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Sample records for monnig meteorite collection

  1. Finding and Collecting Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, M.; Murdin, P.

    2003-04-01

    METEORITES fall at random over the Earth's surface, at a rate of around 1000 per year for samples weighing 10-100 kg (10-20 cm across) and 10 000 per year for samples weighing between 10-100 g. Many of these specimens fall in the ocean and are lost. Those that fall unobserved in temperate or wet regions rapidly weather and break down over a timescale of ˜100-200 yr. In contrast, meteorites that fa...

  2. Catalogue of meteorites in Dutch collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, van P.W.C.

    1979-01-01

    This catalogue contains information on the meteorite collections presently on display or on storage in The Netherlands. It is organized in three separate listings. The first and shortest listing gives the meteorite names grouped according to their classification. The second listing is the main body

  3. Catalogue of meteorites in Dutch collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calsteren, van P.W.C.

    1979-01-01

    This catalogue contains information on the meteorite collections presently on display or on storage in The Netherlands. It is organized in three separate listings. The first and shortest listing gives the meteorite names grouped according to their classification. The second listing is the main body

  4. New Insights in Preservation of Meteorites in Hot Deserts: The Oldest Hot Desert Meteorite Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, A.; Rochette, P.; Bourlès, D.; Gattacceca, J.; Merchel, S.; Jull, A. J. T.; Valenzuela, M.

    2016-08-01

    Terrestrial ages of a subset of a chilean meteorite collection have been determined with cosmogenic nuclides. We show here that provided the environnement is favorable enough, hot desert meteorites can survive over a million year.

  5. 45 CFR 674.4 - Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Antarctica. 674.4 Section 674.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.4 Restrictions on collection of meteorites in Antarctica. No person may collect meteorites in Antarctica for other than scientific research purposes....

  6. The meteorite collection at Museo di Storia Naturale, Pisa University, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchiazzi, Natale; D'Orazio, Massimo; Folco, Luigi

    2004-08-01

    The historical meteorite collection of Museo di Storia Naturale, Pisa University, is presented in this catalog. Dating back to at least 1860, the collection currently (as of June 2003) contains 30 specimens of 26 individual meteorites, representing about 50 kg of extraterrestrial material. The collection includes 2 carbonaceous chondrites, 12 ordinary chondrites, 1 achondrite, 4 stony-iron meteorites, and 7 iron meteorites, including three remarkable specimens: the main mass of Bagnone (48 kg), the fourth largest mass of Quenggouk (717.5 g), and a large (nearly) complete individual of the Siena showerfall (318.8 g).

  7. Comparison of US Antarctic Meteorite Collection to Other Cold and Hot Deserts and Modern Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, K. M.; Righter, K.

    2010-01-01

    The US Antarctic meteorite collection has grown close to 18,000 specimens, over 16,000 of which have been classified. Because of this growth, the parallel growth of Antarctic meteorite collections by Japan and China, and also the hot desert collections (from Africa and Australia), we will update the statistical overview of the US collection (last done in 1990 [1]), and make comparisons to other collections and modern falls.

  8. Description of a very dense meteorite collection area in western Atacama: Insight into the long-term composition of the meteorite flux to Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Aurore; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Rochette, Pierre; Braucher, RéGis; Carro, Bertrand; Christensen, Eric J.; Cournede, CéCile; Gounelle, Matthieu; Laridhi Ouazaa, Nejia; Martinez, Rodrigo; Valenzuela, Millarca; Warner, Michael; Bourles, Didier

    2016-03-01

    We describe the geological, morphological, and climatic settings of two new meteorite collections from Atacama (Chile). The "El Médano collection" was recovered by systematic on-foot search in El Médano and Caleta el Cobre dense collection areas and is composed of 213 meteorites before pairing, 142 after pairing. The "private collection" has been recovered by car by three private hunters and consists of 213 meteorites. Similar to other hot desert finds, and contrary to the falls and Antarctica finds, both collections show an overabundance of H chondrites. A recovery density can be calculated only for the El Médano collection and gives 251 and 168 meteorites larger than 10 g km-2, before and after pairing, respectively. It is by far the densest collection area described in hot deserts. The Atacama Desert is known to have been hyperarid for a long period of time and, based on cosmic-ray exposure ages on the order of 1-10 Ma, to have been stable over a period of time of several million years. Such a high meteorite concentration might be explained invoking either a yet unclear concentration mechanism (possibly related to downslope creeping) or a previously underestimated meteorite flux in previous studies or an average terrestrial age over 2 Myr. This last hypothesis is supported by the high weathering grade of meteorites and by the common terrestrial fragmentation (with fragments scattered over a few meters) of recovered meteorites.

  9. Updates on Pairing Issues with the US Antarctic Meteorite Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Satterwhite, C.; Schutt, J.

    2015-01-01

    The US Antarctic meteorite program has re-covered >21,000 meteorites since 1976, with thousands of those recovered from several icefields over multiple seasons, some-times spanning over a decade [1]. Pairing is assigned as best as possible at the time of classification, based on information from the field team, macro-scale hand sample features in the lab, and petrography, but later focused studies can reveal details that suggest re-evaluation of pairing groups. As a result, pairing groups are revealed over time, and must be continuously updated. Here we examine a few groups with known issues and give an update on some of the larger or more significant pairing groups.

  10. 35 seasons of US antarctic meteorites (1976-2010) a pictorial guide to the collection

    CERN Document Server

    Righter, Kevin; McCoy, Timothy; Harvey, Ralph; Harvey, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The US Antarctic meteorite collection exists due to a cooperative program involving the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Smithsonian Institution.  Since 1976, meteorites have been collected by a NSF-funded field team, shipped for curation, characterization, distribution, and storage at NASA, and classified and stored for long term at the Smithsonian.  It is the largest collection in the world with many significant samples including lunar, martian, many interesting chondrites and achondrites, and even several unusual one-of-

  11. Finding Shatter Cones in Meteorites from the Natural History Museum Vienna Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrière, L.; Brandstätter, F.; Koeberl, C.

    2013-09-01

    New findings of shatter cones in a few meteorites from the Natural History Museum Vienna as well as other impact metamorphism features are presented. Their occurrence in meteorites records hypervelocity collisions in the solar system.

  12. Unmelted Meteoritic Debris Collected from Eltanin Ejecta in Polarstern Cores from Expedition ANT XII/4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Frank T.

    2002-01-01

    A total of 1.7g of unmelted meteorite particles have been recovered from FS Polarstern piston cores collected on expedition ANT XII/4 that contain ejecta from the Eltanin impact event. Most of the mass (1.2 g) is a large, single specimen that is a polymict breccia, similar in mineralogy and chemistry to howardites or the silicate fraction of mesosiderites. Most of the remaining mass is in several large individual pieces (20-75mg each) that are polymict breccias, fragments dominated by pyroxene, and an igneous rock fragment. The latter has highly fractionated REE, similar to those reported in mafic clasts from mesosiderites. Other types of specimens identified include fragments dominated by maskelynite or olivine. These pieces of the projectile probably survived impact by being blown off the back surface of the Eltanin asteroid during its impact into the Bellingshausen Sea.

  13. Cosmic-ray exposure histories of two Antarctic meteorites from Chinese collections and the Guangmingshan and Zhuanghe chondrites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道德; 林杨挺; 刘小汉; 琚宜太

    2003-01-01

    Concentrations of noble gases of two Antarctic meteorites (GRV 98002, 98004) from Chinese collections, and the Guangmingshan and Zhuanghe chondrites were measured. Based on the petrography and mineralogy of these meteorites, and production rates of the cosmogenic nuclides, we calculated cosmic-ray exposure and gas retention ages of the four chondrites. Exposure ages of the four chondrites are 0.052 Ma ± 0.008 Ma (GRV 98004, H5), 17.0 Ma ± 2.5 Ma (GRV98002, L5), 3.8 Ma ± 0.6 Ma (Zhuanghe, H5), and 68.9 Ma ± 10 Ma (Guangmingshan, H5), respectively. The exposure age of GRV 98004 is the lowest value of Antarctic meteorites reported up to date; while that of Guangmingshan is higher than other Chinese meteorites of H-group. Both GRV 98002 and Zhuanghe have low 4He concentrations, probably due to shock effects or solar heating at orbits with small perihelion distances during cosmic-ray exposure. On the other hand, losses of cosmogenic 3He and 4He are correlated with both GRV 98002 and Guangmingshan.

  14. 45 CFR 674.5 - Requirements for collection, handling, documentation, and curation of Antarctic meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION ANTARCTIC METEORITES § 674.5 Requirements for... geographical feature; (v) The name, organizational affiliation, and address of the finder or the expedition... shall consult with the National Science Foundation's Office of Polar Programs to identify...

  15. Thermoluminescence survey of 12 meteorites collected by the European 1988 Antarctic meteorite expedition to Allan Hills and the importance of acid washing for thermoluminescence sensitivity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1991-01-01

    Natural and induced thermoluminescence (TL) data are reported for 12 meteorites recovered from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica by the European field party during the 1988/1989 field season. The samples include one with extremely high natural TL, ALH88035, suggestive of exposure to unusually high radiation doses (i.e., low degrees of shielding), and one, ALH88034, whose low natural TL suggests reheating within the last 100,000 years. The remainder have natural TL values suggestive of terrestrial ages similar to those of other meteorites from Allan Hills. ALH88015 (L6) has induced TL data suggestive of intense shock. TL sensitivities of these meteorites are generally lower than observed falls of their petrologic types, as is also observed for Antarctic meteorites in general. Acid-washing experiments indicate that this is solely the result of terrestrial weathering rather than a nonterrestrial Antarctic-non-Antarctic difference. However, other TL parameters, such as natural TL and induced peak temperature-width, are unchanged by acid washing and are sensitive indicators of a meteorite's metamorphic and recent radiation history.

  16. 我国南极陨石收集进展(2000-2010)%Progress of Antarctic Meteorite Collection in China(2000-2010)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    缪秉魁; 林杨挺; 王道德; 欧阳自远

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic meteorite survey has been one of the most important Antarctic expedition projects of many countries since the middle of the last century. China Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) began to search meteorites in Antarctica at the end of the last century, and has obtained great achievements in the new century. During the first decade of this century, CHIN ARE has collected more than ten thousands Antarctic meteorite.s, China became one of the richest countries with Antarctic meteorites, and had found a new meteorite concentrated area in East Antarctica-Grove Mountains.%自上世纪中叶以来,南极陨石收集就成为国际上南极考察项目中的一个重要亮点.在世纪之交之际,我国南极考察队开始了南极陨石收集,在短短的十年时间,在南极陨石收集方面取得了丰硕成果.我国不但收集了一万多块陨石样品,成为拥有南极陨石最多的国家之一,而且新发现了一个陨石富集区——格罗夫山.

  17. Meteorite Magazine: Promoting Science, Discovery, And Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Lebofsky, N. R.; Sears, H.; Sears, D.

    2006-09-01

    In late 2005, Larry and Nancy Lebofsky and Derek and Hazel Sears took over the editing and publishing of Meteorite magazine. We saw a great educational potential for the magazine. With a circulation over 600, the magazine reaches a broad readership: meteorite scientists, hunters, collectors, and enthusiasts. Unlike the professional journal of the Meteoritical Society, Meteoritics and Planetary Sciences, the articles in Meteorite range from scientific articles, reports from meteorite shows, and how to preserve meteorites to stories about searching for meteorites around the world. Meteorites are of interest to people. Asteroids, meteoroids, meteors, and meteorites are in many states' science standards. Yet, how many museums have meteorite collections with staff who know little about them? How many amateur astronomers, when seeing meteors or meteor showers, can explain how asteroids, comets, meteors, and meteorites are related and what they tell us about the formation of our Solar System? How many meteorite collectors are knowledgeable about how these objects are related to each other? How do we reach the broader community? Unlike the hundreds of amateur and school astronomy clubs, there are no meteorite clubs. While one can point out the wonders of the night sky and what can be seen through a telescope at star parties, there is no such thing as school meteorite hunting parties. The meteorite and planetary sciences communities working together can bring the excitement of meteorites and the science behind these fascinating objects to teachers, students, and museum and planetarium staff. We will present ideas for accomplishing this.

  18. Meteorites from Cluj-Napoca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radu, Gelu; Pop, Dana

    2003-04-01

    The article represents an interview of the journalist Gelu Radu with the director of the Meteorites Museum from the Geological Faculty of the Cluj-Napoca University (Romania) Dana Pop concerning the History, Collection and Actual state of an unique in Romania Meteorites Museum, founded in 1882 after the fall of the Mociu Meteorit (Cluj County) on 3 february 1882. One discusses about the collection of the Museum and the policy of changes with other similar museums throughout the world.

  19. The Meteorite of Belogradchik [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper reveals the history of the meteorite of Belogradchik (1874, samples of which have been presented in many meteorite collections in all over the world except Bulgaria. The meteorite, often named 'Virba', was studied and described by Daubree (1874 and Meunier (1893.

  20. Antarctic Meteorite Classification and Petrographic Database Enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, N. S.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Righter, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Antarctic Meteorite collection, which is comprised of over 18,700 meteorites, is one of the largest collections of meteorites in the world. These meteorites have been collected since the late 1970 s as part of a three-agency agreement between NASA, the National Science Foundation, and the Smithsonian Institution [1]. Samples collected each season are analyzed at NASA s Meteorite Lab and the Smithsonian Institution and results are published twice a year in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, which has been in publication since 1978. Each newsletter lists the samples collected and processed and provides more in-depth details on selected samples of importance to the scientific community. Data about these meteorites is also published on the NASA Curation website [2] and made available through the Meteorite Classification Database allowing scientists to search by a variety of parameters. This paper describes enhancements that have been made to the database and to the data and photo acquisition process to provide the meteorite community with faster access to meteorite data concurrent with the publication of the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter twice a year.

  1. Preliminary Results on Magnetic Mineralogy and Elemental Composition of Meteorites from Geological Museum of Kazan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzina, D. M.; Nurgaliev, D. K.; Gareev, B. I.; Batalin, G. A.; Silantev, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Thermomagnetic analysis (magnetic mineralogy) and Micro X-ray Fluorescence analysis (mapping) were made for collection of meteorites. As a result we have elements distribution on surface of meteorites and Fe-Ni presence in meteorites.

  2. Meteorite classiifcation for building the Chinese Antarctic Meteorite Depository-Introduction of the classiifcation of 500 Grove Mountains meteorites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhipeng; ZHANG Jie; MIAO Bingkui; OU Ronglin; XIE Lanfang; YANG Rui; JING Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites provide an important window into the origins and evolution of the solar system. Since the first four meteorites were recovered in Grove Mountains, Antarctica, in 1998, a further total of 12665 meteorites have been collected over seven polar seasons in the Grove Mountains. All of these meteorites are owned and managed by the Chinese Antarctic Meteorite Depository (CAMD) at the Polar Research Institute of China (PRIC). In recent years, another 500 Antarctic meteorites have been classiifed and characterized based on mineralogy and petrology. In this work we examine four samples that have been identiifed as terrestrial, and a further 496 samples that have been conifrmed as meteorites. These meteorites are further divided into different types:488 ordinary chondrites, one eucrite, one ureilite, one CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, one EH4 enstatite chondrite, one mesosiderite and three iron meteorites. The classiifcation of meteorites not only provides an abundance of fundamental scientiifc data, but is also signiifcant for introducing meteorites and related scientiifc knowledge to the public, particularly via the website of Chinese Resource-sharing Platform of Polar Samples for scientiifc research and education.

  3. Lunar Meteorites: A Global Geochemical Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Joy, K. H.; Arai, T.; Gross, J.; Korotev, R. L.; McCubbin, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    To date, the world's meteorite collections contain over 260 lunar meteorite stones representing at least 120 different lunar meteorites. Additionally, there are 20-30 as yet unnamed stones currently in the process of being classified. Collectively these lunar meteorites likely represent 40-50 distinct sampling locations from random locations on the Moon. Although the exact provenance of each individual lunar meteorite is unknown, collectively the lunar meteorites represent the best global average of the lunar crust. The Apollo sites are all within or near the Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), thus lithologies from the PKT are overrepresented in the Apollo sample suite. Nearly all of the lithologies present in the Apollo sample suite are found within the lunar meteorites (high-Ti basalts are a notable exception), and the lunar meteorites contain several lithologies not present in the Apollo sample suite (e.g., magnesian anorthosite). This chapter will not be a sample-by-sample summary of each individual lunar meteorite. Rather, the chapter will summarize the different types of lunar meteorites and their relative abundances, comparing and contrasting the lunar meteorite sample suite with the Apollo sample suite. This chapter will act as one of the introductory chapters to the volume, introducing lunar samples in general and setting the stage for more detailed discussions in later more specialized chapters. The chapter will begin with a description of how lunar meteorites are ejected from the Moon, how deep samples are being excavated from, what the likely pairing relationships are among the lunar meteorite samples, and how the lunar meteorites can help to constrain the impactor flux in the inner solar system. There will be a discussion of the biases inherent to the lunar meteorite sample suite in terms of underrepresented lithologies or regions of the Moon, and an examination of the contamination and limitations of lunar meteorites due to terrestrial weathering. The

  4. Magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic moment and characterization of Carancas meteorite

    CERN Document Server

    Rosales, Domingo

    2015-01-01

    On September, 15th, 2007, in the community of Carancas (Puno, Peru) a stony meteorite formed a crater explosive type with a mean diameter of 13.5 m. some samples meteorite fragments were collected. The petrologic analysis performed corresponds to a meteorite ordinary chondrite H 4-5. In this paper we have analyzed the magnetic properties of a meteorite fragment with a proton magnetometer. Also in order to have a complete characterization of the Carancas meteorite and its crater, from several papers, articles and reports, we have made a compilation of the most important characteristics and properties of this meteorite.

  5. Grove Mountains meteorite recovery and relevant data distribution service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunxia; Ai, Songtao; Chen, Nengcheng; Wang, Zemin; E, Dongchen

    2011-11-01

    Meteorites are extremely valuable in providing clues about the origin, evolution, and composition of the Sun, the Moon, the Earth, other planets, and asteroids. Since the first discovery of a meteorite in Antarctica, more and more meteorite concentrations on bare ice stranding sites were discovered. Antarctica is identified as a prolific source of extraterrestrial materials. The Grove Mountains area, covered by ice, snow, and nunataks, is located in the Antarctic inland area. It is about 380 km away from the Chinese Zhongshan Antarctic Research Station in East Antarctica. Since 1998, 11,452 meteorites have been collected from the Grove Mountains by the Chinese National Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE). It is confirmed that the Grove Mountains area is a productive search area for meteorites in Antarctica. More and more meteorite recoveries led to the recognition that unique mechanisms relating to meteorite concentrations exist in Antarctica. Besides meteorite field collections, the extraction of blue ice based on satellite images, meteorite concentration mechanisms, and meteorite data distribution service are discussed in this paper. Wide distribution of blue ice indicates the enrichment of meteorites. Based on the different spectrum characteristics and coherence of snow, blue ice, and bare rocks, blue ice areas are extracted from optical images and coherence maps. According to meteorite field collections and optical images, moraines are also identified as meteorite concentration sites in the Grove Mountains area. The meteorite concentration theories should be further analyzed by taking into account ice-flow dynamics, mountains' blocking effect, katabatic wind and ice ablation, and others. Moreover, in order to strengthen the visualization and network sharing of the valuable meteorite data, desktop software based on ArcObjects and web software based on ArcIMS are developed within this study. The desktop software also enables further analysis of the meteorite

  6. Principles of meteoritics

    CERN Document Server

    Krinov, E L

    1960-01-01

    Principles of Meteoritics examines the significance of meteorites in relation to cosmogony and to the origin of the planetary system. The book discusses the science of meteoritics and the sources of meteorites. Scientists study the morphology of meteorites to determine their motion in the atmosphere. The scope of such study includes all forms of meteorites, the circumstances of their fall to earth, their motion in the atmosphere, and their orbits in space. Meteoric bodies vary in sizes; in calculating their motion in interplanetary space, astronomers apply the laws of Kepler. In the region of

  7. Meteorites from Grove Mountains, Antarctica:An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王道德; 林杨挺

    2003-01-01

    Thirty-two meteorites were collected in Grove Mountains area, Antarctica,by the 15th and 16th Chinese Antarctic Research Expeditions (CHINARE). Petrography and mineral chemistry of these meteorites are reviewed, among which there are one Martian lherzolite, one eucrite, one ungrouped iron meteorite, and six unequilibrated and twenty-three equilibrated ordinary chondrites. An equilibrated ordinary chondrite GRV 98004 (H5) has an unusually low cosmic-ray exposure age. Meteorite concentrating processes in Grove Mountains area are discussed. In addition, future studies on Grove Mountains (GRV) meteorites are proposed.

  8. Noble Gases in the Chelyabinsk Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Makiko K.; Sumino, Hirochika; Nagao, Keisuke; Mikouchi, Takashi; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fell in Russia on February 15, 2013 and was classified as LL5 chondrite. The diameter before it entered the atmosphere has been estimated to be about 20 m [1]. Up to now, numerous fragments weighing much greater than 100 kg in total have been collected. In this study, all noble gases were measured for 13 fragments to investigate the exposure history of the Chelyabinsk meteorite and the thermal history of its parent asteroid.

  9. Effective radium-226 concentration in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Perrier, Frédéric; Moreira, Manuel; Zanda, Brigitte; Rochette, Pierre; Teitler, Yoram

    2017-07-01

    solar wind implantation, and probably a similar carrier phase such as Q phase. An unclear correlation is observed with 40Ar, which may rule out a purely radiogenic effect on radon emanation. Thus, larger radon emanation suggests a larger capacity of collecting solar and terrestrial gases, which should imply higher loss of gases generated in the meteorite and larger dispersion of Pb/U ratios for age determination. This study provides the first quantification of natural radon-222 loss from meteorites and opens promising perspectives to quantify the relationship between pore space connectivity and the transfer properties for noble gases in meteorites and other extraterrestrial bodies.

  10. Meteorite transport—Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisdom, Jack

    2017-08-01

    Meteorites are delivered from the asteroid belt by way of chaotic zones (Wisdom 1985a). The dominant sources are believed to be the chaotic zones associated with the ν6 secular resonance, the 3:1 mean motion resonance, and the 5:2 mean motion resonance. Though the meteorite transport process has been previously studied, those studies have limitations. Here I reassess the meteorite transport process with fewer limitations. Prior studies have not been able to reproduce the afternoon excess (the fact that approximately twice as many meteorites fall in the afternoon as in the morning) and suggested that the afternoon excess is an observational artifact; here it is shown that the afternoon excess is in fact consistent with the transport of meteorites by way of chaotic zones in the asteroid belt. By studying models with and without the inner planets it is found that the inner planets significantly speed up the transport of meteorites.

  11. Meteorites from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, M.; Murdin, P.

    2002-01-01

    The SNC METEORITES, named after the initials of the first discovered members (Shergotty, Nakhla and Chassigny), are a group of stony meteorites that are thought to come from Mars, rather than the asteroid belt. They are all igneous rocks (i.e. formed by crystallizing from molten material) and are distinguished from other meteorites by their ages, which are as low as 165 million years old. A young...

  12. Petrography and Geochemistry of Lunar Meteorite Miller Range 13317

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, R. A.; Korotev, R. L.

    2016-01-01

    Miller Range (MIL) 13317 is a 32-g lunar meteorite collected during the 2013-2014 ANSMET (Antarctic Search for Meteorites) field season. It was initially described as having 25% black fusion crust covering a light- to dark-grey matrix, with numerous clasts ranging in size up to 1 cm; it was tenta-tively classified as a lunar anorthositic breccia. Here we present the petrography and geochemistry of MIL 13317, and examine possible pairing relationships with previously described lunar meteorites.

  13. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Allen, J.; Kascak, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core and regolith samples, from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected from a US cooperative effort among NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution that funds expeditions to Antarctica. The meteorites that are collected include rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. The sample disks for educational use include these different samples. Active relevant learning has always been important to teachers and the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program provides this active style of learning for students and the general public. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks permit students to conduct investigations comparable to actual scientists. The Lunar Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Basalt, Breccia, Highland Regolith, Anorthosite, Mare Regolith and Orange Soil. The Meteorite Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Chondrite L3, Chondrite H5, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Basaltic Achondrite, Iron and Stony-Iron. Teachers are given different activities that adhere to their standards with the disks. During a Sample Disk Certification Workshop, teachers participate in the activities as students gain insight into the history, formation and geologic processes of the moon, asteroids and meteorites.

  14. Investigations on five iron meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonazzi, A. [Parma Univ. (Italy). Istituto di Mineralogia; Jiang, K. [Ist. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. of Parma (Italy); Ortalli, I. [Ist. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. of Parma (Italy); Pedrazzi, G. [Ist. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. of Parma (Italy); Zhang, X. [Ist. di Scienze Fisiche, Univ. of Parma (Italy)

    1994-11-01

    In the present paper, we report an analysis of five iron meteorites belonging to the private collection of the mineralogy museum of the University of Parma (Italy). The collection is made up of eighteen samples, collected over two centuries. Up to now, they have never been studied by spectroscopical techniques and their classification was estimated on the basis of morphological inspection. Electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) have been used to analyse the samples. (orig.)

  15. A potential hidden layer of meteorites below the ice surface of Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evatt, G W; Coughlan, M J; Joy, K H; Smedley, A R D; Connolly, P J; Abrahams, I D

    2016-02-16

    Antarctica contains some of the most productive regions on Earth for collecting meteorites. These small areas of glacial ice are known as meteorite stranding zones, where upward-flowing ice combines with high ablation rates to concentrate large numbers of englacially transported meteorites onto their surface. However, meteorite collection data shows that iron and stony-iron meteorites are significantly under-represented from these regions as compared with all other sites on Earth. Here we explain how this discrepancy may be due to englacial solar warming, whereby meteorites a few tens of centimetres below the ice surface can be warmed up enough to cause melting of their surrounding ice and sink downwards. We show that meteorites with a high-enough thermal conductivity (for example, iron meteorites) can sink at a rate sufficient to offset the total annual upward ice transport, which may therefore permanently trap them below the ice surface and explain their absence from collection data.

  16. Foundations of Forensic Meteoritics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1992-07-01

    It may be useful to know if a meteorite was found at the site where it fell. For instance, the polymict ureilites North Haig and Nilpena were found 1100 km apart, yet are petrologically identical [1]. Could this distance represent transport from a single strewn field, or does it represent distinct fall sites? A meteorite may contain sufficient clues to suggest some characteristics of its fall site. If these inferences are inconsistent with the find site, one may infer that the meteorite has been transported. It will likely be impossible to determine the exact fall site of a transported meteorite. Data relevant to a meteorite's fall site may be intrinsic to the meteorite, or acquired at the site. For instance, an intrinsic property is terrestrial residence age (from abundances of cosmogenic radioisotopes and their decay products); a meteorite's terrestrial residence age must be the same or less than that of the surface on which it fell. After falling, a meteorite may acquire characteristic telltales of terrestrial geological, geochemical, and biological processes. These telltale clues may include products of chemical weathering, adhering geological materials, biological organisms living (or once living) on the meteorite, and biological materials adhering to (but never living on) the meteorite. The effects of chemical weathering, present in all but the freshest finds, range from slight rusting to extensive decomposition and veining The ages of weathering materials and veins, as with terrestrial residence ages above, must be less than the age of the fall surface. The mineralogy and chemistry, elemental and isotopic, of weathering materials will differ according to the mineralogy and composition of the meteorite, and the mineralogy, geochemistry, hydrology, and climate of the fall site. Weathering materials may also vary as climate changes and may vary among the microenvironments associated with a meteorite on the Earth's surface. Geological materials (rock, sediment

  17. Magnetism in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herndon, J. M.; Rowe, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    An overview is presented of magnetism in meteorites. A glossary of magnetism terminology followed by discussion of the various techniques used for magnetism studies in meteorites are included. The generalized results from use of these techniques by workers in the field are described. A brief critical analysis is offered.

  18. The Kaidun Meteorite: Where Did It Come From?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Andrei; Zolensky, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The Kaidun meteorite, which fell on 3.12.1980 at lat. 15 deg N, long. 48.3 deg E, holds a special place in the world meteorite collection. Kaidun is characterized by an unprecedentedly wide variety of meteorite material in its makeup. The high degree of variability in this meteorite s material is evidenced by the richness of its mineral composition - nearly 60 minerals and mineral phases have been identified in Kaidun, including several never before found in nature, such as florenskiite FeTiP, the first known phosphide of a lithophilic element.

  19. Asteroid 2008 TC3 Breakup and Meteorite Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, C.; Jenniskens, P.; Shaddad, M. H.; Zolensky, M. E.; Fioretti, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    The recovery of meteorites from the impact of asteroid 2008 TC3 in the Nubian Desert of Sudan on October 7, 2008, marked the first time meteorites were collected from an asteroid observed in space by astronomical techniques before impacting. Search teams from the University of Khartoum traced the location of the strewn field and collected about 660 meteorites in four expeditions to the fall region, all of which have known fall coordinates. Upon further study, the Almahata Sitta meteorites proved to be a mixed bag of mostly ureilites (course grained, fine grained, and sulfide-metal assemblages), enstatite chondrites (EL3-6, EH3, EH5, breccias) and ordinary chondrites (H5-6, L4-5). One bencubbinite-like carbonaceous chondrite was identified, as well as one unique Rumuruti-like chondrite and an Enstatite achondrite. New analysis: The analysed meteorites so far suggest a high 30-40 percent fraction of non-ureilites among the recovered samples, but that high fraction does not appear to be in agreement with the meteorites in the University of Khartoum (UoK) collection. Ureilites dominate the meteorites that were recovered by the Sudanese teams. To better understand the fraction of recovered materials that fell to Earth, a program has been initiated to type the meteorites in the UoK collection in defined search areas. At this meeting, we will present some preliminary results from that investigation.

  20. The shape of meteorites

    OpenAIRE

    Hiroichi, Hasegawa

    1981-01-01

    The shape of meteorites is described by axial ratio (b/a), where a and b are the longest and the intermediate axial lengths of meteorite, respectively. Used samples are the Yamato meteorites recovered in 1973-1975. Distribution of (b/a) and the average value of 0.730 of 930 chondrites except carbonaceous ones are obtained. The results are similar to those of basalt fragments in laboratory impact experiment. Five chondrite showers are also analyzed. Their mass spectra are well represented by ...

  1. Meteorite Seymchan structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hontsova, S. S.; Petrova, E. V.; Muftahetdinova, R. F.; Chulanova, V. N.; Grokhovsky, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The meteorite Seymchan specimen was studied using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Olivine grains have roundish shapes, which was formed during matter cooling. Different features of the metal structure such as plessite structure and Neimann bands were observed. The oxide edges were observed in the boundaries between phases. The oxides were formed in the terrestrial conditions. The boundary regions between metal and olivine in the meteorite contain grains of troilite, schreibersite, and chromite.

  2. Expected Geochemical and Mineralogical Properties of Meteorites from Mercury: Inferences from Messenger Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; McCoy, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites from the Moon, Mars, and many types of asteroid bodies have been identified among our global inventory of meteorites, however samples of Mercury and Venus have not been identified. The absence of mercurian and venusian meteorites could be attributed to an inability to recognize them in our collections due to a paucity of geochemical information for Venus and Mercury. In the case of mercurian meteorites, this possibility is further supported by dynamical calculations that suggest mercurian meteorites should be present on Earth at a factor of 2-3 less than meteorites from Mars [1]. In the present study, we focus on the putative mineralogy of mercurian meteorites using data obtained from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, which has provided us with our first quantitative constraints on the geochemistry of planet Mercury. We have used the MESSENGER data to compile a list of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics that a meteorite from Mercury is likely to exhibit.

  3. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 103

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzicka, Alex; Grossman, Jeffrey; Bouvier, Audrey; Agee, Carl B.

    2017-05-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin 103 contains 2582 meteorites including 10 falls (Ardón, Demsa, Jinju, Križevci, Kuresoi, Novato, Tinajdad, Tirhert, Vicência, Wolcott), with 2174 ordinary chondrites, 130 HED achondrites, 113 carbonaceous chondrites, 41 ureilites, 27 lunar meteorites, 24 enstatite chondrites, 21 iron meteorites, 15 primitive achondrites, 11 mesosiderites, 10 Martian meteorites, 6 Rumuruti chondrites, 5 ungrouped achondrites, 2 enstatite achondrites, 1 relict meteorite, 1 pallasite, and 1 angrite, and with 1511 from Antarctica, 588 from Africa, 361 from Asia, 86 from South America, 28 from North America, and 6 from Europe. Note: 1 meteorite from Russia was counted as European. The complete contents of this bulletin (244 pages) are available on line. Information about approved meteorites can be obtained from the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (MBD) available on line at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/.

  4. Meteorite Linked to Rock at Meridiani

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This meteorite, a basalt lava rock nearly indistinguishable from many Earth rocks, provided the first strong proof that meteorites could come from Mars. Originally weighing nearly 8 kilograms (17.6 pounds), it was collected in 1979 in the Elephant Moraine area of Antarctica. The side of the cube at the lower left in this image measures 1 centimeter (0.4 inches). This picture shows a sawn face of this fine-grained gray rock. (The vertical stripes are saw marks.) The black patches in the rock are melted rock, or glass, formed when a large meteorite hit Mars near the rock. The meteorite impact probably threw this rock, dubbed 'EETA79001,' off Mars and toward Antarctica on Earth. The black glass contains traces of martian atmosphere gases. The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has discovered that a rock dubbed 'Bounce' at Meridiani Planum has a very similar mineral composition to this meteorite and likely shares common origins. Bounce itself is thought to have originated outside the area surrounding Opportunity's landing site; an impact or collision likely threw the rock away from its primary home.

  5. Meteorites in meteorites - Evidence for mixing among the asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkening, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    Inclusions of one type of meteorite enclosed in another have been found in several gas-rich meteorites, unequilibrated chondrites and mesosiderites. The inclusions in all but one case are chondritic; a majority are mineralogically and isotopically similar to carbonaceous chondrites. These meteorite mixtures most probably resulted from collisions among asteroids.

  6. The dimension added by 3D scanning and 3D printing of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview for the 3D photodocumentation of meteorites is presented, focussing on two 3D scanning methods in relation to 3D printing. The 3D photodocumention of meteorites provides new ways for the digital preservation of culturally, historically or scientifically unique meteorites. It has the potential for becoming a new documentation standard of meteorites that can exist complementary to traditional photographic documentation. Notable applications include (i.) use of physical properties in dark flight-, strewn field-, or aerodynamic modelling; (ii.) collection research of meteorites curated by different museum collections, and (iii.) public dissemination of meteorite models as a resource for educational users. The possible applications provided by the additional dimension of 3D illustrate the benefits for the meteoritics community.

  7. Using C-14 and C-14 - Be-10 for Terrestrial Ages of Desert Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Bland, P. A.; Klandrud, S. E.; McHargue, L. R.; Bevan, A. W. R.; Kring, D. A.; Wlotzka, F.

    2000-01-01

    The arid regions of the world appear to be great storage locations for meteorites, where they can survive for long periods of time in such environments. Large numbers of meteorites have been recovered from diverse areas of and and semi-arid regions of North Africa, Arabia, North America and Western Australia. The cold desert of Antarctica is a further storehouse of meteorites. One of the first recognized areas for collections of meteorites was Roosevelt County, New Mexico. The Nullarbor region of Australia and the northern Sahara Desert in Africa are also prolific sources of meteorites.

  8. Kinetic Damage from Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, W.; Brown, P.; Matney, M.

    2017-01-01

    Comparing the natural meteorite flux at the Earth's surface to that of space debris, re-entering debris is 2 orders of magnitude less of a kinetic hazard at all but the very largest (and therefore rarest) sizes compared to natural impactors. Debris re-entries over several metric tonnes are roughly as frequent as natural impactors, but the survival fraction is expected to be much higher. Kinetic hazards from meteorites are very small, with only one recorded (indirect) injury reported. We expect fatalities to be even more rare, on the order of one person killed per several millennia. That several reports exist of small fragments/sand hitting people during meteorite falls is consistent with our prediction that this should occur every decade or so.

  9. Organic Chemistry of Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the molecular structures and C,N,H-isotopic compositions of organic matter in meteorites reveal a complex history beginning in the parent interstellar cloud which spawned the solar system. Incorporation of interstellar dust and gas in the protosolar nebula followed by further thermal and aqueous processing on primordial parent bodies of carbonaceous, meteorites have produced an inventory of diverse organic compounds including classes now utilized in biochemistry. This inventory represents one possible set of reactants for chemical models for the origin of living systems on the early Earth. Evidence bearing on the history of meteoritic organic matter from astronomical observations and laboratory investigations will be reviewed and future research directions discussed.

  10. Piezomagnetization of meteorites

    OpenAIRE

    Nagata,Takesi/Funaki,Minoru

    1982-01-01

    The piezo-remanent magnetization (PRM) of Mt. Baldr b (H5-6) and ALH-769 (L6) chondrites and Yamato-74013 diogenite is experimentally demonstrated. J_γ^∥(H_+P_+P_0H_0) of these stony meteorites is approximately proportional to an applied magnetic field, H, when P is kept constant. There is a possibility that the natural remanent magnetization of the two chondrites is due to an acquisition of PRM in a weak magnetic field. Dependence of magnetic susceptibility of a stony meteorite upon applied ...

  11. Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Microfossils of large filamentous trichomic prokaryotes have been detected during in-situ investigations of carbonaceous meteorites. This research has been carried out using the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) to examine freshly fractured interior surfaces of the meteorites. The images obtained reveal that many of these remains are embedded in the meteorite rock matrix. Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies establish that the filamentous microstructures have elemental compositions consistent with the meteorite matrix, but are often encased within carbon-rich electron transparent sheath-like structures infilled with magnesium sulfate. This is consistent with the taphonomic modes of fossilization of cyanobacteria and sulphur bacteria, since the life habits and processes of these microorganisms frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with the properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, and the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the sheath. In this paper the evidence for biogenicity presented includes detailed morphological and morphometric data consistent with known characteristics of uniseriate and multiseriate cyanobacteria. Evidence for indigeneity includes the embedded nature of the fossils and elemental compositions inconsistent with modern biocontaminants.

  12. Asteroids, meteorites, and comets

    CERN Document Server

    Elkins-Tanton, Linda T

    2010-01-01

    Asteroids, Comets, and Meteorites provides students, researchers, and general readers with the most up-to-date information on this fascinating field. From the days of the dinosaurs to our modern environment, this book explores all aspects of these cosmic invaders.

  13. Meteorite Fractures and Scaling for Atmospheric Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, Kathryn L.; Ostrowski, Daniel R.

    2016-10-01

    We are attempting to understand the behavior of asteroids entering the atmosphere in order to help quantify the impact hazard. The strength of meteorites plays a critical role in determining the outcome of their impact events. Our objective is to scale fracture parameters in meteorites to their parent body.In this study over a thousand meteorite fragments in the Natural History Museums of Vienna and London (mostly hand-sized, some 40 or 50 cm across) were examined and fracture patterns in selected fragments were imaged. We identified six kinds of fracturing behavior. The density and length of the observed fractures were measured in hand specimens and thin sections. We assume that fracturing follows the Weibull distribution, where fractures are assumed to be randomly distributed through the target and the likelihood of encountering a fracture increases with distance. The images collected of the six fracture behaviors provide a two-dimensional view of the fractures. A relationship exists between the distributions of measured trace length and actual fracture size, where the slope of a log-log plot of trace length vs fracture density is proportional to α, the shape parameter. The value for α is unclear and a large range in α has been determined from light curve data. α can be used to scale strengths from the meteorite to the larger parent body.The majority of the meteorite fractures imaged displayed no particular sensitivity to meteorite texture. A value of α of 0.185 has been determined for a chondrite with a fracture pattern that shows no sensitivity to meteorite texture and has no point of origin. This study will continue to examine additional meteorites with similar fracture patterns along with the other 5 patterns to see if there is a correlation between fracture pattern and α. This may explain the variations in α determined from fireball data. Values of α will be used in models created by the Asteroid Threat Assessment Project to try to determine the

  14. Chiral Biomarkers in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    The chirality of organic molecules with the asymmetric location of group radicals was discovered in 1848 by Louis Pasteur during his investigations of the rotation of the plane of polarization of light by crystals of sodium ammonium paratartrate. It is well established that the amino acids in proteins are exclusively Levorotary (L-aminos) and the sugars in DNA and RNA are Dextrorotary (D-sugars). This phenomenon of homochirality of biological polymers is a fundamental property of all life known on Earth. Furthermore, abiotic production mechanisms typically yield recemic mixtures (i.e. equal amounts of the two enantiomers). When amino acids were first detected in carbonaceous meteorites, it was concluded that they were racemates. This conclusion was taken as evidence that they were extraterrestrial and produced by abiologically. Subsequent studies by numerous researchers have revealed that many of the amino acids in carbonaceous meteorites exhibit a significant L-excess. The observed chirality is much greater than that produced by any currently known abiotic processes (e.g. Linearly polarized light from neutron stars; Circularly polarized ultraviolet light from faint stars; optically active quartz powders; inclusion polymerization in clay minerals; Vester-Ulbricht hypothesis of parity violations, etc.). This paper compares the measured chirality detected in the amino acids of carbonaceous meteorites with the effect of these diverse abiotic processes. IT is concluded that the levels observed are inconsistent with post-arrival biological contamination or with any of the currently known abiotic production mechanisms. However, they are consistent with ancient biological processes on the meteorite parent body. This paper will consider these chiral biomarkers in view of the detection of possible microfossils found in the Orgueil and Murchison carbonaceous meteorites. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data obtained on these morphological biomarkers will be

  15. Meteoritic Microfossils In Eltanin Impact Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, F. T.; Wollenburg, J.; Gersonde, R.; Kuhn, G.

    2006-12-01

    Introduction: We report the unique occurrence of microfossils composed largely of meteoritic ejecta particles from the late Pliocene (2.5 Ma) Eltanin impact event. These deposits are unique, recording the only known km- sized asteroid impact into a deep-ocean (5 km) basin. First discovered as in Ir anomaly in sediment cores that were collected in 1965, the deposits contain mm-sized shock-melted asteroidal material, unmelted meteorite fragments (named the Eltanin meteorite), and trace impact spherules. Two oceanographic expeditions by the FS Polarstern in 1995 and 2001 explored 80,000 square km of the impact region, mapping the distribution of meteoritic ejecta, disturbance of seafloor sediments by the impact, and collected 20 new cores with impact deposits in the vicinity of the Freeden Seamounts (57.3S, 90.5W). Analyses of sediment cores show that the impact disrupted sediments on the ocean floor, redepositing them as a chaotic jumble of sediment fragments overlain by a sequence of laminated sands, silts and clays deposited from the water column. Overprinted on this is a pulse of meteoritic ejecta, likely transported ballistically, then settled through the water column. At some localities, meteoritic ejecta was as much as 5 to 50 kg per square meter. This is the most meteorite-rich locality known on Earth. Results: Two cores were taken in a basin near the top of the Freeden Seamounts at a water depth of 2.7 km. Sediments in this shallow basin are compositionally different than those at all other sites as they contain abundant calcareous microfossils. In deeper water sites (4 to 5 km depth), higher pressures and CO2 concentrations cause dissolution of calcite and sediments contain siliceous (opal) microfossils or are barren. An exception to this is a few sites in the immediate vicinity of the seamounts that contain calcareous sediments that flowed off the seamounts after being disturbed by the impact. At the top of the seamounts, sediments with meteoritic ejecta

  16. The Okhansk Meteorite: Specifics of Composition, Structure, and Genesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Bakhtin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Okhansk meteorite fell on August 18, 1887 near the village of Tabor, about 15 km away from the town of Okhansk in Perm province and weighed 186.5 kg (the total weight of collected fragments, according to P.I. Krotov, was more than 245 kg. The shock wave from the meteorite entry knocked down animals and riders on horses. Despite the fact that it was significantly stronger than that caused by the Chelyabinsk meteorite of 2013, all information about this meteorite has completely erased from people's memory. It has been shown that the meteorite is an ordinary olivine-bronzite chondrite. Its main silicate minerals are olivine, bronzite, plagioclase, and diopside. The main ore minerals are kamacite and troilite. The meteorite contains silicate glass in large amounts. The analysis of the composition and structure of the Okhansk meteorite has demonstrated that it was formed at the early stages of accretion of the melted substance of the protosolar nebula without undergoing endogenous, temperature, or pressure changes.

  17. Organic matter in meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorca, Jordi

    2004-12-01

    Some primitive meteorites are carbon-rich objects containing a variety of organic molecules that constitute a valuable record of organic chemical evolution in the universe prior to the appearance of microorganisms. Families of compounds include hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, amino acids, amines, amides, heterocycles, phosphonic acids, sulfonic acids, sugar-related compounds and poorly defined high-molecular weight macromolecules. A variety of environments are required in order to explain this organic inventory, including interstellar processes, gas-grain reactions operating in the solar nebula, and hydrothermal alteration of parent bodies. Most likely, substantial amounts of such organic materials were delivered to the Earth via a late accretion, thereby providing organic compounds important for the emergence of life itself, or that served as a feedstock for further chemical evolution. This review discusses the organic content of primitive meteorites and their relevance to the build up of biomolecules.

  18. Meteoritics, Number 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-06-01

    composition of the light elements indicates the absence of dif- ferent classes of processes of melting, segregation, hydrothermal pro- cesses, and...Wien, Verh., 1888, 164. 40. Janoschek, R., Das Alter der Moldavitschotterc in Mahren (The Age of the Moldavite Fragments in Moravia). Akad. Wiss. Wien...quartz porphyries and diorite porphyries . The time of the fall of the meteorite can be determined only ap- proximately. It is associated with the post

  19. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  20. Iron Meteorites and Upwelling in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourlay, B. S.; Behr, E.; Mardon, A.; Behr, E.

    2016-09-01

    In Antarctica, a meteorite stranding zone, stone meteorites are more common than iron. Dr. Evatt's team suggests that the heat conductivity of iron may be opposing the upwelling effects so iron meteorites sink under the ice unlike the stone ones.

  1. Clay minerals in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M. E.; Keller, L. P.

    1991-01-01

    Many meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) with primitive compositions contain significant amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, which are generally interpreted as evidence of protoplanetary aqueous alteration at an early period of the solar system. These meteorites are chondrites (near solar composition) of the carbonaceous and ordinary varieties. The former are subdivided (according to bulk composition and petrology) into CI, CM, CV, CO, CR, and ungrouped classes. IDPs are extraterrestrial particulates, collected in stratosphere, which have chemical compositions indicative of a primitive origin; they are typically distinct from the primitive meteorites. Characterization of phyllosilicates in these materials is a high priority because of the important physico-chemical information they hold. The most common phyllosilicates present in chondritic extraterrestrial materials are serpentine-group minerals, smectites, and micas. We discuss these phyllosilicates and describe the interpretation of their occurrence in meteorites and IDPs and what this indicates about history of their parent bodies, which are probably the hydrous asteroids.

  2. Amino and fatty acids in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvenvolden, K. A.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of two carbonaceous meteorites have provided much of the latest evidence which seems to support Oparin's theory on the origin of life. The meteorites involved are the Murray meteorite, which fell in 1950, and the Murchison meteorite, which fell in 1969. The amino acids in the two meteorites are similar in composition. Eight of the twenty amino acids found belong to amino acids present in proteins. A number of monocarboxylic and dicarboxylic fatty acids were also found in the meteorites.

  3. Oxygen Isotopes in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. N.

    2003-12-01

    Oxygen isotope abundance variations in meteorites are very useful in elucidating chemical and physical processes that occurred during the formation of the solar system (Clayton, 1993). On Earth, the mean abundances of the three stable isotopes are 16O: 99.76%, 17O: 0.039%, and 18O: 0.202%. It is conventional to express variations in abundances of the isotopes in terms of isotopic ratios, relative to an arbitrary standard, called SMOW (for standard mean ocean water), as follows:The isotopic composition of any sample can then be represented by one point on a "three-isotope plot," a graph of δ17O versus δ18O. It will be seen that such plots are invaluable in interpreting meteoritic data. Figure 1 shows schematically the effect of various processes on an initial composition at the center of the diagram. Almost all terrestrial materials lie along a "fractionation" trend; most meteoritic materials lie near a line of "16O addition" (or subtraction). (4K)Figure 1. Schematic representation of various isotopic processes shown on an oxygen three-isotope plot. Almost all terrestrial materials plot along a line of "fractionation"; most primitive meteoritic materials plot near a line of "16O addition." The three isotopes of oxygen are produced by nucleosynthesis in stars, but by different nuclear processes in different stellar environments. The principal isotope, 16O, is a primary isotope (capable of being produced from hydrogen and helium alone), formed in massive stars (>10 solar masses), and ejected by supernova explosions. The two rare isotopes are secondary nuclei (produced in stars from nuclei formed in an earlier generation of stars), with 17O coming primarily from low- and intermediate-mass stars (shielding in the UV photodissociation of CO (van Dishoeck and Black, 1988). This process results from the large differences in abundance between C16O, on the one hand, and C17O and C18O on the other. Photolysis of CO occurs by absorption of stellar UV radiation in the

  4. Study of Meteoritic Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg

    . The manuscripts presented in this thesis have provided critical insights into the origin and distribution of short-lived radioisotopes as well as the formation and transport history of chondrules and, by extension, the precursor material to asteroidal and planetary bodies. The proposal of 26Al heterogeneity...... and the observation of a reduced initial abundance of 26Al in the accretion regions of chondrules and asteroidal bodies impacts our understanding of the accretion timescales of protoplanets in a significant way. Combining high-precision isotope measurements of multiple systems on individual meteoritic inclusions...

  5. Stardust in meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew M

    2011-11-29

    Primitive meteorites, interplanetary dust particles, and comets contain dust grains that formed around stars that lived their lives before the solar system formed. These remarkable objects have been intensively studied since their discovery a little over twenty years ago and they provide samples of other stars that can be studied in the laboratory in exquisite detail with modern analytical tools. The properties of stardust grains are used to constrain models of nucleosynthesis in red giant stars and supernovae, the dominant sources of dust grains that are recycled into the interstellar medium by stars.

  6. The SNC Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, M. E.

    2014-10-01

    The SNC (Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny) group, are achondritic meteorites. Of all SNC meteorites recognized up to date, shergottites are the most abundant group. The petrographic study of Shergotty began several years ago when Tschermak, (1872) identified this rock as an extraterrestrial basalt. Oxygen isotopes in SNC meteorites indicate that these rocks are from a single planetary body (Clayton and Mayeda, 1983). Because the abundance patterns of rare gases trapped in glasses from shock melts (e.g., Pepin, 1985) turned out to be very similar to the Martian atmosphere (as analyzed by the Viking landers, Owen, 1976), the SNC meteorites are believed to originate from Mars (e.g. McSween, 1994). Possibly, they were ejected from the Martian surface either in a giant impact or in several impact events (Meyer 2006). Although there is a broad consensus for nakhlites and chassignites being -1.3Ga old, the age of the shergottites is a matter of ongoing debates. Different lines of evidences indicate that these rocks are young (180Ma and 330-475Ma), or very old (> 4Ga). However, the young age in shergottites could be the result of a resetting of these chronometers by either strong impacts or fluid percolation on these rocks (Bouvier et al., 2005-2009). Thus, it is important to check the presence of secondary processes, such as re-equilibration or pressure-induce metamorphism (El Goresy et al., 2013) that can produce major changes in compositions and obscure the primary information. A useful tool, that is used to reconstruct the condition prevailing during the formation of early phases or the secondary processes to which the rock was exposed, is the study of glass-bearing inclusions hosted by different mineral phases. I will discuss the identification of extreme compositional variations in many of these inclusions (Varela et al. 2007-2013) that constrain the assumption that these objects are the result of closed-system crystallization. The question then arises whether these

  7. Handling Heavenly Jewels - 35 Years of Antarctic Meteorite Processing at Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, C. E.; McBridge, K. M.; Harrington, R.; Schwarz, C. M.

    2011-01-01

    The ANSMET program began in 1976, and since that time more than 18,000 meteorites have been processed in the Meteorite Processing Lab at Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX[1]. The meteorites are collected and returned to JSC on a freezer truck and remain frozen until they are initially processed. Initial Processing of Meteorites: Initial processing involves drying the meteorites in a nitrogen glove box for 24 to 48 hours, photographing, measuring, weighing and writing a description of the interior and exterior. The meteorite is broken and a representative sample is sent to the Smithsonian Institution for classification. Newsletter & Requests: Once initial processing has been complete and the meteorites have been classified, the information is published in the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter[2,3]. The newsletter is published twice yearly and is sent electronically to researchers around the world and is also available on line. Researchers are asked to fill out a request form and submit it to the Meteorite Working Group secretary. All sample requests will be reviewed by either the meteorite curator or the Meteorite Working Group de-pending on the type of meteorite and the research being conducted. Processing for Sample Requests: In the meteorite processing lab, meteorite samples are prepared several different ways. Most samples are prepared as chips obtained by use of stainless steel chisels in a chipping bowl or rock splitter. In special situations where a researcher needs a slab the meteorite samples can be bandsawed in a dry nitrogen glove box with a diamond blade, no liquids are ever introduced into the cabinet. The last type of sample preparation is thin/thick sections. The meteorite thin section lab at JSC can prepare standard 30-micron thin sections, thick sections of variable thickness (100 to 200 microns), or demountable sections using superglue. Information for researchers: It is important that re-searchers fill the sample request form completely, in order

  8. Meteors and meteorites spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.; Lenža, L.; Ferus, M.; Civiš, S.; Knížek, A.; Kubelík, P.; Kaiserová, T.; Váňa, P.

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of our meteor spectroscopy project is to better understand the physical and chemical properties of meteoroids. Astrometric and spectral observations of real meteors are obtained via spectroscopic CCD video systems. Processed meteor data are inserted to the EDMOND database (European viDeo MeteOr Network Database) together with spectral information. The fully analyzed atmospheric trajectory, orbit and also spectra of a Leonid meteor/meteoroid captured in November 2015 are presented as an example. At the same time, our target is the systematization of spectroscopic emission lines for the comparative analysis of meteor spectra. Meteoroid plasma was simulated in a laboratory by laser ablation of meteorites samples using an (ArF) excimer laser and the LIDB (Laser Induced Dielectric Breakdown) in a low pressure atmosphere and various gases. The induced plasma emissions were simultaneously observed with the Echelle Spectrograph and the same CCD video spectral camera as used for real meteor registration. Measurements and analysis results for few selected meteorite samples are presented and discussed.

  9. Presolar Diamond in Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Amari, Sachiko

    2009-01-01

    Presolar diamond, the carrier of the isotopically anomalous Xe component Xe-HL, was the first mineral type of presolar dust that was isolated from meteorites. The excesses in the light, p-process only isotopes 124Xe and 126Xe, and in the heavy, r-process only isotopes 134Xe and 136Xe relative to the solar ratios indicate that Xe-HL was produced in supernovae: they are the only stellar source where these two processes are believed to take place. Although these processes occur in supernovae, their physical conditions and timeframes are completely different. Yet the excesses are always correlated in diamond separates from meteorites. Furthermore, the p-process 124Xe/126Xe inferred from Xe-L and the r-process 134Xe/136Xe from Xe-H do not agree with the p-process and r-process ratios derived from the solar system abundance, and the inferred p-process ratio does not agree with those predicted from stellar models. The 'rapid separation scenario', where the separation of Xe and its radiogenic precursors Te and I take...

  10. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy on meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giacomo, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.degiacomo@ba.imip.cnr.it; Dell' Aglio, M.; De Pascale, O. [MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy); Longo, S.; Capitelli, M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bari (Italy); MIP-CNR sec Bari (Italy)

    2007-12-15

    The classification of meteorites when geological analysis is unfeasible is generally made by the spectral line emission ratio of some characteristic elements. Indeed when a meteorite impacts Earth's atmosphere, hot plasma is generated, as a consequence of the braking effect of air, with the consequent ablation of the falling body. Usually, by the plasma emission spectrum, the meteorite composition is determined, assuming the Boltzmann equilibrium. The plasma generated during Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) experiment shows similar characteristics and allows one to verify the mentioned method with higher accuracy. On the other hand the study of Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy on meteorite can be useful for both improving meteorite classification methods and developing on-flight techniques for asteroid investigation. In this paper certified meteorites belonging to different typologies have been investigated by LIBS: Dofhar 461 (lunar meteorite), Chondrite L6 (stony meteorite), Dofhar 019 (Mars meteorite) and Sikhote Alin (irony meteorite)

  11. An Adulterated Martian Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-07-01

    Martian meteorite, Elephant Moraine EETA79001, is composed of two distinct rock types. Scientists have thought that both formed from magmas, hence are igneous rocks and contain important information about the interior of Mars, the nature of lava flows on its surface, and the timing of igneous events on Mars. All that is now open to question, as a group of investigators at Lockheed Martin Space Operations and the Johnson Space Center led by David Mittlefehldt (Lockheed) has shown that one of the rock types making up EETA79001, designated lithology A, is almost certainly a melted mixture of other rocks. Mittlefehldt and coworkers suggest that formation by impact melting is the most likely explanation for the chemical and mineralogical features seen in the rock. If confirmed by other investigations, this may change the way we view the igneous evolution of Mars.

  12. Study of Meteoritic Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mia Bjørg Stolberg

    There is no question more fundamental than understanding our origins, in other words, understanding our place in the cosmos. This question is particularly timely, as results in the field of exoplanet research have established with confidence that about half of the stars in the galaxy are orbited...... as astronomical observation of starforming regions and exoplanets provide a framework for understanding star-formation processes and the evolution of planetary systems, but offer no direct insight into the earliest solar system. This necessary and complementary information can be obtained through the study...... of meteorite samples that date back to the birth of the solar system. In this thesis, we have taken advantage of novel methods for the high-precision analysis of various radiogenic and stable isotope systems by plasma source and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (ICPMS and TIMS) as well as by secondary...

  13. Cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, Silke; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Rugel, Georg [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden (Germany); Cartwright, Julia A.; Ott, Ulrich [MPI fuer Chemie, Mainz (Germany); Faestermann, Thomas; Fimiani, Leticia; Korschinek, Gunther; Ludwig, Peter [TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    After successful installation of the Dresden Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (DREAMS) facility, determinations of the lighter radionuclides {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 41}Ca are now easily attainable in Germany. Accompanied by data for the heavier radionuclides (i.e. {sup 53}Mn and {sup 60}Fe) that can be measured at the 14 MV tandem at Munich and stable nuclides such as {sup 21,22}Ne and {sup 38}Ar from noble gas mass spectrometry at MPI Mainz, complete and unique exposure histories of extraterrestrial material can be reconstructed. For example, recent analyses of the 100{sup th} Martian meteorite Ksar Ghilane 002 and four samples from the nickel-rich ataxite Gebel Kamil show interesting features revealing amazing stories.

  14. Lunar and Meteorite Thin Sections for Undergraduate and Graduate Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.; Galindo, C.; Luckey, M.; Reustle, J.; Todd, N.; Allen, C.

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation, and distribution of samples for research, education, and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core samples, pebbles, sand and dust from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected on US expeditions to Antarctica including rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. Studies of rock and soil samples from the Moon and meteorites continue to yield useful information about the early history of the Moon, the Earth, and the inner solar system.

  15. Grove Mountains (GRV) 99027: A new Martian meteorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Yangting; WANG Daode; MIAO Bingkui; OUYANG Ziyuan; LIU Xiaohan; JU Yitai

    2003-01-01

    We report the petrography, mineral chemistry and oxygen isotopic composition of GRV 99027, a new Martian meteorite recently collected during the 16th Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition. This meteorite consists of two textural regions. The interstitial region is characterized by the presence of plagioclase and phosphate, and higher FeO contents of olivine and orthopyroxene, in comparison with the poikilitic region. All of the observations are similar to the three known Martian lherzolites. We classify GRV 99027 as the fourth sample of Martian lherzolite.

  16. Molecular asymmetry in extraterrestrial chemistry: Insights from a pristine meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Huang, Yongsong; Alexandre, Marcelo R

    2008-03-11

    The nonracemic amino acids of meteorites provide the only natural example of molecular asymmetry measured so far outside the biosphere. Because extant life depends on chiral homogeneity for the structure and function of biopolymers, the study of these meteoritic compounds may offer insights into the establishment of prebiotic attributes in chemical evolution as well as the origin of terrestrial homochirality. However, all efforts to understand the origin, distribution, and scope of these amino acids' enantiomeric excesses (ee) have been frustrated by the ready exposure of meteorites to terrestrial contaminants and the ubiquitous homochirality of such contamination. We have analyzed the soluble organic composition of a carbonaceous meteorite from Antarctica that was collected and stored under controlled conditions, largely escaped terrestrial contamination and offers an exceptionally pristine sample of prebiotic material. Analyses of the meteorite diastereomeric amino acids alloisoleucine and isoleucine allowed us to show that their likely precursor molecules, the aldehydes, also carried a sizable molecular asymmetry of up to 14% in the asteroidal parent body. Aldehydes are widespread and abundant interstellar molecules; that they came to be present, survived, and evolved in the solar system carrying ee gives support to the idea that biomolecular traits such as chiral asymmetry could have been seeded in abiotic chemistry ahead of life.

