due to the need to maintain the nanocrystalline structure. This research investigated new ways of creating nanocrystalline material, new methods of consolidating nanocrystalline material, and an analysis of these different methods of creation and consolidation to evaluate their applicability to mesoscale weapons applications where part features are often under 100 {micro}m wide and the material's microstructure must be very small to give homogeneous properties across the feature.

  20. Preparation of mono-disperse spherical silicon dioxide by ultrasonic hydrothermal method%超声水热法制备单分散球形二氧化硅及因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申晓毅; 翟玉春; 刘岩

    2008-01-01

    引言单分散球形二氧化硅颗粒性能优良,在催化剂载体、化工、医药和固体填料领域应用广泛[1],对其开发具有重要的实际意义。Kolbe[2]发现在碱催化下,正硅酸乙酯在醇溶液中发生水解缩聚反应生成SiO2。Stober等[3-4]发现用氨水作正硅酸乙酯水解反应的催化剂可以控制SiO2粒子的粒径,生成颗粒细小的SiO2,

  1. Deformation in nanocrystalline metals

    OpenAIRE

    Helena Van Swygenhoven; Julia R. Weertman

    2006-01-01

    It is now possible to synthesize polycrystalline metals made up of grains that average less than 100 nm in size. Such nanocrystalline metals contain a significant volume fraction of interfacial regions separated by nearly perfect crystals. The small sizes involved limit the conventional operation of dislocation sources and thus a fundamental question arises: how do these materials deform plastically? We review the current views on deformation mechanisms in nanocrystalline, face-centered cubic...

  2. Diffusion in nanocrystalline solids

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Alan V.

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced atomic migration was an early observation from experimental studies into nanocrystalline solids. This contribution presents an overview of the available diffusion data for simple metals and ionic materials in nanocrystalline form. It will be shown that enhanced diffusion can be interpreted in terms of atomic transport along the interfaces, which are comparable to grain boundaries in coarse-grained analogues. However, the method of sample preparation is seen to play a major role in...

  3. Deformation in nanocrystalline metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Van Swygenhoven

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available It is now possible to synthesize polycrystalline metals made up of grains that average less than 100 nm in size. Such nanocrystalline metals contain a significant volume fraction of interfacial regions separated by nearly perfect crystals. The small sizes involved limit the conventional operation of dislocation sources and thus a fundamental question arises: how do these materials deform plastically? We review the current views on deformation mechanisms in nanocrystalline, face-centered cubic metals based on insights gained by atomistic computer simulations. These insights are discussed with reference to recent striking experimental observations that can be compared with predictions made by the simulations.

  4. Nanocrystalline and Nanoporous Ceramics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, Henk

    1996-01-01

    Nanocrystalline and nanoporous ceramics, renowned for their special transport properties, have typical applications in the fields of energy, the environment, and separation technology. One example is a solid oxide fuel cell, where an anode with improved characteristics was obtained by an optimized n

  5. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

    2004-02-03

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  6. characterization of nanocrystalline silicon germanium film and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    simulation the methods at different temperatures. ..... began to increase in low temperatures, which the total energy is stable in LD method and .... 21. van Gunsteren, W.F.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Rullmann, J.A.C. Molecular Physics 1981, 44, 69.

  7. Silicon nanoparticle-ZnS nanophosphors for ultraviolet-based white light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupca, Matthew; Nayfeh, Osama M.; Hoang, Tuan; Nayfeh, Munir H.; Alhreish, Bahjat; Boparai, Jack; AlDwayyan, Abdullah; AlSalhi, Mohamad

    2012-10-01

    Present red phosphor converters provide spectra dominated by sharp lines and suffer from availability and stability issues which are not ideal for color mixing in display or solid state lighting applications. We examine the use of mono dispersed 3 nm silicon nanoparticles, with inhomogeneously broadened red luminescence as an effective substitute for red phosphors. We tested a 3-phase hybrid nanophosphor consisting of ZnS:Ag, ZnS:Cu,Au,Al, and nanoparticles. Correlated color temperature is examined under UV and LED pumping in the range 254, 365-400 nm. The temperature is found reasonably flat for the longer wavelengths and drops for the shorter wavelengths while the color rendering index increases. The photo stability of the phosphors relative to the silicon nanoparticles is recorded. The variation in the temperature is analyzed in terms of the strength of inter-band-gap transition and continuum band to band transitions.

  8. Fabrication and Characterization of Nanocrystalline VO2 Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Chen; YI Xin-Jian; LAI Jian-Jun; LI Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nanocrystalline VO2 films with phase transition temperature 34℃ have been fabricated on Si3N4-film-coated silicon and quartz substrates by argon-annealing films of metastable VO2(B). The original VO2(B) films are obtained by ion beam sputtering in an argon-oxygen atmosphere at 200 ℃. The nanocrystalline VO2 films exhibit strong changes in electrical and optical properties when a phase transition is completed. The phase transition temperature in the as-fabricated samples is about 34 ℃, which is smaller in comparison with 68 ℃ in the singlecrystalline VO2 material. A lower phase transition temperature is favorable for device applications such as smart window coating and low power consumption optical switching.

  9. Effect of particle clustering of silver nanoparticles on ultrathin silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokeen, Poonam; Jain, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-07-01

    Particle clustering is a major concern for uniform dispersal of nanoparticles in various deposition procedures. Well separated uniform distribution of metal nanoparticles is essential for effective coupling of surface plasmons. This work experimentally and theoretically, discusses the effect of nanoparticle clustering on the light trapping efficiency of silver nanoparticles. Pulsed laser deposition system has been used for deposition of silver nanoparticles, and substrate heating has been used to promote uniform distribution of nanoparticles. Pre-heated substrate depositions are compared with corresponding post-annealed samples. XRD, FESEM, Photoluminescence and UV-visible spectroscopy have been used to study the variations in their structural and optical properties. Mono-dispersal of silver nanoparticles for pre-heated substrates results in sharper surface plasmon resonance in comparison to post-annealed samples. Mie theory is used to estimate the particle size of the nanoparticles and findings are in accordance with quantitative analysis of FESEM images. Finite-difference time domain technique is used to discuss the effect of particle distribution on an ultrathin film silicon solar cell. Device degradation is observed as a result of clustering of silver nanoparticles. Hence, mono-dispersal of plasmonic nanostructures is important for required results and pre-heated deposition of metal nanoparticles by pulsed laser deposition can effectively solve the problem of particle clustering.

  10. Biological applications of nanocrystalline diamond

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Oliver; Daenen, Michael; Haenen, Ken

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films have generated substantial interest in recent years due to their low cost, extreme properties and wide application arena. Diamond is chemically inert, has a wide electrochemical window and is stable in numerous harsh environments. Nanocrystalline diamond has the advantage of being readily grown on a variety of substrates at very low thickness, resulting in smooth conformal coatings with high transparency. These films can be doped from highly insulating to metalli...

  11. Dislocation Dynamics in Nanocrystalline Nickel

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Z. W.; Wiezorek, J. M. K.; Stach, E. A.; Follstaedt, D. M.; Knapp, J. A.; Mao, S. X.

    2007-01-01

    It is believed that the dynamics of dislocation processes during the deformation of nanocrystalline materials can only be visualized by computational simulations. Here we demonstrate that observations of dislocation processes during the deformation of nanocrystalline Ni with grain sizes as small as 10 nm can be achieved by using a combination of in situ tensile straining and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Trapped unit lattice dislocations are observed in strained grains...

  12. Development of improved materials for environmental applications: nanocrystalline NaY zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weiguo; Li, Gonghu; Grassian, Vicki H; Larsen, Sarah C

    2005-03-01

    Two nanocrystalline NaY samples were synthesized with Si/Al ratios of 1.8 and crystal sizes of 23 and 50 nm, respectively. The synthesized NaY zeolites were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, silicon solid-state magic angle spinning NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. A commercial NaY sample was analogously characterized for comparison with the synthesized nanocrystalline NaY. FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine was used to elucidate the adsorption sites on the different NaY samples. More Brønsted acid sites and more silanol sites were detected on the nanocrystalline NaY zeolites, relative to the commercial NaY. The nanocrystalline NaY exhibited increased adsorption capacities for representative pollutant molecules, such as toluene (approximately 10%) and nitrogen dioxide (approximately 30%), relative to commercial NaY. Functionalization of nanocrystalline NaY was examined as a method for tailoring the properties of nanocrystalline zeolites for specific environmental applications through the control of zeolite properties, such as hydrophobicity.

  13. Nanocrystalline diamond films for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Alcaide, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond films, which comprise the so called nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), represent a class of biomaterials possessing outstanding mechanical, tribological, and electrical properties, which include high surface smoothness, high corrosion re...

  14. Core-shell silicon nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, M M; Anantram, M P; Karim, K S

    2013-01-01

    Silicon nanowires can enhance broadband optical absorption and reduce radial carrier collection distances in solar cell devices. Arrays of disordered nanowires grown by vapor-liquid-solid method are attractive because they can be grown on low-cost substrates such as glass, and are large area compatible. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that an array of disordered silicon nanowires surrounded by a thin transparent conductive oxide has both low diffuse and specular reflection with total values as low as nanowire facilitates enhancement in external quantum efficiency using two different active shell materials: amorphous silicon and nanocrystalline silicon. As a result, the core-shell nanowire device exhibits a short-circuit current enhancement of 15% with an amorphous Si shell and 26% with a nanocrystalline Si shell compared to their corresponding planar devices.

  15. Plasma metallurgical production of nanocrystalline borides and carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    he experience in production and study of properties of nanocrystalline borides and chromium carbides, titanium, silicon was summarized. The design and features of the vertical three-jet once-through reactor with power 150 kW, used in the plasma metallurgical production, was described. The technological, thermotechnical and resource characteristics of the reactor were identified. The parameters of borides and carbides synthesis, their main characteristics in the nanodispersed state and equipment-technological scheme of production were provided. Evaluation of engineering-and-economical performance of the laboratory and industrial levels of borides and carbides production and the state corresponding to the segment of the world market was carried out.

  16. Characterisation of interfaces in nanocrystalline palladium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Divakar; V S Raghunathan

    2003-02-01

    Structures of grain boundaries and triple line junctions in nanocrystalline materials are of interest owing to large fractions of atoms in nanocrystalline materials being at these interfacial positions. Grain boundary and triple line junction structures in nanocrystalline palladium have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The main microstructural features observed include the varying atomic structures of grain boundaries and the presence of disordered regions at triple line junctions. Also, there is variation in lattice parameters in different nanocrystalline grains. Geometric phase analysis is used to quantify atomic displacements within nanocrystalline grains. Displacement fields thus detected indicate links to the interface structures.

  17. Nanocrystalline magnetic alloys and ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Pal; D Chakravorty

    2003-02-01

    Magnetic properties of materials in their nanocrystalline state have assumed significance in recent years because of their potential applications. A number of techniques have been used to prepare nanocrystalline magnetic phases. Melt spinning, high energy ball milling, sputtering, glassceramization and molecular beam epitaxy are some of the physical methods used so far. Among the chemical methods, sol-gel and co-precipitation routes have been found to be convenient. Ultrafine particles of both ferro- and ferrimagnetic systems show superparamagnetic behaviour at room temperature. Coercivity $(H_c)$ and maximum energy product $(BH)_{\\text{max}}$ of the magnetic particles can be changed by controlling their sizes. The present paper reviews all these aspects in the case of nanocrystalline magnetic systems — both metallic and ceramics.

  18. Silicon applications in photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelenski, A. M.; Gawlik, G.; Wesolowski, M.

    2005-09-01

    Silicon technology enabled the miniaturization of computers and other electronic system for information storage, transmission and transformation allowing the development of the Knowledge Based Information Society. Despite the fact that silicon roadmap indicates possibilities for further improvement, already now the speed of electrons and the bandwidth of electronic circuits are not sufficient and photons are commonly utilized for signal transmission through optical fibers and purely photonic circuits promise further improvements. However materials used for these purposes II/V semiconductor compounds, glasses make integration of optoelectronic circuits with silicon complex an expensive. Therefore research on light generation, transformation and transmission in silicon is very active and recently, due to nanotechnology some spectacular results were achieved despite the fact that mechanisms of light generation are still discussed. Three topics will be discussed. Porous silicon was actively investigated due to its relatively efficient electroluminescence enabling its use in light sources. Its index of refraction, differs considerably from the index of silicon, and this allows its utilization for Bragg mirrors, wave guides and photonic crystals. The enormous surface enables several applications on medicine and biotechnology and in particular due to the effective chemo-modulation of its refracting index the design of optical chemosensors. An effective luminescence of doped and undoped nanocrystalline silicon opened another way for the construction of silicon light sources. Optical amplification was already discovered opening perspectives for the construction of nanosilicon lasers. Luminescences was observed at red, green and blue wavelengths. The used technology of silica and ion implantation are compatible with commonly used CMOS technology. Finally the recently developed and proved idea of optically pumped silicon Raman lasers, using nonlinearity and vibrations in the

  19. Laser Compression of Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Jarmakani, H. N.; Bringa, E. M.; Earhart, P.; Remington, B. A.; Vo, N. Q.; Wang, Y. M.

    2009-12-01

    Shock compression in nanocrystalline nickel is simulated over a range of pressures (10-80 GPa) and compared with experimental results. Laser compression carried out at Omega and Janus yields new information on the deformation mechanisms of nanocrystalline Ni. Although conventional deformation does not produce hardening, the extreme regime imparted by laser compression generates an increase in hardness, attributed to the residual dislocations observed in the structure by TEM. An analytical model is applied to predict the critical pressure for the onset of twinning in nanocrystalline nickel. The slip-twinning transition pressure is shifted from 20 GPa, for polycrystalline Ni, to 80 GPa, for Ni with g. s. of 10 nm. Contributions to the net strain from the different mechanisms of plastic deformation (partials, perfect dislocations, twinning, and grain boundary shear) were quantified in the nanocrystalline samples through MD calculations. The effect of release, a phenomenon often neglected in MD simulations, on dislocation behavior was established. A large fraction of the dislocations generated at the front are annihilated.

  20. Superb nanocrystalline alloys for plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ With high rigidity and antiwear performance,nanocrystalline metals and their alloys can find wide applications in surface protection.However, the existence of grain boundaries often leads to erosive micro-batteries which accelerate the process of corrosion.Therefore, it has already become a key issue for surface engineering researchers to find nano materials with higher lubricating, anticorrosion and antiwear capacities.

  1. Synthesis of silicon nanocones using rf microplasma at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Hasegawa, Y.

    2005-10-01

    We report the synthesis of silicon nanocones using the rf microplasma discharge at atmospheric pressure. The products formed underneath the tube electrode on Fe-coated crystalline silicon were constituted mainly of silicon and silicon oxide despite the use of a methane-argon mixture. Carbon nanotubes and silicon nanowires were also formed around the silicon nanocones. The number density and average size of silicon nanocones increased with the plasma exposure time accompanied by the enlargement of their surface distribution. The growth mechanism of silicon nanocones is discussed in terms of the catalytic growth via diffusion of silicon with nanocrystalline Si particle through FeSix nanoclusters, and enhanced Si oxidation by the plasma heating.

  2. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Yong Kang, E-mail: yk@rd.numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Materials Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta, E-mail: maria@rd.numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Materials Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Knowledge Hub Aichi, Yakusa-cho, Nagakute-ku, Toyota (Japan); Ueno, Tomonaga, E-mail: tomo@rd.numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Materials Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Nagahiro, E-mail: hiro@rd.numse.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Materials Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Knowledge Hub Aichi, Yakusa-cho, Nagakute-ku, Toyota (Japan); Green Mobility Collaborative Research Center, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Goban-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9 nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20 °C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  3. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Yong Kang; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Ueno, Tomonaga; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9 nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20 °C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  4. Deformation Twinning During Nanoindentation of Nanocrystalline Ta

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Y. M.; Hodge, A. M.; Biener, J.; Hamza, A.V.; Barnes, D E; Liu, Kai; Nieh, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    The deformation mechanism of body-centered cubic (bcc) nanocrystalline tantalum with grain sizes of 10–30 nm is investigated by nanoindentation, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. In a deviation from molecular dynamics simulations and existing experimental observations on other bcc nanocrystalline metals, the plastic deformation of nanocrystalline Ta during nanoindentation is controlled by deformation twinning. The observation of multiple twin i...

  5. Optical Characterization of Chemically Etched Nanoporous Silicon Embedded in Sol-Gel Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Al Dwayyan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoporous (NPs silicon fabricated by chemical etching process in HF acid was first separated in tetrahydrofuran (THF solvent and then incorporated into SiO2 matrix. The matrix was prepared by sol gel process in which dimethylformamide (DMF was used as drying chemical control additive (DCCA to form crack-free dried sample. We examined the optical properties of NPs in three medium which are solvent, sol, and dried sol gel. Our observations reveal that absorption spectra of NPs silicon in THF are modified with respect to the spectra in sol gel. Significant stability in PL of NPs silicon in the sol gel is observed. Influence of matrix environment on peaks of NPs is also discussed. Surface morphology is characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM which shows that the NPs silicon in THF is similar to the sol gel but becomes aggregation particle to particle. Presence of Si nanoparticles in THF and sol is confirmed by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The NPs silicons have mono dispersive and high crystalline nature with spherical shape of around 5 nm in sizes.

  6. Nanocrystalline diamond films for biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Alcaide, Maria

    2014-01-01

    performance of nanocrystalline diamond films is reviewed from an application-specific perspective, covering topics such as enhancement of cellular adhesion, anti-fouling coatings, non-thrombogenic surfaces, micropatterning of cells and proteins, and immobilization of biomolecules for bioassays. In order......Nanocrystalline diamond films, which comprise the so called nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD), represent a class of biomaterials possessing outstanding mechanical, tribological, and electrical properties, which include high surface smoothness, high corrosion...... resistance, chemical inertness, superior electrochemical behavior, biocompatibility, and nontoxicity. These properties have positioned the nanocrystalline diamond films as an attractive class of materials for a range of therapeutic and diagnostic applications in the biomedical field. Consequently...

  7. Tensile behavior of nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, P.G.; Weertman, J.R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Eastman, J.A. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1995-11-01

    High density nanocrystalline copper produced by inert gas condensation was tested in tension. Displacements were measured using foil strain gauges, which greatly improved the accuracy of the strain data. The Young`s modulus of nanocrystalline copper was found to be consistent with that of coarse-grained copper. Total elongations of {approx} 1% were observed in samples with grain sizes less than 50 nm, while a sample with a grain size of 110 nm exhibited more than 10% elongation, perhaps signifying a change to a dislocation-based deformation mechanism in the larger-grained material. In addition, tensile tests were performed as a function of strain rate, with a possible trend of decreased strength and increased elongation as the strain rate was decreased.

  8. Intergranular fracture in nanocrystalline metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; van Swygenhoven, H.; Derlet, P. M.

    2002-08-01

    Crack propagation studies in nanocrystalline Ni samples with mean grain sizes ranging from 5 to 12 nm are reported using atomistic simulations. For all grain sizes pure intergranular fracture is observed. Intergranular fracture is shown to proceed by the coalescence of microvoids formed at the grain boundaries ahead of the crack. The energy released during propagation is higher than the Griffith value, indicating an additional grain-boundary accommodation mechanism.

  9. Structure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Murty; M K Datta; S K Pabi

    2003-02-01

    Nanocrystalline materials, which are expected to play a key role in the next generation of human civilization, are assembled with nanometre-sized “building blocks” consisting of the crystalline and large volume fractions of intercrystalline components. In order to predict the unique properties of nanocrystalline materials, which are a combination of the properties of the crystalline and intercrystalline regions, it is essential to understand precisely how the structures of crystalline and intercrystalline regions vary with decrease in crystallite size. In addition, study of the thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials against significant grain growth is both scientific and technological interest. A sharp increase in grain size (to micron levels) during consolidation of nanocrystalline powders to obtain fully dense materials may consequently result in the loss of some unique properties of nanocrystalline materials. Therefore, extensive interest has been generated in exploring the size effects on the structure of crystalline and intercrystalline region of nanocrystalline materials, and the thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials against significant grain growth. The present article is aimed at understanding the structure and stability of nanocrystalline materials.

  10. Structural evolution of a Ta-filament during hot-wire chemical vapour deposition of Silicon investigated by electron backscatter diffraction

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oliphant, CJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigate the structural changes of a burnt-out tantalum filament that was operated at typical hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon synthesis conditions in our hot-wire chemical vapour deposition chamber. Scanning electron...

  11. Patterned hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces of ultra-smooth nanocrystalline diamond layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, M.; Mohr, M.; Brühne, K.; Fecht, H. J.; Łojkowski, M.; Święszkowski, W.; Łojkowski, W.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we show that ultra nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) surfaces have been modified to add them hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. The nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. This allows growing diamond on different substrates which can be even 3D or structured. Silicon and, for optical applications, transparent quartz glass are the preferred substrates for UNCD layers growth. Fluorine termination leads to strong hydrophobic properties as indicated by a high contact angle for water of more than 100°. Hydrogen termination shows lesser hydrophobic behavior. Hydrophilic characteristics has been realised with oxygen termination. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) measurements confirm the oxygen and fluorine- termination on the nanocrystalline diamond surface. Further, by micropatterning using photolithography, multi-terminated layers have been created with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic areas. In addition, we have shown that retermination is achieved, and the properties of the surface have been changed from hydrophobic to hydrophilic and vice versa. Micro- roughness and stress in the grown film influences slightly the wetting angle as well. The opportunity to realize local differences in hydrophobicity on nanocrystalline diamond layers, in any size or geometry, offers interesting applications for example in microbiological investigations. Multi-terminated arrays show identical surface roughness and at the same time differences in hydrophobicity. These arrays have been visualized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM).

  12. Doped and Undoped Zinc Oxide Nanostructures on Silicon Wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubenko, E.; Bondarenko, V.

    2013-05-01

    We present results of hydrothermal deposition of undoped and Al doped ZnO nanocrystals on nanocrystalline silicon. ZnO nanocrystals were deposited in an equimolar zinc nitride and hexamethylenetetramine solution. Aluminum nitride was used as Al precursor. The difference of the morphology of doped and undoped ZnO nanocrystals is discussed. Photoluminescence properties of the obtained nanocrystals are shown.

  13. Bulk nano-crystalline alloys

    OpenAIRE

    T.-S. Chin; Lin, C. Y.; Lee, M.C.; R.T. Huang; S. M. Huang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) Fe–B–Y–Nb–Cu, 2 mm in diameter, were successfully annealed to become bulk nano-crystalline alloys (BNCAs) with α-Fe crystallite 11–13 nm in size. A ‘crystallization-and-stop’ model was proposed to explain this behavior. Following this model, alloy-design criteria were elucidated and confirmed successful on another Fe-based BMG Fe–B–Si–Nb–Cu, 1 mm in diameter, with crystallite sizes 10–40 nm. It was concluded that BNCAs can be designed in general by the proposed cr...

  14. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J; Crowhurst, Jonathan C; Worsley, Marcus A; Laurence, Ted A; Kilcoyne, A L David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M; Visbeck, Kenneth S; Fakra, Sirine C; Evans, William J; Zaug, Joseph M; Satcher, Joe H

    2011-05-24

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  16. Nanocrystalline diamond in carbon implanted SiO{sub 2}.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsoi, K.A.; Prawer, S.; Nugent, K.W.; Walker, R. J.; Weiser, P.S. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Recently, it was reported that nanocrystalline diamond can be produced via laser annealing of a high dose C implanted fused quartz (SiO{sub 2}) substrate. The aim of this investigation is to reproduce this result on higher C{sup +} dose samples and the non-implanted silicon sample, as well as optimise the power range and annealing time for the production of these nanocrystals of diamond. In order to provide a wide range of laser powers the samples were annealed using an Ar ion Raman laser. The resulting annealed spots were analysed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Raman analysis. These techniques are employed to determine the type of bonding produced after laser annealing has occurred. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Metallic coatings on silicon substrates, and methods of forming metallic coatings on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Hyde, Timothy A.; Fincke, James R.

    2008-03-11

    The invention includes methods of forming a metallic coating on a substrate which contains silicon. A metallic glass layer is formed over a silicon surface of the substrate. The invention includes methods of protecting a silicon substrate. The substrate is provided within a deposition chamber along with a deposition target. Material from the deposition target is deposited over at least a portion of the silicon substrate to form a protective layer or structure which contains metallic glass. The metallic glass comprises iron and one or more of B, Si, P and C. The invention includes structures which have a substrate containing silicon and a metallic layer over the substrate. The metallic layer contains less than or equal to about 2 weight % carbon and has a hardness of at least 9.2 GPa. The metallic layer can have an amorphous microstructure or can be devitrified to have a nanocrystalline microstructure.

  18. Temperature-dependent void formation and growth at ion-irradiated nanocrystalline CeO2 Si interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bergquist, Alex G [ORNL; Zhang, Yanwen [ORNL; Varga, Tamas [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Moll, Sandra [TN International / AREVA, 1, rue des Hérons, 78182 Montigny Le Bretonneux, France; Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center; Weber, William J [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Ceria is a thermally stable ceramic that has numerous applications in the nuclear industry, including use in nuclear fuels and waste forms. Recently, interest has surged in nanostructured ceria due to its increased mechanical properties and electronic conductivity in comparison with bulk ceria and its ability to self-heal in response to energetic ion bombardment. Here, nanocrystalline ceria thin films grown over a silicon substrate are irradiated to fluences of up to 4 1016 ions/cm2 under different irradiation conditions: with differing ion species (Si+ and Ni+), different ion energies (1.0 1.5 MeV), and at varying temperatures (160 600 K). While the nanocrystalline ceria is found to exhibit exceptional radiation resistance under all tested conditions, severe ion irradiation-induced mixing, void formation, and void growth are observed at the ceria/silicon interface, with the degree of damage proving to be temperature dependent.

  19. Micromechanics Modeling of Fracture in Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaessgen, E. H.; Piascik, R. S.; Raju, I. S.; Harris, C. E.

    2002-01-01

    Nanocrystalline metals have very high theoretical strength, but suffer from a lack of ductility and toughness. Therefore, it is critical to understand the mechanisms of deformation and fracture of these materials before their full potential can be achieved. Because classical fracture mechanics is based on the comparison of computed fracture parameters, such as stress intlmsity factors, to their empirically determined critical values, it does not adequately describe the fundamental physics of fracture required to predict the behavior of nanocrystalline metals. Thus, micromechanics-based techniques must be considered to quanti@ the physical processes of deformation and fracture within nanocrystalline metals. This paper discusses hndamental physicsbased modeling strategies that may be useful for the prediction Iof deformation, crack formation and crack growth within nanocrystalline metals.

  20. Bilirubin adsorption on nanocrystalline titania films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Zhengpeng [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Si Shihui [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)]. E-mail: sishihui@mail.csu.edu.cn; Fung Yingsing [Department of Chemistry, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road, Hong Kong (China)

    2007-02-26

    Bilirubin produced from hemoglobin metabolism and normally conjugated with albumin is a kind of lipophilic endotoxin, and can cause various diseases when its concentration is high. Bilirubin adsorption on the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films was investigated using quartz crystal microbalance, UV-vis and IR techniques, and factors affecting its adsorption such as pH, bilirubin concentration, solution ionic strength, temperature and thickness of TiO{sub 2} films were discussed. The amount of adsorption and parameters for the adsorption kinetics were estimated from the frequency measurements of quartz crystal microbalance. A fresh surface of the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films could be photochemically regenerated because holes and hydroxyl radicals were generated by irradiating the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films with UV light, which could oxidize and decompose organic materials, and the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films can be easily regenerated when it is used as adsorbent for the removal of bilirubin.

  1. Charge Transfer in Nanocrystalline Semiconductor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bouroushian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline electrodes in liquid junction devices possess a number of unique properties arising from their convoluted structure and the dimensions of their building units. The light-induced charge separation and transport in photoelectrochemical systems using nanocrystalline/nanoporous semiconductor electrodes is discussed here in connection with the basic principles of the (Schottky barrier theory. Recent models for charge transfer kinetics in normal and unipolar (dye-sensitized cells are reviewed, and novel concepts and materials are considered.

  2. Does nanocrystalline silver have a transferable effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadworny, Patricia L; Landry, Breanne K; Wang, JianFei; Tredget, Edward E; Burrell, Robert E

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the mechanism of nanocrystalline silver antiinflammatory activity, and tested nanocrystalline silver for systemic antiinflammatory effects. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy of skin treated directly with nanocrystalline silver for 24 hours showed that at skin surfaces there were significant deposits at weights corresponding to Ag, AgO, AgCl, AgNO(3), Ag(2)O, and silver clusters Ag(2-6), but silver penetration was minimal. To test for translocation of the effect, a porcine contact dermatitis model in which wounds were induced on one side of the back and then treated with nanocrystalline silver on the opposite side of the back was used. Visual and histological data showed improvement relative to animals treated with saline only. Significantly increased induction of apoptosis in the inflammatory cells present in the dermis was observed with remote nanocrystalline silver treatments. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis showed decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-8, and increased levels of antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-4, epidermal growth factor, keratinocyte growth factor, and keratinocyte growth factor-2. Thus, the antiinflammatory effects of nanocrystalline silver appear to be induced by interactions with cells in the top layers of the skin, which then release biological signals resulting in widespread antiinflammatory activity.

  3. Plastic deformation of nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A high-resolution electron microscopy study has uncovered the plastic behavior of accommodating large strains in nanocrystalline (NC) Ni subject to cold rolling at liquid nitrogen temperature. The activation of grain-boundary-mediated-plasticity is evidenced in NC-Ni, including twinning and formation of stacking fault via partial dislocation slips from the grain boundary. The formation and storage of 60? full dislocations are observed inside NC-grains. The grain/twin boundaries act as the barriers of dislocation slips, leading to dislocation pile-up, severe lattice distortion, and formation of sub-grain boundary. The vicinity of grain/twin boundary is where defects preferentially accumulate and likely the favorable place for onset of plastic deformation. The present results indicate the heterogeneous and multiple natures of accommodating plastic strains in NC-grains.

  4. Plastic deformation of nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XiaoLei

    2009-01-01

    A high-resolution electron microscopy study has uncovered the plastic behavior of accommodating large strains in nanocrystalline(NC)Ni subject to cold rolling at liquid nitrogen temperature.The acti vation of grain-boundary-mediated-plasticity is evidenced in NC-Ni,including twinning and formation of stacking fault via partial dislocation slips from the grain boundary.The formation and storage of 60° full dislocations are observed inside NC-grains.The grain/twin boundaries act as the barriers of dislocation slips,leading to dislocation pile-up,severe lattice distortion,and formation of sub-grain boundary.The vicinity of grain/twin boundary is where defects preferentially accumulate and likely the favorable place for onset of plastic deformation.The present results indicate the heterogeneous and multiple natures of accommodating plastic strains in NC-grains.

  5. Synthesis of Silicon Nanoparticles in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markosyan, Aram H.; Le Picard, Romain; Girshick, Steven L.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    The synthesis of silicon nanoparticles (Si-NPs) is being investigated for their use in photo-emitting electronics, photovoltaics, and biotechnology. The ability to control the size and mono-disperse nature of Si-NPs is important to optimizing these applications. In this paper we discuss results from a computational investigation of Si-NP formation and growth in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor with the goal of achieving this control. We use a two dimensional numerical model where the algorithms for the kinetics of NP formation are self-consistently coupled with a plasma hydrodynamics simulation. The reactor modeled here resembles a GEC reference cell through which, for the base case, a mixture of Ar/SiH4 = 70/30 flows at 150 sccm at a pressure of 100 mTorr. In continuous wave mode, three coils located on top of the reactor deliver 150 W. The electric plasma potential confines negatively charged particles at the center of the discharge, increasing the residence time of negative NPs, which enables the NPs to potentially grow to large and controllable sizes of many to 100s nm. We discuss methods of controlling NP growth rates by varying the mole fraction and flow rate of SiH4, and using a pulsed plasma by varying the pulse period and duty cycle. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and National Science Foundation.

  6. Mechanisms of Superplastic Deformation of Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    CAMPBELL MZ436 30 44 D DEBUSSCHER MZ436 20 29 J ERIDON MZ436 21 24 W HERMAN MZ435 01 24 S PENTESCU MZ436 21 24 38500 MOUND RD... HESS & EISENHARDT G ALLEN D MALONE T RUSSELL 9113 LE SAINT DR FAIRFIELD OH 45014 NO. OF NO. OF COPIES ORGANIZATION COPIES

  7. Microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition of ultra-nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Shin

    Microwave plasma assisted ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition was investigated using hydrogen deficient, carbon containing argon plasma chemistries with MSU-developed microwave plasma reactors. Ultra-nanocrystalline diamond film deposition on mechanically scratched silicon wafers was experimentally explored over the following input variables: (1) pressure: 60--240Torr, (2) total gas flow rate: 101--642 sccm, (3) input microwave power 732--1518W, (4) substrate temperature: 500°C--770°C, (5) deposition time: 2--48 hours, and (6) N2 impurities 5--2500 ppm. H2 concentrations were less than 9%, while CH 4 concentration was 0.17--1.85%. It was desired to grow films uniformly over 3″ diameter substrates and to minimize the grain size. Large, uniform, intense, and greenish-white discharges were sustained in contact with three inch silicon substrates over a 60--240 Torr pressure regime. At a given operating pressure, film uniformity was controlled by adjusting substrate holder geometry, substrate position, input microwave power, gas chemistries, and total gas flow rates. Film ultra-nanocrystallinity and smoothness required high purity deposition conditions. Uniform ultra-nanocrystalline films were synthesized in low leak-rate system with crystal sizes ranging from 3--30 nm. Films with 11--50 nm RMS roughness and respective thickness values of 1--23 mum were synthesized over 3″ wafers under a wide range of different deposition conditions. Film RMS roughness 7 nm was synthesized with thickness of 430 nm. Film uniformities of almost 100% were achieved over three inch silicon wafers. UV Raman and XRD characterization results indicated the presence of diamond in the synthesized films. Optical Emission Spectroscopy measurements showed that the discharge gas temperature was in excess of 2000 K. The synthesized films are uniformly smooth and the as grown ultra-nanocrystalline diamond can be used for a high frequency SAW device substrate material. IR measurements

  8. Nanocrystalline cellulose from coir fiber: preparation, properties, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanocrystalline cellulose derived from various botanical sources offers unique and potentially useful characteristics. In principle, any cellulosic material can be considered as a potential source of a nanocrystalline material, including crops, crop residues, and agroindustrial wastes. Because of t...

  9. Femtosecond laser irradiation-induced infrared absorption on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghua Zhu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The near-infrared (NIR absorption below band gap energy of crystalline silicon is significantly increased after the silicon is irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses at a simple experimental condition. The absorption increase in the NIR range primarily depends on the femtosecond laser pulse energy, pulse number, and pulse duration. The Raman spectroscopy analysis shows that after the laser irradiation, the silicon surface consists of silicon nanostructure and amorphous silicon. The femtosecond laser irradiation leads to the formation of a composite of nanocrystalline, amorphous, and the crystal silicon substrate surface with microstructures. The composite has an optical absorption enhancement at visible wavelengths as well as at NIR wavelength. The composite may be useful for an NIR detector, for example, for gas sensing because of its large surface area.

  10. Thin film silicon deposited at 100 C by VHF PECVD: optoelectronic properties and incorporation in solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinza, Monica; Rath, Jatindra K.; Schropp, Ruud E.I. [Nanophotonics - Physics of Devices, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Faculty of Science, Utrecht University, PO Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-04-15

    This paper explores the possibility of producing amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon using very high frequency PECVD at a low substrate temperature of 123 C at high deposition rate of 0.4-0.7 nm/s. The quality of these amorphous layers remains similar to that obtained in layers deposited at low deposition rate of 0.1 nm/s. The amorphous-to-nanocrystalline transition is sensitive to deposition chamber history. The microstructure parameter of the best nanocrystalline layers amounts to 0.4. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. The radiation response of mesoporous nanocrystalline zirconia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzini, Ayelén M.; Alurralde, Martin A.; Giménez, Gustavo; Luca, Vittorio

    2016-12-01

    The next generation of nuclear systems will require materials capable of withstanding hostile chemical, physical and radiation environments over long time-frames. Aside from its chemical and physical stability, crystalline zirconia is one of the most radiation tolerant materials known. Here we report the first ever study of the radiation response of nanocrystalline and mesoporous zirconia and Ce3+-stabilized nanocrystalline zirconia (Ce0.1Zr0.9O2) thin films supported on silicon wafers. Zirconia films prepared using the block copolymer Brij-58 as the template had a thickness of around 60-80 nm. In the absence of a stabilizing trivalent cation they consisted of monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia nanocrystals with diameters in the range 8-10 nm. Films stabilized with Ce3+ contained only the tetragonal phase. The thin films were irradiated with iodine ions of energies of 70 MeV and 132 keV at low fluences (1013 - 1014 cm-2) corresponding to doses of 0.002 and 1.73 dpa respectively, and at 180 keV and high fluences (2 × 1016 cm-2) corresponding to 82.4 dpa. The influence of heavy ion irradiation on the nanocrystalline structure was monitored through Rietveld analysis of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) patterns recorded at angles close to the critical angle to ensure minimum contribution to the diffraction pattern from the substrate. Irradiation of the mesoporous nanocrystalline zirconia thin films with 70 MeV iodine ions, for which electronic energy loss is dominant, resulted in slight changes in phase composition and virtually no change in crystallographic parameters as determined by Rietveld analysis. Iodine ion bombardment in the nuclear energy loss regime (132-180 keV) at low fluences did not provoke significant changes in phase composition or crystallographic parameters. However, at 180 keV and high fluences the monoclinic phase was totally eliminated from the GIXRD pattern of films prepared at both 350 and 500 °C implying either a monoclinic

  12. Ionic liquid-templated preparation of mesoporous silica embedded with nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ward Antony

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A series of mesoporous silicas impregnated with nanocrystalline sulphated zirconia was prepared by a sol-gel process using an ionic liquid-templated route. The physicochemical properties of the mesoporous sulphated zirconia materials were studied using characterisation techniques such as inductively coupled optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Analysis of the new silicas indicates isomorphous substitution of silicon with zirconium and reveals the presence of extremely small (< 10 nm polydispersed zirconia nanoparticles in the materials with zirconium loadings from 27.77 to 41.4 wt.%.

  13. Characterization and Application of Colloidal Nanocrystalline Materials for Advanced Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Khagendra P.

