WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring virologic responses

  1. Therapy of chronic hepatitis C: Virologic response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljić-Kapulica Nada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Virological testing is considered to be essential in the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in order to diagnose infection, and, most importantly, as a quide for treatment decisions and assess the virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of a sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with pegiinterferon alpha (PEGINF and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy. Methods. A total of 34 patients, treated with PEG-IFN and RBV were studied. Serum HCV-RNA was measured before the treatment, 12 weeks following the start of the therapy and 6 weeks after the treatment cessation. SVR was defined as undetectable serum HCV-RNA 6 months of post-treatment follow-up, virologic relapse (VR as relapse of HCV-RNA during the post-treatment follow-up. Serum HCV-RNA was measured with the Cobas Amplicor test. Results. At the end of post-treatment follow-up 19 (55.8% patients demonstrated a SVR. The majority of the patients were genotype 1 (27, and the other were genotype 3 (5 patients and genotype 4 (2 patients. There was VR in 6 patients 6 months after the therapy. In 9 patients HCV-RNA was positive after 12 weeks. Conclusion. We demonstrated that patients with chronic HCV infection can be successfully treated with combination of PEG-INF and RBV. This result emphasizes also that post-treatment follow-up to identify patients with SVR or VR could be important.

  2. Performance of immunological response in predicting virological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingole, Nayana; Mehta, Preeti; Pazare, Amar; Paranjpe, Supriya; Sarkate, Purva

    2013-03-01

    In HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART), the decision on when to switch from first-line to second-line therapy is dictated by treatment failure, and this can be measured in three ways: clinically, immunologically, and virologically. While viral load (VL) decreases and CD4 cell increases typically occur together after starting ART, discordant responses may be seen. Hence the current study was designed to determine the immunological and virological response to ART and to evaluate the utility of immunological response to predict virological failure. All treatment-naive HIV-positive individuals aged >18 years who were eligible for ART were enrolled and assessed at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months clinically and by CD4 cell count and viral load estimations. The patients were categorized as showing concordant favorable (CF), immunological only (IO), virological only (VO), and concordant unfavorable responses (CU). The efficiency of immunological failure to predict virological failure was analyzed across various levels of virological failure (VL>50, >500, and >5,000 copies/ml). At 6 months, 87(79.81%), 7(5.5%), 13 (11.92%), and 2 (1.83%) patients and at 12 months 61(69.3%), 9(10.2%), 16 (18.2%), and 2 (2.3%) patients had CF, IO, VO, and CU responses, respectively. Immunological failure criteria had a very low sensitivity (11.1-40%) and positive predictive value (8.3-25%) to predict virological failure. Immunological criteria do not accurately predict virological failure resulting in significant misclassification of therapeutic responses. There is an urgent need for inclusion of viral load testing in the initiation and monitoring of ART.

  3. Virological response and resistance among HIV-infected children receiving long-term antiretroviral therapy without virological monitoring in Uganda and Zimbabwe: Observational analyses within the randomised ARROW trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J Szubert

    2017-11-01

    receiving first-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa without real-time VL monitoring had good virological and resistance outcomes over 4 years, regardless of CD4 monitoring strategy. Many children with detectable low-level viraemia spontaneously resuppressed, highlighting the importance of confirming virological failure before switching to second-line therapy. Children experiencing rebound ≥5,000 copies/ml were much less likely to resuppress, but NRTI resistance increased only slowly. These results are relevant to the increasing numbers of HIV-infected children receiving first-line ART in sub-Saharan Africa with limited access to virological monitoring.ISRCTN Registry, ISRCTN24791884.

  4. Drug resistance in HIV patients with virological failure or slow virological response to antiretroviral therapy in Ethiopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdissa, Alemseged; Yilma, Daniel; Fonager, Jannik

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ongoing scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has prompted the interest in surveillance of transmitted and acquired HIV drug resistance. Resistance data on virological failure and mutations in HIV infected populations initiating treatment in sub-Saharan Af...... mutations among failing patients justify increased vigilance by improving the availability and systematic use of VL testing to monitor ART response, and underlines the need for rapid, inexpensive tests to identify the most common drug resistance mutations....