  17. A gamma-ray spectroscopy survey of Omani meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Patrick; Tolba, Tamer; Vuilleumier, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The gamma-ray activities of 33 meteorite samples (30 ordinary chondrites, 1 Mars meteorite, 1 iron, 1 howardite) collected during Omani-Swiss meteorite search campaigns 2001-2008 were nondestructively measured using an ultra-low background gamma-ray detector. The results provide several types of information: Potassium and thorium concentrations were found to range within typical values for the meteorite types. Similar mean 26Al activities in groups of ordinary chondrites with a) weathering degrees W0-1 and low 14C terrestrial age and b) weathering degree W3-4 and high 14C terrestrial age are mostly consistent with activities observed in recent falls. The older group shows no significant depletion in 26Al. Among the least weathered samples two meteorite were found to contain clearly detectable 22Na indicating they are recent falls. Based on an estimate of the surface area searched, the corresponding fall rate is <120 events/106 km2*a, consistent with estimated fall rates. 12 samples from the large JaH 091 s...

  18. Microbiological investigation of two chondrite meteorites: Murchison and Polonnaruwa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Lyu, Zhe; Whitman, William B.; LaBrake, Geneviev R.; Wallis, Jamie; Wickramarathne, Keerthi; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Hoover, Richard B.

    2015-09-01

    The question of the contamination of meteorites by modern environmental microorganisms is an issue that has been raised since evidence for biological remains in carbonaceous meteorites was first published in the early 1960's.1-3 The contamination hypothesis has been raised for recent fossils of diatoms and filamentous cyanobacteria found embedded in the stones even though the nitrogen content of the fossils was below the 0.5% detection limit for Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) of the Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope. All modern biological contaminants should have nitrogen content in the detectable range of 2% to 20% indicating the remains are ancient fossils rather than living or Holocene cells. In our work, the possibility that extremophilic bacteria from our lab collection might be able to metabolize organic matter in the studied meteorites was tested. The potential toxic or inhibitory growth effects were also checked for different anaerobic cultures. UV exposed meteorite samples with consequent sterile extraction of the internal part were subjected to anaerobic cultivation techniques. As a result, eight anaerobic strains were isolated from internal and exterior parts of the studied meteorites. Preliminary results of their morphology, cytology, physiology, and molecular (16SrRNA sequencing) studies are presented and discussed in this article.

  19. Molecular asymmetry in extraterrestrial chemistry: Insights from a pristine meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Huang, Yongsong; Alexandre, Marcelo R.

    2008-01-01

    The nonracemic amino acids of meteorites provide the only natural example of molecular asymmetry measured so far outside the biosphere. Because extant life depends on chiral homogeneity for the structure and function of biopolymers, the study of these meteoritic compounds may offer insights into the establishment of prebiotic attributes in chemical evolution as well as the origin of terrestrial homochirality. However, all efforts to understand the origin, distribution, and scope of these amino acids' enantiomeric excesses (ee) have been frustrated by the ready exposure of meteorites to terrestrial contaminants and the ubiquitous homochirality of such contamination. We have analyzed the soluble organic composition of a carbonaceous meteorite from Antarctica that was collected and stored under controlled conditions, largely escaped terrestrial contamination and offers an exceptionally pristine sample of prebiotic material. Analyses of the meteorite diastereomeric amino acids alloisoleucine and isoleucine allowed us to show that their likely precursor molecules, the aldehydes, also carried a sizable molecular asymmetry of up to 14% in the asteroidal parent body. Aldehydes are widespread and abundant interstellar molecules; that they came to be present, survived, and evolved in the solar system carrying ee gives support to the idea that biomolecular traits such as chiral asymmetry could have been seeded in abiotic chemistry ahead of life. PMID:18310323

  20. The carbon components in SNC meteorites of feldspathic harzburgite composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Douglas, C.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    Two meteorites collected in Antarctica, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516, have characteristics which link them to the shergottite group of SNC meteorites. Essentially, ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 are feldspathic harzburgites, being comprised of roughly equal quantities of olivine and pyroxene, with an additional few percent of feldspar which has subsequently been converted to maskelynite by shock. The meteorites represent samples of a cumulate rock which is itself composed of two different lithologies: in one, large pyroxenes poikilitically enclose olivine crystals, while the other consists of interstitial areas made up of pyroxene, olivine, maskelynite, whitlockite, troilite, ilmenite and chlorapatite. It has been proposed that meteorites such as ALH A77005 (and LEW 88516) are relict samples of the source peridotite from which the other shergottites formed. As such it should be informative to study in detail the carbon components present within these samples, in order to make comparisons with data from other shergottites. Although not plutonic in origin, and therefore not sampling a truly deep source, analyses of ALH A77005 and LEW 88516 should assist with attempts to define the bulk carbon isotopic composition of Mars. This has been assessed previously through analyses of carbon of presumed magmatic origin in other SNC meteorites, but the carbon isotopic compositions obtained seem to be at variance with what might be expected. It is important to constrain the carbon isotopic composition of Mars as well as possible so that models of atmospheric evolution, based on carbon isotopic data, can yield the most reliable results.

  1. Mid-Infrared Study of Samples from Several Stones from the Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott; Nuevo, Michel; Flynn, George J.; Wirick, Sue

    2013-01-01

    On April 22, 2012, a fireball was observed over California and Nevada, and the falling fragments of the meteorite were detected by weather radar near small townships in the El Dorado County, California. Some of these stones were collected at Sutter s Mill, in the historic site where the California gold rush was initiated, giving the name to this meteorite. Thus far, 77 pieces of the meteorite have been collected, for a total mass of 943 g, with the biggest stone weighing 205 g [1].

  2. Transmittance, Reflectance, and Emission Spectroscopy of Meteorites from the UV to the IR Spectral Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturilli, A.; Helbert, J.; Koulen, J. M.; Ferrari, S.; Martellato, E.

    2016-08-01

    Transmittance, reflectance, and emissivity Spectra of six meteorites have been collected at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) of DLR in Berlin in the whole spectral range from the UV to the IR.

  3. Two Distinct Secondary Carbonate Species in OC Meteorites from Antarctica are Possible Analogs for Mars Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M. E.; Niles, P. B.; Locke, D. R.; Chapman, P.

    2016-01-01

    Meteorites falling in Antarctica are captured in ice and stored until the glacial flow transports them to the surface where they can be collected. Prior to collection, they are altered during interactions between the rock, the cryosphere, and the hydrosphere. The purpose of this study is to characterize the stable isotope values of terrestrial, secondary carbonate minerals from Ordinary Chondrite (OC) meteorites collected in Antarctica. This facilitates better understanding of terrestrial weathering in martian meteorites as well as mechanisms for weathering in cold, arid environments as an analog to Mars. OC samples were selected for analysis based upon size and collection proximity to known martian meteorites. They were also selected based on petrologic type (3+) such that they were likely to be carbonate-free before falling to Earth.

  4. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. III - Lunar and basaltic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Derek W. G.; Benoit, Paul H.; Sears, Hazel; Batchelor, J. D.; Symes, Steve

    1991-01-01

    Natural thermoluminescence (TL) data were obtained to investigate recent thermal and radiation histories of the lunar meteorite MacAlpine Hills 88104/5 and 65 eucrites, howardites, diogenites, and mesosiderites. All these meteorites have low levels of natural TL compared to chondrites, which is primarily because they display anomalous fading. Some meteorites have especially low natural TL which must reflect heating within the last 100,000-1,000,000 y. The parameters for TL decay were determined assuming plausible values for cosmic ray dose rate and that the natural TL of MAC88104/5 was totally drained by ejection from the moon. The obtained parameters for TL decay suggest that the moon-earth transit times for MAC88104 and MAC88105 were 2,000 and 1,800 y, respectively, compared with 19,000 and 2,500 y for Y791197 and ALHA81005, respectively.

  5. Racemization of Meteoritic Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Chyba, Christopher F.

    2000-05-01

    Meteorites may have contributed amino acids to the prebiotic Earth, affecting the global ratio of right-handed to left-handed (D/L) molecules. We calculate D/L ratios for seven biological, α-hydrogen, protein amino acids over a variety of plausible parent body thermal histories, based on meteorite evidence and asteroid modeling. We show that amino acids in meteorites do not necessarily undergo complete racemization by the time they are recovered on Earth. If the mechanism of amino acid formation imposes some enantiomeric preference on the amino acids, a chiral signature can be retained through the entire history of the meteorite. Original enantiomeric excesses in meteorites such as Murchison, which have undergone apparently short and cool alteration scenarios, should have persisted to the present time. Of the seven amino acids for which relevant data are available, we expect glutamic acid, isoleucine, and valine, respectively, to be the most likely to retain an initial enantiomeric excess, and phenylalanine, aspartic acid, and alanine the least. Were the D/L ratio initially identical in each amino acid, final D/L ratios could be used to constrain the initial ratio and the thermal history experienced by the whole suite.

  6. The Meteoritical Bulletin, no. 85, 2001 September

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, J.N.; Zipfel, J.

    2001-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin No. 85 lists information for 1376 newly classified meteorites, comprising 658 from Antarctica, 409 from Africa, 265 from Asia (262 of which are from Oman), 31 from North America, 7 from South America, 3 from Australia, and 3 from Europe. Information is provided for 11 falls (Dergaon, Dunbogan, Gujba, Independence, Itqiy, Mora??vka, Oued el Hadjar, Sayama, Sologne, Valera, and Worden). Noteworthy non-Antarctic specimens include 5 martian meteorites (Dar al Gani 876, Northwest Africa 480 and 817, and Sayh al Uhaymir 051 and 094); 6 lunar meteorites (Dhofar 081, 280, and 287, and Northwest Africa 479, 482, and 773); an ungrouped enstatite-rich meteorite (Itqiy); a Bencubbin-like meteorite (Gujba); 9 iron meteorites; and a wide variety of other interesting stony meteorites, including CH, CK, CM, CO, CR, CV, R, enstatite, and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, primitive achondrites, HED achondrites, and ureilites.

  7. Coordinated In Situ Analyses of Organic Nanoglobules in the Sutter's Mill Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura--Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Keller, L. P.; Clemett, S. J.; Nguyen, A. N.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    The Sutter s Mill meteorite is a newly fallen carbonaceous chondrite that was collected and curated quickly after its fall [1]. Preliminary petrographic and isotopic investigations suggest affinities to the CM2 carbonaceous chondrites. The primitive nature of this meteorite and its rapid recovery provide an opportunity to investigate primordial solar system organic matter in a unique new sample. Organic matter in primitive meteorites and chondritic porous interplanetary dust particles (CP IDPs) is commonly enriched in D/H and N-15/N-14 relative to terrestrial values [2-4]. These anomalies are ascribed to the partial preservation of presolar cold molecular cloud material [2]. Some meteorites and IDPs contain gm-size inclusions with extreme H and N isotopic anomalies [3-5], possibly due to preserved primordial organic grains. The abundance and isotopic composition of C in Sutter's Mill were found to be similar to the Tagish Lake meteorite [6]. In the Tagish Lake meteorite, the principle carriers of large H and N isotopic anomalies are sub-micron hollow organic spherules known as organic nanoglobules [7]. Organic nanoglobules are commonly distributed among primitive meteorites [8, 9] and cometary samples [10]. Here we report in-situ analyses of organic nano-globules in the Sutter's Mill meteorite using UV fluorescence imaging, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), NanoSIMS, and ultrafast two-step laser mass spectrometry (ultra-L2MS).

  8. Irradiation history of meteoritic inclusions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel

    -sun. To the scientists that study them, they represent a rich archive of the dynamic processes that lead to the formation of our sol r system and eventually the planetary system that we observe today. Although meteorites and their components have been studied for several hundred years, the recent decades of mass......Understanding the formation and earliest evolution of our solar system is a longstanding goal shared by cosmochemistry, astronomy and astrophysics. Meteorites play a key role in this pursuit, providing a ground truth against which all theories must be weighed. Chondritic meteorites are in essence...... extraterrestrial sediments that contain Calcium-Aluminium-rich Inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules that formed as individual objects during the earliest stages of solar system evolution. They later accreted together to form large bodies, after spending up to several million years in individual orbit around the proto...

  9. Organic Chemistry of Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, John R.

    2001-01-01

    Chiral and carbon-isotopic analyses of isovaline have been carried out on numerous samples of the Murchison and one sample of the Murray carbonaceous chondrite. The isovaline was found to be heterogeneous with regard to enantiomeric excess (ee) both between samples and within a single Murchison sample. L-Excesses ranging from 0 to 15% were observed. The isovaline delta(sup 13) C was found to be about +18%. No evidence was obtained suggesting terrestrial contamination in the more abundant L-enantiomer. A correlation was observed between isovaline (also alpha - aminoisobutyric acid) concentration and PCP content of five CM chondrites. It is suggested that isovaline, along with other meteoritic a-methyl amino acids with ee, are of presolar origin. The possible formation of ee in extraterrestrial amino acids by exposure to circularly polarized light or by magnetochiral photochemistry is discussed. Key words: Murchison meteorite, Murray meteorite, amino acids, isovaline, chirality, carbon isotopes, PCP.

  10. Two years of the Javorje meteorite investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Miler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Meteorite Javorje is a IIIAB medium octahedrite iron meteorite with 7.83 wt% Ni content. It was found inNovember 2009 near village Javorje in the Poljane Valley. With nearly five kilograms it represents the largest andheaviest meteorite found so far in the territory of Slovenia. The purpose of this paper is to present general characteristicsof meteorite Javorje to the slovenian geological community. This paper reviews results of already publishedresearch of this meteorite and provides some newer findings and details about major, accessory and secondaryminerals, and also its cooling rate.

  11. Mysterious iodine-overabundance in Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreibus, G.; Waenke, H.; Schultz, L.

    1986-01-01

    Halogen as well as other trace element concentrations in meteorite finds can be influenced by alteration processes on the Earth's surface. The discovery of Antarctic meteorites offered the opportunity to study meteorites which were kept in one of the most sterile environment of the Earth. Halogen determination in Antartic meteorites was compared with non-Antarctic meteorites. No correlation was found between iodine concentration and the weathering index, or terrestrial age. The halogen measurements indicate a contaminating phase rich in iodine and also containing chlorine. Possible sources for this contamination are discussed.

  12. Meteorites - A petrologic-chemical synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Robert T.

    In this book, an attempt has been made to summarize current knowledge and understanding about meteorites in a manner comprehensible to both professional scientists and university students. Attention is given to the flux of meteoritic material, major meteorite types, sources of meteorites, the recovery of meteorites, meteorite nomenclature, and literature. The chemistry and classification of the chondrites is considered along with details regarding carbonaceous chondrites, ordinary chondrites, the enstatite chondrite-achondrite association, and questions regarding time and process in the evolution of chondrites. The eucrite association is discussed, taking into account eucrites, diogenites, howardites, mesosiderites, the radiometric ages of eucrites and their associates, and the chemical evolution of the eucrite association. Differentiated meteorites are considered along with source objects, and parent bodies.

  13. Martian "microfossils" in lunar meteorites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, D W; Kral, T A

    1998-07-01

    One of the five lines of evidence used by McKay et al. (1996) for relic life in the Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 was the presence of objects thought to be microfossils. These ovoid and elongated forms are similar to structures found in terrestrial rocks and described as "nanobacteria" (Folk, 1993; McBride et al., 1994). Using the same procedures and apparatus as McKay et al. (1996), we have found structures on internal fracture surfaces of lunar meteorites that cannot be distinguished from the objects described on similar surfaces in ALH 84001. The lunar surface is currently a sterile environment and probably always has been. However, the lunar and Martian meteorites share a common terrestrial history, which includes many thousands of years of exposure to Antarctic weathering. Although we do not know the origin of these ovoid and elongated forms, we suggest that their presence on lunar meteorites indicates that the objects described by McKay et al. (1996) are not of Martian biological origin.

  14. Moessbauer study of Slovak meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipka, J.; Sitek, J.; Dekan, J., E-mail: julius.dekan@stuba.sk; Degmova, J. [Slovak University of Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology (Slovakia); Porubcan, V. [Comenius University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was used as an analytical tool in the investigation of iron containing compounds of two meteorites (Rumanova and Kosice) out of total of six which had fallen on Slovak territory. In the magnetic fraction of the iron bearing compounds in the Rumanova meteorite, maghemite, troilite and Fe-Ni alloy were identified. In the non-magnetic fraction silicate phases were found, such as olivine and pyroxene. The paramagnetic component containing Fe{sup 3 + } ions corresponds probably to small superparamagnetic particles. The Kosice meteorite was found near the town of Kosice in February 2010. Its magnetic fraction consists of a Fe-Ni alloy with the Moessbauer parameters of the magnetic field corresponding to kamacite {alpha}-Fe(Ni, Co) and troilite. The non-magnetic part consists of Fe{sup 2 + } phases such as olivine and pyroxene and traces of a Fe{sup 3 + } phase. The main difference between these meteorites is their iron oxide content. These kinds of analyses can bring important knowledge about phases and compounds formed in extraterrestrial conditions, which have other features than their terrestrial analogues.

  15. Historical Trends in U.S. Antarctic Meteorite Allocations, With a Close Look at Cr Chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Satterwhite, C. E.; Funk, R. C.; Harrington, R.

    2017-01-01

    ANSMET samples have been housed at and allocated from NASA-JSC since 1978. This nearly 40 year history of allocations from the collection has been contemporaneous with many major milestones such as the discovery that we have meteorites from Moon and Mars, missions to S-type asteroids (NEAR, Hayabusa, Dawn), and C-type asteroids (Dawn, Hayabusa 2, and OSIRIS-REx). We look for the possible influence of these major milestones on historical trends in the meteorite allocations, identify other factors that might contribute to allocation trends, and focus on the allocation history of a few select meteorites.

  16. Complex petrogenesis of the Nakhla (SNC) meteorite - Evidence from petrography and mineral chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1990-01-01

    The Nakhla (SNC) meteorite, of putative Martian origin, consists of euhedra and subhedra of augite and olivine in a fine-grained basaltic mesostasis. This paper presents petrographic and mineral chemical data on the Nakhla meteorite, which were collected to help distinquish among the four existing hypotheses for the formation of olivine in this meteorite. It is concluded that none of these hypotheses can explain the origins of olivine and augite. A new hypothesis is proposed, which is consistent with the data presented. It suggests that the cores of augites and olivines are both xenocrysts from a partially equilibrated source rock.

  17. An Interdisciplinary Method for the Visualization of Novel High-Resolution Precision Photography and Micro-XCT Data Sets of NASA's Apollo Lunar Samples and Antarctic Meteorite Samples to Create Combined Research-Grade 3D Virtual Samples for the Benefit of Astromaterials Collections Conservation, Curation, Scientific Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Zeigler, R. A.; Righter, K.; Beaulieu, K. R.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Hanna, R.; Ketcham, R. A.; Todd, N. S.

    2016-12-01

    New technologies make possible the advancement of documentation and visualization practices that can enhance conservation and curation protocols for NASA's Astromaterials Collections. With increasing demands for accessibility to updated comprehensive data, and with new sample return missions on the horizon, it is of primary importance to develop new standards for contemporary documentation and visualization methodologies. Our interdisciplinary team has expertise in the fields of heritage conservation practices, professional photography, photogrammetry, imaging science, application engineering, data curation, geoscience, and astromaterials curation. Our objective is to create virtual 3D reconstructions of Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples that are a fusion of two state-of-the-art data sets: the interior view of the sample by collecting Micro-XCT data and the exterior view of the sample by collecting high-resolution precision photography data. These new data provide researchers an information-rich visualization of both compositional and textural information prior to any physical sub-sampling. Since January 2013 we have developed a process that resulted in the successful creation of the first image-based 3D reconstruction of an Apollo Lunar Sample correlated to a 3D reconstruction of the same sample's Micro-XCT data, illustrating that this technique is both operationally possible and functionally beneficial. In May of 2016 we began a 3-year research period during which we aim to produce Virtual Astromaterials Samples for 60 high-priority Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples and serve them on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website. Our research demonstrates that research-grade Virtual Astromaterials Samples are beneficial in preserving for posterity a precise 3D reconstruction of the sample prior to sub-sampling, which greatly improves documentation practices, provides unique and novel visualization of the sample's interior and

  18. An Interdisciplinary Method for the Visualization of Novel High-Resolution Precision Photography and Micro-XCT Data Sets of NASA's Apollo Lunar Samples and Antarctic Meteorite Samples to Create Combined Research-Grade 3D Virtual Samples for the Benefit of Astromaterials Collections Conservation, Curation, Scientific Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenfeld, E. H.; Evans, C. A.; Oshel, E. R.; Liddle, D. A.; Beaulieu, K.; Zeigler, R. A.; Hanna, R. D.; Ketcham, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    New technologies make possible the advancement of documentation and visualization practices that can enhance conservation and curation protocols for NASA's Astromaterials Collections. With increasing demands for accessibility to updated comprehensive data, and with new sample return missions on the horizon, it is of primary importance to develop new standards for contemporary documentation and visualization methodologies. Our interdisciplinary team has expertise in the fields of heritage conservation practices, professional photography, photogrammetry, imaging science, application engineering, data curation, geoscience, and astromaterials curation. Our objective is to create virtual 3D reconstructions of Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples that are a fusion of two state-of-the-art data sets: the interior view of the sample by collecting Micro-XCT data and the exterior view of the sample by collecting high-resolution precision photography data. These new data provide researchers an information-rich visualization of both compositional and textural information prior to any physical sub-sampling. Since January 2013 we have developed a process that resulted in the successful creation of the first image-based 3D reconstruction of an Apollo Lunar Sample correlated to a 3D reconstruction of the same sample's Micro- XCT data, illustrating that this technique is both operationally possible and functionally beneficial. In May of 2016 we began a 3-year research period during which we aim to produce Virtual Astromaterials Samples for 60 high-priority Apollo Lunar and Antarctic Meteorite samples and serve them on NASA's Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation website. Our research demonstrates that research-grade Virtual Astromaterials Samples are beneficial in preserving for posterity a precise 3D reconstruction of the sample prior to sub-sampling, which greatly improves documentation practices, provides unique and novel visualization of the sample's interior and

  19. Moessbauer study of the Jilin and Xinyang meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuchang [North Carolina Univ., Asheville, NC (United States). Moessbauer Effect Data Center; Stevens, J.G. [North Carolina Univ., Asheville, NC (United States). Moessbauer Effect Data Center; Li Yushu [FEA Management, Inc., Grand Blanc, MI (United States); Li Zhaolin [Dept. of Geology, Zhongshan Univ., Guanzhou (China)

    1994-11-01

    The Xinyang and Jilin meteorites were investigated using Moessbauer spectroscopy. In addition to troilites and silicates, the Jilin meteorite contains taenite and kamacite, while the Xinyang meteorite contains kamacite only. The Moessbauer data of these two meteorites confirm them as ordinary H chondrites. The Moessbauer parameters can be interpreted by a model based on the cooling history of these meteorites. (orig.)

  20. Siena, 1794: History's Most Consequential Meteorite Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1995-09-01

    In the mythos of meteoritics, the fall of stones at L'Aigle in Normandy at 1 p. m. on April 26, 1803, is commonly regarded as the event that turned skeptics into believers and opened the way for the new science. A strong case can be made, however, that the fall of stones at Siena at 7:00 p.m. on June 16, 1794, established the authenticity of meteorite falls and set in motion the reexaminations of entrenched beliefs that led to the founding of the new science. The Siena fall was heralded by the appearance of an extraordinarily high, dark cloud emitting smoke, sparks like rockets, and bolts of unusually slow-moving red lightning. With a tremendous explosion a shower of stones, ranging in weight from a few milligrams to 3 kg, fell southeast of Siena. This was the first meteorite fall to occur in the vicinity of a sizeable European city and the first to be witnessed by so many people, including English visitors, that the fall of the stones from the sky could not be denied. It also was the first fall to be seriously investigated by scholars, at several universities in Italy, who collected eye-witness reports and specimens and formulated hypotheses of origin. Their task was greatly complicated by the timing of the fall which occurred 18 hours after Mt. Vesuvius sprang into full eruption. Some believed that the two events were entirely coincidental; others thought that the stones either were ejecta from the volcano (which lay about 320 km to the southeast of Siena) or had consolidated in the fiery masses of dust and ash expelled by the mountain. No explanations seemed entirely satisfactory, but, in an age when the very possibility of falling stones had been decisively ruled out by savants of the Enlightenment, the well-observed fall at Siena opened a new dialog on this subject. The Siena fall occurred only two months after the publication in Riga and Leipzig of Ernst F. F. Chladni's book On the Origin of Ironmasses in which he concluded from historical records that

  1. Organic compounds in carbonaceous meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A

    2002-06-01

    The carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are fragments of asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the solar system 4.6 billion years ago. These carbon-rich objects contain a variety of extraterrestrial organic molecules that constitute a record of chemical evolution prior to the origin of life. Compound classes include aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, amino acids, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, phosphonic acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, sugars, amines, amides, nitrogen heterocycles, sulfur heterocycles and a relatively abundant high molecular weight macromolecular material. Structural and stable isotopic characteristics suggest that a number of environments may have contributed to the organic inventory, including interstellar space, the solar nebula and the asteroidal meteorite parent body. This review covers work published between 1950 and the present day and cites 193 references.

  2. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 82, 1998 July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, J.N.

    1998-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin No. 82 lists information for 974 new meteorites, including 521 finds from Antarctica, 401 finds from the Sahara, 21 finds from the Nullarbor region of Australia, and 7 falls (Ban Rong Du, Burnwell, Fermo, Jalanash, Juancheng, Monahans (1998), and Silao). Many rare types of meteorites are reported: counting pairing groups as one, these include one CR chondrite, two CK chondrites, two CO chondrites, four CV chondrites, one CH chondrite or Bencubbin-like, six C2 (unclassified) chondrites, two EH chondrites, two EL chondrites, three R chondrites, thirty unequilibrated ordinary chondrites, one ungrouped chondrite, three eucrites, six howardites, one diogenite, eleven ureilites, nine iron meteorites, one mesosiderite, two brachinites, one lodranite, one winonaite, and two lunar meteorites (Dar al Gani 400 and EET 96008). All italicized abbreviations refer to addresses tabulated at the end of this document. ?? Meteoritical Society, 1998.

  3. Electrical conductivity of chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duba, AL; Didwall, E. M.; Burke, G. J.; Sonett, C. P.

    1987-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of samples of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous chondrites is 4 to 6 orders of magnitude greater than rock forming minerals such as olivine for temperatures up to 700 C. The remarkably high electrical conductivity of these meteorites is attributed to carbon at the grain boundaries. Much of this carbon is produced by pyrolyzation of hydrocarbons at temperatures in excess of 150 C. As the temperature increases, light hydrocarbons are driven off and a carbon-rich residue or char migrates to the grain boundaries enhancing electrical conductivity. Assuming that carbon was present at the grain boundaries in the material which comprised the meteorite parent bodies, the electrical heating of such bodies was calculated as a function of body size and solar distance during a hypothetical T-Tauri phase of the sun. Input conductivity data for the meteorite parent body were the present carbonaceous chondrite values for temperatures up to 840 C and the electrical conductivity values for olivine above 840 C.

  4. Iron Mossbauer spectral study of weathered Antarctic and SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, T. C.; Burns, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    Mossbauer spectral measurements were made on suites of finds from Antarctica and falls collected elsewhere in order to distinguish preterrestrial oxidation products formed on parent meteorite bodies from secondary minerals derived from chemical weathering on earth. Ferric iron is shown to be present throughout the interiors of all the specimens, in amounts ranging from less than 1 to greater than 30 percent Fe(3+). The results indicate that achondrites found to date did not originate from the outermost surface of Mars.

  5. The Ozernoye meteorite: New data on mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Yu. V.; Koroteev, V. A.; Khiller, V. V.; Burlakov, E. V.; Ivanov, K. S.; Kleimenov, D. A.

    2016-12-01

    New data on the mineral composition of the Ozernoye meteorite, found in the Kurgan region in 1983, are presented. It has been found that that the meteorite's matter is composed of olivine (chrysolite), orthopyroxene (bronzite), clinopyroxene (augite), maskelynite, chromite, ilmenite, metals Fe and Ni (kamasite, taenite), sulfides (troilite, pentlandite), chlorapatite, and merrillite. Augite, taenite, pentlandite, and merrillite were identified in the Ozernoye meteorite for the first time. The chemical compositions are given for all these minerals. The meteorite itself is an ordinary chondrite stone belonging to petrological type L5.

  6. The Tagish Lake meteorite: a possible sample from a D-type asteroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiroi, T; Zolensky, M E; Pieters, C M

    2001-09-21

    A new type of carbonaceous chondrite, the Tagish Lake meteorite, exhibits a reflectance spectrum similar to spectra observed from the D-type asteroids, which are relatively abundant in the outer solar system beyond the main asteroid belt and have been inferred to be more primitive than any known meteorite. Until the Tagish Lake fall, these asteroids had no analog in the meteorite collections. The Tagish Lake meteorite is a carbon-rich (4 to 5 weight %), aqueously altered carbonaceous chondrite and contains high concentrations of presolar grains and carbonate minerals, which is consistent with the expectation that the D-type asteroids were originally made of primitive materials and did not experience any extensive heating.

  7. Lunar Meteorites Sayh Al Uhaymir 449 and Dhofar 925, 960, and 961: Windows into South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Ryan A.; Jolliff, B. L.; Korotev, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, three lunar meteorites were collected in close proximity to each other in the Dhofar region of Oman: Dhofar 925 (49 g), Dhofar 960 (35 g), and Dhofar 961 (22 g). In 2006, lunar meteorite Sayh al Uhaymir (SaU) 449 (16.5 g) was found about 100 km to the NE. Despite significant differences in the bulk composition of Dhofar 961 relative to Dhofar 925/960 and SaU 449 (which are identical to each other), these four meteorites are postulated to be paired based on their find locations, bulk composition, and detailed petrographic analysis. Hereafter, they will collectively be referred to as the Dhofar 961 clan. Comparison of meteorite and component bulk compositions to Lunar Prospector 5-degree gamma-ray data suggest the most likely provenance of this meteorite group is within the South Pole-Aitken Basin. As the oldest, largest, and deepest recognizable basin on the Moon, the composition of the material within the SPA basin is of particular importance to lunar science. Here we review and expand upon the geochemistry and petrography of the Dhofar 961 clan and assess the likelihood that these meteorites come from within the SPA basin based on their bulk compositions and the compositions and characteristics of the major lithologic components found within the breccia.

  8. What do Meteorite Falls Tell Us about the Strength of Asteroid Boulders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Daniel; Demasi, Michael; Kring, David

    2016-10-01

    One possible source of data on the strength of a boulder on an asteroid's surface is the meteorite collection and the observations of meteorite falls. Since highly fractured boulders should breakup in the atmosphere and arrive as meteorite showers, the relative ratio of boulders to showers can provide insight into boulder strength. Since about 85-95% of the mass of a meteoroid is lost during atmospheric entry, we have chosen to investigate only those falls with a final recovered mass of at least 10 kg. This corresponds to a minimum pre-atmospheric mass of 100-200 kg and roughly 25 centimeter minimum diameter. Using the Catalogue of Meteorites and the Meteoritical Bulletins we compiled a list of observed meteorite falls with a total recovered mass greater than or equal to 10 kg. We found a total of 269 meteorites that met these criteria, of which 263 entries reported or estimated the number of fragments associated with their falls. The overall percentage of observed showers was found to be around 34%. The ratio of "boulders" to showers was determined to be around 1.94:1. Comparing the percentage of showers within the meteorite types shows a trend in strength with irons (showers only 4.3%) very rarely exhibit reported showers, stony-irons (25%), ordinary chondrites (28.5%), achondrites (35.7%), and carbonaceous chondrites (70%) are dominantly showers.The meteorite fall data primarily sample the "boulder" population of meteoroids roughly 0.25 meters to a few meters in their pre-atmospheric diameter because of the 85-95% atmospheric loss. The relative rarity of showers seems to indicate that most meteoroids that survive to produce meteorites in this size range are fairly strong and coherent. Not surprisingly, irons and stony-irons are the strongest class which is consistent with the overwhelmingly high production of Earth's smallest impact craters by iron meteorites. Carbonaceous chondrites are by far the weakest and most fracture-prone meteorite class with 70% of the

  9. Attempts to comprehend Martian surface processes through interpretation of the oxygen isotopic compositions of carbonates in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Pillinger, C. T.; Grady, Monica M.

    1992-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are known to contain trace quantities of a variety of secondary minerals such as carbonates, sulfates, and aluminosilicates. Since these constituents are thought to be mostly preterrestrial in origin, their study has the potential to provide rigorous constraints on the nature of martian weathering processes. However, this line of investigation is potentially complicated by the presence within the meteorite samples of any additional weathering products produced by terrestrial processes. Examination of such terrestrial components is important since weathering processes that affect meteorite samples following their fall to Earth might have some bearing on the nature of analogous processes at the surface of Mars. It is obviously necessary to try and distinguish which secondary components in SNC meteorites are terrestrial in origin from those that are preterrestrial. Herein consideration is made of the stable isotopic compositions of weathering products in two SNC meteorites: EET A79001 (a sample collected from Antarctica) and Nakhla (a fall from Egypt, 1911).

  10. Terrestrial microbes in martian and chondritic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airieau, S.; Picenco, Y.; Andersen, G.

    2007-08-01

    remaining fragments of the samples were used for amino acid and isotopic analyses [6]. Some samples were fragments of dried and wet meteorites isolated in centrifuge tubes after a 10-day water extraction. Sabouraud Dextrose (dilutions 1:10 and 1:1000), Bacto Agar, LB Broth Miller (dilutions 1:10 and 1:1000), and R2A agar (1:1 and 1:1000), were autoclaved and cooled in culture plates inside a clean hood for cell culture. Some controls retained sterile moist agar still adhering to the perimeter of the plates for up to 18 months, and validated the sterile technique. Cell culture, PCR and microscopy documented a diversity of archea, prokaryotes and eukaryotes in these samples [7]. The plates displaying microbial growth at room temperature after 6 weeks or less were used to produce streak plates and isolate colonies of individual species for long term freezing in Eppendorf tubes. Any plate with biological growth along the perimeter of the plate was discarded. The plates without microbial activity after 6 weeks were stored in a fridge for 18 months. Control plates, exposed to the clean hood, laboratory room, used gloves, and weighing paper used in the analyses, sustained the prolonged storage with no sign of microbial activity that could be related to the analysis method. Dust grains and water extracts from the meteorites were spread on agar surfaces in cell culture Petri dishes in a clean hood. SNC samples.In early 2005, the surface of SNC stones in the USNM curation facility were brushed with sterile swabs. Fallen dust grains were collected on weighing paper and isolated in sterile tubes. The sample suite included Zagami USNM 6545, Lafayette USNM 1505, Los Angeles USNM 7052, Shergotty USNM 321, Nakhla USNM 5892, Nakhla USNM 426 (117.4 g) and Nakhla USNM 426 (18.2 g), and Chassigny USNMMNHN 2524. The controls, worker's gloves, blank swabs, and weighing paper exhibited no microbial activity in subsequent months. The cell culture was conducted with Sabouraud Dextrose and R2A only

  11. NASA Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program is designed for K-12 classroom educators who work in K-12 schools, museums, libraries, or planetariums. Educators have to be certified to borrow the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks by attending a NASA Certification Workshop provided by a NASA Authorized Sample Disk Certifier.

  12. Scaling analysis of meteorite shower mass distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Lene; Meibom, A.; Bohr, Jakob

    1998-01-01

    Meteorite showers are the remains of extraterrestrial objects which are captivated by the gravitational field of the Earth. We have analyzed the mass distribution of fragments from 16 meteorite showers for scaling. The distributions exhibit distinct scaling behavior over several orders of magnetude...

  13. Comet and Meteorite Traditions of Aboriginal Australians

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Of the hundreds of distinct Aboriginal cultures of Australia, many have oral traditions rich in descriptions and explanations of comets, meteors, meteorites, airbursts, impact events, and impact craters. These views generally attribute these phenomena to spirits, death, and bad omens. There are also many traditions that describe the formation of meteorite craters as well as impact events that are not known to Western science.

  14. Pairing Relationships Among Feldspathic Lunar Meteorites from Miller Range, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeigler, Ryan A.; Korotev, R. L.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Miller Range ice fields have been amongst the most prolific for lunar meteorites that ANSMET has searched [1-3]. Six different stones have been recovered during the 2005, 2007, and 2009 field seasons: MIL 05035 (142 g), MIL 07006 (1.4 g), MIL 090034 (196 g), MIL 090036 (245 g), MIL 090070 (137 g), and MIL 090075 (144 g). Of these, the five stones collected during the 2007 and 2009 seasons are feldspathic breccias. Previous work on the Miller Range feldspathic lunar meteorites (FLMs) has suggested that they are not all paired with each other [4-5]. Here we examine the pairing relationships among the Miller Range FLMs using petrography in concert with traceand major-element compositions.

  15. Carbon-14 activities in recently fallen meteorites and Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, A. J. T.; Donahue, D. J.; Linick, T. W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports C-14 measurements in meteorites using an extraction method which employs RF melting of samples as small as 0.1 g. A study of extraction of cosmic-ray-produced C-14 in samples of Bruderheim gave C-14 levels between 38 and 60 dpm/kg for samples which had been preheated in air between 250 and 700 C, with a mean value of 46.8 + or - 1.4 dpm/kg. A range of values between 35 and 59 dpm/kg was found for other falls of saturated meteorites preheated to 500 C. The preheating step is shown to be effective in removing terrestrial carbon contamination. A series of samples previously dated by Kr-81 as having ages of 120-310 kyr gave C-14 levels of between less than 0.16 and 0.37 + or - 0.10 dpm/kg. These levels are consistent with levels of in situ production by cosmic rays at the earth's surface.

  16. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 96, September 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, M.K.; Smith, C.; Benedix, G.; Herd, C.D.K.; Righter, K.; Haack, H.; Yamaguchi, A.; Chennaoui, Aoudjehane H.; Grossman, J.N.

    2009-01-01

    The Meteoritical Bulletin No. 96 contains a total of 1590 newly approved meteorite names with their relevant data. These include 12 from specific locations within Africa, 76 from northwest Africa, 9 from the Americas, 13 from Asia, 1 from Australia, 2 from Europe, 950 from Antarctica recovered by the Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition (CHINARE), and 527 from the American Antarctic program (ANSMET). Among these meteorites are 4 falls, Almahata Sitta (Sudan), Sulagiri (India), Ash Creek (United States), and Maribo (Denmark). Almahata Sitta is an anomalous ureilite and is debris from asteroid 2008 TC3 and Maribo is a CM2 chondrite. Other highlights include a lunar meteorite, a CM1 chondrite, and an anomalous IVA iron. ?? The Meteoritical Society, 2009.

  17. SNC meteorites - Evidence against an asteroidal origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Warner, J. L.; Wood, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    About 1.3 billion years ago, on one or more distant planetary bodies, silicate melts formed and produced cumulate rocks which eventually made their way to earth. Nine of these rocks have been recovered. Three distinct groups are involved, including shergottites, nakhlites, and chassignites (abbreviated as SNC). The young crystallization ages and other chemical features of SNC meteorites have prompted several workers to suggest that the specimens may be samples of igneous rock, ejected from the surface of Mars during an impact event. Others have rejected the Martian origin of SNC meteorites in favor of a more traditional asteroidal parent body. The present investigation shows that the petrologic, geochemical, and isotopic evidence is inconsistent with an asteroidal origin for SNC meteorites. It is found that the characteristics of SNC meteorites argue convincingly against their origin in a planetary object as small as the largest asteroid. That these meteorites may be fragments of the Martian surface still remains the most likely possibility.

  18. Annual Occurrence of Meteorite-Dropping Fireballs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalova, Natalia; Jopek, Tadeusz J.

    2016-07-01

    The event of Chelyabinsk meteorite has brought about change the earlier opinion about limits of the sizes of potentially dangerous asteroidal fragments that crossed the Earth's orbit and irrupted in the Earth's atmosphere making the brightest fireball. The observations of the fireballs by fireball networks allows to get the more precise data on atmospheric trajectories and coordinates of predicted landing place of the meteorite. For the reason to search the periods of fireball activity is built the annual distribution of the numbers of meteorites with the known fall dates and of the meteorite-dropping fireballs versus the solar longitude. The resulting profile of the annual activity of meteorites and meteorite-dropping fireballs shows several periods of increased activity in the course of the year. The analysis of the atmospheric trajectories and physical properties of sporadic meteorite-dropping fireballs observed in Tajikistan by instrumental methods in the summer‒autumn periods of increased fireballs activity has been made. As a result the structural strength, the bulk density and terminal mass of the studied fireballs that can survive in the Earth atmosphere and became meteorites was obtained. From the photographic IAU MDC_2003 meteor database and published sources based on the orbit proximity as determined by D-criterion of Southworth and Hawkins the fireballs that could be the members of group of meteorite-dropping fireballs, was found. Among the near Earth's objects (NEOs) the searching for parent bodies for meteorite-dropping fireballs was made and the evolution of orbits of these objects in the past on a long interval of time was investigated.

  19. James Smithson (1765-1829): Smithsonian Institution Founder And Its First Meteorite Investigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, R. S., Jr.; Ewing, H. P.

    2005-12-01

    The Englishman James Smithson's bequest led to the founding of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington in 1846. He had never visited the US and his motivations are unclear. His archive and meteorite-containing mineral collection were also donated but were tragically lost in the Smithsonian fire in 1865. Only a tantalizing quotation remains: "the cabinet also contained a valuable suite of meteoritic stones, which appear to be . . . the important meteorites which have fallen in Europe during several centuries." Smithson's life spanned late 18th century Enlightenment skepticism concerning meteorites to their acceptance in the early decades of the 19th century. New research reveals Smithson as an active participant at the birth of modern meteoritics. Smithson was well educated, well connected, financially independent, and one of the youngest men ever to be elected a FRS. He spent much of his life in Europe associating with the scientific leaders there, and he was a sought after chemical analyst. William Thomson (1761-1806), an Oxford mentor and a lifelong friend, took up residence in Naples in 1790. He was monitoring Mt. Vesuvius's, an interest shared with Smithson, when it erupted on June 15, 1794. The next day the Siena meteorite fell 200 km to the north. Smithson, then residing in Florence, went immediately over the Chianti Hills to investigate the fall. Welcomed with awed respect by the local savants, the twenty nine year old Smithson investigated the fall and described it in a letter to his mentor Henry Cavendish (1731-1810) for dissemination in London. William Thomson provided a mineralogical description of the Siena stones for the published description. The Siena meteorite fall marked the beginning of a decade of investigation by scientists that led to the acceptance of meteorites. Smithson was there throughout these investigations and the political and social unrest that accompanied them.

  20. Stardust silicates from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Kazuhide; Krot, Alexander N; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2004-04-29

    Primitive chondritic meteorites contain material (presolar grains), at the level of a few parts per million, that predates the formation of our Solar System. Astronomical observations and the chemical composition of the Sun both suggest that silicates must have been the dominant solids in the protoplanetary disk from which the planets of the Solar System formed, but no presolar silicates have been identified in chondrites. Here we report the in situ discovery of presolar silicate grains 0.1-1 microm in size in the matrices of two primitive carbonaceous chondrites. These grains are highly enriched in 17O (delta17O(SMOW) > 100-400 per thousand ), but have solar silicon isotopic compositions within analytical uncertainties, suggesting an origin in an oxygen-rich red giant or an asymptotic giant branch star. The estimated abundance of these presolar silicates (3-30 parts per million) is higher than reported for other types of presolar grains in meteorites, consistent with their ubiquity in the early Solar System, but is about two orders of magnitude lower than their abundance in anhydrous interplanetary dust particles. This result is best explained by the destruction of silicates during high-temperature processing in the solar nebula.

  1. Meteorites. Earth Science Curriculum Project Pamphlet Series PS-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Carleton B.

    Discussed are meteors from an historical and astronomical viewpoint; then presented is the chemical makeup of iron meteorites, stony meteorites, and stony-iron meteorites. Age determination, moon craters, and tektites are also treated. The interested observer learns how to identify meteorites and to describe how they fall. (Author/RE)

  2. More Words about the Meteorite of Belogradchik [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.V. Toshev

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently a paper about the meteorite of Belogradchik has been published (Тошев, 2010а. Additional information about the meteorite of 1874 is given in the present article. Here the description of the meteorite is after Flight (1887. Safvet pasha is the official who decided to donate the meteorite in Paris.

  3. Combining meteorites and missions to explore Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Timothy J; Corrigan, Catherine M; Herd, Christopher D K

    2011-11-29

    Laboratory studies of meteorites and robotic exploration of Mars reveal scant atmosphere, no evidence of plate tectonics, past evidence for abundant water, and a protracted igneous evolution. Despite indirect hints, direct evidence of a martian origin came with the discovery of trapped atmospheric gases in one meteorite. Since then, the study of martian meteorites and findings from missions have been linked. Although the meteorite source locations are unknown, impact ejection modeling and spectral mapping of Mars suggest derivation from small craters in terrains of Amazonian to Hesperian age. Whereas most martian meteorites are young ( 4.5 Ga and formation of enriched and depleted reservoirs. However, the history inferred from martian meteorites conflicts with results from recent Mars missions, calling into doubt whether the igneous histor y inferred from the meteorites is applicable to Mars as a whole. Allan Hills 84001 dates to 4.09 Ga and contains fluid-deposited carbonates. Accompanying debate about the mechanism and temperature of origin of the carbonates came several features suggestive of past microbial life in the carbonates. Although highly disputed, the suggestion spurred interest in habitable extreme environments on Earth and throughout the Solar System. A flotilla of subsequent spacecraft has redefined Mars from a volcanic planet to a hydrologically active planet that may have harbored life. Understanding the history and habitability of Mars depends on understanding the coupling of the atmosphere, surface, and subsurface. Sample return that brings back direct evidence from these diverse reservoirs is essential.

  4. Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanda, Brigitte; Rotaru, Monica; Hewins, Translated by Roger

    2001-07-01

    1. The harder they fall C. Perron; 2. Stones fallen from the sky U. Marvin; 3. Impact craters P. Thomas; 4. Cretaceous Park R. Rocchia, E. Robin and H. Leroux; 5. Like no rock on Earth B. Zanda, M. Christophe Michel Lévy, M. Bourot Denise and C. Caillet Komorowski; 6. Little planets D. Benest; 7. The Sound and the Fury J.-P. Bibring; 8. Signed carbon F. Robert, M. Festou and F. Raulin; 9. A stormy nebula R. Hewins; 10. The age of the solar system G. Manhès; 11. Galactic fossils E. Zinner; 12. Leafing through the past two centuries... P. Pellas; Glossary; Acknowledgements; Illustration credits.

  5. Terrestrial and exposure histories of Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.

    1986-01-01

    Records of cosmogenic effects were studied in a large suite of Antarctic meteorites. The cosmogenic nuclide measurements together with cosmic ray track measurements on Antartic meteorites provide information such as exposure age, terrestrial age, size and depth in meteoroid or parent body, influx rate in the past, and pairing. The terrestrail age is the time period between the fall of the meteorite on the Earth and the present. To define terrestrial age, two or more nuclides with different half-lives and possibly noble gases are required. The cosmogenic radionuclides used are C-14, Kr-81, Cl-36, Al-26, Be-10, Mn-53, and K-40.

  6. Iron and stony-iron meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benedix, Gretchen K.; Haack, Henning; McCoy, T. J.

    2014-01-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich...... sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar...

  7. Meteorites from recent amor-type orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, P. H.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-01-01

    We report here the discovery of a recent meteorite shower in Antarctica, the members of which have very high natural thermoluminescence levels. It is apparent from these data that the shower has been on Earth only a short time (approximately 1000 years) and the meteorite probably came to Earth through rapid (less than 10 exp 5 years) evolution from an orbit with perihelion greater than 1.1 AU, similar to Amor asteroids. Only a very small number of meteorites, including a few modern falls, appear to have had similar orbital histories.

  8. Moessbauer spectroscopy of the SNC meteorite Zagami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agerkvist, D. P.; Vistisen, L.

    1993-01-01

    We have performed Mossbauer spectroscopy on two different pieces of the meteorite Zagami belonging to the group of SNC meteorites. In one of the samples we found a substantial amount of olivine inter grown with one kind of pyroxene, and also another kind of pyroxene very similar to the pyroxene in the other sample we examined. Both samples showed less than 1 percent of Fe(3+) in the silicate phase. The group of SNC meteorites called shergottites, to which Zagami belongs, are achondrites whose texture, mineralogy and composition resembles those of terrestrial diabases. The results from the investigation are presented.

  9. Zirconium and hafnium in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmann, W. D.; Chyi, L. L.

    1974-01-01

    The abundances of zirconium and hafnium have been determined in nine stony meteorites by a new, precise neutron-activation technique. The Zr/Hf abundance ratios for the chondrites vary in a rather narrow range, consistent with previously published observations from our group. Replicate analyses of new, carefully selected clean interior samples of the Cl chondrite Orgueil yield mean zirconium and hafnium abundances of 5.2 and 0.10 ppm, respectively. These abundances are lower than we reported earlier for two Cl chondrite samples which we now suspect may have suffered contamination. The new Cl zirconium and hafnium abundances are in closer agreement with predictions based on theories of nucleosynthesis than the earlier data.

  10. Activation analysis of meteorites. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, H.; Honda, M.; Sato, H. [Nihon Univ., College of Humanities and Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Ebihara, M.; Oura, Y.; Setoguchi, M. [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ., Faculty of Science, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    A long-lived cosmogenic nuclide, {sup 53}Mn in extra-terrestrial materials has been determined in the DR-1 hole of the JRR-3M reactor, applying the well-thermalized neutron flux. The neutron flux intensities are variable with the depths whereas the fast thermal ratios are not quite variable. By this method, {sup 53}Mn contents in iron meteorites and metal phases in general could be routinely determined in many samples. The chemical separation method has been modified and a convenient short circuit method has been proposed to shorten the process. The short method is to count the activities of {sup 54}Mn just after the irradiation without further purification of manganese. (author)

  11. Comparison of lunar rocks and meteorites: Implications to histories of the moon and parent meteorite bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, M.; Fodor, R. V.; Keil, K.

    1977-01-01

    There are many similarities between lunar samples and stone meteorites. Lunar samples, especially from the highlands, indicate that they have been affected by complex and repeated impact processes. Similar complex and repeated impact processes have also been operative on the achondritic and chondritic meteorites. Similarities between lunar and meteoritic rocks are discussed as follows: (1) Monomict and polymict breccias occur in lunar rocks, as well as in achondritic and chondritic meteorites, having resulted from complex and repeated impact processes; (2) Chondrules are present in lunar meteorites, as well as in a few achondritic and most chondritic meteorites. They apparently crystallized spontaneously from molten highly supercooled droplets which may have formed from impact melts or, perhaps, volcanic processes (as well as from the solar nebula, in the case of meteoritic chondrites); (3) Lithic fragments vary from little modified (relative to the apparent original texture) to partly or completely melted and recrystallized lithic fragments. Their detailed study allows conclusions to be drawn about their parent rock types and their origin, thereby gaining insight into preimpact histories of lunar and meteoritic breccias. There is evidence that cumulate rocks were involved in the early history of both moon and parent meteorite bodies.

  12. Chladniite: A New Mineral Honoring the Father of Meteoritics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, T. J.; Steele, I. M.; Keil, K.; Leonard, B. F.; Endress, M.

    1993-07-01

    cell. A total of 17 lines were observed in the powder pattern. Chladniite is hexagonal, R 3(bar), a = 14.967 angstroms, c = 42.595 angstroms, beta = 120 degrees. Attempts to determine the structure of chladniite are in progress. Chladniite is named for Ernst Florens Friedrich Chladni (1756-1827), who is widely regarded as the "Father of Meteoritics." After his initial training as a lawyer, Chladni turned his attention to science, particularly problems in acoustics. He was not, however, able to obtain a permanent position and embarked upon the life of a nomad, traveling among the great cities of Europe lecturing about acoustics. During these travels, he eventually gained an interest in meteoritics. It was Chladni's pioneering book of 1794 that, for the first time, presented strong evidence for an extraterrestrial origin of meteoritic stones and irons [5]. In addition, Chladni argued that meteorites must have been the building blocks of all planets and argued that a large iron core must exist inside the Earth. During his extensive travels, Chladni also established a meteorite collection that can still be seen at Humboldt University in Berlin. It is appropriate that a mineral be named in his honor as we approach the 200th anniversary of the publication of his monumental work. References: [1] McCoy et al. (1993) Meteoritics, in press. [2] Fuchs et al. (1967) GCA, 21, 1711-1719. [3] Araki and Moore (1981) Am. Mineral., 66, 827-842. [4] Livingstone (1980) Min. Mag., 43, 833-836. [5] Chladni (1794) Riga, J. F. Hartknoch (in German); reprinted (with introduction by G. Hoppe) by Akad. Verlagsgesellschaft Geest & Portig K.-G. (1982) (in German).

  13. Russian meteorite Bronze Age (rock record)

    CERN Document Server

    Vodolazhskaya, Larisa

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of petroglyphs found in the quartzite grotto near the Skelnovsky small village in the Northern Black Sea in the South of Russia. The aim of the study was the analysis and interpretation of the Early Bronze Age petroglyphs using archaeoastronomical methods. The article presents a comparative analysis of Skelnovsky grotto ancient images and contemporary eyewitness accounts of the Sikhote-Alin meteorite fall and meteorite shower. Some petroglyphs were interpreted by us using ethnographic and folklore material. In this study, the magnetic declination for the geographical coordinates Skelnovsky farm was calculated, and the projection of the whole picture Skelnovskih petroglyphs on the topographical map of the area was built. The proposed location of the meteorite fall was determined with this projection. It is confirmed by satellite pictures, on which are the distinguishable terrain features, typical for the meteorite fall, are visible including the possible impact crater...

  14. Consortium Study of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Fries, M. D.; Gibson, E. K.; Harrington, R.; Keller, L. P.; McCoy, T. J.; Morris, R. V.; Nagao, K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Niles, P.; Nyquist, L.; Park, J.; Peng, Z. X.; Shih, C.-Y.; Simon, J. I.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    On February 15, 2013 approximately 17 m asteroid hit Earth, causing shock waves and air blasts over a portion of Russia. A significant amount of material has been recovered from this meteorite fall, officially named Chelyabinsk.

  15. The Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 81, 1997 July

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, J.N.

    1997-01-01

    Meteoritical Bulletin, No. 81 lists 181 new meteorites. Noteworthy among these are a new lunar meteorite (Dar al Gani 262), four observed falls (Dong Ujimqin Qi, Galkiv, Mount Tazerzait, and Piplia Kalan), four irons (Albion, Great Sand Sea 003, Hot Springs, and Mont Dieu), two mesosiderites (Dong Ujimqin Qi and Lamont), an acapulcoite (FRO 95029), a eucrite (Piplia Kalan), two probably-paired ureilites (Dar al Gani 164 and 165), an R chondrite (Hammadah al Hamra 119), an ungrouped type-3 chondrite (Hammadah al Hamra 180), a highly unequilibrated ordinary chondrite (Wells, LL3.3), and a variety of carbonaceous and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites from Libya and Antarctica. All italicized abbreviations refer to addresses listed in the appendix. ?? Meteoritical Society, 1997.

  16. Two Shatter-Coned NWA Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHone, J. F.; Shoemaker, C.; Killgore, M.; Killgore, K.

    2012-03-01

    Shatter cones are found in target rocks at more than 70 terrestrial impact sites and are regarded as reliable field criteria for meteoroid impact events. Shatter cones are now seen in chondritic meteorites and indicate early collision events.

  17. Educating the Public about Meteorites and Impacts through Virtual Field Trips and Classroom Experience Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashcraft, Teresa; Hines, R.; Minitti, M.; Taylor, W.; Morris, M. A.; Wadhwa, M.

    2014-01-01

    With specimens representing over 2,000 individual meteorites, the Center for Meteorite Studies (CMS) at Arizona State University (ASU) is home to the world's largest university-based meteorite collection. As part of our mission to provide educational opportunities that expand awareness and understanding of the science of meteoritics, CMS continues to develop new ways to engage the public in meteorite and space science, including the opening of a new Meteorite Gallery, and expansion of online resources through upgrades to the CMS website, meteorites.asu.edu. In 2008, CMS was the recipient of a philanthropic grant to improve online education tools and develop loanable modules for educators. These modules focus on the origin of meteorites, and contain actual meteorite specimens, media resources, a user guide, and lesson plans, as well as a series of engaging activities that utilize hands-on materials geared to help students develop logical thinking, analytical skills, and proficiency in STEM disciplines. In 2010, in partnership with the ASU NASA Astrobiology Institute team, CMS obtained a NASA EPOESS grant to develop Virtual Field Trips (VFTs) complemented by loanable “Experience Boxes” containing lesson plans, media, and hands-on objects related to the VFT sites. One VFT-Box pair focuses on the record of the oldest multicellular organisms on Earth. The second VFT-Box pair focuses on the Upheaval Dome (UD) structure, a meteorite impact crater in Utah’s Canyonlands National Park. UD is widely accepted as the deeply eroded remnant of a ~5 kilometer impact crater (e.g. Kriens et al., 1999). The alternate hypothesis that the Dome was formed by the upwelling of salt from a deposit underlying the region (e.g. Jackson et al., 1998) makes UD an ideal site to learn not only about specific scientific principles present in the Next Generation Science Standards, but also the process of scientific inquiry. The VFTs are located on an interactive website dedicated to VFTs, vft

  18. The Valec fireball and predicted meteorite fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceplecha, Z.; Spurny, P.

    1987-01-01

    A fireball was photographed with a luminous trajectory below a height of 20 km. On Aug. 3, 1984, seven stations photographed this slow moving fireball, which traversed 94 km of luminous trajectory in 9.2 sec and terminated its visible flight at a height of 19.1 km. The computed dark flight trajectory intersected the surface close to Valec, a small village 40 km west of Brno. The Valec fireball was the lowest photographed fireball ever. The Valec fireball was photographed by fish eye cameras. The positional precision of all the records were within the range of 1 to 2 minutes of arc. All computations were done using the FIRBAL program, a set of almost 4000 Fortran statements run on EC 1040 computer. The average computed mass at the terminal point, i.e., the predicted mass of the biggest meteorite, was 16 kg. This number is based on the dynamical data at the terminal point solely. Visual data was also collected from occasional observers. This observed phenomenon is discussed.

  19. Third International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Third International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts (formerly Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution) was held August 5-7, 2003, at the Kloesterle, Noerdlingen. The conference addressed a wide range of topics relating to planetary impacts and their effects on planetary crusts, climate, life on Earth, rocks, and rock-forming minerals. This CD-ROM contains the preface, table of contents, program, abstracts and indexes.

  20. The organic inventory of primitive meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Zita

    Carbonaceous meteorites are primitive samples that provide crucial information about the solar system genesis and evolution. This class of meteorites has also a rich organic inventory, which may have contributed the first prebiotic building blocks of life to the early Earth. We have studied the soluble organic inventory of several CR and CM meteorites, using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD), gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Our target organic molecules include amino acids, nucleobases and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), among others. CR chondrites contain the highest amino acids concentration ever detected in a meteorite. The degree of aqueous alteration amongst this class of meteorites seems to be responsible for the amino acid distribution. Pioneering compound-specific carbon isotope measurements of nucleobases present in carbonaceous chondrites show that these compounds have a non-terrestrial origin. This suggests that components of the ge-netic code may have had a crucial role in life's origin. Investigating the abundances, distribution and isotopic composition of organic molecules in primitive meteorites significantly improves our knowledge of the chemistry of the early solar system, and the resources available for the first living organisms on Earth.

  1. Update on terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welten, K C; Nishiizumi, K; Caffee, M W

    2000-01-14

    Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites are one of the few parameters that will help us to understand the meteorite concentration mechanism on blue-ice fields. Traditionally, terrestrial ages were determined on the basis of {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase, which has an uncertainty of about 70 ky. For young meteorites (< 40 ky), the terrestrial age is usually and most accurately determined using {sup 14}C in the stone phase. In recent years two methods have been developed which are independent of shielding effects, the {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method and the {sup 41}Ca/{sup 36}Cl method. These methods have reduced the typical uncertainties in terrestrial ages by a factor of 2, to about 30 ky. The {sup 10}Be-{sup 36}Cl/{sup 10}Be method is quite dependent on the exposure age, which is unknown for most Antarctic meteorites. The authors therefore also attempt to use the relation between {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl/{sup 26}Al to derive a terrestrial age less dependent on the exposure age. The authors have measured the concentrations of cosmogenic {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al and {sup 36}Cl in the metal phase of {approximately} 70 Antarctic meteorites, from more than 10 different ice-fields, including many new ones. They then discuss the trends in terrestrial ages of meteorites from different ice-fields.