    Solar energy is Earth's primary source of renewable energy and photovoltaic solar cells enable the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity. Crystalline silicon solar cells and modules have dominated photovoltaic technology from the beginning and they now constitute more than 90% of the PV market. Thin film (CdTe and CIGS) solar cells and modules come in second position in market share. Some organic, dye-sensitized and perovskite solar cells are emerging in the market but are not yet in full commercial scale. Solar cells made from colloidal nanocrystalline materials may eventually provide both low cost and high efficiency because of their promising properties such as high absorption coefficient, size tunable band gap, and quantum confinement effect. It is also expected that the greenhouse gas emission and energy payback time from nanocrystalline solar PV systems will also be least compared to all other types of PV systems mainly due to the least embodied energy throughout their life time. The two well-known junction architectures for the fabrication of quantum dot based photovoltaic devices are the Schottky junction and heterojunction. In Schottky junction cells, a heteropartner semiconducting material is not required. A low work function metal is used as the back contact, a transparent conducting layer is used as the front contact, and the layer of electronically-coupled quantum dots is placed between these two materials. Schottky junction solar cells explain the usefulness of nanocrystalline materials for high efficiency heterojunction solar cells. For heterojunction devices, n-type semiconducting materials such as ZnO , CdS or TiO2 have been used as suitable heteropartners. Here, PbS quantum dot solar cells were fabricated using ZnO and CdS semiconductor films as window layers. Both of the heteropartners are sputter-deposited onto TCO coated glass substrates; ZnO was deposited with the substrate held at room temperature and for CdS the substrate was at 250

  14. Structural elucidation of nanocrystalline biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maltsev, S.

    2008-10-23

    Bone diseases, such as osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, are the second most prevalent health problem worldwide. In Germany approximately 5 millions people are affected by arthritis. Investigating biomineralization processes and bone molecular structure is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was the primary technique used due to its advantages in characterising poorly ordered and disordered materials. Compared to all the diffraction techniques that widely applied in structural investigations, the usefulness of NMR is independent of long range molecular order. This makes NMR an outstanding technique for studies of complex/amorphous materials. Conventional NMR experiments (single pulse, spin-echo, cross polarization (CP), etc.) as well as their modifications and high-end techniques (2D HETCOR, REDOR, etc.) were used in this work. Combining the contributions from different techniques enhances the information content of the investigations and can increase the precision of the overall conclusions. Also XRD, TEM and FTIR were applied to different extent in order to get a general idea of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite crystallite structure. Results: - A new approach named 'Solid-state NMR spectroscopy using the lost I spin magnetization in polarization transfer experiments' has been developed for measuring the transferred I spin magnetization from abundant nuclei, which is normally lost when detecting the S spin magnetization. - A detailed investigation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite core was made to prove that proton environment of the phosphates units and phosphorus environment of hydroxyl units are the same as in highly crystalline hydroxyapatite sample. - Using XRD it was found that the surface of the hydroxyapatite nanocrystals is not completely disordered, as it was suggested before, but resembles the hydroxyapatite structure with HPO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (and some CO{sub 3}{sup

  15. Surface Features of Nanocrystalline Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Miglierini

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline alloys are prepared by controlled annealing of metallic glass precursors. The latter are obtained by rapid quenching of a melt on a rotating wheel. This process leads to structural deviation of the produced ribbons’ surfaces. Structural features of as-quenched and thermally annealed 57Fe81Mo8Cu1B10 ribbons were studied employing Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectrometry (CEMS and Conversion X-ray Mössbauer Spectrometry (CXMS. Enrichment of the alloy’s composition in 57Fe helped in identification of surface crystallites that were formed even during the production process. Magnetite and bcc-Fe were found at the wheel side of the as-quenched ribbons whereas only bcc-Fe nanocrystals were uncovered at the opposite air side. Accelerated formation of bcc-Fe was observed in this side of the ribbons after annealing. The relative content of magnetite at the wheel side was almost stable in near surface areas (CEMS and in more deep subsurface regions (CXMS. It vanished completely after annealing at 550 °C. No magnetite was observed at the air side of the ribbons regardless the annealing temperature and/or depth of the scanned regions.

  16. Consolidation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ramesh et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of sintering temperature on the sinterability of synthesized nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA was investigated. The starting powder was synthesized via a novel wet chemical route. HA green compacts were prepared and sintered in atmospheric condition at various temperatures ranging from 900–1300 °C. The results revealed that the thermal stability of HA phase was not disrupted throughout the sintering regime employed. In general, the results showed that above 98% of theoretical density coupled with hardness of 7.21 GPa, fracture toughness of 1.17 MPa m1/2 and Young's modulus of above 110 GPa were obtained for HA sintered at temperature as low as 1050 °C. Although the Young's modulus increased with increasing bulk density, the hardness and fracture toughness of the sintered material started to decline when the temperature was increased beyond 1000–1050 °C despite exhibiting high densities >98% of theoretical value. The occurrence of this phenomenon is believed to be associated with a thermal-activated grain growth process.

  17. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licai Fu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on the synthesis of nanocrystalline metals and alloys prepared by combustion synthesis technique are reviewed. Then, the mechanical and tribological properties of these materials with microstructure control are discussed.

  18. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Licai Fu; Jun Yang; Weimin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on the synthesis of nanocrystalline metals and alloys prepared by combustion synthesis technique are reviewed. Then, the mechanical and tribological properties of these materials with microstructure control are discussed.

  19. Properties and Application of Nanocrystalline Poly (vinyl chloride)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuanxi XIONG; Hong YANG; Lijie DONG; Qihong LIU; Qingmin LIU

    2004-01-01

    The structure and properties of nanocrystalline PVC were investigated. The crystalline region of nanocrystalline PVC was observed by TEM to be 80 nm. The melting point of nanocrystalline PVC was found to be 128℃ which is obviously lower than typical PVC (210℃). The X-ray diagram indicated that the crystal existed in nanocrystalline PVC. The evident effect of self-plasticizing and reinforcement appeared when nanocrystalline PVC was added. The optimum amount for self-plasticizing is about 10%. The maximal impact strength of 95.1 kJ/m2 was achieved by adding 20% nanocrystalline PVC and tensile strength with 56.2 MPa which was 122% of pure PVC was obtained after adding 5% nanocrystalline PVC.

  20. Combustion synthesis of bulk nanocrystalline iron alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Licai Fu; Jun Yang; Weimin Liu

    2016-01-01

    The controlled synthesis of large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys with predefined architecture is in general a big challenge, and making full use of these materials in applications still requires greatly effort. The combustion synthesis technique has been successfully extended to prepare large-scale nanocrystalline metals and alloys, especially iron alloy, such as FeC, FeNi, FeCu, FeSi, FeB, FeAl, FeSiAl, FeSiB, and the microstructure can be designed. In this issue, recent progress on...

  1. Phase-change oscillations in silicon microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywar, A.; Bakan, G.; Boztug, C.; Silva, H.; Gokirmak, A.

    2009-02-01

    We have observed liquid-solid phase-change oscillations in 2-5.5 μm long silicon wires biased through a load resistor. Molten silicon resistivity is approximately 30 times lower than that of the room temperature solid-state resistivity of the highly doped nanocrystalline-silicon thin film used to fabricate the wires. Wires typically melt with 15-20 V electrical stresses, draining the parasitic capacitance introduced by the experimental setup within 1 μs. The power dissipated in the wire is not sufficient to keep it in molten state after the discharge, leading to repeated melting and resolidification of the wires with 1 MHz, 2-20 mA current oscillations.

  2. Femtosecond Laser Crystallization of Boron-doped Amorphous Hydrogenated Silicon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Rybalko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with femtosecond laser pulses is one of the promising ways to produce nanocrystalline silicon for photovoltaics. The structure of laser treated films is the most important factor determining materials' electric and photoelectric properties. In this work we investigated the effect of femtosecond laser irradiation of boron doped amorphous hydrogenated silicon films with different fluences on crystalline volume fraction and electrical properties of this material. A sharp increase of conductivity and essential decrease of activation energy of conductivity temperature dependences accompany the crystallization process. The results obtained are explained by increase of boron doping efficiency in crystalline phase of modified silicon film.

  3. Reactive plasma synthesis of nanocrystalline ceramic oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumar, K. P.; Vijay, M.; Thiyagarajan, T. K.; Krishnan, K.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.

    2010-02-01

    Reactive plasma synthesis is an attractive route to synthesize nanocrystalline materials. A 40 kW DC non-transferred arc plasma reactor has been designed and developed in our laboratory for synthesis of nanocrystalline materials. The main components of the plasma reactor include a 40 kW DC plasma generator or plasma torch, water-cooled reactor segment, product collection facility, DC power supply, cooling-water system and exhaust gas vent. The system has been used to synthesize nano-crystalline oxides of aluminium, titanium and zirconium. Aluminium metal powder was used as the starting material to synthesize alumina. The hydrides of Ti and Zr were used as the precursor for synthesis of nanocrystalline titania and zirconia respectively. The precursor powders were injected into the thermal plasma jet and were allowed to react with oxygen injected downstream the jet. The precursor powder particles were oxidized 'in-flight' to form nano-sized powder of the respective metal, which deposited on the walls of the reactor and collector assembly. Various analytical tools were used to characterized the products.

  4. Multiphase Nanocrystalline Ceramic Concept for Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mecartnery, Martha [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Graeve, Olivia [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Liverpool (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-25

    The goal of this research is to help develop new fuels for higher efficiency, longer lifetimes (higher burn-up) and increased accident tolerance in future nuclear reactors. Multiphase nanocrystalline ceramics will be used in the design of simulated advanced inert matrix nuclear fuel to provide for enhanced plasticity, better radiation tolerance, and improved thermal conductivity

  5. Optical properties of nano-silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Tripathy; R K Soni; S K Ghoshal; K P Jain

    2001-06-01

    We investigated the optical properties of silicon clusters and Si nanocrystallites using photoluminescence (PL) and Raman scattering technique. Broad luminescence band in the red region was observed from Si-doped SiO2 thin films deposited by co-sputtering of Si and SiO2 on -type Si (100) substrates, annealed in Ar and O2 atmosphere. Nanocrystalline Si particles fabricated by pulsed plasma processing technique showed infrared luminescence from as grown film at room temperature. Raman spectra from these films consisted of broad band superimposed on a sharp line near 516 cm–1 whose intensity, frequency, and width depend on the particle sizes arising from the phonon confinement in the nanocrystalline silicon. We also performed PL, Raman and resonantly excited PL measurements on porous silicon film to compare the optical properties of Si nanostructures grown by different techniques. An extensive computer simulation using empirical pseudopotential method was carried out for 5–18 atoms Si clusters and the calculated gap energies were close to our PL data.

  6. Progress of Si-based nanocrystalline luminescent materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Si-based nanomaterials are some new photoelctronic and informational materials developed rapidly in recent years, and they have potential applications in the light emitting devices, e. g. Si light emitting diode, Si laser and integrated Si-based photoelectronics. Among them are nanoscale porous silicon (ps), Si nanocrystalline embedded SiO2 (SiOx, x < 2.0) matrices, Si nanoquantum dot and Si/SiO2 superlattice, etc. At present, there are various indications that if these materials can achieve efficient and stable luminescence, which are photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL), it is possible for them to lead to a new informational revolution in the early days of the 21st century. In this article, we will mainly review the progress of study on Si-based nanomaterials in the past ten years. The involved contents are the fabricated methods, structural characterizations and light emitting properties. Finally, we predicate the developed tendency of this field in the following ten years.

  7. Hydrogen related crystallization in intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon films prepared by reactive radiofrequency magnetron sputtering at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senouci, D. [Laboratoire de Genie Physique, Universite Ibn-Khaldoun, 14000 Tiaret (Algeria); LPCMME, Departement de Physique, Universite d' Oran Es-senia, 3100, Oran (Algeria); Baghdad, R., E-mail: r_baghdad@mail.univ-tiaret.dz [Laboratoire de Genie Physique, Universite Ibn-Khaldoun, 14000 Tiaret (Algeria); Belfedal, A.; Chahed, L. [LPCMME, Departement de Physique, Universite d' Oran Es-senia, 3100, Oran (Algeria); Portier, X. [CIMAP, CEA, CNRS UMR 6252-ENSICAEN, UCBN, 6 Bvd Marechal Juin, 14050 Caen Cedex (France); Charvet, S. [LPMC, UFR des Sciences, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens (France); Kim, K.H. [LPICM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); TOTAL S.A., Gas and Power, R and D Division, Courbevoie (France); Roca i Cabarrocas, P. [LPICM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interfaces et Couches Minces, CNRS UMR 7647, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Zellama, K. [LPMC, UFR des Sciences, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 80039 Amiens (France)

    2012-11-01

    We present an investigation on the transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline silicon and associated hydrogen changes during the first steps of hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon growth for films elaborated by reactive radiofrequency magnetron sputtering at a substrate temperature as low as room temperature and for deposition times varying from 3 to 60 min. Complementary experimental techniques have been used to characterize the films in their as-deposited state. They are completed by thermal hydrogen effusion experiments conducted in the temperature range, from room temperature to 800 Degree-Sign C. The results show that, during the initial stages of growth, the presence of a hydrogen-rich layer is necessary to initiate the crystallization process. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystalline silicon growth at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline silicon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical reactions of H atoms with strained Si-Si bonds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H selective etching and chemical transport caused the silicon nucleation.

  8. Microwave-assisted additive free synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatte, Kushal D.; Tambade, Pawan; Fujita, Shin-ichiro; Arai, Masahiko; Bhalchandra M. Bhanage

    2010-01-01

    An additive free synthesis of nanocrystalline zinc oxide using microwave technique is reported. Current methodology is faster, cleaner and cost effective compared with conventional method for the synthesis of zinc oxide nanocrystalline materials. The structure and morphology of nanocrystalline zinc oxide was investigated by TEM, XRD, EDAX, UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that microwave heating can produce polygonal zinc oxide within a short span of time.

  9. Twinning interactions induced amorphisation in ultrafine silicon grains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Y. [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Zhang, L.C., E-mail: liangchi.zhang@unsw.edu.au [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Zhang, Y. [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology (China)

    2016-03-21

    Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis on a severely deformed Al-Si composite material has revealed that partial dislocation slips and deformation twinning are the major plastic deformation carriers in ultrafine silicon grains. This resembles the deformation twinning activities and mechanisms observed in nano-crystalline face-centred-cubic metallic materials. While deformation twinning and amorphisation in Si were thought unlikely to co-exist, it is observed for the first time that excessive twinning and partial dislocation interactions can lead to localised solid state amorphisation inside ultrafine silicon grains.

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of bulk nanocrystalline Erbium metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Yue

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Bulk nanocrystalline Erbium metals were prepared via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS and subsequent annealing process. The nanocrystalline Er metals have the same hexagonal close packed structure as that of coarse-grained sample. Decrease in grain size results in remarkable changes in the three magnetic ordering temperatures of the nanocrystalline Er metal. At 5 K, the magnetization drops by 10.9%, while the coercivity increases by 4 times for nanocrystalline Er compared with those of coarse-grained sample. These results indicate the remarkable influence of the nanostructure on the magnetism of Er due to finite size effect.

  11. Microemulsion-based synthesis of nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Ashok K; Ganguly, Aparna; Vaidya, Sonalika

    2010-02-01

    Microemulsion-based synthesis is found to be a versatile route to synthesize a variety of nanomaterials. The manipulation of various components involved in the formation of a microemulsion enables one to synthesize nanomaterials with varied size and shape. In this tutorial review several aspects of microemulsion based synthesis of nanocrystalline materials have been discussed which would be of interest to a cross-section of researchers working on colloids, physical chemistry, nanoscience and materials chemistry. The review focuses on the recent developments in the above area with current understanding on the various factors that control the structure and dynamics of microemulsions which can be effectively used to manipulate the size and shape of nanocrystalline materials.

  12. New Nanocrystalline Materials for Power Electronics Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bydzovsky

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available New nanocrystalline materials for the applications in the power electronics systems are developed and tested.These materials are intended to be used in the magnetic circuits of switching-mode power supplies (SMPS. The aim was toachieve extremely low hysteresis and non-linearity in operating region resulting in increased efficiency and decreased weightand size whilst keeping low price of the high-power frequency converters for SMPS.

  13. New Nanocrystalline Materials for Power Electronics Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Bydzovsky; Jozef Kuchta; Elemir Usak; Peter Svec

    2008-01-01

    New nanocrystalline materials for the applications in the power electronics systems are developed and tested. These materials are intended to be used in the magnetic circuits of switching-mode power supplies (SMPS). The aim was to achieve extremely low hysteresis and non-linearity in operating region resulting in increased efficiency and decreased weight and size whilst keeping low price of the high-power frequency converters for SMPS.

  14. Quantized Nanocrystalline CdTe Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Nanocrystalline CdTe thin films were prepared by asymmetric rectangular pulse electrodeposition in organic solution at 110°C. STM image shows a porous network morphology constructed by interconnected spherical CdTe crystallites with a mean diameter of 4.2 nm. A pronounced size quantization was indicated in the action and absorption spectra. Potentials dependence dual conductive behavior was revealed in the photocurrent-potential (I-V) curves.

  15. Silicon nanoparticle optimization and integration into amorphous silicon via PECVD for use in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klafehn, Grant W.

    An alternative approach to traditional growth methods of nanocrystalline material is co-deposition by injection of separately synthesized silicon nanoparticles into amorphous silicon. Current methods of co-deposition of silicon nanoparticles and amorphous silicon via plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition allow the two reactors' pressures to affect each other, leading to either poor amorphous silicon quality or uncontrollable nanoparticle size and deposition rate. In this thesis, a technique for greater control of stand-alone silicon nanoparticle size and quality grown was achieved by using a slit nozzle. The nozzle was used to separate the nanoparticle and amorphous reactors, allowing for the ability to control nanoparticle size, crystallinity, and deposition rate during co-deposition, while still allowing for high quality amorphous silicon growth. Changing the width of the nozzle allowed for control of the size of the nanoparticles from 10 to 4.5 nm in diameter, and allowed for the precursor gas flow rate, and thus deposition rate, to be changed with only a 6 % change in size estimated from luminescence emission wavelength. Co-deposited samples were grown within a broad range of flow rates for the silicon nanoparticle precursor gas, resulting in each sample having a different crystal fraction. FTIR, PL, Raman, and XRD were used to analyze their composition. The silicon nanoparticle synthesis was separately optimized to control size and crystallinity, and the influence of the nanoparticle process gases on amorphous silicon growth was also explored. Finally, COMSOL simulations were performed to support and possibly predict Si-NP growth variables that pertain to Si-NP size.

  16. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF BAMBOO NANOCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjiao Yu,

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC has many potential applications because of its special properties. In this paper, NCC was prepared from bamboo pulp. Bamboo pulp was first pretreated with sodium hydroxide, followed by hydrolysis with sulfuric acid. The concentration of sulfuric acid and the hydrolysis time on the yield of NCC were studied. The results showed that sulfuric acid concentration had larger influence than the hydrolysis time on the yield of NCC. When the temperature was 50oC, the concentration of sulfuric acid was 48wt% and the reaction time was 30 minutes, a high quality of nanocrystalline cellulose was obtained; under these conditions, the length of the nanocrystalline cellulose ranged from 200 nm to 500 nm, the diameter was less than 20 nm, the yield was 15.67wt%, and the crystallinity was 71.98%, which is not only higher than those of cellulose nanocrystals prepared from some non-wood materials, but also higher than bamboo cellulose nanocrystals prepared by other methods.

  17. Preparation and Instability of Nanocrystalline Cuprous Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Malinda D; White, Miles A; Thompson, Michelle J; Miller, Gordon J; Vela, Javier

    2015-07-06

    Low-dimensional cuprous nitride (Cu3N) was synthesized by nitridation (ammonolysis) of cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanocrystals using either ammonia (NH3) or urea (H2NCONH2) as the nitrogen source. The resulting nanocrystalline Cu3N spontaneously decomposes to nanocrystalline CuO in the presence of both water and oxygen from air at room temperature. Ammonia was produced in 60% chemical yield during Cu3N decomposition, as measured using the colorimetric indophenol method. Because Cu3N decomposition requires H2O and produces substoichiometric amounts of NH3, we conclude that this reaction proceeds through a complex stoichiometry that involves the concomitant release of both N2 and NH3. This is a thermodynamically unfavorable outcome, strongly indicating that H2O (and thus NH3 production) facilitate the kinetics of the reaction by lowering the energy barrier for Cu3N decomposition. The three different Cu2O, Cu3N, and CuO nanocrystalline phases were characterized by a combination of optical absorption, powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and electronic density of states obtained from electronic structure calculations on the bulk solids. The relative ease of interconversion between these interesting and inexpensive materials bears possible implications for catalytic and optoelectronic applications.

  18. [Effect of temperature on the structure of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocrystalline glass-ceramics studied by Raman spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Wei; Ouyang, Shun-Li; Zhang, Xue-Feng; Jia, Xiao-Lin; Deng, Lei-Bo; Liu, Fang

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper, nanocrystalline glass-ceramic of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system was produced by melting method. The CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 nanocrystalline glass-ceramic was measured by Raman spectroscopy in the temperature range from -190 to 310 degrees C in order to study the effect of temperature on the structure of this system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics. The results showed that different non-bridge oxygen bond silicon-oxygen tetrahedron structural unit changes are not consistent with rising temperature. Further analyses indicated that: the SiO4 tetrahedron with 2 non-bridged oxygen (Q2), the SiO4 tetrahedron with 3 non-bridged oxygen (Q(1)), which are situated at the edge of the 3-D SiO4 tetrahedrons network, and the SiO4 tetrahedron with 4 non-bridged oxygen (Q(0)), which is situated outside the 3-D network all suffered a significant influence by the temperature change, which has been expressed as: shifts towards the high wave-number, increased bond force constants, and shortened bond lengths. This paper studied the influence of temperature on CMAS system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics using variable temperature Raman technology. It provides experiment basis to the research on external environment influence on CMAS system nanocrystalline glass-ceramics materials in terms of structure and performance. In addition, the research provides experimental basis for controlling the expansion coefficient of nanocrystalline glass-ceramic of CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 system.

  19. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paget, V.; Sergent, J. A.; Chevillard, S.

    2011-07-01

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO2) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO2-25 nm and SiO2-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO2-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO2-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO2-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO2-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  20. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paget, V; Sergent, J A; Chevillard, S, E-mail: sylvie.chevillard@cea.fr [Laboratory of Experimental Cancerology, Institute of Cellular and Molecular Radiobiology, CEA, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2011-07-06

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO{sub 2}) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO{sub 2}-25 nm and SiO{sub 2}-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO{sub 2}-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO{sub 2}-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO{sub 2}-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO{sub 2}-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  1. Solid state consolidation nanocrystalline copper-tungsten using cold spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Aaron Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sarobol, Pylin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Argibay, Nicolas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clark, Blythe [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Diantonio, Christopher [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that nanostructured metals can exhibit significantly improved properties compared to metals with conventional grain size. Unfortunately, nanocrystalline metals typically are not thermodynamically stable and exhibit rapid grain growth at moderate temperatures. This severely limits their processing and use, making them impractical for most engineering applications. Recent work has shown that a number of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metal alloys exist. These alloys have been prepared as powders using severe plastic deformation (e.g. ball milling) processes. Consolidation of these powders without compromise of their nanocrystalline microstructure is a critical step to enabling their use as engineering materials. We demonstrate solid-state consolidation of ball milled copper-tantalum nanocrystalline metal powder using cold spray. Unfortunately, the nanocrystalline copper-tantalum powder that was consolidated did not contain the thermodynamically stable copper-tantalum nanostructure. Nevertheless, this does this demonstrates a pathway to preparation of bulk thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Furthermore, it demonstrates a pathway to additive manufacturing (3D printing) of nanocrystalline copper-tantalum. Additive manufacturing of thermodynamically stable nanocrystalline metals is attractive because it enables maximum flexibility and efficiency in the use of these unique materials.

  2. Silicon spintronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Ron

    2012-04-23

    Worldwide efforts are underway to integrate semiconductors and magnetic materials, aiming to create a revolutionary and energy-efficient information technology in which digital data are encoded in the spin of electrons. Implementing spin functionality in silicon, the mainstream semiconductor, is vital to establish a spin-based electronics with potential to change information technology beyond imagination. Can silicon spintronics live up to the expectation? Remarkable advances in the creation and control of spin polarization in silicon suggest so. Here, I review the key developments and achievements, and describe the building blocks of silicon spintronics. Unexpected and puzzling results are discussed, and open issues and challenges identified. More surprises lie ahead as silicon spintronics comes of age.

  3. Application of Nanocrystalline Alloy Core in Electric Power Transformer%纳米晶合金铁芯在电力互感器中的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范浩

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the performance of the nanocrystalline alloy materials ,probes the value of the nanocrystalline alloy core used in the power transformer by comparing the nanocrystalline alloy core and traditional silicon steel core ,and discusses the key technologies about the nanocrystalline alloy core used in the power transformer ,in order to provide reference for relevant professionals .%首先就纳米晶合金铁芯材料性能展开分析 ,并对纳米晶合金铁芯与传统硅钢片材料的电力互感器铁芯进行对比 ,从而探析纳米晶合金铁芯在电力互感器中的运用价值 ,并对纳米晶合金铁芯在电力互感器中的运用关键技术展开探讨 ,为相关专业人士提供参考.

  4. Distribution of Local Open-Circuit Voltage on Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Mixed-Phase Si:H and SiGe:H Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.-S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Yan, B.; Owens, J. M.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

    2006-05-01

    Local open-circuit voltage (Voc) distributions on amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed-phase silicon solar cells were measured using a scanning Kelvin probe microscope (SKPM) on the p layer of an n-i-p structure without the top ITO contact. During the measurement, the sample was illuminated with a laser beam that was used for the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Therefore, the surface potential measured by SKPM is the sum of the local Voc and the difference in workfunction between the p layer and the AFM tip. Comparing the SKPM and AFM images, we find that nanocrystallites aggregate in the amorphous matrix with an aggregation size of {approx}0.5 ..mu..m in diameter, where many nanometer-size grains are clustered. The Voc distribution shows valleys in the nanocrystalline aggregation area. The transition from low to high Voc regions is a gradual change within a distance of about 1 ..mu..m. The minimum Voc value in the nanocrystalline clusters in the mixed-phase region is larger than the Voc of a nc-Si:H single-phase solar cell. These results could be due to lateral photo-charge redistribution between the two phases. We have also carried out local Voc measurements on mixed-phase SiGe:H alloy solar cells. The magnitudes of Voc in the amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are consistent with the J-V measurements.

  5. Biological evaluation of ultrananocrystalline and nanocrystalline diamond coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, Shelby A; Kumar, Girish; Zheng, Jiwen; Sumant, Anirudha V; Goering, Peter L; Narayan, Roger J

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured biomaterials have been investigated for achieving desirable tissue-material interactions in medical implants. Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings are the two most studied classes of synthetic diamond coatings; these materials are grown using chemical vapor deposition and are classified based on their nanostructure, grain size, and sp(3) content. UNCD and NCD are mechanically robust, chemically inert, biocompatible, and wear resistant, making them ideal implant coatings. UNCD and NCD have been recently investigated for ophthalmic, cardiovascular, dental, and orthopaedic device applications. The aim of this study was (a) to evaluate the in vitro biocompatibility of UNCD and NCD coatings and (b) to determine if variations in surface topography and sp(3) content affect cellular response. Diamond coatings with various nanoscale topographies (grain sizes 5-400 nm) were deposited on silicon substrates using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed uniform coatings with different scales of surface topography; Raman spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbon bonding typical of diamond coatings. Cell viability, proliferation, and morphology responses of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) to UNCD and NCD surfaces were evaluated. The hBMSCs on UNCD and NCD coatings exhibited similar cell viability, proliferation, and morphology as those on the control material, tissue culture polystyrene. No significant differences in cellular response were observed on UNCD and NCD coatings with different nanoscale topographies. Our data shows that both UNCD and NCD coatings demonstrate in vitro biocompatibility irrespective of surface topography.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAI Pin-qiang; YU Hui, LI Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel was synthesize d by direct current electrodeposition from a modified Watts-type bath. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the microstructure of nickel deposits. The results show that nanocrytalline nickel with grain sizes in the range 20~50nm can be synthesized from saccharin-containing Watts-type baths with current density range 5~30A/dm2. There existed preferred orientation in the deposits and it changed progressively from a (200) fibre texture to a (111) (200) double fibre texture as saccharin concentration increased. The hardness of the deposits increased prominently as grain size decreased to nanometer range.

  7. Transparent nanocrystalline diamond coatings and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Khan, Adam

    2017-08-22

    A method for coating a substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The plasma ball has a diameter. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the substrate and the substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the substrate, and a diamond coating is deposited on the substrate. The diamond coating has a thickness. Furthermore, the diamond coating has an optical transparency of greater than about 80%. The diamond coating can include nanocrystalline diamond. The microwave plasma source can have a frequency of about 915 MHz.

  8. Atomistic Mechanisms of Fatigue in Nanocrystalline Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, D.; Willemann, M.; Hyde, B.

    2005-04-01

    We investigate the mechanisms of fatigue behavior in nanocrystalline metals at the atomic scale using empirical force laws and molecular level simulations. A combination of molecular statics and molecular dynamics was used to deal with the time scale limitations of molecular dynamics. We show that the main atomistic mechanism of fatigue crack propagation in these materials is the formation of nanovoids ahead of the main crack. The results obtained for crack advance as a function of stress intensity amplitude are consistent with experimental studies and a Paris law exponent of about 2.

  9. LIGHT-WEIGHT NANOCRYSTALLINE HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. G. Sankar; B. Zande; R.T. Obermyer; S. Simizu

    2005-11-21

    During Phase I of this SBIR Program, Advanced Materials Corporation has addressed two key issues concerning hydrogen storage: 1. We have conducted preliminary studies on the effect of certain catalysts in modifying the hydrogen absorption characteristics of nanocrystalline magnesium. 2. We have also conducted proof-of-concept design and construction of a prototype instrument that would rapidly screen materials for hydrogen storage employing chemical combinatorial technique in combination with a Pressure-Composition Isotherm Measurement (PCI) instrument. 3. Preliminary results obtained in this study approach are described in this report.

  10. Nanocrystalline Ni-W coatings on copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panagopoulos, C.N., E-mail: chpanag@metal.ntua.gr [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780, Athens (Greece); Plainakis, G.D.; Lagaris, D.A. [Laboratory of Physical Metallurgy, National Technical University of Athens, Zografos, 15780, Athens (Greece)

    2011-04-15

    Nanocrystalline Ni-W coatings were produced on copper substrates with the aid of electrodeposition technique. The morphology, chemical composition and structure of the produced coatings were examined with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The microhardness of alloy Ni-W coatings on copper substrate was also studied. The adhesion between the Ni-W coating, having W content 50 wt%, and the copper substrate, was also studied with a scratch testing apparatus. The scratch tests resulted in the coatings suffering an intensive brittle fracture and minor delamination.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DAIPin-qiang; YUHui; LIQiang

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nickel was synthesized by direct current electrodeposition from a modified Watts-type bath. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the microstructure of nickel deposits. The results show that nanocrytalline nickel with grain sizes in the range 20-50nm can be synthesized from saccharin-containing Watts-type baths with current density range 5-30A/dm2. There existed preferred orientation in the deposits and it changed progressively from a (200) fibre texture to a (111) (200) double fibre texture as saccharin concentration increased. The hardness of the deposits increased prominently as grain size decreased to nanometer range.

  12. Amorphous to nanocrystalline transition in HWCVD Si:H films by substrate temperature variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogoi, Purabi; Jha, Himanshu S.; Agarwal, Pratima [Department of Physics, IIT Guwahati, Guwahati (India); Deva, Dinesh [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur (India)

    2010-04-15

    Thin films of hydrogenated silicon with band gap ranging from 2.0-2.34 eV are prepared at deposition rate 8-14A/sec in an indigenously fabricated HWCVD system keeping all parameters except substrate temperature fixed. The films grown at T{sub s}{<=}150 C are found to be pure amorphous, whereas the formation of nanocrystalline phase starts at T{sub s} {>=} 200 C. With increase in T{sub s}, crystalline fraction increases along with the increase in the band gap whereas the hydrogen content in the films and the deposition rate decreases. The variation of microstructure by varying substrate temperature without a significant decrease in deposition rate is useful for various device applications. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Adsorption of diazinon and fenitrothion on nanocrystalline magnesium oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Armaghan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline magnesium oxide was prepared by the sol–gel method from magnesium methoxide and characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Sol–gel derived nanocrystalline magnesium oxide along with a commercial nanocrystalline magnesium oxide was used as adsorbents to study the adsorption of two common, organophosphorous pesticides, diethoxy-[(2-isopropyl-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyloxy]-thioxophosphorane (diazinon and dimethoxy-(3-methyl-4-nitrophenoxy-thioxophosphorane (fenitrothion. Adsorption of diazinon and fenitrothion on the sol–gel derived, and commercial nanocrystalline magnesium oxides was studied using UV–vis, FT-IR and 31P NMR spectroscopies. The effect of hydroxyl groups on edge/corner and flat panel of magnesium oxide in adsorption of diazinon and fenitrothion was investigated. The results showed that the adsorption of diazinon on the sol–gel derived nanocrystalline magnesium oxide is destructive whereas on commercial one is non-destructive. Commercial nanocrystalline magnesium oxide showed higher activity in the adsorption of fenitrothion than the sol–gel derived, and adsorptions on both nanocrystalline magnesium oxides are destructive.

  14. Graphene on silicon nitride micromembranes for optoelectromechanical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Silvan; Bagci, Tolga; Rasmussen, Andreas Næsby

    2012-01-01

    Metal-catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of large area uniform nanocrystalline graphene on oxidized silicon substrates is demonstrated. The material grows slowly, allowing for thickness control down to monolayer graphene. The as-grown thin films are continuous with no observable pinholes......, and are smooth and uniform across whole wafers, as inspected by optical-, scanning electron-, and atomic force microscopy. The sp(2) hybridized carbon structure is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. Room temperature electrical measurements show ohmic behavior (sheet resistance similar to exfoliated graphene......) and up to 13% of electric-field effect. The Hall mobility is similar to 40 cm(2)/ Vs, which is an order of magnitude higher than previously reported values for nanocrystalline graphene. Transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transport measurements indicate a graphene crystalline domain...

  15. Formation of Surface Corrosion-Resistant Nanocrystalline Structures on Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykyforchyn, Hryhoriy; Kyryliv, Volodymyr; Maksymiv, Olha; Slobodyan, Zvenomyra; Tsyrulnyk, Oleksandr

    2016-12-01

    Engineering materials with nanocrystalline structure could be exploited under simultaneous action of mechanical loading and corrosion environments; therefore, their corrosion resistance is important. Surface nanocrystalline structure was generated on middle carbon steels by severe plastic deformation using the method of mechanical pulse friction treatment. This treatment additionally includes high temperature phase transformation and alloying. Using a complex of the corrosive, electrochemical and physical investigations, it was established that nanocrystalline structures can be characterized by lower or increased corrosion resistance in comparison with the reference material. It is caused by the action of two confronting factors: arising energy level and anticorrosive alloying of the surface layer.

  16. Microstructure and Performances of Nanocrystalline Zinc-nickel Alloy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Guang-yu; LIAN Jian-she; NIU Li-yuan; JIANG Zhong-hao

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc-nickel alloy coatings were deposited from an alkaline zincate bath contained an organic additive that can reduce polarization and a complexing agent. SEM and TEM observations and XRD analysis were performed to examine the microstructure and phase composition of the coatings. The nickel content in deposits is 12.0~14.7% and the coating is consisted of single nanocrystalline γ-phase structure (Ni5Zn21), with grain average grain size about 15nm. The nanocrystalline zinc-nickel alloy coatings have better corrosion resistance, less brittleness and higher microhardness than the conventional zinc coatings.

  17. Si/Nanocrystalline Diamond Film Heterojunction Diodes Preparation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    With electron assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition technology, nanocrystalline diamond films were deposited on polished n-(100)Si wafer surface. The deposited films were characterized and observed by Raman spectrum, X-ray diffraction, semiconductor characterization system and Hall effective measurement system. The results show that with EA-HFCVD, not only an undoped nanocrystalline diamond films with high-conductivity (p-type semiconducting) but also a p-n heterojunction diode between the nanocrystalline diamond films and n-Si substrate is fabricated successfully. The p-n heterojunction has smaller forward resistance and bigger positive resistance. The p-n junction effective is evident.

  18. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  19. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  20. Nanocrystalline magnetic materials obtained by flash annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.K. Murakami

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to produce enhanced-remanence nanocrystalline magnetic material by crystallizing amorphous or partially amorphous Pr4.5Fe77B18.5 alloys by the flash annealing process, also known as the dc-Joule heating process, and to determine the optimal conditions for obtaining good magnetic coupling between the magnetic phases present in this material. Ribbons of Pr4.5Fe77B18.5 were produced by melt spinning and then annealed for 10-30 s at temperatures 500 - 640 °C by passing current through the sample to develop the enhanced-remanence nanocrystalline magnetic material. These materials were studied by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and magnetic measurements. Coercivity increases of up to 15% were systematically observed in relation to furnace-annealed material. Two different samples were carefully examined: (i a sample annealed at 600 °C which showed the highest coercive field Hc and remanence ratio Mr/Ms and (ii a sample annealed at 520 °C which showed phase separation in the second quadrant demagnetization curve. Our results are in agreement with other studies which show that flash annealing improves the magnetic properties of some amorphous ferromagnetic ribbons.

  1. Bulk nanocrystalline Al prepared by cryomilling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline Al was fabricated by mechanically milling at cryogenic temperature (cryomilling) and then by hot pressing in vacuum. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the microstructure evolution of the material during cryomilling and consolidation was investigated. With increasing the milling time, the grain size decreased sharply and reduced to 42 nm when cryomilled for 12 h. The grains had grown up, and the columnar grain was formed under the hot pressing and extrusion compared with the cryomilled powders. The grain size of as-extruded specimen was approximately 300-500 nm. The reason of high thermal stability of this bulk was attributed primarily to the Zener pinning from the grain boundary of the AlN arising from cryomilling and the solute drag of the impurity. Tensile tests show that the strength of nanocrystalline Al is enhanced with decreasing grain size. The ultimate tensile strength and tensile elongation were 173 MPa and 17.5%, respectively. It appears that the measured high strength in the cryomilled Al is related to a grain-size effect, dispersion strengthening, and dislocation strengthening.

  2. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ZengWei; ZHU Di; QU NingSong

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed,and nanocrystal-line nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents.Unlike traditional methods,the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing.Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits,pinholes and nodules.Furthermore,comparing with the deposit prepared by tradi-tional methods,the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm.Every diffraction peak's intensity of the deposit was reduced,the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased.The microhardness notably increased.The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force.It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.Key.words:electrodeposition,electroforming,hard particle,nanocrystalline,bright nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  3. Microhardness studies of nanocrystalline lead molybdate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandakumar, V.M. [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695581 (India); Department of Physics, Mahatma Gandhi College, Pattom Palace P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695004 (India); Abdul Khadar, M., E-mail: mabdulkhadar@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695581 (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, University of Kerala, Kariavattom P.O., Thiruvananthapuram 695581 (India)

    2009-08-30

    Nanocrystalline lead molybdate (PbMoO{sub 4}) of four different grain sizes were synthesized through chemical precipitation technique and the grain sizes and crystal structure are determined using the broadening of X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy. The microhardness of nanocrystalline lead molybdate (PbMoO{sub 4}) with different grain sizes were measured using a Vicker's microhardness tester for various applied loads ranging from 0.049 to 1.96 N. The microhardness values showed significant indentation size effect at low indentation loads. The proportional specimen resistance model put forward by Li and Bradt and energy balance model put forward by Gong and Li were used to analyze the behaviour of measured microhardness values under different indentation loads. The microhardness data obtained for samples of different grain sizes showed grain size dependent strengthening obeying normal Hall-Petch relation. The dependence of compacting pressure and annealing temperature on microhardness of the nanostructured sample with grain size of {approx}18 nm were also studied. The samples showed significant increase in microhardness values as the compacting pressure and annealing time were increased. The variation of microhardness of the material with pressure of pelletization and annealing time are discussed in the light of change of pore size distribution of the samples.