  5. Declining sustained virological response in hepatitis c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batool, U.; Qureshi, S.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To determine the response of treatment with standard interferon and Ribazole in treatment naive hepatitis C infected patients, with different grades of activity. Design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: This study was carried out at the Department of Medicine, KRL General Hospital, Islamabad, from January 2001 to September 2004. Patients and Methods: A total of 300 patients were enrolled. All patients were anti-HCV positive confirmed by device method, PCR positive and had 3a genotype. A specially-designed proforma containing the patient profile, family transmission, and baseline laboratory values was filled. All patients were treated according to a set protocol of Interferon plus ribavirin therapy (IFN alpha 2a, 3MU t.i.w 24 weeks plus ribavirin 1000 to 1200 mg/day) for six months. Chi-square tests were used to analyze the data. Primary end point was a sustained virological response (SVR) that is response assessed after six months of completion of treatment. Results: Over a period of four years response rates to standard Interferon plus Ribazole therapy were studied. Out of the total 300 patients data was available for 161 patients as 60 patients were excluded and 79 patients are currently under treatment. Treatment was stopped in 3 patients due to serious side effects. In the 161 patients, 135 (83.8%), achieved response at the end of treatment at six months; End of Treatment Complete Response (EOTCR); and 26 (16.14%) were non-responders (NR). Out of the complete responders, 68 patients had been followed completely up to six months after the treatment to asses Sustained Viral Response (SVR) defined as undetectable HCV RNA in serum at the end of six months post treatment follow-up. Sustained viral response was seen in 46 patients Le. 68% ( CI: 57-79%) and 22(32.3%) were relapsers (those who developed recurrence of viremia after having achieved eradication at the end of six months treatment). Response rates are co-related with

  6. Virological response without CD4 recovery | Madide | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is to suppress viral replication so that immune restoration can occur. Failure of immune restoration is usually associated with poor virological suppression. In children a good immunological and clinical response to ART is often achieved despite incomplete viral suppression.

  7. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    : Virologic response (viral load SIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...

  8. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    : Virologic response (viral load SIDA patients. Analyses were stratified by region (south, central west, north, east) or time started cART (early, 1996-1997; mid, 1998-1999; late, 2000-1904). RESULTS: Virologic...

  9. Kinetics and Determining Factors of the Virologic Response to Antiretrovirals during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Weinberg

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected pregnant women with undetectable plasma HIV RNA concentrations at delivery pose a minimal risk of vertical transmission. We studied the kinetics and the determinants of the virologic response to antiretroviral therapy in 117 consecutive pregnancies. Patients who initiated therapy during pregnancy had a VL decrease of 2 and 2.5 log10 after 4 and 24 weeks, respectively. Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM of the protease inhibitors administered in doses recommended for nonpregnant adults resulted in below-target concentrations in 29%, 35%, and 44% of 1st, 2nd, and 3rd trimester measurements, respectively, but low drug concentrations did not correlate with virologic failure. Demographic characteristics, antiretroviral experience prior to pregnancy, baseline VL, or use of specific antiretrovirals did not affect the virologic response. Adherence to ≥95% of prescribed doses and utilization of psychosocial services were associated with undetectable plasma HIV RNA at delivery. In conclusion, the virologic responses of pregnant and nonpregnant adults share similar charactersitics.

  10. Virologic response at week 8 of combined treatment as a predictor of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ali Monis

    2012-04-16

    Apr 16, 2012 ... in non rapid virologic response, chronic HCV genotype 4 infected patients .... Other liver diseases as alcoholic liver disease, non alco- holic fatty liver disease .... penses and limit the side-effects associated with drug exposure.

  11. Diagnostic value of different adherence measures using electronic monitoring and virologic failure as reference standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschamps, Ann E; De Geest, Sabina; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Bobbaers, Herman; Peetermans, Willy E; Van Wijngaerden, Eric

    2008-09-01

    Nonadherence to antiretroviral therapy is a substantial problem in HIV and jeopardizes the success of treatment. Accurate measurement of nonadherence is therefore imperative for good clinical management but no gold standard has been agreed on yet. In a single-center prospective study nonadherence was assessed by electronic monitoring: percentage of doses missed and drug holidays and by three self reports: (1) a visual analogue scale (VAS): percentage of overall doses taken; (2) the Swiss HIV Cohort Study Adherence Questionnaire (SHCS-AQ): percentage of overall doses missed and drug holidays and (3) the European HIV Treatment Questionnaire (EHTQ): percentage of doses missed and drug holidays for each antiretroviral drug separately. Virologic failure prospectively assessed during 1 year, and electronic monitoring were used as reference standards. Using virologic failure as reference standard, the best results were for (1) the SHCS-AQ after electronic monitoring (sensitivity, 87.5%; specificity, 78.6%); (2) electronic monitoring (sensitivity, 75%; specificity, 85.6%), and (3) the VAS combined with the SHCS-AQ before electronic monitoring (sensitivity, 87.5%; specificity, 58.6%). The sensitivity of the complex EHTQ was less than 50%. Asking simple questions about doses taken or missed is more sensitive than complex questioning about each drug separately. Combining the VAS with the SHCS-AQ seems a feasible nonadherence measure for daily clinical practice. Self-reports perform better after electronic monitoring: their diagnostic value could be lower when given independently.