  2. Keto-acids in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G.; Chang, P. M.; Dugas, A.; Byrd, A.; Chang, P. M.; Washington, N.

    2005-01-01

    The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry and are generally used as references for organic compounds in extraterrestrial material. Among the classes of organic compounds found in these meteorites are amino acids, carboxylic acids, hydroxy acids, purines, and pyrimidines. Such compounds, important in contemporary biochemistry, are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth in asteroids and comets and may have played a role in early life and/or the origin of life. Absent among (today's) critically important biological compounds reported in carbonaceous meteorites are keto acids, i.e., pyruvic acid, acetoacetic acid, and higher homologs. These compounds are key intermediates in such critical processes as glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. In this study several individual meteoritic keto acids were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) (see figure below). All compounds were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), isopropyl ester (ISP), and tert-butyldimethylsilyl (tBDMS) derivatives. In general, the compounds follow the abiotic synthesis pattern of other known meteorite classes of organic compounds [1,2]: a general decrease in abundance with increasing carbon number within a class of compounds and many, if not all, possible isomers present at a given carbon number. The majority of the shown compounds was positively identified by comparison of their mass spectra to commercially available standards or synthesized standards.

  3. Iron and Stony-iron Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, H.; McCoy, T. J.

    2003-12-01

    Without iron and stony-iron meteorites, our chances of ever sampling the deep interior of a differentiated planetary object would be next to nil. Although we live on a planet with a very substantial core, we will never be able to sample it. Fortunately, asteroid collisions provide us with a rich sampling of the deep interiors of differentiated asteroids.Iron and stony-iron meteorites are fragments of a large number of asteroids that underwent significant geological processing in the early solar system. Parent bodies of iron and some stony-iron meteorites completed a geological evolution similar to that continuing on Earth - although on much smaller length- and timescales - with melting of the metal and silicates, differentiation into core, mantle, and crust, and probably extensive volcanism. Iron and stony-iron meteorites are our only available analogues to materials found in the deep interiors of Earth and other terrestrial planets. This fact has been recognized since the work of Chladni (1794), who argued that stony-iron meteorites must have originated in outer space and fallen during fireballs and that they provide our closest analogue to the material that comprises our own planet's core. This chapter deals with our current knowledge of these meteorites. How did they form? What can they tell us about the early evolution of the solar system and its solid bodies? How closely do they resemble the materials from planetary interiors? What do we know and don't we know?Iron and stony-iron meteorites constitute ˜6% of meteorite falls (Grady, 2000). Despite their scarcity among falls, iron meteorites are our only samples of ˜75 of the ˜135 asteroids from which meteorites originate ( Keil et al., 1994; Scott, 1979; Meibom and Clark, 1999; see also Chapter 1.05), suggesting that both differentiated asteroids and the geologic processes that produced them were common.Despite the highly evolved nature of iron and stony-iron meteorites, their chemistry provides important

  4. Classification of stony meteorites and chondrules – the case of meteorite Jesenice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Ambrožič

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the paper there is a description about genesis of meteorites, in particularly about stony meteorites– chondrites, since meteorite Jesenice is an ordinary L chondrite. Chondrules represent main part of the mass ofchondritic meteorites. For this reason the second part of the paper talks about morphology, texture, mineralogy andchemical properties of chondrules. Main theories about chondrule formation and other distinctive textures found inchondrites are also presented. The paper also presents a review across different meteorite classifications. Meteoriteclassifications differ depending on the geochemical and mineralogical properties of meteorites. In this paper are alsoused some new Slovenian terms correlated with the science of meteorites and mineral materials. Classification ofmeteorite Jesenice is based on its macroscopic and microscopic characteristics. We classified meteorite Jesenice onthe basis of shock metamorphosis, grade of weathering, petrological properties and chemical composition of olivine.We found out that meteorite Jesenice is weakly shocked weakly weathered undifferentiated low total iron ordinarychondrite. Our results are in agreement with findings of Bischoff and his colleagues.

  5. Contemporary Inuit Traditional Beliefs Concerning Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, A. A.; Mardon, E. G.; Williams, J. S.

    1992-07-01

    Inuit religious mythology and the importance of meteorites as "messages" from the Creator of all things is only now being recognized. Field investigations near Resolute, Cornwallis Island in the high Canadian Arctic in 1988 are the bases for this paper. Through interpreters, several elders of the local Inuit described in detail the Inuit belief, recognition, and wonder at the falling meteors & meteorites during the long Polar Night and Polar Day. Such events are passed on in the oral tradition from generation to generation by the elders and especially those elders who fulfill the shamanistic roles. The Inuit have come across rocks that they immediately recognize as not being "natural" and in the cases of a fall that was observed and the rock recovered the meteorite is kept either on the person or in some hidden niche known only to that person. In one story recounted a meteorite fell and was recovered at the birth of one very old elder and the belief was that if the rock was somehow damaged or taken from his possession he would die. Some indirect indication also was conveyed that the discovery and possession of meteorites allow shaman to have "supernatural" power. This belief in the supernatural power of meteorites can be seen historically in many societies, including Islam and the "black rock" (Kaaba) of Mecca. It should also be noted, however, that metallic meteorites were clearly once the major source of iron for Eskimo society as is indicated from the recovery of meteoritical iron arrow heads and harpoon heads from excavated pre-Viking contact sites. The one evident thing that became clear to the author is that the Inuit distinctly believe that these meteorites are religious objects of the highest order and it brings into question the current academic practice of sending meteorites south to research institutes. Any seeming conflict with the traditional use of meteoric iron is more apparent than real--the animals, the hunt, and the act of survival--all being

  6. Lunar and martian meteorite delivery services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1994-01-01

    Launch mechanisms for lunar and martian meteorites have been investigated, by integrating physical modeling constraints, geochemical cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) constraints, and petrologic constraints. The potential source region for lunar meteorites is remarkably small compared to the final crater volume. CRE constraints indicate that most launches start at depths of less than or equal to 3.2 m, and cratering theory implies derivation of suitably accelerated objects from a subvolume with diameter only about 0.3 x the final crater diameter. The shallow depth provenance is probably related to shock-wave interference, enhanced by the lunar regolith's extremely low compressional wave velocity. CRE constraints alone imply that four to five separate launch events are represented among the eight well-studied lunar meteorites. Most of the lunar meteorites are regolith breccias, which tend to show only limited compositional diversity within any kilometer-scale region of the Moon. Several others are polymict breccias, which also show relatively subdued compositional diversity, compared to igneous rocks. The observed diversity among these samples in terms of abundances of mare basalt and KREEP, and in Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratio, implies that among eight well-studied lunar meteorites only two potential source craters pairings are plausible: between Asuka-881757 + Y-793169 (most probable) and between Y-793274 + EET875721. Altogether, these eight lunar meteorites apparently represent at least six separate source craters, including three in the past 10(exp 5) years and five in the past 10(exp 6) years. CRE constraints imply that SNC meteorites are launched from systematically greater than lunar meteorites. SNCs are also systematically bigger, and all nine well-studied SNCs are uncommonly young (by martian standards) mafic igneous rocks. Comparison between Viking and Apollo results reveals that rocks the size of common meteorites are remarkably scarce in the martian regolith, probably due

  7. Lunar and martian meteorite delivery services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1994-10-01

    Launch mechanisms for lunar and martian meteorites have been investigated, by integrating physical modeling constraints, geochemical cosmic-ray exposure (CRE) constraints, and petrologic constraints. The potential source region for lunar meteorites is remarkably small compared to the final crater volume. CRE constraints indicate that most launches start at depths of less than or equal to 3.2 m, and cratering theory implies derivation of suitably accelerated objects from a subvolume with diameter only about 0.3 x the final crater diameter. The shallow depth provenance is probably related to shock-wave interference, enhanced by the lunar regolith's extremely low compressional wave velocity. CRE constraints alone imply that four to five separate launch events are represented among the eight well-studied lunar meteorites. Most of the lunar meteorites are regolith breccias, which tend to show only limited compositional diversity within any kilometer-scale region of the Moon. Several others are polymict breccias, which also show relatively subdued compositional diversity, compared to igneous rocks. The observed diversity among these samples in terms of abundances of mare basalt and KREEP, and in Mg/(Mg + Fe) ratio, implies that among eight well-studied lunar meteorites only two potential source craters pairings are plausible: between Asuka-881757 + Y-793169 (most probable) and between Y-793274 + EET875721. Altogether, these eight lunar meteorites apparently represent at least six separate source craters, including three in the past 105 years and five in the past 106 years. CRE constraints imply that SNC meteorites are launched from systematically greater than lunar meteorites. SNCs are also systematically bigger, and all nine well-studied SNCs are uncommonly young (by martian standards) mafic igneous rocks. Comparison between Viking and Apollo results reveals that rocks the size of common meteorites are remarkably scarce in the martian regolith, probably due to pervasive

  8. Ferromanganese – an excellent imitation of metallic meteorite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Milić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 100 anniversary of the fall of an iron meteorite in the Soča Valley (meteorite Avče, fell in 1908 theinterest in meteorites has increased substantialy in Slovenia. The number of presumed meteorite finds increasedaccordingly. Among the numerous swaps, different slag and iron minerals prevail. This paper presents a new materialwhich can be mistanken for iron meteorite, a ferromanganese alloy, which was found in the vicinity of Kropa.The vast majority of morphological characteristics and some physical properties of this alloy are very similar toiron nickel meteorite.

  9. The First Billion Years of Martian History as Seen from the SNC Meteorites: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    There are currently 28 known, distinct samples of Mars that have been liberated from that planet by impacts and subsequently delivered to the Earth. The formation ages of these samples range from 4.5 b.y. to 180 m.y. Collectively, these samples are called SNC meteorites after the major petrologic subdivisions: Shergottite, Nakhlite, Chassigny. Texturally, most of these meteorites are cumulates or partial cumulates. However, a few may represent real melt compositions: EET79001B, Y9800459, QUE94201, and the groundmass of EET79001A.

  10. The Tissint Martian meteorite as evidence for the largest impact excavation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baziotis, Ioannis P; Liu, Yang; DeCarli, Paul S; Melosh, H Jay; McSween, Harry Y; Bodnar, Robert J; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure minerals in meteorites provide clues for the impact processes that excavated, launched and delivered these samples to Earth. Most Martian meteorites are suggested to have been excavated from 3 to 7 km diameter impact craters. Here we show that the Tissint meteorite, a 2011 meteorite fall, contains virtually all the high-pressure phases (seven minerals and two mineral glasses) that have been reported in isolated occurrences in other Martian meteorites. Particularly, one ringwoodite (75 × 140 μm(2)) represents the largest grain observed in all Martian samples. Collectively, the ubiquitous high-pressure minerals of unusually large sizes in Tissint indicate that shock metamorphism was widely dispersed in this sample (~25 GPa and ~2,000 °C). Using the size and growth kinetics of the ringwoodite grains, we infer an initial impact crater with ~90 km diameter, with a factor of 2 uncertainty. These energetic conditions imply alteration of any possible low-T minerals in Tissint.

  11. Tissint martian meteorite: a fresh look at the interior, surface, and atmosphere of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoudjehane, H Chennaoui; Avice, G; Barrat, J-A; Boudouma, O; Chen, G; Duke, M J M; Franchi, I A; Gattacceca, J; Grady, M M; Greenwood, R C; Herd, C D K; Hewins, R; Jambon, A; Marty, B; Rochette, P; Smith, C L; Sautter, V; Verchovsky, A; Weber, P; Zanda, B

    2012-11-09

    Tissint (Morocco) is the fifth martian meteorite collected after it was witnessed falling to Earth. Our integrated mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical study shows that it is a depleted picritic shergottite similar to EETA79001A. Highly magnesian olivine and abundant glass containing martian atmosphere are present in Tissint. Refractory trace element, sulfur, and fluorine data for the matrix and glass veins in the meteorite indicate the presence of a martian surface component. Thus, the influence of in situ martian weathering can be unambiguously distinguished from terrestrial contamination in this meteorite. Martian weathering features in Tissint are compatible with the results of spacecraft observations of Mars. Tissint has a cosmic-ray exposure age of 0.7 ± 0.3 million years, consistent with those of many other shergottites, notably EETA79001, suggesting that they were ejected from Mars during the same event.

  12. Scientific Yield of Meteorites Recovered from the Dominion Range, Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Satterwhite, C.; Funk, R.; Harrington, R.

    2017-01-01

    The US Antarctic Meteorite Program has visited the Dominion Range in the Transantarctic Mountains during several different seasons, including the 1985, 2003, 2008, 2010, and 2014 seasons. Total recovered meteorites from this region is over 2000. The 1985 (11 samples), 2003 (141 samples), 2008 (521) and 2010 (901 samples) seasons have been fully classified, and the 2014 samples (562) are in the process of being classified and characterized. Given that close to 1500 samples have been classified so far, it seems like a good opportunity to summarize the state of the collection. Here we describe the significant samples documented from this area, as well as a large meteorite shower that dominates the statistics of the region.

  13. The SNC Meteorites Are From Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Gleason, James D.; Bogard, Donald D.

    1999-01-01

    The thirteen SNC meteorites are all igneous rocks, either basalts or basaltic cumulates. They are inferred to be from Mars, based on direct comparison with martian materials and on consistency with inferences about Mars. Most telling is that the SNC meteorites contain traces of gas which is very similar in elemental and isotopic compositions to the modem Martian atmosphere as measured by Viking. The martian atmosphere appears to be unique in the solar system, so its presence in the SNCs is accepted as virtually unequivocal proof that they formed on Mars. Independent of this link, the SNC meteorites must be from a planet with a significant atmosphere because they contain several abundant gas components, some of which carry large isotopic fractionations characteristic of atmospheric processing. The chemical compositions of the SNC meteorites are also consistent with data from in situ analyses of martian soils and rocks, and are quite different from compositions of other meteorites, rocks from the Earth, and rocks from the Moon. The range of formation ages for the SNC meteorites, 4.5 Ga to 0. 18 Ga, is consistent with the varied ages of the Martian surface (based on its cratering record) and inconsistent with surface ages on any other solar system body. The extreme chemical fractionations in the SNC meteorites suggest complex internal processes on a large planet, which is inconsistent with an asteroidal origin. Some SNCs were altered by aqueous solutions at greater than 0.7 Ga, consistent with the recent presence of liquid groundwater in Mars inferred independently from the geology of its surface. There seems little likelihood that the SNCs are not from Mars. If they were from another planetary body, it would have to be substantially identical to Mars as it now is understood.

  14. Amino acids in the Martian meteorite Nakhla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, D P; Bada, J L; Brinton, K L; McDonald, G D

    1999-08-03

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, beta-alanine, and gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (gamma-ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from meteorite soon after its fall to Earth, although it is possible that some of the amino acids are endogenous to the meteorite. The rapid amino acid contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  15. Rare meteorites common in the Ordovician period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Philipp R.; Schmitz, Birger; Bottke, William F.; Rout, Surya S.; Kita, Noriko T.; Cronholm, Anders; Defouilloy, Céline; Dronov, Andrei; Terfelt, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Most meteorites that fall today are H and L type ordinary chondrites, yet the main belt asteroids best positioned to deliver meteorites are LL chondrites 1,2 . This suggests that the current meteorite flux is dominated by fragments from recent asteroid breakup events 3,4 and therefore is not representative over longer (100-Myr) timescales. Here we present the first reconstruction of the composition of the background meteorite flux to Earth on such timescales. From limestone that formed about one million years before the breakup of the L-chondrite parent body 466 Myr ago, we have recovered relict minerals from coarse micrometeorites. By elemental and oxygen-isotopic analyses, we show that before 466 Myr ago, achondrites from different asteroidal sources had similar or higher abundances than ordinary chondrites. The primitive achondrites, such as lodranites and acapulcoites, together with related ungrouped achondrites, made up ~15-34% of the flux compared with only ~0.45% today. Another group of abundant achondrites may be linked to a 500-km cratering event on (4) Vesta that filled the inner main belt with basaltic fragments a billion years ago 5 . Our data show that the meteorite flux has varied over geological time as asteroid disruptions create new fragment populations that then slowly fade away from collisional and dynamical evolution. The current flux favours disruption events that are larger, younger and/or highly efficient at delivering material to Earth.

  16. The Microbiological Contamination of Meteorites: A Null Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, A.; Toporski, J. K. W.; Westall, F. W.; Thomas-Keprta, K.; Gibson, E. K.; Avci, R.; Whitby, C.; McKay, D. S.; Griffin, C.

    2000-01-01

    Using 4 different techniques we have studied 9 meteorites including the Martian meteorites ALH84001 and Nakhla for terrestrial contamination in all 9 we have found evidence of terrestrial microorganisms.

  17. Hyperfine Interactions in Iron Meteorites: Comparative Study by Moessbauer Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshtrakh, M. I., E-mail: oshtrakh@mail.utnet.ru [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Milder, O. B. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Grokhovsky, V. I. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Physical Techniques and Devices for Quality Control (Russian Federation); Semionkin, V. A. [Ural State Technical University - UPI, Faculty of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2004-11-15

    The iron meteorites Sikhote-Alin, Bilibino, Chinga and Dronino with different Ni concentration and terrestrial age were studied by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Different Moessbauer hyperfine parameters were determined for studied meteorites and possible Fe-Ni phases were supposed.

  18. Candidate Source Regions for SNC Meteorites on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ody, A.; Poulet, F.; Quantin, C.; Cannon, K. M.; Mustard, J. F.; Bibring, J.-P.

    2014-07-01

    We compare NIR spectra of various SNC meteorites with NIR OMEGA spectra in order to constrain the types of geological settings in which martian meteorite analogue rocks could have formed, as well as their apparent age and their representativeness.

  19. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan; Bottke, William; Cloutis, Ed; Izawa, Matt; O'Brien, Dave; Mann, Paul; Cuddy, Matt; Corre, Lucille Le; Gaffey, Michael; Fujihara, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the spectral and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its possible parent body in the main asteroid belt. Our analysis shows that the meteorite contains two spectrally distinct but compositionally indistinguishable components of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material. Our X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk meteorite are extremely similar in modal mineralogy. The meteorite is compositionally s...

  20. Noble Gases in the Lunar Meteorites Calcalong Creek and QUE 93069

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindle, T. D.; Burkland, M. K.; Grier, J. A.

    1995-09-01

    Although the world's collections contain comparable numbers of martian and lunar meteorites (about 10 each), their ejection histories seem to be quite different [1]. We have sampled no more than four martian craters, but almost every one of the lunar meteorites apparently represents a separate cratering event. Furthermore, most lunar meteorites were apparently ejected from the top meter of the surface, unlike any of the martian meteorites. We have measured noble gases in two bulk samples of the lunar meteorite QUE93069 and three of Calcalong Creek, ranging in size from 7 to 15 mg. Averaged results are given in Table 1. Both meteorites contain solar-wind-implanted noble gas. QUE 93069, which is a mature anorthositic regolith breccia [2], contains amounts comparable to the most gas-rich lunar meteorites. The relatively low 40Ar/36Ar ratios of both meteorites suggest surface exposures no more than 2.5 Ga ago [3]. Calcalong Creek has readily observable spallogenic gas. The 131Xe/126Xe ratio of 4.8+/-0.3 corresponds to an average shielding depth of slightly more than 40 gm/cm^2 [4]. In common with many lunar breccias, Calcalong Creek has been exposed to cosmic rays for several hundred Ma (calculations based on [4] and [5]). The 3He apparent exposure age is much shorter, suggesting diffusive loss of He. To determine the detailed exposure history, it is necessary to have measurements of cosmogenic radionuclides. Our samples were too small to measure 81Kr, but [6] have measured 10Be, 26Al and 36Cl. Their data are consistent with either extended exposure at MAC 88104/5 [1], but the chemical differences between the two make it highly unlikely that they come from the same event. It is difficult to determine the amount of spallogenic gas in QUE 93069 because of the huge solar wind signature. However, a few isotopes that are normally dominated by spallation (3He, 21Ne, 80Kr and 126Xe) are enhanced by >1 sigma over solar wind values, although in every case the spallogenic gas is

  1. LEW88516 and SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    We report on the isotopic composition of Pb and the concentration of Pb, U, and Th in a sample of LEW88516 (LEW). LEW was a 13-g stone recovered from Antarctica and was classified as a new member of the Shergottite group. This work was undertaken with the hope that LEW might yield new information to elucidate further the origin and evolution of Shergottites and other SNC meteorites. We have previously studied U-Th-Pb in other Shergottites, namely Shergotty, Zagami, EETA79001, and ALHA77005, as well as Nakhla. The results indicate that the initial leads of these Shergottites were well defined, were distinct from each other, and have high Pb-204/Pb-206 (from 0.0652 to 0.0739). These leads evolved in different reservoirs over most of solar system history in a low U-238/Pb-204(micro) is approximately equal to 5 environment. The U-Th-Pb isotopic systems are quite regular, which unambiguously indicates an event of U-Th-Pb fractionation at approximately 200 m.y. The details of the data arrays are complex. The young age is in general agreement with some of the ages obtained by other methods, but precise concordance between the different methods is not established. The new results on LEW are remarkably similar to those of ALHA77005 and support the other observations based on the mineralogy, petrology, and bulk composition. The clear distinction between the Shergottites and Nakhla is confirmed. We consider that the Shergottites and possibly all the SNC's were derived from an impact on the regolith of a differentiated terrestrial type planetary body (Mars?) with a high content of volatiles as compared to the earth.

  2. Amino Acids in the Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Bada, Jeffrey L.; Brinton, Karen L. F.; McDonald, Gene D.

    1999-08-01

    A suite of protein and nonprotein amino acids were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography in the water- and acid-soluble components of an interior fragment of the Martian meteorite Nakhla, which fell in Egypt in 1911. Aspartic and glutamic acids, glycine, alanine, β -alanine, and γ -amino-n-butyric acid (γ -ABA) were the most abundant amino acids detected and were found primarily in the 6 M HCl-hydrolyzed, hot water extract. The concentrations ranged from 20 to 330 parts per billion of bulk meteorite. The amino acid distribution in Nakhla, including the D/L ratios (values range from contamination of Martian meteorites after direct exposure to the terrestrial environment has important implications for Mars sample-return missions and the curation of the samples from the time of their delivery to Earth.

  3. Meteorites: messengers from the early solar system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Beda A

    2010-01-01

    Meteorites are fragments from solar system bodies, dominantly asteroids. A small fraction is derived from the Moon and from Mars. These rocks tell a rich history of the early solar system and range from solids little changed since the earliest phases of solid matter condensation in the solar nebula (chondrites) to material representing asteroidal metamorphism and melting, impact processes on the Moon and even aqueous alteration near the surface of Mars. Meteorites are very rare. Currently many meteorites result from searches in Antarctica and the hot deserts of North Africa and Arabia. The present high find rate likely represents a unique short-term event, asking for a careful management of this scarce scientific resource.

  4. The source crater of martian shergottite meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Stephanie C; Ody, Anouck; Poulet, François

    2014-03-21

    Absolute ages for planetary surfaces are often inferred by crater densities and only indirectly constrained by the ages of meteorites. We show that the meteorites classified as shergottites. Shergottites and this crater are linked by their coinciding meteorite ejection ages and the crater formation age and by mineralogical constraints. Because Mojave formed on 4.3 billion-year-old terrain, the original crystallization ages of shergottites are old, as inferred by Pb-Pb isotope ratios, and the much-quoted shergottite ages of <600 million years are due to resetting. Thus, the cratering-based age determination method for Mars is now calibrated in situ, and it shifts the absolute age of the oldest terrains on Mars backward by 200 million years.

  5. Age determination of meteorites using radioactive nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimizu, Masaharu [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Recently, the precise isotope ratios of some refractory elements in meteorites have been reported using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The in situ decay of {sup 182}Hf (T{sub 1/2}=9 Myr), which was produced at the latest nucleosynthesis, is recognized in many meteorites as isotopic anomalies of its daughter isotope, {sup 182}W. The degrees of relative {sup 182}W isotopic deviation in extra-terrestrial and terrestrial silicate samples vary from +0.3% to {+-}0% related to the size of their parent bodies. One ready interpretation of its correlation is the difference in timing of metal-silicate separation in the parent bodies. Between the earth and meteorite parent bodies, the difference is calculated to be about four times of the half-life of {sup 182}Hf, equivalent to 36 Myr. (author)

  6. Amino Acid Degradation after Meteoritic Impact Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, M.; Westall, F.; vanderGaast, S.; Vilas, F.; Hoerz, F.; Barnes, G.; Chabin, A.; Brack, A.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are among the most important prebiotic molecules as it is from these precursors that the building blocks of life were formed [1]. Although organic molecules were among the components of the planetesimals making up the terrestrial planets, large amounts of primitive organic precursor molecules are believed to be exogenous in origin and to have been imported to the Earth via micrometeorites, carbonaceous meteorites and comets, especially during the early stages of the formation of the Solar System [1,2]. Our study concerns the hypothesis that prebiotic organic matter, present on Earth, was synthesized in the interstellar environment, and then imported to Earth by meteorites or micrometeorites. We are particularly concerned with the formation and fate of amino acids. We have already shown that amino acid synthesis is possible inside cometary grains under interstellar environment conditions [3]. We are now interested in the effects of space conditions and meteoritic impact on these amino acids [4-6]. Most of the extraterrestrial organic molecules known today have been identified in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites [7]. One of the components of these meteorites is a clay with a composition close to that of saponite, used in our experiments. Two American teams have studied the effects of impact on various amino acids [8,9]. [8] investigated amino acids in saturated solution in water with pressure ranges between 5.1 and 21 GPa and temperature ranges between 412 and 870 K. [9] studied amino acids in solid form associated with and without minerals (Murchison and Allende meteorite extracts) and pressure ranges between 3 and 30 GPa. In these two experiments, the amino acids survived up to 15 GPa. At higher pressure, the quantity of preserved amino acids decreases quickly. Some secondary products such as dipeptides and diketopiperazins were identified in the [8] experiment.

  7. Catalogue of meteorites from South America

    CERN Document Server

    Acevedo, Rogelio Daniel; García, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The first Catalogue of Meteorites from South America includes new specimens never previously reported, while doubtful cases and pseudometeorites have been deliberately omitted.The falling of these objects is a random event, but the sites where old meteorites are found tend to be focused in certain areas, e.g. in the deflation surfaces in Chile's Atacama Desert, due to favorable climate conditions and ablation processes.Our Catalogue provides basic information on each specimen like its provenance and the place where it was discovered (in geographic co-ordinates and with illustrative maps), its

  8. Panspermia: Evidence from Astronomy to Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, J.; Wallis, D. H.

    The theory of cometary panspermia is reviewed in relation to evidence from astronomy, biology, and recent studies of meteorites. The spectroscopic signatures in interstellar material within our galaxy and in external galaxies that have been known for many years most plausibly represent evidence for the detritus of life existing on a cosmic scale. Such spectral features discovered in galaxies of high redshift points to life arising at a very early stage in the history of the Universe. Evidence of fossils of microscopic life forms in meteorites that have been discussed over several decades, and augmented recently with new data, reaffirms the case for cometary panspermia.

  9. Fossil Diatoms in a New Carbonaceous Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramasinghe, N. C.; Wallis, J.; Wallis, D. H.; Samaranayake, Anil

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery for the first time of diatom frustules in a carbonaceous meteorite that fell in the North Central Province of Sri Lanka on 29 December 2012. Contamination is excluded by the circumstance that the elemental abundances within the structures match closely with those of the surrounding matrix. There is also evidence of structures morphologically similar to red rain cells that may have contributed to the episode of red rain that followed within days of the meteorite fall. The new data on "fossil" diatoms provide strong evidence to support the theory of cometary panspermia.

  10. Microfossils of Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopes have been used at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center to investigate freshly fractured interior surfaces of a large number of different types of meteorites. Large, complex, microfossils with clearly recognizable biological affinities have been found embedded in several carbonaceous meteorites. Similar forms were notably absent in all stony and nickel-iron meteorites investigated. The forms encountered are consistent in size and morphology with morphotypes of known genera of Cyanobacteria and microorganisms that are typically encountered in associated benthic prokaryotic mats. Even though many coccoidal and isodiametric filamentous cyanobacteria have a strong morphological convergence with some other spherical and filamentous bacteria and algae, many genera of heteropolar cyanobacteria have distinctive apical and basal regions and cellular differentiation that makes it possible to unambiguously recognize the forms based entirely upon cellular dimensions, filament size and distinctive morphological characteristics. For almost two centuries, these morphological characteristics have historically provided the basis for the systematics and taxonomy of cyanobacteria. This paper presents ESEM and FESEM images of embedded filaments and thick mats found in-situ in the Murchison CM2 and Orgueil cn carbonaceous meteorites. Comparative images are also provided for known genera and species of cyanobacteria and other microbial extremophiles. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) studies indicate that the meteorite filaments typically exhibit dramatic chemical differentiation with distinctive difference between the possible microfossil and the meteorite matrix in the immediate proximity. Chemical differentiation is also observed within these microstructures with many of the permineralized filaments enveloped within electron transparent carbonaceous sheaths. Elemental distributions of

  11. Extraterrestrial nucleobases in the Murchison meteorite

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Zita; Fogel, Marilyn L; Sephton, Mark A; Glavin, Daniel P; Watson, Jonathan S; Dworkin, Jason P; Schwartz, Alan W; Ehrenfreund, Pascale

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-rich meteorites, carbonaceous chondrites, contain many biologically relevant organic molecules and delivered prebiotic material to the young Earth. We present compound-specific carbon isotope data indicating that measured purine and pyrimidine compounds are indigenous components of the Murchison meteorite. Carbon isotope ratios for uracil and xanthine of delta13C=+44.5per mil and +37.7per mil, respectively, indicate a non-terrestrial origin for these compounds. These new results demonstrate that organic compounds, which are components of the genetic code in modern biochemistry, were already present in the early solar system and may have played a key role in life's origin.

  12. Meteorites from Phobos and Deimos at Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegert, P.; Galiazzo, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    We examine the conditions under which material from the martian moons Phobos and Deimos could reach our planet in the form of meteorites. We find that the necessary ejection speeds from these moons (900 and 600 m/s for Phobos and Deimos respectively) are much smaller than from Mars' surface (5000 m/s). These speeds are below typical impact speeds for asteroids and comets (10-40 km/s) at Mars' orbit, and we conclude that delivery of meteorites from Phobos and Deimos to the Earth can occur.

  13. Overview of Mars: SNC meteorite results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waenke, H.

    1988-01-01

    The SNC meteorites according to their oxygen isotope ratios and various trace element ratios form a distinct group of 8 achondrites. Their young crystallization ages and fractionated REE pattern which exclude an asteroidal origin, were the first observations to point towards Mars as their parent body. In spite of the many arguments for Mars as the parent body of the SNC meteorites there does not exist a generally accepted model for the ejecting process and other dynamical problems involved. In this discussion it is, however, assumed that Mars is the SNC parent body. The chemical composition of Mars is examined.

  14. Martian parent craters for the SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Mccoy, T. J.; Taylor, G. J.; Keil, K.

    1992-01-01

    Information on the petrology and ages of the SNC meteorites, together with geological data derived from Viking Orbiter images, are used to identify 25 candidate impact craters in the Tharsis region of Mars that could possibly be the source craters for these meteorites. The craters chosen as candidate source craters had diameters greater than 10 km, morphologies indicative of young craters, and satisfied both the petrological criteria of the SNCs and the proposed 1.3 Ga crystallization ages. On the basis of the constraints implied by the identification of the candidate source craters, interpretations of the absolute chronology of Mars are proposed.

  15. High-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Naotaka; Miyahara, Masaaki

    2017-09-01

    Heavily shocked meteorites contain various types of high-pressure polymorphs of major minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar, and quartz) and accessory minerals (chromite and Ca phosphate). These high-pressure minerals are micron to submicron sized and occur within and in the vicinity of shock-induced melt veins and melt pockets in chondrites and lunar, howardite-eucrite-diogenite (HED), and Martian meteorites. Their occurrence suggests two types of formation mechanisms (1) solid-state high-pressure transformation of the host-rock minerals into monomineralic polycrystalline aggregates, and (2) crystallization of chondritic or monomineralic melts under high pressure. Based on experimentally determined phase relations, their formation pressures are limited to the pressure range up to 25 GPa. Textural, crystallographic, and chemical characteristics of high-pressure minerals provide clues about the impact events of meteorite parent bodies, including their size and mutual collision velocities and about the mineralogy of deep planetary interiors. The aim of this article is to review and summarize the findings on natural high-pressure minerals in shocked meteorites that have been reported over the past 50 years.

  16. THE NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF METEORITIC HCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    HCN is ubiquitous in extraterrestrial environments and is central to current theories on the origin of early solar system organic compounds such as amino acids. These compounds, observed in carbonaceous meteorites, were likely important in the origin and/or evolution of early life. As part of our attempts to understand the origin(s) of meteoritic CN{sup –}, we have analyzed the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N isotopic composition of HCN gas released from water extracts of the Murchison meteorite and found its value to be near those of the terrestrial atmosphere. The findings, when evaluated viz-a-viz molecular abundances and isotopic data of meteoritic organic compounds, suggest that HCN formation could have occurred during the protracted water alteration processes known to have affected the mineralogy of many asteroidal bodies during their solar residence. This was an active synthetic stage, which likely involved simple gasses, organic molecules, their presolar precursors, as well as mineral catalysts and would have lead to the formation of molecules of differing isotopic composition, including some with solar values.

  17. ORIGIN OF EXCESS (176)Hf IN METEORITES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James Norman; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  18. The Germanium Dichotomy in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M.; Yang, S.; Righter, K.; Zanda, B.; Hewins, R. H.

    2016-01-01

    Germanium is a moderately volatile and siderophile element that follows silicon in its compatibility during partial melting of planetary mantles. Despite its obvious usefulness in planetary geochemistry germanium is not analyzed routinely, with there being only three prior studies reporting germanium abundances in Martian meteorites. The broad range (1-3 ppm) observed in Martian igneous rocks is in stark contrast to the narrow range of germanium observed in terrestrial basalts (1.5 plus or minus 0.1 ppm). The germanium data from these studies indicates that nakhlites contain 2-3 ppm germanium, while shergottites contain approximately 1 ppm germanium, a dichotomy with important implications for core formation models. There have been no reliable germanium abundances on chassignites. The ancient meteoritic breccia, NWA 7533 (and paired meteorites) contains numerous clasts, some pristine and some impact melt rocks, that are being studied individually. Because germanium is depleted in the Martian crust relative to chondritic impactors, it has proven useful as an indicator of meteoritic contamination of impact melt clasts in NWA 7533. The germanium/silicon ratio can be applied to minerals that might not partition nickel and iridium, like feldspars. We report germanium in minerals from the 3 known chassignites, 2 nakhlites and 5 shergottites by LAICP- MS using a method optimized for precise germanium analysis.

  19. Indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Martins, Z; Orzechowska, G E; Fogel, M L; Ehrenfreund, P

    2008-01-01

    CR meteorites are among the most primitive meteorites. In this paper, we report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites, two of which show the highest amino acid concentrations ever found in a chondrite. EET92042, GRA95229 and GRO95577 were analyzed for their amino acid content using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatographymass spectrometry (GC-MS). Our data show that EET92042 and GRA95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations ranging from 180 parts-per-million (ppm) to 249 ppm. GRO95577, however, is depleted in amino acids. The most abundant amino acids present in the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites are the alpha-amino acids glycine, isovaline, alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), and alanine, with delta13C values ranging from +31.6per mil to +50.5per mil. The carbon isotope results together with racemic enantiomeric ratios determined for most amino acids strongly i...

  20. Origin of igneous meteorites and differentiated asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, E.; Goldstein, J.; Asphaug, E.; Bottke, W.; Moskovitz, N.; Keil, K.

    2014-07-01

    Introduction: Igneously formed meteorites and asteroids provide major challenges to our understanding of the formation and evolution of the asteroid belt. The numbers and types of differentiated meteorites and non-chondritic asteroids appear to be incompatible with an origin by fragmentation of numerous Vesta-like bodies by hypervelocity impacts in the asteroid belt over 4 Gyr. We lack asteroids and achondrites from the olivine-rich mantles of the parent bodies of the 12 groups of iron meteorites and the ˜70 ungrouped irons, the 2 groups of pallasites and the 4--6 ungrouped pallasites. We lack mantle and core samples from the parent asteroids of the basaltic achondrites that do not come from Vesta, viz., angrites and the ungrouped eucrites like NWA 011 and Ibitira. How could core samples have been extracted from numerous differentiated bodies when Vesta's basaltic crust was preserved? Where is the missing Psyche family of differentiated asteroids including the complementary mantle and crustal asteroids [1]? Why are meteorites derived from far more differentiated parent bodies than chondritic parent bodies even though C and S class chondritic asteroids dominate the asteroid belt? New paradigm. Our studies of meteorites, impact modeling, and dynamical studies suggest a new paradigm in which differentiated asteroids accreted at 1--2 au less than 2 Myr after CAI formation [2]. They were rapidly melted by 26Al and disrupted by hit-and-run impacts [3] while still molten or semi-molten when planetary embryos were accreting. Metallic Fe-Ni bodies derived from core material cooled rapidly with little or no silicate insulation less than 4 Myr after CAI formation [4]. Fragments of differentiated planetesimals were subsequently tossed into the asteroid belt. Meteorite evidence for early disruption of differentiated asteroids. If iron meteorites were samples of Fe-Ni cores of bodies that cooled slowly inside silicate mantles over ˜50--100 Myr, irons from each core would have

  1. Meteorite and meteoroid: New comprehensive definitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, A.E.; Grossman, J.N.

    2010-01-01

    Meteorites have traditionally been defined as solid objects that have fallen to Earth from space. This definition, however, is no longer adequate. In recent decades, man-made objects have fallen to Earth from space, meteorites have been identified on the Moon and Mars, and small interplanetary objects have impacted orbiting spacecraft. Taking these facts and other potential complications into consideration, we offer new comprehensive definitions of the terms "meteorite,""meteoroid," and their smaller counterparts: A meteoroid is a 10-??m to 1-m-size natural solid object moving in interplanetary space. A micrometeoroid is a meteoroid 10 ??m to 2 mm in size. A meteorite is a natural, solid object larger than 10 ??m in size, derived from a celestial body, that was transported by natural means from the body on which it formed to a region outside the dominant gravitational influence of that body and that later collided with a natural or artificial body larger than itself (even if it is the same body from which it was launched). Weathering and other secondary processes do not affect an object's status as a meteorite as long as something recognizable remains of its original minerals or structure. An object loses its status as a meteorite if it is incorporated into a larger rock that becomes a meteorite itself. A micrometeorite is a meteorite between 10 ??m and 2 mm in size. Meteorite- "a solid substance or body falling from the high regions of the atmosphere" (Craig 1849); "[a] mass of stone and iron that ha[s] been directly observed to have fallen down to the Earth's surface" (translated from Cohen 1894); "[a] solid bod[y] which came to the earth from space" (Farrington 1915); "A mass of solid matter, too small to be considered an asteroid; either traveling through space as an unattached unit, or having landed on the earth and still retaining its identity" (Nininger 1933); "[a meteoroid] which has reached the surface of the Earth without being vaporized" (1958

  2. Chiral Biomarkers and Microfossils in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-01-01

    Homochirality of the biomolecules (D-sugars of DNA and RNA and L-amino acids of proteins) is a fundamental property of all life on Earth. Abiotic mechanisms yield racemic mixtures (D/L=1) of chiral molecules and after the death of an organism, the enantiopure chiral biomolecules slowly racemize. Several independent investigators have now established that the amino acids present in CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites have a moderate to strong excess of the L-enantiomer. Stable isotope data have established that these amino acids are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain many other strong chemical biomarkers including purines and pyrimidines (nitrogen heterocycles of nucleic acids); pristine and phytane (components of the chlorophyll pigment) and morphological biomarkers (microfossils of filamentous cyanobacteria). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis reveals that nitrogen is below the detectability level in most of the meteorite filaments as well as in Cambrian Trilobites and filaments of 2.7 Gya Archaean cyanobacteria from Karelia. The deficiency of nitrogen in the filaments and the total absence of sugars, of twelve of the life-critical protein amino acids, and two of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA provide clear and convincing evidence that these filaments are not modern biological contaminants. This paper reviews the chiral, chemical biomarkers morphological biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites. This paper reviews chiral and morphological biomarkers and discusses the missing nitrogen, sugars, protein amino acids, and nucleobases as ?bio-discriminators? that exclude modern biological contaminants as a possible explanation for the permineralized cyanobacterial filaments found in the meteorites.

  3. Chiral biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2010-09-01

    Homochirality of the biomolecules (D-sugars of DNA and RNA and L-amino acids of proteins) is a fundamental property of all life on Earth. Abiotic mechanisms yield racemic mixtures (D/L=1) of chiral molecules and after the death of an organism, the enantiopure chiral biomolecules slowly racemize. Several independent investigators have now established that the amino acids present in CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites have a moderate to strong excess of the L-enantiomer. Stable isotope data have established that these amino acids are both indigenous and extraterrestrial. Carbonaceous meteorites also contain many other strong chemical biomarkers including purines and pyrimidines (nitrogen heterocycles of nucleic acids); pristine and phytane (components of the chlorophyll pigment) and morphological biomarkers (microfossils of filamentous cyanobacteria). Energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analysis reveals that nitrogen is below the detectability level in most of the meteorite filaments as well as in Cambrian Trilobites and filaments of 2.7 Gya Archaean cyanobacteria from Karelia. The deficiency of nitrogen in the filaments and the total absence of sugars, of twelve of the life-critical protein amino acids, and two of the nucleobases of DNA and RNA provide clear and convincing evidence that these filaments are not modern biological contaminants. This paper reviews the chiral, chemical biomarkers morphological biomarkers and microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites. This paper reviews chiral and morphological biomarkers and discusses the missing nitrogen, sugars, protein amino acids, and nucleobases as "bio-discriminators" that exclude modern biological contaminants as a possible explanation for the permineralized cyanobacterial filaments found in the meteorites.

  4. The 10Be contents of SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, D. K.; Tuniz, C.; Moniot, R. K.; Savin, W.; Vajda, S.; Kruse, T.; Herzog, G. F.

    1986-01-01

    Several authors have explored the possibility that the Shergottites, Nakhlites, and Chassigny (SNC) came from Mars. The spallogenic gas contents of the SNC meteorites have been used to: constrain the sizes of the SNC's during the last few million years; to establish groupings independent of the geochemical ones; and to estimate the likelihood of certain entries in the catalog of all conceivable passages from Mars to Earth. The particular shielding dependence of Be-10 makes the isotope a good probe of the irradiation conditions experienced by the SNC meteorites. The Be-10 contents of nine members of the group were measured using the technique of accelerator mass spectrometry. The Be-10 contents of Nakhla, Governador Valadares, Chassigny, and probably Lafayette, about 20 dpm/kg, exceed the values expected from irradiation of the surface of a large body. The Be-10 data therfore do not support scenario III of Bogard et al., one in which most of the Be-10 in the SNC meteorites would have formed on the Martian surface; they resemble rather the Be-10 contents found in many ordinary chondrites subjected to 4 Pi exposures. The uncertainties of the Be-10 contents lead to appreciable errors in the Be-10 ages, t(1) = -1/lambda ln(1 Be-10/Be-10). Nonetheless, the Be-10 ages are consistent with the Ne-21 ages calculated assuming conventional, small-body production rates and short terrestrial ages for the finds. It is believed that this concordance strengthens the case for at least 3 different irradiation ages for the SNC meteorites. Given the similar half-thicknesses of the Be-10 and Ne-21 production rates, the ratios of the Be-10 and Ne-21 contents do not appear consistent with common ages for any of the groups. In view of the general agreement between the Be-10 and Ne-21 ages it does not seem useful at this time to construct multiple-stage irradiation histories for the SNC meteorites.

  5. Organic Matter from Comet 81p/Wild 2, IDPS and Carbonaceous Meteorites; Similarities and Differences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirick, S.; Flynn, G; Keller, L; Nakamura Messenger, K; Peltzer, C; Jacobsen, C; Sandford, S; Zolensky, M

    2009-01-01

    During preliminary examination of 81P/Wild 2 particles collected by the NASA Stardust spacecraft, we analyzed seven, sulfur embedded and ultramicrotomed particles extracted from five different tracks. Sections were analyzed using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (SXTM) and carbon X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were collected. We compared the carbon XANES spectra of these Wild 2 samples with a database of spectra on thirty-four interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and with several meteorites. Two of the particles analyzed are iron sulfides and there is evidence that an aliphatic compound associated with these particles can survive high temperatures. An iron sulfide from an IDP demonstrates the same phenomenon. Another, mostly carbon free containing particle radiation damaged, something we have not observed in any IDPs we have analyzed or any indigenous organic matter from the carbonaceous meteorites, Tagish Lake, Orgueil, Bells and Murchison. The carbonaceous material associated with this particle showed no mass loss during the initial analysis but chemically changed over a period of two months. The carbon XANES spectra of the other four particles varied more than spectra from IDPs and indigenous organic matter from meteorites. Comparison of the carbon XANES spectra from these particles with 1. the carbon XANES spectra from thirty-four IDPs (<15 micron in size) and 2. the carbon XANES spectra from carbonaceous material from the Tagish Lake, Orgueil, Bells, and Murchison meteorites show that 81P/Wild 2 carbon XANES spectra are more similar to IDP carbon XANES spectra then to the carbon XANES spectra of meteorites.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and amino acids in meteorites and ice samples from LaPaz Icefield, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botta, O.; Martins, Z.; Emmenegger, C.; Dworkin, J. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Harvey, R. P.; Zenobi, R.; Bada, J. L.; Ehrenfreund, P.

    2008-11-01

    We have analyzed ice samples and meteorites from the LaPaz region of Antarctica to investigate the composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and amino acids with the goal to understand whether or not there is a compositional relationship between the two reservoirs. Four LL5 ordinary chondrites (OCs) and one CK carbonaceous chondrite were collected as part of the 2003/2004 ANSMET season. Ice samples collected from directly underneath the meteorites were extracted. In addition, exhaust particles from the snowmobiles used during the expedition were collected to investigate possible contributions from this source. The meteorite samples, the particulate matter and solid-state extracts of the ice samples and the exhaust filters were subjected to two-step laser mass spectrometry (L2MS) to investigate the PAH composition. For amino acids analysis, the meteorites were extracted with water and acid hydrolyzed, and the extracts were analyzed with offline OPA/NAC derivatization combined with liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection and time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS). PAHs in the particulate matter of the ice were found to be qualitatively similar to the meteorite samples, indicating that micron-sized grains of the meteorite may be embedded in the ice samples. The concentration levels of dissolved PAHs in all the ice samples were found to be below the detection limit of the L2MS. The PAH composition of the snowmobile exhaust is significantly different to the one in particulate matter, making it an unlikely source of contamination for Antarctic meteorites. The amino acids glycine, β-alanine and γ-amino-n-butyric acid that were detected at concentrations of 3 to 19 parts per billion (ppb) are probably indigenous to the Antarctic meteorites. Some of the LaPaz ice samples were also found to contain amino acids at concentration levels of 1 to 33 parts per trillion (ppt), in particular α-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), an abundant non

  7. Identifying meteorite source regions through near-Earth object spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Cristina A.; Binzel, Richard P.

    2010-02-01

    By virtue of their landing on Earth, meteorites reside in near-Earth object (NEO) orbits prior to their arrival. Thus the population of observable NEOs, in principle, gives important representation of meteorite source bodies. By linking meteorites to NEOs, and linking NEOs to their most likely main-belt source locations, we seek to gain insight into the original Solar System formation locations for different meteorite classes. To forge possible links between meteorites and NEOs, we have developed a three dimensional method for quantitative comparisons between laboratory measurements of meteorites and telescopic measurements of near-Earth objects. We utilize meteorite spectra from the Reflectance Experiment Laboratory (RELAB) database and NEO data from the SpeX instrument on the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF). Using the Modified Gaussian Model (MGM) as a mathematical tool, we treat asteroid and meteorite spectra identically in the calculation of 1-μm and 2-μm Geometric Band Centers and their Band Area Ratios (BARs). Using these identical numerical parameters we quantitatively compare the spectral properties of S-, Sq-, Q- and V-type NEOs with the spectral properties of the meteorites in four classes: H, L, LL and HED. For each NEO spectrum, we assign a set of probabilities for it being related to each of these four meteorite classes. Our NEO-meteorite correlation probabilities are then convolved with NEO-source region probabilities to yield a final set of meteorite-source region correlations. While the ν6 resonance dominates the delivery for all four meteorite classes, an excess (significant at the 2.1-sigma level) source region signature is found for the H chondrites through the 3:1 mean motion resonance. This results suggest an H chondrite source with a higher than average delivery preference through the 3:1 resonance. A 3:1 resonance H chondrite source region is consistent with the short cosmic ray exposure ages known for H chondrites.

  8. Analysis of Chiral Carboxylic Acids in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Hein, J. E.; Aponte, J. C.; Parker, E. T.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Homochirality of amino acids in proteins and sugars in DNA and RNA is a critical feature of life on Earth. In the absence of a chiral driving force, however, reactions leading to the synthesis of amino acids and sugars result in racemic mixtures. It is currently unknown whether homochirality was necessary for the origins of life or if it was a product of early life. The observation of enantiomeric excesses of certain amino acids of extraterrestrial origins in meteorites provides evidence to support the hypothesis that there was a mechanism for the preferential synthesis or destruction of a particular amino acid enantiomer [e.g., 1-3]. The cause of the observed chiral excesses is un-clear, although at least in the case of the amino acid isovaline, the degree of aqueous alteration that occurred on the meteorite parent body is correlated to the isovaline L-enantiomeric excess [3, 4]. This suggests that chiral symmetry is broken and/or amplified within the meteorite parent bodies. Besides amino acids, there have been only a few reports of other meteoritic compounds found in enantiomeric excess: sugars and sugar acids [5, 6] and the hydroxy acid lactic acid [7]. Determining whether or not additional types of molecules in meteorites are also present in enantiomeric excesses of extraterrestrial information will provide insights into mechanisms for breaking chiral symmetry. Though the previous measurements (e.g., enantiomeric composition of lactic acid [7], and chiral carboxylic acids [8]) were made by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, the potential for increased sensitivity of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analyses is important because for many meteorite samples, only small sample masses are available for study. Furthermore, at least in the case of amino acids, many of the largest amino acid enantiomeric excesses were observed in samples that contained lower abundances (tens of ppb) of a given amino acid enantiomer. In the present work, we describe

  9. Magnetic tests for magnetosome chains in Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Kim, Soon Sam; Kirschvink, Joseph L; Kopp, Robert E; Sankaran, Mohan; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Komeili, Arash

    2004-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies have been used to argue that magnetite crystals in carbonate from Martian meteorite ALH84001 have a composition and morphology indistinguishable from that of magnetotactic bacteria. It has even been claimed from scanning electron microscopy imaging that some ALH84001 magnetite crystals are aligned in chains. Alignment of magnetosomes in chains is perhaps the most distinctive of the six crystallographic properties thought to be collectively unique to magnetofossils. Here we use three rock magnetic techniques, low-temperature cycling, the Moskowitz test, and ferromagnetic resonance, to sense the bulk composition and crystallography of millions of ALH84001 magnetite crystals. The magnetic data demonstrate that although the magnetite is unusually pure and fine-grained in a manner similar to terrestrial magnetofossils, most or all of the crystals are not arranged in chains.

  10. Life on Mars: chemical arguments and clues from Martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, A; Pillinger, C T

    1998-08-01

    Primitive terrestrial life-defined as a chemical system able to transfer its molecular information via self-replication and to evolve-probably originated from the evolution of reduced organic molecules in liquid water. Several sources have been proposed for the prebiotic organic molecules: terrestrial primitive atmosphere (methane or carbon dioxide), deep-sea hydrothermal systems, and extraterrestrial meteoritic and cometary dust grains. The study of carbonaceous chondrites, which contain up to 5% by weight of organic matter, has allowed close examination of the delivery of extraterrestrial organic material. Eight proteinaceous amino acids have been identified in the Murchison meteorite among more than 70 amino acids. Engel reported that L-alanine was surprisingly more abundant than D-alanine in the Murchison meteorite. Cronin also found excesses of L-enantiomers for nonprotein amino acids. A large collection of micrometeorites has been recently extracted from Antarctic old blue ice. In the 50- to 100-micron size range, carbonaceous micrometeorites represent 80% of the samples and contain 2% of carbon, on average. They might have brought more carbon than that involved in the present surficial biomass. The early histories of Mars and Earth clearly show similarities. Liquid water was once stable on the surface of Mars, attesting the presence of an atmosphere capable of deccelerating C-rich micrometeorites. Therefore, primitive life may have developed on Mars as well and fossilized microorganisms may still be present in the near subsurface. The Viking missions to Mars in 1976 did not find evidence of either contemporary or past life, but the mass spectrometer on the lander aeroshell determined the atmospheric composition, which has allowed a family of meteorites to be identified as Martian. Although these samples are essentially volcanic in origin, it has been recognized that some of them contain carbonate inclusions and even veins that have a carbon isotopic

  11. Analogy of meteorite impacts in laboratory conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Tara; Bussoli, Marco; Dezulian, R [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Universita degli studi Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Villa, A [Dipartimento di Biotecnologie e Bioscienze, Universita degli studi Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza, 20126 Milano (Italy); Krousky, E [PALS, Prague (Czech Republic); Aliverdiev, A A [Institute of Physics DSC of Russian Academy of Sciences, 377003, Yaragskogo Street, 94, Makhachkala (Russian Federation); Kubkowska, M; Wolowski, J, E-mail: dtar@hotmail.com [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23 STR 01-497, Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-12-15

    In this work, we report on the possibility of using laser-generated craters to investigate planetary events such as meteorite impact craters. Experiments using a 0.44 {mu}m/350 ps wavelength laser beam on aluminum foil targets are performed. We obtain simple and complex craters similar in contour to those formed due to meteorite impacts on the terrestrial surface. Our preliminary results show that the central peak of complex craters seems to be higher because of the turbulence beneath the crater floor. Results obtained using a two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code, MULTI, show that the laser ablation surface modifies and rises. This could be one of several factors explaining the central peak existence.

  12. Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, Volume 31, No. 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satterwhite, Cecilia (Editor); Righter, Kevin (Editor)

    2008-01-01

    This newsletter reports 418 new meteorites from the 2004 and 2006 ANSMET seasons from the Cumulus Hills (CMS), LaPaz Ice Field (LAP), Graves Nunataks (GRA), Grosvenor Mountains (GRO), Larkman Nunatak (LAR), MacAlpine Hills (MAC), Miller Range (MIL), Roberts Massif (RBT), and Scott Glacier (SCO). These new samples include one iron, 1 eucrite, 1 mesosiderite, 6 CK chondrites (2 with pairing), 2 CV3 chondrites, 1 CM1, 7 CM2 (4 with pairing), 3 CR2 (2 with pairing), and one each of a type 3 L and H chondrites. The CK6 chondrites (LAR 06869, 06872, 06873) are unusual in that they have no discernable chondrules, extremely fine-grained texture, and are full of veins. This newsletter represents a break from recent newsletters in which we have announced many unusual and popular samples, including new lunar and martian meteorites, an unusual achondrite (GRA 06128 and 06129 the topic of a special session at this years LPSC).

  13. Moessbauer spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher L.; Oliver, Frederick W.; Hammond, Ernest C., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Meteorites provide a wealth of information about the solar system's formation, since they have similar building blocks as the Earth's crust but have been virtually unaltered since their formation. Some stony meteorites contain minerals and silicate inclusions, called chondrules, in the matrix. Utilizing Moessbauer spectroscopy, we identified minerals in the Murchison meteorite, a carbonaceous chondritic meteorite, by the gamma ray resonance lines observed. Absorption patterns of the spectra were found due to the minerals olivine and phyllosilicate. We used a scanning electron microscope to describe the structure of the chondrules in the Murchison meteorite. The chondrules were found to be deformed due to weathering of the meteorite. Diameters varied in size from 0.2 to 0.5 mm. Further enhancement of the microscopic imagery using a digital image processor was used to describe the physical characteristics of the inclusions.

  14. Hardness of kamacite and shock histories of 119 meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. V.; Gordon, R. B.; Lipschutz, M. E.

    1972-01-01

    Use of metallographic and X-ray diffraction techniques to study the shock histories of 119 iron and stony-iron meteorites, and measurement of the hardness of kamacite in these specimens and in artificially shocked-unannealed and annealed meteorite specimens. Shock increases kamacite hardness, but complications introduced by other physical and chemical properties of meteorites limit its utility as a shock indicator. About 50% of the meteorites studied show evidence for preterrestrial shock loading to pressures of greater than or equal to 130 kb, and 40% have not been shocked to such high pressures. The remaining meteorites have been heat-altered in such a way that their shock histories cannot be determined explicitly. These results, together with those obtained previously, indicate that the plurality, if not the majority, of all iron and stony-iron meteorites sampled by the earth were shocked to pressures of greater than or equal to 130 kb during preterrestrial collisions between asteroidal-sized objects.

  15. Phosphates and Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper proposes tests for exobiological examination of samples prior to obtaining martian rocks of known provenance via future sample-return missions. If we assume that all of the secondary minerals in martian meteorite ET79001 were indeed cogenetic and originate from Mars, we list conclusions that can be drawn that are of exobiological interest. This work serves as a preamble for the subsequent work listed below.

  16. Seismic detection of meteorite impacts on Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Teanby, N.A.; Wookey, J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Meteorite impacts provide a potentially important seismic source for probing Mars? interior. It has recently been shown that new craters can be detected from orbit using high resolution imaging, which means the location of any impact-related seismic event could be accurately determined thus improving the constraints that could be placed on internal structure using a single seismic station. This is not true of other seismic sources on Mars such as sub-surface faulting, whic...

  17. Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The present volume of abstracts of conference papers discusses topics associated with the role of meteorite impacts on the Earth, the moon, and Titan. Particular attention is given to the description of the impact damage and the description of the actual craters. Attention is also given to the Sudbury structure, and the Chicxulub crater. Mineralogical, geophysical, petrographic, seismic and image data are described and discussed.

  18. Acritarchs in carbonaceous meteorites and terrestrial rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2013-10-01

    Acritarchs are a group of organic-walled, acid-resistant microfossils of uncertain or unknown origin. Some are thought to represent the cysts or resting stages of unicellular protists (possibly dinoflagellates), chrysophytes (green algae) or other planktonic eukaryotic algae. Acritarchs are found throughout the geologic column extending back as far at 3.2 Ga. The presence of large sphaeromorphs in the Archaean provides evidence that the eukaryotic lineage extends much farther back in time than previously thought possible. Acritarchs are abundant in the Paleoproterozoic shales (1.9-1.6 Ga) of the former Soviet Union and they have been extensively used for the investigation of Proterozoic and Paleozoic biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental parameters. Scanning Electron Microscope studies have revealed the fossilized remains of organic-walled microfossils of unknown origin and exhibiting characteristics of acritarchs in a variety of carbonaceous meteorites. In many cases, these remains are black or brown in color and have Carbon/Oxygen ratios suggesting they have been diagenetically converted into kerogen. It is not feasible that the fossilized remains of organicwalled microfossils such as acritarchs represent biological contaminant that invaded and became embedded in the rock matrix of carbonaceous meteorites within the short time periods of their residence on Earth. Consequently, these groups of microfossils are considered to provide an additional line for the existence of indigenous extraterrestrial microbial remains in meteorites. This paper presents a brief review of acritarchs in terrestrial rocks and provides images of a number of similar morphotypes of uncertain origin found in freshly fractured samples of carbonaceous meteorites.

  19. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  20. A meteorite crater on Mt. Ararat?

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G

    2010-01-01

    We briefly report on a crater on the western slope of Mt.Ararat . It is located in an area closed to foreigners at an altitude around 2100m with geographic coordinates 39\\deg 47' 30"N, 44\\deg 14' 40"E. The diameter of the crater is around 60-70m, the depth is up to 15m. The origin of the crater, either of meteorite impact or volcanic, including the evaluation of its age, will need detailed studies.

  1. De Magnete et Meteorite: Cosmically Motivated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, LH; Pinkerton, FE; Bordeaux, N; Mubarok, A; Poirier, E; Goldstein, JI; Skomski, R; Barmak, K

    2014-01-01

    Meteorites, likely the oldest source of magnetic material known to mankind, are attracting renewed interest in the science and engineering community. Worldwide focus is on tetrataenite, a uniaxial ferromagnetic compound with the tetragonal L1(0) crystal structure comprised of nominally equiatomic Fe-Ni that is found naturally in meteorites subjected to extraordinarily slow cooling rates, as low as 0.3 K per million years. Here, the favorable permanent magnetic properties of bulk tetrataenite derived from the meteorite NWA 6259 are quantified. The measured magnetization approaches that of Nd-Fe-B (1.42 T) and is coupled with substantial anisotropy (1.0-1.3 MJ/m(3)) that implies the prospect for realization of technologically useful coercivity. A highly robust temperature dependence of the technical magnetic properties at an elevated temperature (20-200 degrees C) is confirmed, with a measured temperature coefficient of coercivity of -0.005%/ K, over one hundred times smaller than that of Nd-Fe-B in the same temperature range. These results quantify the extrinsic magnetic behavior of chemically ordered tetrataenite and are technologically and industrially significant in the current context of global supply chain limitations of rare-earth metals required for present-day high-performance permanent magnets that enable operation of a myriad of advanced devices and machines.