  4. Carbon-nanotube electron-beam (C-beam) crystallization technique for silicon TFTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Woong; Kang, Jung Su; Park, Kyu Chang

    2016-02-01

    We introduced a carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron beam (C-beam) for thin film crystallization and thin film transistor (TFT) applications. As a source of electron emission, a CNT emitter which had been grown on a silicon wafer with a resist-assisted patterning (RAP) process was used. By using the C-beam exposure, we successfully crystallized a silicon thin film that had nano-sized crystalline grains. The distribution of crystalline grain size was about 10 ˜ 30 nm. This nanocrystalline silicon thin film definitely had three crystalline directions which are (111), (220) and (311), respectively. The silicon TFTs crystallized by using a C-beam exposure showed a field effect mobility of 20 cm2/Vs and an on/off ratio of more than 107. The C-beam exposure can modify the bonding network of amorphous silicon with its proper energy.

  5. Martensite and bainite in nanocrystalline steels: understanding, design and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caballero Francisca G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There are major difficulties in creating novel nanocrystalline structures that have a combination of properties appropriate for large scale applications. An important requirement is to be able to manufacture nanocrystalline components which are large in all dimensions on their macroscale whilst retaining their nanostructure. In addition, the material concerned must be cheap to produce if it is not to be limited to niche applications. Severe plastic deformation has not succeeded in this respect since grain growth cannot effectively be suppressed during consolidation processes. Therefore, processing bulk nanocrystalline materials for structural applications still poses a big challenge, particularly in achieving an industrially viable process. Here we describe various processing strategies and alloy developments currently being explored in the modern steel industry that have the potential to create extremely strong and affordable nanocrystalline engineering steels.

  6. High Temperature Stable Nanocrystalline SiGe Thermoelectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sherwin (Inventor); Matejczyk, Daniel Edward (Inventor); Determan, William (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of forming a nanocomposite thermoelectric material having microstructural stability at temperatures greater than 1000 C. The method includes creating nanocrystalline powder by cryomilling. The method is particularly useful in forming SiGe alloy powder.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulation of thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI; Mingzhi; XIAO; Shifang; YUAN; Xiaojian; HU; Wangyu

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline vanadium with an average grain size ranging from 2.86 to 7.50 nm are calculated by means of the analytic embedded-atom method and molecular dynamics. The grain boundary and nanocrystalline grain atoms are differentiated by the common neighbor analysis method. The results indicate that the fraction of grain boundary increases with the grain size decreasing, and the mean energy of atoms is higher than that of coarse crystals. The thermal-stable temperatures of nanocrystalline vanadium are determined from the evolution of atomic energy, fraction of grain boundary and radial distribution function. It is shown that the stable temperature decreases obviously with the grain size decreasing. In addition the reasons which cause the grain growth of nanocrystalline vanadium are discussed.

  8. Martensite and bainite in nanocrystalline steels: understanding, design and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero Francisca G.

    2015-01-01

    There are major difficulties in creating novel nanocrystalline structures that have a combination of properties appropriate for large scale applications. An important requirement is to be able to manufacture nanocrystalline components which are large in all dimensions on their macroscale whilst retaining their nanostructure. In addition, the material concerned must be cheap to produce if it is not to be limited to niche applications. Severe plastic deformation has not succeeded in this respec...

  9. A New Attempt to Obtain Bulk Nanocrystalline Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengjie Yao; Linxiu Du; Xianghua Liu; Guodong Wang

    2009-01-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline steel sample was obtained in laboratory through refining of austenite grains and controlled rolling. Transmission electron microscopy micrographs show that some textures are evolved in the process of the treatment and two typical carbides are classified according to their size and location. The tensile strength of the nanocrystalline sample is obviously lower than conventional consideration, and scanning electron microscopy observation shows that the existence of the first type of carbide is considered as the main reason for the failure.

  10. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  11. Reversal of exchange bias in nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Prados, C; Hernando, A; Montone, A

    2002-01-01

    The sign of the exchange bias in field cooled nanocrystalline antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic bilayers (Co-O and Ni-O/permalloy) is reversed at temperatures approaching the antiferromagnetic (AFM) blocking temperature. A similar phenomenon is observed after magnetic training processes at similar temperatures. These effects can be explained assuming that the boundaries of nanocrystalline grains in AFM layers exhibit lower transition temperatures than grain cores.

  12. Electrochemistry of Inorganic Nanocrystalline Electrode Materials for Lithium Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. W. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    much different from that of traditional crystalline ones because of their significant ‘surface effects’. In connection with that, the nanocrystalline cathode materials are reported to have an enhanced electrochemical activity when the first significative electrochemical step is insertion of Li ions (discharge process. The “electrochemical grafting” concept will be given as a plausible explanation. As illustrative examples, electrochemical behaviors of nanocrystalline manganese oxydes are presented.

  13. Voronoi Based Nanocrystalline Generation Algorithm for Atomistic Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    with implementing ran- domly dispersed Voronoi tessellation algorithms for nanocrystalline construction is 1 Approved for public release; distribution...generate a list of grain centers that are populated with seeds —spherical groups of atoms extracted from a reference file. This method uses a single...the methods and code used to generate a nanocrystalline structure with a single reference file for seed extraction. Some of the code segments detailed

  14. Defect and electrical properties of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Xin-Sheng; Wang Yu; Dong Liang; Qi Li-Zhen; Zhang Feng

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide particles were prepared by a wet-chemical method. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis shows that the average grain size is about 15nm. The oxygen deficiency of nanometre-sized sample is higher than that of ordinary tungsten trioxide. The electric conductivity increases because of high oxygen deficiency. Ironic relaxation polarization and crystallographic shear (CS) planes theory were used to explain the unusual dielectric characteristic of nanocrystalline tungsten trioxide.

  15. Nanocrystalline La2Mo2O9 and Its Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qin; Xia Tian; Li Jiayan; Liu Xiangdong; Ma Xianfeng; Meng Jian; Cao Xueqiang

    2004-01-01

    In this work, both the thermal expansion and electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline La2Mo2O9 were studied.The nanocrystalline powder of La2Mo2O9 was obtained by sol-gel method, and with the help of SHP (superhigh pressure)up to 4.5 × 104 atm at 700 ℃ for a short time, and the nanocrystalline powder was densified without obvious particle size growth. The electrical conductivity of nanocrystalline La2Mo2O9 was one orderof magnitude lower than that of the microcrystalline sample at the same temperature. Owing to the phase transition, the microcrystalline La2Mo2O9 has an abrupt increase of thermal expansion with a peak value of 48 × 10-6 K-1 at 556 ℃. For the nanocrystalline material, the peak value increases to 112 × 10-6 K-1 at 520 ℃. On the other hand, above 600 ℃ the significant growth of particle size of the nanocrystalline La2Mo2O9 was observed, accompanying by a tremendous increase of thermal expansion with a peak value of third higher than that of La2Mo2O9.

  16. Enhancing Quantum Dots for Bioimaging using Advanced Surface Chemistry and Advanced Optical Microscopy: Application to Silicon Quantum Dots (SiQDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; Hinde, Elizabeth; Owen, Dylan M; Lowe, Stuart B; Reece, Peter J; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-10-28

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is successfully demonstrated in both one- and two-photon cases with surface modified, nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots in the context of bioimaging. The technique is further demonstrated in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer studies where the color of the nanoparticles is tuned by using organic dye acceptors directly conjugated onto the nanoparticle surface.

  17. Magnetic Properties of Grain Boundaries of Nanocrystalline Ni and of Ni Precipitates in Nanocrystalline NiCu Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, H.; Guan, Z.; Li, X.; Wichert, Th.

    2001-11-01

    Perturbed γγ-angular correlation spectroscopy (PAC) was used to investigate nanocrystalline Ni and NiCu alloys, which are prepared by pulsed electrodeposition (PED). Using diffusion for doping nanocrystalline Ni with 111In four different ordered grain boundary structures are observed, which are characterized by unique electric field gradients. The incorporation of 111In on substitutional bulk sites of Ni is caused by moving grain boundaries below 1000 K and by volume diffusion above 1000 K. The nanocrystalline NiCu alloys prepared by PED are microscopically inhomogeneous as observed by PAC. In contrast, this inhomogeneity cannot be detected by X-ray diffraction. The influence of the temperature of the electrolyte, the current density during deposition, and the optional addition of saccharin to the electrolyte on the homogeneity of nanocrystalline NiCu alloys was investigated.

  18. Morphological and optical properties changes in nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) deposited on porous aluminum nanostructures by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition for Solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrib, M., E-mail: mondherghrib@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Gaidi, M.; Ghrib, T.; Khedher, N. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Ben Salam, M. [L3M, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences of Bizerte, 7021 Zarzouna (Tunisia); Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique (L.P.V.), Centre de Recherche et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2011-08-15

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy was used to determine the electrical band gap of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) deposited by plasma enhancement chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on porous alumina structure by fitting the experimental spectra using a model based on the quantum confinement of electrons in Si nanocrystallites having spherical and cylindrical forms. This model permits to correlate the PL spectra to the microstructure of the porous aluminum silicon layer (PASL) structure. The microstructure of aluminum surface layer and nc-Si films was systematically studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). It was found that the structure of the nanocrystalline silicon layer (NSL) is dependent of the porosity (void) of the porous alumina layer (PAL) substrate. This structure was performed in two steps, namely the PAL substrate was prepared using sulfuric acid solution attack on an Al foil and then the silicon was deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on it. The optical constants (n and k as a function of wavelength) of the deposited films were obtained using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in the UV-vis-NIR regions. The SE spectrum of the porous aluminum silicon layer (PASL) was modeled as a mixture of void, crystalline silicon and aluminum using the Cauchy model approximation. The specific surface area (SSA) was estimated and was found to decrease linearly when porosity increases. Based on this full characterization, it is demonstrated that the optical characteristics of the films are directly correlated to their micro-structural properties.

  19. Stabilization of mesoporous nanocrystalline zirconia with Laponite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xinmei; YAN Zifeng; LU Gaoqing

    2005-01-01

    The mesoporous nanocrystalline zircoina was synthesized via solid state reaction--structure directing method in the presence of Laponite. The introduction of Laponite renders the higher thermal stability and lamellar track to the zirconia. Laponite acts as inhibitor for crystal growth and also hard template for the mesostructure. The role of Laponite is attributed to the interaction between the zirconia precursors and the nano-platelets of Laponite via the bridge of hydrophilic segments of surfactant. It results in the formation of Zr-O-Mg-O-Si frameworks in the direction of Laponite layer with the condensation of frameworks during the calcination process, which contributes the higher stability and lamellar structure to the nano-sized zirconia samples.

  20. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Alfred C. W.; Lam, Edmond; Chong, Jonathan; Hrapovic, Sabahudin; Luong, John H. T., E-mail: john.luong@cnrc-nrc.gc.ca [National Research Council Canada (Canada)

    2013-05-15

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  1. Reinforced plastics and aerogels by nanocrystalline cellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alfred C. W.; Lam, Edmond; Chong, Jonathan; Hrapovic, Sabahudin; Luong, John H. T.

    2013-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rigid rod-like nanoscale material, can be produced from cellulosic biomass in powder, liquid, or gel forms by acid and chemical hydrolysis. Owing to its unique and exceptional physicochemical properties, the incorporation of a small amount of NCC into plastic enhances the mechanical strength of the latter by several orders of magnitudes. Carbohydrate-based NCC poses no serious environmental concerns, providing further impetus for the development and applications of this green and renewable biomaterial to fabricate lightweight and biodegradable composites and aerogels. Surface functionalization of NCC remains the main focus of NCC research to tailor its properties for dispersion in hydrophilic or hydrophobic media. It is of uttermost importance to develop tools and protocols for imaging of NCC in a complex matrix and quantify its reinforcement effect.

  2. Nanocrystalline Steels’ Resistance to Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skołek E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement in X37CrMoV5-1 steel with two different microstructures: a nanocrystalline carbide-free bainite and tempered martensite. The nanobainitic structure was obtained by austempering at the bainitic transformation zone. It was found, that after hydrogen charging, both kinds of microstructure exhibit increased yield strength and strong decrease in ductility. It has been however shown that the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement of X37CrMoV5-1 steel with nanobainitic structure is higher as compared to the tempered martensite. After hydrogen charging the ductility of austempered steel is slightly higher than in case of quenched and tempered (Q&T steel. This effect was interpreted as a result of phase composition formed after different heat treatments.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline zinc ferrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, J.S.; Yang, X.L.; Gao, L.

    1999-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powders with a partially inverted spinel structure were synthesized by high-energy ball milling in a closed container at ambient temperature from a mixture of alpha-Fe2O3 and ZnO crystalline powders in equimolar ratio. From low-temperature and in-field Mossbauer...... measurements it is revealed that ZnFe2O4 particles prepared are in superparamagnetic state at ambient temperature. A doublet with an average quadrupole splitting of 0.8 nm/s is observed for the as-milled sample at 295 K, which is much larger than that for bulk ZnFe2O4 prepared by traditional ceramic method...... and that for ultrafine ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by the co-precipitation method. This indicates larger structural defects in the nanometer-sized ZnFe2O4 particles prepared by high-energy ball milling....

  4. An ecotoxicological characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Tibor; Naish, Valerie; O'Connor, Brian; Blaise, Christian; Gagné, Francois; Hall, Lauren; Trudeau, Vance; Martel, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    The pulp and paper industry in Canada is developing technology for the production and use of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC). A key component of the developmental work is an assessment of potential environmental risks. Towards this goal, NCC samples as well as carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC), a surrogate of the parent cellulosic material, were subjected to an ecotoxicological evaluation. This involved toxicity tests with rainbow trout hepatocytes and nine aquatic species. The hepatocytes were most sensitive (EC20s between 10 and 200 mg/l) to NCC, although neither NCC nor CMC caused genotoxicity. In tests with the nine species, NCC affected the reproduction of the fathead minnow at (IC25) 0.29 g/l, but no other effects on endpoints such as survival and growth occurred in the other species at concentrations below 1 g/l, which was comparable to CMC. Based on this ecotoxicological characterization, NCC was found to have low toxicity potential and environmental risk.

  5. Functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films with phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, Christo [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Reintanz, Philipp M. [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Kulisch, Wilhelm [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Degenhardt, Anna Katharina [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Weidner, Tobias [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz (Germany); Baio, Joe E. [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Merz, Rolf; Kopnarski, Michael [Institut für Oberflächen- und Schichtanalytik (IFOS), Kaiserslautern (Germany); Siemeling, Ulrich [Institute of Chemistry, Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Reithmaier, Johann Peter [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany); Popov, Cyril, E-mail: popov@ina.uni-kassel.de [Institute of Nanostructure Technologies and Analytics (INA), Center for Interdisciplinary Nanostructure Science and Technology (CINSaT), University of Kassel (Germany)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Grafting of phthalocyanines on nanocrystalline diamond films with different terminations. • Pc with different central atoms and side chains synthesized and characterized. • Attachment of Pc on H- and O-terminated NCD studied by XPS and NEXAFS spectroscopy. • Orientation order of phthalocyanine molecules on NCD surface. - Abstract: Phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives containing different central metal atoms (Mn, Cu, Ti) and different peripheral chains were synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Their interaction with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, as-grown by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition or after their modification with oxygen plasma to exchange the hydrogen termination with oxygen-containing groups, was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The elemental composition as determined by XPS showed that the Pc were grafted on both as-grown and O-terminated NCD. Mn, Cu and Ti were detected together with N stemming from the Pc ring and S in case of the Ti-Pc from the peripheral ligands. The results for the elemental surface composition and the detailed study of the N 1s, S 2p and O 1s core spectra revealed that Ti-Pc grafted better on as-grown NCD but Cu-Pc and Mn-Pc on O-terminated films. Samples of Mn-Pc on as-grown and O-terminated NCD were further investigated by NEXAFS spectroscopy. The results showed ordering of the grafted molecules, laying flat on the H-terminated NCD surface while only the macrocycles were oriented parallel to the O-terminated surface with the peripheral chains perpendicular to it.

  6. Silicon Spintronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.

    2008-01-01

    Integration of magnetism and mainstream semiconductor electronics could impact information technology in ways beyond imagination. A pivotal step is implementation of spin-based electronic functionality in silicon devices. Remarkable progress made during the last two years gives confidence that this

  7. Lithographically patterned silicon nanostructures on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megouda, Nacera [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Piret, Gaeelle; Galopin, Elisabeth; Coffinier, Yannick [Institut de Recherche Interdisciplinaire (IRI, USR 3078), Universite Lille1, Parc de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley-BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq and Institut d' Electronique, de Microelectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN, CNRS-8520), Cite Scientifique, Avenue Poincare-B.P. 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Hadjersi, Toufik, E-mail: hadjersi@yahoo.com [Unite de Developpement de la Technologie du Silicium (UDTS), 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, B.P. 140 Alger-7 merveilles, Alger (Algeria); Elkechai, Omar [Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); and others

    2012-06-01

    The paper reports on controlled formation of silicon nanostructures patterns by the combination of optical lithography and metal-assisted chemical dissolution of crystalline silicon. First, a 20 nm-thick gold film was deposited onto hydrogen-terminated silicon substrate by thermal evaporation. Gold patterns (50 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 50 {mu}m spaced by 20 {mu}m) were transferred onto the silicon wafer by means of photolithography. The etching process of crystalline silicon in HF/AgNO{sub 3} aqueous solution was studied as a function of the silicon resistivity, etching time and temperature. Controlled formation of silicon nanowire arrays in the unprotected areas was demonstrated for highly resistive silicon substrate, while silicon etching was observed on both gold protected and unprotected areas for moderately doped silicon. The resulting layers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  8. Characteristics of exciton photoluminescence kinetics in low-dimensional silicon structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sachenko, A V; Manojlov, E G; Svechnikov, S V

    2001-01-01

    The time-resolved visible photoluminescence of porous nanocrystalline silicon films obtained by laser ablation have been measured within the temperature range 90-300 K. A study has been made of the interrelationship between photoluminescence characteristics (intensity, emission spectra, relaxation times, their temperature dependencies and structural and dielectric properties (size and shapes of Si nanocrystals, oxide phase of nanocrystal coating, porosity). A photoluminescence model is proposed that describes photon absorption and emission occurring in quantum-size Si nanocrystals while coupled subsystems of electron-hole pairs and excitons take part in the recombination. Possible excitonic Auger recombination mechanism in low-dimensional silicon structures is considered

  9. Low-temperature deposition of crystalline silicon nitride nanoparticles by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chan-Soo; Youn, Woong-Kyu; Lee, Dong-Kwon; Seol, Kwang-Soo; Hwang, Nong-Moon

    2009-07-01

    The nanocrystalline alpha silicon nitride (α-Si 3N 4) was deposited on a silicon substrate by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at the substrate temperature of 700 °C under 4 and 40 Torr at the wire temperatures of 1430 and 1730 °C, with a gas mixture of SiH 4 and NH 3. The size and density of crystalline nanoparticles on the substrate increased with increasing wire temperature. With increasing reactor pressure, the crystallinity of α-Si 3N 4 nanoparticles increased, but the deposition rate decreased.

  10. Review: Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of nanocrystalline diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Okada

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline diamond films have attracted considerable attention because they have a low coefficient of friction and a low electron emission threshold voltage. In this paper, the author reviews the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD of nanocrystalline diamond and mainly focuses on the growth of nanocrystalline diamond by low-pressure PE-CVD. Nanocrystalline diamond particles of 200–700 nm diameter have been prepared in a 13.56 MHz low-pressure inductively coupled CH4/CO/H2 plasma. The bonding state of carbon atoms was investigated by ultraviolet-excited Raman spectroscopy. Electron energy loss spectroscopy identified sp2-bonded carbons around the 20–50 nm subgrains of nanocrystalline diamond particles. Plasma diagnostics using a Langmuir probe and the comparison with plasma simulation are also reviewed. The electron energy distribution functions are discussed by considering different inelastic interaction channels between electrons and heavy particles in a molecular CH4/H2 plasma.

  11. Interaction between a bisphosphonate, tiludronate, and biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaud, Patricia; Gras, Pierre; Coppel, Yannick; Rey, Christian; Sarda, Stéphanie

    2013-02-19

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are well established as successful antiresorptive agents for the prevention and treatment of bone diseases such as osteoporosis and Paget's disease. The aim of this work was to clarify the reaction mechanisms between a BP molecule, tiludronate, and the nanocrystalline apatite surface. The adsorption of tiludronate on well-characterized synthetic biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites with homogeneous but different compositions and surface characteristics was investigated to determine the effect of the nanocrystalline apatite substrate on the adsorption behavior. The results show that the adsorption of tiludronate on nanocrystalline biomimetic apatite surfaces varies over a large range. The most immature apatitic samples exhibited the highest affinity and the greatest amount adsorbed at saturation. Maturation of the nanocrystals induces a decrease of these values. The amount of phosphate ion released per adsorbed BP molecule varied, depending on the nanocrystalline substrate considered. The adsorption mechanism, although associated with a release of phosphate ions, cannot be considered as a simple ion exchange process involving one or two phosphate ions on the surface. A two-step process is proposed consisting of a surface binding of BP groups to calcium ions associated with a proton release inducing the protonation of surface orthophosphate ions and their eventual solubilization.

  12. Synergistic strengthening effect of nanocrystalline copper reinforced with carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hu; Zhang, Zhao-Hui; Hu, Zheng-Yang; Wang, Fu-Chi; Li, Sheng-Lin; Korznikov, Elena; Zhao, Xiu-Chen; Liu, Ying; Liu, Zhen-Feng; Kang, Zhe

    2016-05-17

    In this study, a novel multi-walled carbon nanotubes reinforced nanocrystalline copper matrix composite with super high strength and moderate plasticity was synthesized. We successfully overcome the agglomeration problem of the carbon nanotubes and the grain growth problem of the nanocrystalline copper matrix by combined use of the electroless deposition and spark plasma sintering methods. The yield strength of the composite reach up to 692 MPa, which is increased by 2 and 5 times comparing with those of the nanocrystalline and coarse copper, respectively. Simultaneously, the plasticity of the composite was also significantly increased in contrast with that of the nanocrystalline copper. The increase of the density of the carbon nanotubes after coating, the isolation effect caused by the copper coating, and the improvement of the compatibility between the reinforcements and matrix as well as the effective control of the grain growth of the copper matrix all contribute to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. In addition, a new strengthening mechanism, i.e., the series-connection effect of the nanocrystalline copper grains introduced by carbon nanotubes, is proposed to further explain the mechanical behavior of the nanocomposite.

  13. A new method for preparing mono-dispersed nanoparticles using magnetized water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaei Pour, Ali; Gholizadeh, Mostafa; Housaindokht, Mohammadreza; Moosavi, Fatemeh; Monhemi, Hasan

    2017-04-01

    We studied the use of magnetized water on the size of the nanoparticles. Magnetized water found to reduce the diameter of the nanoparticles during a homogeneous precipitation process, which is a combination of nucleation and nuclei growth processes. We found that the modified water, which demonstrated different physical properties especially on the surface tension and viscosity, significantly influenced the both processes. Therefore, the nucleation process was initially prolonged in the homogeneous precipitation process due to the lower critical size of nucleus and higher rate of nucleation, and consequently formed smaller particles and a larger number of particles. Furthermore, the growth rate of nanoparticles was hindered owing to the higher viscosity of the water and restriction in the mass transport process. As a result, the precipitated particles with the magnetized water were eventually structured smaller particle diameter compared to the bulk. The presented method in here indicated a low cost, straightforward, and feasible technique for industrial application. In addition, this method could open a new promising perspective on nanomaterial synthesis in order to facilitate the production of monodispersed nanoparticles. Molecular dynamic confirmed that surface tension decreased as the external magnetic field was applied. Moreover, the density profile illustrated that the average number of hydrogen atoms is greater than oxygen atoms.

  14. Piezochromic phenomena of nanometer voids formed by mono-dispersed nanometer powders compacting process.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihong Su

    Full Text Available Piezochromism describes a tendency of certain materials changing colors when they are subjected to various pressure levels. It occurs particularly in some polymers or inorganic materials, such as in palladium complexes. However, piezochromism is generally believed to work at high pressure range of 0.1-10 GPa. This research work focused on unique piezochromism responses of the nanometer voids formed by the 5-20 nm inorganic ISOH nanometer powders. It was discovered that microstructures of the nanometer voids could change color at very low pressures of only 0.002-0.01 GPa; its sensitivity to pressure was increased by tens of times. It is believed that the uniform microstructures of nanometer powders contributed to the material's high sensitivity of piezochromic phenomena. One factor which quantum optical change caused by nanometer voids affected the quantum confinement effect; another is surface Plasmon Resonance of great difference dielectric property between conductive ITO powder and insulation hydroxide.

  15. Synthesis of mono-dispersed Fe-Co nanoparticles with precise composition control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yufeng; Zheng, Yi; Hu, Shuchun

    2017-01-01

    Monodispersed Fe-Co nanoparticles are synthesized by reducing FeCl2 and CoCl2 in diphenyl ether, with n-butyllithium as reducing agent and oleic acid as surfactant. The body centered cubic (BCC) crystal structure of Fe-Co nanoparticles is confirmed by both XRD patterns and TEM diffraction patterns. The average nanoparticle size is 10 nm at the reported experimental condition. The magnetization of the Fe-Co increases with increased cobalt atomic percentage. XPS technique is used to investigate the surface chemical states of Fe-Co nanoparticles. Finally, the composition of Fe-Co nanoparticles is investigated through EDX, confirming the molar ratio of Fe/Co in nanoparticles could be accurately controlled by changing the composition of the precursors.

  16. Synthesis of PPy-like Nanocrystallines by Oriented Plasma Polymerization at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG Xin-sheng; GUO Ying; XU Jin-zhou; ZHANG Jing

    2006-01-01

    Polymeric polypyrrole-like (PPy-like) nanocrystallines were fast synthesized through oriented plasma polymerization at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. The effects of discharge power on the nanocrystalline morphology were investigated. Larger power tends to produce longer nanocrystallines. 3 mm long nanowires were produced at the largest power in our experiment. TEM image and the sharp electronic diffraction spots in SAD suggest that the nanoparticles have a single crystal phase. The chemical structure of the nanocrystalline has been studied through FTIR, EDX etc. This novel polymerization method could have great applications in fabricating functional polymeric nanocrystallines.

  17. Functionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films with phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petkov, Christo; Reintanz, Philipp M.; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Degenhardt, Anna Katharina; Weidner, Tobias; Baio, Joe E.; Merz, Rolf; Kopnarski, Michael; Siemeling, Ulrich; Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Popov, Cyril

    2016-08-01

    Phthalocyanine (Pc) derivatives containing different central metal atoms (Mn, Cu, Ti) and different peripheral chains were synthesized and comprehensively characterized. Their interaction with nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, as-grown by hot-filament chemical vapor deposition or after their modification with oxygen plasma to exchange the hydrogen termination with oxygen-containing groups, was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The elemental composition as determined by XPS showed that the Pc were grafted on both as-grown and O-terminated NCD. Mn, Cu and Ti were detected together with N stemming from the Pc ring and S in case of the Ti-Pc from the peripheral ligands. The results for the elemental surface composition and the detailed study of the N 1s, S 2p and O 1s core spectra revealed that Ti-Pc grafted better on as-grown NCD but Cu-Pc and Mn-Pc on O-terminated films. Samples of Mn-Pc on as-grown and O-terminated NCD were further investigated by NEXAFS spectroscopy. The results showed ordering of the grafted molecules, laying flat on the H-terminated NCD surface while only the macrocycles were oriented parallel to the O-terminated surface with the peripheral chains perpendicular to it.

  18. Nanocrystalline films for gas-reactive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Jeffrey A.; Thompson, Loren J.

    2004-02-17

    A gas sensor for detection of oxidizing and reducing gases, including O.sub.2, CO.sub.2, CO, and H.sub.2, monitors the partial pressure of a gas to be detected by measuring the temperature rise of an oxide-thin-film-coated metallic line in response to an applied electrical current. For a fixed input power, the temperature rise of the metallic line is inversely proportional to the thermal conductivity of the oxide coating. The oxide coating contains multi-valent cation species that change their valence, and hence the oxygen stoichiometry of the coating, in response to changes in the partial pressure of the detected gas. Since the thermal conductivity of the coating is dependent on its oxygen stoichiometry, the temperature rise of the metallic line depends on the partial pressure of the detected gas. Nanocrystalline (<100 nm grain size) oxide coatings yield faster sensor response times than conventional larger-grained coatings due to faster oxygen diffusion along grain boundaries rather than through grain interiors.

  19. Rheology of nanocrystalline cellulose aqueous suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei-Sabet, Sadaf; Hamad, Wadood Y; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2012-12-11

    The rheological properties and microstructure of nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) aqueous suspensions have been investigated at different concentrations. The suspension is isotropic up to 3 wt %, and phase separates to liquid crystalline and isotropic domains at higher concentrations where the samples exhibit a fingerprint texture and the viscosity profile shows a three-region behavior, typical of liquid crystals. The suspension behaves as a rheological gel at even higher concentrations where the viscosity profile shows a single shear thinning behavior over the whole range of shear rates investigated. The effects of ultrasound energy and temperature on the rheological properties and structure of these suspensions were studied using polarized optical microscopy and rheometry. Our results indicate that the amount of applied ultrasound energy affects the microstructure of the suspensions and the pitch of the chiral nematic domains. The viscosity profile is changed significantly at low shear rates, whereas the viscosity of biphasic suspensions at intermediate and high shear rates decreased with increasing temperature. This suggests that, between 30 and 40 °C, structural rearrangement takes place. At higher concentrations of about 10 wt %, the temperature has no significant effect on viscosity; however, a marked increase in viscosity has been observed at around 50 °C. Finally, the Cox-Merz rule was found to fail after a critical concentration, thereby implying significant structural formation. This critical concentration is much higher for sonicated compared to unsonicated suspensions.

  20. Mesoporous junctions and nanocrystalline solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetzel, Michael

    2000-03-01

    Learning from the concepts used by green plants, we have developed a molecular photovoltaic system based on the sensitization of nanocrystalline TiO2 films. In analogy to photosyntesis, light is absorbed by a monolayer of dye attached to the surface of a wide-band-gap oxide. The mesoporous morphology of the layer provides a substrate characterized by a very large surface area. The roughness factor of a 10-micron thick film reaches easily 1000. Light penetrating the dye loaded TiO2 nanocrystals is therefore collected in an efficient manner, similar to the thylakoid vesicles in green leafs which are stacked in order to enhance solar light harvesting. The excited dye injects an electron in the conduction band of the oxide resulting in efficient and very rapid charge separation. Nearly quantitative conversion of photons in electric current have been achieved with these devices over the whole visible and near-IR range of the spectrum. The overall AM 1.5 solar-to electric power conversion efficiency has reached already 11unravel the dynamics of interfacial charge transfer reactions at these dye- sensitized heterojunctions.

  1. Mechanical electrodeposition of bright nanocrystalline nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new mechanical electrodeposition technology was proposed, and nanocrystalline nickel deposit with bright and smooth surface was prepared in the bath without any additive agents. Unlike traditional methods, the novel technology employed dynamical hard particles to continuously polish the cathode surface and disturb the nearby solution during electrodepositing. Experimental results showed that the polishing effect of hard particles can effectively prevent the hydrogen bubbles and impurities from adhering on the deposit surface and avoid the production of pits, pinholes and nodules. Furthermore, comparing with the deposit prepared by traditional methods, the one prepared by the novel technology was substantially refined with grain size ranging from 30 to 80 nm. Every diffraction peak’s intensity of the deposit was reduced, the preferential orientation degree of (200) decreased and those of (111) and (220) increased. The microhardness notably increased. The magnetic properties were also changed with decreased saturation magnetization and increased coercive force. It was also found that variation of current density and cathode rotational speed could affect the structure and properties of the nickel deposits prepared by this technology.

  2. Microhardness studies of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anandakumar, V.M. [Department of Physics, Mahatma Gandhi College, Thiruvananthapuram (India); Khadar, M.A. [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology and Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram (India)

    2008-02-15

    Nanocrystals of calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) of three different grain sizes were synthesized through chemical precipitation technique and the grain sizes and crystal structure were determined using the broadening of X-ray diffraction patterns and transmission electron microscopy. The microhardness of compacted pellets of nanocrystalline calcium tungstate (CaWO{sub 4}) with different grain sizes were measured using a Vickers microhardness tester for various applied loads ranging from 0.049 N to 1.96 N. The values of microhardness showed significant reverse indentation size effect at low indentation loads. The microhardness data obtained for samples of different grain sizes showed grain size dependent strengthening obeying normal Hall-Petch relation. The dependence of compacting pressure and annealing temperature on microhardness of the nanostructured sample with grain size of 13 nm were also studied. The samples showed significant increase in microhardness as the compacting pressure and annealing time were increased. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  3. Microstructure characterization and cation distribution of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Y.M., E-mail: ymabbas@live.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Mansour, S.A.; Ibrahim, M.H. [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt); Ali, Shehab E., E-mail: shehab_physics@yahoo.com [Suez Canal University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Ismailia (Egypt)

    2011-11-15

    Nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite has been synthesized using two different methods: ceramic and co-precipitation techniques. The nanocrystalline ferrite phase has been formed after 3 h of sintering at 1000 deg. C. The structural and microstructural evolutions of the nanophase have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and the Rietveld method. The refinement result showed that the type of the cationic distribution over the tetrahedral and octahedral sites in the nanocrystalline lattice is partially an inverse spinel. The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer. - Highlights: > The refinement result showed that the cationic distribution over the sites in the lattice is partially an inverse spinel. > The transmission electronic microscope analysis confirmed the X-ray results. > The magnetic properties of the samples were characterized using a vibrating sample magnetometer.

  4. In vivo evaluation of matrix pellets containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2002-06-20

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in-vivo behaviour of matrix pellets formulated with nanocrystalline ketoprofen after oral administration to dogs. No significant differences in AUC-values were seen between pellet formulations containing nanocrystalline or microcrystalline ketoprofen and a commercial ketoprofen formulation (reference: Rofenid 200 Long Acting). C(max) of the formulations containing nano- or microcrystalline ketoprofen was significantly higher compared to reference, whereas t(max) was significantly lower. The in-vivo burst release observed for the spray dried nanocrystalline ketoprofen matrix pellets was reduced following compression of the pellets in combination with placebo wax/starch pellets. These matrix tablets sustained the ketoprofen plasma concentrations during 5.6 and 5.4 h for formulations containing nano- and microcrystalline ketoprofen, respectively.

  5. High-pressure structural behavior of nanocrystalline Ge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, H.; Liu, J. F.; Yan, H.;

    2007-01-01

    The equation of state and the pressure of the I-II transition have been studied for nanocrystalline Ge using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The bulk modulus and the transition pressure increase with decreasing particle size for both Ge-I and Ge-II, but the percentage volume collapse at the transi......The equation of state and the pressure of the I-II transition have been studied for nanocrystalline Ge using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The bulk modulus and the transition pressure increase with decreasing particle size for both Ge-I and Ge-II, but the percentage volume collapse...... at the transition remains constant. Simplified models for the high-pressure structural behaviour are presented, based on the assumption that a large fraction of the atoms reside in grain boundary regions of the nanocrystalline material. The interface structure plays a significant role in affecting the transition...

  6. Ferromagnetism appears in nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remes, Zdenek [Institute of Physics ASCR v.v.i., Cukrovarnicka 10, 162 00 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Sun, Shih-Jye, E-mail: sjs@nuk.edu.tw [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Varga, Marian [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Chou, Hsiung [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Hsu, Hua-Shu [Department of Applied Physics, National Pingtung University of Education, Pingtung 900, Taiwan (China); Kromka, Alexander [Department of Applied Physics, National University of Kaohsiung, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China); Horak, Pavel [Nuclear Physics Institute, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2015-11-15

    The nanocrystalline diamond films turn to be ferromagnetic after implanting various nitrogen doses on them. Through this research, we confirm that the room-temperature ferromagnetism of the implanted samples is derived from the measurements of magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Samples with larger crystalline grains as well as higher implanted doses present more robust ferromagnetic signals at room temperature. Raman spectra indicate that the small grain-sized samples are much more disordered than the large grain-sized ones. We propose that a slightly large saturated ferromagnetism could be observed at low temperature, because the increased localization effects have a significant impact on more disordered structure. - Highlights: • Nitrogen implanted nanocrystalline diamond films exhibit ferromagnetism at room temperature. • Nitrogen implants made a Raman deviation from the typical nanocrystalline diamond films. • The ferromagnetism induced from the structure distortion is dominant at low temperature.

  7. Solvothermal synthesis of nanocrystalline FeS2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yanhua; ZHENG Yufeng; ZHANG Xiaogang; SUN Yanfei; DONG Youzhong

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of the nanocrystalline FeS2 via a solvent-thermal process. Using FeSO4 and NH2CSNH2 as precursors and polyvinyl- pyrrolidone (PVP) as a protective agent (dispersant), we have successfully synthesized nanocrystalline FeS2 both under acidic conditions (Ph = 5) and under alkali conditions (Ph = 10) at various temperatures and for different time in alcohol-water solution. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Ultraviolet Visible (UV-VIS) spectroscopy were used to characterize the morphology, structure, particle size and optical characterization of sample synthesized under acidic condition, and the XRD pattern was refined by Rietveld method. The experimental result shows that nanocrystalline FeS2 with uniform size, highly crystallized quality and excellent dispersivity has been synthesized at 200℃for 36 h.

  8. Mesoporous silica and organosilica films templated by nanocrystalline chitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Dinh; Shopsowitz, Kevin E; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2013-11-04

    Liquid crystalline phases can be used to impart order into inorganic solids, creating materials that mimic natural architectures. Herein, mesoporous silica and organosilica films with layered structures and high surface areas have been templated by nanocrystalline chitin. Aqueous suspensions of spindle-shaped chitin nanocrystals were prepared by sequential deacetylation and hydrolysis of chitin fibrils isolated from king crab shells. The nanocrystalline chitin self-assembles into a nematic liquid-crystalline phase that has been used to template silica and organosilica composites. Removal of the chitin template by either calcination or sulfuric-acid-catalyzed hydrolysis gave mesoporous silica and ethylene-bridged organosilica films. The large, crack-free mesoporous films have layered structures with features that originate from the nematic organization of the nanocrystalline chitin.