  12. Role of IL-28B polymorphisms in virologic response to combined ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Amira Youssef Shaala

    2014-10-17

    Oct 17, 2014 ... of cirrhosis showed higher risk of failed response at 3 and 6 months (p = 0.016 and 0.020 respec- tively). Also .... Sustained virologic response is defined as non .... nicity, body mass index, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis,.

  13. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS.......026) and time (P changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P ....001; north: P = 0.070; east, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: There was some evidence of regional differences in initial virologic response to cART. Improvements over time were observed, suggesting that so far, the effect of primary resistance has not been of sufficient magnitude to prevent increasing suppression...

  14. HIV multi-drug resistance at first-line antiretroviral failure and subsequent virological response in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Law, Matthew; Kantor, Rami; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Li, Patrick CK; Phanuphak, Praphan; Merati, Tuti; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Lee, Christopher KC; Ditangco, Rossana; Mustafa, Mahiran; Singtoroj, Thida; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure often results from the development of resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Three patterns, including thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), 69 Insertion (69Ins) and the Q151M complex, are associated with resistance to multiple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and may compromise treatment options for second-line ART. Methods We investigated patterns and factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure in patients from The TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance – Monitoring study (TASER-M), and evaluated their impact on virological responses at 12 months after switching to second-line ART. RAMs were compared with the IAS-USA 2013 mutations list. We defined multi-NRTI RAMs as the presence of either Q151M; 69Ins; ≥2 TAMs; or M184V+≥1 TAM. Virological suppression was defined as viral load (VL) Malaysia and Philippines were included. There were 97/105 (92%) patients harbouring ≥1 RAMs at first-line failure, 39/105 with multi-NRTI RAMs: six with Q151M; 24 with ≥2 TAMs; and 32 with M184V+≥1 TAM. Factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs were CD4 ≤200 cells/µL at genotyping (OR=4.43, 95% CI [1.59–12.37], p=0.004) and ART duration >2 years (OR=6.25, 95% CI [2.39–16.36], p<0.001). Among 87/105 patients with available VL at 12 months after switch to second-line ART, virological suppression was achieved in 85%. The median genotypic susceptibility score (GSS) for the second-line regimen was 2.00. Patients with ART adherence ≥95% were more likely to be virologically suppressed (OR=9.33, 95% CI (2.43–35.81), p=0.001). Measures of patient resistance to second-line ART, including the GSS, were not significantly associated with virological outcome. Conclusions Multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure were associated with low CD4 level and longer duration of ART. With many patients switching to highly susceptible regimens, good adherence was still crucial in achieving

  15. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS: Vi...... rates Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6...

  16. Risk factors of virologic failure and slow response to art among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors of virologic failure and slow response to art among HIV-infected children and adolescents in Nairobi. J. M. Kabogo, S. Gupta, A. K. Maina, M. Ochwoto, R. W. Omange, R. N. Musoke, R. W. Lihana, E. Muniu, F. W. Wamunyokoli, B. Liang, E. M. Songok ...

  17. HIV multi-drug resistance at first-line antiretroviral failure and subsequent virological response in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiamsakul, Awachana; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Law, Matthew; Kantor, Rami; Praparattanapan, Jutarat; Li, Patrick C K; Phanuphak, Praphan; Merati, Tuti; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Lee, Christopher K C; Ditangco, Rossana; Mustafa, Mahiran; Singtoroj, Thida; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin

    2014-01-01

    First-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) failure often results from the development of resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Three patterns, including thymidine analogue mutations (TAMs), 69 Insertion (69Ins) and the Q151M complex, are associated with resistance to multiple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and may compromise treatment options for second-line ART. We investigated patterns and factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs at first-line failure in patients from The TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance - Monitoring study (TASER-M), and evaluated their impact on virological responses at 12 months after switching to second-line ART. RAMs were compared with the IAS-USA 2013 mutations list. We defined multi-NRTI RAMs as the presence of either Q151M; 69Ins; ≥ 2 TAMs; or M184V+≥ 1 TAM. Virological suppression was defined as viral load (VL) failure and (2) factors associated with virological suppression after 12 months on second-line. A total of 105 patients from 10 sites in Thailand, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia and Philippines were included. There were 97/105 (92%) patients harbouring ≥ 1 RAMs at first-line failure, 39/105 with multi-NRTI RAMs: six with Q151M; 24 with ≥ 2 TAMs; and 32 with M184V+≥ 1 TAM. Factors associated with multi-NRTI RAMs were CD4 ≤ 200 cells/µL at genotyping (OR=4.43, 95% CI [1.59-12.37], p=0.004) and ART duration >2 years (OR=6.25, 95% CI [2.39-16.36], pfailure were associated with low CD4 level and longer duration of ART. With many patients switching to highly susceptible regimens, good adherence was still crucial in achieving virological response. This emphasizes the importance of continued adherence counselling well into second-line therapy.

  18. On the front line of HIV virological monitoring: barriers and facilitators from a provider perspective in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutstein, S E; Golin, C E; Wheeler, S B; Kamwendo, D; Hosseinipour, M C; Weinberger, M; Miller, W C; Biddle, A K; Soko, A; Mkandawire, M; Mwenda, R; Sarr, A; Gupta, S; Mataya, R

    2016-01-01

    Scale-up of viral load (VL) monitoring for HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a priority in many resource-limited settings, and ART providers are critical to effective program implementation. We explored provider-perceived barriers and facilitators of VL monitoring. We interviewed all providers (n = 17) engaged in a public health evaluation of dried blood spots for VL monitoring at five ART clinics in Malawi. All ART clinics were housed within district hospitals. We grouped themes at patient, provider, facility, system, and policy levels. Providers emphasized their desire for improved ART monitoring strategies, and frustration in response to restrictive policies for determining which patients were eligible to receive VL monitoring. Although many providers pled for expansion of monitoring to include all persons on ART, regardless of time on ART, the most salient provider-perceived barrier to VL monitoring implementation was the pressure of work associated with monitoring activities. The work burden was exacerbated by inefficient data management systems, highlighting a critical interaction between provider-, facility-, and system-level factors. Lack of integration between laboratory and clinical systems complicated the process for alerting providers when results were available, and these communication gaps were intensified by poor facility connectivity. Centralized second-line ART distribution was also noted as a barrier: providers reported that the time and expenses required for patients to collect second-line ART frequently obstructed referral. However, provider empowerment emerged as an unexpected facilitator of VL monitoring. For many providers, this was the first time they used an objective marker of ART response to guide clinical management. Providers' knowledge of a patient's virological status increased confidence in adherence counseling and clinical decision-making. Results from our study provide unique insight into provider

  19. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling to improve adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke eLangebeek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counselling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes.Methods: We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counselling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counselling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD in adherence and the odds ratio (OR of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71. Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.63. However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counselling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Electronic monitoring-informed counselling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counselling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not

  20. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counseling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes. We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counseling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counseling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in adherence and the odds ratio (OR) of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits (CI). A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.71). Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.63). However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counseling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant. Electronic monitoring-informed counseling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counseling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not in studies where it was the only intervention component.

  1. Performance and Logistical Challenges of Alternative HIV-1 Virological Monitoring Options in a Clinical Setting of Harare, Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Ondoa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated a low-cost virological failure assay (VFA on plasma and dried blood spot (DBS specimens from HIV-1 infected patients attending an HIV clinic in Harare. The results were compared to the performance of the ultrasensitive heat-denatured p24 assay (p24. The COBAS AmpliPrep/COBAS TaqMan HIV-1 test, version 2.0, served as the gold standard. Using a cutoff of 5,000 copies/mL, the plasma VFA had a sensitivity of 94.5% and specificity of 92.7% and was largely superior to the VFA on DBS (sensitivity = 61.9%; specificity = 99.0% or to the p24 (sensitivity = 54.3%; specificity = 82.3% when tested on 302 HIV treated and untreated patients. However, among the 202 long-term ART-exposed patients, the sensitivity of the VFA decreased to 72.7% and to 35.7% using a threshold of 5,000 and 1,000 RNA copies/mL, respectively. We show that the VFA (either on plasma or on DBS and the p24 are not reliable to monitor long-term treated, HIV-1 infected patients. Moreover, achieving acceptable assay sensitivity using DBS proved technically difficult in a less-experienced laboratory. Importantly, the high level of virological suppression (93% indicated that quality care focused on treatment adherence limits virological failure even when PCR-based viral load monitoring is not available.