  2. Characterisation of presumed meteorite from Trbovlje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Miler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study was to identify and characterise a specimen of presumed meteorite, supposedly found in 1947 while crushing gangue material from an open-pit coal mining site in Trbovlje. The presumed meteorite was characterised according to its physical properties, chemical and mineral composition using EDSanalysis. Based on macroscopic characteristics and physical properties, such as external features, magnetism and density, and reaction with diluted HCl, it was established that the specimen is not a meteorite but a concretion that contains calcite. SEM/EDS analysis showed that the studied material was compositionally homogeneous. It consists predominantly of calcite, gypsum and iron sulphide. The prevailing mineral is calcite, which forms irregular grains.Iron sulphide occurs as pyrite (or marcasite, which forms thin coatings rimming calcite grains, while gypsum formsthin transitional layers between calcite grains and pyrite or marcasite crusts as a result of reaction between ironsulphide oxidation products and calcite. The matrix between grains mostly consists of very fine-grained mixture of iron sulphide, calcite, gypsum and iron sulphide oxidation products, however, fields of pure gypsum were also found between some grains. According to the composition of the concretion, it can be assumed that the specimen isa pyrite- and/or marcasite- carbonate concretion, perhaps coal ball, which most probably formed by mineralisation within peat in the early stage of coal genesis in the Trbovlje formation.

  3. Field Guide to Meteors and Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, O. Richard

    2008-01-01

    Imagine the unique experience of being the very first person to hold a newly-found meteorite in your hand – a rock from space, older than Earth! "Weekend meteorite hunting" with magnets and metal detectors is becoming ever more popular as a pastime, but of course you can’t just walk around and pick up meteorites in the same way that you can pick up seashells on the beach. Those fragments that survived the intense heat of re-entry tend to disguise themselves as natural rocks over time, and it takes a trained eye – along with the information in this book – to recognize them. Just as amateur astronomers are familiar with the telescopes and accessories needed to study a celestial object, amateur meteoriticists have to use equipment ranging from simple hand lenses to microscopes to study a specimen, to identify its type and origins. Equipment and techniques are covered in detail here of course, along with a complete and fully illustrated guide to what you might find and where you might find it. In fact, th...

  4. Disaggregating meteorites by automated freeze thaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher R J

    2011-06-01

    An automated freeze-thaw (AFT) instrument for disaggregating meteorites is described. Meteorite samples are immersed in 18.2 MΩ water and hermetically sealed in a clean 30 ml Teflon vial. This vial and its contents are dipped between baths of liquid nitrogen and hot water over a number of cycles by a dual-stepper motor system controlled by LabView. Uniform and periodic intervals of freezing and thawing induce multiple expansions and contractions, such that cracks propagate along natural flaws in the meteorite for a sufficient number of AFT cycles. For the CR2 chondrite NWA801, the boundaries between different phases (i.e., silicates, metal, matrix) became progressively weaker and allowed for an efficient recovery of 500 individual chondrules and chondrule fragments spanning 0.2-4.7 mm diameters after 243 AFT cycles over 103.3 h. Further FT experiments on a basalt analog showed that the time required for freezing and thawing the same number of cycles can be reduced by a factor of ∼4. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  5. Chemical evolution and meteorites: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2004-02-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a primitive group of meteorites, which contain abundant organic material and provide a unique natural record of prebiotic chemical evolution. This material comprises a varied suite of soluble organic compounds that are similar, sometimes identical, to those found in the biosphere, such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, and sugar derivatives. Some amino acids of this suite also show L-enantiomeric excesses, and suggest the possibility they may have contributed to terrestrial homochirality by direct input of meteoritic material to the early Earth. This optical activity appears to be limited to the subgroup of alpha-methyl amino acids which, although not common in the extant biosphere, would have been well suited to provide the early earth with both enantiomeric excesses and means for their amplification by subsequent chemical evolution. We can also envision this exogenous delivery of carbonaceous material by meteorites and comets as having coincided with the endogenous formation of prebiotic precursors and influenced their evolution by complementary reactions or catalysis.

  6. Studies on Al Kidirate and Kapoeta meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gismelseed, A.M. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan); Khangi, F. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan); Ibrahim, A. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, Khartoum (Sudan); Yousif, A.A. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman); Worthing, M.A. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman); Rais, A. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman); Elzain, M.E. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman); Brooks, C.K. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman); Sutherland, H.H. [Coll. of Science, Sultan Qaboos Univ., Alkhoud (Oman)

    1994-11-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy (20-300 K), magnetic susceptibility measurements (77-350 K), scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on two meteorite samples: one from an old fall (Kapoeta) and another from a very recent fall (Al Kidirate). The two specimens differ in their mineralogy. Chondrules appear to be absent in Kapoeta and it is probably a pyroxene-plagioclase achondrite with ferrohypersthene as the most abundant mineral. On the other hand, the Al Kidirate meteorite is an ordinary chondrite and the specimen consists of olivine, orthopyroxene, troilite and kamacite. The Moessbauer measurements confirm the above characterization, showing a paramagnetic doublet for the Kapoeta sample and at least two paramagnetic doublets and magnetic sextets for the Al Kidirate specimens. The former were assigned to Fe in pyroxene sites, while the latter was assigned to Fe in pyroxene, olivine, Fe-S and Fe-Ni alloys. The difference in the mineralogy of the two meteorites has also been reflected in the temperature-dependent magnetic susceptibility. The magnetization and the hyperfine interaction parameters will be discussed in relation to the mineralogy. (orig.)

  7. Chemical Evolution and Meteorites: An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2004-02-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a primitive group of meteorites, which contain abundant organic material and provide a unique natural record of prebiotic chemical evolution. This material comprises a varied suite of soluble organic compounds that are similar, sometimes identical, to those found in the biosphere, such as amino acids, carboxylic acids, and sugar derivatives. Some amino acids of this suite also show L-enantiomeric excesses, and suggest the possibility they may have contributed to terrestrial homochirality by direct input of meteoritic material to the early Earth. This optical activity appears to be limited to the subgroup of α-methyl amino acids which, although not common in the extant biosphere, would have been well suited to provide the early earth with both enantiomeric excesses and means for their amplification by subsequent chemical evolution. We can also envision this exogenous delivery of carbonaceous material by meteorites and comets as having coincided with the endogenous formation of prebiotic precursors and influenced their evolution by complementary reactions or catalysis.

  8. Mineralogy, Petrology, Chronology, and Exposure History of the Chelyabinsk Meteorite and Parent Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Abell, P.; Agresti, D.; Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S.; Delaney, J. S.; Fries, M. D.; Gibson, E. K.; Harrington, R.; Herzog, G. F.; Keller, L. P.; Locke, D.; Lindsay, F.; McCoy, T. J.; Morris, R. V.; Nagao, K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Niles, P. B.; Nyquist, L.; Park, J.; Peng, Z. X.; Shih, C. Y.; Simon, J. I.; Swisher, C. C., III; Tappa, M.

    2015-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite fall on February 15, 2013 attracted much more attention worldwide than do most falls. A consortium led by JSC received 3 masses of Chelyabinsk (Chel-101, -102, -103) that were collected shortly after the fall and handled with care to minimize contamination. Initial studies were reported in 2013; we have studied these samples with a wide range of analytical techniques to better understand the mineralogy, petrology, chronology and exposure history of the Chelyabinsk parent body.

  9. Space Rocks: A Series of Papers on Meteorites and Asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Hooper, Nina Louise

    2016-01-01

    The subject of this work is the compositions of asteroids and meteorites. Studies of the composition of small Solar System bodies are fundamental to theories of planet formation. Meteorites, samples available for analysis in the lab, help constrain the timeline and conditions in the early Solar System. Asteroid reflectance spectra help define the links between asteroids and meteorites. Studies of the spectral types and sizes of asteroids test dynamical models. These studie...

  10. Probability of meteorite immpact in Sweden since year 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Wrige, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    This Thesis investigates the number of possible meteorite impacts in Sweden since the year 2000. Sweden did not until recently have any photographic monitoring of incoming meteorites, thus a search through media reporting observations from the public has been performed. A theoretical approximation, based on an established extra-terrestrial mass ux, gives the number of 210 possible meteorite impacts for this time period. All of these could have been reballs, but by subtracting the daylight hou...

  11. Dating climatic change in hot deserts using desert varnish on meteorite finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. R.; Bland, P. A.

    2003-01-01

    palaeoclimate data derived from a number of other proxies. The implications of this work are that the large number of meteorites that have been collected from several hot deserts of the world may be a powerful source of information on climate change over the last 30-35 kyr.

  12. Oxygen isotope variation in stony-iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, R C; Franchi, I A; Jambon, A; Barrat, J A; Burbine, T H

    2006-09-22

    Asteroidal material, delivered to Earth as meteorites, preserves a record of the earliest stages of planetary formation. High-precision oxygen isotope analyses for the two major groups of stony-iron meteorites (main-group pallasites and mesosiderites) demonstrate that each group is from a distinct asteroidal source. Mesosiderites are isotopically identical to the howardite-eucrite-diogenite clan and, like them, are probably derived from the asteroid 4 Vesta. Main-group pallasites represent intermixed core-mantle material from a single disrupted asteroid and have no known equivalents among the basaltic meteorites. The stony-iron meteorites demonstrate that intense asteroidal deformation accompanied planetary accretion in the early Solar System.

  13. The Orgueil meteorite: 150 years of history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gounelle, Matthieu; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this paper is to summarize 150 yr of history of a very special meteorite. The Orgueil meteorite fell near Montauban in southwestern France on May 14, 1864. The bolide, which was the size of the full Moon, was seen across Western France, and almost immediately made the news in local and Parisian newspapers. Within a few weeks of the fall, a great diversity of analyses were performed under the authority of Gabriel Auguste Daubrée, geology professor at the Paris Museum, and published in the Comptes Rendus de l'Académie des Sciences. The skilled scientists reported the presence of iron sulfides, hydrated silicates, and carbonates in Orgueil. They also characterized ammonium salts which are now gone, and observed sulfates being remobilized at the surface of the stone. They identified the high water and carbon contents, and noted similarities with the Alais meteorite, which had fallen in 1806, 300 km away. While Daubrée and his colleagues noted the similarity of the Orgueil organic matter with some terrestrial humus, they were cautious not to make a direct link with living organisms. One century later, Nagy and Claus were less prudent and announced the discovery of "organized" elements in some samples of Orgueil. Their observations were quickly discredited by Edward Anders and others who also discovered that some pollen grains were intentionally placed into the rock back in the 1860s. Orgueil is now one of the most studied meteorites, indeed one of the most studied rocks of any kind. Not only does it contain a large diversity of carbon-rich compounds, which help address the question of organo-synthesis in the early solar system but its chemical composition is also close to that of the Sun's photosphere and serves as a cosmic reference. Secondary minerals, which make up 99% of the volume of Orgueil, were probably formed during hydrothermal alteration on the parent-body within the first few million years of the solar system; their study is essential to our

  14. Samarium-neodymium evolution of meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prinzhofer, A.; Papanastassiou, D.A.; Wasserburg, G.J. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (United States))

    1992-02-01

    The authors have obtained Sm-Nd data on two differentiated meteorites, Ibitira, a eucrite with distinct basaltic texture and with evidence of crystallization; and Morristown, a group 3A mesosiderite; as well as on Acapulco, an unclassified meteorite with chondritic chemical composition and a highly recrystallized texture. They have demonstrated the presence of in situ decay of short-lived {sup 146}Sm in these meteorites with initial abundance of {sup 146}Sm/{sup 144}Sm from 0.009 to 0.007 for the different meteorites. Precisely defined {sup 147}Sm-{sup 143}Nd internal isochrons were obtained yielding ages of 4.60 {+-} 0.03 AE for Acapulco, 4.47 {+-} 0.02 AE for Morristown, and 4.46 {+-} 0.02 AE for Ibitira. The corresponding initial {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd values obtained were 0.2 {+-} 0.9, 2.1 {+-} 0.7, and 1.6 {+-} 0.8 {var epsilon}u (epsilon units). Detailed consideration of the coupled {sup 147}Sm-{sup 143}Nd and {sup 146}Sm-{sup 142}Nd systematics and of the elevated initial {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd values indicates the presence of inconsistencies in the data for the two Sm-Nd parent-daughter pairs in spiteof the precise isochrons. The authors present a model which provides an interpretation of the paired Sm-Nd systematics in terms of an impulsive disturbance. The results indicate that three meteorites studied are relatively ancient objects, formed within the first 50 to 100 m.y. of the solar system, by planetary differentiation and impact processes, and were subjected to late metamorphism. The time of late metamorphism is substantially younger than 4.4 AE and possibly as recent as {approximately}3.9 AE. This metamorphism has resulted in partial, very limited reequilibration between plagioclase and phosphate, resulting in the observed shifts in initial {sup 143}Nd/{sup 144}Nd, Sm-Nd model ages, and the {sup 142}Nd/{sup 144}Nd abundances, but preserving the major temporal structures of early original formation and later disturbances.

  15. Asteroids and meteorites - Origin of stony-iron meteorites at mantle-core boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, R.; Chapman, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    Stony-iron meteorites formed at the core/mantle interfaces of small asteroidal parents. The mesosiderites formed when the thick crust of a largely molten parent body (100-200 km in diameter) foundered and sank through the mantle to the core. Pallasites formed in smaller parent bodies (50-100 km) in which olivine crystals from the partially molten mantle sank to the core/mantle interface and rafted there. Subsequent collisions stripped away the rocky mantles of both kinds of parent bodies, exposing the stony-iron surfaces of their cores to direct impacts, which continue to knock off meteorite fragments.

  16. Mechanical properties of several Fe-Ni meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulford, Roberta N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; El - Dasher, Bassem [LLNL

    2010-10-28

    The strength and elastic constants of meteorites are of increasing interest as predictions of meteorite impacts on earth come within the realm of possibility. In addition, meteorite impacts on extraterrestrial bodies provide an excellent sampling tool for evaluation of planetary compositions and properties. Fe-Ni meteorites provide a well-defined group of materials of fairly uniform composition. Iron-nickel meteorites exhibit a unique lamellar microstructure, a Widmanstatten structure, consisting of small regions with steep-iron-nickel composition gradients. This microstructure is found in the Fe-Ni system only in meteorites, and is believed to arise as a result of slow cooling in a planetary core or other large mass. Meteorites with compositions consisting of between 5 and 17% nickel in iron are termed 'octahedrite,' and further characterized according to the width of the Ni-poor kamacite bands; 'fine,' (0.2-0.5 mm) 'medium,' (0.5-1.3 mm) and 'coarse,' (1.5-3.3 mm). Many meteorites have inclusions and structures indicating that the material has been shocked at some point early in its evolution. Several Iron-nickel meteorites have been examined using Vickers and spherical indentation, x-ray fluorescence, and EBSD. Direct observation of mechanical properties in these highly structured materials provides a valuable supplement to bulk measurements, which frequently exhibit large variation in dynamic properties, even within a single sample. Previous studies of the mechanical properties of a typical iron-nickel meteorite, a Diablo Canyon specimen, indicated that the strength of the composite was higher by almost an order of magnitude than values obtained from laboratory-prepared specimens. Additional meteorite specimens have been examined to establish a range of error on the previously measured yield, to determine the extent to which deformation upon re-entry contributes to yield, and to establish the degree to which the strength

  17. Pulmonary Inflammatory Responses to Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures - to Acute Meteorite Dust Exposures - Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, A. D.; McCubbin, F. M.; Kaur, J.; Smirnov, A.; Galdanes, K.; Schoonen, M. A. A.; Chen, L. C.; Tsirka, S. E.; Gordon, T.

    2017-01-01

    New initiatives to begin lunar and martian colonization within the next few decades are illustrative of the resurgence of interest in space travel. One of NASA's major concerns with extended human space exploration is the inadvertent and repeated exposure to unknown dust. This highly interdisciplinary study evaluates both the geochemical reactivity (e.g. iron solubility and acellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation) and the relative toxicity (e.g. in vitro and in vivo pulmonary inflammation) of six meteorite samples representing either basalt or regolith breccia on the surface of the Moon, Mars, and Asteroid 4Vesta. Terrestrial mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) is also used for comparison. The MORB demonstrated higher geochemical reactivity than most of the meteorite samples but caused the lowest acute pulmonary inflammation (API). Notably, the two martian meteorites generated some of the highest API but only the basaltic sample is significantly reactive geochemically. Furthermore, while there is a correlation between a meteorite's soluble iron content and its ability to generate acellular ROS, there is no direct correlation between a particle's ability to generate ROS acellularly and its ability to generate API. However, assorted in vivo API markers did demonstrate strong positive correlations with increasing bulk Fenton metal content. In summary, this comprehensive dataset allows for not only the toxicological evaluation of astromaterials but also clarifies important correlations between geochemistry and health.

  18. Carbonaceous Meteorites Contain a Wide Range of Extraterrestrial Nucleobases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P.; Smith, Karen E.; Cleaves, H. James, II; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C.; Glavin, Daniel P.; House, Christopher H.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2011-01-01

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nuc1eobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nuc1eobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs; purine, 2,6-diminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analoge were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  19. Atom-Probe Measurements of Meteoritic Nanodiamonds and Terrestrial Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, J. B.; Isheim, D.; Floss, C.; Daulton, T. L.; Seidman, D. N.; Heck, P. R.; Davis, A. M.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Hiller, J.; Mane, A.; Elam, J. W.; Stephan, T.

    2013-09-01

    We present new data from the novel application of atom-probe tomography to the study of nanodiamonds from the meteorite Allende. The mean meteoritic ^12C/^13C peak ratio is higher than that of our standards, but there are instrumental artifacts.

  20. Chemical analysis of organic molecules in carbonaceous meteorites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrao Pinto Martins, Zita Carla

    2007-01-01

    Meteorites are extraterrestrial objects that survive the passage through the Earth’s atmosphere and impact the Earth's surface. They can be divided into several classes, the carbonaceous chondrites being one of them. Carbonaceous chondrites are the oldest and best preserved meteorites and contain a

  1. Chemical analysis of organic molecules in carbonaceous meteorites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torrao Pinto Martins, Zita Carla

    2007-01-01

    Meteorites are extraterrestrial objects that survive the passage through the Earth’s atmosphere and impact the Earth's surface. They can be divided into several classes, the carbonaceous chondrites being one of them. Carbonaceous chondrites are the oldest and best preserved meteorites and contain a

  2. Carbonaceous meteorites contain a wide range of extraterrestrial nucleobases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael P; Smith, Karen E; Cleaves, H James; Ruzicka, Josef; Stern, Jennifer C; Glavin, Daniel P; House, Christopher H; Dworkin, Jason P

    2011-08-23

    All terrestrial organisms depend on nucleic acids (RNA and DNA), which use pyrimidine and purine nucleobases to encode genetic information. Carbon-rich meteorites may have been important sources of organic compounds required for the emergence of life on the early Earth; however, the origin and formation of nucleobases in meteorites has been debated for over 50 y. So far, the few nucleobases reported in meteorites are biologically common and lacked the structural diversity typical of other indigenous meteoritic organics. Here, we investigated the abundance and distribution of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs in formic acid extracts of 12 different meteorites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The Murchison and Lonewolf Nunataks 94102 meteorites contained a diverse suite of nucleobases, which included three unusual and terrestrially rare nucleobase analogs: purine, 2,6-diaminopurine, and 6,8-diaminopurine. In a parallel experiment, we found an identical suite of nucleobases and nucleobase analogs generated in reactions of ammonium cyanide. Additionally, these nucleobase analogs were not detected above our parts-per-billion detection limits in any of the procedural blanks, control samples, a terrestrial soil sample, and an Antarctic ice sample. Our results demonstrate that the purines detected in meteorites are consistent with products of ammonium cyanide chemistry, which provides a plausible mechanism for their synthesis in the asteroid parent bodies, and strongly supports an extraterrestrial origin. The discovery of new nucleobase analogs in meteorites also expands the prebiotic molecular inventory available for constructing the first genetic molecules.

  3. A New Old Meteorite Find from Claromeco, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, R. D.; Subías, I.

    2012-09-01

    Two reddish brown meteoritic stones of 13 kg each were found in 1963 leaning against a windmill in a farm at argentine pampas (38º 48" 16"" S, 60º 07" 23"" W), but they are the focus of attention just now. This meteorite could be classified as a LL ordinary chondrite.

  4. Gold in meteorites and in the earth's crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robert Sprague

    1968-01-01

    The reported gold contents of meteorites range from 0.0003 to 8.74 parts per million. Gold is siderophilic, and the greatest amounts in meteorites are in the iron phases. Estimates ,of the gold content of the earth's crust are in the range of 0.001 to 0.006 parts per million.

  5. On isotopic analyses of Mihonoseki and other meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, Masako [National Science Museum, Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-12-31

    In the last December, since a meteorite penetrated a house in Mihonoseki-machi, Yatsuka-gun, Simane-ken, Japan, many people aware how meteorites are important for the study of space science. First, the results of the isotopic studies on meteorites obtained so far are summarized. The Mihonoseki meteorite is valuable only because it has the possibility of detecting short life cosmogenic radioactive nuclides as its fall was informed shortly after the fall, though it is a normal chondrite without special feature. A part of the obtained {gamma} ray spectrograph of the Mihonoseki was compared visually with that of the Tahara meteorite which fell one and a half years ago, the Hashima meteorite which fell about 80 years ago and terrestrial rocks. The preliminary data are given together with the data of the chondrites that fell in Japan in the last 10 years. As for the Mihonoseki meteorite, 15 cosmic ray-produced radioactive nuclides with the half life from 2.44 days to 7.2 x 10{sup 5} years were measured. Also the isotopic ratio of rare gas elements was determined, and from these data, it is concluded that the Mihonoseki meteorite has been exposed to cosmic ray for a long age, and it was not subjected to heavy shock effect. (K.I.).

  6. Ar-40-Ar-39 Age of an Impact-Melt Lithology in Lunar Meteorite Dhofar 961

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara; Frasl, Barbara; Jolliff, Brad; Korotev, Randy; Zeigler, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The Dhofar 961 lunar meteorite was found in 2003 in Oman. It is texturally paired with Dhofar 925 and Dhofar 960 (though Dhofar 961 is more mafic and richer in incompatible elements). Several lines of reasoning point to the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA) basin as a plausible source (Figure 2): Mafic character of the melt-breccia lithic clasts consistent the interior of SPA, rules out feldspathic highlands. Compositional differences from Apollo impact-melt groups point to a provenance that is separated and perhaps far distant from the Procellarum KREEP Terrane SPA "hot spots" where Th concentrations reach 5 ppm and it has a broad "background" of about 2 ppm, similar to lithic clasts in Dhofar 961 subsamples If true, impact-melt lithologies in this meteorite may be unaffected by the Imbrium-forming event that is pervasively found in our Apollo sample collection, and instead record the early impact history of the Moon.

  7. A New Martian Meteorite from Antarctica:Grove Mountains (GRV) 020090

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Bingkui; OUYANG Ziyuan; WANG Daode; JU Yitai; WANG Guiqin; LIN Yangting

    2004-01-01

    Reported in this paper are the petrology and mineral chemistry of GRV 020090, the second Martian meteorite collected from the Grove Mountains, Antarctica. This meteorite, with a mass of 7.54 g, is completely covered by a black and glazy fusion crust. It has two distinct textural regions. The interstitial region is composed of euhedral grains of olivine,pigeonite, and anhedral interstitial maskelynite, with minor chromite, augite, phosphates and troilite. The poikilitic region consists of three clasts of pyroxenes, each of which has a pigeonite core and an augite rim. A few grains of subhedral to rounded olivine and euhedral chromite are enclosed in the pyroxene oikocrysts. GRV 020090 is classified as a new member of lherzolitic shergottites based on the modal composition and mineral chemistry. This work will shed light on the composition of Martian crust and magmatism on the Mars.

  8. Nanodiamonds in meteorites: properties and astrophysical context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Ott

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This contribution provides an overview on properties and origin of nanodiamonds in primitive meteorites. Nanodiamond are a type of stardust, i.e. “pre-solar” grains that formed in the outflows or ejecta of stars.Design/methodology/approach: We summarize previously obtained results and include our results dealing with recoil loss from nanoparticles during radioactive decay of trace elements within them.Findings: Nanodiamonds in primitive meteorites have a mean size of ~2.6 nm and an abundance reaching up to ~0.15 % by weight. They contain trace noble gases, notably xenon, with an unusual isotopic composition. The latter is reminiscent of the p- and r-processes of nucleosynthesis that are thought to occur during supernova explosions. Our new results show that recoil loss during β decay of implanted 22Na does not exceed what is expected from energy distribution and range-energy relations in matter. While a CVD origin for the diamonds appears likely (but is not assured, the noble gases were probably introduced by ion implantation.Research limitations/implications: The isotopic pattern of Xe contained in nanodiamonds indicates some unconventional types of element synthesis in stars or modification by secondary processes. Recoil loss from nanometer-sized grains during decay of unstable precursor nuclides has been suggested as an explanation, but our experiments do not support this idea.Originality/value: Other processes must be invoked for explanation of the isotopically unusual xenon trapped in meteoritic nanodiamonds. Ion implantation experiments suggest of “trapped” cosmic ray 3He for deriving an age for the diamonds.

  9. Discovering Research Value in Small Meteorite Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, W. A.

    1995-09-01

    The Campo del Cielo meteorite crater field in Argentina contains at least 20 small meteorite craters, but a recent review of the field data and a remote sensing study suggest there may be many more. The fall occurred about 4000 y ago into a uniform loessy soil, and the craters are well enough preserved so that some of their parameters of impact can be determined by excavation. The craters were formed by multi-ton fragments of a type IA meteoroid with abundant silicate inclusions. Relative to the horizontal, the angle of infall was around 10 degrees. Reflecting the low angle of infall, the crater field is elongated with apparent dimensions of 3 x 18.5 km. The largest craters are near the center of this ellipse. This suggests that when the parent meteoroid broke apart the resulting fragments diverged from the original trajectory in inverse relation to their masses and did not undergo size sorting due to atmospheric deceleration. The major axis of the crater field as we know it extends along N58 degrees E, but the azimuths of infall determined by excavation of Craters 9 and 10 are N84 degrees E and N77 degrees E, respectively, suggesting that the major axis of the crater field is not yet well determined. This is supported by the elongation of magnetic anomalies over 4 other craters, all of which trend significantly more easterly than the major axis of the crater field. The 3 or 4 largest craters appear to be explosion craters and the others are shock-wave excavations extended by penetration funnels with multi-ton masses preserved within them. There are two ways in which field research on the Campo del Cielo craterfield is found to be useful. (1)This occurrence of a swarm of projectiles impacting at known angles and similar velocities into a uniform target material provides an excellent field site at which to test the applicability of various existing studies directed toward the interpretation of impact craters on planetary surfaces other than the earth. Given certain

  10. Martian surface paleotemperatures from thermochronology of meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuster, David L; Weiss, Benjamin P

    2005-07-22

    The temporal evolution of past martian surface temperatures is poorly known. We used thermochronology and published noble gas and petrographic data to constrain the temperature histories of the nakhlites and martian meteorite ALH84001. We found that the nakhlites have not been heated to more than 350 degrees C since they formed. Our calculations also suggest that for most of the past 4 billion years, ambient near-surface temperatures on Mars are unlikely to have been much higher than the present cold (<0 degrees C) state.

  11. Iron meteorites can support the growth of acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Toril, Elena; Martínez-Frías, Jesús; Gómez Gómez, José María; Rull, Fernando; Amils, Ricardo

    2005-06-01

    Chemolithoautotrophy based on reduced inorganic minerals is considered a primitive energy transduction system. Evidence that a high number of meteorites crashed into the planet during the early period of Earth history led us to test the ability of iron-oxidizing bacteria to grow using iron meteorites as their source of energy. Here we report the growth of two acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria, Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, on a piece of the Toluca meteorite as the only source of energy. The alteration of the surface of the exposed piece of meteorite, the solubilization of its oxidized metal constituents, mainly ferric iron, and the formation of goethite precipitates all clearly indicate that iron-meteorite-based chemolithotrophic metabolism is viable.

  12. Evaluation of meteorites as habitats for terrestrial microorganisms: Results from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia, a Mars analogue site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alastair W.; Wilson, Siobhan A.; Tomkins, Andrew G.; Gagen, Emma J.; Fallon, Stewart J.; Southam, Gordon

    2017-10-01

    Unambiguous identification of biosignatures on Mars requires access to well-characterized, long-lasting geochemical standards at the planet's surface that can be modified by theoretical martian life. Ordinary chondrites, which are ancient meteorites that commonly fall to the surface of Mars and Earth, have well-characterized, narrow ranges in trace element and isotope geochemistry compared to martian rocks. Given that their mineralogy is more attractive to known chemolithotrophic life than the basaltic rocks that dominate the martian surface, exogenic rocks (e.g., chondritic meteorites) may be good places to look for signs of prior life endemic to Mars. In this study, we show that ordinary chondrites, collected from the arid Australian Nullarbor Plain, are commonly colonized and inhabited by terrestrial microorganisms that are endemic to this Mars analogue site. These terrestrial endolithic and chasmolithic microbial contaminants are commonly found in close association with hygroscopic veins of gypsum and Mg-calcite, which have formed within cracks penetrating deep into the meteorites. Terrestrial bacteria are observed within corrosion cavities, where troilite (FeS) oxidation has produced jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6]. Where terrestrial microorganisms have colonized primary silicate minerals and secondary calcite, these mineral surfaces are heavily etched. Our results show that inhabitation of meteorites by terrestrial microorganisms in arid environments relies upon humidity and pH regulation by minerals. Furthermore, microbial colonization affects the weathering of meteorites and production of sulfate, carbonate, Fe-oxide and smectite minerals that can preserve chemical and isotopic biosignatures for thousands to millions of years on Earth. Meteorites are thus habitable by terrestrial microorganisms, even under highly desiccating environmental conditions of relevance to Mars. They may therefore be useful as chemical and isotopic ;standards; that preserve evidence of

  13. Impact cratering as a major process in planet formation: Projectile identification of meteorite craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G.; Kratz, K.

    2009-12-01

    Ancient surfaces of solid planets show that impact cratering is a major process in planet formation. Understanding origin and influence of impactors on the chemical composition of planets (core, mantle and crust) it is important to know the relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Rh, Pd) in the silicate mantle and crust of planets and meteorites. Refractory highly siderophile elements, such as Os and Ir, are abundant in most meteorites but depleted in crustal rocks (low target/meteorite ratios) and thus the most reliable elements for projectile identification. However, target/meteorite ratios are high if target rocks consist of mantle rocks. In such cases elements are enriched in impactites due to relatively high abundances (ng/g level) in target rocks to make the identification of projectile types difficult (e.g., Gardnos impact structure in Norway). The Ru/Ir ratio is the most reliable key ratio that rules out Earth primitive upper mantle (PUM) derived refractory highly siderophile element components in impactites. The well established Ru/Ir ratio of the Earth mantle of 2.0 ± 0.1 (e.g. Schmidt and Kratz 2004) is significantly above the chondritic ratios varying from 1.4 to 1.6. On Earth Rh/Ir, Ru/Ir, Pd/Ir, and Pt/Os derived from PUM match the ratios of group IV irons with fractionated trace element patterns. The question raise if HSE in mantle rocks are added to the accreting Earth by a late bombardment of pre-differentiated objects or the cores of these objects (magmatic iron meteorites as remnants of the first planetesimals, e.g. Kleine et al. 2009) or some unsampled inner solar system materials from the Mercury-Venus formation region, not sampled through meteorite collections (Schmidt 2009). The PGE and Ni systematics of the upper continental crust (UCC) closely resembles group IIIAB iron meteorites with highly fractionated refractory trace element patterns, pallasites, and the evolved suite of Martian meteorites (representing

  14. Multiple Cosmic Sources for Meteorite Macromolecules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A; Watson, Jonathan S; Meredith, William; Love, Gordon D; Gilmour, Iain; Snape, Colin E

    2015-10-01

    The major organic component in carbonaceous meteorites is an organic macromolecular material. The Murchison macromolecular material comprises aromatic units connected by aliphatic and heteroatom-containing linkages or occluded within the wider structure. The macromolecular material source environment remains elusive. Traditionally, attempts to determine source have strived to identify a single environment. Here, we apply a highly efficient hydrogenolysis method to liberate units from the macromolecular material and use mass spectrometric techniques to determine their chemical structures and individual stable carbon isotope ratios. We confirm that the macromolecular material comprises a labile fraction with small aromatic units enriched in (13)C and a refractory fraction made up of large aromatic units depleted in (13)C. Our findings suggest that the macromolecular material may be derived from at least two separate environments. Compound-specific carbon isotope trends for aromatic compounds with carbon number may reflect mixing of the two sources. The story of the quantitatively dominant macromolecular material in meteorites appears to be made up of more than one chapter.

  15. {sup 48}Ca HETEROGENEITY IN DIFFERENTIATED METEORITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Wei; Lee, Typhoon; Lee, Der-Chuen; Shen, Jason Jiun-San; Chen, Jiang-Chang, E-mail: haart@earth.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Earth Sciences, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-10

    Isotopic heterogeneities of {sup 48}Ca have been found in numerous bulk meteorites that are correlated with {sup 50}Ti and {sup 54}Cr anomalies among differentiated planetary bodies, and the results suggest that a rare subset of neutron-rich Type Ia supernova (nSN Ia) was responsible for contributing these neutron-rich iron-group isotopes into the solar system (SS). The heterogeneity of these isotopes found in differentiated meteorites indicates that the isotopic compositions of the bulk SS are not uniform, and there are significant amounts of nSNe Ia dust incompletely mixed with the rest of SS materials during planetary formation. Combined with the data of now-extinct short-lived nuclide {sup 60}Fe, which can be produced more efficiently from an nSN Ia than a Type II supernova ejecta, the observed planetary-scale isotopic heterogeneity probably reflects a late input of stellar dust grains with neutron-rich nuclear statistical equilibrium nuclides into the early SS.

  16. Microbial Populations of Stony Meteorites: Substrate Controls on First Colonizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair W. Tait

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Finding fresh, sterilized rocks provides ecologists with a clean slate to test ideas about first colonization and the evolution of soils de novo. Lava has been used previously in first colonizer studies due to the sterilizing heat required for its formation. However, fresh lava typically falls upon older volcanic successions of similar chemistry and modal mineral abundance. Given enough time, this results in the development of similar microbial communities in the newly erupted lava due to a lack of contrast between the new and old substrates. Meteorites, which are sterile when they fall to Earth, provide such contrast because their reduced and mafic chemistry commonly differs to the surfaces on which they land; thus allowing investigation of how community membership and structure respond to this new substrate over time. We conducted 16S rRNA gene analysis on meteorites and soil from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. We found that the meteorites have low species richness and evenness compared to soil sampled from directly beneath each meteorite. Despite the meteorites being found kilometers apart, the community structure of each meteorite bore more similarity to those of other meteorites (of similar composition than to the community structure of the soil on which it resided. Meteorites were dominated by sequences that affiliated with the Actinobacteria with the major Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU classified as Rubrobacter radiotolerans. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the next most abundant phyla. The soils were also dominated by Actinobacteria but to a lesser extent than the meteorites. We also found OTUs affiliated with iron/sulfur cycling organisms Geobacter spp. and Desulfovibrio spp. This is an important finding as meteorites contain abundant metal and sulfur for use as energy sources. These ecological findings demonstrate that the structure of the microbial community in these meteorites is controlled by the substrate, and will not

  17. Microbial Populations of Stony Meteorites: Substrate Controls on First Colonizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alastair W; Gagen, Emma J; Wilson, Siobhan A; Tomkins, Andrew G; Southam, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    Finding fresh, sterilized rocks provides ecologists with a clean slate to test ideas about first colonization and the evolution of soils de novo. Lava has been used previously in first colonizer studies due to the sterilizing heat required for its formation. However, fresh lava typically falls upon older volcanic successions of similar chemistry and modal mineral abundance. Given enough time, this results in the development of similar microbial communities in the newly erupted lava due to a lack of contrast between the new and old substrates. Meteorites, which are sterile when they fall to Earth, provide such contrast because their reduced and mafic chemistry commonly differs to the surfaces on which they land; thus allowing investigation of how community membership and structure respond to this new substrate over time. We conducted 16S rRNA gene analysis on meteorites and soil from the Nullarbor Plain, Australia. We found that the meteorites have low species richness and evenness compared to soil sampled from directly beneath each meteorite. Despite the meteorites being found kilometers apart, the community structure of each meteorite bore more similarity to those of other meteorites (of similar composition) than to the community structure of the soil on which it resided. Meteorites were dominated by sequences that affiliated with the Actinobacteria with the major Operational Taxonomic Unit (OTU) classified as Rubrobacter radiotolerans. Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were the next most abundant phyla. The soils were also dominated by Actinobacteria but to a lesser extent than the meteorites. We also found OTUs affiliated with iron/sulfur cycling organisms Geobacter spp. and Desulfovibrio spp. This is an important finding as meteorites contain abundant metal and sulfur for use as energy sources. These ecological findings demonstrate that the structure of the microbial community in these meteorites is controlled by the substrate, and will not reach homeostasis

  18. Ancient Uses of Meteoritic Metals as Precedent for Modern In-Situ Asteroid Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardon, Austin A.; Fawcett, Brett; Krispin, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Given the strain on earth's supply of metal and the meteoritic content of meteorites, a prudent course would be to pursue in-situ asteroid mining of meteors for metal. There is a precedent for this going back to ancient Egypt; humans have always used the meteoritic content of meteorites to fashion everything from weapons to cosmetics.

  19. Chemical and mineralogical size segregation in the impact disruption of anhydrous stone meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, G.J.; Durda, D.D. (SUNYP); (SW Research Institute)

    2005-02-02

    We performed impact disruption experiments on pieces from eight different anhydrous chondritic meteorites - four weathered ordinary chondrite finds from North Africa (NWA791, NWA620, NWA869 and MOR001), three almost unweathered ordinary chondrite falls (Mbale, Gao, and Saratov), and an almost unweathered carbonaceous chondrite fall (Allende). In each case the impactor was a small (1/8 or 1/4 in) aluminum sphere fired at the meteorite target at {approx} 5 km/s, comparable to the mean collision speed in the main-belt. Some of the {approx}5 to {approx} 150 {micro}m debris from each disruption was collected in aerogel capture cells, and the captured particles were analyzed by in situ synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence. For each meteorite, many of the smallest particles (< 10 {micro}m up to 35 {micro}m in size, depending on the meteorite) exhibit very high Ni/Fe ratios compared to the Ni/Fe ratios measured in the larger particles (> 45 {micro}m), a composition consistent with the smallest debris being dominated by matrix material while the larger debris is dominated by fragments from olivine chondrules. These results may explain why the {approx} 10 {micro}m interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected from the Earth's stratosphere are C-rich and volatile-rich compared to the presumed solar nebula composition. The {approx} 10 {micro}m IDPs may simply sample the matrix of an inhomogeneous parent body, structurally and mineralogically similar to the chondritic meteorites, which are inhomogeneous assemblages of compact, strong, C- and volatile-poor chondrules that are distributed in a more porous, C- and volatile-rich matrix. In addition, these results may explain why the micrometeorites, which are {approx} 50 {micro}m to millimeters in size, recovered from the polar ices are Ni- and S-poor compared to chondritic meteorites, since these polar micrometeorites may preferentially sample fragments from the Ni- and S-poor olivine chondrules. These results indicate that

  20. Unprecedented concentrations of indigenous amino acids in primitive CR meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Martins, Zita; Alexander, Conel; Orzechowska, Grazyna; Fogel, Marylin

    CR meteorites are among the most primitive meteorites. We have performed pioneering work determining the compositional characteristics of amino acids in this type of carbonaceous chondrites. We report the first measurements of amino acids in Antarctic CR meteorites, two of which show the highest amino acid concentrations ever found in a chondrite. We have analyzed the amino acid content of the Antarctic CRs EET92042, GRA95229 and GRO95577 using high performance liquid chromatography with UV fluorescence detection (HPLC-FD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Additionally, compound-specific carbon isotopic measurements for most of the individual amino acids from the EET92042 and GRA95229 meteorites were achieved by gas chromatography-combustion-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS). Our data show that EET92042 and GRA95229 are the most amino acid-rich chondrites ever analyzed, with total amino acid concentrations of 180 and 249 parts-per-million (ppm), respectively. GRO95577, however, is depleted in amino acids (determined for most amino acids indicate that primitive organic matter was preserved in these meteorites. In addition, the relative abundances of α-AIB and β-alanine amongst Antarctic CR meteorites appear to correspond to the degree of aqueous alteration on their respective parent body. Investigating the abundances and isotopic composition of amino acids in primitive chondrites helps to understand the role of meteorites as a source of extraterrestrial prebiotic organic compounds to the early Earth.

  1. Timescales of shock processes in chondritic and martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P; Gillet, Ph; El Goresy, A; Mostefaoui, S

    2005-06-23

    The accretion of the terrestrial planets from asteroid collisions and the delivery to the Earth of martian and lunar meteorites has been modelled extensively. Meteorites that have experienced shock waves from such collisions can potentially be used to reveal the accretion process at different stages of evolution within the Solar System. Here we have determined the peak pressure experienced and the duration of impact in a chondrite and a martian meteorite, and have combined the data with impact scaling laws to infer the sizes of the impactors and the associated craters on the meteorite parent bodies. The duration of shock events is inferred from trace element distributions between coexisting high-pressure minerals in the shear melt veins of the meteorites. The shock duration and the associated sizes of the impactor are found to be much greater in the chondrite (approximately 1 s and 5 km, respectively) than in the martian meteorite (approximately 10 ms and 100 m). The latter result compares well with numerical modelling studies of cratering on Mars, and we suggest that martian meteorites with similar, recent ejection ages (10(5) to 10(7) years ago) may have originated from the same few square kilometres on Mars.

  2. Castelvecchio and Castiglione del Lago: Two new Italian iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moggi Cecchi, V.; Pratesi, G.; Caporali, S.; Herd, C. D. K.; Chen, G.

    2017-08-01

    Until 2016 only 38 Italian meteorites have been classified and published on the Meteoritical Bulletin Database. Among these, only 4 were irons. We here report the results of the analyses performed on two iron meteorites recovered in Italy. The first one, Castiglione del Lago, weighing 667g, was recovered in 1970. The textural features observed by means of both optical microscope and SEM, as well as SEM-EDX and ICP-MS analyses, allowed to classify it as IAB-MG iron. The second one, named Castelvecchio, has been recovered at Lignana, near Pontito, in August 2015. In the same locality a fireball was witnessed on October 23, 1986, by Mario Goiorani, a meteorite collector. The main mass, weighing 49.5g, was recovered inside a hollow. A chip, observed with both optical metallographic microscope and SEM, displayed no kamacite lamellae at the centimetric scale, suggesting a classification as IIAB iron. This classification was confirmed by ICP-MS analyses. Both meteorites have been approved by the Meteoritical Society in 2016 and published in the on-line Meteoritical Bulletin Database (https://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor).

  3. Terrestrial Ages of Antarctic Meteorites: Up Date 1999

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.

    2000-01-01

    We are continuing our ongoing study of cosmogenic nuclides in Antarctic meteorites. In addition to the studies of exposure histories of meteorites, we study terrestrial ages and pairing of Antarctic meteorites and desert meteorites. Terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites provide information on meteorite accumulation mechanisms, mean weathering lifetimes, and influx rates. The determination of Cl-36 (half-life=3.01 x 10(exp 5) y) terrestrial ages is one of our long-term on-going projects, however, in many instances neither Cl-36 or C-14 (5,730 y) yields an accurate terrestrial age. Using Ca-41 (1.04 x 10(exp 5) y) for terrestrial age determinations solves this problem by filling the gap in half-life between C-14 and Cl-36 ages. We are now applying the new Ca-41 - Cl-36 terrestrial age method as well as the Cl-36 - Be-10 method to Antarctic meteorites. Our measurements and C-14 terrestrial age determinations by the University of Arizona group are always complementary.

  4. Multivariate Curve Resolution-Alternating Least Squares (MCR-ALS) with Raman Imaging Applied to Lunar Meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Joseph P; Smith, Frank C; Booksh, Karl S

    2017-01-01

    Lunar meteorites provide a more random sampling of the surface of the Moon than do the returned lunar samples, and they provide valuable information to help estimate the chemical composition of the lunar crust, the lunar mantle, and the bulk Moon. As of July 2014, ∼96 lunar meteorites had been documented and ten of these are unbrecciated mare basalts. Using Raman imaging with multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), we investigated portions of polished thin sections of paired, unbrecciated, mare-basalt lunar meteorites that had been collected from the LaPaz Icefield (LAP) of Antarctica-LAP 02205 and LAP 04841. Polarized light microscopy displays that both meteorites are heterogeneous and consist of polydispersed sized and shaped particles of varying chemical composition. For two distinct probed areas within each meteorite, the individual chemical species and associated chemical maps were elucidated using MCR-ALS applied to Raman hyperspectral images. For LAP 02205, spatially and spectrally resolved clinopyroxene, ilmenite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were observed within the probed areas. Similarly, for LAP 04841, spatially resolved chemical images with corresponding resolved Raman spectra of clinopyroxene, troilite, a high-temperature polymorph of anorthite, substrate-adhesive epoxy, and diamond polish were generated. In both LAP 02205 and LAP 04841, substrate-adhesive epoxy and diamond polish were more readily observed within fractures/veinlet features. Spectrally diverse clinopyroxenes were resolved in LAP 04841. Factors that allow these resolved clinopyroxenes to be differentiated include crystal orientation, spatially distinct chemical zoning of pyroxene crystals, and/or chemical and molecular composition. The minerals identified using this analytical methodology-clinopyroxene, anorthite, ilmenite, and troilite-are consistent with the results of previous studies of the two meteorites using electron microprobe

  5. Hydropyrolysis: A new technique for the analysis of macromolecular material in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Love, Gordon D.; Meredith, Will; Snape, Colin E.; Sun, Cheng-Gong; Watson, Jonathan S.

    2005-10-01

    The carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are fragments of asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the Solar System 4.56 billion years ago. The major organic component in these meteorites is a macromolecular phase that is resistant to solvent extraction. The information contained within macromolecular material can be accessed by degradative techniques such as pyrolysis. Hydropyrolysis refers to pyrolysis assisted by high hydrogen gas pressures and a dispersed sulphided molybdenum catalyst. Hydropyrolysis of the Murchison macromolecular material successfully releases much greater quantities of hydrocarbons than traditional pyrolysis techniques (twofold greater than hydrous pyrolysis) including significant amounts of high molecular weight polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) such as phenanthrene, carbazole, fluoranthene, pyrene, chrysene, perylene, benzoperylene and coronene units with varying degrees of alkylation. When hydropyrolysis products are collected using a silica trap immersed in liquid nitrogen, the technique enables the solubilisation and retention of compounds with a wide range of volatilities (i.e. benzene to coronene). This report describes the hydropyrolysis method and the information it can provide about meteorite macromolecular material constitution.

  6. First Iron Meteorites Observed By the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Rover Curiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III; Gasnault, O.; Le Mouelic, S.; Rapin, W.; Bridges, J.; Wellington, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    The MSL rover Curiosity acquired images of two large (>1m) boulders that exhibited surface textures and visible/near-infrared spectra (445-1012nm) consistent with iron meteorites, similar to those observed by the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) missions. The rocks were first observed on Sol 634 from ~110m distance and subsequently imaged on Sol 637 using Mastcam and the Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) on ChemCam. The rock "Lebanon" was observed from ~43m, and the rock "Littleton" from ~63m, revealing lustrous blue-gray color and small surface pits consistent with regmaglypts. On Sol 640, Lebanon (at ~12m distance), a nearby fragment, and Littleton (~36m) were imaged with Mastcam at 3 times of day. This included multispectral images of Lebanon along with a 6-frame RMI mosaic and a single position on Littleton. After a ~1.5 m drive closer to the rocks, additional Mastcam images were obtained prior to departure. At high resolution the surfaces were smooth with mm-scale, intermittent pockmarks. Collections of sand within regmaglypts suggested previous episodes of at least partial burial and exhumation. Mastcam reflectance spectra were red-sloped, with variations specular reflections, similar to laboratory spectra of iron meteorites (and MER spectra of similar rocks). The rocks did not exhibit the cavernous weathering or purple-hued, patchy coatings associated with meteorites observed by MER. The lack of such physio-chemical weathering may be consistent with the less acidic environments postulated for Gale Crater rocks. The close proximity of these rocks suggests they were part of the same fall. The lack of an associated impact crater suggests the event was either unable to create an impact crater (e.g., low angle entry through a thicker atmosphere), or the rocks survived after erosion of associated impact structure(s). Iron meteorites such as these may therefore provide "witness plates" to processes and environments experienced in this region since their arrival.

  7. Diamond xenolith and matrix organic matter in the Sutter's Mill meteorite measured by C-XANES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Zolensky, Michael E.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Rahman, Zia; Jenniskens, Peter; Cody, George D.

    2014-11-01

    The Sutter's Mill (SM) meteorite fell in El Dorado County, California, on April 22, 2012. This meteorite is a regolith breccia composed of CM chondrite material and at least one xenolithic phase: oldhamite. The meteorite studied here, SM2 (subsample 5), was one of three meteorites collected before it rained extensively on the debris site, thus preserving the original asteroid regolith mineralogy. Two relatively large (10 μm sized) possible diamond grains were observed in SM2-5 surrounded by fine-grained matrix. In the present work, we analyzed a focused ion beam (FIB) milled thin section that transected a region containing these two potential diamond grains as well as the surrounding fine-grained matrix employing carbon and nitrogen X-ray absorption near-edge structure (C-XANES and N-XANES) spectroscopy using a scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) (Beamline 5.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). The STXM analysis revealed that the matrix of SM2-5 contains C-rich grains, possibly organic nanoglobules. A single carbonate grain was also detected. The C-XANES spectrum of the matrix is similar to that of insoluble organic matter (IOM) found in other CM chondrites. However, no significant nitrogen-bearing functional groups were observed with N-XANES. One of the possible diamond grains contains a Ca-bearing inclusion that is not carbonate. C-XANES features of the diamond-edges suggest that the diamond might have formed by the CVD process, or in a high-temperature and -pressure environment in the interior of a much larger parent body.

  8. Bench Crater Meteorite: Hydrated Asteroidal Material Delivered to the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, K. H.; Messenger, S.; Zolensky, M. E.; Frank, D. R.; Kring, D. A.

    2013-01-01

    D/H measurements from the lunar regolith agglutinates [8] indicate mixing between a low D/H solar implanted component and additional higher D/H sources (e.g., meteoritic/ cometary/volcanic gases). We have determined the range and average D/H ratio of Bench Crater meteorite, which is the first direct D/H analysis of meteoritic material delivered to the lunar surface. This result provides an important ground truth for future investigations of lunar water resources by missions to the Moon.

  9. Mineralogical studies of lunar meteorites and their lunar analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, H.; Mori, H.; Miyamoto, M.; Ishii, T.

    1985-01-01

    The minerology and textural properties of three lunar meteorites (Yamato 791197, ALH81005, and Yamato 82192) were analyzed and compared with lunar surface rock samples. The chemical composition and textures of pyroxene and the occurrance of glass matrices were specifically addressed. The study of glass in the lunar meteorites suggests that the glass was not produced by a meteorite impact which excavated the mass into orbit towards the Earth. The glass had been devitrified on the lunar surface before the excavation, and new glass was not produced by the last impact.

  10. Meteorite falls in Bulgaria: Reappraisal of mineralogy, chemistry, and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekov, Vesselin; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe

    2017-08-01

    We present a summary of the mineralogy, mineral chemistry, and magnetic characteristics of all the five Bulgarian meteorite falls. We report the first mineralogical descriptions, chemical analyses, and magnetic measurements of the Konevo (1931) and Silistra (1917) meteorites. We classify Konevo as LL5, and Silistra as an ungrouped achondrite with HED affinities. Pavel (1966; previously classified as an H5) is reclassified as H3-anomalous. We also provide precise mineralogy and mineral chemistry of the Virba meteorite (1873, L6), and more details on the mineral chemistry of Gumoschnik (1904, H5).

  11. Effects of bulk composition on nuclide production processes in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masarik, J.; Reedy, R.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The bulk chemical composition of meteorites is a major factor influencing the production of cosmogenic nuclides. Numerical simulations using Monte Carlo particle production and transport codes were used to investigate particle fluxes, {sup 38}Ar elemental production ratios, and {sup 21}Ne/{sup 22}Ne ratios in meteorites with a wide range of compositions. The calculations show that enhanced fluxes of low-energy secondary particles in metal-rich phases explain certain experimentally observed differences in nuclide production in various meteorite classes.

  12. Meteoritics and cosmology among the Aboriginal cultures of Central Australia

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2011-01-01

    The night sky played an important role in the social structure, oral traditions, and cosmology of the Arrernte and Luritja Aboriginal cultures of Central Australia. A component of this cosmology relates to meteors, meteorites, and impact craters. This paper discusses the role of meteoritic phenomena in Arrernte and Luritja cosmology, showing not only that these groups incorporated this phenomenon in their cultural traditions, but that their oral traditions regarding the relationship between meteors, meteorites and impact structures suggests the Arrernte and Luritja understood that they are directly related.

  13. Crystal fractionation in the SNC meteorites: Implications for sample selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1988-01-01

    Almost all rock types in the SNC meteorites are cumulates, products of magma differentiation by crystal fractionation (addition or removal of crystals). If the SNC meteorites are from the surface of Mars or near subsurface, then most of the igneous units on Mars are differentiated. Basaltic units probably experienced minor to moderate differientation, but ultrabasic units probably experienced extreme differentiation. Products of this differentiation may include Fe-rich gabbro, pyroxenite, periodotite (and thus serpentine), and possibly massive sulfides. The SNC meteorites include ten lithologies (three in EETA79001), eight of which are crystal cumulates. The other lithologies, EETA79001 A and B are subophitic basalts.

  14. Preterrestrial aqueous alteration of the Lafayette (SNC) meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.; Barrett, Ruth A.; Gooding, James L.

    1993-01-01

    The structure and chemical composition of the Lafayette meteorite were examined using several methods. The meteorite contains abundant hydrous post-magnetic alteration material consisting of ferroan smectite clays, magnetite, and ferrihydrite. The textural relations, mineralogy, and composition of these materials were examined and their preterrestrial nature was documented. Olivine, pyroxene, and glass alteration are described and the bulk compositions of the alteration veinlets is discussed. Essential features of the geochemistry of the alteration processes are described. It is suggested that the alteration of the Lafayette meteorite occurred during episodic infiltrations of small volumes of saline water. Constraints placed on water chemistry and water-rock interactions in the Martian crust are outlined.

  15. Sugar-Related Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G.; Kimmich, N.; Belisle, W.; Sarinana, J.; Brabham, K.; Garrel, L.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Sugars and related polyols are critical components of all organisms and may have been necessary for the origin of life. To date, this class of organic compounds had not been definitively identified in meteorites. This study was undertaken to determine if polyols were present in the early Solar System as constituents of carbonaceous meteorites. Results of analyses of the Murchison and Murray meteorites indicate that formaldehyde and sugar chemistry may be responsible for the presence of a variety of polyols. We conclude that polyols were present on the early Earth through delivery by asteroids and possibly comets.

  16. Finite Element Estimation of Meteorite Structural Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Kenneth Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the project titled Asteroid Threat Assessment at NASA Ames Research Center is to develop risk assessment tools. The expertise in atmospheric entry in the Entry Systems and Technology Division is being used to describe the complex physics of meteor breakup in the atmosphere. The breakup of a meteor is dependent on its structural properties, including homogeneity of the material. The present work describes an 11-week effort in which a literature survey was carried for structural properties of meteoritic material. In addition, the effect of scale on homogeneity isotropy was studied using a Monte Carlo approach in Nastran. The properties were then in a static structural response simulation of an irregularly-shape meteor (138-scale version of Asteroid Itokawa). Finally, an early plan was developed for doctoral research work at Georgia Tech. in the structural failure fragmentation of meteors.

  17. Amino Acid Contents of Meteorite Mineral Separates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E. L.; Burton, A. S; Locke, D.

    2017-01-01

    Indigenous amino acids have been found indigenous all 8 carbonaceous chondrite groups. However, the abundances, structural, enantiomeric and isotopic compositions of amino acids differ significantly among meteorites of different groups and petrologic types. This suggests that parent-body conditions (thermal or aqueous alteration), mineralogy, and the preservation of amino acids are linked. Previously, elucidating specific relationships between amino acids and mineralogy was not possible because the samples analyzed for amino acids were much larger than the scale at which petrologic heterogeneity is observed (sub mm-scale differences corresponding to sub-mg samples). Recent advances in amino acid measurements and application of techniques such as high resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) for mineralogical characterizations allow us to perform coordinated analyses on the scale at which mineral heterogeneity is observed.

  18. More Evidence for Multiple Meteorite Magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2009-02-01

    Cosmochemists have identified six main compositional types of magma that formed inside asteroids during the first 100 million years of Solar System history. These magmas vary in their chemical and mineralogical make up, but all have in common low concentrations of sodium and other volatile elements. Our low-sodium-magma diet has now changed. Two groups of researchers have identified a new type of asteroidal magma that is rich in sodium and appears to have formed by partial melting of previously unmelted, volatile-rich chondritic rock. The teams, one led by James Day (University of Maryland) and the other by Chip Shearer (University of New Mexico), studied two meteorites found in Antarctica, named Graves Nunatak 06128 and 06129, using a battery of cosmochemical techniques. These studies show that an even wider variety of magmas was produced inside asteroids than we had thought, shedding light on the melting histories and formation of asteroids.

  19. Did meteorites bring the ingredients of life ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remusat, L.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are commonly considered as the most primitive meteorites and they accreted the primordial constituents of the Solar System. They are called "carbonaceous" due their high amount in extraterrestrial organic compounds. These compounds mainly formed 4.5 billion years ago by processes involving non-biologic chemical reactions, as shown by their isotopes. Among these molecules, several are considered as of biological interest because they could participate to processes equivalent to present day metabolic pathways in living cells; they include sugars, amino acids or nucleobases. These molecules being brought continuously on Earth, they may have induced the appearance of Life on Earth and/or could have an influence on the primitive forms of life.

  20. Radioactivity of the moon, planets, and meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surkou, Y. A.; Fedoseyev, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical data is summarized for the content of natural radioactive elements in meteorites, eruptive terrestrial rocks, and also in lunar samples returned by Apollo missions and the Luna series of automatic stations. The K-U systematics of samples analyzed in the laboratory are combined with data for orbital gamma-ray measurements for Mars (Mars 5) and with the results of direct gamma-ray measurements of the surface of Venus by the Venera 8 lander. Using information about the radioactivity of solar system bodies and evaluations of the content of K, U, and Th in the terrestrial planets, we examine certain aspects of the evolution of material in the protoplanetary gas-dust cloud and then in the planets of the solar system.

  1. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-06-16

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  2. The geologic classification of the meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Donald Parker

    1968-01-01

    The meteorite classes of Prior and Mason are assigned to three proposed genetic groups on the basis of a combination of compositional, mineralogical, and elemental characteristics: l) the calcium-poor, volatile-rich carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites; 2) the calcium-poor, volatile-poor chondrites (enstatite, bronzite, hypersthene, and pigeonite), achondrites (enstatite, hypersthene, and pigeonite), stonyirons (pallasites, siderophyre), and irons; and, 3) the calcium-rich (basaltic) achondrites. Chondrites are correlated with calcium-poor achondrites and the silicate phase of the pallasitic meteorites on Fe contents of olivine and pyroxene; and with metal of the stony-irons and irons on the basis of trace elements (Ga and Ge). Transitions in structure and texture between the chondrites and achondrites are recognized. The Van Schmus-Wood chemical-petrologic classification of the chondrites has been modified and expanded to a mineralogic-petrologic classification of the chondrites and calcium-poor achondrites. Chondrites apparently are the first rocks of the solar system. Paragenetic and textural relations in the Murray carbonaceous chondrite shed new light on the manner of accretion, and on the character of dispersed solid materials ('dust', and chondrules and metal) that existed in the solar system before accretion. Two pre-accretionary mineral assemblages (components) are recognized in the carbonaceous chondrites and in the unequilibrated volatile-poor chondrites. They are: 1) a 'low temperature' water-, rare gas-, and carbon-bearing component; and, 2) a high temperature anhydrous silicate and metal component. Paragenetic relations indicate that component 2 materials predate chondrite formation. An accretionary assemblage (component 3) also is recognized in the carbonaceous chondrites and in the unequilibrated volatile-poor chondrites. Component 3 consists of very fine grains of olivine and pyroxene, which occur as pervasive disseminations, as small irregular

  3. SNC meteorites - Igneous rocks from Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C. A.; Ashwal, L. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is argued that SNC (shergottite, nakhlite, chassignite) meteorites are ejecta from Mars. The mineralogy and chemistry of these objects is discussed, including rare earth element content, potassium/uranium ratios, oxidation state, oxygen isotopes, ages and isotopic evolution, magnetism, shock and texture. The possibility of SNC's deriving from Mercury, Venus, earth, moon, or a eucrite parent body is argued against. Mercury is too volatile-poor and anhydrous, Venus's atmosphere too thick and hot and its gravitational field too large, earth's oxygen isotope content too different from that of SNC's, the moon too different isotopically and chemically, and the ages of eucrites too different. Models suggest that SNC's could have escaped from Mars's gravitational field, and their composition supports Martian origin. Statistically, they could have reached the earth within their measured shock ages. Objections to the hypothesis are also discussed.