  9. Sustainable commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing process with acid recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Ayadi, Mariem; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Berry, Richard

    2017-01-20

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) is a biomaterial having potential applications in a wide range of industries. It is industrially produced by concentrated acid hydrolysis of cellulosic materials. In this process, the sulfuric acid rich liquor can be concentrated and reused. However, removal of sugar monomers and oligomers is necessary for such recycling. Membrane and ion exchange technology can be employed to remove sugars; however, such technologies are not efficient in meeting the quality required to recycle the acid solution. As a part of the present study, activated carbon (AC) has been evaluated as an adsorbent for sugar removal from the acidic solution generated during commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing process. Almost complete removal of sugar can be achieved by this approach. The maximum sugar removal observed during this study was 3.4g/g of AC. Based on this finding, a sustainable method has been proposed for commercial nanocrystalline cellulose manufacturing.

  10. Modeling the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline alloy with hierarchical microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hongxi; Zhou, Jianqiu, E-mail: zhouj@njtech.edu.cn [Nanjing Tech University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (China); Zhao, Yonghao, E-mail: yhzhao@njust.edu.cn [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanostructural Materials Research Center, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-02-15

    A mechanism-based plasticity model based on dislocation theory is developed to describe the mechanical behavior of the hierarchical nanocrystalline alloys. The stress–strain relationship is derived by invoking the impeding effect of the intra-granular solute clusters and the inter-granular nanostructures on the dislocation movements along the sliding path. We found that the interaction between dislocations and the hierarchical microstructures contributes to the strain hardening property and greatly influence the ductility of nanocrystalline metals. The analysis indicates that the proposed model can successfully describe the enhanced strength of the nanocrystalline hierarchical alloy. Moreover, the strain hardening rate is sensitive to the volume fraction of the hierarchical microstructures. The present model provides a new perspective to design the microstructures for optimizing the mechanical properties in nanostructural metals.

  11. Kinetic constants of abnormal grain growth in nanocrystalline nickel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleshin, A. N.

    2016-02-01

    The grain growth in nanocrystalline nickel with a purity of 99.5 at % during non-isothermal annealing was experimentally investigated using differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy. Nanocrystalline nickel was prepared by electrodeposition and had an average grain size of approximately 20 nm. It was shown that, at a temperature corresponding to the calorimetric signal peak, abnormal grain growth occurs with the formation of a bimodal grain microstructure. Calorimeters signals were processed within the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formalism. This made it possible to determine the exponent of the corresponding equation, the frequency factor, and the activation energy of the grain growth, which was found to be equal to the activation energy of the vacancy migration. The reasons for the abnormal grain growth in nanocrystalline nickel were discussed.

  12. Nanocrystalline and ultrafine grain copper obtained by mechanical attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Rodríguez Baracaldo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a method for the sample preparation and characterisation of bulk copper having grain size lower than 1 μm (ultra-fine grain and lower than 100 nm grain size (nanocrystalline. Copper is initially manufactured by a milling/alloying me- chanical method thereby obtaining a powder having a nanocrystalline structure which is then consolidated through a process of warm compaction at high pressure. Microstructural characterisation of bulk copper samples showed the evolution of grain size during all stages involved in obtaining it. The results led to determining the necessary conditions for achieving a wide range of grain sizes. Mechanical characterisation indicated an increase in microhardness to values of around 3.40 GPa for unconsolida- ted nanocrystalline powder. Compressivee strength was increased by reducing the grain size, thereby obtaining an elastic limit of 650 MPa for consolidated copper having a ~ 62 nm grain size.

  13. Electronic structure of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smardz, L. [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17 Street, 60-179 Poznan (Poland); Jurczyk, M.; Smardz, K.; Nowak, M.; Makowiecka, M.; Okonska, I. [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Poznan University of Technology, M. Sklodowska-Curie 5 Sq., 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2008-02-15

    To optimise the choice of the compounds for a selected application, a better understanding of the role of each alloy constituent on the electronic properties of the material is crucial. In this work, we study experimentally the electronic properties of nanocrystalline and polycrystalline (Mg{sub 1-x}M{sub x}){sub 2}Ni, (Mg{sub 1-x}M{sub x}){sub 2}Cu, La(Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}){sub 5}, and Ti(Ni{sub 1-x}M'{sub x}) (M = Mn, Al; M' = Fe, Mg, Zr) alloys. The nanocrystalline and polycrystalline samples were prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) followed by annealing and arc melting method, respectively. All X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra were measured immediately after cleaning of the sample surface in a vacuum of 8 x 10{sup -11} mbar. Furthermore, we have measured XPS spectra of in situ prepared nanocrystalline and polycrystalline LaNi{sub 5}, TiNi, and Mg{sub 2}Ni thin films and compared with those obtained for ex situ prepared bulk materials. The substitution of Mg in Mg{sub 2}Ni and Mg{sub 2}Cu, Ni in LaNi{sub 5} and TiNi by transition metals leads to significant modifications of the shape and width of the valence band of the nanocrystalline as well as polycrystalline samples. Especially, the valence bands of the MA nanocrystalline alloys are considerably broader compared to those measured for the polycrystalline samples. Results also showed that the strong modifications of the electronic structure of the nanocrystalline alloys could significantly influence on their hydrogenation properties. (author)

  14. Formation of nanocrystalline GeSn thin film on Si substrate by sputtering and rapid thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmodi, H.; Hashim, M. R.; Hashim, U.

    2016-10-01

    Nanocrystalline Ge1-xSnx thin films have been formed after rapid thermal annealing of sputtered GeSn layers. The alloy films were deposited onto the Silicon (100) substrate via low cost radio frequency magnetron sputtering. Then, the films were annealed by rapid thermal annealing at 350 °C, 400 °C, and 450 °C for 10 s. The morphological, structural, and optical properties of the layers were investigated with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD). The Raman analysis showed that the only observed phonon mode is attributed to Ge-Ge vibrations. Raman phonon intensities of GeSn thin films were enhanced with increasing the annealing temperature. The results clearly revealed that by increasing the annealing temperature the crystalline quality of the films were improved. The XRD measurements revealed the nanocrystalline phase formation in the annealed films with (111) preferred orientation. The results showed the potentiality of using the sputtering technique and rapid thermal anneal to produce crystalline GeSn layer.

  15. Nanocrystalline and Nanocomposite Magnetic Materials and Their Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert D Shull

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline materials can possess bulk properties quite different from those commonly associated with conventional large-grained materials. Nanocomposites, a subset of nanocrystalline materials, in addition have been found to possess magnetic properties which are similar to, but different from, the properties of the individual constituents. New magnetic phenomena, unusual property combinations, and both enhanced and diminished magnetic property values are just some of the changes observed in magnetic nanocomposites from conventional magnetic materials. Here, a description will be presented of some of the exciting new properties discovered in nanomaterials and the magnetic applications envisioned for them.

  16. Thermodynamic properties and phase stability of nanocrystalline metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xiaoyan; LI Lingmei; ZHANG Jiuxing

    2006-01-01

    The fundamental thermodynamic functions of enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy, as functions of the excess free volume at interfaces, temperature, and grain size, have been derived for single-phase metal nanocrystals. The model was applied to predict the thermal features of nano-grain boundaries and the characteristics of phase transformation in nanocrystalline metals, such as the transformation temperature and the critical grain size for phase transformation at a given temperature. The model predictions have been verified by experimental studies on the β-Co (→) α-Co phase transformation in nanocrystalline Co prepared by ball milling.

  17. Preparation of nanocrystalline BaTiO3 ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG XiangYun; LI DeJun; LI JianBao; WANG XiaoHui; LI LongTu

    2009-01-01

    The high-dense nanocrystalline BaTiO3 (BT) ceramics with grain size smaller than 100 nm have been successfully prepared by the two step sintering and the spark plasma sintering (SPS) process. The successive transitions in nanograin BT ceramics from rhombohedrel to orthorhombic, tetragonal and cubic transitions, similar to those in coarse BT ceramics, were revealed by in-situ temperature dependent Raman spectrum. The multiphase coexistence and the diffused phase transition character were demonstrated in the 8 nm nanocrystalline BT ceramics.

  18. Microstructure and Performances of Nanocrystalline Zinc-nickel Alloy Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIGuang-yu; LIANJian-she; NIULi-yuan; JIANGZhong-hao

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zinc-nickel alloy coatings were deposited from an alkaline zincate bath contained an organic additive that can reduce polarization and a complexing agent. SEM and TEM observations and XRD analysis were performed to examine the microstructure and phase composition of the coatings. The nickel content in deposits is 12.0-14.7% and the coating is consisted of single nanectystalline γ-phase structure (Ni5Zn21), with grain average grain size about 15nm. The nanocrystalline zinc-nickel alloy coatings have better corrosion resistance, less brittleness and higher microhardness than the conventional zinc coatings.

  19. Surface plasmon resonance in nanocrystalline gold-copper alloy films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, S; Datta, Subhadeep; Roy, R K; Pal, A K

    2007-12-01

    Nanocrystalline Au(x)Cu(1-x) films were synthesized by depositing Cu/Au/Cu multilayer in nanocrystalline thin film form with requisite thickness of individual layers onto fused silica substrates by high pressure sputtering technique. The absorbance spectra showed only one surface plasmon peak for all the compositions with the exception that the peak position did not indicate gradual shift as gold concentration was increased. Peak position for the two compositions corresponding to the two superlattice structures, AuCu3 and AuCu, deviated significantly from linear variation. The experimental results have been discussed in light of the existing Mie theory and the Core-shell model.

  20. Preparation of nanocrystalline BaTiO3 ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The high-dense nanocrystalline BaTiO3(BT)ceramics with grain size smaller than 100nm have been successfully prepared by the two step sintering and the spark plasma sintering(SPS)process.The successive transitions in nanograin BT ceramics from rhombohedral to orthorhombic,tetragonal and cubic transitions,similar to those in coarse BT ceramics,were revealed by in-situ temperature dependent Raman spectrum.The multiphase coexistence and the diffused phase transition character were demonstrated in the 8nm nanocrystalline BT ceramics.

  1. A maximum in the strength of nanocrystalline copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2003-01-01

    We used molecular dynamics simulations with system sizes up to 100 million atoms to simulate plastic deformation of nanocrystalline copper. By varying the grain size between 5 and 50 nanometers, we show that the flow stress and thus the strength exhibit a maximum at a grain size of 10 to 15...... nanometers. This maximum is because of a shift in the microscopic deformation mechanism from dislocation-mediated plasticity in the coarse-grained material to grain boundary sliding in the nanocrystalline region. The simulations allow us to observe the mechanisms behind the grain-size dependence...

  2. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Microstructure of Nanocrystalline Copper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Yu-Hua; ZHOU Fu-Xin; LIU Yue-Wu

    2001-01-01

    The microstructure of computer generated nanocrystalline coppers is simulated by using molecular dynamics with the Finnis-Sinclair potential, analysed by means of radial distribution functions, coordination number, atomic energy and local crystalline order. The influence of the grain size on the nanocrystalline structure is studied.The results reveal that as the grain size is reduced, the grain boundary shows no significant structural difference,but the grain interior becomes more disordered, and their structural difference diminishes gradually; however,the density and the atomic average energy of the grain boundary present different tendencies from those of the grain interior.

  3. Distribution of Local Open-Circuit Voltage on Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Mixed-Phase Si:H and SiGe:H Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, C.-S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Kazmerski, L. L.; Yan, B.; Owens, J. M.; Yang, J.; Guha, S.

    2006-01-01

    Local open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) distributions on amorphous and nanocrystalline mixed-phase silicon solar cells were measured using a scanning Kelvin probe microscope (SKPM) on the p layer of an n-i-p structure without the top ITO contact. During the measurement, the sample was illuminated with a laser beam that was used for the atomic force microscopy (AFM). Therefore, the surface potential measured by SKPM is the sum of the local V{sub oc} and the difference in workfunction between the p layer and the AFM tip. Comparing the SKPM and AFM images, we find that nanocrystallites aggregate in the amorphous matrix with an aggregation size of {approx}0.5 {micro}m in diameter, where many nanometer-size grains are clustered. The V{sub oc} distribution shows valleys in the nanocrystalline aggregation area. The transition from low to high V{sub oc} regions is a gradual change within a distance of about 1 {micro}m. The minimum V{sub oc} value in the nanocrystalline clusters in the mixed-phase region is larger than the V{sub oc} of a nc-Si:H single-phase solar cell. These results could be due to lateral photo-charge redistribution between the two phases. We have also carried out local V{sub oc} measurements on mixed-phase SiGe:H alloy solar cells. The magnitudes of V{sub oc} in the amorphous and nanocrystalline regions are consistent with the J-V measurements.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy characterization of magnetron sputtered silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godinho, V., E-mail: godinho@icmse.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Avenue F.D. Roosevelt 50, B 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Denisov, V.N.; Mavrin, B.N.; Novikova, N.N.; Vinogradov, E.A.; Yakovlev, V.A. [Institute for Spectroscopy - Russian Academy of Sciences, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow reg. (Russian Federation); Fernandez-Ramos, C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain); Institute for Prospective and Technological Studies-JRC European Commission, C/Inca Garcilaso s/n, 41092 Seville (Spain); Jimenez de Haro, M.C.; Fernandez, A. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla-CSIC/US, Avda. Americo Vespucio no 49, 41092 Seville (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    Vibrational (infrared and Raman) spectroscopy has been used to characterize SiO{sub x}N{sub y} and SiO{sub x} films prepared by magnetron sputtering on steel and silicon substrates. Interference bands in the infrared reflectivity measurements provided the film thickness and the dielectric function of the films. Vibrational modes bands were obtained both from infrared and Raman spectra providing useful information on the bonding structure and the microstructure (formation of nano-voids in some coatings) for these amorphous (or nanocrystalline) coatings. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis have also been carried out to determine the composition and texture of the films, and to correlate these data with the vibrational spectroscopy studies. The angular dependence of the reflectivity spectra provides the dispersion of vibrational and interference polaritons modes, what allows to separate these two types of bands especially in the frequency regions where overlaps/resonances occurred. Finally the attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared measurements have been also carried out demonstrating the feasibility and high sensitivity of the technique. Comparison of the spectra of the SiO{sub x}N{sub y} films prepared in various conditions demonstrates how films can be prepared from pure silicon oxide to silicon oxynitride with reduced oxygen content.

  5. Rapid thermal annealing and crystallization mechanisms study of silicon nanocrystal in silicon carbide matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Zhenyu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, a positive effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA technique has been researched and compared with conventional furnace annealing for Si nanocrystalline in silicon carbide (SiC matrix system. Amorphous Si-rich SiC layer has been deposited by co-sputtering in different Si concentrations (50 to approximately 80 v%. Si nanocrystals (Si-NC containing different grain sizes have been fabricated within the SiC matrix under two different annealing conditions: furnace annealing and RTA both at 1,100°C. HRTEM image clearly reveals both Si and SiC-NC formed in the films. Much better "degree of crystallization" of Si-NC can be achieved in RTA than furnace annealing from the research of GIXRD and Raman analysis, especially in high-Si-concentration situation. Differences from the two annealing procedures and the crystallization mechanism have been discussed based on the experimental results.

  6. Nanocrystalline Pentaerythritoltetranitrate using Sol-Gel Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Vishwasrao Ingale

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The secondary explosives developed with reduced particle size tend to be more insensitive for mechanical stimuli and may release energy with faster rate and gaining more importance nowadays. Therefore, aiming to reduce the particle size of one of the popular explosives, viz., pentaerythritoltetranitrate (PETN to the nanometer range, a method for preparation of nanocrystalline PETN in the silica (SiO2 gel matrix using sol-gel process has been demonstrated. The PETN-SiO2 xerogels were prepared containing PETN content ranging from 50 per cent to 90 per cent (w/w and the xerogels were characterised using different techniques. An exothermic peak at around 185 oC preceded by an endotherm in thermal analysis accompanied with weight loss in the temperature range from 150 oC to 200 oC   for the xerogel confirmed the presence of PETN in xerogel. Infrared spectra of xerogels showed peaks at around 1285 cm-1 and 1700 cm-1 assigned to O-NO2 and C-O bond representing PETN. Small angle x-ray scattering measurements on xerogels indicated that PETN entered in the pores of silica matrix. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that cystalline PETN    with particle size of around 15 nm dispersed in silica xerogel. The specific surface area for the PETN-SiO2 (90:10 xerogels was found to be 75 m2/g.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(6, pp.534-539, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.594

  7. Copper removal using electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhi, Amir; Safari, Salman; Yang, Han; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2015-06-03

    Removal of heavy metal ions such as copper using an efficient and low-cost method with low ecological footprint is a critical process in wastewater treatment, which can be achieved in a liquid phase using nanoadsorbents such as inorganic nanoparticles. Recently, attention has turned toward developing sustainable and environmentally friendly nanoadsorbents to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media. Electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC), which can be prepared from wood fibers through periodate/chlorite oxidation, has been shown to have a high charge content and colloidal stability. Here, we show that ENCC scavenges copper ions by different mechanisms depending on the ion concentration. When the Cu(II) concentration is low (C0≲200 ppm), agglomerates of starlike ENCC particles appear, which are broken into individual starlike entities by shear and Brownian motion, as evidenced by photometric dispersion analysis, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. On the other hand, at higher copper concentrations, the aggregate morphology changes from starlike to raftlike, which is probably due to the collapse of protruding dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) chains and ENCC charge neutralization by copper adsorption. Such raftlike structures result from head-to-head and lateral aggregation of neutralized ENCCs as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. As opposed to starlike aggregates, the raftlike structures grow gradually and are prone to sedimentation at copper concentrations C0≳500 ppm, which eliminates a costly separation step in wastewater treatment processes. Moreover, a copper removal capacity of ∼185 mg g(-1) was achieved thanks to the highly charged DCC polyanions protruding from ENCC. These properties along with the biorenewability make ENCC a promising candidate for wastewater treatment, in which fast, facile, and low-cost removal of heavy metal ions is desired most.

  8. Determination of elastic and thermal properties of a thin nanocrystalline diamond coating using all-optical methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sermeus, J.; Verstraeten, B.; Salenbien, R. [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Pobedinskas, P.; Haenen, K. [Instituut voor Materiaalonderzoek (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, 3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Glorieux, C., E-mail: christ.glorieux@fys.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Soft Matter and Biophysics, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2015-09-01

    Results are presented on the thermal and elastic properties of a thin, 1.5 μm, nanocrystalline diamond coating (NCD), deposited on a silicon substrate by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. A combination of two all-optical measurement techniques, impulsive stimulated thermal scattering and grating induced laser beam deflection, was employed to launch and detect surface acoustic waves (SAWs). The relation between the dispersive propagation velocity of SAWs to the coating-substrate geometry is exploited to determine the elastic properties of the NCD coating. The elastic properties are found to be consistent with literature values. The thermal properties of the coating were determined by monitoring the thermal diffusion induced washing away of the laser induced transient surface temperature grating. The transient thermal grating signals were fitted by the low-frequency limit of a thermoelastic model for a multilayer configuration. Similar to the dispersion of the surface acoustic wave velocity, the characteristic time of the thermal diffusion driven grating decay evolves from a coating-dominated value at short grating spacings towards a substrate-dominated value at grating spacings well exceeding the coating thickness. The grating spacing dependence of the corresponding effective thermal diffusivity was experimentally determined and fitted, leading to a value for the thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating α{sub NCD} = 8.4{sub −0.1}{sup +2.7} mm{sup 2}·s{sup −1}, which is an order of magnitude lower than that of the silicon substrate. The low value of the thermal diffusivity is interpreted with a simple touching model. - Highlights: • We investigate a thin nano-crystalline diamond coating. • We used two all optical surface acoustic wave based methods. • We found a young's modulus and density that is in line with literature. • The thermal diffusivity of the NCD coating was 2 orders of magnitude lower than the one of bulk diamond.

  9. Increased upper critical field for nanocrystalline MoN thin films deposited on AlN buffered substrates at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, R.; Thanikai Arasu, A. V.; Amaladass, E. P.; Vaidhyanathan, L. S.; Baisnab, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    Molybdenum nitride (MoN) thin films have been deposited using reactive DC magnetron sputtering on aluminum nitride buffered oxidized silicon substrates at ambient temperature. GIXRD of aluminum nitride (AlN) deposited under similar conditions has revealed the formation of wurtzite phase AlN. GIXRD characterization of molybdenum thin films deposited on AlN buffered oxidized silicon substrates has indicated the formation of nanocrystalline MoN thin films. The electrical resistivity measurements indicate MoN thin films have a superconducting transition temperature of ~8 K. The minimum transition width of the MoN thin film is 0.05 K at 0 T. The inferred upper critical field B c2(0) for these nanocrystalline MoN thin films obtained by fitting the temperature dependence of critical field with Werthamer, Helfand and Hohenberg theory lies in the range of 17-18 T which is the highest reported in literature for MoN thin films.

  10. Temperature-dependent void formation and growth at ion-irradiated nanocrystalline CeO{sub 2}–Si interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G., E-mail: perezbergqag@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Varga, Tamas [EMSL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Moll, Sandra [TN International/AREVA, 1, rue des Hérons, 78182 Montigny Le Bretonneux (France); Namavar, Fereydoon [University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Weber, William J. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Ceria is a thermally stable ceramic that has numerous applications in the nuclear industry, including use in nuclear fuels and waste forms. Recently, interest has surged in nanostructured ceria due to its increased mechanical properties and electronic conductivity in comparison with bulk ceria and its ability to self-heal in response to energetic ion bombardment. Here, nanocrystalline ceria thin films grown over a silicon substrate are irradiated to fluences of up to ∼4 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} under different irradiation conditions: with differing ion species (Si{sup +} and Ni{sup +}), different ion energies (1.0–1.5 MeV), and at varying temperatures (160–600 K). While the nanocrystalline ceria is found to exhibit exceptional radiation resistance under all tested conditions, severe ion irradiation-induced mixing, void formation, and void growth are observed at the ceria/silicon interface, with the degree of damage proving to be temperature dependent.

  11. Temperature-dependent void formation and growth at ion-irradiated nanocrystalline CeO2–Si interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Bergquist, Alejandro G.; Zhang, Yanwen; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2014-04-01

    Ceria is a thermally stable ceramic that has numerous applications in the nuclear industry, including use in nuclear fuels and waste forms. Recently, interest has surged in nanostructured ceria due to its increased mechanical properties and electronic conductivity in comparison with bulk ceria and its ability to self-heal in response to energetic ion bombardment. Here, nanocrystalline ceria thin films grown over a silicon substrate are irradiated to fluences of up to ~4 × 1016 ions/cm2 under different irradiation conditions: with differing ion species (Si+ and Ni+), different ion energies (1.0–1.5 MeV), and at varying temperatures (160–600 K). Finally, while the nanocrystalline ceria is found to exhibit exceptional radiation resistance under all tested conditions, severe ion irradiation-induced mixing, void formation, and void growth are observed at the ceria/silicon interface, with the degree of damage proving to be temperature dependent.

  12. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeaki Kobayashi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure.

  13. Electrodeposited nanocrystalline bronze alloys as replacement for Ni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovestad, A.; Tacken, R.A.; Mannetje, H.H.'t

    2008-01-01

    Nanocrystalline white-bronze, CuSn, electroplating was investigated as alternative to Ni plating as undercoat for noble metals in jewellery applications. A strongly acidic plating bath was developed with an organic additive to suppress hydrogen evolution and obtain bright coatings. Polarization curv

  14. Development of a Nanocrystalline Paclitaxel Formulation for Hipec Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Smet, Lieselotte; Colin, Pieter; Ceelen, Wim; Bracke, Marc; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; Remon, Jean Paul; Vervaet, Chris

    2012-01-01

    To develop a nanocrystalline paclitaxel formulation with a high paclitaxel-to-stabilizer ratio which can be used for hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC). Paclitaxel (PTX) nanocrystals were prepared via wet milling using Pluronic F127(A (R)) as stabilizer. The suitability of paclitaxel

  15. Quantum Dynamics of One-Dimensional Nanocrystalline Solids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁建文; 颜晓红; 曹觉先; 王登龙

    2002-01-01

    A novel ballistic-nonballistic dynamic transition in one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids is found upon varyingthe strength of the composition modulation and the grain-boundary effect. This can contribute to the under-standing of the strange electronic transport properties of nanostructured systems.

  16. A new approach to grain boundary engineering for nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeaki; Tsurekawa, Sadahiro; Watanabe, Tadao

    2016-01-01

    A new approach to grain boundary engineering (GBE) for high performance nanocrystalline materials, especially those produced by electrodeposition and sputtering, is discussed on the basis of some important findings from recently available results on GBE for nanocrystalline materials. In order to optimize their utility, the beneficial effects of grain boundary microstructures have been seriously considered according to the almost established approach to GBE. This approach has been increasingly recognized for the development of high performance nanocrystalline materials with an extremely high density of grain boundaries and triple junctions. The effectiveness of precisely controlled grain boundary microstructures (quantitatively characterized by the grain boundary character distribution (GBCD) and grain boundary connectivity associated with triple junctions) has been revealed for recent achievements in the enhancement of grain boundary strengthening, hardness, and the control of segregation-induced intergranular brittleness and intergranular fatigue fracture in electrodeposited nickel and nickel alloys with initial submicrometer-grained structure. A new approach to GBE based on fractal analysis of grain boundary connectivity is proposed to produce high performance nanocrystalline or submicrometer-grained materials with desirable mechanical properties such as enhanced fracture resistance. Finally, the potential power of GBE is demonstrated for high performance functional materials like gold thin films through precise control of electrical resistance based on the fractal analysis of the grain boundary microstructure.

  17. Nanocrystalline cellulose extracted from pine wood and corncob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditzel, Fernanda I; Prestes, Eduardo; Carvalho, Benjamim M; Demiate, Ivo M; Pinheiro, Luís A

    2017-02-10

    The extraction of nanocrystalline cellulose from agro-residues is an interesting alternative to recover these materials. In the present study, nanocrystalline cellulose was extracted from pine wood and corncob. In addition, microcrystalline cellulose was used as a reference to compare results. Initially, the lignocellulosic residues were submitted to delignification pre-treatments. At the end of the process, the bleached fibre was submitted to acid hydrolysis. Additionally, microparticles were obtained from the spray-drying of the nanocrystalline cellulose suspensions. The nanocrystalline cellulose yield for the pine wood was 9.0-% of the value attained for the microcrystalline cellulose. For the corncob, the value was 23.5-%. Therefore, complementary studies are necessary to improve the yield. The spray-dried microparticles showed a crystallinity index of 67.8-% for the pine wood, 70.9-% for the corncob and 79.3-% for the microcrystalline cellulose. These microparticles have great potential for use in the production of polymer composites processed by extrusion.

  18. New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Deepak; Palomino, Javier; Gil, Jennifer; Resto, Oscar; Weiner, Brad R.; Morell, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

  19. Luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.; Wuister, S.F.; Kelly, J.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn^(2+) prepared via an inorganic chemical synthesis are described. Photoluminescence spectra show distinct ZnSe and Mn^(2+) related emissions, both of which are excited via the ZnSe host lattice. The Mn^(2+) emission wavelength and the

  20. Electrodeposited nanocrystalline bronze alloys as replacement for Ni

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovestad, A.; Tacken, R.A.; Mannetje, H.H.'t

    2008-01-01

    Nanocrystalline white-bronze, CuSn, electroplating was investigated as alternative to Ni plating as undercoat for noble metals in jewellery applications. A strongly acidic plating bath was developed with an organic additive to suppress hydrogen evolution and obtain bright coatings. Polarization

  1. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  2. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel Bendali

    Full Text Available Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  3. Distinctive glial and neuronal interfacing on nanocrystalline diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth.

  4. Light emission, light detection and strain sensing with nanocrystalline graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Adnan; Pyatkov, Feliks; Alam, Asiful; Dehm, Simone; Felten, Alexandre; Chakravadhanula, Venkata S K; Flavel, Benjamin S; Kübel, Christian; Lemmer, Uli; Krupke, Ralph

    2015-08-14

    Graphene is of increasing interest for optoelectronic applications exploiting light detection, light emission and light modulation. Intrinsically, the light-matter interaction in graphene is of a broadband type. However, by integrating graphene into optical micro-cavities narrow-band light emitters and detectors have also been demonstrated. These devices benefit from the transparency, conductivity and processability of the atomically thin material. To this end, we explore in this work the feasibility of replacing graphene with nanocrystalline graphene, a material which can be grown on dielectric surfaces without catalyst by graphitization of polymeric films. We have studied the formation of nanocrystalline graphene on various substrates and under different graphitization conditions. The samples were characterized by resistance, optical transmission, Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy measurements. The conducting and transparent wafer-scale material with nanometer grain size was also patterned and integrated into devices for studying light-matter interaction. The measurements show that nanocrystalline graphene can be exploited as an incandescent emitter and bolometric detector similar to crystalline graphene. Moreover the material exhibits piezoresistive behavior which makes nanocrystalline graphene interesting for transparent strain sensors.

  5. Nanocrystalline cellulose with various contents of sulfate groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronova, M I; Surov, O V; Zakharov, A G

    2013-10-15

    Properties of films derived from aqueous nanocrystalline cellulose dispersions by water evaporation depend on concentration of sulfate groups. Namely type of thermodestruction and surface morphology change as a function of contents of sulfate groups. Surface roughness increases and water adsorption enhances with increasing sulfate groups content particularly at high relative pressure.

  6. Toward a quantitative understanding of mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dao, M.; Lu, L.; Asaro, R. J.; De Hosson, J. T. M.; Ma, E.

    Focusing on nanocrystalline (nc) pure face-centered cubic metals, where systematic experimental data are available, this paper presents a brief overview of the recent progress made in improving mechanical properties of nc materials, and in quantitatively and mechanistically understanding the

  7. New route to the fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varshney, Deepak, E-mail: deepvar20@gmail.com; Morell, Gerardo [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Palomino, Javier; Resto, Oscar [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, PO Box 70377, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Gil, Jennifer [Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States); Weiner, Brad R. [Institute of Functional Nanomaterials, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931, Puerto Rico (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00936, Puerto Rico (United States)

    2014-02-07

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films offer applications in various fields, but the existing synthetic approaches are cumbersome and destructive. A major breakthrough has been achieved by our group in the direction of a non-destructive, scalable, and economic process of NCD thin-film fabrication. Here, we report a cheap precursor for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond in the form of paraffin wax. We show that NCD thin films can be fabricated on a copper support by using simple, commonplace paraffin wax under reaction conditions of Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD). Surprisingly, even the presence of any catalyst or seeding that has been conventionally used in the state-of-the-art is not required. The structure of the obtained films was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy recorded at the carbon K-edge region confirm the presence of nanocrystalline diamond. The process is a significant step towards cost-effective and non-cumbersome fabrication of nanocrystalline diamond thin films for commercial production.

  8. Distinctive Glial and Neuronal Interfacing on Nanocrystalline Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendali, Amel; Agnès, Charles; Meffert, Simone; Forster, Valérie; Bongrain, Alexandre; Arnault, Jean-Charles; Sahel, José-Alain; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Bergonzo, Philippe; Picaud, Serge

    2014-01-01

    Direct electrode/neuron interfacing is a key challenge to achieve high resolution of neuronal stimulation required for visual prostheses. Neuronal interfacing on biomaterials commonly requires the presence of glial cells and/or protein coating. Nanocrystalline diamond is a highly mechanically stable biomaterial with a remarkably large potential window for the electrical stimulation of tissues. Using adult retinal cell cultures from rats, we found that glial cells and retinal neurons grew equally well on glass and nanocrystalline diamond. The use of a protein coating increased cell survival, particularly for glial cells. However, bipolar neurons appeared to grow even in direct contact with bare diamond. We investigated whether the presence of glial cells contributed to this direct neuron/diamond interface, by using purified adult retinal ganglion cells to seed diamond and glass surfaces with and without protein coatings. Surprisingly, these fully differentiated spiking neurons survived better on nanocrystalline diamond without any protein coating. This greater survival was indicated by larger cell numbers and the presence of longer neurites. When a protein pattern was drawn on diamond, neurons did not grow preferentially on the coated area, by contrast to their behavior on a patterned glass. This study highlights the interesting biocompatibility properties of nanocrystalline diamond, allowing direct neuronal interfacing, whereas a protein coating was required for glial cell growth. PMID:24664111

  9. Synthesis Method and Absorption Application of Nanocrystalline Alloy Flakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Heng Zhou; Long-Jiang Deng

    2007-01-01

    The soft magnetic FeSiB nanocrystalline/amorphous flakes were fabricated by ball milling from the elemental powders and annealing the amorphous precursor, respectively. The microstructure, magnetic and microwave properties were evaluated by different synthesis methods. By computation, ballmilled Fe78Si13B9 flakes demonstrated potential application in absorption.

  10. Light scattering characteristicof TiO2 nanocrystalline porous films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    TiO2 nanocrystalline porous films consisting of binary particles mixture (mean diameters of 12 and 100 nm) are capable of increasing the light absorption due to the possession of large specific surface area and light scattering property. The simultaneous reduction of the film thickness leads to a decrease of the recombination loss during electron transport and an increase of the photocurrent efficiency.

  11. Quantum dynamics of one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids

    CERN Document Server

    Ding Jian Wen; Cao Jue Xian; Wang Deng Long

    2002-01-01

    A novel ballistic-non-ballistic dynamic transition in one-dimensional nanocrystalline solids is found upon varying the strength of the composition modulation and the grain-boundary effect. This can contribute to the understanding of the strange electronic transport properties of nano-structured systems

  12. Oxygen reduction on nanocrystalline ruthenia-local structure effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Daniel F.; Mukerjee, Sanjeev; Petrykin, Valery;

    2015-01-01

    Nanocrystalline ruthenium dioxide and doped ruthenia of the composition Ru1-xMxO2 (M = Co, Ni, Zn) with 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.2 were prepared by the spray-freezing freeze-drying technique. The oxygen reduction activity and selectivity of the prepared materials were evaluated in alkaline media using the RRDE...

  13. Effect of HF Concentration on Physical and Electronic Properties of Electrochemically Formed Nanoporous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushpendra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The most common fabrication technique of porous silicon (PS is electrochemical etching of a crystalline silicon wafer in a hydrofluoric (HF acid-based solution. The electrochemical process allows for precise control of the properties of PS such as thickness of the porous layer, porosity, and average pore diameter. The effect of HF concentration in the used electrolyte on physical and electronic properties of PS was studied by visual color observation, measuring nitrogen sorption isotherm, field emission type scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. It was found that with decrease in HF concentration, the pore diameter increased. The PS sample with large pore diameter, that is, smaller nanocrystalline size of Si between the pores, was found to lead to a pronounced photoluminescence peak. The systematic rise of photoluminescence peak with increase of pore diameter and porosity of PS was attributed to quantum confinement. The changes in nanocrystalline porous silicon were also clearly observed by an asymmetric broadening and shift of the optical silicon phonons in Raman spectra. The change in electronic properties of PS with pore diameter suggests possibilities of use of PS material as a template for fundamental physics as well as an optical material for technological applications.

  14. Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Beaucarne

    2007-01-01

    with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. In spite of the fundamental limitation of this material due to its disorder and metastability, the technology is now gaining industrial momentum thanks to the entry of equipment manufacturers with experience with large-area PECVD. Microcrystalline Si (also called nanocrystalline Si is a material with crystallites in the nanometer range in an amorphous matrix, and which contains less defects than amorphous silicon. Its lower bandgap makes it particularly appropriate as active material for the bottom cell in tandem and triple junction devices. The combination of an amorphous silicon top cell and a microcrystalline bottom cell has yielded promising results, but much work is needed to implement it on large-area and to limit light-induced degradation. Finally thin-film polysilicon solar cells, with grain size in the micrometer range, has recently emerged as an alternative photovoltaic technology. The layers have a grain size ranging from 1 μm to several tens of microns, and are formed at a temperature ranging from 600 to more than 1000∘C. Solid Phase Crystallization has yielded the best results so far but there has recently been fast progress with seed layer approaches, particularly those using the aluminum-induced crystallization technique.

  15. Hot Superplastic Powder Forging for Transparent nanocrystalline Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, W. Roger

    2006-05-22

    The program explored a completely new, economical method of manufacturing nanocrystalline ceramics, Hot Superplastic Powder Forging (HSPF). The goal of the work was the development of nanocrystalline/low porosity optically transparent zirconia/alumina. The high optical transparency should result from lack of grain boundary scattering since grains will be smaller than one tenth the wavelength of light and from elimination of porosity. An important technological potential for this process is manufacturing of envelopes for high-pressure sodium vapor lamps. The technique for fabricating monolithic nanocrystalline material does not begin with powder whose particle diameter is <100 nm as is commonly done. Instead it begins with powder whose particle diameter is on the order of 10-100 microns but contains nanocrystalline crystallites <<100 nm. Spherical particles are quenched from a melt and heat treated to achieve the desired microstructure. Under a moderate pressure within a die or a mold at temperatures of 1100C to 1300C densification is by plastic flow of superplastic particles. A nanocrystalline microstructure results, though some features are greater than 100nm. It was found, for instance, that in the fully dense Al2O3-ZrO2 eutectic specimens that a bicontinuous microstructure exists containing <100 nm ZrO2 particles in a matrix of Al2O3 grains extending over 1-2 microns. Crystallization, growth, phase development and creep during hot pressing and forging were studied for several compositions and so provided some details on development of polycrystalline microstructure from heating quenched ceramics.

  16. Biomolecule-mediated synthesis of nanocrystalline semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Weon

    CdS and ZnS nanocrystalline semiconductors (NCs) were prepared by titrating inorganic sulfide into preformed Cd(II)- or Zn(II)-complexes of phytochelatins, glutathione or cysteine. This strategy resulted in the formation NCs capped by the chosen biomolecule. The range of sizes and their distributions depended primarily on the quantity of sulfide titrated and the biomolecule chosen for the initial metallo-complex. The processes of NC formation were studied by absorption and fluorescence spectrophotometry. The size distribution was analyzed by gel permeation chromatography. Ethanol precipitation of NCs under aqueous conditions was used to isolate nanoparticles within a very narrow size-range. Reduction of selected dyes was also studied on the surfaces of NCs. Glutathione-capped CdS nanoparticles exhibited significant size heterogeneity even at a single sulfide titration. In contrast, phytochelatins showed much less dispersion in size at a given sulfide titration. Phytochelatins could replace glutathione without changing the size of glutathione-capped CdS nanoparticles. Cysteine appeared to be intermediate between glutathione and phytochelatins in the formation of CdS nanoparticles. The calculated radii, using an effective mass approximation method, were 10.8-17.3, 10.6-11.8, and 13.5-15.5A for glutathione-, phytochelatin-, and cysteine-capped CdS nanoparticles, respectively. Cysteine-capped ZnS showed narrower size distribution than glutathione-capped ZnS. However, elevated temperatures were necessary to accomplish optimal yields of cysteine-capped ZnS NCs. An additional control over the size distribution of NCs was achieved by size-selective precipitation with ethanol. These procedures led to the isolation of nanoparticles that were more uniform in size and chemical compositions as determined by spectroscopic and chemical analyses of size-fractionated samples. Precipitation also allowed preparation of large quantities of powdered nanoparticles that could be

  17. Tailoring the magnetic properties and magnetorheological behavior of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite by varying annealing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlacik, Michal; Pavlinek, Vladimir; Peer, Petra; Filip, Petr

    2014-05-14

    Magnetic nanoparticles of spinel nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite were synthesized via the sol-gel method and subsequent annealing. The influence of the annealing temperature on the structure, magnetic properties, and magnetorheological effect was investigated. The finite crystallite size of the particles, determined by X-ray diffraction and the particle size observed via transmission electron microscopy, increased with the annealing temperature. The magnetic properties observed via a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that an increase in the annealing temperature leads to the increase in the magnetization saturation and, in contrast, a decrease in the coercivity. The effect of annealing on the magnetic properties of ferrite particles has been explained by the recrystallization process at high temperatures. This resulted in grain size growth and a decrease in an imposed stress relating to defects in the crystal lattice structure of the nanoparticles. The magnetorheological characteristics of suspensions of ferrite particles in silicone oil were measured using a rotational rheometer equipped with a magnetic field generator in both steady shear and small-strain oscillatory regimes. The magnetorheological performance expressed as a relative increase in the magnetoviscosity appeared to be significantly higher for suspensions of particles annealed at 1000 °C.