  2. Sustained virologic response following HCV eradication in two brothers with X-linked agammaglobulinaemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Houlihan, Diarmaid D

    2009-08-21

    X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (XLA) is a humoral immunodeficiency syndrome characterized from childhood by the absence of circulating B lymphocytes, absent or reduced levels of serum immunoglobulin and recurrent bacterial infections. For many affected patients, regular treatment with immunoglobulin is life saving. Hepatitis C viral (HCV) infection acquired through contaminated blood products is widely described in this patient cohort. The natural history of HCV infection in patients with XLA tends to follow a more rapid and aggressive course compared to immunocompetent individuals. Furthermore, standard anti-viral therapy appears to be less efficacious in this patient cohort. Here we report the cases of two brothers with XLA who contracted HCV through contaminated blood products. They were treated with a six month course of Interferon alpha-2b and Ribavirin. We report a sustained virologic response five years after completing treatment.

  3. Fatty liver in hepatitis C patients post-sustained virological response with direct-acting antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddin, Mazen; Wong, Micaela M; Todo, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Shelly C; Sanyal, Arun J; Mena, Edward A

    2018-01-01

    AIM To determine steatosis and fibrosis prevalence in hepatitis C patients after a sustained virological response achieved with direct-acting antivirals. METHODS Transient elastography with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) was used to assess hepatic steatosis post-sustained virological response (SVR); the CAP technology was not available in the United States at study initiation. Liver stiffness/fibrosis was measured before and 47 wk after treatment completion. Patients with genotype 3 and patients with cirrhosis were excluded. RESULTS One hundred and one patients were included in the study. Post-SVR there were decreases from baseline in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (63.1 to 17.8 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase (51.8 to 21.5 U/L) and fibrosis score (7.4 to 6.1 kPa) (P steatosis on CAP; of these, 6.25% had advanced fibrosis. Patients with steatosis had higher body mass index (29.0 vs 26.1 kg/m2), glucose (107.8 vs 96.6 mg/dL), ALT (20.4 vs 15.3 mg/dL), CAP score (296.3 vs 212.4 dB/m) and fibrosis score (7.0 vs 5.3 kPa); P steatosis had change in fibrosis score post-SVR (7.7 kPa vs 7.0 kPa and 7.0 kPa vs 5.3 kPa); alternatively, (P steatosis continued to have clinically significant stiffness (≥ 7 kPa). CONCLUSION Fatty liver is very common in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients post-SVR. These patients continue to have elevated mean fibrosis score (≥ 7 kPa) compared to those without fatty liver; some have advanced fibrosis. Long term follow up is needed to assess steatosis and fibrosis in HCV patients post-SVR. PMID:29568207

  4. Is sustained virological response a marker of treatment efficacy in patients with chronic hepatitis C viral infection with no response or relapse to previous antiviral intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurusamy, Kurinchi S; Wilson, Edward; Koretz, Ronald L

    2013-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs.......Randomised clinical trials (RCTs) of antiviral interventions in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection use sustained virological response (SVR) as the main outcome. There is sparse information on long-term mortality from RCTs....

  5. High exposure to nevirapine in plasma is associated with an improved virological response in HIV-1-infected individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, A. I.; Weverling, G. J.; Lange, J. M.; Montaner, J. S.; Reiss, P.; Cooper, D. A.; Vella, S.; Hall, D.; Beijnen, J. H.; Hoetelmans, R. M.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore relationships between exposure to nevirapine and the virological response in HIV-1-infected individuals participating in the INCAS trial. METHODS: The elimination rate constant of plasma HIV-1 RNA (k) was calculated during the first 2 weeks of treatment with nevirapine,

  6. Lower liver stiffness in patients with sustained virological response 4 years after treatment for chronic hepatitis C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ellen Sloth; Moessner, Belinda Klemmensen; Christensen, Peer Brehm

    2011-01-01

    Transient elastography (TE) is a noninvasive and well validated method for measurement of liver stiffness. The aim of this study was to use TE to evaluate whether patients with sustained virological response (SVR) have lower liver stiffness than patients with non-SVR after treatment for chronic...