  4. Radial Breathing Modes in Cosmochemistry and Meteoritics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Wilson, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    One area of continuing interest in cosmochemistry and meteoritics (C&M) is the identification of the nature of Q-phase, although some researchers in C&M are not reporting relevant portions of Raman spectral data. Q is the unidentified carrier of noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Being carbonaceous, the focus has been on any number of Q-candidates arising from the sp2 hybridization of carbon (C). These all derive from various forms of graphene, a monolayer of C atoms packed into a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal honeycomb lattice that is the basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensions for sp2 allotropes of C. As a basic lattice, 2D graphene can be curled into fullerenes (0D), wrapped into carbon nanotubes or CNTs (1D), and stacked into graphite (3D). These take such additional forms as scroll-like carbon whiskers, carbon fibers, carbon onions, GPCs (graphite polyhedral crystals) [6], and GICs (graphite intercalation compounds). Although all of these have been observed in meteoritics, the issue is which can explain the Q-abundances. In brief, one or more of the 0D-3D sp2 hybridization forms of C is Q. For some Q-candidates, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) are the most important Raman active vibrational modes that exist, and bear a direct relevance to solving this puzzle. Typically in C&M they are ignored when present. Their importance is addressed here as smoking-gun signatures for certain Q-candidates and are very relevant to the ultimate identification of Q.

  5. Small Near-Earth Asteroids as a Source of Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Borovička, Jiří; Brown, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Small asteroids intersecting Earth's orbit can deliver extraterrestrial rocks to the Earth, called meteorites. This process is accompanied by a luminous phenomena in the atmosphere, called bolides or fireballs. Observations of bolides provide pre-atmospheric orbits of meteorites, physical and chemical properties of small asteroids, and the flux (i.e. frequency of impacts) of bodies at the Earth in the centimeter to decameter size range. In this chapter we explain the processes occurring during the penetration of cosmic bodies through the atmosphere and review the methods of bolide observations. We compile available data on the fireballs associated with 22 instrumentally observed meteorite falls. Among them are the heterogeneous falls Almahata Sitta (2008 TC$_3$) and Bene\\v{s}ov, which revolutionized our view on the structure and composition of small asteroids, the P\\v{r}\\'{\\i}bram-Neuschwanstein orbital pair, carbonaceous chondrite meteorites with orbits on the asteroid-comet boundary, and the Chelyabinsk fal...

  6. The Chelyabinsk Meteorite Hits an Anomalous Zone in the Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is "strange" because it hits an area in the Urals where anomalous events are observed: shining skies, light balls, UFOs, electrphonic bolids. The area tectonically occurs at the intersection of two fold belts: Urals and Timan.

  7. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Vishnu; Bottke, William; Cloutis, Ed; Izawa, Matt; O'Brien, Dave; Mann, Paul; Cuddy, Matt; Corre, Lucille Le; Gaffey, Michael; Fujihara, Gary

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the spectral and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its possible parent body in the main asteroid belt. Our analysis shows that the meteorite contains two spectrally distinct but compositionally indistinguishable components of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material. Our X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk meteorite are extremely similar in modal mineralogy. The meteorite is compositionally similar to LL chondrite and its most probable parent asteroid in the main belt is a member of the Flora family. Intimate mixture of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material from Chelyabinsk provides a spectral match with (8) Flora, the largest asteroid in the Flora family. The Baptistina family and Flora family overlap each other in dynamical space. Mineralogical analysis of (298) Baptistina and 9 small family members shows that their surface compositions are similar to LL chondrites, although their absorptio...

  8. Investigations of Carbon Phases in Canyon Diablo Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczemska, A.; Jakubowski, T.; Ouzillou, M.; Batory, D.; Abramczyk, H.; Brozek-Pluska, B.; Kopec, M.; Kozanecki, M.; Wiosna-Salyga, G.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray diffraction, Raman mapping and micro-spectrofluorimetric studies have been used in investigations of carbon in Canyon Diablo meteorite. Results show the presence of defected diamond and not well recognized carbon phases (unclear Raman peaks).

  9. International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The papers that were accepted for the International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution, 31 Aug. - 2 Sep. 1992, are presented. One of the major paper topics was the Sudbury project.

  10. Microprobe analysis of brine shrimp grown on meteorite extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, J. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)]. E-mail: j.kennedy@gns.cri.nz; Mautner, M.N. [Soil, Plant and Ecological Sciences Division, Lincoln University (New Zealand) and Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Christchurch 8001 (New Zealand)]. E-mail: m.mautner@solis1.com; Barry, B. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand); Markwitz, A. [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Lower Hutt (New Zealand)

    2007-07-15

    Nuclear microprobe methods have been used to investigate the uptake and distribution of various elements by brine shrimps and their unhatched eggs when grown in extracts of the Murchison and Allende carbonaceous meteorites, which were selected as model space resources. Measurements were carried out using a focussed 2 MeV proton beam raster scanned over the samples in order to obtain the average elemental concentrations. Line scans across the egg and shrimp samples show uptake of elements such as Mg, Ni, S and P which are present in the meteorites. The results confirmed that carbonaceous chondrite materials can provide nutrients, including high levels of the essential nutrient phosphate. The concentrations of these elements varied significantly between shrimp and eggs grown in extracts of the two meteorite types, which can help in identifying optimal growth media. Our results illustrate that nuclear microprobe techniques can determine elemental concentrations in organisms exposed to meteorite derived media and thus help in identifying useful future resources.

  11. Xe and Kr analyses of silicate inclusions from iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Huneke, J. C.; Burnett, D. S.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1971-01-01

    Measurements have been conducted of the amounts and isotopic composition of Xe and Kr in silicate inclusions of several iron meteorites. It is shown that the Xe and Kr contents are comparable to chondritic values. The isotopic compositions show trapped gas of both chondritic and atmospheric composition. Large spallation effects occur in some of the meteorites; the spallation spectra in some instances differ from those reported for stone meteorites. In several meteorites, very large neutron capture effects on Br and I occur. All samples have pronounced Xe129 excesses which apparently indicate differences in the formation times from chondrites of less than about 100 million years; however, the presence of trapped Xe132 in silicates which were enclosed in molten Fe-Ni and cooled slowly proves that they were not entirely outgassed, so that some of the Xe129 excess may also be trapped.

  12. Cosmogenic nuclide evidence on ages, sizes and orbits of meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, V.A.; Ustinova, G.K. [AN SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Geokhimii i Analiticheskoj Khimii

    1995-12-01

    Meteorites, being the most ancient objects in the solar system, retain evidence of many events and processes which have played, perhaps, a crucial role in its formation. To derive and interpret correctly the available information, the history and evolution of the meteorites themselves must be studied thoroughly. Due to radiogenic and cosmogenic nuclides the chronology of meteorites can be retraced from the moment of solidification to their fall to Earth. A consideration of the properties and features of meteorites with different radiogenic and cosmic-ray ages of exposure makes it possible to locate key events in their evolution on a long term scale. Peculiarities in the formation mechanism of H- and L-chondrites have emerged. (author).

  13. SNC meteorites and their implications for reservoirs of Martian volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    1993-01-01

    The SNC meteorites and the measurements of the Viking landers provide our only direct information about the abundance and isotopic composition of Martian volatiles. Indirect measurements include spectroscopic determinations of the D/H ratio of the Martian atmosphere. A personal view of volatile element reservoirs on Mars is presented, largely as inferred from the meteoritic evidence. This view is that the Martian mantle has had several opportunities for dehydration and is most likely dry, although not completely degassed. Consequently, the water contained in SNC meteorites was most likely incorporated during ascent through the crust. Thus, it is possible that water can be decoupled from other volatile/incompatible elements, making the SNC meteorites suspect as indicators of water inventories on Mars.

  14. The Shergotty consortium and SNC meteorites - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laul, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    The key up-to-date findings on the Shergotty and other SNC meteorites are summarized. The Martian origin of these meteorites is strongly suggested by the evidence of trapped noble gases and nitrogen compositions in glasses of the EETA 79001 meteorite, which compare well with the results of the Martian atmosphere investigation by the Viking spacecraft. Age-dating and exposure scenarios suggest two possibilities for the ejection of SNC meteorites: (1) ejection as a large (larger than 6 m) body by a single impact on Mars and then multiple breakup in the asteroidal belt, at about 11 Myr for Chassigny and nakhlites, at 2.5 Myr for Shergotty, Zagami and ALHA 77005, and at 0.6 Myr for EETA 79001; and (2) ejection of small (less than 0.5 m) objects by multiple impacts on the Martian terrain at 11, 2.5, and 0.6 Myr, with no breakup in space.

  15. Hypervelocity Capture of Meteoritic Particles in Nonsilica Aerogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Jones; G Flynn

    2011-12-31

    The Stardust mission captured particles from the comet 81P/Wild 2 in gradient density silica aerogel and returned the collected samples to earth in 2006. The analyses of these particles have revealed several new insights into the formation of our solar system. However, since the aerogel used as the capture material was silica, the elemental analyses of the silica-rich particles were made more complicated in certain ways due to the mixing of the silicon of the particles and that of the aerogel. By using a nonsilica aerogel, future elemental analyses of silica-rich particles captured in aerogel could be made more straightforward. Resorcinol/formaldehyde (RF), alumina, and zirconia aerogels were impact tested with meteoritic fragments and the captured fragments were mapped with synchrotron-based X-ray microprobe (XRM) and the particles were analyzed with X-ray fluorescence (XRF). The resorcinol/formaldehyde aerogel proved to be the best capture material, in that it could be keystoned and XRF could be used to locate and analyze particles that were less than 10 {micro}m.

  16. Compositions of Mars Rocks: SNC Meteorites, Differentiates, and Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, M. J.; Minitti, M.; Weitz, C. M.

    1999-01-01

    The 13 samples from Mars identified in the terrestrial meteorite collections vary from dunite to pyroxenite to microgabbro or basalt. All of these rocks appear to have formed from primitive melts with similar major element compositional characteristics; i.e., FeO-rich and Al2O3-Poor melts relative to terrestrial basalt compositions. Although all of the SNC rocks can be derived by melting of the same Al-depleted mantle, contamination of SNC's by a Rb-enriched mantle or crustal source is required to explain the different REE characteristics of SNC rocks. Thus, there are indications of an old crustal rocktype on Mars, and this rock does not appear to have been sampled. This paper focuses primarily on the composition of the SNC basalts, however, and on the compositions of rocks which could be derived from SNC basaltic melt by magmatic processes. In particular, we consider the possible compositions which could be achieved through accumulation of early-formed crystals in the SNC primitive magma. Through a set of experiments we have determined (1) melt (magma) compositions which could be produced by melt evolution as crystals are removed from batches of this magma cooling at depth, and (2) which evolved (Si02enriched, MgO-depleted) rock compositions could be produced from the SNC magma, and how these compare with the Pathfinder andesite composition. Finally, we compare the SNC magma compositions to the Mars soil composition in order to determine whether any source other than SNC is required.

  17. Rock damage caused by underground excavation and meteorite impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Bäckström, Ann

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of the origin of fractures in rock. The man-made fracturing from engineering activities in crystalline rock as well as the fracturing induced by the natural process of meteorite impacts is studied by means of various characterization methods. In contrast to engineering induced rock fracturing, where the goal usually is to minimize rock damage, meteorite impacts cause abundant fracturing in the surrounding bedrock. In a rock mass ...

  18. Comets, carbonaceous meteorites, and the origin of the biosphere

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    International audience; The Biosphere is considered to represent the Earth's crust, atmosphere, oceans, and ice caps and the living organisms that survive within this habitat. This paper considers the significance of comets and carbonaceous meteorites to the origin and evolution of the Biosphere and presents new Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM) images of indigenous microfossils in the Orgueil and Murchison meteorites. The discovery of microbial extremophiles in deep crustal...

  19. Historical Romanian meteorites: emendations of official catalogue records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lüttge-Pop

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available With its more than 50,000 valid official and provisory meteorite entries, the online catalogue of The Meteoritical Society, i.e., the Meteoritical Bulletin Database (MBDB represents the most authorized and primary source of information in the field. Unfortunately, this official reference contains some erroneous geographical information in the case of five historical Romanian meteorites. For Zsadany, the current country information is “Hungary, Bekes county” instead of Romania, Timiş County. For Mezö-Madaras and Tauti, the county affiliations “Harghita” and respectively “Cluj” have to be corrected into Mureş and Arad, respectively. Geographical coordinates for Kakowa and Ohaba require minor corrections, only. The source of these errors resides in changes of names and administrative affiliations of the localities of the fall/find, while the formal nomenclature protocol requires the meteorite name in the original description to be preserved. The example of the historical Romanian meteorites illustrates the challenges that a researcher unfamiliar with a region faces when locating old specimens, in general. This requires knowledge of regional history and geography, and sometimes access to the original references - usually not written in English, or having a somehow limited circulation. Additionally, in the last two decades several new publications provided more detailed classification information on Sopot, Ohaba, Tauti and Mocs meteorites. Sopot was classified as H5, with shock stage S3. The studied Ohaba and Tauti samples also attested S3 shock stages. Variable shock stages (S3-5 were identified in Mocs samples, the most well-known Romanian meteorite. This new information should be added to the corresponding MBDB entries.

  20. Terrestrial Kr-81-Kr ages of Antarctic meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freundel, M.; Schultz, L.; Reedy, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    The production rate of Ar-38 in meteorites P(38), has been determined, as a function of the sample's chemical composition, from Kr-81-Kr exposure ages of four eucrite falls. The cosmogenic Kr-78/Kr-83 ratio is used to estimate the shielding dependence of P(38). From the 'true' Ar-38 exposure ages and the apparent Kr-81-Kr exposure ages of nine Antarctic eucrite finds, terrestrial ages are calculated. They range from about 300,000 ages (Pecora Escarpment 82502) to very recent falls (Thiel Mountains 82502). Polymict eucrites from the Allan Hills (A78132, A79017, and A81009) have within the limits of error the same exposure age (15.2 x 10 to the 6th ages) and the same terrestrial age (110,000 ages). This is taken as strong evidence that these meteorites are fragments of the same fall. A similar case is the Elephant Moraine polymict eucrites A79005, A79006, and 82600 with an exposure age of 26 x 10 to the 6th ages and a terrestrial age of 180,000 ages. EETA 79004 may be different from this group because its exposure age and terrestrial age are 21 x 10 to the 6th ages and 250,000 ages, respectively. The distribution of terrestrial ages of Allan Hills meteorites is discussed. Meteorites from this blue ice field have two sources: directly deposited falls and meteorites transported to the Allen Hills inside the moving Antarctic ice sheet. During the surface residence time meteorites decompose due to weathering processes. The weathering 'half-life' is about 160,000 ages. From the different age distributions of Allan Hills and Yamato meteorites, it is concluded that meteorite concentrations of different Antarctic ice fields need different explanations.

  1. Meteorite fail at pueblito de allende, chihuahua, Mexico: preliminary information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E A; Schonfeld, E; Richardson, K A; Eldridge, J S

    1969-02-28

    Specimens from the meteorite fall at 1:05 a. m., on 8 February 1969 at Pueblito de Allende, Chihuahua, Mexico, have been recovered. The meteorite is a chondrite (C3 and C4) with both opaque and microcrystalline matrices. Specimens were brought to a low background gamma counter less than 4 (1/2) days after the fall, and gamma rays from short-lived isotopes have been observed.

  2. Self-assembled nanocrystals discovered in Chelyabinsk meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, D A; Bobrov, A I; Malekhonova, N V; Pirogov, A V; Nezhdanov, A V

    2014-03-05

    Current interest in nanomaterials is focused mostly on artificial materials fabricated for various applications. However, naturally occurring nanocrystal arrays, like those recently found in the meteorite that fell near Chelyabinsk in Russia on 15 February, 2013, can provide some new insights into the nature of nanomaterials, including the conditions for their natural occurrence. Here we report the results of our spectroscopic investigation of a fragment of the Chelyabinsk meteorite. The atomic structure of a fragment of the Chelyabinsk meteorite was studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Elemental and phase analysis of the object that was carried out by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron diffraction revealed the presence of crystalline phases of different chemical compounds specific to meteorites of the LL group. In addition to single-crystal inclusions, extensive areas with ferropericlase nanocrystals having characteristic sizes from 3 to 15 nm were found in the structure of the meteorite. The study of the meteorite employing combination scattering of light (Raman) and photoluminescence spectroscopy methods has revealed quantum effects of ferropericlase nanoparticles and related photoluminescence with a maximum in the range of 675-800 nm.

  3. Obtaining Magnetic Properties of Meteorites Using Magnetic Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Nabelek, L.; Mazanec, M.; Simon, K.; Hruba, J.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic images of Murchison meteorite's and Chelyabinsk meteorite's thin section have been obtained from magnetic scanning system from Youngwood Science and Engineering (YSE) capable of resolving magnetic anomalies down to 10-3 mT range from about 0.3 mm distance between the probe and meteorite surface (resolution about 0.15 mm). Anomalies were produced repeatedly, each time after application of magnetic field pulse of varying amplitude and constant, normal or reversed, direction. This process resulted in both magnetizing and demagnetizing of the meteorite thin section, while keeping the magnetization vector in the plane of the thin section. Analysis of the magnetic data allows determination of coercivity of remanence (Bcr) for the magnetic sources in situ. Value of Bcr is critical for calculating magnetic forces applicable during missions to asteroids where gravity is compromised. Bcr was estimated by two methods. First method measured varying dipole magnetic field strength produced by each anomaly in the direction of magnetic pulses. Second method measured deflections of the dipole direction from the direction of magnetic pulses (Nabelek et al., 2015). Nabelek, L., Mazanec, M., Kdyr, S., and Kletetschka, G., 2015, Magnetic, in situ, mineral characterization of Chelyabinsk meteorite thin section: Meteoritics & Planetary Science.

  4. Previously unknown class of metalorganic compounds revealed in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Alexander; Kanawati, Basem; Hertkorn, Norbert; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Moritz, Franco; Harir, Mourad; Lucio, Marianna; Michalke, Bernhard; Wimpenny, Joshua; Shilobreeva, Svetlana; Bronsky, Basil; Saraykin, Vladimir; Gabelica, Zelimir; Gougeon, Régis D.; Quirico, Eric; Ralew, Stefan; Jakubowski, Tomasz; Haack, Henning; Gonsior, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter; Hinman, Nancy W.; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    The rich diversity and complexity of organic matter found in meteorites is rapidly expanding our knowledge and understanding of extreme environments from which the early solar system emerged and evolved. Here, we report the discovery of a hitherto unknown chemical class, dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates [(OH)2MgO2CR]−, in meteoritic soluble organic matter. High collision energies, which are required for fragmentation, suggest substantial thermal stability of these Mg-metalorganics (CHOMg compounds). This was corroborated by their higher abundance in thermally processed meteorites. CHOMg compounds were found to be present in a set of 61 meteorites of diverse petrological classes. The appearance of this CHOMg chemical class extends the previously investigated, diverse set of CHNOS molecules. A connection between the evolution of organic compounds and minerals is made, as Mg released from minerals gets trapped into organic compounds. These CHOMg metalorganic compounds and their relation to thermal processing in meteorites might shed new light on our understanding of carbon speciation at a molecular level in meteorite parent bodies. PMID:28242686

  5. Previously unknown class of metalorganic compounds revealed in meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Alexander; Kanawati, Basem; Hertkorn, Norbert; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Moritz, Franco; Harir, Mourad; Lucio, Marianna; Michalke, Bernhard; Wimpenny, Joshua; Shilobreeva, Svetlana; Bronsky, Basil; Saraykin, Vladimir; Gabelica, Zelimir; Gougeon, Régis D; Quirico, Eric; Ralew, Stefan; Jakubowski, Tomasz; Haack, Henning; Gonsior, Michael; Jenniskens, Peter; Hinman, Nancy W; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2017-03-14

    The rich diversity and complexity of organic matter found in meteorites is rapidly expanding our knowledge and understanding of extreme environments from which the early solar system emerged and evolved. Here, we report the discovery of a hitherto unknown chemical class, dihydroxymagnesium carboxylates [(OH)2MgO2CR](-), in meteoritic soluble organic matter. High collision energies, which are required for fragmentation, suggest substantial thermal stability of these Mg-metalorganics (CHOMg compounds). This was corroborated by their higher abundance in thermally processed meteorites. CHOMg compounds were found to be present in a set of 61 meteorites of diverse petrological classes. The appearance of this CHOMg chemical class extends the previously investigated, diverse set of CHNOS molecules. A connection between the evolution of organic compounds and minerals is made, as Mg released from minerals gets trapped into organic compounds. These CHOMg metalorganic compounds and their relation to thermal processing in meteorites might shed new light on our understanding of carbon speciation at a molecular level in meteorite parent bodies.

  6. ``Campo del Cielo'' Meteorites: Astronomical Heritage and Cultural Colonialism

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro Martín; Altman, Agustina

    2012-09-01

    In the province of Chaco, Argentina, there is a very unique dispersion of metallic meteorites called ``Campo del Cielo''. One of the meteoric fragments of this dispersion, the meteorite called ``El Chaco'', consisting of 37 tons, is the second heaviest in the world. These meteorites are of great importance to the worldview of the Moqoit, aboriginal people that inhabit this region. For the local Creole population the meteorites are also relevant, that's why they have being cited in numerous documents and reports since the colonial period. During the first months of 2012, two Argentine artists and the Artistic Director of the German contemporary art exhibition called dOCUMENTA (13) tried to move ``El Chaco'' meteorite to Germany in order to exhibit it as an artistic object. Due to the fact that moving the meteorite could have a negative impact according to the Moqoit cosmology and that they were not able to participate in the decision they begun a manifestation against the movement of El Chaco. The opposition made by aboriginal communities and experts in cultural astronomy was able to stop the transfer. The whole process and its impact on the local community have promoted a deep discussion about art, science and cultural colonialism. In this paper we aim to address this debate and its consequences. This will allow us to think about contemporary forms of colonialism that are hidden in many scientific and artistic projects. Furthermore, we aim to debate about the most effective ways of protecting astronomical heritage in the Third World.

  7. Magnetic studies on Shergotty and other SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisowski, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    The results of a study of basic magnetic properties of meteorites within the SNC group, including the four known shergottites and two nakhlites, are presented. An estimate is made of the strength of the magnetic field which produced the remanent magnetization of the Shergotty meteorite, for the purpose of constraining the choices for the parent body of these SNC meteorites. Remanence measurements in several subsamples of Shergotty and Zagami meteorites reveal a large variation in intensity that does not seem to be related to the abundance of remanence carriers. The other meteorites carry only weak remanence, suggesting weak magnetizing fields as the source of their magnetic signal. A paleointensity experiment on a weakly magnetized subsample of Shergotty revealed a low temperature component of magnetization acquired in a field of 2000 gammas, and a high temperature component reflecting a paleofield strength of between 250 and 1000 gammas. The weak field environment that these meteorites seem to reflect is consistent with either a Martian or asteroidal origin, but inconsistent with a terrestrial origin.

  8. Molecular and Enantiomeric Analysis of Organic Compounds in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George

    2003-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are relatively enriched in carbon. Much of this carbon is in the form of soluble organic compounds. The Murchison and Murray meteorites are the best-characterized carbonaceous meteorites with respect to organic chemistry. Their content of organic compounds has led to an initial understanding of early solar system organic chemistry as well as what compounds may have played a role in the origin of life (Cronin and Chang, 1993). Reported compounds include: amino acids, amides, carboxylic acids, sulfonic acids, and polyols. This talk will focus on the molecular and enantiomeric analysis of individual meteoritic compounds: polyol acids; and a newly identified class of meteorite compounds, keto acids, i.e., acetoacetic acid, levulinic acid, etc. Keto acids (including pyruvic) are critically important in all contemporary organisms. They are key intermediates in metabolism and processes such as the citric acid cycle. Using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry we identified individual meteoritic keto acids after derivatization to one or more of the following forms: isopropyl ester (ISP), trimethyIsiIy1 (TMS), tert-butyldimethylsilyl (BDMS). Ongoing analyses will determine if, in addition to certain amino acids from Murchison (Cronin and Pizzarello, 1997), other potentially important prebiotic compounds also contain enantiomeric excesses, i.e., excesses that could have contributed to the current homochirality of life.

  9. Assessing the Origins of Aliphatic Amines in the Murchison Meteorite from their Compound-Specific Carbon Isotopic Ratios and Enantiomeric Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Jose; Dworkin, Jason; Elsila, Jamie E.

    2014-01-01

    The study of meteoritic organic compounds provides a unique window into the chemical inventory of the early Solar System and prebiotic chemistry that may have been important for the origin of life on Earth. Multiple families of organic compounds have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite, which is one of the most thoroughly studied carbonaceous chondrites. The amino acids extracted from Murchison have been extensively analyzed, including measurements of non-terrestrial stable isotopic ratios and discoveries of L-enantiomeric excesses for alpha-dialkyl amino acids, notably isovaline. However, although the isotopic signatures of bulk amine-containing fractions have been measured, the isotopic ratios and enantiomeric composition of individual aliphatic amines, compounds that are chemically related to amino acids, remain unknown. Here, we report a novel method for the extraction, separation, identification and quantitation of aliphatic monoamines extracted from the Murchison meteorite. Our results show a complete suite of structural isomers, with a larger concentration of methylamine and ethylamine and decreasing amine concentrations with increasing carbon number. The carbon isotopic compositions of fourteen meteoritic aliphatic monoamines were measured, with delta C-13 values ranging from +21% to +129%, showing a decrease in C-13 with increasing carbon number, a relationship that may be consistent with the chain elongation mechanism under kinetic control previously proposed for meteoritic amino acids. We also found the enantiomeric composition of sec-butylamine, a structural analog to isovaline, was racemic within error, while the isovaline extracted from the same Murchison piece showed an L-enantiomeric excess of 9.7; this result suggested that processes leading to enantiomeric excess in the amino acid did not affect the amine. We used these collective data to assess the primordial synthetic origins of these meteoritic aliphatic amines and their potential

  10. Environmental Effects of Small Meteorite Impact in Unconsolidated Sediments — Case of Iron Meteorite Shower in Morasko, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczuciński, W.; Pleskot, K.; Makohonienko, M.; Tjallingii, R.; Apolinarska, K.; Cerbin, S.; Goslar, T.; Nowaczyk, N.; Rzodkiewicz, M.; Słowiński, M.; Woszczyk, M.; Brauer, A.

    2016-08-01

    We show record of environmental consequences of mid-Holocene small meteorite impact. It is based on sedimentological, geochemical and biological indicators studied in lake deposits, which revealed relatively small extent of the impact effects.

  11. The Antarctic Search for Meteorites: The Future of Space, on Earth Today - EVA Knowledge Capture Outbrief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Stan

    2013-01-01

    NASA astronaut Stan Love shared his experiences with the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET), an annual expedition to the southern continent to collect valuable samples for research in planetary science. ANSMET teams operate from isolated, remote field camps on the polar plateau, where windchill factors often reach -40 F. Several astronaut participants have noted ANSMET's similarity to a space mission. Some of the operational concepts, tools, and equipment employed by ANSMET teams may offer valuable insights to designers of future planetary surface exploration hardware.

  12. Atmospheric trajectory and heliocentric orbit of the Ejby meteorite fall in Denmark on February 6, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurný, P.; Borovička, J.; Baumgarten, G.; Haack, H.; Heinlein, D.; Sørensen, A. N.

    2017-09-01

    A very bright bolide illuminated the sky over Denmark and neighboring countries on February 6th, 2016 at 21:07:18-23UT. It terminated by a multiple meteorite fall in the heavily populated area of the western outskirts of Copenhagen. Several meteorites classified as the H5/6 ordinary chondrites have been found shortly after the fall and total recovered mass reached almost 9 kg (Haack, 2016). Although this spectacular bolide has been reported by many casual witnesses, the instrumental records are very scarce, mainly due to bad weather over Denmark and neighboring countries. Despite it we were able to collect five instrumental records taken from different locations which were useful for the analysis of this event. We used three high resolution digital photographic images taken in Germany, one high resolution radiometric light curve taken by the northernmost Czech automated fireball observatory and one video record taken by a surveillance camera on the Danish west coast where a part of the fireball trajectory was recorded. It allowed us to reliably determine basic parameters defining the luminous trajectory of the bolide in the atmosphere and also heliocentric orbit of the initial meteoroid causing this spectacular meteorite fall. We found that this event was caused by a relatively fragile 50 cm meteoroid with initial mass about 250 kg. It entered the atmosphere with velocity of 14.5 km s-1 and quite steep entry angle of 62°. Its luminous flight started at 85.5 km and after 76 km long trajectory it terminated at 18.3 km. The heliocentric orbit of this meteoroid was of Apollo type with low inclination of 1° and perihelion distance just inside the Earth's orbit. It had a relatively large semimajor axis of 2.8 AU and aphelion distance 4.64 AU. It is the second largest aphelion distance among all meteorites with known orbits and the orbit had the same character as that of the Košice meteorite (H5 ordinary chondrite), which fell on February 28, 2010 (Borovička et al

  13. Identification of new meteorite, Mihonoseki (L), from broken fragments in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Y.; Noma, Y.

    1993-01-01

    New meteorite of Mihonoseki fallen in Shimane-ken was identified by fine broken pieces by using an energy-dispersive scanning electron microprobe analyzer. It shows fusion-crust (i.e. Fe-Si melt), meteoritic minerals (kamacite, taenite, troilite, amorphous plagioclase etc.) and chrondrule with clear glassy rim. Mineralogical, and petrological data of several fine grains suggest that broken fragments of Mihonoseki are L3/4 chondritic meteorite which is the first identification in a Japanese fallen meteorite. The prompt identification method of meteorite-fragments will be applied to the next lunar, Martian and asteroid explorations, as well as meteorite falls on the terrestrial surface.

  14. Development of a Digital Meteorite Identification Program at University of New Mexico (UNM) (Institute of Meteoritics) and Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute (SIPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakin, R.; Lewis, K.; Simmons, J.; Gchachu, K.; Karner, J. M.; Newsom, H. E.; Jones, R. H.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the origin and chemical composition of suspect extra terrestrial specimens has lead to meteorite identification research programs. Such programs, like the University of New Mexico-Southwestern Indian Polytechnic Institute partnership, are being inundated with many non-meteorites (meteor wrongs) sent in by interested individuals from all over the world. This meteorite identification program developed a spreadsheet that aids in identifying the types of minerals in a sample for physical properties, possible meteorite characteristics, minerals and rock properties, and possible man made characteristics. Samples that show meteorite distinctiveness are further analyzed via the Scanning Electron Microprobe (SEM).

  15. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2009-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC(sub 3) called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase high-perfo rmance liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection a nd time-of-flight mass spectrometry (HPLC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sam ple analysis consortium. HPLC analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to six-carbon aliph atic amino acids and one- to three carbon amines with abundances rang ing from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, Beta-amino-n-butyric acid (Beta-ABA), 2-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (no rvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicat ing that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not te rrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha -aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methybutanoic acid, 4-a mino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. Th e total abundances of isovaline and AlB in Almahata Sitta are approximately 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous meteorite Murchison. The extremely love abund ances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous meteorites and may be due to extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent aster oid by partial melting during formation or impact shock heating.

  16. Effects of sonochemical treatment on meteoritic nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatolii V.; Verchovsky, Sasha B.; Shiryaev, Andrei A.; Semjonova, Luba F.

    2017-01-01

    A nanodiamond-rich fraction (NDF) separated from the Orgueil meteorite was subjected to a high-intensity ultrasonic treatment in a weakly acidic aqueous solution. After sedimentation by centrifugation, two fractions of grains (suspension, designated as OD7C and sediment, designated as OD7D) with different properties have been obtained. The following effects of the sonication were revealed from comparison of the contents and isotope compositions of C, N, and Xe released during stepped pyrolysis and combustion of the fractions OD7C and OD7D, the initial NDF and two grain-size fractions (OD10 and OD15) produced without sonication (a) surface layer of the sonicated diamond grains is modified to different extent in comparison with nontreated ones, (b) in some grains concentrations of the bulk N and Xe a reduced significantly, and (c) nondiamond nitrogen containing phases (e.g., Si3N4) have been destroyed. It is suggested that combined effects of the sonication and centrifugation observed for the fractions OD7C and OD7D are due to differences in surface chemistry of the nanodiamond grains, which statistically influences behavior of nanoparticles during the sonication resulting in their preferential modification in the different reaction zones of the cavitating fluid.

  17. The formation of IIE iron meteorites investigated by the chondrule-bearing Mont Dieu meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Roosbroek, N.; Debaille, V.; Pittarello, L.; Goderis, S.; Humayun, M.; Hecht, L.; Jourdan, F.; Spicuzza, M. J.; Vanhaecke, F.; Claeys, Ph.

    2015-07-01

    A 435 kg piece of the Mont Dieu iron meteorite (MD) contains cm-sized silicate inclusions. Based on the concentration of Ni, Ga, Ge, and Ir (8.59 ± 0.32 wt%, 25.4 ± 0.9 ppm, 61 ± 2 ppm, 7.1 ± 0.4 ppm, respectively) in the metal host, this piece can be classified as a IIE nonmagmatic iron. The silicate inclusions possess a chondritic mineralogy and relict chondrules occur throughout the inclusions. Major element analysis, oxygen isotopic analysis (Δ17O = 0.71 ± 0.02‰), and mean Fa and Fs molar contents (Fa15.7 ± 0.4 and Fs14.4 ± 0.5) indicate that MD originated as an H chondrite. Because of strong similarities with Netschaëvo IIE, MD can be classified in the most primitive subgroup of the IIE sequence. 40Ar/39Ar ages of 4536 ± 59 Ma and 4494 ± 95 Ma obtained on pyroxene and plagioclase inclusions show that MD belongs to the old (~4.5 Ga) group of IIE iron meteorites and that it has not been perturbed by any subsequent heating event following its formation. The primitive character of MD sheds light on the nature of its formation process, its thermal history, and the evolution of its parent body.

  18. Exchange of Meteorites (and Life?) Between Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that meteorite-size fragments of rock can be ejected from planetary bodies. Numerical studies of the orbital evolution of such planetary ejecta are consistent with the observed cosmic ray exposure times and infall rates of these meteorites. All of these numerical studies agree that a substantial fraction (up to one-third) of the ejecta from any planet in our Solar System is eventually thrown out of the Solar System during encounters with the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. In this paper I examine the probability that such interstellar meteorites might be captured into a distant solar system and fall onto a terrestrial planet in that system within a given interval of time. The overall conclusion is that it is very unlikely that even a single meteorite originating on a terrestrial planet in our solar system has fallen onto a terrestrial planet in another stellar system, over the entire period of our Solar System's existence. Although viable microorganisms may be readily exchanged between planets in our solar system through the interplanetary transfer of meteoritic material, it seems that the origin of life on Earth must be sought within the confines of the Solar System, not abroad in the galaxy.

  19. The meteoritic origin of Tutankhamun's iron dagger blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comelli, Daniela; D'Orazio, Massimo; Folco, Luigi; El-Halwagy, Mahmud; Frizzi, Tommaso; Alberti, Roberto; Capogrosso, Valentina; Elnaggar, Abdelrazek; Hassan, Hala; Nevin, Austin; Porcelli, Franco; Rashed, Mohamed G.; Valentini, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    Scholars have long discussed the introduction and spread of iron metallurgy in different civilizations. The sporadic use of iron has been reported in the Eastern Mediterranean area from the late Neolithic period to the Bronze Age. Despite the rare existence of smelted iron, it is generally assumed that early iron objects were produced from meteoritic iron. Nevertheless, the methods of working the metal, its use, and diffusion are contentious issues compromised by lack of detailed analysis. Since its discovery in 1925, the meteoritic origin of the iron dagger blade from the sarcophagus of the ancient Egyptian King Tutankhamun (14th C. BCE) has been the subject of debate and previous analyses yielded controversial results. We show that the composition of the blade (Fe plus 10.8 wt% Ni and 0.58 wt% Co), accurately determined through portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, strongly supports its meteoritic origin. In agreement with recent results of metallographic analysis of ancient iron artifacts from Gerzeh, our study confirms that ancient Egyptians attributed great value to meteoritic iron for the production of precious objects. Moreover, the high manufacturing quality of Tutankhamun's dagger blade, in comparison with other simple-shaped meteoritic iron artifacts, suggests a significant mastery of ironworking in Tutankhamun's time.

  20. Meteorites on Mars observed with Mars Exploration Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroder, C.; Rodionov, D.S.; McCoy, T.J.; Jolliff, B.L.; Gellert, Ralf; Nittler, L.R.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Ruff, S.W.; Ashley, James W.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Fleischer, I.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Klingelhofer, G.; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; de Souza, P.A.; Squyres, S. W.; Weitz, C.; Yen, A. S.; Zipfel, J.; Economou, T.

    2008-01-01

    Reduced weathering rates due to the lack of liquid water and significantly greater typical surface ages should result in a higher density of meteorites on the surface of Mars compared to Earth. Several meteorites were identified among the rocks investigated during Opportunity's traverse across the sandy Meridiani plains. Heat Shield Rock is a IAB iron meteorite and has been officially recognized as 'Meridiani Planum.' Barberton is olivine-rich and contains metallic Fe in the form of kamacite, suggesting a meteoritic origin. It is chemically most consistent with a mesosiderite silicate clast. Santa Catarina is a brecciated rock with a chemical and mineralogical composition similar to Barberton. Barberton, Santa Catarina, and cobbles adjacent to Santa Catarina may be part of a strewn field. Spirit observed two probable iron meteorites from its Winter Haven location in the Columbia Hills in Gusev Crater. Chondrites have not been identified to date, which may be a result of their lower strengths and probability to survive impact at current atmospheric pressures. Impact craters directly associated with Heat Shield Rock, Barberton, or Santa Catarina have not been observed, but such craters could have been erased by eolian-driven erosion. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Exchange of meteorites (and life?) between stellar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melosh, H J

    2003-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that meteorite-size fragments of rock can be ejected from planetary bodies. Numerical studies of the orbital evolution of such planetary ejecta are consistent with the observed cosmic ray exposure times and infall rates of these meteorites. All of these numerical studies agree that a substantial fraction (up to one-third) of the ejecta from any planet in our Solar System is eventually thrown out of the Solar System during encounters with the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. In this paper I examine the probability that such interstellar meteorites might be captured into a distant solar system and fall onto a terrestrial planet in that system within a given interval of time. The overall conclusion is that it is very unlikely that even a single meteorite originating on a terrestrial planet in our solar system has fallen onto a terrestrial planet in another stellar system, over the entire period of our Solar System's existence. Although viable microorganisms may be readily exchanged between planets in our solar system through the interplanetary transfer of meteoritic material, it seems that the origin of life on Earth must be sought within the confines of the Solar System, not abroad in the galaxy.

  2. On the isotopic composition of magmatic carbon in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, I. P.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.

    1992-01-01

    SNC meteorites are thought, from many lines of evidence, to come from Mars. A line of investigation which has been pursued in our laboratory over the years involves measurement of the stable isotopic composition of carbon, in its various forms, in SNC meteorites. In order to establish a firm basis for studying the isotopic systematics of carbon in the martian surface environment, it is first necessary to try and constrain the delta C-13 of bulk Mars. Taking all of the available information, it would seem that the delta C-13 of the Earth's mantle lies somewhere in the range of -5 to -7 percent. Preliminary assessment of magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites, would tend to suggest a delta C-13 of 20 to 30 percent, which is conspicuously different from that of the terrestrial mantle. It is not obvious why there should be such a difference between the two planets, although many explanations are possible. One of these possibilities, that previous delta C-13 measurements for magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites are in error to some degree, is being actively investigated. The most recent results seem to constrain the theta C-13 of the magnetic carbon in SNC meteorites to about -20 percent, which is not at odds with previous estimates. As such, it is considered that a detailed investigation of the carbon isotopic systematics of martian surface materials does have the necessary information with which to proceed.

  3. Historical Uses of Meteoritic Metals as Precedent for Modern In-Situ Asteroid Mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krispin, D.; Mardon, A. A.; Fawcett, B. G.

    2016-08-01

    The strain on earth's resources of metal and the metallic density of meteorites mean that in situ asteroid mining is advisable. This has precedent: Use of meteoritic metal dates back to ancient times.

  4. Study of the Circumstance of Meteorites "Northwest Africa" Finds Contribution to an Appropriate Renomenclature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouknine, L.; Kliri, F.; Ibhi, A.

    2016-08-01

    This work tries to respond to solicitations from researchers of the region to highlight the meteorites recovered in Morocco and neighboring countries. The objectives assigned to this study are the contextualization of the finds of meteorites NWA.

  5. Chronological and chemical studies on several differentiated meteorites. Bunkashita inseki no kagakuteki/nendaigakuteki kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, K. (The Inst. of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan). Earth Science Lab.)

    1994-03-24

    Materials on the earth generally pass though the metamorphosing, igneous and the weathering action in a long time, meteorites were considered to faithfully reflect occurrence from the birth to the first stage of the solar system according to the chemical composition. Meteorites are divided into the original chondrites and the differentiated meteorites. In the studies on the origin and evolution of planets, the differentiated meteorites can mainly give the important informations. In the differentiated meteorites, the lithic material is called as achondrites, only five to six kinds have been known until now. With the development of recent researches, discover of meteorites related to the origin of Mars and moon, kinds of meteorites become variety, and studies are also more detailed. In this paper, concerning to the origin of three kinds of achondrites such as eucrites, howardites and diogenites in the differentiated meteorites, the age measurement made by authors was mainly described. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. 1992 WAMET/EUROMET Joint Expedition to Search for Meteorites in the Nullarbor Region, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, A.

    1992-07-01

    The Nullarbor Region is a limestone desert in the south of Australia. It forms part of the larger Eucla Basin, which straddles the border between South Australia and Western Australia. The portion of the Eucla Basin lying in Westem Australia covers an area of about 104,000 km^2 (Bevan and Binns, 1989) and meteorites have been recovered from this region since 1971, new material being deposited at the Western Australia Museum. Between 21/3/92 and 6/4/92 a joint expedition between the Western Australia Museum and EUROMET recovered approximately 440 specimens of meteorites (total mass 13206 g) and 297 tektites. The expedition, whose members were Claude Perron (Paris), Christian Koeberl (Vienna), Georg Delisle (BGR Hannover), Gian- Paolo Sighinolfi (Modena), and Andrew Morse (OU) for Euromet, together with Wayne Smith (Australian Army) and Tom Smith (Perth Astronomical Observatory), was led by Dr Alex Bevan of the Western Australia Museum. Searching was carried out on foot with the participants spread out in a line with a 10-m spacing, walking along a compass bearing for approximately 10 km and back each day. Eight collecting regions were used, with a stop of about 2 days at each camp. Half of the searching was done near known strewn fields in order that the team become practised. Thus the expedition collected material at the following known sites. Camel Donga, Eucrite: The initial recovery was made in 1984 (Cleverly et al., 1986). The strewn field is about 8 km by 2-3 km at coordinates 30 degrees 19'S, 126 degrees 37'E. This expedition recovered 65 stones weighing a total of 2456 g, plus one stone of 4.8 g that was clearly chondritic in hand specimen. Mulga (north), H6: The initial recovery was made in 1964 (McCall, 1968). The strewn field is 8 km by 2 km at coordinates 30 degrees 11'S, 126 degrees 22'E and on this expedition 5 stones were recovered with a weight of 548 g. Also 110 stones (total mass 1535 g) that are certainly not H6 were found within a 100-m radius of

  7. Discovery of seifertite in a shocked lunar meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Masaaki; Kaneko, Shohei; Ohtani, Eiji; Sakai, Takeshi; Nagase, Toshiro; Kayama, Masahiro; Nishido, Hirotsugu; Hirao, Naohisa

    2013-01-01

    Many craters and thick regoliths of the moon imply that it has experienced heavy meteorite bombardments. Although the existence of a high-pressure polymorph is a stark evidence for a dynamic event, few high-pressure polymorphs are found in a lunar sample. α-PbO₂-type silica (seifertite) is an ultrahigh-pressure polymorph of silica, and is found only in a heavily shocked Martian meteorite. Here we show evidence for seifertite in a shocked lunar meteorite, Northwest Africa 4734. Cristobalite transforms to seifertite by high-pressure and -temperature condition induced by a dynamic event. Considering radio-isotopic ages determined previously, the dynamic event formed seifertite on the moon, accompanying the complete resetting of radio-isotopic ages, is ~2.7 Ga ago. Our finding allows us to infer that such intense planetary collisions occurred on the moon until at least ~2.7 Ga ago.

  8. Noble gases and cosmogenic radionuclides in the Eltanin Pacific meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogard, D D; Garrison, D H; Caffee, M W; Kyte, F; Nishiizumi, K

    2000-01-14

    A 1.5 cm long, 1.2 g specimen of the Eltanin meteorite was found at 10.97 m depth in Polarstern piston core PS2704-1. The early studies indicated that the small fragments of the Eltanin meteorite was debris from a km-sized asteroid which impacted into the deep-ocean basin. In this study, the authors measured {sup 39}Ar-{sup 40}Ar age, noble gases, and cosmogenic radionuclides in splits of specimen as a part of consortium studies of Eltanin meteorite. They concluded that the specimen was about 3 m deep from the asteroid surface. The exposure age of the Eltanin asteroid was about 20 Myr.

  9. Fungal Peptaibiotics: Assessing Potential Meteoritic Amino Acid Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Callahan, M. P.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Bruckner, H.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of non-protein alpha-dialkyl-amino acids such as alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-A1B) and isovaline (Iva), which are relatively rare in the terrestrial biosphere, has long been used as an indication of the indigeneity of meteoritic amino acids, however, the discovery of alpha-AIB in peptides producers by a widespread group of filamentous fungi indicates the possibility of a terrestrial biotic source for the alpha-AIB observed in some meteorites. The alpha-AIB-containing peptides produced by these fungi are dubbed peptaibiotics. We measured the molecular distribution and stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios for amino acids found in the total hydrolysates of four biologically synthesized peptaibiotics. We compared these aneasurenetts with those from the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Murchison and from three Antarctic CR2 carbonaceous chondrites in order to understand the peptaibiotics as a potential source of meteoritic contamination.

  10. Investigating the Hydration of CM2 meteorites by IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Góbi, S; Beck, P; Quirico, E; Schmidt, B

    2014-01-01

    Chondritic meteorites are of great interest since they are one of the most ancient remnants of the early solar system. Some of them, like the carbonaceous CM meteorites experienced aqueous alteration thus their olivine content transformed more or less into hydrated silicates such as phyllosilicates. These hydrated CM2 meteorites have been investigated in KBr pellets by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. In our focus of interest was to study the 3 and 10 $\\mu$m (3000 and 1000 cm$^{-1}$, the O$-$H and silicate streching) bands of several CM2 chondrites. By investigating these signals the water content and the extent of hydration can be determined. In order to achieve this, development of a new pellet production method was essential. This technique facilitates the elimination of adsorbed water coming from the surrounding environment, which would complicate correct interpretation of the results.

  11. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of meteorites recovered on Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, K. [Showa Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sci., Tokyo (Japan); Hirunuma, R. [Showa Coll. of Pharmaceutical Sci., Tokyo (Japan); Shinonaga, T. [Dept. of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Ebihara, M. [Dept. of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan); Nakahara, H. [Dept. of Chemistry, Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan)

    1994-11-01

    The chemical states of iron in sixteen Antarctic meteorites belonging to H-group chondrites were studied by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy. An Fe-Ni alloy, troilite, paramagnetic Fe(III), and two kinds of paramagnetic Fe(II) were observed in each meteorite. The Moessbauer parameters indicated that the Fe(II) components can be assigned to olivine and some pyroxenes. The relative area intensities of Fe(III) in the chondrites correlated positively with iodine content, which was determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis, and those of two Fe(II)-species correlated negatively with the content. On the basis of the data on the halogen and the Moessbauer spectrocopy, the terrestrial contamination on Antarctic meteorites is discussed. (orig.)

  12. Recent advances in studies of meteorites using cosmogenic radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reedy, Robert C. E-mail: rreedy@unm.edu

    2004-08-01

    The use of accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to measure cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites has greatly enabled studies of cosmic-ray exposure histories. The high sensitivity of AMS has allowed measurements of samples that are very small or have very low activities. AMS measurements have much better accuracy and precision than usually possible with decay counting. AMS allows the routine measurements of many long-lived radionuclides, including some with half-lives not regularly measured previously or some made by neutron-capture reactions (such as {sup 36}Cl, {sup 41}Ca and {sup 59}Ni). These advancements have enabled many meteorite studies that previously were not often done, such as terrestrial ages. All aspects of a meteorite's cosmic-ray exposure history, its ages and geometries, now can be better studied.

  13. Oral Histories in Meteoritics and Planetary Science—XXIII: Dieter Stöffler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Derek W. G.

    2013-09-01

    In this interview, Dieter Stöffler (Fig. 1) describes how his interest in meteorites and impact craters dates from his Ph.D. studies at the University of Tübingen when it was learned that the Ries crater was formed by impact. A paper by Dieter's advisor, Wolf von Engelhardt, also triggered an interest in meteorites. After graduation, Dieter helped to establish a laboratory for high pressure mineralogy and he examined rocks from the Ries crater, which led to the concept of progressive shock metamorphism. The group also worked on newly returned Apollo samples and guided astronauts over the crater. A year at the NASA Ames Research Center taught Dieter about experimental impact research with a light-gas gun. After a few more years at Tübingen, Dieter obtained a professorship at the University of Münster where he created the Institute of Planetology, got involved in planning space missions including comet sample return, and continued high pressure mineralogy in collaboration with colleagues in Freiburg. Through several decades of research, Dieter and colleagues have documented the effects of shock on all the major rock-forming minerals and devised widely accepted schemes for the classification of shocked rocks. After the unification of Germany, Dieter became Director of the Natural History Museum in Berlin, during which he made much progress rebuilding the laboratories and the collections. Dieter also helped to create a museum and research center in the Ries crater. He received the Barringer Award of the Meteoritical Society in 1994 and several prestigious awards in Germany.

  14. The organic content of the Tagish Lake meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, S; Huang, Y; Becker, L; Poreda, R J; Nieman, R A; Cooper, G; Williams, M

    2001-09-21

    The Tagish Lake meteorite fell last year on a frozen lake in Canada and may provide the most pristine material of its kind. Analyses have now shown this carbonaceous chondrite to contain a suite of soluble organic compounds (approximately 100 parts per million) that includes mono- and dicarboxylic acids, dicarboximides, pyridine carboxylic acids, a sulfonic acid, and both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. The insoluble carbon exhibits exclusive aromatic character, deuterium enrichment, and fullerenes containing "planetary" helium and argon. The findings provide insight into an outcome of early solar chemical evolution that differs from any seen so far in meteorites.

  15. Impact-derived features of the Xiuyan meteorite crater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming

    2008-01-01

    Up to now, 176 meteorite impact craters have been found on the Earth. Among these craters, none of them lies in China. The Xiuyan crater is located in the Liaodong Peninsula of China. This bowl-shaped crater has a diameter of 1.8 km and depth of about 150 m. The impact-derived features include planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz, shatter cones, impact breccia, and radial valleys on the wall of rim. It is the first confirmed meteorite impact crater in China.

  16. Phenolic ethers in the organic polymer of the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, R.; Winans, R. E.; Scott, R. G.; McBeth, R. L.; Moore, L. P.; Studier, M. H.

    1980-03-01

    Results of the oxidation of the organic polymer of the Murchison meteorite with alkaline cupric oxide, a mild-oxidant specific for cleaving ether linkages, are reported. Qualitative analyses by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, solid-probe mass spectrometry and high-resolution mass spectrometry reveal the presence of large amounts of meta-hydroxybenzoic acid and 3-hydroxy-1,5-benzenedicarboxylic acid, along with seven phenolic acids, in the oxidized solution, indicating the presence of phenolic ethers and of aryl alkyl ethers having no nuclear hydroxy group in the meteorite. The formation of phenolic ethers in the solar nebula by Fischer-Tropsch type reactions is then discussed.

  17. Yes, Kakangari is a unique chondrite. [meteoritic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A. M.; Grossman, L.; Ganapathy, R.

    1977-01-01

    The position of the Kakangari chondrite as the representative of a new class of chondrites is considered, taking into account the results of the analysis of a 17.1-mg piece of Kakangari for 20 elements. Elemental concentration data are compared for Kakangari and other meteorite groups. Data for the most similar groups, C2, C3(V), L, and E4 chondrites are represented in a graph along with Kakangari data. It is found that pronounced differences exist between Kakangari and the other meteorite classes.

  18. Iron meteorite fragment studied by atomic and nuclear analytical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesnek, Martin; Štefánik, Milan; Kmječ, Tomáš; Miglierini, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Chemical and structural compositions of a fragment of Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite were investigated by X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS). XRF and NAA revealed the presence of chemical elements which are characteristic for iron meteorites. XRF also showed a significant amount of Si and Al on the surface of the fragment. MS spectra revealed possible presence of α-Fe(Ni, Co) phase with different local Ni concentration. Furthermore, paramagnetic singlet was detected in Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature and at 4.2 K.

  19. Preferential occupation of pyroxene sites by iron in diogenite meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, H. C., E-mail: hcverma@iitk.ac.in [IIT, Department of Physics (India); Tewari, V. C. [Wadia Institute of Himalayan Geology (India); Paliwal, B. S. [J N V University, Department of Geology (India); Tripathi, R. P. [J N V University, Department of Physics (India)

    2008-09-15

    Three diogenite meteorites ALHA77256-121, Tatahounie and Bilanga are studied using Moessbauer spectroscopy to look at the iron occupancy in the two inequivalent pyroxene sites. Though the three meteorites belong to three different conditions, one is an Antarctica find, one is 75 years old fall and one is a recent fall, the iron occupancy in pyroxene sites is very similar. Fe{sup 2+} occupies only the less distorted site and hence a single sharp doublet is observed in the Moessbauer spectra of all these samples. In contrast eucrites show a distribution of iron ions in the two sites of pyroxenes.

  20. James Sowerby: meteorites and his meteoritic sword made for the Emperor of Russia, Alexander I, in 1814

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Paul

    2013-01-01

    James Sowerby included meteorites in his publications of British and exotic natural history and so raised interest in their nature and origins at a time of much debate and involving the President of the Royal Society, Sir Joseph Banks. The celebrations over the defeat of France in 1814 prompted Sowerby to make a sword from the Cape of Good Hope iron meteorite to present to the Russian Emperor, Alexander I, at the time of his state visit to London in June 1814 and in recognition of his achievements in bringing peace to Europe. The story of its attempted presentation, its final reception and the following response, including publications, all helped to increase interest in meteorites and their properties. The rediscovery of the sword after a lengthy disappearance probably brings an unusual saga to a fitting close.

  1. Characterization of Meteorites by Focused Ion Beam Sectioning: Recent Applications to CAIs and Primitive Meteorite Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoffersen, Roy; Keller, Lindsay P.; Han, Jangmi; Rahman, Zia; Berger, Eve L.

    2015-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning has revolutionized preparation of meteorite samples for characterization by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and other techniques. Although FIB is not "non-destructive" in the purest sense, each extracted section amounts to no more than nanograms (approximately 500 cubic microns) removed intact from locations precisely controlled by SEM imaging and analysis. Physical alteration of surrounding material by ion damage, fracture or sputter contamination effects is localized to within a few micrometers around the lift-out point. This leaves adjacent material intact for coordinate geochemical analysis by SIMS, microdrill extraction/TIMS and other techniques. After lift out, FIB sections can be quantitatively analyzed by electron microprobe prior to final thinning, synchrotron x-ray techniques, and by the full range of state-of-the-art analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) techniques once thinning is complete. Multiple meteorite studies supported by FIB/FE-STEM are currently underway at NASA-JSC, including coordinated analysis of refractory phase assemblages in CAIs and fine-grained matrices in carbonaceous chondrites. FIB sectioning of CAIs has uncovered epitaxial and other overgrowth relations between corundum-hibonite-spinel consistent with hibonite preceding corundum and/or spinel in non-equilibrium condensation sequences at combinations of higher gas pressures, dust-gas enrichments or significant nebular transport. For all of these cases, the ability of FIB to allow for coordination with spatially-associated isotopic data by SIMS provides immense value for constraining the formation scenarios of the particular CAI assemblage. For carbonaceous chondrites matrix material, FIB has allowed us to obtain intact continuous sections of the immediate outer surface of Murchison (CM2) after it has been experimentally ion processed to simulate solar wind space weathering. The surface

  2. Seismic detectability of meteorite impacts on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Daisuke; Teanby, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    Europa, the second of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, has an icy outer shell, beneath which there is probably liquid water in contact with a rocky core. Europa, may thus provide an example of a sub-surface habitable environment so is an attractive object for future lander missions. In fact, the Jupiter Icy Moon Explorer (JUICE) mission has been selected for the L1 launch slot of ESA's Cosmic Vision science programme with the aim of launching in 2022 to explore Jupiter and its potentially habitable icy moons. One of the best ways to probe icy moon interiors in any future mission will be with a seismic investigation. Previously, the Apollo seismic experiment, installed by astronauts, enhanced our knowledge of the lunar interior. For a recent mission, NASA's 2016 InSight Mars lander aims to obtain seismic data and will deploy a seismometer directly onto Mars' surface. Motivated by these works, in this study we show how many meteorite impacts will be detected using a single seismic station on Europa, which will be useful for planning the next generation of outer solar system missions. To this end, we derive: (1) the current small impact flux on Europa from Jupiter impact rate models; (2) a crater diameter versus impactor energy scaling relation for ice by merging previous experiments and simulations; (3) scaling relations for seismic signals as a function of distance from an impact site for a given crater size based on analogue explosive data obtained on Earth's icy surfaces. Finally, resultant amplitudes are compared to the noise level of a likely seismic instrument (based on the NASA InSight mission seismometers) and the number of detectable impacts are estimated. As a result, 0.5-3.0 local/regional small impacts (i.e., direct P-waves through the ice crust) are expected to be detected per year, while global-scale impact events (i.e., PKP-waves refracted through the mantle) are rare and unlikely to be detected by a short duration mission. We note that our results are

  3. Magnesium isotope systematics in Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magna, Tomáš; Hu, Yan; Teng, Fang-Zhen; Mezger, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    Magnesium isotope compositions are reported for a suite of Martian meteorites that span the range of petrological and geochemical types recognized to date for Mars, including crustal breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034. The δ26Mg values (per mil units relative to DSM-3 reference material) range from -0.32 to -0.11‰; basaltic shergottites and nakhlites lie to the heavier end of the Mg isotope range whereas olivine-phyric, olivine-orthopyroxene-phyric and lherzolitic shergottites, and chassignites have slightly lighter Mg isotope compositions, attesting to modest correlation of Mg isotopes and petrology of the samples. Slightly heavier Mg isotope compositions found for surface-related materials (NWA 7034, black glass fraction of the Tissint shergottite fall; δ26Mg > -0.17‰) indicate measurable Mg isotope difference between the Martian mantle and crust but the true extent of Mg isotope fractionation for Martian surface materials remains unconstrained. The range of δ26Mg values from -0.19 to -0.11‰ in nakhlites is most likely due to accumulation of clinopyroxene during petrogenesis rather than garnet fractionation in the source or assimilation of surface material modified at low temperatures. The rather restricted range in Mg isotope compositions between spatially and temporally distinct mantle-derived samples supports the idea of inefficient/absent major tectonic cycles on Mars, which would include plate tectonics and large-scale recycling of isotopically fractionated surface materials back into the Martian mantle. The cumulative δ26Mg value of Martian samples, which are not influenced by late-stage alteration processes and/or crust-mantle interactions, is - 0.271 ± 0.040 ‰ (2SD) and is considered to reflect δ26Mg value of the Bulk Silicate Mars. This value is robust taking into account the range of lithologies involved in this estimate. It also attests to the lack of the Mg isotope variability reported for the inner Solar System bodies at current

  4. On the origins of trapped helium, neon and argon isotopic variations in meteorites. I - Gas-rich meteorites, lunar soil and breccia. II - Carbonaceous meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, D. C.