  18. Grain growth of nanocrystalline 3C-SiC under Au ion irradiation at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Limin; Jiang, Weilin; Dissanayake, Amila C.; Varga, Tamas; Zhang, Jiandong; Zhu, Zihua; Hu, Dehong; Wang, Haiyan; Henager, Charles H.; Wang, Tieshan

    2016-01-09

    Nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) represents an excellent model system for a fundamental study of interfacial (grain boundary) processes under nuclear radiation, which are critical to the understanding of the response of nanostructured materials to high-dose irradiation. This study reports on a comparison of irradiation effects in cubic phase SiC (3C-SiC) grains of a few nanometers in size and single-crystal 3C-SiC films under identical Au ion irradiation to a range of doses at 700 K. In contrast to the latter, in which lattice disorder is accumulated to a saturation level without full amorphization, the average grain size of the former increases with dose following a power-law trend. In addition to coalescence, the grain grows through atomic jumps and mass transport, where irradiation induced vacancies at grain boundaries assist the processes. It is found that a higher irradiation temperature leads to slower grain growth and a faster approach to a saturation size of SiC nanograins. The results could potentially have a positive impact on structural components of advanced nuclear energy systems.

  19. EPR Spectroscopy of Different Sol Concentration Synthesized Nanocrystalline-ZnO Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manju Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline zinc oxide (nc-ZnO thin films were grown on p-type silicon substrate through spin coating by sol-gel process using different sol concentrations (10 wt.%, 15 wt.%, and 25 wt.%. These films were characterized by high resolution nondestructive X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDS attachment, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR techniques to understand variations in structural, morphological, and oxygen vacancy with respect to sol concentration. The film surface morphology changes from nanowall to nanorods on increasing sol concentration. EPR spectra revealed the systematic variation from ferromagnetic to paramagnetic nature in these nc-ZnO films. The broad EPR resonance signal arising from the strong dipolar-dipolar interactions among impurity defects present in nc-ZnO film deposited from 10 wt.% sol has been observed and a single strong narrow resonance signal pertaining to oxygen vacancies is obtained in 25 wt.% sol derived nc-ZnO film. The concentrations of impurity defects and oxygen vacancies are evaluated from EPR spectra, necessary for efficient optoelectronic devices development.

  20. The High performance of nanocrystalline CVD diamond coated hip joints in wear simulator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maru, M M; Amaral, M; Rodrigues, S P; Santos, R; Gouvea, C P; Archanjo, B S; Trommer, R M; Oliveira, F J; Silva, R F; Achete, C A

    2015-09-01

    The superior biotribological performance of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings grown by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method was already shown to demonstrate high wear resistance in ball on plate experiments under physiological liquid lubrication. However, tests with a close-to-real approach were missing and this constitutes the aim of the present work. Hip joint wear simulator tests were performed with cups and heads made of silicon nitride coated with NCD of ~10 μm in thickness. Five million testing cycles (Mc) were run, which represent nearly five years of hip joint implant activity in a patient. For the wear analysis, gravimetry, profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy techniques were used. After 0.5 Mc of wear test, truncation of the protruded regions of the NCD film happened as a result of a fine-scale abrasive wear mechanism, evolving to extensive plateau regions and highly polished surface condition (Ra<10nm). Such surface modification took place without any catastrophic features as cracking, grain pullouts or delamination of the coatings. A steady state volumetric wear rate of 0.02 mm(3)/Mc, equivalent to a linear wear of 0.27 μm/Mc favorably compares with the best performance reported in the literature for the fourth generation alumina ceramic (0.05 mm(3)/Mc). Also, squeaking, quite common phenomenon in hard-on-hard systems, was absent in the present all-NCD system.

  1. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Properties and Applications of Nanocrystalline Alloys from Amorphous Precursors

    CERN Document Server

    Idzikowski, Bogdan; Miglierini, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Metallic (magnetic and non-magnetic) nanocrystalline materials have been known for over ten years but only recent developments in the research into those complex alloys and their metastable amorphous precursors have created a need to summarize the most important accomplishments in the field. This book is a collection of articles on various aspects of metallic nanocrystalline materials, and an attempt to address this above need. The main focus of the papers is put on the new issues that emerge in the studies of nanocrystalline materials, and, in particular, on (i) new compositions of the alloys, (ii) properties of conventional nanocrystalline materials, (iii) modeling and simulations, (iv) preparation methods, (v) experimental techniques of measurements, and (vi) different modern applications. Interesting phenomena of the physics of nanocrystalline materials are a consequence of the effects induced by the nanocrystalline structure. They include interface physics, the influence of the grain boundaries, the aver...

  2. Effect of silane flow rate on structural, electrical and optical properties of silicon thin films grown by VHF PECVD technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gope, Jhuma [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Kumar, Sushil, E-mail: skumar@nplindia.org [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Sudhakar, S.; Rauthan, C.M.S. [Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, CSIR-Network of Institutes for Solar Energy, CSIR-National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Srivastava, P.C. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Hydrogenated silicon thin films deposited by VHF PECVD process for various silane flow rates have been investigated. The silane flow rate was varied from 5 sccm to 30 sccm, maintaining all other parameters constant. The electrical, structural and optical properties of these films were systematically studied as a function of silane flow rate. These films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and UV–visible (UV–Vis) spectroscopy. Different crystalline volume fraction (22%–60%) and band gap (∼1.58 eV–∼1.96 eV) were achieved for silicon thin films by varying the silane concentration. A transition from amorphous to nanocrystalline silicon has been confirmed by Raman and FTIR analysis. The film grown at this transition region shows the high conductivity in the order of 10{sup −4} Ω{sup −1} cm{sup −1}. - Highlights: • Silicon films grown using VHF PECVD at various F{sub silane} (silane flow rate). • Amorphous to nanocrystalline silicon transition at F{sub silane} ∼5 sccm–10 sccm. • Deposition rate increases with the increase of F{sub silane}. • Powder formation occurred beyond 20 sccm of F{sub silane}. • Film grown at 20 sccm shows max. crystalline fraction ∼60% with E{sub g} ∼1.58 eV.

  3. Raman spectroscopy of thin-film silicon on woven polyester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, Helena; Wilson, John [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Mather, Robert [Power Textiles Limited, Upland House, Ettrick Road, Selkirk TD7 5AJ (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-15

    Thin-film silicon deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), encompasses both hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and 'nanocrystalline silicon' (nc-Si), the latter being a two-phase mixture of discrete nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix. It is distinguished from a-Si:H by a characteristic Raman spectrum. As the film structure moves from amorphous to more crystalline, the Raman TO phonon spectral region no longer consists of a broad amorphous peak at {proportional_to}480 cm{sup -1} but instead has an obvious narrower peak located at higher wavenumber. The accepted signature peak for nc-Si lies between these two and most probably arises from the hexagonal, wurtzite structure of the nanocrystals. Here we use Raman spectroscopy to show how the structure of thin-film silicon on woven polyester is influenced by the substrate as well as by the deposition conditions. We find that the rough surface of the textile substrate enables nc-Si formation, provided that the correct deposition conditions are employed and that the substrate temperature does not exceed 210 C. Although the gas mixture is the dominant parameter for determining the film structure, and input power also has a significant effect, we find that a specific combination of these interrelated parameters is essential to control the final structure. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Methods for preparation of nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manoharan, Mohan; Martins Loureiro, Sergio Paulo; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2013-04-16

    Disclosed here are methods for the preparation of optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates. The optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates may be used as one or more of quantum-splitting phosphor, visible-light emitting phosphor, vacuum-UV absorbing phosphor, and UV-emitting phosphor. Also disclosed herein are discharge lamps comprising the optionally activated nanocrystalline rare earth phosphates provided by these methods.

  5. Removal of Cadmium and Lead Ions from Aqueous Solution by Nanocrystalline Magnetite Through Mechanochemical Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohsen Hosseinzadeh; Seyyed Ali Seyyed Ebrahimi; Shahram Raygan; Seyed Morteza Masoudpanah

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the removal of cadmium and lead ions from aqueous solution by nanocrystalline magnetite was investigated. The nanocrystalline magnetite was synthesized by mechanochemical activation of hematite in a high energy planetary mill in argon atmosphere for 45 hours. The ability of the synthesized nanocrystalline magnetite for removal of Cd(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions was studied in a batch reactor under different experimental conditions with different pHs, contact times, ini...

  6. Formation of nanocrystalline during flash welding of 0Cr16Ni22Mo2Ti steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A nanocrystalline layer was fabricated in bond area of 0Cr16Ni22Mo2Ti austenite steel using flash welding. The mean grain size near bond line is about 20 nm, and the farther the distance from bond line, the larger the size of the nanocrystalline. The thickness of the nanocrystalline layer is about 50 mm. The formation mechanism of the nanocry- stalline may be that the metal in semisolid state is deformed severely and its solid grains are fragmented.

  7. Method to produce nanocrystalline powders of oxide-based phosphors for lighting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Sergio Paulo Martins; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Williams, Darryl Stephen; Manoharan, Mohan; Srivastava, Alok Mani

    2007-12-25

    Some embodiments of the present invention are directed toward nanocrystalline oxide-based phosphor materials, and methods for making same. Typically, such methods comprise a steric entrapment route for converting precursors into such phosphor material. In some embodiments, the nanocrystalline oxide-based phosphor materials are quantum splitting phosphors. In some or other embodiments, such nanocrystalline oxide based phosphor materials provide reduced scattering, leading to greater efficiency, when used in lighting applications.

  8. Electrodeposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Phosphorous Coatings as a Hard Chrome Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    1 ASETSDefense 2014 Electrodeposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Phosphorous Coatings as a Hard Chrome Alternative Ruben A. Prado, CEF...COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electrodeposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt Phosphorous Coatings as a Hard Chrome Alternative...Mil-Spec development 3 ASETSDefense 2014 ■ Demonstrate/Validate pulsed electrodeposition of Nanocrystalline Cobalt -Phosphorous (nCoP) alloy

  9. Variation in the structure and optical properties of polymorphous silicon thin films using dichlorosilane as silicon precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remolina, A.; Hamui, L.; Monroy, B.M.; Garcia-Sanchez, M.F.; Santana, G. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-360, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan, C. P. 04510, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Ponce, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo 140, C. P. 25290, Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Picquart, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, AP 55-534, Av. Sn Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, Iztapalapa, C.P. 09340, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-03-15

    Polymorphous silicon thin films were obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using dichlorosilane as silicon precursor. The RF power and the dichlorosilane to hydrogen flow rate ratio were varied to obtain different crystalline fractions and average sizes of silicon nanocrystals embedded in the amorphous silicon matrix. Microscopy images confirmed the existence of nanocrystallites with averages sizes between 2 and 6 nm. Broader size distributions were obtained with increasing RF power. Raman results confirmed that different nanocrystalline fractions (from 12% to 54%) can be achieved in these films by regulating the selected growth parameters. The optical band gap calculated by the Tauc model from UV-visible transmittance measurements varies between 1.8 to 2.3 eV. The relationship between the optical properties is discussed in terms of the different nanostructures of the samples. Depending on their absorption properties and effective band gap, these materials can be suitable for application in thin film solar cell devices (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Extreme creep resistance in a microstructurally stable nanocrystalline alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, K. A.; Rajagopalan, M.; Komarasamy, M.; Bhatia, M. A.; Hornbuckle, B. C.; Mishra, R. S.; Solanki, K. N.

    2016-09-01

    Nanocrystalline metals, with a mean grain size of less than 100 nanometres, have greater room-temperature strength than their coarse-grained equivalents, in part owing to a large reduction in grain size. However, this high strength generally comes with substantial losses in other mechanical properties, such as creep resistance, which limits their practical utility; for example, creep rates in nanocrystalline copper are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in typical coarse-grained copper. The degradation of creep resistance in nanocrystalline materials is in part due to an increase in the volume fraction of grain boundaries, which lack long-range crystalline order and lead to processes such as diffusional creep, sliding and rotation. Here we show that nanocrystalline copper-tantalum alloys possess an unprecedented combination of properties: high strength combined with extremely high-temperature creep resistance, while maintaining mechanical and thermal stability. Precursory work on this family of immiscible alloys has previously highlighted their thermo-mechanical stability and strength, which has motivated their study under more extreme conditions, such as creep. We find a steady-state creep rate of less than 10-6 per second—six to eight orders of magnitude lower than most nanocrystalline metals—at various temperatures between 0.5 and 0.64 times the melting temperature of the matrix (1,356 kelvin) under an applied stress ranging from 0.85 per cent to 1.2 per cent of the shear modulus. The unusual combination of properties in our nanocrystalline alloy is achieved via a processing route that creates distinct nanoclusters of atoms that pin grain boundaries within the alloy. This pinning improves the kinetic stability of the grains by increasing the energy barrier for grain-boundary sliding and rotation and by inhibiting grain coarsening, under extremely long-term creep conditions. Our processing approach should enable the development of

  11. Extreme creep resistance in a microstructurally stable nanocrystalline alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, K A; Rajagopalan, M; Komarasamy, M; Bhatia, M A; Hornbuckle, B C; Mishra, R S; Solanki, K N

    2016-09-15

    Nanocrystalline metals, with a mean grain size of less than 100 nanometres, have greater room-temperature strength than their coarse-grained equivalents, in part owing to a large reduction in grain size. However, this high strength generally comes with substantial losses in other mechanical properties, such as creep resistance, which limits their practical utility; for example, creep rates in nanocrystalline copper are about four orders of magnitude higher than those in typical coarse-grained copper. The degradation of creep resistance in nanocrystalline materials is in part due to an increase in the volume fraction of grain boundaries, which lack long-range crystalline order and lead to processes such as diffusional creep, sliding and rotation. Here we show that nanocrystalline copper-tantalum alloys possess an unprecedented combination of properties: high strength combined with extremely high-temperature creep resistance, while maintaining mechanical and thermal stability. Precursory work on this family of immiscible alloys has previously highlighted their thermo-mechanical stability and strength, which has motivated their study under more extreme conditions, such as creep. We find a steady-state creep rate of less than 10(-6) per second-six to eight orders of magnitude lower than most nanocrystalline metals-at various temperatures between 0.5 and 0.64 times the melting temperature of the matrix (1,356 kelvin) under an applied stress ranging from 0.85 per cent to 1.2 per cent of the shear modulus. The unusual combination of properties in our nanocrystalline alloy is achieved via a processing route that creates distinct nanoclusters of atoms that pin grain boundaries within the alloy. This pinning improves the kinetic stability of the grains by increasing the energy barrier for grain-boundary sliding and rotation and by inhibiting grain coarsening, under extremely long-term creep conditions. Our processing approach should enable the development of

  12. Size Dependence of Nanoscale Wear of Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangpatjaroen, Chaiyapat; Grierson, David; Shannon, Steve; Jakes, Joseph E; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2017-01-18

    Nanoscale, single-asperity wear of single-crystal silicon carbide (sc-SiC) and nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) is investigated using single-crystal diamond nanoindenter tips and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips under dry conditions, and the wear behavior is compared to that of single-crystal silicon with both thin and thick native oxide layers. We discovered a transition in the relative wear resistance of the SiC samples compared to that of Si as a function of contact size. With larger nanoindenter tips (tip radius ≈ 370 nm), the wear resistances of both sc-SiC and nc-SiC are higher than that of Si. This result is expected from the Archard's equation because SiC is harder than Si. However, with the smaller AFM tips (tip radius ≈ 20 nm), the wear resistances of sc-SiC and nc-SiC are lower than that of Si, despite the fact that the contact pressures are comparable to those applied with the nanoindenter tips, and the plastic zones are well-developed in both sets of wear experiments. We attribute the decrease in the relative wear resistance of SiC compared to that of Si to a transition from a wear regime dominated by the materials' resistance to plastic deformation (i.e., hardness) to a regime dominated by the materials' resistance to interfacial shear. This conclusion is supported by our AFM studies of wearless friction, which reveal that the interfacial shear strength of SiC is higher than that of Si. The contributions of surface roughness and surface chemistry to differences in interfacial shear strength are also discussed.

  13. Deposition Technology and Microhardness of Electrochemical Deposited Ni-W Alloy Nanocrystalline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUYu-cheng; SHUXia; WANGLi-ping; HUXiao-ye; WANGWen-fang; HUANGXin-min

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a perpendicular experiment was conducted by using 4 key process parmeters, such as concentration of sodium tungstate, current density, PH value and operaftng temperature, which have obvious influence on the electrodeposition of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline. By extreme difference analysis, the influence of multi-factors on the deposition rate and microhardness and sultace quality of the nanocrystalline alloy coatings was studied in detail. By further contrastive experiment, the influence of single-factor on the electrodeposition of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline was also discussod, which will provide basis for the preparation of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline.

  14. Deposition Technology and Microhardness of Electrochemical Deposited Ni-W Alloy Nanocrystalline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yu-cheng; SHU Xia; WANG Li-ping; HU Xiao-ye; WANG Wen-fang; HUANG Xin-min

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a perpendicular experiment was conducted by using 4 key process parameters, such as concentration of sodium tungstate, current density, PH value and operating temperature, which have obvious influence on the electrodeposition of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline. By extreme difference analysis, the influence of multi-factors on the deposition rate and microhardness and surface quality of the nanocrystalline alloy coatings was studied in detail. By further contrastive experiment, the influence of single-factor on the electrodeposition of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline was also discussed, which will provide basis for the preparation of Ni-W alloy nanocrystalline.

  15. Anisotropic Magnetoresistance Effect in Amorphous and Nanocrystalline Fe(Cu,Nb)-Si-B Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The magnetoresistance effect and magnetic properties in amorphous and nanocrystalline Fe(Cu, Nb)-Si-B ribbons have been investigated. It was observed that the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) of nanocrystalline alloy is much smaller than that of amorphous alloy, indicating that the anisotropy of nanocrystalline alloy becomes smaller after crystallizing, and the smallest AMR is coincident with the excellent soft magnetic characteristics. It is believed that the smaller magnetic crystalline anisotropy is the origin of the excellent soft magnetic characteristics of nanocrystalline alloy.

  16. Green synthesis of Kocuran-functionalized silver glyconanoparticles for use as antibiofilm coatings on silicone urethral catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, C.; Sujitha, Pombala

    2014-08-01

    Microbial infections due to biofilm formation on medical implants are serious complications arising after surgery which can be prevented by using antimicrobial coatings on biomaterial surfaces. We developed a simple, rapid and green chemistry approach for synthesis of silver glyconanoparticles (AgNPs) using Kocuran, an exopolysaccharide produced by Kocuria rosea strain BS-1. Kocuran-capped AgNPs exhibited a characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak around 435 nm. They were mono-dispersed, spherical with an average particle size of 12 nm. XRD and SAED studies suggested that AgNPs were crystalline in nature. AgNPs had a zeta potential of -33.9 mV and were anionic charged. They showed colloidal stability at different pH (6 to 10), temperatures (30 °C to 100 °C), in NaCl, NaNO3 and BSA solutions. Kocuran-capped AgNPs exhibited effective antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and cell death was mainly due to hydroxyl radical induction and depletion of NADH. They also inhibited the biofilm development by S. aureus and E. coli and confocal scanning laser microscopic images revealed the damage of intact cell architecture. In vitro evaluation of Kocuran-capped silver glyconanoparticles on human gingival fibroblasts demonstrated good cell proliferation as compared to commercial AgNPs suggesting that they are biocompatible and non-toxic in nature. This is a first report on Kocuran-functionalized AgNPs exhibiting potential antibacterial and antiadhesive properties for use as antimicrobial coatings against bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation on silicone urethral catheters.

  17. Phonon density of states in nanocrystalline 57Fe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash; R Meyer; P Entel

    2003-03-01

    The Born–von Karman model is used to calculate phonon density of states (DOS) of nanocrystalline bcc Fe. It is found that there is an anisotropic stiffening in the interatomic force constants and hence there is shrinking in the nearest-neighbour distances in the nanophase. This leads to additional vibrational modes above the bulk phonons near the bottom of the phonon band. It is found that the high energy phonon modes of nanophase Fe are the surface modes. The calculated phonon DOS closely agree with the experimental data except a peak at 37 meV. The calculated phonon dispersion relations are also compared with those of the bulk phonons and anomalous behaviour is discussed in detail. The specific heat in nanophase enhances as compared to bulk phase at low temperatures and the calculated Debye temperature agrees with the experimental results. It is predicted that the nanocrystalline Fe may consist of about 14 GPa pressure.

  18. A New Method for Preparation of Nanocrystalline Molybdenum Nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Long-Hai; CUI Qi-Liang; ZHANG Jian; LI Xue-Fei; ZHOU Qiang; ZOU Guang-Tian

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nanocrystalline molybdenum nitride (γ-Mo2N) with the cubic structure is prepared by the direct-current arc discharge method in N2 gas, using metal Mo or W rod as a cathode. The x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are used to characterize the product. It is found that the conversion of Mo to γ-Mo2N and affinity of Mo to N2 are determined by the nitrogen pressur e. Moreover, we compare the effect of Mo and W rod as a cathode for preparing γ-Mo2N. The average size of γ-Mo2N particles is about 5nm. The rapid quenching mechanism can be used to explain the formation of nanocrystalline γ-Mo2N.

  19. Semiconducting of nanocrystalline tin oxide and its influence factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-li; DUAN Xue-chen

    2005-01-01

    A series of nanocrystalline SnO2 powders, doped with different Sb contents, were synthesized by route of alkoxides hydrolysis using SnCl4·5H2O and SbCl3 as starting materials and calcined at different temperatures. The microstructure and morphology of samples are investigated by XRD and TEM, the valence state changes of Sb in SnO2 crystal lattice is detected by M(O)ssbauer spectroscopy and XPS.The resistivity of powders is examined with a mould of inside diameter d=10mm at a constant pressure. The results show that lightly-doping Sb is effective means of semiconducting of nanocrystalline SnO2. The ratio of Sb5+ to Sb3+ decreases with increasing Sb content in SnO2 crystal lattices and calcination temperature. The XPS diffraction confirms the same result as Mssbauer spectroscopy.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Q.; Niewczas, M.

    2017-01-01

    Temperature-dependent magnetic anisotropy due to grain boundaries in nanocrystalline Ni has been studied by simulating experimental magnetization data with the stochastic Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert theory. In the model the grain boundary magnetic anisotropy energy is expressed as the sum of the uniaxial anisotropy and the cubic anisotropy, characterized by Kua and Kca anisotropy constants. By comparing the calculated magnetization with the experimental magnetization measurements at finite temperatures, the values of Kua and Kca can be determined. For nanocrystalline Ni it is found that with increasing temperature Kua decreases and Kca increases. At low temperatures Kua dominates the grain boundary anisotropy energy, whereas Kca is very small and it can be neglected. At room temperature Kua and Kca are of the same order with the corresponding ratio Kua /Kca ≈ 1.9 , both coefficients are much larger than the magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant.

  1. Electroacoustic characterization of conventional and electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline celluloses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, Salman; Sheikhi, Amir; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2014-10-15

    Nanoparticles are widely used as drug carriers, texturizing agents, fat replacers, and reinforcing inclusions. Because of a growing interest in non-renewable materials, much research has focused on nanocellulose derivatives, which are biodegradable, biocompatible, and easily synthesized. Among nanocellulose derivatives, nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) has been known for half a century, but its utility is limited because its colloidal stability is challenged by added salt. On the other hand, electrosterically stabilized nanocrystalline cellulose (ENCC) has recently been observed to have superior colloidal stability. Here, we use electrokinetic-sonic-amplitude (ESA) and acoustic attenuation spectroscopy to assess NCC and ENCC ζ-potentials and sizes over wide ranges of pH and ionic strength. The results attest to a soft, porous layer of dicarboxylic cellulose (DCC) polymers that expands and collapses with ionic strength, electrosterically stabilizing ENCC dispersions at ionic strengths up to at least 200mmol L(-1).

  2. Thermochemical Study on the Chiral Sodium Zincophosphate Nanocrystalline

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU, Jian; YUAN, Ai-Qun; HUANG, Zai-Yin; SONG, Bao-Lin; LIAO, Sen

    2006-01-01

    Chiral sodium zincophosphate nanocrystalline has been prepared and characterized. The standard molar enthalpy of the following reaction 12Na3PO4·12H2O(s) + 12ZnSO4·7H2O(s) = Na12(Zn12P12O48)·12H2O(s) +12Na2SO4(s)+216H2O(1) was determined by solution reaction calorimetric at 298.15 K, and calculated to be 33.666+0.195 kJ/mol. From the results and other auxiliary quantities, the standard enthalpy of formation for sodium zincophosphate nanocrystalline was derived to be AfHmΘ [Na12(Zn12P12O48)·12H2O(s), 298.15 K]=-24268.494t0.815 kJ/mol.

  3. Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, M., E-mail: m.wegner@uni-muenster.de; Leuthold, J.; Peterlechner, M.; Divinski, S. V., E-mail: divin@uni-muenster.de [Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, D-48149, Münster (Germany); Song, X., E-mail: xysong@bjut.edu.cn [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100124 Beijing (China); Wilde, G. [Institut für Materialphysik, Universität Münster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Straße 10, D-48149, Münster (Germany); Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, School of Environmental and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 200444 Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-07

    Grain boundary and triple junction diffusion in nanocrystalline Cu samples with grain sizes, 〈d〉, of ∼35 and ∼44 nm produced by spark plasma sintering were investigated by the radiotracer method using the {sup 63}Ni isotope. The measured diffusivities, D{sub eff}, are comparable with those determined previously for Ni grain boundary diffusion in well-annealed, high purity, coarse grained, polycrystalline copper, substantiating the absence of a grain size effect on the kinetic properties of grain boundaries in a nanocrystalline material at grain sizes d ≥ 35 nm. Simultaneously, the analysis predicts that if triple junction diffusion of Ni in Cu is enhanced with respect to the corresponding grain boundary diffusion rate, it is still less than 500⋅D{sub gb} within the temperature interval from 420 K to 470 K.

  4. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies on Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stelmakh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Pielaszek, R.; Bismayer, U.; Werner, S.; Palosz, W.

    2003-01-01

    Application of in situ high pressure powder diffraction technique for examination of specific structural properties of nanocrystals based on the experimental data of SiC nanocrystalline powders of 2 to 30 nrn diameter in diameter is presented. Limitations and capabilities of the experimental techniques themselves and methods of diffraction data elaboration applied to nanocrystals with very small dimensions (< 30 nm) are discussed. It is shown that due to the complex structure, constituting a two-phase, core/surface shell system, no unique lattice parameter value and, consequently, no unique compressibility coefficient can satisfactorily describe the behavior of nanocrystalline powders under pressure. We offer a tentative interpretation of the distribution of macro- and micro-strains in nanoparticles of different grain size.

  5. Dislocation-mediated creep process in nanocrystalline Cu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Jun-Wei; Sun Shi-Cheng; Jiang Zhong-Hao; Lian Jian-She; Jiang Qing

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cu with average grain sizes ranging from ~ 24.4 to 131.3 nm were prepared by the electric brushplating technique.Nanoindentation tests were performed within a wide strain rate range,and the creep process of nanocrystalline Cu during the holding period and its relationship to dislocation and twin structures were examined.It was demonstrated that creep strain and creep strain rate are considerably significant for smaller grain sizes and higher loading strain rates,and are far higher than those predicted by the models of Cobble creep and grain boundary sliding.The analysis based on the calculations and experiments reveals that the significant creep deformation arises from the rapid absorption of high density dislocations stored in the loading regime.Our experiments imply that stored dislocations during loading are highly unstable and dislocation activity can proceed and lead to significant post-loading plasticity.

  6. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co Alloy Synthesis by High Speed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamaliah Idris

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrodeposition of nanocrystals is economically and technologically viable production path for the synthesis of pure metals and alloys both in coatings and bulk form. The study presents nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloy synthesis by high speed electrodeposition. Nanocrystalline Ni-Co alloys coatings were prepared by direct current (DC and deposited directly on steel and aluminum substrates without any pretreatment, using high speed electrodeposition method. The influence of the electrolysis parameters, such as cathodic current density and temperature at constant pH, on electrodeposition and microstructure of Ni-Co alloys were examined. A homogeneous surface morphology was obtained at all current densities of the plated samples, and it was evident that the current density and temperature affect the coating thickness of Ni-Co alloy coatings.

  7. Electrodeposited nanocrystalline bronze alloys as replacement for Ni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovestad, A.; Tacken, R.A.; Mannetje, H.H. [TNO Science and Industry, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-07-01

    Nanocrystalline white-bronze, CuSn, electroplating was investigated as alternative to Ni plating as undercoat for noble metals in jewellery applications. A strongly acidic plating bath was developed with an organic additive to suppress hydrogen evolution and obtain bright coatings. Polarization curves indicate a strong inhibition by the organic additive at the tin equilibrium potential. Mass transfer controlled deposition yields nanocrystalline bronze coating with 0-65 wt% Sn. One or two low temperature equilibrium phases, high temperature equilibrium phases or a non-equilibrium phase were identified by XRD analyses. Bright white bronze, 50 wt% Cu/50 wt% Sn, bronze coatings show improved tarnishing resistance and similar corrosion and wear resistance as undercoat for gold on actual jewellery parts compared to nickel. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Doping Silicon Wafers with Boron by Use of Silicon Paste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Gao; Shu Zhou; Yunfan Zhang; Chen Dong; Xiaodong Pi; Deren Yang

    2013-01-01

    In this work we introduce recently developed silicon-paste-enabled p-type doping for silicon.Boron-doped silicon nanoparticles are synthesized by a plasma approach.They are then dispersed in solvents to form silicon paste.Silicon paste is screen-printed at the surface of silicon wafers.By annealing,boron atoms in silicon paste diffuse into silicon wafers.Chemical analysis is employed to obtain the concentrations of boron in silicon nanoparticles.The successful doping of silicon wafers with boron is evidenced by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and sheet resistance measurements.

  9. UV-laser treatment of nanodiamond seeds—a valuable tool for modification of nanocrystalline diamond films properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, J.; Fitl, P.; Vrňata, M.; Fekete, L.; Taylor, A.; Fendrych, F.

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed to study the UV-laser treatment of precursor (i.e. nanodiamond (ND) seeds on silicon substrates) and its influence on the properties of grown nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. Pulsed Nd : YAG laser operating at the fourth harmonic frequency (laser fluence EL = 250 mJ cm-2, pulse duration 5 ns) was used as a source, equipped with an optical system for focusing laser beam onto the sample, allowing exposure of a local spot and horizontal patterning. The variable parameters were: number of pulses (from 5 to 400) and the working atmosphere (He, Ar and O2). Ablation and/or graphitization of seeded nanodiamond particles were observed. Further the microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition was employed to grow NCD films on exposed and non-exposed areas of silicon substrates. The size, shape and density distribution of laser-treated nanodiamond seeds were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and their chemical composition by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The resulting NCD films (uniform thickness of 400 nm) were characterized by: Raman spectroscopy to analyse occurrence of graphitic phase, and AFM to observe morphology and surface roughness. The highest RMS roughness (˜85 nm) was achieved when treating the precursor in He atmosphere. Horizontal microstructures of diamond films were fabricated.

  10. Characterization of Nanocrystalline SiGe Thin Film Solar Cell with Double Graded-Dead Absorption Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Chun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nanocrystalline silicon-germanium (nc-SiGe thin films were deposited by high-frequency (27.12 MHz plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HF-PECVD. The films were used in a silicon-based thin film solar cell with graded-dead absorption layer. The characterization of the nc-SiGe films are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. The band gap of SiGe alloy can be adjusted between 0.8 and 1.7 eV by varying the gas ratio. For thin film solar cell application, using double graded-dead i-SiGe layers mainly leads to an increase in short-circuit current and therefore cell conversion efficiency. An initial conversion efficiency of 5.06% and the stabilized efficiency of 4.63% for an nc-SiGe solar cell were achieved.

  11. Low Temperature Processing of Nanocrystalline Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT) Thick Films and Ceramics by a Modified Sol-Gel Route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiguang; Wang, Zhihong; Zhao, Changlei; Tan, Ooi Kiang; Hng, Huey Hoon

    2002-11-01

    Dispersing fine particles into a sol-gel matrix is a promising process to get a thick 0-3 composite coating layer. In this paper, we have further improved this modified sol-gel process by nanocrystalline composite technique to realize the low temperature annealing. Dense Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 (PZT) thick films of 10 to 50 μm in thickness have been obtained on the platinum-coated silicon substrates by spin-coating at sintering temperature of 600-700°C and fully developed submicron-sized grains have been demonstrated in screen-printing piezoelectric films on alumina substrates at sintering temperature of 700-800°C. The dependence of various properties such as microstructure, crystallization, ferroelectric and dielectric properties of such made thick films on the processing parameters have been investigated. For a 10 μm-thick film spin-coated on silicon wafer, the dielectric loss and relative permittivity are 0.010 and 1024, respectively, at 1 kHz. The remanent polarization (Pr) and the coercive field (Ec) are 13.6 μC/cm2 and 34.5 kV/cm, respectively. Obviously, such made thick film has comparable properties with bulk PZT ceramic. This novel technique can be extensively used in sol-gel, screen-printing, tape-casting, even in traditional ceramic process to reduce the process temperature.

  12. Osteogenic cell differentiation on H-terminated and O-terminated nanocrystalline diamond films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liskova J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Jana Liskova,1 Oleg Babchenko,2 Marian Varga,2 Alexander Kromka,2 Daniel Hadraba,1 Zdenek Svindrych,1 Zuzana Burdikova,1 Lucie Bacakova1 1Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic; 2Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic Abstract: Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD films are promising materials for bone implant coatings because of their biocompatibility, chemical resistance, and mechanical hardness. Moreover, NCD wettability can be tailored by grafting specific atoms. The NCD films used in this study were grown on silicon substrates by microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and grafted by hydrogen atoms (H-termination or oxygen atoms (O-termination. Human osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells were used for biological studies on H-terminated and O-terminated NCD films. The adhesion, growth, and subsequent differentiation of the osteoblasts on NCD films were examined, and the extracellular matrix production and composition were quantified. The osteoblasts that had been cultivated on the O-terminated NCD films exhibited a higher growth rate than those grown on the H-terminated NCD films. The mature collagen fibers were detected in Saos-2 cells on both the H-terminated and O-terminated NCD films; however, the quantity of total collagen in the extracellular matrix was higher on the O-terminated NCD films, as were the amounts of calcium deposition and alkaline phosphatase activity. Nevertheless, the expression of genes for osteogenic markers – type I collagen, alkaline phosphatase, and osteocalcin – was either comparable on the H-terminated and O-terminated films or even lower on the O-terminated films. In conclusion, the higher wettability of the O-terminated NCD films is promising for adhesion and growth of osteoblasts. In addition, the O-terminated surface also seems to support the deposition of extracellular matrix proteins and extracellular matrix

  13. Nanocrystalline Titanium Dioxide for Solar Cells and Lithium Batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ladislav; Kavan; J.Heyrovsky

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Nanocrystalline TiO2 (anatase) has attracted considerable interest for applications in regenerative photoelectrochemical solar cells[1]. This device is based on charge injection from photoexcited organometallic dye which is adsorbed on the TiO2 surface. A considerable enhancement of the solar cell efficiency was demonstrated on highly organized mesoporous TiO2 thin films made by supramolecular templating with amphiphilic triblock copolymer Pluronic[2]. Titanium dioxide can electrochemically ac...

  14. Preparation of Nanocrystalline MoS2 Hollow Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Nanocrystalline MoS2 with hollow spherical morphology has been prepared by the hydrothermal method. The products are characterized by means of X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results give the evidence that the sample is consists of hollow spheres 400~600 nm in diameter, and there is much whisker on the surface of MoS2 hollow sphere.

  15. Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Yttria Stabilized Zirconia for SOFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridula Biswas

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline zirconia powders stabilized with varying concentration of yttria (YSZ were synthesized following urea solution combustion route. Thermogravimetric analysis combined with differential scanning calorimetry was carried out for the intermediate gel for analyzing reaction kinetics. The final products were characterized by X‐ray diffractometry, transmission electron microscopy and specific surface area measurements. Sintering behavior of theses powders were studied. The powder quality is poor in respect of surface area and sintered density.

  16. Linear grain growth kinetics and rotation in nanocrystalline Ni

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Diana; Mohanty, S.; Monk, J.

    2007-01-01

    We report three-dimensional atomistic molecular dynamics studies of grain growth kinetics in nanocrystalline Ni. The results show the grain size increasing linearly with time, contrary to the square root of the time kinetics observed in coarse-grained structures. The average grain boundary energy per unit area decreases simultaneously with the decrease in total grain boundary area associated with grain growth. The average mobility of the boundaries increases as the grain size increases. The r...

  17. Burstein Moss effect in nanocrystalline CaS : Ce

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geeta Sharma; Puja Chawla; S P Lochab; Nafa Singh

    2011-07-01

    The nanocrystalline CaS : Ce nanophosphors are synthesized by wet chemical co-precipitation method. The particles possess an average size of 10 nm as calculated using Debye–Scherrer formula. The particle size and the crystalline nature of the formed nanoparticles are confirmed by TEM micrograph. The optical studies are carried out using UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. The absorption edge is found to show blue shift with increasing cerium concentration. The shift may be attributed to Burstein Moss effect.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV Tungstate Semiconductor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Manoj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanoparticles.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Novel Nanocrystalline Zirconium (IV) Tungstate Semiconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj, S.; Beena, B.

    2011-01-01

    Nanocrystalline zirconium (IV) tungstate is prepared by chemical coprecipitation method using ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid as the templating agent. Elemental composition is determined by EDS. The characteristic bonding position is identified using FTIR. XRD is used to find the theoritical value of size and phase identification using JCPDS. Morphology is examined using SEM and HRTEM. UV absorption at 260 nm corresponds to an energy gap of 4.48 eV, characteristic of semiconducting nanopar...