  7. Clinical, immunological and virological response to different antiretroviral regimens in a cohort of HIV-2-infected patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, Marchina E.; Prins, Jan M.; Brinkman, Kees; Keuter, Monique; Veenstra, Jan; Danner, Sven A.; Niesters, Hubert G. M.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Schutten, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical, immunological and virological response and the emergence of resistance towards antiretroviral therapy (ART) in a cohort of HIV-2-infected patients. Design: Observational study. Patients: HIV-2-infected patients residing in the Netherlands. Results: From 1995 to

  8. Pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin for 14 versus 24 weeks in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 2 or 3 and rapid virological response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgard, Olav; Bjøro, Kristian; Larsen, Helmer Ring

    2008-01-01

    A recent nonrandomized pilot trial showed that hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients with genotype 2/3 and rapid virological response (RVR) had a 90% sustained virological response (SVR) rate after 14 weeks of treatment. We aimed to assess this concept in a randomized controlled trial. In the trial, 428...

  9. Fatty liver in hepatitis C patients post-sustained virological response with direct-acting antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureddin, Mazen; Wong, Micaela M; Todo, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Shelly C; Sanyal, Arun J; Mena, Edward A

    2018-03-21

    To determine steatosis and fibrosis prevalence in hepatitis C patients after a sustained virological response achieved with direct-acting antivirals. Transient elastography with controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) was used to assess hepatic steatosis post-sustained virological response (SVR); the CAP technology was not available in the United States at study initiation. Liver stiffness/fibrosis was measured before and 47 wk after treatment completion. Patients with genotype 3 and patients with cirrhosis were excluded. One hundred and one patients were included in the study. Post-SVR there were decreases from baseline in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (63.1 to 17.8 U/L), aspartate aminotransferase (51.8 to 21.5 U/L) and fibrosis score (7.4 to 6.1 kPa) ( P < 0.05). Post-SVR, 48 patients (47.5%) had steatosis on CAP; of these, 6.25% had advanced fibrosis. Patients with steatosis had higher body mass index (29.0 vs 26.1 kg/m 2 ), glucose (107.8 vs 96.6 mg/dL), ALT (20.4 vs 15.3 mg/dL), CAP score (296.3 vs 212.4 dB/m) and fibrosis score (7.0 vs 5.3 kPa); P < 0.05. Interestingly, compared to baseline, both patients with and without steatosis had change in fibrosis score post-SVR (7.7 kPa vs 7.0 kPa and 7.0 kPa vs 5.3 kPa); alternatively, ( P < 0.05) and therefore patients with steatosis continued to have clinically significant stiffness (≥ 7 kPa). Fatty liver is very common in hepatitis C virus (HCV) patients post-SVR. These patients continue to have elevated mean fibrosis score (≥ 7 kPa) compared to those without fatty liver; some have advanced fibrosis. Long term follow up is needed to assess steatosis and fibrosis in HCV patients post-SVR.

  10. Hydroxychloroquine augments early virological response to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in genotype-4 chronic hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helal, Gouda Kamel; Gad, Magdy Abdelmawgoud; Abd-Ellah, Mohamed Fahmy; Eid, Mahmoud Saied

    2016-12-01

    The therapeutic effect of pegylated interferon (peg-IFN) alfa-2a combined with ribavirin (RBV) on chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients is low and further efforts are required to optimize this therapy for achievement of higher rates of virological response. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) in combination with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin on early virological response (EVR) in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients. Naïve 120 Egyptian patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection were divided into two groups. Group 1 have administered the standard of care therapy (pegylated interferon alfa-2a plus ribavirin) for 12 weeks, (n = 60). Group 2 have administered hydroxychloroquine plus standard of care therapy for 12 weeks, (n = 60). Therapeutics included hydroxychloroquine (200 mg) oral twice daily, peginterferon alfa-2a (160 μg) subcutaneous once weekly and oral weight-based ribavirin (1000-1200 mg/day). Baseline characteristics were similar in the two groups. The percentage of early virological response was significantly more in patients given the triple therapy than in patients given the standard of care [54/60 (90%) vs. 43/60 (71.7%); P = 0.011; respectively]. Biochemical response at week 12 was also significantly higher in patients given the triple therapy compared with the standard of care [58/60 (96.7%) vs. 42/60 (70%); P hydroxychloroquine to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin improves the rate of early virological and biochemical responses in chronic hepatitis C Egyptian patients without an increase in adverse events. J. Med. Virol. 88:2170-2178, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Effect of HFE gene polymorphism on sustained virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C and elevated serum ferritin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Coelho-Borges