    1972-01-01

    Data are presented from stepwise heating experiments and total extractions on five meteorites: Kapoeta, Fayetteville, Holman Island, Cee Vee, and Pultusk. These data reveal the presence of four isotopically distinct trapped neon components. A comparison of trapped neon with trapped helium and argon in bulk analyses indicates the existence of correlated helium, neon and argon isotopic structures. Component B is attributed primarily to direct implantation of rare gas ions by the present day solar wind. Component C is identified with directly implanted low energy (1-10 Mev/n) solar flare rare gases. Component D is associated with rare gas ions implanted in meteoritic material by the primitive, pre-main sequence, solar wind. A fourth component, observed only in Kapoeta and the lunar fines and breccia, is tentatively attributed to parent body 'atmospheric' ions implanted in surface material by a solar wind induced electric field.

  5. Shock-transformation of whitlockite to merrillite and the implications for meteoritic phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adcock, C. T.; Tschauner, O.; Hausrath, E. M.; Udry, A.; Luo, S. N.; Cai, Y.; Ren, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Kunz, M.; Lin, C.

    2017-01-01

    Meteorites represent the only samples available for study on Earth of a number of planetary bodies. The minerals within meteorites therefore hold the key to addressing numerous questions about our solar system. Of particular interest is the Ca-phosphate mineral merrillite, the anhydrous end-member of the merrillite–whitlockite solid solution series. For example, the anhydrous nature of merrillite in Martian meteorites has been interpreted as evidence of water-limited late-stage Martian melts. However, recent research on apatite in the same meteorites suggests higher water content in melts. One complication of using meteorites rather than direct samples is the shock compression all meteorites have experienced, which can alter meteorite mineralogy. Here we show whitlockite transformation into merrillite by shock-compression levels relevant to meteorites, including Martian meteorites. The results open the possibility that at least part of meteoritic merrillite may have originally been H+-bearing whitlockite with implications for interpreting meteorites and the need for future sample return. PMID:28262701

  6. Buddha from space - An ancient object of art made of a Chinga iron meteorite fragment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, Elmar; Schmieder, Martin; Kurat, Gero; Brandstńtter, Franz; Kramar, Utz; Ntaflos, Theo; Kröchert, Jörg

    2012-09-01

    The fall of meteorites has been interpreted as divine messages by multitudinous cultures since prehistoric times, and meteorites are still adored as heavenly bodies. Stony meteorites were used to carve birds and other works of art; jewelry and knifes were produced of meteoritic iron for instance by the Inuit society. We here present an approximately 10.6 kg Buddhist sculpture (the “iron man”) made of an iron meteorite, which represents a particularity in religious art and meteorite science. The specific contents of the crucial main (Fe, Ni, Co) and trace (Cr, Ga, Ge) elements indicate an ataxitic iron meteorite with high Ni contents (approximately 16 wt%) and Co (approximately 0.6 wt%) that was used to produce the artifact. In addition, the platinum group elements (PGEs), as well as the internal PGE ratios, exhibit a meteoritic signature. The geochemical data of the meteorite generally match the element values known from fragments of the Chinga ataxite (ungrouped iron) meteorite strewn field discovered in 1913. The provenance of the meteorite as well as of the piece of art strongly points to the border region of eastern Siberia and Mongolia, accordingly. The sculpture possibly portrays the Buddhist god Vaiśravana and might originate in the Bon culture of the eleventh century. However, the ethnological and art historical details of the “iron man” sculpture, as well as the timing of the sculpturing, currently remain speculative.

  7. The organic composition of carbonaceous meteorites: the evolutionary story ahead of biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra; Shock, Everett

    2010-03-01

    Carbon-containing meteorites provide a natural sample of the extraterrestrial organic chemistry that occurred in the solar system ahead of life's origin on the Earth. Analyses of 40 years have shown the organic content of these meteorites to be materials as diverse as kerogen-like macromolecules and simpler soluble compounds such as amino acids and polyols. Many meteoritic molecules have identical counterpart in the biosphere and, in a primitive group of meteorites, represent the majority of their carbon. Most of the compounds in meteorites have isotopic compositions that date their formation to presolar environments and reveal a long and active cosmochemical evolution of the biogenic elements. Whether this evolution resumed on the Earth to foster biogenesis after exogenous delivery of meteoritic and cometary materials is not known, yet, the selective abundance of biomolecule precursors evident in some cosmic environments and the unique L-asymmetry of some meteoritic amino acids are suggestive of their possible contribution to terrestrial molecular evolution.

  8. Nature's Starships. I. Observed Abundances and Relative Frequencies of Amino Acids in Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Cobb, Alyssa K

    2014-01-01

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. The...

  9. Investigation of Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites and their Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jesper Christian

    . Moreover, high-precision tungsten and zirconium isotope results for bulk meteorites and inclusions help constrain the nature and degree of processing experienced by dust and gas present in the protoplanetary disk. Our results show that short-lived radionuclei 182Hf and 26Al had different stellar sources...

  10. Radioactivities in returned lunar materials and in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon 14 terrestial ages were determined with low level minicomputers and accelerator mass spectrometry on 1 Yamato and 18 Allan Hills and nearby sited meteorites. Techniques for an accelerator mass spectrometer which make C(14) measurements on small samples were developed. Also Be(10) concentrations were measured in Byrd core and Allan Hills ice samples.

  11. Mechanical properties of several iron-nickel meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulford, Roberta N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; El - Dasher, Bassem [LLNL

    2011-01-06

    Iron-nickel meteorites exhibit a unique lamellar microstructure, consisting of small regions with steep-iron-nickel composition gradients. The microstructure arises as a result of slow cooling in a planetary core or other large mass. The microstructure is further influenced by variable concentrations of other elements such as phosphorous which may have influenced cooling and phase separation. Mechanical properties of these composite structures have been investigated using Vickers and spherical indentation, x-ray fluorescence, and EBSD. Direct observation of mechanical properties in these highly structured materials provides a valuable supplement to bulk measurements, which frequently exhibit large variation in dynamic properties, even within a single sample. Previous studies of the mechanical properties of a typical iron-nickel meteorite, a Diablo Canyon specimen, indicated that the strength of the composite was higher by almost an order of magnitude than values obtained from laboratory-prepared specimens. This was ascribed to the extreme work-hardening evident in the EBSD measurements. Additional specimens from the Canyon Diablo fall (type IAB, coarse octahedrite) and several fine octahedrite meteorites, from the Muonionalusta meteorite (IVA) and Gibeon fall (IVA), have been examined to establish a range of error on the previously measured yield, to determine the extent to which deformation upon reentry contributes to yield, and to establish the degree to which the strength varies as a function of microstructure.

  12. Solar nebula magnetic fields recorded in the Semarkona meteorite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fu, Roger R.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Lima, Eduardo A.

    2014-01-01

    on the intensity of these fields. Here we show that dusty olivine-bearing chondrules from the Semarkona meteorite were magnetized in a nebular field of 54 ± 21 microteslas. This intensity supports chondrule formation by nebular shocks or planetesimal collisions rather than by electric currents, the x-wind...

  13. International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    The papers that were accepted for the International Conference on Large Meteorite Impacts and Planetary Evolution, 31 Aug. - 2 Sep. 1992, are presented. One of the major paper topics was the Sudbury project. Separate abstracts were prepared for papers from this report.

  14. Compositional differences between meteorites and near-Earth asteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, P; Binzel, R P; Thomas, C A; DeMeo, F E; Bus, S J; Rivkin, A S; Tokunaga, A T

    2008-08-14

    Understanding the nature and origin of the asteroid population in Earth's vicinity (near-Earth asteroids, and its subset of potentially hazardous asteroids) is a matter of both scientific interest and practical importance. It is generally expected that the compositions of the asteroids that are most likely to hit Earth should reflect those of the most common meteorites. Here we report that most near-Earth asteroids (including the potentially hazardous subset) have spectral properties quantitatively similar to the class of meteorites known as LL chondrites. The prominent Flora family in the inner part of the asteroid belt shares the same spectral properties, suggesting that it is a dominant source of near-Earth asteroids. The observed similarity of near-Earth asteroids to LL chondrites is, however, surprising, as this meteorite class is relatively rare ( approximately 8 per cent of all meteorite falls). One possible explanation is the role of a size-dependent process, such as the Yarkovsky effect, in transporting material from the main belt.

  15. Pure iron and other magnetic minerals in meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechersky, D. M.; Markov, G. P.; Tsel'movich, V. A.

    2015-01-01

    The results of thermomagnetic and microprobe analyses of 37 samples from 25 different types of meteorite are analyzed with the focus on the presence of pure (nickel-free) iron in them. It is established that the metallic particles in the studied meteorites cluster in three isolated groups: (1) pure iron, (2) kamacite with mode 3-6% Ni, and (3) taenite with mode ˜50% Ni. The hiatuses in the Fe-Ni alloy compositions between these groups of magnetic grains contradict the Fe-Ni phase diagram, which predicts a continuous series of solid solutions in this system. This isolated distribution of the compositions of the metallic particles in the meteorites is reasonably accounted for by the specific properties of the melt (melts) and the processes of their crystallization and decomposition in space. It is suggested that pure iron in the meteorites could have been formed by either of two scenarios. According to the "primary," pure iron crystallizes from the melt, and according to the "secondary" scenario, it is produced by the decomposition of the solid solution.

  16. Mapping the Iron Oxidation State in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A. M.; Treimann, A. H.; Righter, K.

    2017-01-01

    Several types of Martian igneous meteorites have been identified: clinopyroxenites (nakhlites), basaltic shergottites, peridotitic shergottites, dunites (chassignites) and orthopyroxenites [1,2]. In order to constrain the heterogeneity of the Martian mantle and crust, and their evolution through time, numerous studies have been performed on the iron oxidation state of these meteorites [3,4,5,6,7,8,9]. The calculated fO2 values all lie within the FMQ-5 to FMQ+0.5 range (FMQ representing the Fayalite = Magnetite + Quartz buffer); however, discrepancies appear between the various studies, which are either attributed to the choice of the minerals/melts used, or to the precision of the analytical/calculation method. The redox record in volcanic samples is primarily related to the oxidation state in the mantle source(s). However, it is also influenced by several deep processes: melting, crystallization, magma mixing [10], assimilation and degassing [11]. In addition, the oxidation state in Martian meteorites is potentially affected by several surface processes: assimilation of sediment/ crust during lava flowing at Mars' surface, low temperature micro-crystallization [10], weathering at the surface of Mars and low temperature reequilibration, impact processes (i.e. high pressure phase transitions, mechanical mixing, shock degassing and melting), space weathering, and weathering on Earth (at atmospheric conditions different from Mars). Decoding the redox record of Martian meteorites, therefore, requires large-scale quantitative analysis methods, as well as a perfect understanding of oxidation processes.

  17. Studies of noble gases in meteorites and in the earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.P.

    1979-01-01

    The isotopic and elemental abundances of noble gases in the solar system are investigated, using simple mixing models and mass-spectrometric measurements of the noble gases in meteorites and terrestrial rocks and minerals. Primordial neon is modeled by two isotopically distinct components from the interstellar gas and dust. Neon from the gas dominates solar neon, which contains about ten times more /sup 20/Ne than /sup 22/Ne. Neon in meteorites consists of galactic cosmic ray spallation neon and at least two primordial components, neon-E and neon-S. Neon was measured in several meteorites to investigate these end-members. Ca,Al-rich inclusions from the Allende meteorite were examined for correlation between neon-E and oxygen or magnesium isotopic anomalies. Measurements were made to determine the noble gas contents of various terrestrial rocks and minerals, and to investigate the cycling of noble gases between different terrestrial reservoirs. Juvenile and atmospheric gases have been measured in the glassy rims of mid-ocean ridge (MOR) pillow basalts. Evidence is presented that three samples contain excess radiogenic /sup 129/Xe and fission xenon, in addition to the excess radiogenic /sup 40/Ar found in all samples. The Skaergaard data demonstrate that atmospheric noble gases dissolved in ground water can be transferred into crustal rocks. Subduction of oceanic crust altered by seawater can transport atmospheric noble gases into the upper mantle.

  18. Sink or Swim: Meteorites and the Ice Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evatt, G. W.; Mallinson, A.; Joy, K. H.; Smedley, A. R. D.; Abrahams, I. D.

    2016-08-01

    Only 0.7% of Antarctica’s recovered meteorites are iron-based, significantly below the 5.5% recovered from the rest of the Earth. The goal of our work is to find the missing Antarctic specimens, and see if an analogous situation exists in Greenland.

  19. Origin of excess 176Hf in meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Kristine; Connelly, James; Bizzarro, Martin

    2010-01-01

    After considerable controversy regarding the (176)Lu decay constant (lambda(176)Lu), there is now widespread agreement that (1.867 +/- 0.008) x 10(-11) yr(-1) as confirmed by various terrestrial objects and a 4557 Myr meteorite is correct. This leaves the (176)Hf excesses that are correlated with...

  20. Protostellar Cosmic Rays and Extinct Radioactivities in Meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. [Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115 (Taiwan); Shu, F.H.; Shang, H. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Glassgold, A.E. [Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Rehm, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439-4832 (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Calcium-aluminum{endash}rich inclusions (CAIs) and chondrules of chondritic meteorites may originate with the melting of dustballs launched by a magnetically driven bipolar outflow from the inner edge of the primitive solar nebula. Bombardment by protostellar cosmic rays may make the rock precursors of CAIs and chondrules radioactive, producing radionuclides found in meteorites that are difficult to obtain with other mechanisms. Reasonable scalings from the observed hard X-rays for the cosmic-ray protons released by flares in young stellar objects yield the correct amounts of {sup 41}Ca, {sup 53}Mn, and {sup 138}La inferred for meteorites, but proton- and {alpha}-induced transformations underproduce {sup 26}Al by a factor of about 20. The missing {sup 26}Al may be synthesized by {sup 3}He nuclei accelerated in impulsive flares reacting primarily with {sup 24}Mg, an abundant isotope in the target precursor rocks. The mechanism allows a simple explanation for the very different ratios of {sup 26}Al/{sup 27}Al inferred for normal CAIs, CAIs with fractionated and unidentified nuclear (FUN) anomalies, and chondrules. The overproduction of {sup 41}Ca by analogous {sup 3}He reactions and the case of {sup 60}Fe inferred for eucritic meteorites require special interpretations in this picture. {copyright} {ital {copyright} 1998.} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  1. Thermoluminescence study of the terrestrial ages of antarctic meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakanishi, Akio [Shiga Univ., Otsu (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    The terrestrial ages of Antarctic meteorites were estimated from the thermoluminescence (TL) intensity of the fusion crust. It was found that there is a good correlation between the TL intensities and terrestrial ages which had been previously determined by cosmogenic radionuclide abundance. (Author).

  2. The large crater origin of SNC meteorites. [Shergottite, Nakhlite, Chassigny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, A. M.; Melosh, H. J.

    1987-01-01

    A large body of evidence strongly suggests that the shergottite, nakhlite, and Chassigny (SNC) meteorites are from Mars. Various mechanisms for the ejection of large rocks at Martian escape velocity (5 km/sec) have been investigated, but none has proved wholly satisfactory. This article examines a number of possible ejection and cosmic-ray exposure histories to determine which is most plausible. For each possible history, the Melosh (1984, 1985, 1987) spallation model is used to estimate the size of the crater required to produce ejecta fragments of the required size with velocities not less than 5 km/sec and to produce a total mass of solid ejecta consistent with the observed mass flux of SNC meteorites. Estimates of crater production rates on Mars are then used to evaluate the probability that sufficiently large craters have formed during the available time. The results indicate that the SNC meteorites were probably ejected from a very large crater (greater than 100 kilometers in diameter) about 200 million years ago, and that cosmic-ray exposure of the recovered meteorites was initiated after collisional fragmentation of the original ejecta in space at much later times (0.5 to 10 million years ago).

  3. Spectral reflectance of SNC meteorites: Relationships to Martian surface composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcfadden, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    The spectral signatures of each of the Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (SNC) meteorite types measured to date are unique among extraterrestrial materials. Reflectance spectra of dark regions of Mars show evidence of basaltic composition. Analytic analysis of absorption band positions and widths in reflectance spectra of SNC meteorites will permit comparisons with spectra from approximately 600 km sized regions for which high-quality, near-IR spectra are available. Multi-spectral mapping data from orbital spacecraft is expected to provide the necessary spectra to determine basaltic compositions of smaller regions on Mars provided fresh, unaltered basalts can be observed or the effects of Martian weathering can be understood and removed from the spectra. With modeling of spectral weathering and mixing of SNC meteoritic assemblages it should be possible with the Mars Observer data to test for the presence of SNC analogs on the Martian surface. Before the relationship between the basaltic composition of units on Mars and the SNC meteorites can be addressed, it is necessary to analyze the absorption band parameters of the SNC reflectance spectra and to acquire high resolution spectral data on smaller regions of the Martian surface.

  4. Mars regolith versus SNC meteorites: Evidence for abundant crustal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Paul H.

    1987-01-01

    Viking XRF analyses are compared with those for terrestrial and lunar basalt samples, and eucritic meteorites (of possible Mars origin). The comparison indicates depletion of Ca relative to Si in the Mars regolith. It is suggested that carbonate formation during a warmer, wetter epoch early in Mars' history could have been responsible.

  5. Fossils of Prokaryotic microorganisms in the Orgueil meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-08-01

    The Orgueil CI1 meteorite, which fell in southern France on the evening of May 14, 1864, has been one of the most extensively studied of all known carbonaceous meteorites. Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and FESEM) studies of freshly fractured interior surfaces of the Orgueil meteorite have resulted in the detection of the fossilized remains of a large and diverse population of filamentous prokaryotic microorganisms. The taphonomy and the modes of the preservation of these remains are diverse. Some of the remains exhibit carbonization of a hollow sheath and in other cases the remains are permineralized with watersoluble evaporite minerals, such as magnesium sulfate or ammonium salts. Images and EDS spectral data are provided documenting a variety of Orgueil microstructures: abiotic evaporite minerals; pre-solar grains; framboids, ovoids and fluorine-rich filaments of indeterminate biogenicity. These results provide information regarding the size, size range, morphologies and chemical compositions of abiotic microstructures found in native cryptohalite and crystalline and fibrous epsomites from Poison Lake, Washington, USA and Catalayud, Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain. High resolution ESEM and FESEM secondary and backscattered electron Images and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) data will also be presented of recognizable filamentous cyanobacteria and other prokaryotic microfossils. Many of the microfossils found embedded in the meteorite rock matrix are consistent in size and microstructure with known genera and species of filamentous cyanobacteria. Many of these forms can be recognized as morphotypes of cyanobacteria belonging to the Order Oscillatoriaceae. These large, complex microstructures are clearly distinguishable from the abiotic minerals examined - cryptohalite and fibrous epsomites. Many of the well-preserved filamentous forms in the Orgueil meteorite are embedded in the rock matrix and exhibit identifiable

  6. Isotopic Measurements of Organic Sulfonates From The Murchison Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, G. W.; Chang, S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Organic sulfonates and phosphonates have been extracted from the Murchison meteorite for stable isotope measurements. Preliminary stable isotope measurements of individual alkyl sulfonates, R-SO3H (R=C(sub n)H(sub 2n+l)), are shown. These compounds were found in aqueous extracts of Murchison. Both groups show trends similar to other homologous series of organic compounds indigenous to Murchison. Molecular abundances decrease with increasing carbon number, and all possible isomers at each carbon number (through C-4) are present. Carbon isotope measurements of the sulfonates show a decrease in the C-13/C-12 ratio with increasing carbon number. The overall objectives of this project are to obtain dime element carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur - intramolecular isotopic analyses of individual sulfonates, and isotopic measurement of carbon and hydrogen of the phosphonates as a group. The Murchison meteorite is the best characterized carbonaceous chondrite with respect to organic chemistry. The finding of organic sulfonates and phosphonates in Murchison is of interest because they are the first well-characterized series of sulfur and phosphorus containing organic compounds found in meteorites. Also, meteorites, comets, and interplanetary dust particles may have been involved in chemical evolution on the early Earth. Because of the critical role of organic phosphorus and sulfur in all living systems, it is particularly interesting to see examples of abiotic syntheses of these classes of compounds. The study of the isotopic composition of the sulfonates and phosphonates can yield insight into their possible interstellar origin as well as their mechanisms of synthesis in the early solar system. Previous isotopic analyses of other classes of organic compounds indigenous to meteorites, e.g., amino acids, carboxylic acids, and hydrocarbons indicate the possibility that interstellar molecules were incorporated into meteorite parent bodies. In these compounds the ratios of heavy to

  7. Comets, carbonaceous meteorites, and the origin of the biosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    r. b. Hoover

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Biosphere is considered to represent the Earth's crust, atmosphere, oceans, and ice caps and the living organisms that survive within this habitat. This paper considers the significance of comets and carbonaceous meteorites to the origin and evolution of the Biosphere and presents new Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM images of indigenous microfossils in the Orgueil and Murchison meteorites. The discovery of microbial extremophiles in deep crustal rocks, hydrothermal vents and ancient ice has established that the biosphere is far more extensive than previously recognized. Chemical and molecular biomarkers and microfossils in Archaean rocks indicate that life appeared very early on the primitive Earth and the origin of the biosphere is closely linked with the emergence of life. The role of comets, carbonaceous meteorites, interstellar dust and asteroids in the delivery of water, organics and prebiotic chemicals to Earth during the Hadean (4.5–3.8 Ga period of heavy bombardment has become more widely recognized. Spacecraft observations of the chemical compositions and characteristics of the nuclei of several comets (Halley, Borrelly, Wild 2, and Tempel 1 have established that comets contain complex organic chemicals; that water is the predominant volatile; and that high temperatures (~400 K can be reached on the black (albedo~0.03 nuclei when near perihelion. The microscopic dust particles in the Tempel 1 ejecta are similar in size to the particulates of the Orgueil meteorite and evidence is mounting that comets may represent the parent bodies of the CI meteorites. Impact craters and pinnacles on comet Wild 2 suggest a thick crust. Episodic outbursts and jets of Halley, Borrelly, Wild 2 and Tempel 1 near perihelion indicate that localized regimes of liquid water may periodically exist beneath the thick crust of many comets. This increases the possibility that microbial life might survive in comets and therefore the

  8. Organic Analysis of Catalytic Fischer-Tropsch Type Synthesis Products: Are they Similar to Organics in Chondritic Meteorites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazzie, Cyriah A.; Locke, Darren R.; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2014-01-01

    Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis of organic compounds has been hypothesized to occur in the early solar nebula that formed our Solar System. FTT is a collection of abiotic chemical reactions that convert a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen over nano-catalysts into hydrocarbons and other more complex aromatic compounds. We hypothesized that FTT can generate similar organic compounds as those seen in chondritic meteorites; fragments of asteroids that are characteristic of the early solar system. Specific goals for this project included: 1) determining the effects of different FTT catalyst, reaction temperature, and cycles on organic compounds produced, 2) imaging of organic coatings found on the catalyst, and 3) comparison of organic compounds produced experimentally by FTT synthesis and those found in the ordinary chondrite LL5 Chelyabinsk meteorite. We used Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (PY-GCMS) to release organic compounds present in experimental FTT and meteorite samples, and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) to take images of organic films on catalyst grains.

  9. Connecting Lunar Meteorites to Source Terrains on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, B. L.; Carpenter, P. K.; Korotev, R. L.; North-Valencia, S. N.; Wittmann, A.; Zeigler, R. A.

    2014-01-01

    The number of named stones found on Earth that have proven to be meteorites from the Moon is approx. 180 so far. Since the Moon has been mapped globally in composition and mineralogy from orbit, it has become possible to speculate broadly on the region of origin on the basis of distinctive compositional characteristics of some of the lunar meteorites. In particular, Lunar Prospector in 1998 [1,2] mapped Fe and Th at 0.5 degree/pixel and major elements at 5 degree/pixel using gamma ray spectroscopy. Also, various multispectral datasets have been used to derive FeO and TiO2 concentrations at 100 m/pixel spatial resolution or better using UV-VIS spectral features [e.g., 3]. Using these data, several lunar meteorite bulk compositions can be related to regions of the Moon that share their distinctive compositional characteristics. We then use EPMA to characterize the petrographic characteristics, including lithic clast components of the meteorites, which typically are breccias. In this way, we can extend knowledge of the Moon's crust to regions beyond the Apollo and Luna sample-return sites, including sites on the lunar farside. Feldspathic Regolith Breccias. One of the most distinctive general characteristics of many lunar meteorites is that they have highly feldspathic compositions (Al2O3 approx. 28% wt.%, FeO <5 wt.%, Th <1 ppm). These compositions are significant because they are similar to a vast region of the Moon's farside highlands, the Feldspathic Highlands Terrane, which are characterized by low Fe and Th in remotely sensed data [4]. The meteorites provide a perspective on the lithologic makeup of this part of the Moon, specifically, how anorthositic is the surface and what, if any, are the mafic lithic components? These meteorites are mostly regolith breccias dominated by anorthositic lithic clasts and feldspathic glasses, but they do also contain a variety of more mafic clasts. On the basis of textures, we infer these clasts to have formed by large impacts

  10. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr Isotopic Studies of Meteorite Kalahari 009: An Old VLT Mare Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Reese, Y.; Bischoff, A.

    2008-01-01

    Lunar meteorite Kalahari 009 is a fragmental basaltic breccia contain ing various very-low-Ti (VLT) mare basalt clasts embedded in a fine-g rained matrix of similar composition. This meteorite and lunar meteorite Kalahari 008, an anorthositic breccia, were suggested to be paired mainly due to the presence of similar fayalitic olivines in fragment s found in both meteorites. Thus, Kalahari 009 probably represents a VLT basalt that came from a locality near a mare-highland boundary r egion of the Moon, as compared to the typical VLT mare basalt samples collected at Mare Crisium during the Luna-24 mission. The concordant Sm-Nd and Ar-Ar ages of such a VLT basalt (24170) suggest that the extrusion of VLT basalts at Mare Crisium occurred 3.30 +/- 0.05 Ga ag o. Previous age results for Kalahari 009 range from approximately 4.2 Ga by its Lu-Hf isochron age to 1.70?0.04 Ga of its Ar-Ar plateau ag e. However, recent in-situ U-Pb dating of phosphates in Kalahari 009 defined an old crystallization age of 4.35+/- 0.15 Ga. The authors su ggested that Kalahari 009 represents a cryptomaria basalt. In this r eport, we present Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotopic results for Kalahari 009, discuss the relationship of its age and isotopic characteristics to t hose of other L-24 VLT mare basalts and other probable cryptomaria ba salts represented by Apollo 14 aluminous mare basalts, and discuss it s petrogenesis.

  11. Siderophile element systematics of IAB complex iron meteorites: New insights into the formation of an enigmatic group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsham, Emily A.; Bermingham, Katherine R.; Walker, Richard J.

    2016-09-01

    Siderophile trace element abundances and the 187Re-187Os isotopic systematics of the metal phases of 58 IAB complex iron meteorites were determined in order to investigate formation processes and how meteorites within chemical subgroups may be related. Close adherence of 187Re-187Os isotopic data of most IAB iron meteorites to a primordial isochron indicates that the siderophile elements of most members of the complex remained closed to elemental disturbance soon after formation. Minor, presumably late-stage open-system behavior, however, is observed in some members of the sLM, sLH, sHL, and sHH subgroups. The new siderophile element abundance data are consistent with the findings of prior studies suggesting that the IAB subgroups cannot be related to one another by any known crystallization process. Equilibrium crystallization, coupled with crystal segregation, solid-liquid mixing, and subsequent fractional crystallization can account for the siderophile element variations among meteorites within the IAB main group (MG). The data for the sLM subgroup are consistent with equilibrium crystallization, combined with crystal segregation and mixing. By contrast, the limited fractionation of siderophile elements within the sLL subgroup is consistent with metal extraction from a chondritic source with little subsequent processing. The limited data for the other subgroups were insufficient to draw robust conclusions about crystallization processes involved in their formation. Collectively, multiple formational processes are represented in the IAB complex, and modeling results suggest that fractional crystallization within the MG may have been a more significant process than has been previously recognized.

  12. The evolution of meteorites and planets from a hot nebula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald H. Tarling

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Meteorites have a hot origin as planetary materials derive from a supernova, similar to SN1987A, and were acquired by a nearby nova, the Sun. The supernova plasmas became zoned around the nova, mainly by their electromagnetic properties. Carbon and carbide dusts condensed first, followed, within the Inner Planetary Zone, by Ca–Mg–Al oxides and then by iron and nickel metal droplets. In the inner Asteroid Belt, the metals aggregated into clumps as they solidified but over a much longer time in the Inner Zone. ‘Soft’ collisions formed larger (<∼20 km objects in the Asteroid Belt; in the Inner Zone these aggregated forming proto-planetary cores during inwards orbital migration. In the Asteroid Belt, glassy olivines condensed, followed more open lattice minerals growing grew primarily by diffusion. Brittle silicate crystals were comminuted and only aggregated into the carbonaceous meteorites when water–ices formed. The inner planets differentiated by at least 4.4 Ga. Jupiter and the outer planets grew on asteroidal bodies thrown out into freezing water vapours and only formed by 4.1 Ga, resulting in the Late Heavy Bombardment, initially by meteoritic materials and later supplemented by ices from, and beyond, the Asteroid Belt. Critical factors are the properties of very high temperature supernova plasmas, the duration of the molten iron phase in the inner zone. Evidence usually quoted for a cold origin derives from late stage processes in hot meteorite evolution. While highly speculative, it is shown that meteorites and planets can be formed by known processes as supernova plasmas cool.

  13. Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in the Almahata Sitta Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavin, Daniel P.; Aubrey, Andrew D.; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Parker, Eric T.; Bada, Jeffrey L.

    2010-01-01

    Amino acid analysis of a meteorite fragment of asteroid 2008 TC3 called Almahata Sitta was carried out using reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled with UV fluorescence detection and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-FD/ToF-MS) as part of a sample analysis consortium. LC-FD/ToF-MS analyses of hot-water extracts from the meteorite revealed a complex distribution of two- to seven-carbon aliphatic amino acids and one- to three-carbon amines with abundances ranging from 0.5 to 149 parts-per-billion (ppb). The enantiomeric ratios of the amino acids alanine, R-amino-n-butyric acid (beta-ABA), 2-amino-2-methylbutanoic acid (isovaline), and 2-aminopentanoic acid (norvaline) in the meteorite were racemic (D/L approximately 1), indicating that these amino acids are indigenous to the meteorite and not terrestrial contaminants. Several other non-protein amino acids were also identified in the meteorite above background levels including alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (alpha-AIB), 4-amino-2- methylbutanoic acid, 4-amino-3-methylbutanoic acid, and 3-, 4-, and 5-aminopentanoic acid. The total abundances of isovaline and alpha-AIB in Almahata Sitta are 1000 times lower than the abundances of these amino acids found in the CM carbonaceous chondrite Murchison. The extremely low abundances and unusual distribution of five carbon amino acids in Almahata Sitta compared to Cl, CM, and CR carbonaceous chondrites may reflect extensive thermal alteration of amino acids on the parent asteroid by partial melting during formation or subsequent impact shock heating. It is also possible that amino acids were synthesized by catalytic reactions on the parent body after asteroid 2008 TC3 cooled to lower temperatures.

  14. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy Studies of Meteorites: Implications for Weathering Rates, Meteorite Flux, and Early Solar System Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, P. A. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom); Berry, F. J. [Open University, Department of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Jull, A. J. T. [University of Arizona, NSF Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Analyses (United States); Smith, T. B. [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Bevan, A. W. R. [Western Australian Museum, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (Australia); Cadogan, J. M. [University of New South Wales, School of Physics (Australia); Sexton, A. S.; Franchi, L. A.; Pillinger, C. T. [Open University, Planetary Science Research Institute (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-15

    Ordinary chondrite finds, terrestrial age dated using {sup 14}C analyses, from different meteorite accumulation sites, have been examined by Moessbauer spectroscopy to quantitatively determine terrestrial oxidation. We observe differences in weathering rates between sites, and also between different chondrite groups. A comparison of weathering over time, and its effect in 'eroding' meteorites, together with the number and mass distribution of meteorites in each region, enables us to derive estimates of the number of meteorite falls over a given mass per year. Studies of how the oxygen isotopic composition of samples varies with weathering indicate that incipient alteration may occur without a pronounced isotopic effect, possibly due to weathering of silicates to topotactically oriented smectite confined spaces where the water volume is limited. This finding has profound implications for the use of oxygen isotopes as a tool in understanding water-rock interaction. It also may reconcile previously contradictory data regarding the nebular or asteroidal location of pre-terrestrial aqueous alteration. Finally, Moessbauer spectroscopy is also found to be a useful tool in determining mineral abundance in carbonaceous chondrites, where a fine-grained matrix makes traditional approaches inapplicable. Again, the results have implications for the modification of chondritic materials in the early solar system.

  15. Thermally Induced Chemistry of Meteoritic Complex Organic Molecules: A New Heat-Diffusion Model for the Atmospheric Entry of Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Shingledecker, Christopher N

    2014-01-01

    Research over the past four decades has shown a rich variety of complex organic molecular content in some meteorites. This current study is an attempt to gain a better insight into the thermal conditions experienced by these molecules inside meteorites during atmospheric entry. In particular, we wish to understand possible chemical processes that can occur during entry and that might have had an effect on complex organic or prebiotic species that were delivered in this way to the early Earth. A simulation was written in Fortran to model heating by the shock generated during entry and the subsequent thermal diffusion inside the body of a meteorite. Experimental data was used for the thermal parameters of several types of meteorites, including iron-nickel and several classes of chondrites. A Sutton-Graves model of stagnation-point heating was used to calculate peak surface temperatures and an explicit difference formula was used to generate thermal diffusion profiles for both chondrites and iron-nickel type met...

  16. The Nakhla Martian Meteorite is a Cumulate Igenous Rock. Comment on "Glass-Bearing Inclusions in Nakhla (SNC Meteorite) Augite: Heterogeneously Trapped Phases"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    All the properties of the Nakhla Martian meteorite suggest that it is a cumulate igneous rock, formed from a basaltic parental magma. Anomalous magmatic inclusions in Nakhla s augite grains can be explained by disequilibrium processes during crystal growth, and have little significance in the geological history of the meteorite.

  17. Fossils of Prokaryotic Microorganisms in the Orgueil Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2006-01-01

    The Orgueil CII meteorite, which fell in southern France on the evening of May 14, 1864, has been one of the most extensively studied of all known carbonaceous meteorites. Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) studies of freshly fractured interior surfaces of the Orgueil meteorite have resulted in the detection of the fossilized remains of a large and diverse population of filamentous prokaryotic microorganisms. The taphonomy and the diverse modes of the preservation of these remains ,are diverse. Some of the remains exhibit carbonization of a hollow sheath and in other cases the remains are permineralized with water-soluble evaporite minerals, such as magnesium sulfate or ammonium salts. After the sample is fractured and the interior surfaces are exposed to the atmospheric moisture, some of these friable remains have been observed to exhibit significant alterations in appearance with time. Images are presented to document the changes that have been observed in some forms within the past two years. Images and EDS spectral data will also be presented to document the studies carried out on abiotic forms to search for possible nonbiological interpretations of the indigenous filamentous microstructures that have been found in the Orgueil meteorite. Images and EDS data will be presented showing the size, size range, morphology and chemical compositions of abiotic microstructures found in native crystalline and fibrous Epsomites from Poison Lake, Washington, USA and Catalayud, Zaragoza, Aragon, Spain. Many of these embedded forms are consistent in size and microstructure with cyanobacteria morphotypes. Some of the forms are exhibit known characteristics differentiation of cells, and reproductive structures of filamentous trichomic prokaryotes (bacteria and cyanobacteria) and the degraded remains of microfibrils associated with sheaths of cyanobacteria. In this paper, recently obtained comparative images and EDS data will be presented for the mineralized

  18. Ruthenium endemic isotope effects in chondrites and differentiated meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    2010-07-01

    We report on the abundances of Ru isotopes in (1) iron meteorites, (2) stony-iron meteorites (pallasites), (3) ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites, and (4) in refractory inclusions from the carbonaceous meteorite Allende. We have developed improved Multiple-Collector, Negative-ion Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometric (MC-NTIMS) techniques for Ru, with high ionization efficiency of 4% and with chemical separation techniques for Ru, which reduce mass interferences to the ppm level, so that no mass interference corrections needed to be applied. Our data were normalized to 99Ru/ 101Ru to correct for mass-dependent fractionation. We find no Ru isotopic effects in the ordinary chondrites and group IAB iron meteorites we have measured. There are significant effects (deficits) in the pure s-process nuclide 100Ru, in the Allende whole-rock and in refractory inclusions of up to 1.7 parts in 10,000 (ɛu). There are also endemic deficits in 100Ru in iron meteorites and in pallasites of up to 1.1 ɛu. The Ru data suggest a wide spread and large scale heterogeneity in p-, s-, and r-process components resulting in a deficit in s-process nuclides or enhancements in both p- and r-process nuclides, in refractory siderophiles condensing in the early solar nebula. In contrast, the data on bulk Murchison suggest an excess in 100Ru and in 104Ru, which are distinct from the rest of the measured patterns. Our results establish the presence of significant isotopic heterogeneity for Ru in the early solar nebula. The observation of endemic Ru effects in planetary differentiates, such as iron meteorites and pallasites, must reflect the siderophile nature of Ru and the preservation in condensing FeNi metal of refractory metal condensate grains formed in the early solar nebula. Once incorporated in the metal phase, the refractory siderophiles remained in the metal phase through the melting and differentiation of planetesimals to form FeNi cores and silicate mantles and crusts.

  19. Mineralized Remains of Morphotypes of Filamentous Cyanobacteria in Carbonaceous Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The quest for conclusive evidence of microfossils in meteorites has been elusive. One difficulty arises from the fact than many abiotic or inorganic microstructures, mineral grains, and coating artifacts can mimic the smaller representatives of the microbial world that possess very simple morphologies (unicellular cocci or bacilli). However, there exist a wide variety of large, filamentous trichomic prokaryotic microorganisms (cyanobacteria and sulfur bacteria) with sufficiently well known and complex morphologies that they can be recognized and are known to be of unquestionable biogenic origin. The taphonomic modes of fossilization and their of their life habits and processes frequently result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with carbonization, silicification, calcification, phosphatization and metal-binding properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Strong differences of mineral concentrations in closely associated and visibly differentiated cellular microstructures provide strong evidence of biogenicity. This evidence is further enhanced by the detection of recognizable and distinct microstructures (e.g., uniseriate or multiseriate filaments, trichomes, sheaths, cells of proper sizes and size distributions) and growth characteristics (e.g., basal or apical cells, true or false branching of trichomes, tapered or uniform filaments, robust or thin sheaths) and reproductive and nitrogen fixation habits (e.g., baeocytes, hormogonia, akinetes and heterocysts), Microfossils of cyanobacteria and cyanobacterial mats and stromatolites have been recognized a described from many of the most ancient rocks on Earth. The crucial problem lies in developing valid protocols and methodologies for establishing that the putative microfossils are truly indigenous and not merely recent microbial contaminants. During the past several years, we have conducted Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM

  20. Petrologic Locations of Nanodiamonds in Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Laurence

    Nanodiamonds (NDs), with dimensions near two nanometers, are widespread accessory minerals in primitive meteorites. They have been studied extensively in concentrates made from acid-insoluble residues, but surprisingly little is known about their petrologic settings in the meteorites because they have not been studied in situ. Information about such settings is fundamental for determining how they formed and were incorporated into the meteorites. The primary goal of the planned research is to determine and compare the petrologic settings of NDs within matrix of different types of carbonaceous chondrites, with the long-term aim of providing new insights regarding the origin of NDs. This research will also provide new data on the structure and major and trace element compositions of individual NDs and regions within them. Transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) provide uniquely powerful information regarding chemical, bonding, and structural data on the scale needed to solve this problem, assuming the NDs can be located within the host matrix. We have developed methods of observing NDs in situ within the fine-grained matrix of primitive meteorites and will use various TEMs to accomplish that goal for several meteorites. High- resolution imaging and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) will permit determination of both structural and chemical information about the NDs and their adjacent minerals. By the middle of the proposed grant period, two state-of-the-art, aberration-corrected TEMs will have been installed at ASU and will be used to locate heavy elements such as Xe, Te, and Pd within the NDs. These TEMs permit the imaging of individual atoms of heavy elements with annular dark-field (ADF) imaging, and these atoms can be identified using EELS. The result of these new types of measurements will provide information about whether such elements, which have been used to determine whether NDs formed in supernovae, occur within the interiors or on the surfaces of

  1. Lunar Meteorites and Implications for Compositional Remote Sensing of the Lunar Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotev, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Lunar meteorites (LMs) are rocks found on Earth that were ejected from the Moon by impact of an asteroidal meteoroid. Three factors make the LMs important to remote-sensing studies: (1) Most are breccias composed of regolith or fragmental material; (2) all are rocks that resided (or breccias composed of material that resided) in the upper few meters of the Moon prior to launch and (3) most apparently come from areas distant from the Apollo sites. How Many Lunar Locations? At this writing (June 1999), there are 18 known lunar meteorite specimens. When unambiguous cases of terrestrial pairing are considered, the number of actual LMs reduces to 13. (Terrestrial pairing is when a single piece of lunar rock entered Earth's atmosphere, but multiple fragments were produced because the meteoroid broke apart on entry, upon hitting the ground or ice, or while being transported through the ice.) We have no reason to believe that LMs preferentially derive from any specific region(s) of the Moon; i.e., we believe that they are samples from random locations. However, we do not know how many different locations are represented by the LMs; mathematically, it could be as few as 1 or as many as 13. The actual maximum is al. estimate a mare to highland ratio of 54:46 for QUE 94281 and 62:38 for Y 793274; this difference is well within the range observed for soils collected only centimeters apart (in cores) at interface site like Apollo 15 and 17 [11]. Although the two meteorites were found on opposite sides of Antarctica, they are probably launch-paired. The strongest evidence is that the pyroclastic glass spherules that occur in both are of two compositional groups and the two groups are essentially the same in both meteorites. Yamato 791197 is nominally a feldspathic lunar meteorite (below), but among FLMs, it probably contains the highest abundance of clasts and glasses of mare derivation. As a consequence, its composition is at the high-Fe, low-Mg end of the range for FLMs and is

  2. Reactivity and survivability of glycolaldehyde in simulated meteorite impact experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, V P; Zellner, N E B; Waun, C M; Bennett, E R; Earl, E K

    2014-02-01

    Sugars of extraterrestrial origin have been observed in the interstellar medium (ISM), in at least one comet spectrum, and in several carbonaceous chondritic meteorites that have been recovered from the surface of the Earth. The origins of these sugars within the meteorites have been debated. To explore the possibility that sugars could be generated during shock events, this paper reports on the results of the first laboratory impact experiments wherein glycolaldehyde, found in the ISM, as well as glycolaldehyde mixed with montmorillonite clay, have been subjected to reverberated shocks from ~5 to >25 GPa. New biologically relevant molecules, including threose, erythrose and ethylene glycol, were identified in the resulting samples. These results show that sugar molecules can not only survive but also become more complex during impact delivery to planetary bodies.

  3. The age of the carbonates in martian meteorite ALH84001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, L E; Connelly, J N; Nyquist, L E; Shih, C Y; Wiesmann, H; Reese, Y

    1999-10-01

    The age of secondary carbonate mineralization in the martian meteorite ALH84001 was determined to be 3.90 +/- 0.04 billion years by rubidium-strontium (Rb-Sr) dating and 4.04 +/- 0.10 billion years by lead-lead (Pb-Pb) dating. The Rb-Sr and Pb-Pb isochrons are defined by leachates of a mixture of high-graded carbonate (visually estimated as approximately 5 percent), whitlockite (trace), and orthopyroxene (approximately 95 percent). The carbonate formation age is contemporaneous with a period in martian history when the surface is thought to have had flowing water, but also was undergoing heavy bombardment by meteorites. Therefore, this age does not distinguish between aqueous and impact origins for the carbonates.

  4. A Moessbauer effect study of the Soledade meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paduani, C. [Santa Catarina Univ., Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Samudio Perez, C.A. [Universidade de Passo Fundo, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Exatas; Ardisson, J.D. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2005-09-15

    We performed a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of the iron meteorite Soledade. This meteorite, which consists of a metallic matrix, is an octahedrite with polycrystalline troilite, cohenite, schreibersite and rhabdites as major constituents. A chemical analysis indicates 6.78 % Ni, 0.46% Co, besides traces of Cu, Cr, Ga, Ge, As, Sb, W, Re, Ir and Au. No traces of silicates have been found and no oxygen was detected. Iron is appearing in the austenitic phase and alloyed with nickel. An analysis of the Moessbauer spectra at room temperature indicates that the Fe-Ni phase is homogeneously distributed in the matrix, although variations in the composition between different regions are observed. (author)

  5. Stardust from meteorites an introduction to presolar grains

    CERN Document Server

    Lugaro, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The study of presolar meteoritic grains is a new inter-disciplinary field that brings together topics from nuclear physics to astronomy and chemistry. Traditionally, most of the information about the cosmos has been gathered by observing light through telescopes. However, with the recent discovery that some dust grains extracted from primitive meteorites were produced in stellar environments, we now have the opportunity to gather information about stars and our Galaxy from the laboratory analysis of tiny pieces of stardust. Stellar grains represent a unique and fascinating subject of study. Their analysis is a breakthrough in research on stellar nucleosynthesis and the origin of the elements. While a number of specialized reviews exist on the topic, this book is the first work that brings together in a unified and accessible manner the background knowledge necessary for the study of presolar grains together with up-to-date discoveries in the field. The book includes exercise questions and answers, an extensiv...

  6. Multiple carriers of Q noble gases in primitive meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrocchi, Yves; Avice, Guillaume; Estrade, Nicolas

    2015-04-01

    The main carrier of primordial heavy noble gases in chondrites is thought to be an organic phase, known as phase Q, whose precise characterization has resisted decades of investigation. Indirect techniques have revealed that phase Q might be composed of two subphases, one of them associated with sulfide. Here we provide experimental evidence that noble gases trapped within meteoritic sulfides present chemically and thermally driven behavior patterns that are similar to Q gases. We therefore suggest that phase Q is likely composed of two subcomponents: carbonaceous phases and sulfides. In situ decay of iodine at concentration levels consistent with those reported for meteoritic sulfides can reproduce the 129Xe excess observed for Q gases relative to fractionated solar wind. We suggest that the Q-bearing sulfides formed at high temperature and could have recorded the conditions that prevailed in the chondrule-forming region(s).

  7. Multiple carriers of Q noble gases in primitive meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Marrocchi, Yves; Estrade, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The main carrier of primordial heavy noble gases in chondrites is thought to be an organic phase, known as phase Q, whose precise characterization has resisted decades of investigation. Indirect techniques have revealed that phase Q might be composed of two subphases, one of them associated with sulfide. Here we provide experimental evidence that noble gases trapped within meteoritic sulfides present chemically- and thermally-driven behavior patterns that are similar to Q-gases. We therefore suggest that phase Q is likely composed of two subcomponents: carbonaceous phases and sulfides. In situ decay of iodine at concentrations levels consistent with those reported for meteoritic sulfides can reproduce the 129Xe excess observed for Q-gases relative to fractionated Solar Wind. We suggest that the Q-bearing sulfides formed at high temperature and could have recorded the conditions that prevailed in the chondrule-forming region(s).

  8. Petrogenesis of the nakhlite meteorites - Evidence from cumulate mineral zoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Ralph P.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to a simple igneous petrogenesis for the meteorite Nakhla, which was previously called into question because Mg/Fe ratios in olivine indicate substantial disequilibrium between the predominant cumulus minerals (olivine and augite). Comparative analyses of simulated diffusive zoning and the observed cumulus mineral zoning for all three nakhlites (Nakhla, Governador Valadares, and Lafayette) show that their current compositions do not necessarily reflect parental magma compositions. Diffusion has altered primary cumulus compositions to varying degrees, Nakhla being the least affected, and Lafayette being almost completely reequilibrated. Since mineral zoning in each meteorite is strongly concentric around mesostasis areas, it is inferred that reaction with intercumulus liquid has controlled the observed zoning. It is argued that the nakhlites appear to be a series of relatively simple cumulate rocks which have undergone various amounts of late-magmatic and subsolidus diffusion, possibly reflecting their relative positions in a cooling cumulate pile.

  9. Cosmic-ray exposure age of Martian meteorite GRV 99027

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the concentrations of 10Be and 26Al in GRV 99027 recovered by the 16th Chinese Antarctic expedition team, which are 14.1 ± 0.6 dpm/kg and 67.5 ± 3.4 dpm/kg, respectively. From the concentration of 10Be, we calculate a cosmic-ray exposure age of 4.4 ± 0.6 Ma for GRV 99027. The concentration of 26Al is too high compared to the 10Be exposure age, indicating extra production from solar ray. The exposure ages, petrologic and geochemical characteristics of mantle-derived Martian meteorites GRV 99027, LEW 88516, Y-793605, NWA 1950 and ALHA77005 are very similar, suggesting that these meteorites most probably were ejected from Mars in the same impact event.

  10. Reactivity and Survivability of Glycolaldehyde in Simulated Meteorite Impact Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    McCaffrey, V P; Waun, C M; Bennett, E R; Earl, E K

    2015-01-01

    Sugars of extraterrestrial origin have been observed in the interstellar medium (ISM), in at least one comet spectrum, and in several carbonaceous chondritic meteorites that have been recovered from the surface of the Earth. The origins of these sugars within the meteorites have been debated. To explore the possibility that sugars could be generated during shock events, this paper reports on the results of the first laboratory impact experiments wherein glycolaldehyde, found in the ISM, as well as glycolaldehyde mixed with montmorillonite clay, have been subjected to reverberated shocks from ~5 to >25 GPa. New biologically relevant molecules, including threose, erythrose and ethylene glycol, were identified in the resulting samples. These results show that sugar molecules can not only survive but also become more complex during impact delivery to planetary bodies.

  11. Polymer amide in the Allende and Murchison meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Julie E. M.; McGeoch, Malcolm W.

    2015-11-01

    It has been proposed that exothermic gas phase polymerization of amino acids can occur in the conditions of a warm dense molecular cloud to form hydrophobic polymer amide (HPA) (McGeoch and McGeoch 2014). In a search for evidence of this presolar chemistry Allende and Murchison meteorites and a volcano control were diamond burr-etched and Folch extracted for potential HPA yielding 85 unique peaks in the meteorite samples via matrix-assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF/MS). The amino acids after acid hydrolysis in Allende were below the level of detection but many of the Allende peaks via the more sensitive MALDI/TOF analysis could be fitted to a polymer combination of glycine, alanine, and alpha-hydroxyglycine with high statistical significance. A similar significant fit using these three amino acids could not be applied to the Murchison data indicating more complex polymer chemistry.

  12. Photochemical mass-independent sulfur isotopes in achondritic meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Vinai K; Jackson, Teresa L; Thiemens, Mark H

    2005-08-12

    Sulfides from four achondrite meteorite groups are enriched in 33S (up to 0.040 per mil) as compared with primitive chondrites and terrestrial standards. Stellar nucleosynthesis and cosmic ray spallation are ruled out as causes of the anomaly, but photochemical reactions in the early solar nebula could produce the isotopic composition. The large 33S excess present in oldhamite from the Norton County aubrite (0.161 per mil) suggests that refractory sulfide minerals condensed from a nebular gas with an enhanced carbon-oxygen ratio, but otherwise solar composition is the carrier. The presence of a mass-independent sulfur effect in meteorites argues for a similar process that could account for oxygen isotopic anomalies observed in refractory inclusions in primitive chondrites.

  13. Radiochemical photon activation analysis of Halogens in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oura, Yasuji; Latif, S.A.; Setoguchi, Mina; Nakamoto, Tomoshi; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Nakahara, Hiromichi [Tokyo Metropolitan Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science; Ohtsuki, Tsutomu

    1999-12-01

    Halogens (F, Cl, Br and I) in meteorites and rocks are determined by a radiochemical photon activation analysis (RPAA) and compared with that of NPAA. We tried to determine all halogen elements at one time by one irradiation with 20 or 30 MeV maximum energy (E{sub 0}) by controlling irradiation for 2 or 6 hours with cooling. Average current is about 110 {mu}A. After irradiation, the sample was separated by radiochemical analysis. Allende meteorite, JR-I and d-41-7 were analyzed. The value of F, Cl and Br showed good reproducibility and agreed with the value in the reference. However, I showed small value. It may indicate volatilizing of I. (S.Y.)

  14. What we have learned about Mars from SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The SNC meteorites are thought to be igneous martian rocks, based on their young crystallization ages and a close match between the composition of gases implanted in them during shock and the atmosphere of Mars. A related meteorite, ALH84001, may be older and thus may represent ancient martian crust. These petrologically diverse basalts and ultramafic rocks are mostly cumulates, but their parent magmas share geochemical and radiogenic isotopic characteristics that suggest they may have formed by remelting the same mantle source region at different times. Information and inferences about martian geology drawn from these samples include the following: Planetary differentiation occured early at approximately 4.5 GA, probably concurrently with accretion. The martian mantle contains different abundances of moderately volatile and siderophile elements and is more Fe-rich than that of the Earth, which has implications for its mineralogy, density, and origin. The estimated core composition has a S abundance near the threshold value for inner core solidification. The former presence of a core dynamo may be suggested by remanent magnetization in Shergottite-Nakhlite-Chassignite (SNC) meteorites, although these rocks may have been magnetized during shock. The mineralogy of martian surface units, inferred from reflectance spectra, matches that of basaltic shergottites, but SNC lithologies thought to have crystallized in the subsurface are not presently recognized. The rheological properties of martian magmas are more accurately derived form these metorites than from observations of martian flow morphology, although the sampled range of magma compositions islimited. Estimates of planetary water abundance and the amount of outgassed water based on these meteorites are contridictory but overlap estimates based on geological observations and atmospheric measurements. Stable isotope measurements indicate that the martian hydrosphere experienced only limited exchange with the

  15. The early impact histories of meteorite parent bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Davison, Thomas M; Ciesla, Fred J; Collins, Gareth S

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a statistical framework that uses collisional evolution models, shock physics modeling and scaling laws to determine the range of plausible collisional histories for individual meteorite parent bodies. It is likely that those parent bodies that were not catastrophically disrupted sustained hundreds of impacts on their surfaces - compacting, heating, and mixing the outer layers; it is highly unlikely that many parent bodies escaped without any impacts processing the outer few kilometers. The first 10 - 20 Myr were the most important time for impacts, both in terms of the number of impacts and the increase of specific internal energy due to impacts. The model has been applied to evaluate the proposed impact histories of several meteorite parent bodies: up to 10 parent bodies that were not disrupted in the first 100 Myr experienced a vaporizing collision of the type necessary to produce the metal inclusions and chondrules on the CB chondrite parent; around 1 - 5% of bodies that were catastrophi...

  16. Investigation of Isotope Anomalies in Meteorites and their Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jesper Christian

    and earliest evolution of the solar system through the chemical and isotopic study of meteorites. One area of cosmochemistry that has benefited from high-precision mass spectrometry is that of early solar system chronology. Several radioactive isotopes with short and long half-lives are known to have been...... thermal events caused by the actively accreting protosun, an initial well-mixed disk could evolve to isotopic heterogeneity over time. Such extensive thermal processing is likely recorded in a range of elements as any element present in anomalous presolar carrier grains would be isotopically distinct from....... Moreover, high-precision tungsten and zirconium isotope results for bulk meteorites and inclusions help constrain the nature and degree of processing experienced by dust and gas present in the protoplanetary disk. Our results show that short-lived radionuclei 182Hf and 26Al had different stellar sources...

  17. A Method for Estimating Meteorite Fall Mass from Weather Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, C.; Fries, M.; Matson, R.

    2017-01-01

    Techniques such as weather RADAR, seismometers, and all-sky cameras allow new insights concerning the physics of meteorite fall dynamics and fragmentation during "dark flight", the period of time between the end of the meteor's luminous flight and the concluding impact on the Earth's surface. Understanding dark flight dynamics enables us to rapidly analyze the characteristics of new meteorite falls. This analysis will provide essential information to meteorite hunters to optimize recovery, increasing the frequency and total mass of scientifically important freshly-fallen meteorites available to the scientific community. We have developed a mathematical method to estimate meteorite fall mass using reflectivity data as recorded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Next Generation RADAR (NEXRAD) stations. This study analyzed eleven official and one unofficial meteorite falls in the United States and Canada to achieve this purpose.

  18. Hf-W chronometry of core formation in planetesimals inferred from weakly irradiated iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruijer, Thomas S.; Sprung, Peter; Kleine, Thorsten; Leya, Ingo; Burkhardt, Christoph; Wieler, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    The application of Hf-W chronometry to determine the timescales of core formation in the parent bodies of magmatic iron meteorites is severely hampered by 182W burnout during cosmic ray exposure of the parent meteoroids. Currently, no direct method exists to correct for the effects of 182W burnout, making the Hf-W ages for iron meteorites uncertain. Here we present noble gas and Hf-W isotope systematics of iron meteorite samples whose W isotopic compositions remained essentially unaffected by cosmic ray interactions. Most selected samples have concentrations of cosmogenic noble gases at or near the lowermost level observed in iron meteorites and, for iron meteorite standards, have very low noble gas and radionuclide based cosmic ray exposure ages (Mbosi), however, has elevated ɛ182W relative to the other investigated irons, indicating metal-silicate separation ˜2-3 Myr later than in the parent bodies of the three major iron meteorite groups studied here.

  19. Anomalous Features on Anomalous Rocks — Deciphering the Physical Weathering History of Iron Meteorites found on Mars using Terrestrial Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, J.

    2015-12-01

    Non-indigenous rocks (meteorites) found on Mars by rover science teams offer insights into probable recent (mid- to late-Amazonian) weathering processes within 15° of the martian equator. While source materials are often in question for indigenous martian alteration scenarios, the starting materials for most meteorites are known as unweathered, curated falls in Earth-based collections. Both chemical and mechanical weathering processes have modified at least 21 confirmed and candidate exogenic rocks found at three rover landing sites. Such processes have been shown to include acidic corrosion, oxide production, and aeolian scouring. The unknown martian surface exposure duration of the meteorites makes separating physical from chemical weathering effects challenging: Saltating sand grains may accomplish alone what oxidation and rust removal by aeolian scouring may accomplish in a shorter time interval, for example. However, aeolian abrasion appears to dominate for at least some of the surface features in martian irons. Iron meteorites are resistant to wind-blown sand relative to silicate rocks, but are malleable and able to preserve aeolian abrasion effects. These include 1) regmaglypts enlarged into hollows with overhanging cornices; 2) surfaces scalloped or deeply fluted by straight-line groves, and/or 3) deep 'boreholes' present across many surfaces. The flutings, boreholes, and scallops have oriented symmetry and are therefore potentially useful as paleo-wind direction indicators. Boreholes tend to be clean-edged, elliptical to round, of varying diameter, and often occur independently of local topography. Ventifacted igneous rocks found at Garnet Hill, San Gorgonio Pass, California, present features that resemble many aspects of those found in the metal masses on Mars. Though of different petrologies and mineralogies, both rock types are massive, homogeneous and unfractured, which may conceivably account for some apparent similarities in mechanical weathering

  20. Organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites: past, present and future research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A

    2005-12-15

    Carbonaceous meteorites are fragments of ancient asteroids that have remained relatively unprocessed since the formation of the Solar System. These carbon-rich objects provide a record of prebiotic chemical evolution and a window on the early Solar System. Many compound classes are present reflecting a rich organic chemical environment during the formation of the planets. Recent theories suggest that similar extraterrestrial organic mixtures may have acted as the starting materials for life on Earth.

  1. The early impact histories of meteorite parent bodies

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, Thomas M; O'Brien, David P.; Ciesla, Fred J.; Collins, Gareth S

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a statistical framework that uses collisional evolution models, shock physics modeling and scaling laws to determine the range of plausible collisional histories for individual meteorite parent bodies. It is likely that those parent bodies that were not catastrophically disrupted sustained hundreds of impacts on their surfaces - compacting, heating, and mixing the outer layers; it is highly unlikely that many parent bodies escaped without any impacts processing the outer few...