  20. Synthesis and characterisation of nanocrystalline titania spheres: Application to photocatalysis.

    OpenAIRE

    DeSouza, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the making of titania nanocrystalline particles (photonic crystals) and their use as photocatalysts. Chapter 1 describes the work that motivates this research - this includes a description of these structures as propagating a 'slow photon' effect that could make them excellent photocatalysts for decomposing organic compounds. Chapter 2 describes the synthetic procedures that make these photonic crystals. The three-step procedure is detailed involving the infiltration of ...

  1. Optical Design of Dye-Sensitized Nanocrystalline Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-Zhe; MENG Qing-Bo; GAO Chun-Xiao; XUE Bo-Fei; WANG Hong-Xia; CHEN Li-Quan; O.Sato; A.Fujishima

    2004-01-01

    In nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) the absorption of a large fraction of the incident solar radiation is important for achieving high efficiencies. We develop a model to include both the optical process and the electrochemical process. This model allows us to calculate the performance of the different optical designs (for example the different scattering layers and the different reflecting plane). It is found that appropriate optical designs can improve the performance of DSSCs greatly.

  2. The Character of Photo-electrochemistry of Palladium Implanted TiO2 Nano-crystalline Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new electrode was prepared by using Pd implanted into nano-crystalline TiO2 and the character of photo-electrochemistry of implanted electrodes was investigated. The energy band structure of nano-crystalline TiO2 has not changed after implantation with Pd. The photo-current (iph) of palladium implanted TiO2 nano-crystalline electrode is larger than that of pure TiO2 nano-crystalline electrode.

  3. Enhancing the High Temperature Capability of Nanocrystalline Alloys: Utilizing Thermodynamic Stability Maps to Mitigate Grain Growth Through Solute Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    nanocrystalline alloys. nanocrystalline materials , grain growth, grain boundary energy, grain boundary segregation 46 Mark A. Tschopp 410-306...grant DMR-1005677. vi 1. Introduction For nanocrystalline materials to be useful, they must be sufficiently resistant to grain growth at elevated...temperatures to retain their nanoscale grain size (d < 100 nm). One strategy for stabilizing nanocrystalline materials is to add segregating solutes to

  4. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  5. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  6. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  7. Nanocrystalline Metal Oxides for Methane Sensors: Role of Noble Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Basu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methane is an important gas for domestic and industrial applications and its source is mainly coalmines. Since methane is extremely inflammable in the coalmine atmosphere, it is essential to develop a reliable and relatively inexpensive chemical gas sensor to detect this inflammable gas below its explosion amount in air. The metal oxides have been proved to be potential materials for the development of commercial gas sensors. The functional properties of the metal oxide-based gas sensors can be improved not only by tailoring the crystal size of metal oxides but also by incorporating the noble metal catalyst on nanocrystalline metal oxide matrix. It was observed that the surface modification of nanocrystalline metal oxide thin films by noble metal sensitizers and the use of a noble metal catalytic contact as electrode reduce the operating temperatures appreciably and improve the sensing properties. This review article concentrates on the nanocrystalline metal oxide methane sensors and the role of noble metals on the sensing properties.

  8. Nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite/titania coatings on titanium improves osteoblast adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Michiko; Aslani, Arash; Sambito, Marisa A; Kalkhoran, Nader M; Slamovich, Elliott B; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Bulk hydroxyapatite (HA) and titania have been used to improve the osseointegration of orthopedic implants. For this reason, composites of HA and titania have been receiving increased attention in orthopedics as novel coating materials. The objective of this in vitro study was to produce nanophase (i.e., materials with grain size less than 100 nm) HA/titania coatings on titanium. The adhesion of bone forming cells (osteoblasts) on the composite coatings were also assessed and compared with single-phase nanotitania and nano-HA titanium coatings. Nanocrystalline HA powders were synthesized through wet chemistry and hydrothermal treatments at 200 degrees C. Nanocrystalline titania powders obtained commercially were mixed with the nanocrystalline HA powders at various weight ratios. The mixed powders were then deposited on titanium utilizing a room-temperature coating process called IonTite. The results of the present study showed that such coatings maintained the chemistry and crystallite size of the original HA and titania powders. Moreover, osteoblasts adherent on single-phase nanotitania coatings were well-spread whereas they became more round and extended distinct filopodia on the composite and single-phase HA coatings. Interestingly, the number of osteoblasts adherent on the nanotitania/HA composite coatings at weight ratios of 2/1 and 1/2 were significantly greater compared with single-phase nanotitania coatings, currently-used plasma-sprayed HA coatings, and uncoated titanium. These findings suggest that nanotitania/HA coatings on titanium should be further studied for improved orthopedic applications.

  9. Nanocrystalline Cr(2+)-doped ZnSe nanowires laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Guoying; Yang, Chao; Zhou, Shouhuan

    2013-01-09

    By using femtosecond laser pulses to ablate microsized targets that are dispersed in liquid media, nanocrystalline Cr(2+)-doped ZnSe nanowires have been successfully fabricated for the first time. The phase and stoichiometries of the original materials are preserved while the sizes are reduced down to 30-120 nm for these nanowires. X-ray diffraction results show that the products are nanocrystalline ZnSe with cubic sphalerite structure. Scanning electron microscope results indicate that the products be ZnSe nanowires. The nanowires are usually 30-120 nm in diameter and several tens of micrometers in length. Photoluminescence of the nanocrystalline Cr(2+)-doped ZnSe nanowires shows strong emission at around 2000-2500 nm under excitation of 1300-2250 nm wavelength at room temperature. By using the Cr(2+)-doped ZnSe multiple nanowires as the gain medium, mid-infrared oscillation at 2194 nm has been established. The oscillation wavelength of the multiple nanowires laser is 150 nm shifted to shorter wavelengths in comparison with that of microsized powder random laser.

  10. Improve oxidation resistance at high temperature by nanocrystalline surface layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Z X; Zhang, C; Huang, X F; Liu, W B; Yang, Z G

    2015-08-13

    An interesting change of scale sequence occurred during oxidation of nanocrystalline surface layer by means of a surface mechanical attrition treatment. The three-layer oxide structure from the surface towards the matrix is Fe3O4, spinel FeCr2O4 and corundum (Fe,Cr)2O3, which is different from the typical two-layer scale consisted of an Fe3O4 outer layer and an FeCr2O4 inner layer in conventional P91 steel. The diffusivity of Cr, Fe and O is enhanced concurrently in the nanocrystalline surface layer, which causes the fast oxidation in the initial oxidation stage. The formation of (Fe,Cr)2O3 inner layer would inhabit fast diffusion of alloy elements in the nanocrystalline surface layer of P91 steel in the later oxidation stage, and it causes a decrease in the parabolic oxidation rate compared with conventional specimens. This study provides a novel approach to improve the oxidation resistance of heat resistant steel without changing its Cr content.

  11. Low temperature solid-state synthesis of nanocrystalline gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liangbiao, E-mail: wlb6641@163.com [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Shi, Liang; Li, Qianwen; Si, Lulu; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Science at Microscale and Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► GaN nanocrystalline was prepared via a solid-state reacion at relatively low temperature. ► The sizes and crystallinities of the GaN samples obtained at the different temperatures are investigated. ► The GaN sample has oxidation resistance and good thermal stability below 1000 °C. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline gallium nitride was synthesized by a solid-state reaction of metallic magnesium powder, gallium sesquioxide and sodium amide in a stainless steel autoclave at a relatively low temperature (400–550 °C). The structures and morphologies of the obtained products were derived from X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD patterns indicated that the products were hexagonal GaN (JCPDS card no. 76-0703). The influence of reaction temperature on size of the products was studied by XRD and TEM. Furthermore, the thermal stability and oxidation resistance of the nanocrystalline GaN were also investigated. It had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 800 °C in air.

  12. Thermal Stability: The Next Frontier for Nanocrystalline Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathaudhu, Suveen; Boyce, Brad L.

    2015-11-06

    For the past quarter decade, the science and technology of nanocrystalline materials (materials with grain sizes less than 100 nm) has been an extremely rich and diverse field of study.1,2 Generally, it has been observed that tremendous improvements in physical and mechanical properties, including order-of-magnitude increases in yield strength, are possible.2 As predicted by the Hall– Petch equation,3,4 a reduction in grain size should be accompanied by an increase in strength. But, despite the promise of nanocrystalline materials for a host of structural and functional applications, their use has been severely limited by their lack of microstructural stability at elevated temperatures5 or under mechanical loads.6,7 In the case of pure metals, this coarsening often occurs even at ambient temperatures.5 Ironically, the same features that often result in the enhancement of properties in nanocrystalline materials, namely the high volume fraction of high-energy grain boundaries, are responsible for the observed grain growth or phase transformation.8

  13. Size-dependent deformation behavior of nanocrystalline graphene sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhi [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Huang, Yuhong [College of Physics and Information Technology, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062, Shaanxi (China); Ma, Fei, E-mail: mafei@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Sun, Yunjin [Faculty of Food Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Agriculture, Beijing Key Laboratory of Agricultural Product Detection and Control of Spoilage Organisms and Pesticide Residue, Beijing Laboratory of Food Quality and Safety, Beijing 102206 (China); Xu, Kewei, E-mail: kwxu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Department of Physics and Opt-electronic Engineering, Xi’an University of Arts and Science, Xi’an 710065, Shaanxi (China); Chu, Paul K., E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • MD simulation is conducted to study the deformation of nanocrystalline graphene. • Unexpectedly, the elastic modulus decreases with the grain size considerably. • But the fracture stress and strain are nearly insensitive to the grain size. • A composite model with grain domains and GBs as two components is suggested. - Abstract: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is conducted to study the deformation behavior of nanocrystalline graphene sheets. It is found that the graphene sheets have almost constant fracture stress and strain, but decreased elastic modulus with grain size. The results are different from the size-dependent strength observed in nanocrystalline metals. Structurally, the grain boundaries (GBs) become a principal component in two-dimensional materials with nano-grains and the bond length in GBs tends to be homogeneously distributed. This is almost the same for all the samples. Hence, the fracture stress and strain are almost size independent. As a low-elastic-modulus component, the GBs increase with reducing grain size and the elastic modulus decreases accordingly. A composite model is proposed to elucidate the deformation behavior.

  14. Thermoluminescence characteristics of LiF: Cu nanocrystalline phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth, Pooja, E-mail: pujaseth05@gmail.com; Aggarwal, Shruti [University School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India)

    2016-05-23

    Copper (Cu) activated LiF phosphor in nanocrystalline form has been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method for radiation dosimetry application. The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Scanning electron microscopy. Cubical shaped nanostructure with average particle size of 33nm has been formed. The sample was prepared at different concentration of Cu from 0.01mol% to 3 mol%. TL properties were investigated by studying the glow curve after irradiating the phosphor to gamma ray Co{sup 60} source with dose of 15 Gy. It has been found that nanocrystalline LiF: Cu show simple glow curve structure with a single glow peak at 404 K where as commercially available phosphors exhibits multi peak complex glow curve structure. The effect of different normality on the TL properties of phosphor has been studied. Maximum TL intensity for LiF: Cu (0.1mol %) phosphor is observed at the normality of 0.5N and annealing temperature of 200°C. The phosphor showed good linearity up to 10 KGy.

  15. Low thermal conductivity and improved thermoelectric performance of nanocrystalline silicon germanium films by sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, J A Perez; Romero, J J; Abad, B; Muñoz-Rojo, M; Mello, A; Briones, F; Gonzalez, M S Martin

    2016-04-29

    Si x Ge1-x alloys are well-known thermoelectric materials with a high figure of merit at high temperatures. In this work, metal-induced crystallization (MIC) has been used to grow Si0.8Ge0.2 films that present improved thermoelectric performance (zT = 5.6 × 10(-4) at room temperature)--according to previously reported values on films--with a relatively large power factor (σ · S (2) = 16 μW · m(-1) · K(-2)). More importantly, a reduction in the thermal conductivity at room temperature (κ = 1.13 ± 0.12 W · m(-1) · K(-1)) compared to other Si-Ge films (∼3 W · m(-1) · K(-1)) has been found. Whereas the usual crystallization of amorphous SiGe (a-SiGe) is achieved at high temperatures and for long times, which triggers dopant loss, MIC reduces the crystallization temperature and the heating time. The associated dopant loss is thus avoided, resulting in a nanostructuration of the film. Using this method, we obtained Si0.8Ge0.2 films (grown by DC plasma sputtering) with appropriate compositional and structural properties. Different thermal treatments were tested in situ (by heating the sample inside the deposition chamber) and ex situ (annealed in an external furnace with controlled conditions). From the studies of the films by: x-ray diffraction (XRD), synchrotron radiation grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD), micro Raman, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), Hall effect, Seebeck coefficient, electrical and thermal conductivity measurements, we observed that the in situ films at 500 °C presented the best zT values with no gold contamination.

  16. Photogating effect as a defect probe in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H. B. T.; Schropp, R.E.I.; Rubinelli, F.A.

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of the spectrally resolved collection efficiency is of great importance in solar cell characterization. Under standard conditions the bias light is a solar simulator or a light source with a similar broadband irradiation spectrum. When a colored blue or red bias light is used instead

  17. Growth and Characterization of Thin Film Nanocrystalline Silicon Materials and Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    The need for electrical energy is growing fast as a result of the expanding world population and economic activities. On top of this the energy need of each individual is also growing. At present the growth in energy demand is not matched by the growth in energy generation because of insufficient

  18. Spectroscopy and structural properties of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halindintwali, Sylvain; Knoesen, D.; Julies, B.A.; Arendse, C.J.; Muller, T.; Gengler, Régis Y.N.; Rudolf, P.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous SiC:H thin films were grown by hot wire chemical vapour deposition from a SiH4/CH4/H2 mixture at a substrate temperature below 400 °C. Thermal annealing in an argon environment up to 900 °C shows that the films crystallize as μc-Si:H and SiC with a porous microstructure that favours an oxi

  19. Spectroscopy and structural properties of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon carbide thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halindintwali, Sylvain; Knoesen, D.; Julies, B.A.; Arendse, C.J.; Muller, T.; Gengler, Régis Y.N.; Rudolf, P.; Loosdrecht, P.H.M. van

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous SiC:H thin films were grown by hot wire chemical vapour deposition from a SiH4/CH4/H2 mixture at a substrate temperature below 400 °C. Thermal annealing in an argon environment up to 900 °C shows that the films crystallize as μc-Si:H and SiC with a porous microstructure that favours an

  20. Growth and Characterization of Thin Film Nanocrystalline Silicon Materials and Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agbo, S.N.

    2012-01-01

    The need for electrical energy is growing fast as a result of the expanding world population and economic activities. On top of this the energy need of each individual is also growing. At present the growth in energy demand is not matched by the growth in energy generation because of insufficient en

  1. The chemistry of silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Rochow, E G; Emeléus, H J; Nyholm, Ronald

    1975-01-01

    Pergamon Texts in Organic Chemistry, Volume 9: The Chemistry of Silicon presents information essential in understanding the chemical properties of silicon. The book first covers the fundamental aspects of silicon, such as its nuclear, physical, and chemical properties. The text also details the history of silicon, its occurrence and distribution, and applications. Next, the selection enumerates the compounds and complexes of silicon, along with organosilicon compounds. The text will be of great interest to chemists and chemical engineers. Other researchers working on research study involving s

  2. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Abdulraheem

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD. The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause

  3. Optical bandgap of ultra-thin amorphous silicon films deposited on crystalline silicon by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdulraheem, Yaser, E-mail: yaser.abdulraheem@kuniv.edu.kw [Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering and Petroleum, Kuwait University. P.O. Box 5969, 13060 Safat (Kuwait); Gordon, Ivan; Bearda, Twan; Meddeb, Hosny; Poortmans, Jozef [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001, Leuven (Belgium)

    2014-05-15

    An optical study based on spectroscopic ellipsometry, performed on ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) layers, is presented in this work. Ultrathin layers of intrinsic amorphous silicon have been deposited on n-type mono-crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The layer thicknesses along with their optical properties –including their refractive index and optical loss- were characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) in a wavelength range from 250 nm to 850 nm. The data was fitted to a Tauc-Lorentz optical model and the fitting parameters were extracted and used to compute the refractive index, extinction coefficient and optical bandgap. Furthermore, the a-Si:H film grown on silicon was etched at a controlled rate using a TMAH solution prepared at room temperature. The optical properties along with the Tauc-Lorentz fitting parameters were extracted from the model as the film thickness was reduced. The etch rate for ultrathin a-Si:H layers in TMAH at room temperature was found to slow down drastically as the c-Si interface is approached. From the Tauc-Lorentz parameters obtained from SE, it was found that the a-Si film exhibited properties that evolved with thickness suggesting that the deposited film is non-homogeneous across its depth. It was also found that the degree of crystallinity and optical (Tauc) bandgap increased as the layers were reduced in thickness and coming closer to the c-Si substrate interface, suggesting the presence of nano-structured clusters mixed into the amorphous phase for the region close to the crystalline silicon substrate. Further results from Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy confirmed the presence of an interfacial transitional layer between the amorphous film and the underlying substrate showing silicon nano-crystalline enclosures that can lead to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement is suggested to be the cause of the observed

  4. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  5. Formation of a nanocrystalline layer on the surface of stone wool fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Yuanzheng; Korsgaard, Martin; Kirkegaard, Lise Frank;

    2009-01-01

    +. It is found that the diffusion of Mg2+ is dominant in the overall diffusion process. The main phase of the nanocrystalline layer is identified to be periclase (MgO) crystals. The thickness of the nanocrystalline layer can be varied by adjusting the temperature and the duration of preoxidation...

  6. An Investigation on Hall-Petch Relationship in Electrodeposited Nanocrystalline Cu-Ni-P Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiqing Sun; Yinong Shi

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cu-Ni-P alloys with average grain sizes of 7, 10 and 24 nm were synthesized by means of electrodeposition.The grain size dependences of tensile strength and hardness of the nanocrystalline Cu alloys were investigated.The breakdown of Hall-Perch relation was exhibited in both tensile strength and hardness.

  7. Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition by Tiffany Ngo ARL-TN-0643...November 2014 Characterization of Nanocrystalline Aluminum Alloy 5083 Powders Produced by Cryogenic Attrition Tiffany Ngo Weapons and... Materials Research Directorate, ARL Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited

  8. Glass-silicon column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  9. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Al-Jassim, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    We have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that utilizes the very large surface areas, produced by porous silicon etch on both front and back surfaces of the silicon wafer, as gettering sites. In this method, a simple and low-cost chemical etching is used to generate the porous silicon layers. Then, a high-flux solar furnace (HFSF) is used to provide high-temperature annealing and the required injection of silicon interstitials. The gettering sites, along with the gettered impurities, can be easily removed at the end the process. The porous silicon removal process consists of oxidizing the porous silicon near the end the gettering process followed by sample immersion in HF acid. Each porous silicon gettering process removes up to about 10 {mu}m of wafer thickness. This gettering process can be repeated so that the desired purity level is obtained.

  10. Low temperature photoluminescence of a nanostructured silicon-based semiconductor for potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddenzati, A.; Hosatte, M.; Basta, M.; Kuznicki, Z. T.; Remouche, M.; Meyrueis, P.; Haeberlé, O.

    2016-05-01

    A nanoscale layer of amorphized silicon is obtained by implantations with silicon ions through a P-doped FZ-silicon wafer material few nanometers below the wafer surface. After a controlled annealing, the amorphized silicon material is sandwiched between two layers of recrystallized silicon. Defects remain at the interface c-Si/a-Si/c-Si. Photoluminescence at very low temperature is experimented to determine the energy levels generated by this design. TEM pictures show that some nanocrystalline elements are located close to the interface surrounded by a-Si. However, the photoluminescence spectra do not present any signal of luminescence from them. This could be due to random sizes of nanocrystals. Then, a scan from energies below the silicon bandgap has been realized at 8 K. The spectrum is composed of multiple narrow peaks close to the conduction band and a broadband from 0.78 eV to 1.05 eV. In order to determine the origin of these signals, spectra of three distinct peaks were collected at different temperatures from 8 K to 120 K. The broadband collapses more rapidly by increasing the temperature than the narrow lines and theirs maxima of intensity differ.

  11. In vitro corrosion, cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of bulk nanocrystalline pure iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, F L; Zheng, Y F; Wei, S C; Hu, C; Yang, G

    2010-12-01

    Bulk nanocrystalline pure iron rods were fabricated by the equal channel angular pressure (ECAP) technique up to eight passes. The microstructure and grain size distribution, natural immersion and electrochemical corrosion in simulated body fluid, cellular responses and hemocompatibility were investigated in this study. The results indicate that nanocrystalline pure iron after severe plastic deformation (SPD) would sustain durable span duration and exhibit much stronger corrosion resistance than that of the microcrystalline pure iron. The interaction of different cell lines reveals that the nanocrystalline pure iron stimulates better proliferation of fibroblast cells and preferable promotion of endothelialization, while inhibits effectively the viability of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The burst of red cells and adhesion of the platelets were also substantially suppressed on contact with the nanocrystalline pure iron in blood circulation. A clear size-dependent behavior from the grain nature deduced by the gradual refinement microstructures was given and well-behaved in vitro biocompatibility of nanocrystalline pure iron was concluded.

  12. Molten salt synthesis and luminescent properties of YVO4:Eu nanocrystalline phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; LIU Chenglu; ZHOU Zhiqiang; JIA Peiyun; LIN Jun

    2012-01-01

    YVO4:Eu nanocrystalline phosphors were successfully prepared at 400 ℃ in equal moles of NaNO3 and KNO3 molten salts.NaOH concentration and annealing temperature played important roles in phase purity and crystallinity of the nanocrystallines,and the optimum NaOH concentration and annealing temperature were 6∶40 and 400 ℃,respectively.The nanocrystallines were well crystallized with a cubic morphology in an average grain size of 18 nm.Upon excitation of the vanadate groups at 314 nm,YVO4:Eu nanocrystallines exhibited the characteristic emission of Eu3+,which indicated that there was an energy transfer from vanadate groups to Eu3+.Moreover,the influence of superficial effect,especially the dangling bonds on the structure and luminescent properties of the nanocrystallines was discussed in detail.

  13. Rate dependent rheological stress-strain behavior of porous nanocrystalline materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧; 周剑秋

    2008-01-01

    To completely understand the rate-dependent stress-strain behavior of the porous nanocrystalline materials,it is necessary to formulate a constitutive model that can reflect the complicated experimentally observed stress-strain relations of nanocrystalline materials.The nanocrystalline materials consisting grain interior and grain boundary are considered as viscoplastic and porous materials for the reasons that their mechanical deformation is commonly governed by both dislocation glide and diffusion,and pores commonly exist in the nanocrystalline materials.A constitutive law of the unified theory reflecting the stress-strain relations was established and verified by experimental data of bulk nanocrystalline Ni prepared by hydrogen direct current arc plasma evaporation method and hot compression.The effect of the evolution of porosity on stress-strain relations was taken into account to make that the predicted results can keep good agreements with the corresponding experimental results.

  14. Growth and tribological properties of diamond films on silicon and tungsten carbide substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhika, R.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.

    2016-11-01

    Hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to deposit microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon (Si) and tungsten carbide (WC-6Co) substrates. Friction coefficient of larger diamond grains deposited on WC-6Co substrate shows less value approximately 0.2 while this differs marginally on films grown on Si substrate. The study claims that for a less friction coefficient, the grain size is not necessarily smaller. However, the less friction coefficient (less than 0.1 saturated value) in MCD and NCD deposited on Si is explained by the formation of graphitized tribolayer. This layer easily forms when diamond phase is thermodynamically unstable.

  15. Mechanical and piezoresistive properties of thin silicon films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and hot-wire chemical vapor deposition at low substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, J.; Gualdino, A.; Lemke, B.; Paul, O.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2012-07-01

    This paper reports on the mechanical and piezoresistance characterization of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin films deposited by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) and radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) using substrate temperatures between 100 and 250 °C. The microtensile technique is used to determine film properties such as Young's modulus, fracture strength and Weibull parameters, and linear and quadratic piezoresistance coefficients obtained at large applied stresses. The 95%-confidence interval for the elastic constant of the films characterized, 85.9 ± 0.3 GPa, does not depend significantly on the deposition method or on film structure. In contrast, mean fracture strength values range between 256 ± 8 MPa and 600 ± 32 MPa: nanocrystalline layers are slightly stronger than their amorphous counterparts and a pronounced increase in strength is observed for films deposited using HWCVD when compared to those grown by PECVD. Extracted Weibull moduli are below 10. In terms of piezoresistance, n-doped radio-frequency nanocrystalline silicon films deposited at 250 °C present longitudinal piezoresistive coefficients as large as -(2.57 ± 0.03) × 10-10 Pa-1 with marginally nonlinear response. Such values approach those of crystalline silicon and of polysilicon layers deposited at much higher temperatures.

  16. Silicon on glass grown from indium and tin solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansen, Roman; Ehlers, Christian; Teubner, Thomas; Böttcher, Klaus; Gambaryan, Karen; Schmidtbauer, Jan; Boeck, Torsten

    2016-04-01

    A two-step process is used to grow crystalline silicon (c-Si) on glass at low temperatures. In the first step, nanocrystalline seed layers are formed at temperatures in the range of 230 to 400°C by either metal-induced crystallization or by direct deposition on heated substrates. In the second step, c-Si is grown on the seed layer by steady-state liquid phase epitaxy at a temperature range of 580 to 710°C. Microcrystalline Si layers with grain sizes of up to several tens of micrometers are grown from In and Sn solutions. Three-dimensional simulations of heat and convective flow in the crucible have been conducted and give valuable insights into the growth process. The experimental results are promising with regard to the designated use of the material in photovoltaics.

  17. Thermoelectric Effects in Self-heating Silicon Microwires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Gokhan

    Self-heating mechanisms of small-scale structures have been an important subject where electrical and thermal transports are coupled, such as many electronic and optoelectronic devices, micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS), thermoelectric energy conversion devices and phase-change memory devices. In this work, nanocrystalline silicon microwires (L: 1 — 30 gm, Width: 0.1 — 1 gm, Thickness: 50 — 130 nm) are self-heated either through a single, short duration ( 1300 K) give rise to significant electron-hole pair generation and strong thermal gradients (˜1 K/nm) lead to substantial gradients in the generation-recombination balance. The modeled results are good agreement with the both microsecond voltage pulse and long duration AC signal experiments.

  18. Kinetics of diamond-silicon reaction under high pressure-high temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantea, Cristian

    In this dissertation work, the kinetics of the reaction between diamond and silicon at high pressure-high temperature conditions was investigated. This study was motivated by the extremely limited amount of information related to the kinetics of the reaction in diamond-silicon carbide composites formation. It was found that the reaction between diamond and melted silicon and the subsequent silicon carbide formation is a two-stage process. The initial stage is a result of direct reaction of melted silicon with carbon atoms from the diamond surface, the phase boundary reaction. Further growth of SiC is much more complicated and when the outer surfaces of diamond crystals are covered with the silicon carbide layer it involves diffusion of carbon and silicon atoms through the SiC layer. The reaction takes place differently for the two regions of stability of carbon. In the graphite-stable region, the reaction between diamond and melted silicon is associated with the diamond-to-graphite phase transition, while in the diamond-stable region there is no intermediary step for the reaction. The data obtained at HPHT were fitted by the Avrami-Erofeev equation. It was found that the reaction is isotropic, the beta-SiC grown on different faces of the diamond crystals showing the same reaction rate, and that the controlling mechanism for the reaction is the diffusion. In the graphite-stable region the activation energy, 402 kJ/mol is slightly higher than in the diamond-stable region, 260 kJ/mol, as the reaction between diamond and melted silicon is associated with the diamond-to-graphite phase transition, which has higher activation energy. In the diamond-stable region, the calculated activation energy is higher for micron size diamond powders (≈260 kJ/mol), while for nanocrystalline diamond powders a lower value of 170 kJ/mol was obtained. This effect was attributed to nanocrystalline structure and strained bonds within grain boundaries in SiC formed from nanosize diamond

  19. Silicon micro-mold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Alfredo M.

    2006-10-24

    The present invention describes a method for rapidly fabricating a robust 3-dimensional silicon-mold for use in preparing complex metal micro-components. The process begins by depositing a conductive metal layer onto one surface of a silicon wafer. A thin photoresist and a standard lithographic mask are then used to transfer a trace image pattern onto the opposite surface of the wafer by exposing and developing the resist. The exposed portion of the silicon substrate is anisotropically etched through the wafer thickness down to conductive metal layer to provide an etched pattern consisting of a series of rectilinear channels and recesses in the silicon which serve as the silicon micro-mold. Microcomponents are prepared with this mold by first filling the mold channels and recesses with a metal deposit, typically by electroplating, and then removing the silicon micro-mold by chemical etching.

  20. Enhancement of the nucleation of smooth and dense nanocrystalline diamond films by using molybdenum seed layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijnsters, J. G.; Vázquez, L.; van Dreumel, G. W. G.; ter Meulen, J. J.; van Enckevort, W. J. P.; Celis, J. P.

    2010-11-01

    A method for the nucleation enhancement of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films on silicon substrates at low temperature is discussed. A sputter deposition of a Mo seed layer with thickness 50 nm on Si substrates was applied followed by an ultrasonic seeding step with nanosized detonation diamond powders. Hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HF-CVD) was used to nucleate and grow NCD films on substrates heated up at 550 °C. The nucleation of diamond and the early stages of NCD film formation were investigated at different methane percentages in methane/hydrogen gas mixtures by atomic force microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and grazing incidence x-ray analyses in order to gain specific insight in the nucleation process of NCD films. The nucleation kinetics of diamond on the Mo-coated Si substrates was found to be up to ten times higher than on blank Si substrates. The enhancement of the nucleation of diamond on thin Mo interlayers results from two effects, namely, (a) the nanometer rough Mo surface shows an improved embedding of ultrasonically introduced nanosized diamond seeds that act as starting points for the diamond nucleation during HF-CVD and (b) the rapid carbonization of the Mo surface causes the formation of Mo2C onto which diamond easily nucleates. The diamond nucleation density progressively increases at increasing methane percentages and is about 5×1010 cm-2 at 4.0% methane. The improved nucleation kinetics of diamond on Mo interlayers facilitates the rapid formation of NCD films possessing a very low surface roughness down to ˜6 nm, and allows a submicron thickness control.

  1. Enhanced conversion efficiency in nanocrystalline solar cells using optically functional patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Doo; Park, Sang Jun [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Anam-dong, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Eunseok [Photovoltaic Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyoung Suk [KIER-UNIST Advanced Center for Energy, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Jun-Sik, E-mail: jscho@kier.re.kr [Photovoltaic Laboratory, Korea Institute of Energy Research, 152 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Heon, E-mail: heonlee@korea.ac.kr [Department of Materials and Science Engineering, Korea University, 5-1 Anam-dong, Sungbuk-Gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-31

    The lower conversion efficiency of nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells is a result of its lower photon absorption capability of nc-Si:H. To increase photon absorption of nc-Si:H, the Ag substrates were fabricated with optically functional patterns. Two types of patterns, with random and regular structures, were formed by direct imprint technology. Owing to these optically functional patterns, the scattering of reflected light at the surface of the patterned Ag was enhanced and the optical path became longer. Thus, a greater amount of photons was absorbed by the nc-Si:H layer. Compared to flat Ag (without a surface pattern), the light absorption value of the nc-Si:H layer with a random structure pattern was increased at wavelengths ranging from 600 to 1100 nm. In the case of the regular patterned Ag, the light absorption value of the nc-Si:H layer was higher than the flat Ag at 300 to 1100 nm. Subsequently, nc-Si:H solar cells constructed on the optically functional pattern exhibit a 15.7% higher J{sub sc} value and a 19.5% higher overall conversion efficiency, compared to an identical solar cell on flat Ag. - Highlights: • Optically functional patterns were fabricated by direct printing technique. • The light absorption of solar cells was increased by the patterned Ag substrate. • Current density of solar cells on patterned Ag increased by approximately 15.7%. • The efficiency of solar cells on patterned Ag increased by 19.5%.

  2. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanocrystalline materials in an industrial mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eberhard Gock

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanosized materials are polycrystalline materials, whose crystal size is a few (typically 1-100 nanometers in at least one dimension. It has been proposed that as particles become smaller in size they may take on different chemical and physical properties. One of the most intriguing observations was that nanocrystals prepared by the altered “nano“ approach exhibited a higher surface chemical reactivity than more conventionally prepared samples. Nanocrystalline materials have many potential applications in the area of advanced materials. Their strongly size-dependent optical properties render them attractive candidates as tunable light absorbers and emitters in optoelectronic devices such as light-emitting diodes and quantum-dot lasers. These materials can be synthesized via solid state reactions where the efficiency of synthesis can be strongly enhanced by an intervention of high-energy milling (mechanochemical synthesis. The mechanochemical synthesis can effectively control and regulate the course of solid state reactions. Nanocrystalline materials MeS (Me=Pb, Zn, Cd, Cu were successfully synthesized by the mechanochemical route from the corresponding metal acetates and natrium sulphide in an industrial mill. Structure properties of the as-prepared products were characterized by the X-ray powder diffraction, revealing the crystalline nature of the MeS nanoparticles. The methods of TEM, particle size analysis and the low temperature nitrogen sorption were used to analyze the particle morphology and the surface composition. The average sizes of MeS particles of 4-18 nm were estimated by Scherrer´s formula. The nanocrystalline materials are obtained in the simple step, making the process attractive for industrial applications. The main advantage of the application of the industrial mill is that it is a “quantity” process, permitting kilograms of material to be produced at an ambient temperature in a very short processing time. Moreover

  3. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  4. Nanocrystalline Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network with intense white light emission fabricated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Y., E-mail: ymatsumo@cinvestav.mx; Dutt, A. [SEES, Electrical Engineering Department, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Santana-Rodríguez, G. [Institute of Material Research, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán 04510 (Mexico); Santoyo-Salazar, J. [Department of Physics, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Cinvestav-IPN, Mexico, D.F. 07360 (Mexico); Aceves-Mijares, M. [Departament of Electronics, Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72000 (Mexico)

    2015-04-27

    We report the fabrication of a stable Si/SiO{sub 2} core-shell network using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Structural investigations using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of nanocrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide quantum dots in the form of a core-shell network embedded in the amorphous SiO{sub x} matrix, while selected area electron diffraction confirms the formation of a core-shell structure. The core-shell structure exhibits a bright white emission that can be seen with the unaided eye at room temperature without any post-annealing treatments, and the observed photoemission does not alter in color or intensity after prolonged laser exposure. Additional measurements are performed while varying the laser power and optical gain is found in the as-deposited material. Intense stable white luminescence is observed and shows the prospective for various optical and biological applications in the future.

  5. Nanocrystalline Si/SiO2 core-shell network with intense white light emission fabricated by hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Dutt, A.; Santana-Rodríguez, G.; Santoyo-Salazar, J.; Aceves-Mijares, M.

    2015-04-01

    We report the fabrication of a stable Si/SiO2 core-shell network using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition on a silicon substrate at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Structural investigations using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction confirm the presence of nanocrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide quantum dots in the form of a core-shell network embedded in the amorphous SiOx matrix, while selected area electron diffraction confirms the formation of a core-shell structure. The core-shell structure exhibits a bright white emission that can be seen with the unaided eye at room temperature without any post-annealing treatments, and the observed photoemission does not alter in color or intensity after prolonged laser exposure. Additional measurements are performed while varying the laser power and optical gain is found in the as-deposited material. Intense stable white luminescence is observed and shows the prospective for various optical and biological applications in the future.

  6. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  7. Silicon Carbide Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-standing silicon carbide shapes are produced by passing a properly diluted stream of a reactant gas, for example methyltrichlorosilane, into a...reaction chamber housing a thin walled, hollow graphite body heated to 1300-1500C. After the graphite body is sufficiently coated with silicon carbide , the...graphite body is fired, converting the graphite to gaseous CO2 and CO and leaving a silicon carbide shaped article remaining.

  8. Applications of functionalized and nanoparticle-modified nanocrystalline cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Edmond; Male, Keith B; Chong, Jonathan H; Leung, Alfred C W; Luong, John H T

    2012-05-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC), a rod-shaped nanoscale material with exceptional strength and physicochemical properties, can be prepared from inexpensive renewable biomass. Besides its potential use as a reinforcing agent for industrial biocomposites, pristine NCC exhibits low toxicity and poses no serious environmental concerns, providing impetus for its use in bioapplications. Here, we review recent developments in the use of modified NCC for emerging bioapplications, specifically enzyme immobilization, antimicrobial and medical materials, green catalysis, biosensing and controlled drug delivery. We focus on the modification of NCC with chemical functionalities and inorganic nanoparticles, reviewing practical considerations such as reusability, toxicity and scale-up capability.

  9. Nanocrystalline CdTe thin films by electrochemical synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh S. Kapadnis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium telluride thin films were deposited onto different substrates as copper, Fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO, Indium tin oxide (ITO, Aluminum and zinc at room temperature via electrochemical route. The morphology of the film shows the nanostructures on the deposited surface of the films and their growth in vertical direction. Different nanostructures developed on different substrates. The X-ray diffraction study reveals that the deposited films are nanocrystalline in nature. UV-Visible absorption spectrum shows the wide range of absorption in the visible region. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy confirms the formation of cadmium telluride.

  10. Microstrain in Nanocrystalline Copper by High Resolution Electron Microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Changping; RUAN Xuefeng; ZOU Huamin

    2009-01-01

    The elastic microstrains in a crystallite of electrodeposited nanocrystalline copper were investigated by analyzing the high resolution electron microscopy(HRTEM)image.The mi-crostrain was considered as consisting of two parts,in which the uniform part was determined with fast Fourier transformation of the HRTEM image,while the non-uniform part of the microstrain in the crystallite was measured by means of peak finding.Atomic column spacing measurements show that the crystal lattice is contracted in the longitudinal direction,while expanded in the transverse direction of the elliptical crystallite,indicating that the variation of microstrain exists mainly near the grain boundary.

  11. Deposition and Characterization of Nanocrystalline Diamond Films on Mirror-Polished Si Substrate by Biased Enhanced Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, T.; Sharda, T.; Jimbo, T.; Umeno, M.

    Hard and smooth nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films were deposited on polished silicon substrates by biased enhanced growth in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. The films deposited with varying the methane concentration and biasing voltage were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, nano-indenter, x-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Stress in the films increases with decreasing methane concentration in the gas-phase and with increasing biasing. The adhesion between NCD film and Si substrate is very strong sustaining the compressive stress as high as high as 85 GPa. It was hypothesized that hydrogen content of the films and graphitic content of the films are responsible in generating stress. The hardness is well correlated with the Raman peak intensity ratio of NCD peak to G peak.

  12. Hydrogen plasma treatment of very thin p-type nanocrystalline Si films grown by RF-PECVD in the presence of B(CH33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergej Alexandrovich Filonovich, Hugo Águas, Tito Busani, António Vicente, Andreia Araújo, Diana Gaspar, Marcia Vilarigues, Joaquim Leitão, Elvira Fortunato and Rodrigo Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We have characterized the structure and electrical properties of p-type nanocrystalline silicon films prepared by radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and explored optimization methods of such layers for potential applications in thin-film solar cells. Particular attention was paid to the characterization of very thin (~20 nm films. The cross-sectional morphology of the layers was studied by fitting the ellipsometry spectra using a multilayer model. The results suggest that the crystallization process in a high-pressure growth regime is mostly realized through a subsurface mechanism in the absence of the incubation layer at the substrate-film interface. Hydrogen plasma treatment of a 22-nm-thick film improved its electrical properties (conductivity increased more than ten times owing to hydrogen insertion and Si structure rearrangements throughout the entire thickness of the film.