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Abnormal serum ferritin levels are found in approximately 20%-30% of the patients with chronic hepatitis C and are associated with a lower response rate to interferon therapy. OBJECTIVE: To determine if the presence of HFE gene mutations had any effect on the sustained virological response rate to interferon based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients with elevated serum ferritin. METHODS: A total of 44 treatment naÏve patients with histologically demonstrated chronic hepatitis C, all infected with hepatitis C virus genotype non-1 (38 genotype 3; 6 genotype 2 and serum ferritin above 500 ng/mL were treated with interferon (3 MU, 3 times a week and ribavirin (1.000 mg, daily for 24 weeks. RESULTS: Sustained virological response was defined as negative qualitative HCV-RNA more than 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum HCV-RNA was measured by qualitative in house polymerase chain reaction with a limit of detection of 200 IU/mL. HFE gene mutation was detected using restriction-enzyme digestion with RsaI (C282Y mutation analysis and BclI (H63D mutation analysis in 16 (37% patients, all heterozygous (11 H63D, 2 C282Y and 3 both. Sustained virological response was achieved in 0 of 16 patients with HFE gene mutations and 11 (41% of 27 patients without HFE gene mutations (P = 0.002; exact Fisher test. CONCLUSION: Heterozigozity for H63D and/or C282Y HFE gene mutation predicts absence of sustained virological response to combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-1 genotype and serum ferritin levels above 500 ng/mL.

  12. Effect of HFE gene polymorphism on sustained virological response in patients with chronic hepatitis C and elevated serum ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho-Borges, Silvia; Cheinquer, Hugo; Wolff, Fernando Herz; Cheinquer, Nelson; Krug, Luciano; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal serum ferritin levels are found in approximately 20%-30% of the patients with chronic hepatitis C and are associated with a lower response rate to interferon therapy. To determine if the presence of HFE gene mutations had any effect on the sustained virological response rate to interferon based therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients with elevated serum ferritin. A total of 44 treatment naÏve patients with histologically demonstrated chronic hepatitis C, all infected with hepatitis C virus genotype non-1 (38 genotype 3; 6 genotype 2) and serum ferritin above 500 ng/mL were treated with interferon (3 MU, 3 times a week) and ribavirin (1.000 mg, daily) for 24 weeks. Sustained virological response was defined as negative qualitative HCV-RNA more than 24 weeks after the end of treatment. Serum HCV-RNA was measured by qualitative in house polymerase chain reaction with a limit of detection of 200 IU/mL. HFE gene mutation was detected using restriction-enzyme digestion with RsaI (C282Y mutation analysis) and BclI (H63D mutation analysis) in 16 (37%) patients, all heterozygous (11 H63D, 2 C282Y and 3 both). Sustained virological response was achieved in 0 of 16 patients with HFE gene mutations and 11 (41%) of 27 patients without HFE gene mutations (P = 0.002; exact Fisher test). Heterozigozity for H63D and/or C282Y HFE gene mutation predicts absence of sustained virological response to combination treatment with interferon and ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C, non-1 genotype and serum ferritin levels above 500 ng/mL.

  13. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  14. Slower Fibrosis Progression Among Liver Transplant Recipients With Sustained Virological Response After Hepatitis C Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Shahid; Meister, Edward; Habib, Sana; Murakami, Traci; Walker, Courtney; Rana, Abbas; Shaikh, Obaid S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The natural course of hepatic fibrosis in HCV allograft recipients with sustained virological response (SVR) after anti-HCV therapy remains debatable. The aim of this study was to examine the progression of fibrosis in a cohort of patients who achieved SVR compared with those without treatment. Methods The 167 patients who met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were chosen from a transplant database. All patients were required to have histological evidence of recurrent HCV infection post-liver transplantation and a follow-up biopsy. The 140 of these patients had received anti-viral therapy. Twenty-seven patients were identified as controls and were matched with the treatment group in all respects. The patients were categorized into four groups based on treatment response: 1) no treatment (control) (n = 27); 2) non-responders (n = 81); 3) relapsers (n = 32); and 4) SVR (n = 27). The endpoint was the stage of fibrosis on the follow-up liver biopsy. Results The treated and untreated groups were similar in clinical characteristics at the time of transplantation and prior to the initiation of treatment. The 72% of the cohort showed a fibrosis progression of ≥ 1 stage; this change did not significantly differ between the patient groups. Nonetheless, the fibrosis progression rate was the highest in the untreated group and lowest in the patients who achieved SVR. A coefficient of determination was used. Improvements in fibrosis scores were found with greater treatment duration. These improvements were most evident with the achievement of SVR. Conclusions In conclusion, SVR after anti-viral therapy for recurrent hepatitis C infection post-transplantation was associated with slower fibrosis progression and significantly improved graft survival. PMID:27785303