  2. Alteration of Sedimentary Clasts in Martian Meteorite Northwest Africa 7034

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCubbin, F. M.; Tartese, R.; Santos, A. R.; Domokos, G.; Muttik, N.; Szabo, T.; Vazquez, J.; Boyce, J. W.; Keller, L. P.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Anand, M.; Moser, D. E.; Delhaye, T.; Shearer, C. K.; Agee, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The martian meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 and pairings represent the first brecciated hand sample available for study from the martian surface [1]. Detailed investigations of NWA 7034 have revealed substantial lithologic diversity among the clasts [2-3], making NWA 7034 a polymict breccia. NWA 7034 consists of igneous clasts, impact-melt clasts, and "sedimentary" clasts represented by prior generations of brecciated material. In the present study we conduct a detailed textural and geochemical analysis of the sedimentary clasts.

  3. Mass-dependent fractionation of nickel isotopes in meteoritic metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David L.; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Clayton, Robert N.; Dauphas, Nicolas; Janney, Philip E.; Davis, Andrew M.

    We measured nickel isotopes via multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) in the bulk metal from 36 meteorites, including chondrites, pallasites, and irons (magmatic and non-magmatic). The Ni isotopes in these meteorites are mass fractionated; the fractionation spans an overall range of ≈0.4‰ amu-1. The ranges of Ni isotopic compositions (relative to the SRM 986 Ni isotopic standard) in metal from iron meteorites (≈0.0 to ≈0.3‰ amu-1) and chondrites (≈0.0 to ≈0.2‰ amu-1) are similar, whereas the range in pallasite metal (≈-0.1 to 0.0‰ amu-1) appears distinct. The fractionation of Ni isotopes within a suite of fourteen IIIAB irons (≈0.0 to ≈0.3‰ amu-1) spans the entire range measured in all magmatic irons. However, the degree of Ni isotopic fractionation in these samples does not correlate with their Ni content, suggesting that core crystallization did not fractionate Ni isotopes in a systematic way. We also measured the Ni and Fe isotopes in adjacent kamacite and taenite from the Toluca IAB iron meteorite. Nickel isotopes show clearly resolvable fractionation between these two phases; kamacite is heavier relative to taenite by ≈0.4‰ amu-1. In contrast, the Fe isotopes do not show a resolvable fractionation between kamacite and taenite. The observed isotopic compositions of kamacite and taenite can be understood in terms of kinetic fractionation due to diffusion of Ni during cooling of the Fe-Ni alloy and the development of the Widmanstätten pattern.

  4. Indigenous Carbonaceous Matter in the Nakhla Mars Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemett, S. J.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Rahman, Z.; Le, L.; Wentworth, S. J.; Gibson, E. K.; McKay, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed microanalysis of the Martian meteorite Nakhla has shown there are morphologically distinct carbonaceous features spatially associated with low-T aqueous alteration phases including salts and id-dingsite. A comprehensive suite of analytical instrumentation including optical microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, focused ion beam (FIB) microscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), two-step laser mass spectrometry (mu-L(sup 2)MS), laser mu-Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) are being used to characterize the carbonaceous matter and host mineralogy. The search for carbonaceous matter on Mars has proved challenging. Viking Landers failed to unambiguously detect simple organics at either of the two landing sites although the Martian surface is estimated to have acquired at least 10(exp15) kg of C as a consequence of meteoritic accretion over the last several Ga. The dearth of organics at the Martian surface has been attributed to various oxidative processes including UV photolysis and peroxide activity. Consequently, investigations of Martian organics need to be focused on the sub-surface regolith where such surface processes are either severely attenuated or absent. Fortuitously since Martian meteorites are derived from buried regolith materials they provide a unique opportunity to study Martian organic geochemistry.

  5. Specificity of zooplankton distribution in meteorite crater ponds (Morasko, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuczyńska-Kippen N.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to define the most important factors responsible for the zooplankton community structure inhabiting four meteorite crater ponds, located near the city of Poznań (Poland. The functioning of the meteorite craters resembled that of other small water bodies, where seasonality, physical-chemical features (mainly chlorophyll a concentration, pH and conductivity or biological parameters (lack of fish structured zooplankton assemblages. Rotifer species richness and abundance were highest in the autumn (12 species and 5107 ind L-1 on average, while crustaceans prevailed in the summer (12 and 201, respectively. The dominating structure also depended on the season, with pelagic species occurring in the spring and autumn and mainly littoral species in the summer. Moreover, the temporary nature of the craters caused great differentiation in zooplankton among ponds and favoured organisms adapted to living in astatic reservoirs, e.g. bdelloids, Daphnia pulex or Macrocyclops viridis. The co-occurrence of a variable community of small crustaceans with large daphnids indicated the existence of an additional ecological niche – a thick layer of sediments. Despite the occurrence of adverse living conditions (oxygen deficiencies and periodic drying and the eutrophic character of the waters, these ponds were a source of many rare species (e.g. Keratella paludosa, even in the status of dominants. Protective measures (a nature reserve allowed the area of meteorite fall to remain quite natural, despite its location close to an urban area.

  6. Microbiological study of the Murchison CM2 meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikuta, Elena V.; Hoover, Richard B.

    2012-10-01

    In 1864, Louis Pasteur attempted to cultivate living microorganisms from pristine samples of the Orgueil CI1 carbonaceous meteorite. His results were negative and never published, but recorded it in his laboratory notebooks. At that time, only aerobic liquid or agar-based organic reach media were used, as his research on anaerobes had just started. In our laboratory the Murchison CM2 carbonaceous meteorite was selected to expand on these studies for microbiological study by cultivation on anaerobic mineral media. Since the surface could have been more easily contaminated, interior fragments of a sample of the Murchison meteorite were extracted and crushed under sterile conditions. The resulting powder was then mixed in anoxic medium and injected into Hungate tubes containing anaerobic media with various growth substrates at different pH and salinity and incubated at different temperatures. The goal of the experiments was to determine if living cells would grow from the material of freshly fractured interior fragments of the stone. If any growth occurred, work could then be carried out to assess the nature of the environmental contamination by observations of the culture growth (rates of speed and biodiversity); live/dead fluorescent staining to determine contamination level and DNA analysis to establish the microbial species present. In this paper we report the results of that study.

  7. Division F Commission 22: Meteors, Meteorites, and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Borovička, Jiří; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi; Jopek, Tadeusz; Abe, Shinsuke; Consolmagno, Guy J.; Ishiguro, Masateru; Janches, Diego; Ryabova, Galina O.; Vaubaillon, Jérémie; Zhu, Jin

    2016-04-01

    Commission 22 (Meteors, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust) was established at the first IAU General Assembly held in Rome in 1922, with William Frederick Denning as its first President. Denning was an accountant by profession, but as an amateur astronomer he contributed extensively to meteor science. Commission 22 thus established a pattern that has continued to this day that non-professional astronomers were welcomed and valued and could play a significant role in its affairs. The field of meteors, meteorites and interplanetary dust has played a disproportional role in the astronomical perception of the general public through the majestic displays of our annual meteor showers. Those in the field deployed many techniques uncommon in other fields of astronomy, studying the ``vermin of space'', the small solid bodies that pervade interplanetary space and impact Earth's atmosphere, the surface of the Moon, and that of our satellites in orbit. Over time, the field has tackled a wide array of problems, from predicting the encounter with meteoroid streams, to the origin of our meteorites and the nature of the zodiacal cloud. Commission 22 has played an important role in organizing the field through dedicated meetings, a data centre, and working groups that developed professional-amateur relationships and that organized the nomenclature of meteor showers. The contribution of Commission 22 to the field is perhaps most readily seen in the work of the presidents that followed in the footsteps of Denning.

  8. The Holbrook Meteorite - 99 Years Out in the Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillinger, C. T.; Greenwood, R. C.; Gibson, J. M.; Pillinger, J. M.; Gibson, E. K.

    2013-01-01

    At 7:15pm on the evening of 19th July 1912, a bright fireball appeared in the sky above Navajo County, Arizona [1]. After several loud detonations, approximately 16,000 mostly pea-sized stones fell near the Arntz siding of the Santa Fe Railroad, 7 miles from the town of Holbrook. A search orchestrated by W.M.Foote resulted in nearly 220 kg of material being recovered; samples were exchanged with a great many of the World's Museums [2]. In 1931 Harvey Nininger revisited the site and was able to find another 23 kg that had originally been missed [3]. One of us (EKG) returned again in 1968 and found a further ca 1.5 kg specimen [4]. Meteorite hunters have been going back to Holbrook ever since in the hope of more finds. For example in 2001 a group of 45 searchers accumulated 440 g of previously overlooked L6 group meteorite fragments. In 2011, the 99th anniversary of the event, Rubin Garcia located 11 mini-meteorites [5].

  9. Molecular Asymmetry in Prebiotic Chemistry: An Account from Meteorites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Pizzarello

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous Chondrite (CC meteorites are fragments of asteroids, solar planetesimals that never became large enough to separate matter by their density, like terrestrial planets. CC contains various amounts of organic carbon and carry a record of chemical evolution as it came to be in the Solar System, at the time the Earth was formed and before the origins of life. We review this record as it pertains to the chiral asymmetry determined for several organic compounds in CC, which reaches a broad molecular distribution and enantiomeric excesses of up to 50%–60%. Because homochirality is an indispensable attribute of extant polymers and these meteoritic enantiomeric excesses are still, to date, the only case of chiral asymmetry in organic molecules measured outside the biosphere, the possibility of an exogenous delivery of primed prebiotic compounds to early Earth from meteorites is often proposed. Whether this exogenous delivery held a chiral advantage in molecular evolution remains an open question, as many others regarding the origins of life are.

  10. Irradiated Benzene Ice Provides Clues to Meteoritic Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael Patrick; Gerakines, Perry Alexander; Martin, Mildred G.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Peeters, Zan

    2013-01-01

    Aromatic hydrocarbons account for a significant portion of the organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites, as a component of both the low molecular weight, solvent-extractable compounds and the insoluble organic macromolecular material. Previous work has suggested that the aromatic compounds in carbonaceous chondrites may have originated in the radiation-processed icy mantles of interstellar dust grains. Here we report new studies of the organic residue made from benzene irradiated at 19 K by 0.8 MeV protons. Polyphenyls with up to four rings were unambiguously identified in the residue by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Atmospheric pressure photoionization Fourier transform mass spectrometry was used to determine molecular composition, and accurate mass measurements suggested the presence of polyphenyls, partially hydrogenated polyphenyls, and other complex aromatic compounds. The profile of low molecular weight compounds in the residue compared well with extracts from the Murchison and Orgueil meteorites. These results are consistent with the possibility that solid phase radiation chemistry of benzene produced some of the complex aromatics found in meteorites.

  11. Purple Salt and Tiny Drops of Water in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G. J.

    1999-12-01

    Some meteorites, especially those called carbonaceous chondrites, have been greatly affected by reaction with water on the asteroids in which they formed. These reactions, which took place during the first 10 million years of the Solar System's history, formed assorted water-bearing minerals, but nobody has found any of the water that caused the alteration. Nobody, that is, until now. Michael Zolensky and team of scientists from the Johnson Space Center in Houston and Virginia Tech (Blacksburg, Virginia) discovered strikingly purple sodium chloride (table salt) crystals in two meteorites. The salt contains tiny droplets of salt water (with some other elements dissolved in it). The salt is as old as the Solar System, so the water trapped inside the salt is also ancient. It might give us clues to the nature of the water that so pervasively altered carbonaceous chondrites and formed oceans on Europa and perhaps other icy satellites. However, how the salt got into the two meteorites and how it trapped the water remains a mystery - at least for now.

  12. Investigation of Effective Material Properties of Stony Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Carlozzi, Alex; Bryson, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    To assess the threat posed by an asteroid entering Earth's atmosphere, one must predict if, when, and how it fragments during entry. A comprehensive understanding of the Asteroid material properties is needed to achieve this objective. At present, the meteorite material found on Earth are the only objects from an entering asteroid that can be used as representative material and be tested inside a laboratory setting. Therefore, unit cell models are developed to determine the effective material properties of stony meteorites and in turn deduce the properties of asteroids. The unit cell is representative volume that accounts for diverse minerals, porosity, and matrix composition inside a meteorite. The various classes under investigation includes H-class, L-class, and LL-class chondrites. The effective mechanical properties such as Young's Modulus and Poisson's Ratio of the unit cell are calculated by performing several hundreds of Monte-Carlo simulations. Terrestrial analogs such as Basalt and Gabbro are being used to validate the unit cell methodology.

  13. Molecular Asymmetry in Prebiotic Chemistry: An Account from Meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2016-04-13

    Carbonaceous Chondrite (CC) meteorites are fragments of asteroids, solar planetesimals that never became large enough to separate matter by their density, like terrestrial planets. CC contains various amounts of organic carbon and carry a record of chemical evolution as it came to be in the Solar System, at the time the Earth was formed and before the origins of life. We review this record as it pertains to the chiral asymmetry determined for several organic compounds in CC, which reaches a broad molecular distribution and enantiomeric excesses of up to 50%-60%. Because homochirality is an indispensable attribute of extant polymers and these meteoritic enantiomeric excesses are still, to date, the only case of chiral asymmetry in organic molecules measured outside the biosphere, the possibility of an exogenous delivery of primed prebiotic compounds to early Earth from meteorites is often proposed. Whether this exogenous delivery held a chiral advantage in molecular evolution remains an open question, as many others regarding the origins of life are.

  14. Quantitative colorimetric-imaging analysis of nickel in iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, L Lahuerta; López, P Alemán; Fos, G M Antón; Algarra, R Martín; Romero, A M Mellado; Calatayud, J Martínez

    2011-02-15

    A quantitative analytical imaging approach for determining the nickel content of metallic meteorites is proposed. The approach uses a digital image of a series of standard solutions of the nickel-dimethylglyoxime coloured chelate and a meteorite sample solution subjected to the same treatment as the nickel standards for quantitation. The image is processed with suitable software to assign a colour-dependent numerical value (analytical signal) to each standard. Such a value is directly proportional to the analyte concentration, which facilitates construction of a calibration graph where the value for the unknown sample can be interpolated to calculate the nickel content of the meteorite. The results thus obtained were validated by comparison with the official, ISO-endorsed spectrophotometric method for nickel. The proposed method is fairly simple and inexpensive; in fact, it uses a commercially available digital camera as measuring instrument and the images it provides are processed with highly user-friendly public domain software (specifically, ImageJ, developed by the National Institutes of Health and freely available for download on the Internet). In a scenario dominated by increasingly sophisticated and expensive equipment, the proposed method provides a cost-effective alternative based on simple, robust hardware that is affordable and can be readily accessed worldwide. This can be especially advantageous for countries were available resources for analytical equipment investments are scant. The proposed method is essentially an adaptation of classical chemical analysis to current, straightforward, robust, cost-effective instrumentation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Aioun el Atrouss - Evidence for thermal recrystallization of a eurite breccia. [meteoritic mineralogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    The Aioun el Atrouss meteorite is a breccia consisting largely of angular fragments of green orthopyroxene and containing scattered clasts of basaltic composition (mostly pigeonite and calcic plagioclase). It appears to be a physical mixture of two meteorite types - diogenite (hypersthene achondrite) and eucrite (basaltic achondrite). The results of a mineral analysis are tabulated, and typical pyroxene compositions in orthopyroxene (diogenite), subophitic and granoblastic portions of the meteorite are presented.

  16. Nanoindenting the Chelyabinsk meteorite to learn about impact deflection effects in asteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Moyano-Cambero, Carles E.; Pellicer, Eva; Trigo-Rodríguez, Josep M.; Williams, Iwan P.; Blum, Jürgen; Michel, Patrick; Küppers, Michael; Martínez-Jiménez, Marina; Lloro, Ivan; Sort, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is a highly shocked, low porosity, ordinary chondrite, probably similar to S- or Q-type asteroids. Therefore, nanoindentation experiments on this meteorite allow us to obtain key data to understand the physical properties of near-Earth asteroids. Tests at different length scales provide information about the local mechanical properties of the minerals forming this meteorite: reduced Young's modulus, hardness, elastic recovery, and fracture toughness. Those tests are ...

  17. Structure of the chondrules and the chemical composition of olivine in meteorite Jesenice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Ambrožič

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mineralogical analysis of various chondrule types and chemical analysis of olivine indifferent parts of meteorite Jesenice. Quantitative energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy with a scanning electronmicroscope was used in the analyses. The results showed that the chemical composition of the olivine was homogeneousthroughout the meteorite with an average olivine composition of Fa 26.4 ± 0.6. The results of this study werein agreement with previous study of the meteorite, which showed that the meteorite Jesenice was an equilibratedL chondrite.

  18. A new source of basaltic meteorites inferred from Northwest Africa 011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Clayton, Robert N; Mayeda, Toshiko K; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Oura, Yasuji; Miura, Yayoi N; Haramura, Hiroshi; Misawa, Keiji; Kojima, Hideyasu; Nagao, Keisuke

    2002-04-12

    Eucrites are a class of basaltic meteorites that share common mineralogical, isotopic, and chemical properties and are thought to have been derived from the same parent body, possibly asteroid 4 Vesta. The texture, mineralogy, and noble gas data of the recently recovered meteorite, Northwest Africa (NWA) 011, are similar to those of basaltic eucrites. However, the oxygen isotopic composition of NWA011 is different from that of other eucrites, indicating that NWA011 may be derived from a different parent body. The presence of basaltic meteorites with variable oxygen isotopic composition suggests the occurrence of multiple basaltic meteorite parent bodies, perhaps similar to 4 Vesta, in the early solar system.

  19. New Meteorite Type NWA 8159 Augite Basalt: Specimen from a Previously Unsampled Location on Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, C. B.; Muttik, N.; Ziegler, K.; Walton, E. L.; Herd, C. D. K.; McCubbin, F. M.; Santos, A. R.; Simon, J. I.; Peters, T. J.; Tappa, M. J.; Sanborn, M. E.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2014-01-01

    Up until recently the orthopyroxenite ALH 84001, a singleton martian meteorite type, was the only sample that did not fit within the common SNC types. However with the discovery of the unique basaltic breccia NWA 7034 pairing group [1] the diversity of martian meteorites beyond SNC types was expanded, and now with Northwest Africa (NWA) 8159, and its possible pairing NWA 7635 [2], the diversiy is expanded further with a third unique non-SNC meteorite type. The existence of meteorite types beyond the narrow range seen in SNCs is what might be expected from a random cratering sampling of a geologically long-lived and complex planet such as Mars.

  20. Peology and Geochemistry of New Paired Martian Meteorites 12095 and LAR 12240

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, R. C.; Brandon, A. D.; Peslier, A.

    2015-01-01

    The meteorites LAR 12095 and LAR 12240 are believed to be paired Martian meteorites and were discovered during the Antarctic Search for Meteorites (ANSMET) 2012-2013 Season at Larkman Nunatak. The purpose of this study is to characterize these olivine-phyric shergottites by analyzing all mineral phases for major, minor and trace elements and examining their textural relationships. The goal is to constrain their crystallization history and place these shergottites among other Martian meteorites in order to better understand Martian geological history.

  1. Microfossils of filamentous prokaryotes in CI1 and CM2 meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2008-08-01

    Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) studies of recently obtained samples of Orgueil, Ivuna and Murchison meteorites have provided further evidence for the existence of indigenous filamentous microfossils embedded in the mineral matrix of CI1 and CM2 carbonaceous meteorites. Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) spot data and 2-D elemental X-ray maps establish that the nitrogen and sulphur content of the forms found in the meteorites are dramatically different from modern prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. These results are interpreted as providing additional evidence for the existence of a complex suite of indigenous microfossils in carbonaceous meteorites.

  2. Re-Os isotopic composition of the Dongling ⅢCD iron meteorite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Re,Os concentrations and Os isotopic compositions of the Dongling ⅢCD iron meteorite were determined by N-TIMS technique. The result was compared with that of the other irons and chondrites. The Re and Os concentrations of the Dongling iron meteorite were plotted on the trends of the group ⅢA and ⅣA irons. The Pt-Os relation of the Dongling iron meteorite is similar to that of the group ⅡA irons. That suggests a higher fractionation for the Dongling iron meteorite.

  3. Extra-terrestrial world through meteorites; Inseki wo toshite mita uchu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shima, M. [National Science Museum, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes a topic about meteorites as one of the means to know information from space. A meteorite receives irradiation of high-energy cosmic rays to create new atomic nuclei, stabilized nuclear species, and radioactive nuclear species that do not exist naturally on the earth. The Tsukuba meteorite has also been measured successfully in nine hours after the fall by the gamma ray counter. A measured value was obtained on {sup 24}Na having a half-life of 15.03 hours. This was inferred to have been produced by nuclear spallation reaction of Fe, Si and Mg in a spherical particle meteorite, and should have been a large meteorite before entry into the atmosphere, having experienced not too many of collisions in space. A mass analysis was carried out on isotope abundance ratio in carbon and nitrogen in Murchison carbonaceous spherical meteorites. The isotope abundance ratio differs both in carbon and nitrogen from that on the earth, which is thought to have been generated by CNO cycle during element production. Interstellar matters were widely coagulated when meteorites were created. Original meteorites have had incorporated substances in the solar system as well as dusts from outside the solar system when they were created more than 4.6 billion years ago. The meteorites have existed up to the present without having the substances and dusts mixed completely. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Synthesis of Seifertite and its Applications to Shocked Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, M. E.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Asahara, Y.; Saxena, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seifertite is a high pressure polymorph of silica and a post-stishovite phase. The stable phase is observed at very high pressures around the core-mantle boundary, generally above 100 GPa. Despite this, the mineral is increasingly found in shocked meteorites, both Martian (1) (Sharp et al., 1999), and lunar (2) (Miyahara et al., 2013). It appears, then, that the occurrence of seifertite may indicate intensive shock events on Mars and the Moon. In direct contrast to this, recent high pressure studies have shown metastable formation of seifertite from cristobalite, a high-temperature and low-pressure polymorph of silica, at high pressures of only 30 GPa (3) (Dubrovinski et al., 2001) or less (4) (Kubo et al., 2012). Thus, the formation conditions of seifertite in meteorites are not well catalogued. Knowing this, experiments on the reaction kinetics of formation of seifertite from cristobalite are investigated. Synthesis experiments at 20 GPa and 600 C and 900 C were carried out for various heating duration using the Kawai type mutianvil apparatus. Formation of seifertite from cristobalite was observed, and seifertite was quenchable and recovered to ambient conditions. Present results suggest that the existence of seifertite does not indicate an intensive shock pressure above 100 GPa. Rather, it is as low as 20 GPa around 600 C. We intend to report a more detailed study on reaction kinetics of seifertite from cristobalite at high pressures and temperatures, and will discuss new constraints on the impact conditions of some Martian and lunar meteorites from which seifertite was reported. (1) Sharp, T. G. et al. A Post-Stishovite SiO2 Polymorph in the Meteorite Shergotty: Implications for Impact Events, Science, 284, 1511 (1999) (2) Miyahara, M. et al. Discovery of Seifertite in a Shocked Lunar Meteorite, Nat Commun, 4, 1737 (2013) (3) Dubrovinsky, L. S. et al. Pressure-induced Transformations of Cristobalite, Chem Phys Lett, 333, 264 (2001) (4) Kubo, T. et al. Formation

  5. Comets, Carbonaceous Meteorites, and the Origin of the Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-01-01

    The biosphere comprises the Earth s crust, atmosphere, oceans, and ice caps and the living organisms that survive within this habitat. The discoveries of barophilic chemolithoautotrophic thermophiles living deep within the crust and in deep-sea hydrothermal vents, and psychrophiles in permafrost and deep within the Antarctic Ice Sheet indicate the Earth s biosphere is far more extensive than previously recognized. Molecular biomarkers and Bacterial Paleontology provide evidence that life appeared very early on the primitive Earth and the origin of the biosphere is closely linked with the emergence of life. The role of comets, meteorites, and interstellar dust in the delivery of water, organics and prebiotic chemicals has long been recognized. Deuterium enrichment of seawater and comets indicates that comets delivered oceans to the early Earth. Furthermore, the similarity of the D/H ratios and the chemical compositions of CI carbonaceous meteorites and comets indicate that the CI meteorites may be remnants of cometary nuclei with most volatiles removed. Comets, meteorites, and interstellar dust also contain complex organic chemicals, amino acids, macromolecules, and kerogen-like biopolymers and may have played a crucial role in the delivery of complex organics and prebiotic chemicals during the Hadean (4.5-3.8 Gyr) period of heavy bombardment. The existence of indigenous microfossils of morphotypes of cyanobacteria in the CI and CM carbonaceous meteorites suggests that the paradigm that life originated endogenously in the primitive oceans of early Earth may require re-consideration. Recent data on the hot (300-400 K) black crust on comet P/Halley and Stardust images of P/Wild 2 showing depressions, tall cliffs, and pinnacles, indicate the presence of thick, durable, dark crusts on comets. If cavities within the ice and crust sustain vapor pressures in excess of 10 millibar, then localized pools of liquid water and brines could exist within the comet. Since life

  6. Unlocking the zinc isotope systematics of iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgestock, L. J.; Williams, H.; Rehkämper, M.; Larner, F.; Giscard, M. D.; Hammond, S.; Coles, B.; Andreasen, R.; Wood, B. J.; Theis, K. J.; Smith, C. L.; Benedix, G. K.; Schönbächler, M.

    2014-08-01

    Zinc isotope compositions (δ66Zn) and concentrations were determined for metal samples of 15 iron meteorites across groups IAB, IIAB, and IIIAB. Also analyzed were troilite and other inclusions from the IAB iron Toluca. Furthermore, the first Zn isotope data are presented for metal-silicate partitioning experiments that were conducted at 1.5 GPa and 1650 K. Three partitioning experiments with run durations of between 10 and 60 min provide consistent Zn metal-silicate partition coefficients of ∼0.7 and indicate that Zn isotope fractionation between molten metal and silicate is either small (at less than about ±0.2‰) or absent. Metals from the different iron meteorite groups display distinct ranges in Zn contents, with concentrations of 0.08-0.24 μg/g for IIABs, 0.8-2.5 μg/g for IIIABs, and 12-40 μg/g for IABs. In contrast, all three groups show a similar range of δ66Zn values (reported relative to ‘JMC Lyon Zn’) from +0.5‰ to +3.0‰, with no clear systematic differences between groups. However, distinct linear trends are defined by samples from each group in plots of δ66Zn vs. 1/Zn, and these correlations are supported by literature data. Based on the high Zn concentration and δ66Zn ≈ 0 determined for a chromite-rich inclusion of Toluca, modeling is employed to demonstrate that the Zn trends are best explained by segregation of chromite from the metal phase. This process can account for the observed Zn-δ66Zn-Cr systematics of iron meteorite metals, if Zn is highly compatible in chromite and Zn partitioning is accompanied by isotope fractionation with Δ66Znchr-met≈-1.5‰. Based on these findings, it is likely that the parent bodies of the IAB complex, IIAB and IIIAB iron meteorites featured δ66Zn values of about -1.0 to +0.5‰, similar to the Zn isotope composition inferred for the bulk silicate Earth and results obtained for chondritic meteorites. Together, this implies that most solar system bodies formed with similar bulk Zn isotope

  7. Mineralized remains of morphotypes of filamentous cyanobacteria in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.

    2005-09-01

    The quest for conclusive evidence of microfossils in meteorites has been elusive. Abiotic microstructures, mineral grains, and even coating artifacts may mimic unicellular bacteria, archaea and nanobacteria with simple spherical or rod morphologies (i.e., cocci, diplococci, bacilli, etc.). This is not the case for the larger and more complex microorganisms, colonies and microbial consortia and ecosystems. Microfossils of algae, cyanobacteria, and cyanobacterial and microbial mats have been recognized and described from many of the most ancient rocks on Earth. The filamentous cyanobacteria and sulphur-bacteria have very distinctive size ranges, complex and recognizable morphologies and visibly differentiated cellular microstructures. The taphonomic modes of fossilization and the life habits and processes of these microorganisms often result in distinctive chemical biosignatures associated with carbonization, silicification, calcification, phosphatization and metal-binding properties of their cell-walls, trichomes, sheaths and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Valid biogenicity is provided by the combination of a suite of known biogenic elements (that differ from the meteorite matrix) found in direct association with recognizable and distinct biological features and microstructures (e.g., uniseriate or multiseriate filaments, trichomes, sheaths and cells of proper size/size range); specialized cells (e.g., basal or apical cells, hormogonia, akinetes, and heterocysts); and evidence of growth characteristics (e.g., spiral filaments, robust or thin sheaths, laminated sheaths, true or false branching of trichomes, tapered or uniform filaments) and evidence of locomotion (e.g. emergent cells and trichomes, coiling hormogonia, and hollow or flattened and twisted sheaths). Since 1997 we have conducted Environmental and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM and FESEM) studies of freshly fractured interior surfaces of carbonaceous meteorites, terrestrial

  8. Mid-Infrared Study of Samples from Multiple Stones from the Sutters Mill Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, S. A.; Nuevo, M.; Flynn, G. J.; Wirick, S.

    2013-01-01

    The Sutter's Mill meteorite fell in N. California on April 22, 2012 and numerous pieces have been recovered and studied. We present Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of fragments from several stones of the meteorite. Methods and analysis: Infrared spectra of the samples were recorded with a Nicolet iN10 MX FTIR microscope in the mid-IR range (4000-675/cm; spectral resolution 4/cm). All samples were deposited on a clean glass slide, crushed with a stainless steel roller tool, and placed directly on the focal plane of the microscope. IR spectra were collected by averaging 128 scans. Results: Preliminary IR spectra of the non-fusion crust samples show mineral compositions that are dominated by phyllosilicates, carbonates, or mixtures of both [2]. The carbonates display a dominant, broad band centered at 1433/cm, with additional bands at 2515/cm, 1797/cm, 882/cm, and 715/cm). Features associated with phyllosilicates include a symmetric Si-O stretching mode band centered at 1011/cm and several O-H stretching mode bands. The O-H shows up in two forms (1) a broadband centered at 3415/cm that is probably largely due to adsorbed H2O and (2) a much weaker, narrower feature centered near 3680/cm due to structural -OH. Features observed in the 2985-2855/cm range suggest the presence of aliphatic -CH3 and -CH2- groups. The relative intensities of the bands in this range are somewhat unusual. Typically, the asymmetric aliphatic CH stretching bands are stronger than the symmetric stretching bands, but in this case the reverse is true. This unusual pattern is well matched by the aliphatic features seen in the spectrum of a terrestrial calcite (CaCO3) standard. This observation, and the fact that the strength of the carbonate and aliphatic bands seem to correlate, suggest the organics are associated with the carbonates. Conclusions: IR spectra of samples from the Sutter's Mill meteorite show absorption features associated with carbonates, phyllosilicates, and organics. Both

  9. The Martian sources of the SNC meteorites (two, not one), and what can and can't be learned from the SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, A. H.

    1993-01-01

    The SNC meteorites, which almost certainly originate in the Martian crust, have been inferred to come from a single impact crater site, but no known crater fits all criteria. Formation at two separate sites (S from one, NC from the other) is more consistent with the sum of petrologic, geochronologic, and cosmochronologic data. If the source craters for the SNC meteorites can be located, Mars science will advance considerably. However, many significant questions cannot be answered by the SNC meteorites. These questions await a returned sample.

  10. New Chilean iron meteorites: Medium octahedrites from Northern Chile are unique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.; Canut de Bon, Claudio

    1998-03-01

    We report data on three new irons from Northern Chile, and propose names. All are unnamed irons from the meteorite collection at the Universidad de La Serena. For two the provenance is unknown, for the third the presumed discovery site is in the countryside east of Iquique. The three have been analyzed by neutron-activation analysis and their structures examined with a binocular microscope. La Serena is a complete 663 g iron, a new member of group IIICD; it is not paired with any other iron. Elqui has a mass of 260 g; two faces are fractures, possibly produced by human actions, but fusion crust appears to be present on some of the remaining surface. It is a hexahedrite and a member of group IIAB. but its composition differs from that of all other Chilean hexahedrites. The third iron, Pozo Almonte, is a medium octahedrite member of group IIIAB, one of the most common meteorite groups. To find out whether it is paired, we assembled a full set of IIIAB irons from Northern Chile. Our compositional data show that Pozo Almonte is not paired with any other IIIAB iron, and that there are no pairings within the full set with the possible exception of Joel's Iron and Sierra Sandon, which differ only in their contents of Ir, 0.39 and 0.34 mg/g, respectively. However, Buchwald's (1975) structural observations rule out this possible pairing. We find appreciable differences in Cu, As and Au between the previously paired IIIAB irons Chanaral and Ilimaes, and conclude that these should not be paired.

  11. A Stranger in the Midst: Searching for Relict Grains from Rare Meteorite Types in Mid-Ordovician Limestone Strata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E.; Schmitz, B.

    2016-08-01

    A layer of Mid-Ordovician limestone harbors exceptional amounts of L-chondritic chromite grains. The layer also contains grains from potentially rarer types of meteorites, following the discovery of the fossil meteorite Österplana 065.

  12. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program — Space Rocks for Classrooms, Museums, Science Centers, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J.; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Huynh, P.; Tobola, K.; Loftin, L.

    2010-03-01

    NASA’s Lunar and Meteorite Sample Education Disk Program has Lucite disks containing Apollo lunar samples and meteorite samples that are available for trained educators to borrow for use in classrooms, museums, science center, and libraries.

  13. A Martian Fractionation Line Constructed from Oxygen Isotope Analyses of Bulk Material and Minerals from SNC Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, N. R.; Ali, A.; Jabeen, I.; Osinski, G.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Nasir, S.; Flemming, R.; Shivak, J.; Gregory, D.

    2013-09-01

    Precise triple oxygen isotope data of SNC Martian meteorites are obtained by laser-assisted fluorination technique. Martian fractionation line is constructed using bulk material and mineral separates of SNC meteorites.

  14. The Meteoritical Quincentennial: The Stone of Ensisheim 1492-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvin, U. B.

    1992-07-01

    This year marks the 500th anniversary of the fall of a meteorite at Ensisheim in Alsace. In at least two respects this event is unique in the history of meteoritics. First, this was the earliest witnessed meteorite fall in the West from which pieces are preserved. Second, it is the only meteorite of which a continuous five-century public record exists in manuscripts and books. Beginning with newsheets printed in 1492, writings about this event illuminate the evolution of ideas from a 15th century belief that stones from the sky were of miraculous origin, to an 18th century conviction that stones do not fall from the sky, to our present view that they fall in abundance, originating in interplanetary space (Marvin, 1992). This paper will highlight certain previously unexamined aspects of the story and address problems inherent in historical analysis. Unusable Maps. The fall of the stone was heralded by an explosion which, according to Sebastian Brant (1492), was heard along the valleys of the Danube, Neckar, Aare, Ill, and Rhine and in the alpine cantons of Schwyz and Uri. Contemporary maps, such as that published in The Nuremberg Chronicle of 1493, so distorted the regional geography that a fireball trajectory cannot be reconstructed on them. On modern maps, however, the areas Brant listed stretch about 150 km to the southeast of Ensisheim, a distance well within the range of sounds reported from other exploding fireballs. Newton (1891) and Marvin (1992) worked out possible trajectories that could account for the sound being heard in all named localities. This suggests that, far from exaggerating distances for dramatic effect, Brant's description may well have been accurate. If so, he compiled his information from word-of-mouth reports without reference to the rudimentary maps available in his time. The Language of Wonder. A document mounted beside the stone in the Ensisheim church stated that learned men did not know what it was: it must be supernatural, a wonder

  15. Magnetic particles extracted from manganese nodules: Suggested origin from stony and iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, R.B.

    1970-01-01

    On the basis of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe data, spherical and ellipsoidal particles extracted from manganese nodules were divided into three groups. Group I particles are believed to be derived from iron meteorites, and Group II particles from stony meteorites. Group III particles are believed to be volcanic in origin.

  16. Nature of the emission band of Dergaon meteorite in the region 5700—6700 Å

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bhattacharyya; A Gohain Barua; R Konwar; R Changmai; G D Baruah

    2004-06-01

    An emission band system in the region 5700—6700 Å from Dergaon stoney iron meteorite which fell at Dergaon, India on March 2, 16.40 local time (2001) was excited with the help of a continuous 500 mW Ar+ laser. The band system is attributed to silicate (olivine), a major component of the meteorite.

  17. The Effect of Meteorite Impacts on the Elements Essential for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, G. R.; Cockell, C. S.; Lindgren, P.; Parnell, J.

    2010-04-01

    We explore the question: what is the effect of meteorite impact events on the concentration and distribution of elements essential for life? The results for carbonates suggest that there may not be a major loss of these elements during meteorite impact events.

  18. Determination of {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 36}Cl in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchel, S.; Herpers [Koeln Univ. (Germany); Neumann, S.; Michel, R. [Hannover Univ. (Germany); Kubik, P.W.; Synal, H.A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Long-lived cosmogenic radionuclides were determined in stony ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al) and iron ({sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, {sup 36}Cl) meteorites using AMS after radiochemical separation. A selection of these data is briefly discussed with respect to exposure histories of the meteorites and is compared to model calculations. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs.

  19. Cosmic abundance of iron and nature of primitive material in meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J.

    1972-01-01

    Comparison of solar abundance data with bulk analyses of type-I carbonaceous meteorites and microprobe analyses of type-I phyllosilicates. The comparison seems to lend support to Kerridge's (1971) hypothesis that the apparently primitive chemistry of such meteorites may be the result of a major component dominating the analysis and that this component may be unaltered solar system condensate.

  20. Magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites - Origin by aqueous activity on a planetesimal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerridge, J. F.; Mackay, A. L.; Boynton, W. V.

    1979-01-01

    The composition and morphology of magnetite in CI carbonaceous meteorites appear incompatible with a nebular origin. Mineralization on the meteorite parent body is a more plausible mode of formation. The iodine-xenon age of this material therefore dates an episode of secondary mineralization on a planetesimal rather than the epoch of condensation in the primitive solar nebula.

  1. Understanding Prebiotic Chemistry Through the Analysis of Extraterrestrial Amino Acids and Nucleobases in Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 50 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origines) of life on Earth were aided by extrataterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally. we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return missions.

  2. Meteoritic Input of Amino Acids and Nucleobases: Methodology and Implications for the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S.; Stern, Jennifer C.; Elsila, Jamie E.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.

    2012-01-01

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 40 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origin(s) of life on Earth were aided by extraterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial review focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally, we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return mIssIons.

  3. Understanding prebiotic chemistry through the analysis of extraterrestrial amino acids and nucleobases in meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Aaron S; Stern, Jennifer C; Elsila, Jamie E; Glavin, Daniel P; Dworkin, Jason P

    2012-08-21

    The discoveries of amino acids of extraterrestrial origin in many meteorites over the last 50 years have revolutionized the Astrobiology field. A variety of non-terrestrial amino acids similar to those found in life on Earth have been detected in meteorites. A few amino acids have even been found with chiral excesses, suggesting that meteorites could have contributed to the origin of homochirality in life on Earth. In addition to amino acids, which have been productively studied for years, sugar-like molecules, activated phosphates, and nucleobases have also been determined to be indigenous to numerous meteorites. Because these molecules are essential for life as we know it, and meteorites have been delivering them to the Earth since accretion, it is plausible that the origin(s) of life on Earth were aided by extraterrestrially-synthesized molecules. Understanding the origins of life on Earth guides our search for life elsewhere, helping to answer the question of whether biology is unique to Earth. This tutorial review focuses on meteoritic amino acids and nucleobases, exploring modern analytical methods and possible formation mechanisms. We will also discuss the unique window that meteorites provide into the chemistry that preceded life on Earth, a chemical record we do not have access to on Earth due to geologic recycling of rocks and the pervasiveness of biology across the planet. Finally, we will address the future of meteorite research, including asteroid sample return missions.

  4. Early planetesimal melting from an age of 4.5662 Gyr for differentiated meteorites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, J.; Bizzarro, Martin; Wittig, N.

    2005-01-01

    Long- and short-lived radioactive isotopes and their daughter products in meteorites are chronometers that can test models for Solar System formation. Differentiated meteorites come from parent bodies that were once molten and separated into metal cores and silicate mantles. Mineral ages for thes...

  5. Nature's starships. I. Observed abundances and relative frequencies of amino acids in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, Alyssa K.; Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: cobbak@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Origins Institute, McMaster University, ABB 241, 1280 Main Street, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2014-03-10

    The class of meteorites called carbonaceous chondrites are examples of material from the solar system which have been relatively unchanged from the time of their initial formation. These meteorites have been classified according to the temperatures and physical conditions of their parent planetesimals. We collate available data on amino acid abundance in these meteorites and plot the concentrations of different amino acids for each meteorite within various meteorite subclasses. We plot average concentrations for various amino acids across meteorites separated by subclass and petrologic type. We see a predominance in the abundance and variety of amino acids in CM2 and CR2 meteorites. The range in temperature corresponding to these subclasses indicates high degrees of aqueous alteration, suggesting aqueous synthesis of amino acids. Within the CM2 and CR2 subclasses, we identify trends in relative frequencies of amino acids to investigate how common amino acids are as a function of their chemical complexity. These two trends (total abundance and relative frequencies) can be used to constrain formation parameters of amino acids within planetesimals. Our organization of the data supports an onion shell model for the temperature structure of planetesimals. The least altered meteorites (type 3) and their amino acids originated near cooler surface regions. The most active amino acid synthesis likely took place at intermediate depths (type 2). The most altered materials (type 1) originated furthest toward parent body cores. This region is likely too hot to either favor amino acid synthesis or for amino acids to be retained after synthesis.

  6. Micro-elemental analysis of some Transylvanian meteorites and lunar samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasilescu, Angela [Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, Bucharest, 077125 Magurele (Romania)], E-mail: angela@nipne.ro; Constantinescu, B.; Bugoi, Roxana [Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Horia Hulubei National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, Bucharest, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Ceccato, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Grambole, D.; Herrmann, F. [Ionenstrahlzentrum Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, D-01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Micro-PIXE investigations on some Transylvanian chondritic meteorite fragments and on small Moon soil pieces from the LUNA-16 mission were performed at the Legnaro and Rossendorf proton microprobes. The most exciting finding of the study was the presence of Pt grains in the Moci meteorite. The results are compared to previously published data.

  7. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar dating of terrestrial and exterrestrial materials. Basalts from the Japan Sea floor, Deccan Plateau and meteorites from Antarctica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneoka, Ichiro [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Earthquake Research Inst.; Takigami, Yutaka

    1994-09-01

    Through a series of {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar dating for terrestrial and exterrestrial samples, the results for basalts from the Japan Sea floor, Deccan Plateau and for meteorites from Antarctica give significant information concerning their formation histories. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar ages of basalts from the Japan Sea floor give a constraint that the Japan Sea floor was formed at least 20 Ma. {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar ages for dyke samples from the Deccan Plateau indicate a possibility for the occurrence of a little younger ages than that of the main plateau formations by a few million years. Meteorites collected from Antarctica show some variable {sup 40}Ar-{sup 39}Ar ages reflecting their different thermal histories. (author).

  8. Analysis of a crater-forming meteorite impact in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P.; ReVelle, D. O.; Silber, E. A.; Edwards, W. N.; Arrowsmith, S.; Jackson, L. E.; Tancredi, G.; Eaton, D.

    2008-09-01

    The fireball producing a crater-forming meteorite fall near Carancas, Peru, on 15 September 2007 has been analyzed using eyewitness, seismic, and infrasound records. The meteorite impact, which produced a crater of 13.5 m diameter, is found to have released of order 1010 J of energy, equivalent to ~2-3 tons of TNT high explosives based on infrasonic measurements. Our best fit trajectory solution places the fireball radiant at an azimuth of 82° relative to the crater, with an entry angle from the horizontal of 63°. From entry modeling and infrasonic energetics constraints, we find an initial energy for the fireball to be in the 0.06-0.32 kton TNT equivalent. The initial velocity for the meteoroid is restricted to be below 17 km/s from orbit considerations alone, while modeling suggests an even lower best fit velocity close to 12 km/s. The initial mass of the meteoroid is in the range of 3-9 tons. At impact, modeling suggests a final end mass of order a few metric tons and impact velocity in the 1.5-4 km/s range. We suggest that the formation of such a substantial crater from a chondritic mass was the result of the unusually high strength (and corresponding low degree of fragmentation in the atmosphere) of the meteoritic body. Additionally, the high altitude of the impact site (3800 m.a.s.l) resulted in an almost one order of magnitude higher impact speed than would have been the case for the same body impacting close to sea level.

  9. Diamonds in meteorites – Raman mapping and cathodoluminescence studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.T. Karczemska

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available diversity among the diversity of other extraterrestrial carbon phases. The main subject of research shown here are example meteorites consisting diamonds: ureilites DaG 868 and Dho 3013. Results are compared with previous investigations. Diamonds exist in many different meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs and in comets dust. Origin of different diamonds is still debated among the scientists, two main possibilities are taken into consideration CVD process or shock metamorphism. Understanding laboratory techniques of manufacturing diamond helps in understanding the processes taking place in the Space. From the other side, the new findings and discoveries give the new insight to material science and laboratory techniques.Design/methodology/approach: The samples were examined with different methods, the most investigations presented here are Raman Mapping and Cathodoluminescence (CL.Findings: Diamonds have been found in different samples with different shock stages. It means that not all diamonds in urelites could have shock origin. Diamonds from examined samples show high diversity, they exist in different sizes, from nanodiamonds to micrometer sizes diamonds and in different polytypes. Shifts of Raman diamond peaks indicates this.Research limitations/implications: Results show the possibilities of creating the new diamond-based materials similar to those found in meteorites. Diamond polytypes are not well characterized yet and could give some surprises for materials science. For future research it would be interesting to apply more methods such as X-ray diffraction or HRTEM.Originality/value: SEM+BSE+EDS+CL results and Raman imaging results of DaG 868 and Dho 1303 ureilites are shown for the first time.

  10. The Fall and Recovery of the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, Alan R.; McCausland, Phil J.; Brown, Peter G.; Longstaffe, Fred J.; Russell, Samuel D.; tagliaferri, Edward; Wacker, John F.; Mazur, michael J.

    2006-03-01

    The Tagish Lake C2 (ungrouped) carbonaceous chondrite fall of January 18, 2000 delivered >10 kg of one of the most primitive and physically weak meteorites yet studied. In this paper we report the detailed circumstances of the fall and the recovery of all documented Tagish Lake fragments. We also provide measurements of bulk physical properties (mass, grain and bulk density), bulk triple oxygen-isotope ratios, and short-lived cosmogenic radionuclides counts for several fragments. Ground eyewitnesses and recorded observations of the Tagish Lake fireball event provide a refined estimate of the fireball trajectory, and hence, its pre-atmospheric orbit. From its calculated orbit and its similarity to the remotely-sensed properties of the D and P-class asteroids, the Tagish Lake carbonaceous chondrite represents these outer belt asteroids, and is not of cometary origin. The bulk oxygen-isotope compositions reported here are among the highest known for meteorites. These data plot just below the Terrestrial Fractionation Line, following a trend similar to the CM meteorite mixing line. The bulk density of the Tagish Lake material (1.66 ±0.02 g/cm3) is the same, within error, as the total bulk densities of many C-class and especially D- and P-class asteroids. The high microporosity of Tagish Lake samples (~40%) provides an obvious candidate material for the composition of low bulk density primitive asteroids such as Phobos, Deimos and the P-class binary 87 Sylvia, without requiring a substantial contribution from macroporosity in the form of ice, thick regolith or “rubble pile” assemblages with large interior voids.

  11. Fossilized diatoms in meteorites from recent falls in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Wallis, Jamie; Wickramarathne, Keerthi; Samaranayake, Anil; Williams, George; Jerman, Gregory; Wallis, D. H.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    2013-09-01

    On December 29, 2012, a bright yellow and green fireball was observed to disintegrate over the Polonnaruwa District of North Central, Sri Lanka. Many low density, black stones were recovered soon after the observed fall from rice paddy fields near the villages of Aralaganwila and Dimbulagala. These stones were initially studied by optical microscopy methods at the Medical Research Institute in Colombo, Sri Lanka. Soon thereafter, samples were sent to the UK and to the United States. More extensive Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy studies were then carried out at Cardiff University and the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center. The physico-chemical properties, elemental abundances, mineralogy and stable isotope data clearly indicate that these stones are non-terrestrial. Freshly fractured interior surfaces of the black stones have also been observed to contain the remains of fossilized diatom. Many of the diatom frustules are clearly embedded in the meteorite rock matrix and exhibit nitrogen levels below the EDX detection limits. Some of the fossil diatoms are araphid marine pennates and planktonic forms that are inconsistent with conditions associated with rice paddy fields. These observations indicate the fossilized diatoms are indigenous to the meteorites rather than post-arrival biological contaminants. The carbon content and mineralogy suggests that these stones may represent a previously ungrouped clan of carbonaceous meteorites. The extremely low density (~0.6) of the stones and their observed mineralogy was inconsistent with known terrestrial rocks (e.g., pumice, diatomite and fulgurites). The minerals detected suggest that the parent body of the Polonnaruwa stones may have been the nucleus of a comet. These observations are interpreted as supporting the Hoyle-Wickramasinghe Panspermia hypothesis and the hypothesis that diatoms and other microorganisms might be capable of living and growing in water ice and brines in comets.

  12. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Meteorites to and from the Moon and Mars: My Planet or Yours?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Meteorites from Mars - Constraints from Numerical Modeling; 2) Iron Oxidation Products in Martian Ordinary Chondrite Finds as Possible Indicators of Liquid Water Exposure at Mars Exploration Rover Landings Sites; 3) Meteorites on Mars; 4) Sulfide Stability of Planetary Basalts; 5) Exposure and Terrestrial Histories of New Lunar and Martian Meteorites.

  13. Formation processes and time scales for meteorite parent bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The transition from small particles suspended in the solar nebula to the planetesimals (asteroids) that became the parent bodies of meteorites is examined. Planetesimals probably grew by coagulation of grain aggregates that collided due to different rates of settling and drag-induced orbital decay. Their growth was accompanied by radial transport of solids, possibly sufficient to deplete the primordial mass in the asteroid zone, but with relatively little mixing. The formation of asteroid-sized planetesimals was probably rapid, on a time scale less than 1 Myr.

  14. Experimental studies of oblique impact. [of meteorites on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gault, D. E.; Wedekind, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    Meteoritic materials most probably impact planetary bodies along oblique trajectories inclined less than 45 deg above their surfaces. Laboratory studies of hypervelocity impacts against rock and particulate media are presented that indicate important effects of obliquity on crater size, shape, and ejecta distribution. The effects are particularly important to crater size-frequency analyses and geologic interpretations of crater formations. Impacts at shallow incidence, which are not uncommon, lead to ricochet of the impacting object accompanied with some entrained excavated materials at velocities only slightly reduced from the pre-impact value.

  15. Large meteorite impacts: The K/T model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohor, B. F.

    1992-01-01

    The Cretaceous/Tertiary (K/T) boundary event represents probably the largest meteorite impact known on Earth. It is the only impact event conclusively linked to a worldwide mass extinction, a reflection of its gigantic scale and global influence. Until recently, the impact crater was not definitively located and only the distal ejecta of this impact was available for study. However, detailed investigations of this ejecta's mineralogy, geochemistry, microstratigraphy, and textures have allowed its modes of ejection and dispersal to be modeled without benefit of a source crater of known size and location.

  16. Fractional crystallization of iron meteorites: Constant versus changing partition coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    1994-01-01

    Analyses of magmatic iron meteorites, plotted on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams, often form linear arrays. Traditionally, this linearity has been ascribed to fractional crystallization under the assumption of constant partition coefficients (i.e., Rayleigh fractionation). Paradoxically, however, partition coefficients in the Fe-Ni-S-P system are decidedly not constant. This contribution provides a rationale for understanding how trends on LogC(sub i) vs LogC(sub Ni) diagrams can be linear, even when partition coefficients are changing rapidly.

  17. Sulfur and Hydrogen Isotope Anomalies in Meteorite Sulfonic Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George W.; Thiemens, Mark H.; Jackson, Teresa L.; Chang, Sherwood

    1997-01-01

    Intramolecular carbon, hydrogen, and sulfur isotope ratios were measured on a homologous series of organic sulfonic acids discovered in the Murchison meteorite. Mass-independent sulfur isotope fractionations were observed along with high deuterium/hydrogen ratios. The deuterium enrichments indicate formation of the hydrocarbon portion of these compounds in a low-temperature environment that is consistent with that of interstellar clouds. Sulfur-33 enrichments observed in methanesulfonic acid could have resulted from gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of a precursor, carbon disulfide. The source of the sulfonic acid precursors may have been the reactive interstellar molecule carbon monosulfide.

  18. Interstellar chemistry recorded in organic matter from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Henner; Young, Andrea F; Alexander, Conel M O'd; Hoppe, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nittler, Larry R

    2006-05-05

    Organic matter in extraterrestrial materials has isotopic anomalies in hydrogen and nitrogen that suggest an origin in the presolar molecular cloud or perhaps in the protoplanetary disk. Interplanetary dust particles are generally regarded as the most primitive solar system matter available, in part because until recently they exhibited the most extreme isotope anomalies. However, we show that hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic compositions in carbonaceous chondrite organic matter reach and even exceed those found in interplanetary dust particles. Hence, both meteorites (originating from the asteroid belt) and interplanetary dust particles (possibly from comets) preserve primitive organics that were a component of the original building blocks of the solar system.

  19. The Nature of C Asteroid Regolith from Meteorite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, M.; Mikouchi, T.; Hagiya, K.; Ohsumi, K.; Komatsu, M.; Jenniskens, P.; Le, L.; Yin, Q.-Z; Kebukawa, Y.; Fries, M.

    2013-01-01

    Regolith from C (and related) asteroid bodies are a focus of the current missions Dawn at Ceres, Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS REx. An asteroid as large as Ceres is expected to be covered by a mature regolith, and as Hayabusa demonstrated, flat and therefore engineeringly-safe ponded deposits will probably be the sampling sites for both Hayabusa 2 and OSIRIS REx. Here we examine what we have learned about the mineralogy of fine-grained asteroid regolith from recent meteorite studies and the examination of the samples harvested from asteroid Itokawa by Hayabusa.

  20. The common property of isotope anomalies in meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert, F. [Museum-USM 205, CNRS-UMS 2679 LEME, 75 - Paris (France)

    2004-03-01

    The treatment proposed to account for the non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionation effect observed for oxygen isotopes during the synthesis of ozone (Robert and Camy-Peyret 2001) is applied to other chemical elements. A numerical treatment to calculate isotopic reaction rate ratios is proposed. This treatment yields non-mass-dependent isotopic effects in other chemical elements, qualitatively similar to those observed in some of the high temperature minerals found in the carbonaceous meteorites. This treatment may reflect the numerical consequences of an unrecognized quantum mechanical effect, linked to a property of chemical reactions involving indistinguishable isotopes. (author)

  1. Water in SNC meteorites - Evidence for a Martian hydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Haraldur R.; Clayton, Robert N.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.

    1992-01-01

    The Shergotty-Nakhla-Chassigny (SNC) meteorites, purportedly of Martian origin, contain 0.04 to 0.4 percent water by weight. Oxygen isotopic analysis can be used to determine whether this water is extraterrestrial or terrestrial. Such analysis reveals that a portion of the water is extraterrestrial and furthermore was not in oxygen isotopic equilibrium with the host rock. Lack of equilibrium between water and host rock implies that the lithosphere and hydrosphere of the SNC parent body formed two distinct oxygen isotopic reservoirs. If Mars was the parent body, the maintenance of two distinct reservoirs may result from the absence of plate tectonics on the planet.

  2. Meteorite Falls Observed in U.S. Weather Radar Data in 2015 and 2016 (To Date)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc; Fries, Jeffrey; Hankey, Mike; Matson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    To date, over twenty meteorite falls have been located in the weather radar imagery of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)'s NEXRAD radar network. We present here the most prominent events recorded since the last Meteoritical Society meeting, covering most of 2015 and early 2016. Meteorite Falls: The following events produced evidence of falling meteorites in radar imagery and resulted in meteorites recovered at the fall site. Creston, CA (24 Oct 2015 0531 UTC): This event generated 218 eyewitness reports submitted to the American Meteor Society (AMS) and is recorded as event #2635 for 2015 on the AMS website. Witnesses reported a bright fireball with fragmentation terminating near the city of Creston, CA, north of Los Angeles. Sonic booms and electrophonic noise were reported in the vicinity of the event. Weather radar imagery records signatures consistent with falling meteorites in data from the KMUX, KVTX, KHNX and KVBX. The Meteoritical Society records the Creston fall as an L6 meteorite with a total recovered mass of 688g. Osceola, FL (24 Jan 2016 1527 UTC): This daytime fireball generated 134 eyewitness reports on AMS report number 266 for 2016, with one credible sonic boom report. The fireball traveled roughly NE to SW with a terminus location north of Lake City, FL in sparsely populated, forested countryside. Radar imagery shows distinct and prominent evidence of a significant meteorite fall with radar signatures seen in data from the KJAX and KVAX radars. Searchers at the fall site found that recoveries were restricted to road sites by the difficult terrain, and yet several meteorites were recovered. Evidence indicates that this was a relatively large meteorite fall where most of the meteorites are unrecoverable due to terrain. Osceola is an L6 meteorite with 991 g total mass recovered to date. Mount Blanco, TX (18 Feb 2016 0343 UTC): This event produced only 39 eyewitness reports and is recorded as AMS event #635 for 2016. No

  3. Coesite and stishovite in a shocked lunar meteorite, Asuka-881757, and impact events in lunar surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, E; Ozawa, S; Miyahara, M; Ito, Y; Mikouchi, T; Kimura, M; Arai, T; Sato, K; Hiraga, K

    2011-01-11

    Microcrystals of coesite and stishovite were discovered as inclusions in amorphous silica grains in shocked melt pockets of a lunar meteorite Asuka-881757 by micro-Raman spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, electron back-scatter diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. These high-pressure polymorphs of SiO(2) in amorphous silica indicate that the meteorite experienced an equilibrium shock-pressure of at least 8-30 GPa. Secondary quartz grains are also observed in separate amorphous silica grains in the meteorite. The estimated age reported by the (39)Ar/(40)Ar chronology indicates that the source basalt of this meteorite was impacted at 3,800 Ma ago, time of lunar cataclysm; i.e., the heavy bombardment in the lunar surface. Observation of coesite and stishovite formed in the lunar breccias suggests that high-pressure impact metamorphism and formation of high-pressure minerals are common phenomena in brecciated lunar surface altered by the heavy meteoritic bombardment.

  4. In Situ Thermal Imagery of Antarctic Meteorites and Their Stability on the Ice Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, R. P.; Righter, M.; Karner, J. M.; Hyneck, B.; Keller, L.; Meshik, A.; Mittlefehldt, D.; Radebaugh, J.; Rougeux, B.; Schutt, J.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanisms behind Antarctic meteorite concentrations remain enigmatic nearly 5 decades after the first recoveries, and much of the research in this direction has been based on anedcotal evidence. While these observations suggest many plausible processes that help explain Antarctic meteorite concentrations, the relative importance of these various processes (which can result in either an increase or decrease of specimens) is a critical component of any more robust model of how these concentrations form. During the 2016-2017 field season of the US Antarctic Search for Meteorites program we aquired in situ thermal imagery of meteorites specimens that provide semi-quantitative assesment of the relative temperature of these specimens and the ice. These provide insight into one hypothesized loss mechanism, the downward thermal tunnelling of meteorites warmed in the sun.

  5. More Accounts of Meteoritic Events in the Oral Traditions of Indigenous Australians

    CERN Document Server

    Hamacher, Duane W

    2014-01-01

    Descriptions of natural events, such as fireballs and meteorite impacts, are found within Indigenous Australian oral traditions. Studies of oral traditions demonstrate that they extend beyond the realm of myth and legend; they contain structured knowledge about the natural world (science) as well as historic accounts of natural events and geo-hazards. These traditions could lead to the discovery of meteorites and impact sites previously unknown to Western science. In addition to benefiting the scientific study of meteoritics, this study can help social scientists better understand the nature and longevity of oral traditions and further support the growing body of evidence that oral traditions contain historical accounts of natural events. In a previous study led by the author in 2009, no meteorite-related oral traditions were identified that led to the discovery of meteorites and/or impact craters. This paper challenges those initial findings.

  6. The Enantiomeric Ratios of Meteoritic Organic Compounds: Their Possible Roles in the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George

    2012-01-01

    This talk will give an overview of the enantiomer (mirror-image) ratios of organic compounds in meteorites and also describe the results of the present work in my lab. The primary focus will be on sugar derivatives (sugar acids) of carbonaceous meteorites. Our work begins to address questions associated with chirality, i.e., the origins of homochirality. On Earth, biological monomers (amino acids, sugars, etc.) are usually found with one of the enantiomers more abundant than the other. However, biological polymers (proteins, nucleic acids, etc.) are only composed of one enantiomer i.e., they are homochiral. There are hints in meteorites that some organic molecules may also exist in homochiral forms. The talk will address questions such as: did extraterrestrial sources aid in the beginning of this homochirality? Do the increasing size and apparent enantiomer excesses of some meteoritic compounds also extend to larger meteoritic compounds and polymers?