  13. Quantitative X-ray pair distribution function analysis of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrates: a contribution to the understanding of cement chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grangeon, Sylvain; Baronnet, Alain; Marty, Nicolas; Poulain, Agnieszka; Elkaïm, Erik; Roosz, Cédric; Gaboreau, Stéphane; Henocq, Pierre; Claret, Francis

    2017-01-01

    The structural evolution of nanocrystalline calcium silicate hydrate (C–S–H) as a function of its calcium to silicon (Ca/Si) ratio has been probed using qualitative and quantitative X-ray atomic pair distribution function analysis of synchrotron X-ray scattering data. Whatever the Ca/Si ratio, the C–S–H structure is similar to that of tobermorite. When the Ca/Si ratio increases from ∼0.6 to ∼1.2, Si wollastonite-like chains progressively depolymerize through preferential omission of Si bridging tetrahedra. When the Ca/Si ratio approaches ∼1.5, nanosheets of portlandite are detected in samples aged for 1 d, while microcrystalline portlandite is detected in samples aged for 1 year. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging shows that the tobermorite-like structure is maintained to Ca/Si > 3.

  14. Novel Silicon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Novel silicon nanotubes with inner-diameter of 60-80 nm was prepared using hydrogen-added dechlorination of SiCl4 followed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on a NixMgyO catalyst. The TEM observation showed that the suitable reaction temperature is 973 K for the formation of silicon nanotubes. Most of silicon nanotubes have one open end and some have two closed ends. The shape ofnanoscale silicon, however, is a micro-crystal type at 873 K, a rod or needle type at 993 K and an onion-type at 1023 K, respectively.

  15. Breast Implants: Saline vs. Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... differ in material and consistency, however. Saline breast implants Saline implants are filled with sterile salt water. ... of any age for breast reconstruction. Silicone breast implants Silicone implants are pre-filled with silicone gel — ...

  16. Monolithic Composite Electrodes Comprising Silicon Nanoparticles Embedded in Lignin-derived Carbon Fibers for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, Orlando [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Martha, Surendra K. [Indian Inst. of Technology (IIT), Yedduaram (India); McGuire, Michael A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tenhaeff, Wyatt [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); More, Karren [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Daniel, Claus [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nanda, Jagjit [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-08-26

    Here, we report direct manufacturing of high-capacity carbon/silicon composite fiber electrodes for lithium-ion batteries produced via a flexible low-cost melt processing route, yielding low-cost stable silicon particles coated in situ by a 10 nanometer thick protective silica layer. Moreover, the core–shell silicon/SiO2 islands are embedded in electrochemically active and electronically conductive carbon fiber derived from lignin precursor material. The silicon–silica–carbon composites exhibit capacities exceeding 700 mAh g-1 with Coulombic efficiencies in excess of 99.5 %. Finally, the high efficiency, stability, and rate capability are linked to the nanocrystalline structure and abundant, uniform nanometer-thick SiO2 interfaces that are produced during the spinning and subsequent pyrolysis of the precursor blend.

  17. Grain size stabilization of nanocrystalline copper at high temperatures by alloying with tantalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darling, K.A., E-mail: kristopher.darling.civ@mail.mil [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Roberts, A.J. [ORISE Program, U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States); Mishin, Y. [George Mason University, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Mathaudhu, S.N. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 (United States); Kecskes, L.J. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5069 (United States)

    2013-10-05

    Highlights: •A mean grain size of 167 nm is retained after annealing at 97% of the melting point. •Hardness surpasses conventional pure nanocrystalline Cu by 2.5 GPa. •Extreme stability is attributed to both thermodynamic and kinetic stabilization. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline Cu–Ta alloys belong to an emerging class of immiscible materials with potential for high-temperature applications. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Vickers microhardness, transmission and scanning electron microscopy (TEM/SEM), and atomistic simulations have been applied to study the structural evolution in high-energy cryogenically alloyed nanocrystalline Cu–10 at.%Ta. The thermally induced coarsening of the as-milled microstructure was investigated and it was found that the onset of grain growth occurs at temperatures higher than that for pure nanocrystalline Cu. The total heat release associated with grain growth was 0.553 kJ/mol. Interestingly, nanocrystalline Cu–10 at.%Ta maintains a mean grain size (GS) of 167 nm after annealing at 97% of its melting point. The increased microstructural stability is attributed to a combination of thermodynamic and kinetic stabilization effects which, in turn, appear to be controlled by segregation and diffusion of Ta solute atoms along grain boundaries (GBs). The as-milled nanocrystalline Cu–10 at.%Ta exhibits Vickers microhardness values near 5 GPa surpassing the microhardness of conventional pure nanocrystalline Cu by ∼2.5 GPa.

  18. Biomimetic helical rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium for improving orthopedic implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Chen, Yupeng; Rodriguez, Jose; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J

    2008-01-01

    Natural bone consists of hard nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA) in a nanostructured protein-based soft hydrogel template (ie, mostly collagen). For this reason, nanostructured HA has been an intriguing coating material on traditionally used titanium for improving orthopedic applications. In addition, helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), newly developed materials which form through the self-assembly process of DNA base pair building blocks in body solutions, are soft nanotubes with a helical architecture that mimics natural collagen. Thus, the objective of this in vitro study was for the first time to combine the promising attributes of HRNs and nanocrystalline HA on titanium and assess osteoblast (bone-forming cell) functions. Different sizes of nanocrystalline HA were synthesized in this study through a wet chemical precipitation process following either hydrothermal treatment or sintering. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that HRNs aligned with nanocrystalline HA, which indicates a high affinity between both components. Some of the nanocrystalline HA formed dense coatings with HRNs on titanium. More importantly, results demonstrated enhanced osteoblast adhesion on the HRN/nanocrystalline HA-coated titanium compared with conventional uncoated titanium. Among all the HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings tested, osteoblast adhesion was the greatest when HA nanometer particle size was the smallest. In this manner, this study demonstrated for the first time that biomimetic HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings on titanium were cytocompatible for osteoblasts and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic implants.

  19. Synthesis and properties of nanocrystalline nonferrous metals prepared by flow-levitation-molding method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline nonferrous metals (Cu, Al, and Ag) were synthesized by flow-levitation-molding method. The microstructure of the as-prepared nanocrystalline metals was characterized by XRD and FESEM. The microhardness and electrical resistivity were tested by the HMV-2 type Microhardness Tester and 6157 type Electrometer, respectively. The synthesis process was also studied. The results show that the spheriform particles in nanocrystalline metals have average grain size of 20-30 nm. The relative density of nanocrystalline Cu, Al, and Ag are 95.1%, 98.1% and 98.3%, respectively. The microhardness of nanocrystalline Cu, Al and Ag are 2.01, 2.11 and 1.26 GPa respectively, which are larger than those of their coarse-grained counterparts by the factor of 4.5, 14, and 2.5, respectively. The electrical resistivity of nanocrystalline Cu at room temperature is 1.5 × 10-7 Ω·m, which is higher than coarse-grained Cu by a factor of 7.5. The pressure is the predominant factor influencing the density of the as-prepared nanocrystalline nonferrous metals.

  20. The electrochemical corrosion of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron in acidic sulfate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S G; Shen, C B; Long, K; Zhang, T; Wang, F H; Zhang, Z D

    2006-01-12

    The corrosion properties of bulk nanocrystalline ingot iron (BNII) fabricated from conventional polycrystalline ingot iron (CPII) by severe rolling were investigated by means of immersion test, potentiodynamic polarization (PDP), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation. These experimental results indicate that BNII possesses excellent corrosion resistance in comparison with CPII in acidic sulfate solution at room temperature. It may mainly result from different surface microstructures between CPII and BNII. However, the corrosion resistance of nanocrystalline materials is usually degraded because of their metastable microstructure nature, and the residual stress in nanocrystalline materials also can result in degradation of corrosion resistance according to the traditional point of view.

  1. Investigation of grain boundary activity in nanocrystalline Al under an indenter by using a multiscale method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Yu-Fei; Yang Xin; Zhao Xing; Wang Shao-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Grain boundary activity in nanocrystalline Al under an indenter is studied by using a multiscale method.It is found that grain boundaries and twin boundaries can be transformed into each other by emitting and absorbing dislocations.The transition processes might result in grain coarsening and refinement events.Dislocation reflection generated by a piece of stable grain boundary is also observed,because of the complex local atomic structure within the nanocrystalline Al.This implies that nanocrystalline metals might improve their internal structural stability with the help of some special local grain boundaries.

  2. Three-dimensional analysis by electron diffraction methods of nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gammer, Christoph; Mangler, Clemens; Karnthaler, Hans-Peter; Rentenberger, Christian

    2011-12-01

    To analyze nanocrystalline structures quantitatively in 3D, a novel method is presented based on electron diffraction. It allows determination of the average size and morphology of the coherently scattering domains (CSD) in a straightforward way without the need to prepare multiple sections. The method is applicable to all kinds of bulk nanocrystalline materials. As an example, the average size of the CSD in nanocrystalline FeAl made by severe plastic deformation is determined in 3D. Assuming ellipsoidal CSD, it is deduced that the CSD have a width of 19 ± 2 nm, a length of 18 ± 1 nm, and a height of 10 ± 1 nm.

  3. Curie Temperature of the Intergranular Amorphous Phase in Nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The FeZrB amorphous alloys for simulating the intergranular amorphous phase in the nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 soft magnetic materials were obtained by mechanical alloying of a mixture of elemental Fe, Zr and B powdersfor 25 h. It is shown that the Curie temperature of the simulated intergranular phase alloy is much lower than thatof the intergranular phase with the same chemical composition in the nanocrystalline Fe89Zr7B4 alloy. The possiblemechanism is mainly due to the strong ferromagnetic exchange force among the nanocrystalline α-Fe grains.

  4. Magnetic properties of nanocrystalline pyrrhotite prepared by high-energy milling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balaz, P.; Godocikova, E.; Alacova, A.;

    2004-01-01

    The nanocrystalline pyrrhotite was prepared by high-energy milling of lead sulphide with elemental Fe acting as reducing element. X-ray diffractometry, Mossbauer spectroscopy and VSM magnetometry were used to determine the properties of nanocrystalline iron sulphide prepared by the corresponding...... mechanochemical reaction. Pyrrhotite Fe1-xS together with the residual Fe metal were identified by the X-ray diffractometry. The kinetic studies performed by Mossbauer spectroscopy and VSM magnetometry allowed us to follow in more details the progress of the nanocrystalline magnetic phase formation during...... the milling....

  5. Biomimetic nanocrystalline apatites: Emerging perspectives in cancer diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kattan, Ahmed; Girod-Fullana, Sophie; Charvillat, Cédric; Ternet-Fontebasso, Hélène; Dufour, Pascal; Dexpert-Ghys, Jeannette; Santran, Véronique; Bordère, Julie; Pipy, Bernard; Bernad, José; Drouet, Christophe

    2012-02-14

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites constitute the mineral part of hard tissues, and the synthesis of biomimetic analogs is now well-mastered at the lab-scale. Recent advances in the fine physico-chemical characterization of these phases enable one to envision original applications in the medical field along with a better understanding of the underlying chemistry and related pharmacological features. In this contribution, we specifically focused on applications of biomimetic apatites in the field of cancer diagnosis or treatment. We first report on the production and first biological evaluations (cytotoxicity, pro-inflammatory potential, internalization by ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells) of individualized luminescent nanoparticles based on Eu-doped apatites, eventually associated with folic acid, for medical imaging purposes. We then detail, in a first approach, the preparation of tridimensional constructs associating nanocrystalline apatite aqueous gels and drug-loaded pectin microspheres. Sustained releases of a fluorescein analog (erythrosin) used as model molecule were obtained over 7 days, in comparison with the ceramic or microsphere reference compounds. Such systems could constitute original bone-filling materials for in situ delivery of anticancer drugs.

  6. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Ringe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR, the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask `how are nanoshapes created?', `how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', `how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  7. An oral controlled release matrix pellet formulation containing nanocrystalline ketoprofen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, G J; Vervaet, C; Van Driessche, I; Hoste, S; De Smedt, S; Demeester, J; Jain, R A; Ruddy, S; Remon, J P

    2001-05-21

    A controlled release pellet formulation using a NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion of ketoprofen was developed. In order to be able to process the aqueous NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion into a hydrophobic solid dosage form a spray drying procedure was used. The in vitro dissolution profiles of wax based pellets loaded with nanocrystalline ketoprofen are compared with the profiles of wax based pellets loaded with microcrystalline ketoprofen and of a commercial sustained release ketoprofen formulation. Pellets were produced using a melt pelletisation technique. All pellet formulations were composed of a mixture of microcrystalline wax and starch derivatives. The starch derivatives used were waxy maltodextrin and drum dried corn starch. Varying the concentration of drum dried corn starch increased the release rate of ketoprofen but the ketoprofen recovery remained problematic. To increase the dissolution yield surfactants were utilised. The surfactants were either added during the production process of the NanoCrystal colloidal dispersion (sodium laurylsulphate) or during the pellet manufacturing process (Cremophor RH 40). Both methods resulted in a sustained but complete release of nanocrystalline ketoprofen from the matrix pellet formulations.

  8. A variational multiscale constitutive model for nanocrystalline materials

    KAUST Repository

    Gurses, Ercan

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a variational multi-scale constitutive model in the finite deformation regime capable of capturing the mechanical behavior of nanocrystalline (nc) fcc metals. The nc-material is modeled as a two-phase material consisting of a grain interior phase and a grain boundary effected zone (GBAZ). A rate-independent isotropic porous plasticity model is employed to describe the GBAZ, whereas a crystal-plasticity model which accounts for the transition from partial dislocation to full dislocation mediated plasticity is employed for the grain interior. The constitutive models of both phases are formulated in a small strain framework and extended to finite deformation by use of logarithmic and exponential mappings. Assuming the rule of mixtures, the overall behavior of a given grain is obtained via volume averaging. The scale transition from a single grain to a polycrystal is achieved by Taylor-type homogenization where a log-normal grain size distribution is assumed. It is shown that the proposed model is able to capture the inverse HallPetch effect, i.e., loss of strength with grain size refinement. Finally, the predictive capability of the model is validated against experimental results on nanocrystalline copper and nickel. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low cost and efficient photovoltaic conversion by nanocrystalline solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graetzel, M. [Institut de Chimie Physique, Ecole Polytechnique Federal de Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1996-09-01

    Solar cells are expected to provide environmentally friendly solutions to the world`s energy supply problem. Learning from the concepts used by green plants we have developed a molecular photovoltaic device whose overall efficiency for AM 1.5 solar light to electricity has already attained 8-11%. The system is based on the sensitization of nanocrystalline oxide films by transition metal charge transfer sensitizers. In analogy to photosynthesis, the new chemical solar cell achieves the separation of the light absorption and charge carrier transport processes. Extraordinary yields for the conversion of incident photons into electric current are obtained, exceeding 90% for transition metal complexes within the wavelength range of their absorption band. The use of molten salt electrolytes together with coordination complexes of ruthenium as sensitizers and adequate sealing technology has endowed these cells with a remarkable stability making practical applications feasible. Seven industrial cooperations are presently involved in the development to bring these cells to the market. The first cells will be applied to supply electric power for consumer electronic devices. The launching of production of several products of this type is imminent and they should be on the market within the next two years. Quite aside from their intrinsic merits as photovoltaic device, the mesoscopic oxide semiconductor films developed in our laboratory offer attractive possibilities for a number of other applications. Thus, the first example of a nanocrystalline rocking chair battery will be demonstrated and its principle briefly discussed.

  10. Flame synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline titania powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskaran Manjith Kumar

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Flame reactors are considered to be one of the most promising and versatile synthesis routes for the largescale production of submicron and nanosized particles. An annular co-flow type oxy-gas diffusion burner was designed for its application in a modular flame reactor for the synthesis of nanocrystalline oxide ceramics. The burner consisted of multiple ports for the individually regulated flow of a precursor vapour, inert gas, fuel gas and oxidizer. The nanopowders formed during flame synthesis in the reaction chamber were collected by a suitable set of filters. In the present study, TTIP was used as the precursor for the synthesis of nanocrystalline TiO2 and helium was used to carry the precursor vapour to the burner head. Methane and oxygen were used as fuel and oxidizer respectively. The operating conditions were varied by systematically changing the flow rates of the gases involved. The synthesized powders were characterized using standard techniques such as XRD, SEM, TEM, BET etc., in order to determine the crystallite size, phase content, morphology, particle size and degree of agglomeration. The influences of gas flow rates on the powder characteristics are discussed.

  11. Nanocrystalline functional materials and nanocomposites synthesis through aerosol routes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Olivera B.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper represents the results of the design of functional nanocrystalline powders and nanocomposites using chemical reactions in aerosols. The process involves ultrasonic aerosol formation (mist generators with the resonant frequencies of 800 kHz, 1.7 and 2.5 MHz from precursor salt solutions and control over the aerosol decomposition in a high-temperature tubular flow reactor. During decomposition, the aerosol droplets undergo evaporation/drying, precipitation and thermolysis in a single-step process. Consequently, spherical, solid, agglomerate-free submicronic particles are obtained. The particle morphology, revealed as a composite structure consisting of primary crystallites smaller than 20 nm was analysed by several methods (XRD, DSC/DTA, SEM, TEM and discussed in terms of precursor chemistry and process parameters. Following the initial attempts, a more detailed aspect of nanocrystalline particle synthesis was demonstrated for the case of nanocomposites based on ZnO-MeO (MeO=Bi Cr+, suitable for electronic applications, as well as an yttrium-aluminum base complex system, suitable for phosphorus applications. The results imply that parts of the material structure responsible for different functional behaviour appear through in situ aerosol synthesis by processes of intraparticle agglomeration, reaction and sintering in the last synthesis stage.

  12. Mechanochemically Synthesized CIGS Nanocrystalline Powder for Solar Cell Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharati Rehani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide (CIGS is a compound semiconductor material from the group of I-III-VI. The material is a solid solution of copper, indium and selenium (CIS and copper, gallium and selenium with an empirical formula of CuIn(1 – xGaxSe2, where 0  x  1. CIGS has an exceptionally high absorption coefficient of more than 105 cm – 1 for 1.5 eV. Solar cells prepared from absorber layers of CIGS materials have shown an efficiency higher than 20 %. CuIn(1 – xGaxSe2 (x  0.3 nanocrystalline compound was mechanochemically synthesized by high-energy milling in a planetary ball mill. The phase identification and crystallite size of milled powders at different time intervals were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The XRD analysis indicates chalcopyrite structure and the crystallite size of about 10 nm of high-energy milled CIGS powder after two and half hours of milling. An attempt for preparing the thin film from CIGS nanocrystalline powder was carried out using the flash evaporation technique. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM reveals uniform distribution of CIGS particles in thin film.

  13. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samudrala, S K; Felfer, P J; Araullo-Peters, V J; Cao, Y; Liao, X Z; Cairney, J M

    2013-09-01

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping.

  14. Photoluminescence origin of nanocrystalline SiC films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ji-wen; LI Juan; LI Yan-hui; LI Chang-ling; ZHAO Yan-ping; ZHAO Jie; XU Jing-jun

    2005-01-01

    The nanocrystalline SiC films were prepared on Si (111) substrates by rf magnetron sputtering and then annealed at 800℃ and 1 000℃ for 30 minutes in a vacuum annealing system. The crystal structure and crystallization of as-annealed SiC films were determined by the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectra and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Measurement of photoluminescence (PL) of the nanocrystalline SiC (nc-SiC) films shows that the blue light with 473 nm and 477 nm wavelengths emitted at room temperature and that the PL peak shifts to shorter wavelength side and the PL intensity becomes stronger as the annealing temperature decreases. The time-resolved spectrum of the PL at 477 nm exhibits a bi-exponential decay process with lifetimes of 600 ps and 5 ns and a characteristic of the direct band gap.The strong blue light emission with short PL lifetimes suggests that the quantum confinement effect of the SiC nanocrystals resulted in the radiative recombination of the direct optical transitions.

  15. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-11-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask 'how are nanoshapes created?', 'how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?', 'how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?'. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed.

  16. Weakened Flexural Strength of Nanocrystalline Nanoporous Gold by Grain Refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Eun-Ji; Kim, Ju-Young

    2016-04-13

    High density of grain boundaries in solid materials generally leads to high strength because grain boundaries act as strong obstacles to dislocation activity. We find that the flexural strength of nanoporous gold of grain size 206 nm is 33.6% lower than that of grain size 238 μm. We prepared three gold-silver precursor alloys, well-annealed, prestrained, and high-energy ball-milled, from which nanoporous gold samples were obtained by the same free-corrosion dealloying process. Ligaments of the same size are formed regardless of precursor alloys, and microstructural aspects of precursor alloys such as crystallographic orientation and grain size is preserved in the dealloying process. While the nanoindentation hardness of three nanoporous golds is independent of microstructural variation, flexural strength of nanocrystalline nanoporous gold is significantly lower than that of nanoporous golds with much larger grain size. We investigate weakening mechanisms of grain boundaries in nanocrystalline nanoporous gold, leading to weakening of flexural strength.

  17. Nano-crystalline CNx Films and Field Electron Emission Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张兰; 马会中; 李会军; 杨仕娥; 姚宁; 胡欢陵; 张兵临

    2003-01-01

    CNx films with x ≈ 0.5 were prepared on to a titanium coated ceramic substrate by using microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. As-deposited films were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The films consist of nano-crystalline grains with sites in a range of 20-40nm approximately. The interplanar distance (d-value) of the nano-crystalline structure determined from the peak position of x-ray diffraction was found to be 0.336nm. This value is consistent with the d-value of graphite. XPS measurements of the N1 s and C1 s core levels for the same sample demonstrate two types of bonding structures between carbon and nitrogen atoms, corresponding to sp2 C-N and sp3 C-N. It is suggested that the N atoms mainly exist in aromatic rings of the nano-graphite layers by substituting carbon positions with nitrogen. Field electron emission characteristics of the film were tested. The turn-on field of the emission was as Iow as 1.1 V/μm.

  18. Implantation induced hardening of nanocrystalline titanium thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, R; Amirthapandian, S; Mangamma, G; Ramaseshan, R; Dash, S; Tyagi, A K; Jayaram, V; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Formation of nanocrystalline TiN at low temperatures was demonstrated by combining Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) and ion implantation techniques. The Ti films of nominal thickness approximatly 250 nm were deposited at a substrate temperature of 200 degrees C by ablating a high pure titanium target in UHV conditions using a nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. These films were implanted with 100 keV N+ ions with fluence ranging from 1.0 x 10(16) ions/cm2 to 1.0 x 10(17) ions/cm2 The structural, compositional and morphological evolutions were tracked using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), respectively. TEM analysis revealed that the as-deposited titanium film is an fcc phase. With increasing ion fluence, its structure becomes amorphous phase before precipitation of nanocrystalline fcc TIN phase. Compositional depth profiles obtained from SIMS have shown the extent of nitrogen concentration gradient in the implantation zone. Both as-deposited and ion implanted films showed much higher hardness as compared to the bulk titanium. AFM studies revealed a gradual increase in surface roughness leading to surface patterning with increase in ion fluence.

  19. Electrical characterization of nanocrystalline zinc selenide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jeewan; Shikha, Deep; Tripathi, Surya Kant

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, we have studied the effect of photo-illumination on electrical properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe thin films. The ZnSe thin films with different grain sizes (coherently diffracting domains) have been prepared. The semiconducting material with the composition Zn25Se75 has been prepared using melt-quenching technique. Thermal evaporation technique has been used to prepare nanocrystalline ZnSe thin films on highly cleaned glass substrates at different partial pressures of Ar gas. The grain size has been controlled by the partial pressure of inert gas. The grain size has been calculated using X-ray diffraction plots. Mobility activation has been studied from the photocurrent decay curves. The effective density of states ( N eff), frequency factor ( S), and trap depth ( E) have been calculated for all the films having different grain sizes. Three different types of trap levels have been found in these films. There is a linear distribution of traps having different energies below the conduction band. The increase in photoconductivity is explained in terms of built in potential barriers ( ϕ b) at the grain boundaries.

  20. Large piezoresistive effect in surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, S. D., E-mail: stoffel.d.janssens@gmail.com; Haenen, K., E-mail: ken.haenen@uhasselt.be [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); IMOMEC, IMEC vzw, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium); Drijkoningen, S. [Institute for Materials Research (IMO), Hasselt University, Wetenschapspark 1, B-3590 Diepenbeek (Belgium)

    2014-09-08

    Surface conductivity in hydrogen-terminated single crystal diamond is an intriguing phenomenon for fundamental reasons as well as for application driven research. Surface conductivity is also observed in hydrogen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond although the electronic transport mechanisms remain unclear. In this work, the piezoresistive properties of intrinsic surface conductive nanocrystalline diamond are investigated. A gauge factor of 35 is calculated from bulging a diamond membrane of 350 nm thick, with a diameter of 656 μm and a sheet resistance of 1.45 MΩ/sq. The large piezoresistive effect is reasoned to originate directly from strain-induced changes in the resistivity of the grain boundaries. Additionally, we ascribe a small time-dependent fraction of the piezoresistive effect to charge trapping of charge carriers at grain boundaries. In conclusion, time-dependent piezoresistive effect measurements act as a tool for deeper understanding the complex electronic transport mechanisms induced by grain boundaries in a polycrystalline material or nanocomposite.

  1. Investigation of nanocrystalline Gd films loaded with hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Hruška, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The present work reports on microstructure studies of hydrogen-loaded nanocrystalline Gd films prepared by cold cathode beam sputtering on sapphire (112¯0) substrates. The Gd films were electrochemically step-by-step charged with hydrogen and the structural development with increasing concentration of absorbed hydrogen was studied by transmission electron microscopy and in-situ   X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. The relaxation of hydrogen-induced stresses was examined by acoustic emission measurements. In the low concentration range absorbed hydrogen occupies preferentially vacancy-like defects at GBs typical for nanocrystalline films. With increasing hydrogen concentration hydrogen starts to occupy interstitial sites. At the solid solution limit the grains gradually transform into the ββ-phase (GdH2). Finally at high hydrogen concentrations xH>2.0xH>2.0 H/Gd, the film structure becomes almost completely amorphous. Contrary to bulk Gd specimens, the formation of the γγ-phase (GdH3) was not observed in this work.

  2. Magnetotransport in nanocrystalline SmB6 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yong

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available SmB6 has been predicted to be a prototype of topological Kondo insulator (TKI but its direct experimental evidence as a TKI is still lacking to date. Here we report on our search for the signature of a topological surface state and investigation of the effect of disorder on transport properties in nanocrystalline SmB6 thin films through longitudinal magnetoresistance and Hall coefficient measurements. The magnetoresistance (MR at 2 K is positive and linear (LPMR at low field and become negative and quadratic at higher field. While the negative part is understood from the reduction of the hybridization gap due to Zeeman splitting, the positive dependence is similar to what is observed in other topological insulators (TI. We conclude that the LPMR is a characteristic of TI and is related to the linear dispersion near the Dirac cone. The Hall resistance shows a sign change around 50K. It peaks and becomes nonlinear around 10 K then decreases below 10 K. This indicates that carriers with opposite signs emerge below 50 K. These properties indicate that the surface states are robust and probably topological in our nanocrystalline films.

  3. Nanocrystalline materials: recent advances in crystallographic characterization techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringe, Emilie

    2014-01-01

    Most properties of nanocrystalline materials are shape-dependent, providing their exquisite tunability in optical, mechanical, electronic and catalytic properties. An example of the former is localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR), the coherent oscillation of conduction electrons in metals that can be excited by the electric field of light; this resonance frequency is highly dependent on both the size and shape of a nanocrystal. An example of the latter is the marked difference in catalytic activity observed for different Pd nanoparticles. Such examples highlight the importance of particle shape in nanocrystalline materials and their practical applications. However, one may ask ‘how are nanoshapes created?’, ‘how does the shape relate to the atomic packing and crystallography of the material?’, ‘how can we control and characterize the external shape and crystal structure of such small nanocrystals?’. This feature article aims to give the reader an overview of important techniques, concepts and recent advances related to these questions. Nucleation, growth and how seed crystallography influences the final synthesis product are discussed, followed by shape prediction models based on seed crystallography and thermodynamic or kinetic parameters. The crystallographic implications of epitaxy and orientation in multilayered, core-shell nanoparticles are overviewed, and, finally, the development and implications of novel, spatially resolved analysis tools are discussed. PMID:25485133

  4. Deformation Induced Internal Friction Peaks in Nanocrystalline Nickel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping-Yun; ZHANG Xi-Yan; NI Hai-Tao; CAO Zhen-Hua; MENG Xiang-Kang

    2012-01-01

    We report the mechanical spectroscopy study of the cold-rolling induced dynamical behavior of crystalline defects in nanocrystalline (NC) nickel. The results show that internal friction (IF) peaks in NC nickel can be induced by cold-rolling. An IF peak, originating from dislocation activity, occurs when the strain is in the range of 9.7-32.8%. Two Bordoni peaks occur when the strain is 39.0% and an IF peak associated with deformation twinning appears when the strain is 42.6%. These results mean that deformation of NC nickel is mediated by different kinds of defects as the strain increases.%We report the mechanical spectroscopy study of the cold-rolling induced dynamical behavior of crystalline defects in nanocrystalline (NC) nickel The results show that internal friction (IF) peaks in NC nickel can be induced by cold-rolling.An IF peak,originating from dislocation activity,occurs when the strain is in the range of 9.7- 32.8%.Two Bordoni peaks occur when the strain is 39.0% and an IF peak associated with deformation twinning appears when the strain is 42.6%.These results mean that deformation of NC nickel is mediated by different kinds of defects as the strain increases.

  5. New atom probe approaches to studying segregation in nanocrystalline materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, S.K.; Felfer, P.J.; Araullo-Peters, V.J. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cao, Y.; Liao, X.Z. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Cairney, J.M., E-mail: julie.cairney@sydney.edu.au [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); The Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2013-09-15

    Atom probe is a technique that is highly suited to the study of nanocrystalline materials. It can provide accurate atomic-scale information about the composition of grain boundaries in three dimensions. In this paper we have analysed the microstructure of a nanocrystalline super-duplex stainless steel prepared by high pressure torsion (HPT). Not all of the grain boundaries in this alloy display obvious segregation, making visualisation of the microstructure challenging. In addition, the grain boundaries present in the atom probe data acquired from this alloy have complex shapes that are curved at the scale of the dataset and the interfacial excess varies considerably over the boundaries, making the accurate characterisation of the distribution of solute challenging using existing analysis techniques. In this paper we present two new data treatment methods that allow the visualisation of boundaries with little or no segregation, the delineation of boundaries for further analysis and the quantitative analysis of Gibbsian interfacial excess at boundaries, including the capability of excess mapping. - Highlights: ► New data treatment methods allow delineation of grain boundaries, even without segregation. ► Proxigrams calculated from the surfaces accurately show the extent of segregation. ► Tessellation of the data volume can be used to map the Gibbsian interfacial excess.

  6. Dehydrogenative silane coupling on silicon surfaces via early transition metal catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun-Hui; Buriak, Jillian M

    2006-02-01

    Derivatization of silicon surfaces is an area of intense interest due to the centrality of silicon in the microelectronics industry and because of potential promise for a myriad of other applications. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of Si-Si bond formation directly on the surface to contrast with the more widely studied Si-C and Si-O bond forming reactions. Functionalization of hydride-terminated silicon surfaces with silanes is carried out via early transition metal mediated dehydrogenative silane coupling reactions. Zirconocene and titanocene catalyst systems were evaluated for heterocoupling of a molecular silane, RSiH3, with a surface Si-H group on Si(s). The zirconocene catalysts proved to be much more reactive than the titanium system, and so the former was examined exclusively. The silanes, aromatic or aliphatic, are bonded to the silicon surface through direct Si-Si bonds, although the level of incorporation of the trihydroarylsilanes was substantially higher than that of the aliphatic silanes. The reaction proceeds on nanocrystalline hydride-terminated porous silicon surfaces, as well as flat Si(100)-H(x) and Si(111)-H interfaces. The reactions were studied by a variety of techniques, including FTIR, SIMS, and XPS.

  7. The correlation of blue shift of photoluminescence and morphology of silicon nanoporous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jumaili, Batool E. B.; Talib, Zainal A.; Josephine L., Y.; Paiman, Suriati B.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Al-Jumaily, Abdulmajeed H. J.; Ramizy, Asmiet; Abdulateef, Sinan A.; Muh'd, Ibrahim B.; Mofdal, Manahil E. E.

    2016-07-01

    Porous silicon with diameters ranging from 6.41 to 7.12 nm were synthesized via electrochemical etching by varied anodization current density in ethanoic solutions containing aqueous hydrofluoric acid up to 65mA/cm2.The luminescence properties of the nanoporous at room temperature were analyzed via photoluminescence spectroscopy. Photoluminescence PL spectra exhibit a broad emission band in the range of 360-700 nm photon energy. The PL spectrum has a blue shift in varied anodization current density; the blue shift incremented as the existing of anodization although the intensity decreased. The current blue shift is owning to alteration of silicon nanocrystal structure at the superficies. The superficial morphology of the PS layers consists of unified and orderly distribution of nanocrystalline Si structures, have high porosity around (93.75%) and high thickness 39.52 µm.

  8. Nonlinear Transient Dynamics of Photoexcited Silicon Nanoantenna for Ultrafast All-Optical Signal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Baranov, Denis G; Milichko, Valentin A; Kudryashov, Sergey I; Krasnok, Alexander E; Belov, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    Optically generated electron-hole plasma in high-index dielectric nanostructures was demonstrated as a means of tuning of their optical properties. However, until now an ultrafast operation regime of such plasma driven nanostructures has not been attained. Here, we perform pump-probe experiments with resonant silicon nanoparticles and report on dense optical plasma generation near the magnetic dipole resonance with ultrafast (about 2.5 ps) relaxation rate. Basing on experimental results, we develop an analytical model describing transient response of a nanocrystalline silicon nanoparticle to an intense laser pulse and show theoretically that plasma induced optical nonlinearity leads to ultrafast reconfiguration of the scattering power pattern. We demonstrate 100 fs switching to unidirectional scattering regime upon irradiation of the nanoparticle by an intense femtosecond pulse. Our work lays the foundation for developing ultracompact and ultrafast all-optical signal processing devices.

  9. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, M.; Castellan, C.; Signorini, S.; Trenti, A.; Pavesi, L.

    2017-09-01

    Silicon photonics is a technology based on fabricating integrated optical circuits by using the same paradigms as the dominant electronics industry. After twenty years of fervid development, silicon photonics is entering the market with low cost, high performance and mass-manufacturable optical devices. Until now, most silicon photonic devices have been based on linear optical effects, despite the many phenomenologies associated with nonlinear optics in both bulk materials and integrated waveguides. Silicon and silicon-based materials have strong optical nonlinearities which are enhanced in integrated devices by the small cross-section of the high-index contrast silicon waveguides or photonic crystals. Here the photons are made to strongly interact with the medium where they propagate. This is the central argument of nonlinear silicon photonics. It is the aim of this review to describe the state-of-the-art in the field. Starting from the basic nonlinearities in a silicon waveguide or in optical resonator geometries, many phenomena and applications are described—including frequency generation, frequency conversion, frequency-comb generation, supercontinuum generation, soliton formation, temporal imaging and time lensing, Raman lasing, and comb spectroscopy. Emerging quantum photonics applications, such as entangled photon sources, heralded single-photon sources and integrated quantum photonic circuits are also addressed at the end of this review.

  10. Nonlinear silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsia, Kevin K.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-05-01

    An intriguing optical property of silicon is that it exhibits a large third-order optical nonlinearity, with orders-ofmagnitude larger than that of silica glass in the telecommunication band. This allows efficient nonlinear optical interaction at relatively low power levels in a small footprint. Indeed, we have witnessed a stunning progress in harnessing the Raman and Kerr effects in silicon as the mechanisms for enabling chip-scale optical amplification, lasing, and wavelength conversion - functions that until recently were perceived to be beyond the reach of silicon. With all the continuous efforts developing novel techniques, nonlinear silicon photonics is expected to be able to reach even beyond the prior achievements. Instead of providing a comprehensive overview of this field, this manuscript highlights a number of new branches of nonlinear silicon photonics, which have not been fully recognized in the past. In particular, they are two-photon photovoltaic effect, mid-wave infrared (MWIR) silicon photonics, broadband Raman effects, inverse Raman scattering, and periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). These novel effects and techniques could create a new paradigm for silicon photonics and extend its utility beyond the traditionally anticipated applications.

  11. Periodically poled silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, Nick K.; Tsia, Kevin K.; Solli, Daniel R.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-02-01

    Bulk centrosymmetric silicon lacks second-order optical nonlinearity χ(2) - a foundational component of nonlinear optics. Here, we propose a new class of photonic device which enables χ(2) as well as quasi-phase matching based on periodic stress fields in silicon - periodically-poled silicon (PePSi). This concept adds the periodic poling capability to silicon photonics, and allows the excellent crystal quality and advanced manufacturing capabilities of silicon to be harnessed for devices based on χ(2)) effects. The concept can also be simply achieved by having periodic arrangement of stressed thin films along a silicon waveguide. As an example of the utility, we present simulations showing that mid-wave infrared radiation can be efficiently generated through difference frequency generation from near-infrared with a conversion efficiency of 50% based on χ(2) values measurements for strained silicon reported in the literature [Jacobson et al. Nature 441, 199 (2006)]. The use of PePSi for frequency conversion can also be extended to terahertz generation. With integrated piezoelectric material, dynamically control of χ(2)nonlinearity in PePSi waveguide may also be achieved. The successful realization of PePSi based devices depends on the strength of the stress induced χ(2) in silicon. Presently, there exists a significant discrepancy in the literature between the theoretical and experimentally measured values. We present a simple theoretical model that produces result consistent with prior theoretical works and use this model to identify possible reasons for this discrepancy.

  12. ALICE silicon strip module

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    This small silicon detector strip will be inserted into the inner tracking system (ITS) on the ALICE detector at CERN. This detector relies on state-of-the-art particle tracking techniques. These double-sided silicon strip modules have been designed to be as lightweight and delicate as possible as the ITS will eventually contain five square metres of these devices.

  13. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  14. Silicon Valley Ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph Leu

    2005-01-01

    @@ It is unlikely that any industrial region of the world has received as much scrutiny and study as Silicon Valley. Despite the recent crash of Internet and telecommunications stocks,Silicon Valley remains the world's engine of growth for numerous high-technology sectors.