  7. Meteorites and the RNA World: A Thermodynamic Model of Nucleobase Synthesis within Planetesimals

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Ben K D

    2016-01-01

    The possible meteorite parent body origin of Earth's pregenetic nucleobases is substantiated by the guanine (G), adenine (A) and uracil (U) measured in various meteorites. Cytosine (C) and thymine (T) however are absent in meteorites, making the emergence of a RNA and later RNA/DNA/protein world problematic. We investigate the meteorite parent body (planetesimal) origin of all nucleobases by computationally modeling 18 reactions that potentially contribute to nucleobase formation in such environments. Out of this list, we identify the two most important reactions for each nucleobase and find that these involve small molecules such as HCN, CO, NH3, and water that ultimately arise from the protoplanetary disks in which planetesimals are built. The primary result of this study is that cytosine is unlikely to persist within meteorite parent bodies due to aqueous deamination. Thymine has a thermodynamically favourable reaction pathway from uracil, formaldehyde and formic acid, but likely did not persist within pla...

  8. Siderophile Element Profile Measurements in Iron Meteorites Using Laser Ablation ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, H. C.; Watson, E. B.; McDonough, W. F.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of siderophile elements during cooling of iron meteorites can lead to insight into the general thermal histories of the meteorites as well as their respective parent bodies. Traditionally trace element analyses in meteorites have been done using techniques that only measure the average concentration in each phase. With these methods, all of the spatial information with respect to the distribution of an element within one phase is lost. Measuring concentration profiles of trace elements in meteorites is now possible, with the advent of high-resolution analytical techniques such as laser ablation, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) with spatial resolution <20 microns. [e.g. 1,2] and secondary ion mass spectrometry [3]. These profiles can give more insight into both the partitioning and diffusive behavior of siderophile elements in metal systems relevant to iron meteorites, as well as parent body cooling rates.

  9. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy applications to meteorites: Chemical analysis and composition profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Aglio, M.; De Giacomo, A.; Gaudiuso, R.; Pascale, O. De; Senesi, G. S.; Longo, S.

    2010-12-01

    A fast procedure for chemical analysis of different meteorites is presented, based on LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy). The technique is applied to several test cases (Dhofar 019, Dhofar 461, Sahara 98222, Toluca, Sikhote Alin and Campo del Cielo) and can be useful for rapid meteorite identification providing geologists with specific chemical information for meteorite classification. Concentration profiles of Fe, Ni and Co are simultaneously detected across the Widmanstätten structure of the iron meteorite Toluca with a view to determining cooling rates. The LIBS analysis of meteorites is also used as a laboratory test for analogous studies on the respective parent bodies (Mars, asteroids) in space exploration missions where one clear advantage of the proposed technique is that no direct contact with the sample is required.

  10. Micro-Raman, FTIR, SEM-EDX and structural analysis of the Çanakkale meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsalan, O; Yilmaz, A; Bolukbasi, O; Ozturk, B; Esenoglu, H H; Ildiz, G O; Ornek, C Y

    2012-06-15

    This study demonstrates for the first time, the spectroscopic characterization of Çanakkale Meteorite that fell at Çanakkale, Republic of Turkey (40°8'44″N; 26°24'23″E). The olivine group [(Mg, Fe)(2)SiO(4)], enstatite [Mg(2)Si(2)O(6)] (one of the orthopyroxene minerals) and plagioclase were identified by the micro-Raman and FTIR spectroscopies and EDX-SEM analyses. This meteorite has not yet been classified in the World's Database of Meteorites. The aim of this study is to investigate this meteorite by vibrational spectroscopic techniques and open the possibility to classify it and list in the World's Database of Meteorites. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The chemistry that preceded life's origin: a study guide from meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzarello, Sandra

    2007-04-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites are rare fragments of asteroids that contain organic carbon of diverse composition, various complexity, and whose lineage can in several instances be traced back to pre-solar environments. Their analyses offer a unique glimpse into the chemistry of the solar system that preceded life and may have been available to its emergence on the early Earth. While the heterogeneity of the organic materials of meteorites is indicative of random synthetic processes for their formation, some of their components have identical counterparts in the biosphere, and a group of meteoritic amino acids were found to display chiral asymmetry, a property known since the time of Pasteur to be inextricably linked to life's processes. The ability of these amino acids to act as asymmetric catalysts, as well as indications that molecular asymmetry in meteorites may not be limited to these compounds, encourage the suggestion of possible involvement of meteoritic material in the induction of selective traits in molecular evolution.

  12. Multi-element and isotopic analyses of iron meteorites using a glow discharge mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Tadashi (Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara (Japan). School of Hygienic Sciences); Takahashi, Takako (Marubun Corp., Kotoku, Tokyo (Japan). Analytical Research Lab.); Honda, Masatake; Nagai, Hisao (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Coll. of Humanities and Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Multi-element and isotopic analyses were performed of eight iron meteorites using a glow discharge mass spectrometer. Virtually all the elements can be determined. Major components (Fe, Co and Ni) through to ultra-trace constituents at the sub ng g[sup -1] level (Sc etc.) are measured directly with minimum chemical treatment within the same analytical cycle. Extremely high relative concentrations of Ni, Cu, Pd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Pb and Bi were found in the meteorite Yamato 791694; the concentration of C was also very high. The isotopic composition of Pb in this meteorite was close to primordial. Low concentrations of C, N and O were found in the meteorite Gibeon. Very low S and Zn and high Cr and V were found in a third meteorite, Chinga. An excess of [sup 53]Cr was observed in Yamato 75031, which was consistent with the cosmic ray production level expected from the concentration of [sup 45]Sc. (Author).

  13. Research Progress in Meteoritics and Cosmochemistry(2001-2010)%陨石学与天体化学(2001~2010)研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林杨挺; 缪秉魁; 徐琳; 胡森; 冯璐; 赵旭晁; 杨晶

    2013-01-01

    In the first 10 years of 21st century, meteoritics and cosmochemistry made significant progress in China. During 5 times of Chinese Antarctic Research Expeditions, more than 10 thousands of meteorites have been collected from Grove Mountain areas, supplying with precious extraterrestrial samples. The study of meteoritics and cosmochemistry has also been promoted by Chang'e mission and the great success in the first episode of Chinese lunar exploration, and is challenged by the demands of space exploration. Various high precision and high laterial resolution measurements of extraterrestrial samples are now available with a number of newly established facilities and e-quipments. Furthermore, many young researchers have been involved in cosmochemistry and trained via classifying the large number of Antarctic meteorites. By studying of various groups of meteorites, numerous discoveries have been made, inclusing presolar grains in primitive chondrites, short-lived radionuclides, condensation processes of the solar nebula under different redox conditions, petrogenesis and isotopic dating of lunar meteorites and martian meteorites, shock metamorphism and high pressure polymorphs in shocked meteorites, and confirmation of the first meteorite impact crater in China.%21世纪的第一个十年,陨石学与天体化学研究在中国迎来了一个前所未有的发展时期.在南极格罗夫山地区共开展了5次科学考察,收集到超过1万块陨石,提供了珍贵的研究样品;嫦娥工程的立项和一期工程的成功实施,是陨石学与天体化学发展的重大机遇,也是挑战;高精度原位微区分析平台建设的完成,则为地外物质样品的分析提供了关键的技术保证.更为重要的是,通过大量南极陨石的分类工作,培养和锻炼了陨石学研究的青年人才.在此基础上,通过对各化学群陨石的研究,取得了许多重要的成果,包括陨石中前太阳颗粒的发现和研究、陨石中的灭绝核

  14. Identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Jessberger, Elmar K; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2004-06-22

    Amino acids identified in the Murchison chondritic meteorite by molecular and isotopic analysis are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust particles where they may have triggered the appearance of life by assisting in the synthesis of proteins via prebiotic polycondensation reactions [Oró, J. (1961) Nature 190, 389-390; Chyba, C. F. & Sagan, C. (1992) Nature 355, 125-132]. We report the identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite by new enantioselective GC-MS analyses. dl-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, dl-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, 4,4'-diaminoisopentanoic acid, 3,3'-diaminoisobutanoic acid, and 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid were detected in the parts per billion range after chemical transformation into N,N-diethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivatives. The chiral diamino acids show a racemic ratio. Laboratory data indicate that diamino acids support the formation of polypeptide structures under primitive Earth conditions [Brack, A. & Orgel, L. E. (1975) Nature 256, 383-387] and suggest polycondensation reactions of diamino acids into early peptide nucleic acid material as one feasible pathway for the prebiotic evolution of DNA and RNA genomes [Joyce, G. F. (2002) Nature 418, 214-221]. The results obtained in this study favor the assumption that not only amino acids (as the required monomers of proteins) form in interstellar/circumstellar environments, but also the family of diamino monocarboxylic acids, which might have been relevant in prebiotic chemistry.

  15. Searching for the Source Crater of Nakhlite Meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, A; Chatzitheodoridis, E

    2016-11-01

    We surveyed the Martian surface in order to identify possible source craters of the nakhlite Martian meteorites. We investigated rayed craters that are assumed to be younger than 11 Ma, on lava surfaces with a solidification age around 1.2 Ga. An area of 17.3 million km(2) Amazonian lava plains was surveyed and 53 rayed craters were identified. Although most of them are smaller than the threshold limit that is estimated as minimum of launching fragments to possible Earth crossing trajectories, their observed size frequency distribution agrees with the expected areal density from cratering models characteristic for craters that are less than few tens of Ma old. We identified 6 craters larger than 3 km diameter constituting the potentially best source craters for nakhlites. These larger candidates are located mostly on a smooth lava surface, and in some cases, on the earlier fluvial-like channels. In three cases they are associated with fluidized ejecta lobes and rays - although the rays are faint in these craters, thus might be older than the other craters with more obvious rays. More work is therefore required to accurately estimate ages based on ray system for this purpose. A more detailed search should further link remote sensing Martian data with the in-situ laboratory analyses of Martian meteorites, especially in case of high altitude, steep terrains, where the crater rays seems to rarely survive several Ma.

  16. Water in Pyroxene and Olivine from Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.

    2012-01-01

    Water in the interior of terrestrial planets can be dissolved in fluids or melts and hydrous phases, but can also be locked as protons attached to structural oxygen in lattice defects in nominally anhydrous minerals (NAM) like olivine, pyroxene, or feldspar [1-3]. Although these minerals contain only tens to hundreds of ppm H2O, this water can amount to at least one ocean in mass when added at planetary scales because of the modal dominance of NAM in the mantle and crust [4]. Moreover these trace amounts of water can have drastic effects on melting temperature, rheology, electrical and heat conductivity, and seismic wave attenuation [5]. There is presently a debate on how much water is present in the martian mantle. Secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) studies of NAM [6], amphiboles and glass in melt inclusions [7-10], and apatites [11, 12] from Martian meteorites report finding as much water as in the same phases from Earth's igneous rocks. Most martian hydrous minerals, however, generally have the relevant sites filled with Cl and F instead of H [13, 14], and experiments using Cl [15] in parent melts can reproduce Martian basalt compositions as well as those with water [16]. We are in the process of analyzing Martian meteorite minerals by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) in order to constrain the role of water in this planet s formation and magmatic evolution

  17. 57Fe Mössbauer study of the chainpur meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elewa, Nancy N.; Cobas, R.; Cadogan, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Chainpur meteorite is one of 23 ordinary chondrites classified as LL3-type (low-Fe & low-metal). It was observed as a shower of stones falling on May 9, 1907 in Uttar Pradesh, India. We report here the characterization of the Fe-bearing phases in this chondrite using 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy carried out at 298 K, 120 K, 50 K and 13 K. The paramagnetic doublets of olivine and pyroxene dominate the room temperature spectrum, accounting for around 70 % of the spectral area. Moreover, a doublet present with a spectral area of 5 % and assigned to a superparamagnetic Fe 3+ phase is a consequence of terrestrial weathering. On the basis of the measured 57Fe electric quadrupole splitting of the olivine component at room temperature we estimate the mean Fe:Mg ratio in this meteoritic olivine to be around 35:65 % although there is clearly a wide range of composition. The effects of magnetic ordering of the major components olivine and pyroxene are observed at 13 K.

  18. Investigations of Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gismelseed, A. M.; Abdallah, S. B.; Al-Rawas, A. D.; Al-Mabsali, F. N.; Widatallah, H. M.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Ericsson, T.; Annersten, H.

    2016-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) have been performed on two meteorites named Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat after identifying their falling sites in the Western region of Sudan. These two meteorites are ordinary chondrites with similar mineralogy. XRD and EMPA show that the two specimens consist of primary olivine, ortho-pyroxene and later crystallising clino-pyroxene as reaction rims against plagioclase. Fe-metal phases are dominated by kamacite (≈6 wt.% Ni) and minor amounts of tetrataenite (≈52 wt.% Ni). Troilite (FeS) and alabandite (MnS) are optically observed as sulphide phases. The Mössbauer measurements at 295 and 78 K are in agreement with the above characterizations, showing at least two paramagnetic doublets which are assigned to olivine and pyroxene and magnetic sextets assigned to kamacite (hyperfine field ≈33.5 T) and troilite FeS (hyperfine field ≈31 T).

  19. Electron microscopy study of the iron meteorite Santa Catharina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Williams, D. B.; Goldstein, J. I.; Clarke, R. S., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    A characterization of the microstructural features of Santa Catharina (SC) from the millimeter to submicron scale is presented. The same specimen was examined using an optical microscope, a scanning electron microscope, an electron probe microanalyzer, and an analytical electron microscope. Findings include the fact that SC metal nodules may have different bulk Ni values, leading to different microstructures upon cooling; that SC USNM 6293 is the less corroded sample, as tetrataenite exists as less than 10 nm ordered domains throughout the entire fcc matrix (it is noted that this structure is the same as that of the Twin City meteorite and identical to clear taenite II in the retained taenite regions of the octahedrites); that SC USNM 3043 has a more complicated microstructure due to corrosion; and that the low Ni phase of the cloudy zone was selectively corroded in some areas and formed the dark regions, indicating that the SC meteorite corrosion process was electrochemical in nature and may involve Cl-containing akaganeite.

  20. Hungaria Asteroid Family as the Source of Aubrite Meteorites

    CERN Document Server

    Ćuk, Matija; Nesvorný, David

    2014-01-01

    The Hungaria asteroids are interior to the main asteroid belt, with semimajor axes between 1.8 and 2 AU, low eccentricities and inclinations of 16-35 degrees. Small asteroids in the Hungaria region are dominated by a collisional family associated with (434) Hungaria. The dominant spectral type of the Hungaria group is the E or X-type (Warner et al, 2009), mostly due to the E-type composition of Hungaria and its genetic family. It is widely believed the E-type asteroids are related to the aubrite meteorites, also known as enstatite achondrites (Gaffey et al, 1992). Here we explore the hypothesis that aubrites originate in the Hungaria family. In order to test this connection, we compare model Cosmic Ray Exposure ages from orbital integrations of model meteoroids with those of aubrites. We show that long CRE ages of aubrites (longest among stony meteorite groups) reflect the delivery route of meteoroids from Hungarias to Earth being different than those from main-belt asteroids. We find that the meteoroids from...

  1. Structural Characterization of Iron Meteorites through Neutron Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caporali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this communication, we demonstrate the use of neutron tomography for the structural characterization of iron meteorites. These materials prevalently consist of metallic iron with variable nickel content. Their study and classification is traditionally based on chemical and structural analysis. The latter requires cutting, polishing and chemical etching of large slabs of the sample in order to determine the average width of the largest kamacite lamellae. Although this approach is useful to infer the genetical history of these meteorites, it is not applicable to small or precious samples. On the base of different attenuation coefficient of cold neutrons for nickel and iron, neutron tomography allows the reconstruction of the Ni-rich (taenite and Ni-poor (kamacite metallic phases. Therefore, the measure of the average width of the largest kamacite lamellae could be determined in a non-destructive way. Furthermore, the size, shape, and spatial correlation between kamacite and taenite crystals were obtained more efficiently and accurately than via metallographic investigation.

  2. Palladium-silver chronology of IAB iron meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, K. J.; Schönbächler, M.; Benedix, G. K.; Rehkämper, M.; Andreasen, R.; Davies, C.

    2013-01-01

    The extinct 107Pd-107Ag decay system (half-life ˜6.5 Ma) is a useful chronometer to constrain the thermal evolution of the IAB parent body. To this end, Pd/Ag concentrations and the Ag isotope compositions of metals separated from 6 different IAB iron meteorites were determined. The samples show ɛ107Ag variations between +0.1 and +15.8 with 108Pd/109Ag ratios between 38 and 200. The data can be divided into two groups based on their petrology, each defining an isochron: a graphite and troilite rich inclusion bearing group (A), with the IAB meteorites Toluca, Odessa and Canyon Diablo and a more silicate rich group (B), which includes Campo Del Cielo, Caddo County and Goose Lake. Using the initial abundance of 107Pd derived from carbonaceous chondrites, the corresponding age for the group (A) is 18.7 (+3.6/-5.0) Ma after the start of the solar system and 14.9 (+2.5/-4.9) Ma for the group (B). This suggests that the last thermal event to reach high enough temperatures to melt metal on the IAB parent body occurred within the first 15 Ma of our solar system.

  3. Identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, Uwe J.; Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Hendrik Bredehöft, Jan; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Thiemann, Wolfram H.-P.

    Amino acids identified in the Murchison chondritic meteorite by molecular and isotopic analysis are thought to have been delivered to the early Earth by asteroids, comets, and interplanetary dust particles where they may have triggered the appearance of life by assisting in the synthesis of proteins via prebiotic polycondensation reactions [Oró, J. (1961) Nature 190, 389-390; Chyba, C. F. & Sagan, C. (1992) Nature 355, 125-132]. We report the identification of diamino acids in the Murchison meteorite by new enantioselective GC-MS analyses. DL-2,3-diaminopropanoic acid, DL-2,4-diaminobutanoic acid, 4,4'-diaminoisopentanoic acid, 3,3'-diaminoisobutanoic acid, and 2,3-diaminobutanoic acid were detected in the parts per billion range after chemical transformation into N,N-diethoxycarbonyl ethyl ester derivatives. The chiral diamino acids show a racemic ratio. Laboratory data indicate that diamino acids support the formation of polypeptide structures under primitive Earth conditions [Brack, A. & Orgel, L. E. (1975) Nature 256, 383-387] and suggest polycondensation reactions of diamino acids into early peptide nucleic acid material as one feasible pathway for the prebiotic evolution of DNA and RNA genomes [Joyce, G. F. (2002) Nature 418, 214-221]. The results obtained in this study favor the assumption that not only amino acids (as the required monomers of proteins) form in interstellar/circumstellar environments, but also the family of diamino monocarboxylic acids, which might have been relevant in prebiotic chemistry.

  4. Investigations of Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gismelseed, A. M., E-mail: abbasher@squ.edu.om [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science (Oman); Abdallah, S. B. [University of Khartoum, Department of Geology, Faculty of Science (Sudan); Al-Rawas, A. D.; Al-Mabsali, F. N.; Widatallah, H. M.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A. [Sultan Qaboos University, College of Science (Oman); Ericsson, T. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Material Sciences (Sweden); Annersten, H. [Uppsala University, Department of Earth Sciences (Sweden)

    2016-12-15

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, and electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) have been performed on two meteorites named Al-Dalang and Al-Hawashat after identifying their falling sites in the Western region of Sudan. These two meteorites are ordinary chondrites with similar mineralogy. XRD and EMPA show that the two specimens consist of primary olivine, ortho-pyroxene and later crystallising clino-pyroxene as reaction rims against plagioclase. Fe-metal phases are dominated by kamacite (≈6 wt.% Ni) and minor amounts of tetrataenite (≈52 wt.% Ni). Troilite (FeS) and alabandite (MnS) are optically observed as sulphide phases. The Mössbauer measurements at 295 and 78 K are in agreement with the above characterizations, showing at least two paramagnetic doublets which are assigned to olivine and pyroxene and magnetic sextets assigned to kamacite (hyperfine field ≈33.5 T) and troilite FeS (hyperfine field ≈31 T).

  5. Search for Fractional-Charge Particles in Meteoritic Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Peter C.; Lee, Eric R.; Lee, Irwin T.; Perl, Martin L.; Halyo, Valerie; Loomba, Dinesh

    2007-10-01

    We have used an automated Millikan oil drop method to search for free fractional-charge particles in a sample containing in total 3.9 mg of pulverized Allende meteorite suspended in 259 mg of mineral oil. The average diameter of the drops was 26.5μm with the charge on about 42 500 000 drops being measured. This search was motivated by the speculation that isolatable, fractional-charge particles produced in the early Universe and present in our Solar System are more likely to be accumulated in asteroids than on Earth‘s surface. No evidence for fractional-charge particles was found. With 95% confidence, the concentration of particles with fractional-charge more than 0.25 e (e being the magnitude of the electron charge) from the nearest integer charge is less than 1.3×10-21 particles per nucleon in the meteoritic material and less than 1.9×10-23 particles per nucleon in the mineral oil.

  6. Searching for the Source Crater of Nakhlite Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kereszturi, A.; Chatzitheodoridis, E.

    2016-11-01

    We surveyed the Martian surface in order to identify possible source craters of the nakhlite Martian meteorites. We investigated rayed craters that are assumed to be younger than 11 Ma, on lava surfaces with a solidification age around 1.2 Ga. An area of 17.3 million km2 Amazonian lava plains was surveyed and 53 rayed craters were identified. Although most of them are smaller than the threshold limit that is estimated as minimum of launching fragments to possible Earth crossing trajectories, their observed size frequency distribution agrees with the expected areal density from cratering models characteristic for craters that are less than few tens of Ma old. We identified 6 craters larger than 3 km diameter constituting the potentially best source craters for nakhlites. These larger candidates are located mostly on a smooth lava surface, and in some cases, on the earlier fluvial-like channels. In three cases they are associated with fluidized ejecta lobes and rays - although the rays are faint in these craters, thus might be older than the other craters with more obvious rays. More work is therefore required to accurately estimate ages based on ray system for this purpose. A more detailed search should further link remote sensing Martian data with the in-situ laboratory analyses of Martian meteorites, especially in case of high altitude, steep terrains, where the crater rays seems to rarely survive several Ma.

  7. Isotope geochemistry of boron in mantle rocks, tektites and meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaussidon, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 54 - Nancy (France). Centre de Recherches Petrographiques et Geochimiques

    1995-12-31

    Recent ion microprobe studies of fresh oceanic basalt glasses and chondrules from primitive meteorites give an overview of the distribution of boron isotopes in the mantle and in extra-terrestrial rocks. After removal of secondary boron isotope variations due to interactions between mantle melts and the oceanic crust, the primitive mantle is found to have a constant {delta}{sup 11}B value of -10 {+-} 2 per mill, similar to that of the bulk continental crust. In contrast, large isotopic variations between -50 and +40 per mill are present at the micron scale in meteoritic chondrules which are among the most primitive objects of the solar system. These isotopic variations imply that a significant part of the boron of the solar system was synthesized in the presolar cloud, likely by spallation reactions between lo-energy cosmic rays and nebular hydrogen. These heterogeneities were partly preserved in chondrules which formed early in the evolution of the solar system but are not observed for the silicate Earth implying an efficient mixing just before or during the accretion of the Earth. (authors). 74 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Petrogenesis of the nakhlite meteorites: Evidence from cumulate mineral zoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, R.P.; McSween, H.Y. Jr. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States))

    1992-04-01

    A simple igneous petrogenesis for the meteorite Nakhla has previously been called into question because Mg/Fe ratios in olivine indicate substantial disequilibrium between the predominant cumulus minerals (olivine and augite). Comparative analyses of simulated diffusive zoning and the observed cumulus mineral zoning for all three nakhlites (Nakhla, Governador Valadares, and Lafayette) show that their current compositions do not necessarily reflect parental magma compositions. Instead, diffusion has altered primary cumulus compositions to varying degrees, Nakhla being the least affected, and Lafayette being almost completely re-equilibrated. Only the cores of augite grains in Nakhla and Governador Valadares appear to have preserved their original compositions. Mineral zoning in each meteorite is strongly concentric around mesostasis areas, suggesting that reaction with intercumulus liquid has controlled the observed zoning. The presence of pigeonite and orthopyroxene overgrowths in Nakhla and Governador Valadares, and of poikilitic orthopyroxene enclosing olivine relicts in Lafayette, indicate substantial late-magmatic reactions. Two-pyroxene geothermometry for Lafayette indicates temperatures around 95C, suggesting subsolidus equilibration as well. The nakhlites appear to be a series of relatively simple cumulate rocks which have undergone various amounts of late-magmatic and subsolidus diffusion, possibly reflecting their relative positions in a cooling cumulate pile.

  9. Moessbauer Spectroscopy of Mineral Separates from SNC Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyar, M. D.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous workers have recently focused attention on the issue of the oxygen fugacity (f(sub O2)) of martian samples. Estimates of fO2 based on Fe-Ti oxides and D(sub Eu)/D(sub Gd) and D(sub Eu)/D(sub Sm) ratios suggest a range of fO2 values for SNC meteorites from IW+2.5 - IW+3.5 for Shergotty to IW- 2.0 - IW+0.2 for QUE94201. Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) is also a function of f(sub O2), and synchrotron micro-XANES values for olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar Fe(3+) have been reported. However, the relationship between the reported Fe(3+) values and the other methods for estimating f(sub O2) is not clear, and further measurements of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) by a more conventional technique have been needed. Accordingly, in this project, new Mossbauer spectroscopy data on mineral separates handpicked from 10 SNC meteorites are reported.

  10. Chelyabinsk meteorite explains unusual spectral properties of Baptistina Asteroid Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Bottke, William F.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; O'Brien, David P.; Mann, Paul; Cuddy, Matthew; Le Corre, Lucille; Gaffey, Michael J.; Fujihara, Gary

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the spectral and compositional properties of Chelyabinsk meteorite to identify its possible parent body in the main asteroid belt. Our analysis shows that the meteorite contains two spectrally distinct but compositionally indistinguishable components of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material. Our X-ray diffraction analysis confirms that the two lithologies of the Chelyabinsk meteorite are extremely similar in modal mineralogy. The meteorite is compositionally similar to LL chondrite and its most probable parent asteroid in the main belt is a member of the Flora family. Our work confirms previous studies (e.g., Vernazza et al. [2008]. Nature 454, 858-860; de León, J., Licandro, J., Serra-Ricart, M., Pinilla-Alonso, N., Campins, H. [2010]. Astron. Astrophys. 517, A23; Dunn, T.L., Burbine, T.H., Bottke, W.F., Clark, J.P. [2013]. Icarus 222, 273-282), linking LL chondrites to the Flora family. Intimate mixture of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material from Chelyabinsk provides a spectral match with (8) Flora, the largest asteroid in the Flora family. The Baptistina family and Flora family overlap each other in dynamical space. Mineralogical analysis of (298) Baptistina and 11 small family members shows that their surface compositions are similar to LL chondrites, although their absorption bands are subdued and albedos lower when compared to typical S-type asteroids. A range of intimate mixtures of LL5 chondrite and shock blackened/impact melt material from Chelyabinsk provides spectral matches for all these BAF members. We suggest that the presence of a significant shock/impact melt component in the surface regolith of BAF members could be the cause of lower albedo and subdued absorption bands. The conceptual problem with part of this scenario is that impact melts are very rare within ordinary chondrites. Of the ∼42,000 ordinary chondrites, less than 0.5% (203) of them contain impact melts. A major reason that impact

  11. NEUTRON-POOR NICKEL ISOTOPE ANOMALIES IN METEORITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, Robert C. J.; Coath, Christopher D.; Regelous, Marcel; Elliott, Tim [Bristol Isotope Group, School of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Wills Memorial Building, Queen' s Road, Bristol BS8 1RJ (United Kingdom); Russell, Sara, E-mail: r.steele@uclmail.net [Meteoritics and Cosmic mineralogy, Natural History Museum, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-10

    We present new, mass-independent, Ni isotope data for a range of bulk chondritic meteorites. The data are reported as {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, or the parts per ten thousand deviations from a terrestrial reference, the NIST SRM 986 standard, of the {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni internally normalized {sup 60}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni, and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni ratios. The chondrites show a range of 0.15, 0.29, and 0.84 in {epsilon}{sup 60}Ni{sub 58/61}, {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61}, and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61} relative to a typical sample precision of 0.03, 0.05, and 0.08 (2 s.e.), respectively. The carbonaceous chondrites show the largest positive anomalies, enstatite chondrites have approximately terrestrial ratios, though only EH match Earth's composition within uncertainty, and ordinary chondrites show negative anomalies. The meteorite data show a strong positive correlation between {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}, an extrapolation of which is within the error of the average of previous measurements of calcium-, aluminium-rich inclusions. Moreover, the slope of this bulk meteorite array is 3.003 {+-} 0.166 which is within the error of that expected for an anomaly solely on {sup 58}Ni. We also determined to high precision ({approx}10 ppm per AMU) the mass-dependent fractionation of two meteorite samples which span the range of {epsilon}{sup 62}Ni{sub 58/61} and {epsilon}{sup 64}Ni{sub 58/61}. These analyses show that 'absolute' ratios of {sup 58}Ni/{sup 61}Ni vary between these two samples whereas those of {sup 62}Ni/{sup 61}Ni and {sup 64}Ni/{sup 61}Ni do not. Thus, Ni isotopic differences seem most likely explained by variability in the neutron-poor {sup 58}Ni, and not correlated anomalies in the neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 62}Ni and {sup 64}Ni. This contrasts with previous inferences from mass-independent measurements of Ni and

  12. A Preliminary Study On the Electrical Signatures of Some Iron and Stony Meteorites and Their Dependence On Nickel Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabawy Bassem S.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study is considered as an exploratory study of electrical properties of meteorites at variable current frequencies, called the electrical signature. The electric resistivity has been measured at different frequencies, varying between 1 and 100 KHz for some iron meteorites (Mundrabilla and Gibeon meteorites, stony meteorite samples (NWA 869, NWA 7629 and Ghubara and Fe-Ni alloys, of known Ni concentration, which have been prepared and used as standards to be compared with the studied meteorites. In addition, SEM studies supported by EDX technique have been applied. The SEM and EDX displays enabled us to obtain the chemical composition and internal structural fabrics of the studied samples. Porosity and density (bulk and grain densities have also been measured for both types of meteorites. Porosity values of the studied meteorites are very low (∅ ≤ 3% and correspond to micro vugs and cracks. The grain density of non-weathered samples varies from 3.48 g/cm3 for the stony meteorites to 7.91 g/cm3 for the iron meteorites. The obtained electrical signatures are diagnostic for each type and can be used to detect quantitatively the concentration of Ni. The electrical signature of stony meteorites is much simpler than that of iron meteorites, and simpler signatures have been obtained at higher Ni concentrations.

  13. A Preliminary Study On the Electrical Signatures of Some Iron and Stony Meteorites and Their Dependence On Nickel Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabawy, Bassem S.; Rochette, Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The present study is considered as an exploratory study of electrical properties of meteorites at variable current frequencies, called the electrical signature. The electric resistivity has been measured at different frequencies, varying between 1 and 100 KHz for some iron meteorites (Mundrabilla and Gibeon meteorites), stony meteorite samples (NWA 869, NWA 7629 and Ghubara) and Fe-Ni alloys, of known Ni concentration, which have been prepared and used as standards to be compared with the studied meteorites. In addition, SEM studies supported by EDX technique have been applied. The SEM and EDX displays enabled us to obtain the chemical composition and internal structural fabrics of the studied samples. Porosity and density (bulk and grain densities) have also been measured for both types of meteorites. Porosity values of the studied meteorites are very low (∅ ≤ 3%) and correspond to micro vugs and cracks. The grain density of non-weathered samples varies from 3.48 g/cm3 for the stony meteorites to 7.91 g/cm3 for the iron meteorites. The obtained electrical signatures are diagnostic for each type and can be used to detect quantitatively the concentration of Ni. The electrical signature of stony meteorites is much simpler than that of iron meteorites, and simpler signatures have been obtained at higher Ni concentrations.

  14. Searching for Extraterrestrial Amino Acids in a Contaminated Meteorite: Amino Acid Analyses of the Canakkale L6 Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, A. S.; Elsila, J. E.; Glavin, D. P.; Dworkin, J. P.; Ornek, C. Y.; Esenoglu, H. H.; Unsalan, O.; Ozturk, B.

    2016-01-01

    Amino acids can serve as important markers of cosmochemistry, as their abundances and isomeric and isotopic compositions have been found to vary predictably with changes in parent body chemistry and alteration processes. Amino acids are also of astrobiological interest because they are essential for life on Earth. Analyses of a range of meteorites, including all groups of carbonaceous chondrites, along with H, R, and LL chondrites, ureilites, and a martian shergottite, have revealed that amino acids of plausible extraterrestrial origin can be formed in and persist after a wide range of parent body conditions. However, amino acid analyses of L6 chondrites to date have not provided evidence for indigenous amino acids. In the present study, we performed amino acid analysis on larger samples of a different L6 chondite, Canakkale, to determine whether or not trace levels of indigenous amino acids could be found. The Canakkale meteor was an observed fall in late July, 1964, near Canakkale, Turkey. The meteorite samples (1.36 and 1.09 g) analyzed in this study were allocated by C. Y. Ornek, along with a soil sample (1.5 g) collected near the Canakkale recovery site.

  15. Worldwide Weather Radar Imagery May Allow Substantial Increase in Meteorite Fall Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Marc; Matson, Robert; Schaefer, Jacob; Fries, Jeffery; Hankey, Mike; Anderson, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    Weather radar imagery is a valuable new technique for the rapid recovery of meteorite falls, to include falls which would not otherwise be recovered (e.g. Battle Mountain). Weather radar imagery reveals about one new meteorite fall per year (18 falls since 1998), using weather radars in the United States alone. However, an additional 75 other nations operate weather radar networks according to the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO). If the imagery of those radars were analyzed, the current rate of meteorite falls could be improved considerably, to as much as 3.6 times the current recovery rate based on comparison of total radar areal coverage. Recently, the addition of weather radar imagery, seismometry and internet-based aggregation of eyewitness reports has improved the speed and accuracy of fresh meteorite fall recovery [e.g. 1,2]. This was demonstrated recently with the radar-enabled recovery of the Sutter's Mill fall [3]. Arguably, the meteorites recovered via these methods are of special scientific value as they are relatively unweathered, fresh falls. To illustrate this, a recent SAO/NASA ADS search using the keyword "meteorite" shows that all 50 of the top search results included at least one named meteorite recovered from a meteorite fall. This is true even though only 1260 named meteorite falls are recorded among the >49,000 individual falls recorded in the Meteoritical Society online database. The US NEXRAD system used thus far to locate meteorite falls covers most of the United States' surface area. Using a WMO map of the world's weather radars, we estimate that the total coverage of the other 75 national weather radar networks equals about 3.6x NEXRAD's coverage area. There are two findings to draw from this calculation: 1) For the past 16 years during which 18 falls are seen in US radar data, there should be an additional 65 meteorite falls recorded in worldwide radar imagery. Also: 2) if all of the world's radar data could be analyzed, the

  16. Detection of a meteoritic component in Ivory Coast tektites with rhenium-osmium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, Christian; Shirey, Steven B.

    1993-07-01

    Measurement of rhenium (Re) and osmium (Os) concentrations and Os isotopic compositions in Ivory Coast tektites (natural glasses with upper crustal compositions that are ejected great distances during meteorite impact) and rocks from the inferred source crater, Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, show that these tektites incorporate about 0.6 percent of a meteoritic component. Analysis of elemental abundances of noble metals alone gives equivocal results in the detection of meteoritic components because the target rocks already have relatively large amounts of noble metals. The Re-Os system is ideally suited for the study of meteorite impacts on old continental crust for three reasons. The isotopic compositions of the target rocks and the meteoritic impactor are significantly different. Closed-system mixing of target rocks and meteorites is linear on Re-Os isochron diagrams, which thus permits identification of the loss of Re or Os. Osmium isotopic compositions are not likely to be altered during meteorite impact even if Re and Os are lost.

  17. Detection of a meteoritic component in ivory coast tektites with rhenium-osmium isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberl, C; Shirey, S B

    1993-07-30

    Measurement of rhenium (Re) and osmium (Os) concentrations and Os isotopic compositions in Ivory Coast tektites (natural glasses with upper crustal compositions that are ejected great distances during meteorite impact) and rocks from the inferred source crater, Lake Bosumtwi, Ghana, show that these tektites incorporate about 0.6 percent of a meteoritic component. Analysis of elemental abundances of noble metals alone gives equivocal results in the detection of meteoritic components because the target rocks already have relatively large amounts of noble metals. The Re-Os system is ideally suited for the study of meteorite impacts on old continental crust for three reasons. (i) The isotopic compositions of the target rocks and the meteoritic impactor are significantly different. (ii) Closed-system mixing of target rocks and meteorites is linear on Re-Os isochron diagrams, which thus permits identification of the loss of Re or Os. (iii) Osmium isotopic compositions are not likely to be altered during meteorite impact even if Re and Os are lost.

  18. AMSNEXRAD-Automated detection of meteorite strewnfields in doppler weather radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankey, Michael; Fries, Marc; Matson, Rob; Fries, Jeff

    2017-09-01

    For several years meteorite recovery in the United States has been greatly enhanced by using Doppler weather radar images to determine possible fall zones for meteorites produced by witnessed fireballs. While most fireball events leave no record on the Doppler radar, some large fireballs do. Based on the successful recovery of 10 meteorite falls 'under the radar', and the discovery of radar on more than 10 historic falls, it is believed that meteoritic dust and or actual meteorites falling to the ground have been recorded on Doppler weather radar (Fries et al., 2014). Up until this point, the process of detecting the radar signatures associated with meteorite falls has been a manual one and dependent on prior accurate knowledge of the fall time and estimated ground track. This manual detection process is labor intensive and can take several hours per event. Recent technological developments by NOAA now help enable the automation of these tasks. This in combination with advancements by the American Meteor Society (Hankey et al., 2014) in the tracking and plotting of witnessed fireballs has opened the possibility for automatic detection of meteorites in NEXRAD Radar Archives. Here in the processes for fireball triangulation, search area determination, radar interfacing, data extraction, storage, search, detection and plotting are explained.

  19. Seeding the Pregenetic Earth: Meteoritic Abundances of Nucleobases and Potential Reaction Pathways

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Ben K D

    2015-01-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are a class of meteorite known for having a high content of water and organics. In this study, abundances of the nucleobases, i.e., the building blocks of RNA and DNA, found in carbonaceous chondrites are collated from a variety of published data and compared across various meteorite classes. An extensive review of abiotic chemical reactions producing nucleobases is then performed. These reactions are then reduced to a list of 15 individual reaction pathways that could potentially occur within meteorite parent bodies. The nucleobases guanine, adenine and uracil are found in carbonaceous chondrites in the amounts of 1$-$500 ppb. It is currently unknown which reaction is responsible for their synthesis within the meteorite parent bodies. One class of carbonaceous meteorites dominate the abundances of both amino acids and nucleobases$-$the so-called CM2 (e.g. Murchison meteorite). CR2 meteorites (e.g. Graves Nunataks) also dominate the abundances of amino acids, but are the least abundant...

  20. Formation of a small impact structure discovered within the Agoudal meteorite strewn field, Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, C. A.; Ivanova, M. A.; Artemieva, N. A.; Sadilenko, D. A.; Chennaoui Aoudjehane, H.; Roschina, I. A.; Korochantsev, A. V.; Humayun, M.

    2015-01-01

    A relic impact structure was recognized within the strewn field of the Agoudal iron meteorite. The heavily eroded structure has preserved shatter cones in a limestone basement, and remnants of autochthonous and allochthonous breccias. Fragments of iron incorporated into the allochthonous breccia have a chemical composition (Ni = 5.16 wt%, Ir = 0.019 ppm) similar to that of the Agoudal meteorite, supporting a syngenetic origin of the strewn field and the impact structure. The total recovered mass of Agoudal meteorite fragments is estimated at approximately 500 kg. The estimated size of the SE-NW-oriented strewn field is 6 × 2 km. Model calculations with minimal preatmospheric size show that a similar meteorite strewn field plus one small crater with observed shock effects could be formed by fragmentation of a meteoroid approximately 1.4 m in diameter with an impact angle of approximately 60° from the horizontal. However, the most probable is an impact of a larger, 3-4 m diameter meteoroid, resulting a strewn field with approximately 10 craters, 10-30 m in diameter each, plus numerous meteorite fragments. The calculated scattering area of meteorite shrapnel ejected from these impact craters could completely cover the observed strewn field of the Agoudal meteorite.

  1. Particle-Gas Dynamics and Primitive Meteorite Parent Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.; Champney, J. M.; Hogan, R. M.

    1993-07-01

    A major obstacle to understanding the accretion of primitive meteorite parent bodies has been the lack of a credible theoretical framework for the environment in which the earliest accretion occurs. Chondrules and inclusions in primitive meteorites are in the millimeter-centimeter size range and the earliest aggregates of these objects must have been in the centimeter-meter size range. For these sizes, particle-gas dynamics are difficult to model: the particles are neither micron-sized and firmly anchored to the gas, nor kilometer-sized planetesimals already fully decoupled from the gas. Significant feedback and strong coupling between the gas and particle phases must be dealt with in this intermediate size range [1]. We have previously reported preliminary results concerning the stage of planetary formation during which the particulate material has grown into centimeter-to-meter sized primordial aggregates [2]. During this stage, particles are able to settle toward the midplane into a layer of mass density comparable to or much greater than that of the gas. We now report more mature results [3]. Our numerical models rely on the Reynolds averaged NavierStokes equations for the gas and particles, and are fully viscous, turbulent, and compressible. Our turbulence modeling uses a Prandtl local shear parametrization, validated by laboratory experiments. We have developed a new model for particle diffusivity (in turbulence) involving the particle Schmidt number, which is a function of particle size and density. We have modeled a cool, quiescent nebula at 1 AU (280K) and 10 AU (90K), and a possible FU Orionis or early high temperature stage (1000K) at 1 AU. Our main results include: (a) rapid accretion of planetesimals by gravitationally unstable fragmentation on an orbital timescale (the "Goldreich-Ward instability") is unlikely to occur until objects have already accreted by some other process to the mass of the largest known meteorite samples, if at all [4]; (b) from

  2. Hydrogen Isotopic Systematics of Nominally Anhydrous Phases in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kera

    Hydrogen isotope compositions of the martian atmosphere and crustal materials can provide unique insights into the hydrological and geological evolution of Mars. While the present-day deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio (D/H) of the Mars atmosphere is well constrained (~6 times that of terrestrial ocean water), that of its deep silicate interior (specifically, the mantle) is less so. In fact, the hydrogen isotope composition of the primordial martian mantle is of great interest since it has implications for the origin and abundance of water on that planet. Martian meteorites could provide key constraints in this regard, since they crystallized from melts originating from the martian mantle and contain phases that potentially record the evolution of the H 2O content and isotopic composition of the interior of the planet over time. Examined here are the hydrogen isotopic compositions of Nominally Anhydrous Phases (NAPs) in eight martian meteorites (five shergottites and three nakhlites) using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). This study presents a total of 113 individual analyses of H2O contents and hydrogen isotopic compositions of NAPs in the shergottites Zagami, Los Angeles, QUE 94201, SaU 005, and Tissint, and the nakhlites Nakhla, Lafayette, and Yamato 000593. The hydrogen isotopic variation between and within meteorites may be due to one or more processes including: interaction with the martian atmosphere, magmatic degassing, subsolidus alteration (including shock), and/or terrestrial contamination. Taking into consideration the effects of these processes, the hydrogen isotope composition of the martian mantle may be similar to that of the Earth. Additionally, this study calculated upper limits on the H2O contents of the shergottite and nakhlite parent melts based on the measured minimum H2O abundances in their maskelynites and pyroxenes, respectively. These calculations, along with some petrogenetic assumptions based on previous studies, were subsequently used

  3. PGAA, PGAI and NT with cold neutrons: test measurement on a meteorite sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canella, Lea; Kudejová, Petra; Schulze, Ralf; Türler, Andreas; Jolie, Jan

    2009-12-01

    First comprehensive analysis with PGAA, Prompt Gamma-ray Activation Imaging (PGAI) and neutron tomography (NT) techniques at the research reactor FRM II was tested on a piece of the Allende meteorite. With the PGAA method the bulk elemental composition of the heterogeneous meteorite was determined. Due to the small dimension of the sample, only the 2D elemental distribution of the object was derived with position sensitive PGAI analysis. As an example 2D maps for Si, Fe and Mg are presented. Neutron tomography of the meteorite was carried out with the same cold neutron beam.

  4. Origin and Evolution of Prebiotic Organic Matter as Inferred from the Tagish Lake Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, Christopher D.; Blinova, Alexandra; Simkus, Danielle N.; Huang, Yongsong; Tarozo, Rafael; Alexander, Conel M.; Gyngard, Frank; Nittler, Larry R.; Cody, George D.; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Kebukawa, Yoko; Kilcoyne, A. L.; Hilts, Robert W.; Slater, Greg F.; Glavin, Daniel P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Callahan, Michael P.; Elsila, Jamie E.; De Gregorio, Bradley T.; Stroud, Rhonda M.

    2011-01-01

    The complex suite of organic materials in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites probably originally formed in the interstellar medium and/or the solar protoplanetary disk, but was subsequently modified in the meteorites' asteroidal parent bodies. The mechanisms of formation and modification are still very poorly understood. We carried out a systematic study of variations in the mineralogy, petrology, and soluble and insoluble organic matter in distinct fragments of the Tagish Lake meteorite. The variations correlate with indicators of parent body aqueous alteration and at least some molecules of pre-biotic importance formed during the alteration.

  5. Transition element distribution in stony meteorites and in terrestrial and lunar rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B.; Jarosewich, E.; Nelen, J.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the distribution of the transition elements (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) among the individual minerals of stony meteorites, and comparison with data on comparable lunar and terrestrial minerals. As an example of meteorite distribution patterns, data on the Modoc meteorite are presented. For the lunar rocks, microprobe data are used, along with published information from other investigators. For comparison with terrestrial igneous rocks, Skaergaard intrusion rocks are used. They present some striking analogies in mineralogy and petrology with the lunar igneous rocks and are thus peculiarly suitable for this cross comparison.

  6. A Silicate Inclusion in Puente del Zacate, a IIIA Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Edward J.; Davis, Andrew M.; Clayton, Robert N.; Mayeda, Toshiko K.; Moore, Carleton B.; Steele, Ian M.

    1996-09-01

    The IIIA and IIIB iron meteorites are considered to have formed in the cores of asteroids. A silicate inclusion within the IIIA meteorite Puente del Zacate consisting of olivine (Fa_4), low-calcium pyroxene (Fs_6Wo_1), chromium diopside (Fs_3Wo47), plagioclase (An14Or_4), graphite, troilite, chromite, daubreelite, and iron metal resembles inclusions in IAB iron meteorites. The oxygen isotopic composition of the Puente del Zacate inclusion is like chromite and phosphate inclusions in other IIIA and IIIB irons. The Puente del Zacate inclusion may have been derived from the lower mantle of the IIIAB parent asteroid.

  7. Evidence for coeval Late Triassic terrestrial impacts from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater

    CERN Document Server

    Carporzen, L; Carporzen, Laurent; Gilder, Stuart A.

    2006-01-01

    High temperature impact melt breccias from the Rochechouart (France) meteorite crater record magnetization component with antipodal, normal and reverse polarities. The corresponding paleomagnetic pole for this component lies between the 220 Ma and 210 Ma reference poles on the Eurasian apparent polar wander path, consistent with the 214 $\\pm$ 8 Ma 40Ar/39Ar age of the crater. Late Triassic tectonic reconstructions of the Eurasian and North American plates place this pole within 95% confidence limits of the paleomagnetic pole from the Manicouagan (Canada) meteorite impact crater, which is dated at 214 $\\pm$ 1 Ma. Together, these observations reinforce the hypothesis of a Late Triassic, multiple meteorite impact event on Earth.

  8. Determining the source locations of martian meteorites: Hapke mixture models applied to CRISM simulated data of igneous mineral mixtures and martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennifer; Grindrod, Peter

    2017-04-01

    At present, martian meteorites represent the only samples of Mars available for study in terrestrial laboratories. However, these samples have never been definitively tied to source locations on Mars, meaning that the fundamental geological context is missing. The goal of this work is to link the bulk mineralogical analyses of martian meteorites to the surface geology of Mars through spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral imagery. Hapke radiation transfer modelling has been shown to provide accurate (within 5 - 10% absolute error) mineral abundance values from laboratory derived hyperspectral measurements of binary [1] and ternary [2] mixtures of plagioclase, pyroxene and olivine. These three minerals form the vast bulk of the SNC meteorites [3] and the bedrock of the Amazonian provinces on Mars that are inferred to be the source regions for these meteorites based on isotopic aging. Spectral unmixing through the Hapke model could be used to quantitatively analyse the Martian surface and pinpoint the exact craters from which the SNC meteorites originated. However the Hapke model is complex with numerous variables, many of which are determinable in laboratory conditions but not from remote measurements of a planetary surface. Using binary and tertiary spectral mixtures and martian meteorite spectra from the RELAB spectral library, the accuracy of Hapke abundance estimation is investigated in the face of increasing constraints and simplifications to simulate CRISM data. Constraints and simplifications include reduced spectral resolution, additional noise, unknown endmembers and unknown particle physical characteristics. CRISM operates in two spectral resolutions, the Full Resolution Targeted (FRT) with which it has imaged approximately 2% of the martian surface, and the lower spectral resolution MultiSpectral Survey mode (MSP) with which it has covered the vast majority of the surface. On resampling the RELAB spectral mixtures to these two wavelength ranges it was

  9. Chelyabinsk airburst, damage assessment, meteorite recovery, and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Olga P; Jenniskens, Peter; Emel'yanenko, Vacheslav; Kartashova, Anna; Biryukov, Eugeny; Khaibrakhmanov, Sergey; Shuvalov, Valery; Rybnov, Yurij; Dudorov, Alexandr; Grokhovsky, Victor I; Badyukov, Dmitry D; Yin, Qing-Zhu; Gural, Peter S; Albers, Jim; Granvik, Mikael; Evers, Läslo G; Kuiper, Jacob; Kharlamov, Vladimir; Solovyov, Andrey; Rusakov, Yuri S; Korotkiy, Stanislav; Serdyuk, Ilya; Korochantsev, Alexander V; Larionov, Michail Yu; Glazachev, Dmitry; Mayer, Alexander E; Gisler, Galen; Gladkovsky, Sergei V; Wimpenny, Josh; Sanborn, Matthew E; Yamakawa, Akane; Verosub, Kenneth L; Rowland, Douglas J; Roeske, Sarah; Botto, Nicholas W; Friedrich, Jon M; Zolensky, Michael E; Le, Loan; Ross, Daniel; Ziegler, Karen; Nakamura, Tomoki; Ahn, Insu; Lee, Jong Ik; Zhou, Qin; Li, Xian-Hua; Li, Qiu-Li; Liu, Yu; Tang, Guo-Qiang; Hiroi, Takahiro; Sears, Derek; Weinstein, Ilya A; Vokhmintsev, Alexander S; Ishchenko, Alexei V; Schmitt-Kopplin, Phillipe; Hertkorn, Norbert; Nagao, Keisuke; Haba, Makiko K; Komatsu, Mutsumi; Mikouchi, Takashi

    2013-11-29

    The asteroid impact near the Russian city of Chelyabinsk on 15 February 2013 was the largest airburst on Earth since the 1908 Tunguska event, causing a natural disaster in an area with a population exceeding one million. Because it occurred in an era with modern consumer electronics, field sensors, and laboratory techniques, unprecedented measurements were made of the impact event and the meteoroid that caused it. Here, we document the account of what happened, as understood now, using comprehensive data obtained from astronomy, planetary science, geophysics, meteorology, meteoritics, and cosmochemistry and from social science surveys. A good understanding of the Chelyabinsk incident provides an opportunity to calibrate the event, with implications for the study of near-Earth objects and developing hazard mitigation strategies for planetary protection.

  10. Martian soil component in impact glasses in a Martian meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M N; Borg, L E; McKay, D S; Wentworth, S J

    1999-11-01

    Chemical compositions of impact melt glass veins, called Lithology C (Lith C) in Martian meteorite EET79001 were determined by electron microprobe analysis. A large enrichment of S, and significant enrichments of Al, Ca, and Na were observed in Lith C glass compared to Lithology A (Lith A). The S enrichment is due to mixing of plagioclase- enriched Lith A material with Martian soil, either prior to or during impact on Mars. A mixture of 87% Lith A, 7% plagioclase, and 6% Martian soil reproduces the average elemental abundances observed in Lith C. Shock melting of such a mixture of plagioclase-enriched, fine-grained Lith A host rock and Martian soil could yield large excesses of S (observed in this study) and Martian atmospheric noble gases (found by Bogard et al., 1983) in Lith C. These mixing proportions can be used to constrain the elemental abundance of phosphorus in Martian soil.

  11. Paleomagnetism. Solar nebula magnetic fields recorded in the Semarkona meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R; Weiss, Benjamin P; Lima, Eduardo A; Harrison, Richard J; Bai, Xue-Ning; Desch, Steven J; Ebel, Denton S; Suavet, Clément; Wang, Huapei; Glenn, David; Le Sage, David; Kasama, Takeshi; Walsworth, Ronald L; Kuan, Aaron T

    2014-11-28

    Magnetic fields are proposed to have played a critical role in some of the most enigmatic processes of planetary formation by mediating the rapid accretion of disk material onto the central star and the formation of the first solids. However, there have been no experimental constraints on the intensity of these fields. Here we show that dusty olivine-bearing chondrules from the Semarkona meteorite were magnetized in a nebular field of 54 ± 21 microteslas. This intensity supports chondrule formation by nebular shocks or planetesimal collisions rather than by electric currents, the x-wind, or other mechanisms near the Sun. This implies that background magnetic fields in the terrestrial planet-forming region were likely 5 to 54 microteslas, which is sufficient to account for measured rates of mass and angular momentum transport in protoplanetary disks.

  12. Martian carbon dioxide: Clues from isotopes in SNC meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, H. R.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Jull, A. J. T.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attempts to unravel the origin and evolution of the atmosphere and hydrosphere on Mars from isotopic data have been hampered by the impreciseness of the measurements made by the Viking Lander and by Earth-based telescopes. The SNC meteorites which are possibly pieces of the Martian surface offer a unique opportunity to obtain more precise estimates of the planet's volatile inventory and isotopic composition. Recently, we reported results on oxygen isotopes of water extracted by pyrolysis from samples of Shergotty, Zagami, Nakhla, Chassigny, Lafayette, and EETA-79001. Now we describe complementary results on the stable isotopic composition of carbon dioxide extracted simultaneously from those same samples. We will also report on C-14 abundances obtained by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) for some of these CO2 samples.

  13. Solar flares, the lunar surface, and gas rich meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, D. J.; Cowsik, R.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Price, P. B.; Rajan, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Investigations on the Fe-group nuclei track density vs depth in lunar rocks and Surveyor 3 TV camera filter glass were critically examined considering more factors than previously. The analysis gives a firmer basis to the observation of the preferential leakage of low energy Fe nuclei from the accelerating region of the sun. The track density gradients in lunar rock 12022 and filter glass are used to determine the lunar erosion rate of 3 angstroms/yr. Track gradients are less steep than predicted from energy spectrum observed in the Surveyor glass, perhaps due to sputtering. High densities of etchable tracks were found at all depths down to 60 cm in fines from Apollo cores and also in thin sections of the Pesjanoe, Pantar, and Fayetteville gas-rich meteorites. It is felt unlikely that suprathermal heavy ions were responsible for the high track densities.

  14. DECODING THE MESSAGE FROM METEORITIC STARDUST SILICON CARBIDE GRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate, E-mail: maria.lugaro@monash.edu, E-mail: karen.michelle.lewis@gmail.com, E-mail: bkgibson@uclan.ac.uk, E-mail: kpilkington@uclan.ac.uk [Monash Centre for Astrophysics (MoCA), Monash University, Clayton VIC 3800 (Australia)

    2013-05-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analyzed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analyzed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carries the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modeling of dust condensation in stellar winds as a function of the metallicity.

  15. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  16. Decoding the message from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Karen M; Gibson, Brad K; Pilkington, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analysed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analysed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carry the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modelling of dust condensation in stellar winds as function of the metallicity.

  17. Meteoritic Stardust and the Presolar History of the Solar Neighborhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nittler, Larry R.

    Presolar stardust is present at low levels in meteorites and cometary dust and identified as ancient stellar matter by unusual isotopic compositions reflecting nuclear processes in stellar interiors and galactic chemical evolution. Most grains originated in winds from asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernova and their isotopic compositions provide important constraints on models of evolution and nucleosynthesis in these environments. The presolar grains from AGB stars appear to have formed in a lower-mass population of stars than predicted by GCE models. A merger of the Milky Way with a dwarf galaxy some 1 Gyr before the birth of the Solar System may explain this and other grain observations and the data thus can provide a unique window into the presolar history of the solar neighborhood.

  18. Organic chemistry of Murchison meteorite: Carbon isotopic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, G. U.; Blair, N. E.; Desmarais, D. J.; Cronin, J. R.; Chang, S.

    1986-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual organic compounds of meteoritic origin remains unknown, as most reported carbon isotopic ratios are for bulk carbon or solvent extractable fractions. The researchers managed to determine the carbon isotopic ratios for individual hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids isolated from a Murchison sample by a freeze-thaw-ultrasonication technique. The abundances of monocarboxylic acids and saturated hydrocarbons decreased with increasing carbon number and the acids are more abundant than the hydrocarbon with the same carbon number. For both classes of compounds, the C-13 to C-12 ratios decreased with increasing carbon number in a roughly parallel manner, and each carboxylic acid exhibits a higher isotopic number than the hydrocarbon containing the same number of carbon atoms. These trends are consistent with a kinetically controlled synthesis of higher homologues for lower ones.

  19. LEW 88516: A Meteorite Compositionally Close to the "Martian Mantle"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreibus, G.; Jochum, K. H.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wlotzka, F.; Wanke, H.

    1992-07-01

    Several samples from a total of 250 mg of the recently discovered Antarctic shergottite LEW 88516 were analysed for major and trace elements by neutron activation techniques, SSMS, and a carbon-sulfur analyser. Results are presented in Table 1, together with data on ALHA 77005 (Wanke et al., 1976). This and earlier results (Boynton et al., 1992; Lindstrom et al.,1992) show the close compositional similarity of Lew 88516 to ALHA 77005. A major difference between the two shergottites is the much lower iodine content of the ALHA 77005 meteorite. The absence of similar variations in Br and Cl confirms earlier suggestions of an Antarctic source for the I excess. In a Mg/Si vs. Al/Si diagram (Fig. 1) the LEW 88516 meteorite plots at the intersection of a Shergotty parent (SPB) body fractionation trend and a line connecting enstatite chondrites and CM chondrites. The position of LEW 88516 and also of ALHA 77005 in the vicinity of ordinary chondrites is indicative of their relatively primitive composition. Lithophile trace elements show some enhancement of Sc and V over heavy REE and depletion of light REE, suggesting either a residual character for the two meteorites or assimilation of a cumulate phase during their formation. Comparatively high Ni and Co also reflect the more mafic character of the two meteorites. The present analysis and the earlier data on ALHA 77005 unambiguously demonstrate the presence of Ir in an abundance range typical for the terrestrial upper mantle. A similar Ir level was found in Chassigny, but the more fractionated Shergotty has 100 times lower Ir contents. The presence of Ir in the martian mantle samples may be the result of sulfide-silicate equilibration. The sulfides in Lew 88516 are small pyrrhotite grains (5-30 micron, 52 atom% S) and occur often together with ilmenite, at grain boundaries of the major silicate minerals. Sulfides contain an average of 1.8% Ni. However, the major fraction of Ni must reside in oxides and/or silicates as the

  20. The polymer-like organic material in the Orgueil meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandurski, E. L.; Nagy, B.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for analysis of polymeric organic material contained in powder from the Orgueil chondrite, using a stepwise high-vacuum pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technique. Pyrolysis products obtained include a series of alkanes and alkenes to C8, an extensive series of alkylbenzene isomers, thiophene, alkylthiophenes, benzothiophene, acetonitrile, acrylonitrile, benzonitrile, acetone, and phenol. Most of these products are shown to be similar both qualitatively and quantitatively to those previously obtained from solvent-extracted Allende powder, indicating a basically aromatic and heteroaromatic polymer matrix with short aliphatic bridges or side chains. The production of acrylonitrile, acetonitrile, and benzonitrile (common breakdown products of amino acids) from the insoluble organic material is taken to suggest that amino acids exist in an insoluble form, perhaps as peptides, in the meteorite's polymeric component. Similarities between the structure of the Orgueil polymeric material and terrestrial kerogen are discussed which raise the possibility that both might have been produced in part by similar reactions.