  15. Photoluminescence of Silicon Nanocrystals in Silicon Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ferraioli

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent results on the photoluminescence properties of silicon nanocrystals embedded in silicon oxide are reviewed and discussed. The attention is focused on Si nanocrystals produced by high-temperature annealing of silicon rich oxide layers deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The influence of deposition parameters and layer thickness is analyzed in detail. The nanocrystal size can be roughly controlled by means of Si content and annealing temperature and time. Unfortunately, a technique for independently fine tuning the emission efficiency and the size is still lacking; thus, only middle size nanocrystals have high emission efficiency. Interestingly, the layer thickness affects the nucleation and growth kinetics so changing the luminescence efficiency.

  16. Silicon germanium mask for deep silicon etching

    KAUST Repository

    Serry, Mohamed

    2014-07-29

    Polycrystalline silicon germanium (SiGe) can offer excellent etch selectivity to silicon during cryogenic deep reactive ion etching in an SF.sub.6/O.sub.2 plasma. Etch selectivity of over 800:1 (Si:SiGe) may be achieved at etch temperatures from -80 degrees Celsius to -140 degrees Celsius. High aspect ratio structures with high resolution may be patterned into Si substrates using SiGe as a hard mask layer for construction of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and semiconductor devices.

  17. Optimization of plasma parameters for the production of silicon nano-crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Chaabane, N; Vach, H; Cabarrocas, P R I

    2003-01-01

    We use silane-hydrogen plasmas to synthesize silicon nano-crystals in the gas phase and thermophoresis to collect them onto a cooled substrate. To distinguish between nano-crystals formed in the plasma and those grown on the substrate, as a result of surface and subsurface reactions, we have simultaneously deposited films on a conventional substrate heated at 250 deg. C and on a second substrate cooled down to 90 deg. C. A series of samples deposited at various discharge pressures, in the range of 400 mTorr to 1.2 Torr, have been characterized by Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometry. At low pressure (400-500 mTorr), the films are amorphous on the cold substrate and micro-crystalline on the hot one. As pressure increases, gas phase reactions lead to the formation of nano-crystalline particles which are attracted by the cold substrate due to thermophoresis. Consequently, we obtain nano-crystalline silicon thin films on the cold substrate and amorphous thin films on the heated one in the pressure range of 600-900...

  18. In situ observation of deformation processes in nanocrystalline face-centered cubic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobler, Aaron; Brandl, Christian; Hahn, Horst; Kübel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The atomistic mechanisms active during plastic deformation of nanocrystalline metals are still a subject of controversy. The recently developed approach of combining automated crystal orientation mapping (ACOM) and in situ straining inside a transmission electron microscope was applied to study the deformation of nanocrystalline Pd x Au1- x thin films. This combination enables direct imaging of simultaneously occurring plastic deformation processes in one experiment, such as grain boundary motion, twin activity and grain rotation. Large-angle grain rotations with ≈39° and ≈60° occur and can be related to twin formation, twin migration and twin-twin interaction as a result of partial dislocation activity. Furthermore, plastic deformation in nanocrystalline thin films was found to be partially reversible upon rupture of the film. In conclusion, conventional deformation mechanisms are still active in nanocrystalline metals but with different weighting as compared with conventional materials with coarser grains.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline Ni produced by cryomilling in liquid nitrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bin; FAN Jianzhong; HAO Bin; TIAN Xiaofeng; CHENG Junsheng; ZHANG Jishan

    2007-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni powders were successfully fabricated by mechanically milling at cryogenic temperature (cryomilling) with 1 wt.%Y2O3 particles. The experimental results have shown that the Ni grain size is reduced to 25 nmafter 2 h of cryomilling in the presence of the Y2O3 particles. The cryomilled Ni/Y2O3 powders can maintain their nanocrystalline structure up to 900℃, or 62% of the melting point of Ni. A bulk nanocrystalline Ni/Y2O3 material with a thermally stable grain size of approximately 100 nm was produced by cryomilling, cold isostatic pressing, followed by hot isostatic pressing. The microhardness of bulk nanocrystalline Ni/1wt.%Y2O3 is 315 DPH, which is two times as high as that of conventional Ni.

  20. Studies of methods to restrict the grain growth of nanocrystalline metal oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Angari, Y

    2002-01-01

    There is considerable interest in nanocrystalline materials. This thesis is concerned with nanocrystalline oxides and the development of methods to prevent their grain growth on heating. This growth, which is evident at temperatures as low as 400 deg C, presents a serious problem in the study and applications of nanocrystalline oxides. The systems that were studied were nanocrystalline magnesium oxide, zirconium oxide, cerium oxide and tin oxide. The methods of preventing grain growth included the encapsulation of the oxide in the pores of porous silica, mixing with nanocrystals of alumina and treating the surface with a silanising agent, hexamethyldisilazane. All the methods employed showed some effect on reducing the grain growth. Encapsulation in the pores of silica was effective, however it proved difficult to get large amounts of the oxides into the pores. A more efficient method of preparing large samples was the incorporation of alumina, which was achieved by a sol-gel process. An alkoxide of the targe...

  1. Preparation and mechanism study of bulk pure rare-earth metals with amorphous and nanocrystalline structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ErDong; SONG XiaoYan; ZHANG JiuXing; LU NianDuan

    2007-01-01

    The preparation and the mechanism study of bulk pure rare-earth metals with amorphous and nanocrystalline structures, which were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS), were carried out in this paper. With different processing parameters, the amorphous, two phases of amorphous and nanocrystalline, and complete nanocrystalline microstructures have been obtained. The nano-grain sizes in the bulk nanocrystalline materials are found smaller than the original powder particles sizes, which may change the conventional viewpoint that the grains in the sintered bulk are generally coarser than the raw powder particles. The technique developed in the present work can be extended to the preparation of many other nano bulk metal materials, and thus enables the studies of the nano-size effects on the physical, chemical and mechanical properties of bulk nano materials.

  2. Nanocrystalline [beta]-Ta Coating Enhances the Longevity and Bioactivity of Medical Titanium Alloys

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Linlin Liu; Jiang Xu; Shuyun Jiang

    2016-01-01

      A [beta]-Ta nanocrystalline coating was engineered onto a Ti-6Al-4V substrate using a double cathode glow discharge technique to improve the corrosion resistance and bioactivity of this biomedical alloy...

  3. Cavitation Resistance of TiN Nanocrystalline Coatings with Various Thickness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krella, A

    2009-01-01

    TiN nanocrystalline coatings of various thicknesses deposited on austenitic stainless steel, X6CrNiTi18-10, by means of the cathodic arc evaporation method were investigated in a cavitation tunnel with a slot cavitator...

  4. Properties of nanocrystalline copper prepared by vacuum-warm-compaction method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHU Guang; LIU Wei; YANG Tian-zu; TANG Yong-jian

    2009-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Cu with average grain size of 22.8-25.3 nm was prepared by vacuum-warm-compaction method. Scanning electronic microscope, HMV-2 type microhardness tester, X-ray diffractometer, and 6157 type electrometer were used to determine the microstructure, microhardness and electrical resistivity of as-prepared nanocrystalline Cu, respectively. The results show that the microhardness of nanocrystalline Cu increases with larger pressure, longer duration of pressure or higher temperature. The highest microhardness of nanocrystalline Cu is 3.8 GPa, which is 7 times higher than that of coarse-grained copper. The electrical resistivity of as-prepared specimens is (1.2-1.4)×10-7 Ω·m at temperature 233-293 K, which is 5-6 times higher than that of the coarse-grained copper.

  5. Covalent attachment and growth of nanocrystalline films of photocatalytic TiOF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Lv, Fujian; Xiao, Shengxiong; Bian, Zhenfeng; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Nuckolls, Colin; Li, Hexing

    2014-11-01

    This manuscript describes a synthesis of nanocrystalline TiOF2 film. The nanocrystalline TiOF2 becomes chemically attached to the surface of the glass slide. These films are robust and can be recycled as photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes and solvents. These films also have significant antibacterial properties upon irradiation.This manuscript describes a synthesis of nanocrystalline TiOF2 film. The nanocrystalline TiOF2 becomes chemically attached to the surface of the glass slide. These films are robust and can be recycled as photocatalysts for the degradation of organic dyes and solvents. These films also have significant antibacterial properties upon irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Methods for sample preparation, characterization and Fig. S1-S8. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05598e

  6. Nanocrystalline Diamond as a Coating for Joint Implants: Cytotoxicity and Biocompatibility Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Amaral, Margarida; Gomes, Pedro S; Lopes, Maria A; Santos, José D; Silva, Rui F; Fernandes, Maria H

    2008-01-01

    Nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings combine a very low surface roughness with the outstanding diamond properties, such as superlative hardness, low self-friction coefficient, high wear and corrosion resistance...

  7. Evolution of the microstructure in nanocrystalline copper electrodeposits during room temperature storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2007-01-01

    and continued with an unprecedented time resolution until stationary values of the recorded data were obtained. Independent of the copper layer thickness, the as-deposited microstructure consisted of nanocrystalline grains with orientation dependent crystallite sizes. Orientation dependent grain growth...

  8. Transformation from amorphous to nano-crystalline SiC thin films prepared by HWCVD technique without hydrogen dilution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Shariatmadar Tehrani

    2015-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on Si(111) by the hot wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) technique using silane (SiH4) and methane (CH4) gases without hydrogen dilution. The effects of SiH4 to CH4 gas flow ratio (R) on the structural properties, chemical composition and photoluminescence (PL) properties of the films deposited at the different gas flow ratios were investigated and compared. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra revealed a structural transition from amorphous SiC to cubic nano-crystalline SiC films with the increase in the gas flow ratio. Raman scattering confirmed the multi-phased nature of the films. Auger electron spectroscopy showed that the carbon incorporation in the film structure was strongly dependent on the gas flow ratio. A similar broad visible room-temperature PL with two peaks was observed for all SiC films. The main PL emission was correlated to the band to band transition in uniform a-SiC phase and the other lower energy emission was related to the confined a-Si : H clusters in a-SiC matrix. SiC nano-crystallites exhibit no significant contribution to the radiative recombination.

  9. Topological characterization of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, A. H.; Dasan, Y. K.; Khan, Ihsan Ullah; Ahmad, Faiz; Ayoub, Muhammad

    2016-11-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the morphological and barrier properties of nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) bionanocomposites. Nanocrystalline cellulose was isolated from waste oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber using Sulphuric acid hydrolysis. Chemical modifications of nanocrystalline cellulose was performed to allow good compatibilization between fiber and the polymer matrices and also to improve dispersion of fillers. Bionanocomposite materials were produced from these nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced Poly (lactic acid) and Poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) using solvent casting and evaporation techniques. The properties of extracted nanocrystalline cellulose were examined using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometer, TEM and AFM. Besides that, the properties of bionanocomposites were examined through FESEM and oxygen permeability properties analysis. Better barrier and morphological properties were obtained for nanocrystalline cellulose reinforced bionanocomposites than for neat polymer blend.

  10. Polymer blend of PLA/PHBV based bionanocomposites reinforced with nanocrystalline cellulose for potential application as packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasan, Y K; Bhat, A H; Ahmad, Faiz

    2017-02-10

    The current research discusses the development of poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and poly-(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) reinforced nanocrystalline cellulose bionanocomposites. The nanocrystalline cellulose was derived from waste oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber by acid hydrolysis process. The resulting nanocrystalline cellulose suspension was then surface functionalized by TEMPO-mediated oxidation and solvent exchange process. Furthermore, the PLA/PHBV/nanocrystalline cellulose bionanocomposites were produced by solvent casting method. The effect of the addition of nanocrystalline cellulose on structural, morphology, mechanical and barrier properties of bionanocomposites was investigated. The results revealed that the developed bionanocomposites showed improved mechanical properties and decrease in oxygen permeability rate. Therefore, the developed bio-based composite incorporated with an optimal composition of nanocrystalline cellulose exhibits properties as compared to the polymer blend.

  11. Nanocrystalline sp 2 and sp 3 carbons: CVD synthesis and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terranova, M. L.; Rossi, M.; Tamburri, E.

    2016-11-01

    The design and production of innovative materials based on nanocrystalline sp 2- and sp 3-coordinated carbons is presently a focus of the scientific community. We present a review of the nanostructures obtained in our labs using a series of synthetic routes, which make use of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques for the selective production of non-planar graphitic nanostructures, nanocrystalline diamonds, and hybrid two-phase nanostructures.

  12. Manufacturing technology of the composite materials: nanocrystalline material – polymer type

    OpenAIRE

    B. Ziębowicz; D. Szewieczek; L.A. Dobrzański

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This paper presents the material and technological solution which makes it possible to obtain the nanocrystalline, ferromagnetic powder material of Fe73.5Cu1Nb3Si13.5B9 alloy after its thermal nanocrystallization with the succeeding high-energy milling. Another aspect was to develop the technology to obtain the nanocrystalline composite materials made by binding the obtained powder material with the high density low-pressures polyethylene (PEHD) with the controlled ferromagnetic and ...

  13. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J

    2009-04-29

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml(-1) HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel composites

  14. Internal Friction of Bend-Deformed Nanocrystalline Nickel by Mechanical Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ping-Yun; ZHANG Xi-Yan; WU Xiao-Lei; HUANG Yi-Neng; MENG Xiang-Kang

    2008-01-01

    @@ Internal friction of nanocrystalline nickel is investigated by mechanical spectroscopy from 360 K to 120 K.Two relaxation peaks are found when nanocrystaJline nickel is bent up to 10% strain at room temperature and fast cooling.However, these two peaks disappear when the sample is annealed at room temperature in vacuum for ten days.The occurrence and disappearance of the two relaxation peaks can be explained by the interactions of partial dislocations and point defects in nanocrystalline materials.

  15. Structure and properties of nanocrystalline rare earth bulks prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢年端; 宋晓艳; 刘雪梅; 张久兴

    2009-01-01

    A series of rare earth bulks with the ultrafine nanocrystalline structure were prepared by applying an "oxygen-free" (an environmental oxygen concentration less than 0.5 ppm) in-situ synthesis system, where the inert-gas condensation was combined with the spark plasma sintering technology into an entirely closed system. The thermal and mechanical properties of the prepared ultrafine nanocrystalline bulks were characterized and compared with those of the raw polycrystalline bulks. It was found that the speci...

  16. Fabrication of Porous Nanocrystalline NiCo2O4 Electrode for Water Electrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Yang; Xiaozhan Yang; Jianbao Li; Hong Lin; Ning Wang; Chunfu Lin; Gangfeng Guo

    2006-01-01

    A porous nanocrystalline NiCo2O4 compound electrode was obtained. The morphology of the electrode was controlled by altering the concentration of precipitant (NaOH solution). The electrode was consisted of metal substrate (Ni)and porous nanocrystalline NiCo2O4 film which was stacked by homosized and pretty regular hexagonal nanoparticles, with thinner than 50 nm and about 200 nm in diameter. The electrode exhibits good electrochemical properties compared with Ni electrode.

  17. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijie; Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J.; Fenniri, Hicham; Webster, Thomas J.

    2009-04-01

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml-1 HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel composites

  18. Specimen- and grain-size dependence of compression deformation behavior in nanocrystalline copper

    OpenAIRE

    Okamoto, Norihiko L.; Kashioka, Daisuke; Hirato, Tetsuji; Inui, Haruyuki

    2014-01-01

    The compression deformation behavior of electrodeposited nanocrystalline copper pillars with average grain sizes (d) of 360, 100, and 34 nm has been investigated as a function of specimen size (D). The yield stress for nanocrystalline pillars with d = 360 and 100 nm does not depend on specimen size, exhibiting essentially the bulk yield stress until the specimen size is reduced down to the critical values ((D/d)∗ = 35 and 85), below which the yield stress decreases with the decrease in specim...

  19. Biologically inspired rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite hydrogel nanocomposites as improved bone substitutes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Lijie; Webster, Thomas J [Division of Engineering, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Rodriguez, Jose; Raez, Jose; Myles, Andrew J; Fenniri, Hicham [National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, 11421 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2M9 (Canada)], E-mail: hicham.fenniri@ualberta.ca, E-mail: thomas_webster@brown.edu

    2009-04-29

    Today, bone diseases such as bone fractures, osteoporosis and bone cancer represent a common and significant public health problem. The design of biomimetic bone tissue engineering materials that could restore and improve damaged bone tissues provides exciting opportunities to solve the numerous problems associated with traditional orthopedic implants. Therefore, the objective of this in vitro study was to create a biomimetic orthopedic hydrogel nanocomposite based on the self-assembly properties of helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs), the osteoconductive properties of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (HA), and the biocompatible properties of hydrogels (specifically, poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), pHEMA). HRNs are self-assembled nanomaterials that are formed from synthetic DNA base analogs in water to mimic the helical nanostructure of collagen in bone. In this study, different geometries of nanocrystalline HA were controlled by either hydrothermal or sintering methods. 2 and 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA particles were well dispersed into HRN hydrogels using ultrasonication. The nanocrystalline HA and nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogels were characterized by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. Mechanical testing studies revealed that the well dispersed nanocrystalline HA in HRN hydrogels possessed improved mechanical properties compared to hydrogel controls. In addition, the results of this study provided the first evidence that the combination of either 2 or 10 wt% nanocrystalline HA and 0.01 mg ml{sup -1} HRNs in hydrogels greatly increased osteoblast (bone-forming cell) adhesion up to 236% compared to hydrogel controls. Moreover, this study showed that HRNs stimulated HA nucleation and mineralization along their main axis in a way that is very reminiscent of the HA/collagen assembly pattern in natural bone. In summary, the presently observed excellent properties of the biomimetic nanocrystalline HA/HRN hydrogel

  20. Biomimetic helical rosette nanotubes and nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium for improving orthopedic implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijie Zhang

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Lijie Zhang1, Yupeng Chen2, Jose Rodriguez3, Hicham Fenniri3, Thomas J Webster11Division of Engineering, 2Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA; 3National Institute for Nanotechnology and Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Natural bone consists of hard nanostructured hydroxyapatite (HA in a nanostructured protein-based soft hydrogel template (ie, mostly collagen. For this reason, nanostructured HA has been an intriguing coating material on traditionally used titanium for improving orthopedic applications. In addition, helical rosette nanotubes (HRNs, newly developed materials which form through the self-assembly process of DNA base pair building blocks in body solutions, are soft nanotubes with a helical architecture that mimics natural collagen. Thus, the objective of this in vitro study was for the first time to combine the promising attributes of HRNs and nanocrystalline HA on titanium and assess osteoblast (bone-forming cell functions. Different sizes of nanocrystalline HA were synthesized in this study through a wet chemical precipitation process following either hydrothermal treatment or sintering. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that HRNs aligned with nanocrystalline HA, which indicates a high affinity between both components. Some of the nanocrystalline HA formed dense coatings with HRNs on titanium. More importantly, results demonstrated enhanced osteoblast adhesion on the HRN/nanocrystalline HA-coated titanium compared with conventional uncoated titanium. Among all the HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings tested, osteoblast adhesion was the greatest when HA nanometer particle size was the smallest. In this manner, this study demonstrated for the first time that biomimetic HRN/nanocrystalline HA coatings on titanium were cytocompatible for osteoblasts and, thus, should be further studied for improving orthopedic implants.Keywords: helical rosette nanotubes

  1. Transformational silicon electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-02-25

    In today\\'s traditional electronics such as in computers or in mobile phones, billions of high-performance, ultra-low-power devices are neatly integrated in extremely compact areas on rigid and brittle but low-cost bulk monocrystalline silicon (100) wafers. Ninety percent of global electronics are made up of silicon. Therefore, we have developed a generic low-cost regenerative batch fabrication process to transform such wafers full of devices into thin (5 μm), mechanically flexible, optically semitransparent silicon fabric with devices, then recycling the remaining wafer to generate multiple silicon fabric with chips and devices, ensuring low-cost and optimal utilization of the whole substrate. We show monocrystalline, amorphous, and polycrystalline silicon and silicon dioxide fabric, all from low-cost bulk silicon (100) wafers with the semiconductor industry\\'s most advanced high-κ/metal gate stack based high-performance, ultra-low-power capacitors, field effect transistors, energy harvesters, and storage to emphasize the effectiveness and versatility of this process to transform traditional electronics into flexible and semitransparent ones for multipurpose applications. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. Roadmap on silicon photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David; Zilkie, Aaron; Bowers, John E.; Komljenovic, Tin; Reed, Graham T.; Vivien, Laurent; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Cassan, Eric; Virot, Léopold; Fédéli, Jean-Marc; Hartmann, Jean-Michel; Schmid, Jens H.; Xu, Dan-Xia; Boeuf, Frédéric; O'Brien, Peter; Mashanovich, Goran Z.; Nedeljkovic, M.

    2016-07-01

    Silicon photonics research can be dated back to the 1980s. However, the previous decade has witnessed an explosive growth in the field. Silicon photonics is a disruptive technology that is poised to revolutionize a number of application areas, for example, data centers, high-performance computing and sensing. The key driving force behind silicon photonics is the ability to use CMOS-like fabrication resulting in high-volume production at low cost. This is a key enabling factor for bringing photonics to a range of technology areas where the costs of implementation using traditional photonic elements such as those used for the telecommunications industry would be prohibitive. Silicon does however have a number of shortcomings as a photonic material. In its basic form it is not an ideal material in which to produce light sources, optical modulators or photodetectors for example. A wealth of research effort from both academia and industry in recent years has fueled the demonstration of multiple solutions to these and other problems, and as time progresses new approaches are increasingly being conceived. It is clear that silicon photonics has a bright future. However, with a growing number of approaches available, what will the silicon photonic integrated circuit of the future look like? This roadmap on silicon photonics delves into the different technology and application areas of the field giving an insight into the state-of-the-art as well as current and future challenges faced by researchers worldwide. Contributions authored by experts from both industry and academia provide an overview and outlook for the silicon waveguide platform, optical sources, optical modulators, photodetectors, integration approaches, packaging, applications of silicon photonics and approaches required to satisfy applications at mid-infrared wavelengths. Advances in science and technology required to meet challenges faced by the field in each of these areas are also addressed together with

  3. Nanocrystalline TiO2 by three different synthetic approaches: A comparison

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T V Anuradha; S Ranganathan

    2007-06-01

    A comparison of the efficiency of three different synthetic routes viz. sol–gel method involving templating, mechanochemical synthesis and combustion synthesis for the production of nanostructured TiO2, is reported. In the sol–gel method, nanocrystalline TiO2 is produced when titanium tetraisopropoxide is templated onto dodecylamine which forms the liquid crystalline hexagonal structure and the template is then extracted using 1 : 1 solution of ethanol–hydrochloric acid mixture. Mechanochemical synthesis of nanocrystalline TiO2 involved mechanical milling of stoichiometric amounts of titanium and cupric oxide in a planetary ball mill using stainless steel vial with wear resistant stainless steel balls. Nanocrystalline TiO2 is produced by the combustion reaction involving titanyl nitrate and fuels like glycine and citric acid. Nanostructured TiO2 with an average particle size of ∼ 14 nm is produced by the sol–gel method whereas the mechanochemical reaction between titanium and cupric oxide resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline TiO2 with an average particle size of ∼ 20 nm after 12 h of milling. On the other hand, combustion synthesis resulted in the formation of nanocrystalline TiO2 with an average particle size of less than ∼ 50 nm. The microstructures of nanocrystalline TiO2 produced by the above three methods are analysed.

  4. Formation of nanocrystalline layers by surface severe plastic deformation and pulsed plasma electrolytic carburizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2010-07-01

    Surfaces of various kinds of metallic materials spheres were treated by nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation and then pulsed nanocrystalline plasma electrolytic carburizing to study nanocrystalline substrate effect on formation and nano-hardness of hard nanocrystalline layer. The surface layers of the metallic materials developed by the nanocrystalline surface severe plastic deformation were characterized by means of high resolution scanning electron microscope. Nearly equiaxed nanocrystals with grain sizes ranging from 15 to 90 nm were observed in the near surface regions of all metallic materials, which are low carbon steel and commercially pure titanium. The effect of substrate nanocrystallization on growth kinetics and hardness of formed nanocrystalline carbide layer was studied with the means of figure analysis and nanohardness tests. Figure analysis show the length to diameter ratio and distribution curve of nanocrystals and it has been found that the achieved properties of hard layer (growth rate, nano-hardness, nanostructure...) are related to these factors. It was also clarified that these techniques and surface nanocrystallization can be easily achieved in most of metallic materials. Results indicate that the resultant hardened carburized layers exhibited excellent hardness profile. Investigation of the layer characteristics showed strong dependence followed from the treatment experimental parameters as well as the shape of nanocrystals.

  5. Silver film on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} support: Photocatalytic and antimicrobial ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukoje, Ivana D., E-mail: ivanav@vinca.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tomašević-Ilić, Tijana D., E-mail: tommashev@gmail.com [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Zarubica, Aleksandra R., E-mail: zarubica2000@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Mathematics, University of Niš, Višegradska 33, 18000 Niš (Serbia); Dimitrijević, Suzana, E-mail: suzana@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Budimir, Milica D., E-mail: mickbudimir@gmail.com [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vranješ, Mila R., E-mail: mila@vinca.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Šaponjić, Zoran V., E-mail: saponjic@vinca.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Nedeljković, Jovan M., E-mail: jovned@vinca.rs [Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 522, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Simple photocatalytic rout for deposition of Ag on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films. • High antibactericidal efficiency of deposited Ag on TiO{sub 2} support. • Improved photocatalytic performance of TiO{sub 2} films in the presence of deposited Ag. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films were prepared on glass slides by the dip coating technique using colloidal solutions consisting of 4.5 nm particles as a precursor. Photoirradiation of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} film modified with alanine that covalently binds to the surface of TiO{sub 2} and at the same time chelate silver ions induced formation of metallic silver film. Optical and morphological properties of thin silver films on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} support were studied by absorption spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. Improvement of photocatalytic performance of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} films after deposition of silver was observed in degradation reaction of crystal violet. Antimicrobial ability of deposited silver films on nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} support was tested in dark as a function of time against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The silver films ensured maximum cells reduction of both bacteria, while the fungi reduction reached satisfactory 98.45% after 24 h of contact.

  6. Experimental evidence of tunable space-charge-layer-induced electrical properties of nanocrystalline ceria thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Lee, Jong-Ho; Yoo, Han-Ill

    2013-10-07

    Fully dense nanocrystalline ceria films were successfully deposited on a MgO single crystal by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The electrical conductivity of the nanocrystalline thin film was 20 times higher than that of the bulk sample. The activation energy of bulk ceria was 2.3 eV, whereas the activation energy of the nanocrystalline sample was only 1.2 eV. After post-annealing at 1273 K in which the grain size of the nanocrystalline thin film increased to ~400 nm, the electrical conductivity and activation energy of the film were changed similar to those of bulk. These unique electrical properties of the nano-crystalline thin-film can be attributed to the grain size effect, or more specifically, to the space charge layer (SCL) effect. Furthermore, the electrical conductivity of the nanocrystalline thin film became similar to that of the bulk in an extremely reducing atmosphere because of the unusual dependence of the SCL effect on the oxygen partial pressure.

  7. Recrystallization of polycrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lall, C.; Kulkarni, S. B.; Graham, C. D., Jr.; Pope, D. P.

    1981-01-01

    Optical metallography is used to investigate the recrystallization properties of polycrystalline semiconductor-grade silicon. It is found that polycrystalline silicon recrystallizes at 1380 C in relatively short times, provided that the prior deformation is greater than 30%. For a prior deformation of about 40%, the recrystallization process is essentially complete in about 30 minutes. Silicon recrystallizes at a substantially slower rate than metals at equivalent homologous temperatures. The recrystallized grain size is insensitive to the amount of prestrain for strains in the range of 10-50%.

  8. Porous silicon gettering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Menna, P.; Pitts, J.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    The authors have studied a novel extrinsic gettering method that uses the large surface areas produced by a porous-silicon etch as gettering sites. The annealing step of the gettering used a high-flux solar furnace. They found that a high density of photons during annealing enhanced the impurity diffusion to the gettering sites. The authors used metallurgical-grade Si (MG-Si) prepared by directional solidification casing as the starting material. They propose to use porous-silicon-gettered MG-Si as a low-cost epitaxial substrate for polycrystalline silicon thin-film growth.

  9. Microstructured silicon radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okandan, Murat; Derzon, Mark S.; Draper, Bruce L.

    2017-03-14

    A radiation detector comprises a silicon body in which are defined vertical pores filled with a converter material and situated within silicon depletion regions. One or more charge-collection electrodes are arranged to collect current generated when secondary particles enter the silicon body through walls of the pores. The pores are disposed in low-density clusters, have a majority pore thickness of 5 .mu.m or less, and have a majority aspect ratio, defined as the ratio of pore depth to pore thickness, of at least 10.

  10. Emissivity of microstructured silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Patrick G; Smith, Peter; King, Vernon; Billman, Curtis; Winkler, Mark; Mazur, Eric

    2010-03-01

    Infrared transmittance and hemispherical-directional reflectance data from 2.5 to 25 microm on microstructured silicon surfaces have been measured, and spectral emissivity has been calculated for this wavelength range. Hemispherical-total emissivity is calculated for the samples and found to be 0.84 before a measurement-induced annealing and 0.65 after the measurement for the sulfur-doped sample. Secondary samples lack a measurement-induced anneal, and reasons for this discrepancy are presented. Emissivity numbers are plotted and compared with a silicon substrate, and Aeroglaze Z306 black paint. Use of microstructured silicon as a blackbody or microbolometer surface is modeled and presented, respectively.

  11. Silicon nanowire hybrid photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Garnett, Erik C.

    2010-06-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky junction solar cells have been fabricated using n-type silicon nanowire arrays and a spin-coated conductive polymer (PEDOT). The polymer Schottky junction cells show superior surface passivation and open-circuit voltages compared to standard diffused junction cells with native oxide surfaces. External quantum efficiencies up to 88% were measured for these silicon nanowire/PEDOT solar cells further demonstrating excellent surface passivation. This process avoids high temperature processes which allows for low-cost substrates to be used. © 2010 IEEE.

  12. Amorphous and nanocrystalline phase formation in highly-driven Al-based binary alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalay, Yunus Eren [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Remarkable advances have been made since rapid solidification was first introduced to the field of materials science and technology. New types of materials such as amorphous alloys and nanostructure materials have been developed as a result of rapid solidification techniques. While these advances are, in many respects, ground breaking, much remains to be discerned concerning the fundamental relationships that exist between a liquid and a rapidly solidified solid. The scope of the current dissertation involves an extensive set of experimental, analytical, and computational studies designed to increase the overall understanding of morphological selection, phase competition, and structural hierarchy that occurs under far-from equilibrium conditions. High pressure gas atomization and Cu-block melt-spinning are the two different rapid solidification techniques applied in this study. The research is mainly focused on Al-Si and Al-Sm alloy systems. Silicon and samarium produce different, yet favorable, systems for exploration when alloyed with aluminum under far-from equilibrium conditions. One of the main differences comes from the positions of their respective T0 curves, which makes Al-Si a good candidate for solubility extension while the plunging T0 line in Al-Sm promotes glass formation. The rapidly solidified gas-atomized Al-Si powders within a composition range of 15 to 50 wt% Si are examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The non-equilibrium partitioning and morphological selection observed by examining powders at different size classes are described via a microstructure map. The interface velocities and the amount of undercooling present in the powders are estimated from measured eutectic spacings based on Jackson-Hunt (JH) and Trivedi-Magnin-Kurz (TMK) models, which permit a direct comparison of theoretical predictions. For an average particle size of 10 {micro}m with a Peclet number of ~0.2, JH and TMK deviate from

  13. Application of microplasma to synthesis of silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kenji; Ogino, Tomohisa; Asahi, Daisuke; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Okazaki, Ken

    2006-10-01

    We developed microplasma to synthesize nanocrystalline silicon particles (nc-Si). Gas residence time in micro plasma reactor is of the order of μs, while time required for particle nucleation by three-body collision? is about ms. Thus it is possible to separate crystal nucleation and growth in a single reactor. This process is very important for synthesis nc-Si. Microplasma was formed in a capillary tube of diameter 470 μm which is connected to the VHF power source. We used Ar/SiCl4 mixtures for nc-Si source for safety. H2 was added to convert exhausted Cl to HCl. Electron density of micro plasma (Ne) was estimated by Stark broadening of Hβ, and found that Ne is 1-3*10^15 cm-3. Rotation temperature was measured to be approximately 1500 K. Intensity ratio of Si(288 nm)/Ar(750 nm) increased linearly with increasing initial concentration of SiCl4. If the residence time was 30 μs, particle nucleation seemed to start in the discharge region, and particles keep growing involving impurity elements such as N or Cl. On the other hand, when residence time was set to shorter than 10 μs, the amount of impurities can be minimized. Under this condition, Raman spectra showed crystalline silicon peak around 520 cm-1. TEM image also indicated the size of synthesized nc-Si to be in the range of 4-20 nm.

  14. Stability of zinc oxide nanofluids prepared with aggregated nanocrystalline powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J P; Chung, S J; Nettleship, I; Soong, Y; Martello, D V; Chyu, M K

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous zinc oxide (ZnO) suspensions were prepared using a two-step preparation method in which an aggregated nanocrystalline ZnO powder was dispersed in water using a polyelectrolyte. The fluid showed anomalously high thermal conductivity when compared with the Maxwell and Hamilton-Crosser predictions. However, analysis of the particle size distribution showed that the fluid contained aggregated 20 nm crystallites of ZnO with a high volume fraction of particles larger than 100 nm. Sedimentation experiments revealed that particles settled out of the stationary fluid over times ranging from 0.1 hours to well over 10,000 hours. The size of the particles remaining in suspension agreed well with predictions made using Stoke's law, suggesting flocculation was not occurring in the fluids. Finally, a new concept of nanofluid stability is introduced based on the height of the fluid, sedimentation, Brownian motion and the kinetic energy of the particles.

  15. Structural modification of nanocrystalline ceria by ion beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanwen; Edmondson, Philip D; Varga, Tamas; Moll, Sandra; Namavar, Fereydoon; Lan, Chune; Weber, William J

    2011-07-07

    Exceptional size-dependent electronic-ionic conductivity of nanostructured ceria can significantly alter materials properties in chemical, physical, electronic and optical applications. Using energetic ions, we have demonstrated effective modification of interface volume and grain size in nanocrystalline ceria from a few nm up to ∼25 nm, which is the critical region for controlling size-dependent material property. The grain size increases and follows an exponential law as a function of ion fluence that increases with temperature, while the cubic phase is stable under the irradiation. The unique self-healing response of radiation damage at grain boundaries is utilized to control the grain size at the nanoscale. Structural modification by energetic ions is proposed to achieve desirable electronic-ionic conductivity.

  16. Production of nanocrystalline cellulose from lignocellulosic biomass: technology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinchi, L; Cotana, F; Fortunati, E; Kenny, J M

    2013-04-15

    The use of renewables materials for industrial applications is becoming impellent due to the increasing demand of alternatives to scarce and unrenewable petroleum supplies. In this regard, nanocrystalline cellulose, NCC, derived from cellulose, the most abundant biopolymer, is one of the most promising materials. NCC has unique features, interesting for the development of new materials: the abundance of the source cellulose, its renewability and environmentally benign nature, its mechanical properties and its nano-scaled dimensions open a wide range of possible properties to be discovered. One of the most promising uses of NCC is in polymer matrix nanocomposites, because it can provide a significant reinforcement. This review provides an overview on this emerging nanomaterial, focusing on extraction procedures, especially from lignocellulosic biomass, and on technological developments and applications of NCC-based materials. Challenges and future opportunities of NCC-based materials will be are discussed as well as obstacles remaining for their large use.

  17. Nanocrystalline forsterite for biomedical applications: synthesis, microstructure and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, S; Yaghoubi, A; Lee, K Y Sara; Chin, K M Christopher; Purbolaksono, J; Hamdi, M; Hassan, M A

    2013-09-01

    Forsterite (Mg2SiO4) because of its exceptionally high fracture toughness which is close to that of cortical bones has been nominated as a possible successor to calcium phosphate bioceramics. Recent in vitro studies also suggest that forsterite possesses good bioactivity and promotes osteoblast proliferation as well as adhesion. However studies on preparation and sinterability of nanocrystalline forsterite remain scarce. In this work, we use a solid-state reaction with magnesium oxide (MgO) and talc (Mg3Si4(OH)2) as the starting precursors to synthesize forsterite. A systematic investigation was carried out to elucidate the effect of preparatory procedures including heat treatment, mixing methods and sintering temperature on development of microstructures as well as the mechanical properties of the sintered forsterite body.

  18. Healing mechanism of nanocrack in nanocrystalline metals during creep process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meraj, Md.; Pal, Snehanshu

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has been performed to demonstrate the fate of cracks present inside ultrafine-grained (grain size 7 nm) nanocrystalline Ni specimen during creep deformation process. It is observed that internal nanocracks are healed within a few pico-seconds of initial part of creep process even if the constant applied load on the specimen is tensile in nature and acting normal to crack surface in the outward direction. This kind of crack-healing phenomenon can be accounted by the facts such as stress-driven grain boundary migration, grain boundary diffusion and amorphization of specimen as per results obtained from this MD simulation. This MD study also reveals that the presence of nanocrack inside ultrafine-grained NC Ni in fact slightly improves creep properties and such enhancement of the creep properties is intensified as the size of internal crack increases.

  19. Dislocation Effects on the Diffraction Line Profiles from Nanocrystalline Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Alberto; Scardi, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    A Pd nano-polycrystalline microstructure was simulated by molecular dynamics, including edge or screw dislocations in one of the 50 grains, so as to produce a realistic model of nanocrystalline domain with line defect. The same crystalline domain was also studied, with or without line defects, as a free-standing, isolated nanocrystal. Atomic coordinates of the selected domain were used to generate powder patterns by means of the Debye scattering equation, and these patterns were used as "experimental" data to test existing methods of line profile analysis in controlled condition, i.e., with known type and density of defects. Results show that the Krivolgaz-Wilkens theory of dislocation line broadening qualitatively agrees with the MD model, but errors can be larger than 50 pct. A critical issue arises from the instability of the Krivolgaz-Wilkens model when all line profile parameters are simultaneously refined: reasonable results can be obtained by fixing or restricting some parameters.

  20. Anticorrosion Nanocrystalline Beta Zeolite Thin Film for Advanced Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Saud M. Al-subaie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Steel alloys corrosion is ubiquitous and is conventionally protected by anticorrosion chromate coatings. However, the process suffers from the release of carcinogenic hexavalent chromium ions that needs to be replaced by an ecofriendly alternative. In this context, the need for the development of satisfactory ecofriendly chromium-free coating with superior corrosion performance is highly desirable. In the present study, we synthesized fully dispersible nanocrystalline Beta zeolite seeds and coated on steel alloys followed by steaming. The samples were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, and DLS analyses. The anticorrosion behavior of the synthesized nanoparticle coatings on steel alloys was investigated by electrochemical measurements (DC polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS in NaCl and acid and alkaline media under identical experimental conditions. The present study demonstrated that the nanozeolite coating can be a potential alternative for toxic and carcinogenic chromate coating.