  15. Sustained virologic response to interferon-free therapies ameliorates HCV-induced portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandorfer, Mattias; Kozbial, Karin; Schwabl, Philipp; Freissmuth, Clarissa; Schwarzer, Rémy; Stern, Rafael; Chromy, David; Stättermayer, Albert Friedrich; Reiberger, Thomas; Beinhardt, Sandra; Sieghart, Wolfgang; Trauner, Michael; Hofer, Harald; Ferlitsch, Arnulf; Ferenci, Peter; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the impact of sustained virologic response (SVR) to interferon (IFN)-free therapies on portal hypertension in patients with paired hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) measurements. One hundred and four patients with portal hypertension (HVPG ⩾6mmHg) who underwent HVPG and liver stiffness measurement before IFN-free therapy (baseline [BL]) were retrospectively studied. Among 100 patients who achieved SVR, 60 patients underwent HVPG and transient elastography (TE) after antiviral therapy (follow-up [FU]). SVR to IFN-free therapies significantly decreased HVPG across all BL HVPG strata: 6-9mmHg (BL: 7.37±0.28 vs. FU: 5.11±0.38mmHg; -2.26±0.42mmHg; pportal hypertension across all BL HVPG strata. However, changes in HVPG seemed to be more heterogeneous among patients with BL HVPG of ⩾16mmHg and a HVPG decrease was less likely in patients with more advanced liver dysfunction. TE might be useful for the non-invasive evaluation of portal hypertension after SVR. We investigated the impact of curing hepatitis C using novel interferon-free treatments on portal hypertension, which drives the development of liver-related complications and mortality. Cure of hepatitis C decreased portal pressure, but a decrease was less likely among patients with more pronounced hepatic dysfunction. Transient elastography, which is commonly used for the non-invasive staging of liver disease, might identify patients without clinically significant portal hypertension after successful treatment. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Weight loss, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia associated with sustained virologic response to Hepatitis C treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Tice, Alan D.; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Chow, Dominic C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify apparent adverse effects of treatment of chronic hepatitis C and their relationship to sustained virologic response (SVR). METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted of all Hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin in an academic ambulatory infectious disease practice. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared between patients with SVR and without SVR. RESULTS: Fifty-four patients completed therapy with the overall SVR rate of 76%. SVR was associated with genotype non-1 (P=0.01), weight loss more than 5 kilograms (P=0.04), end of treatment leukopenia (P=0.02) and thrombocytopenia (P=0.05). In multivariate analysis, SVR was significant associated with HCV genotype non-1 (Adjusted Odd Ratio [AOR] 15.22; CI 1.55 to 149.72; P=0.02), weight loss more than 5 kilograms, (AOR 5.74; CI 1.24 to 26.32; P=0.04), and end of treatment white blood cell count level less than 3 X 103 cells/µl (AOR 9.09; CI 1.59 to 52.63; P=0.02). Thrombocytopenia was not significant after adjustment. Other factors including age, gender, ethnicity, injection drug use, viral load, anemia, alanine transaminase level, and liver histology did not reach statistical significance. CONCLUSION: Besides non-1 genotype, SVR was found to be independently associated with weight loss during therapy, and leukopenia at the end of HCV treatment. These correlations suggest continuation of therapy despite adverse effects, may be of benefit. PMID:20107528

  17. Interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 in chronic hepatitis C: Correlations with insulin resistance, histological features & sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Dana; Grigorescu, Mircea Dan; Radu, Corina; Suciu, Alina; Grigorescu, Mircea

    2017-04-01

    One of the multiple factors contributing to virological response in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10). Its level reflects the status of interferon-stimulated genes, which in turn is associated with virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of serum IP-10 levels on sustained virological response (SVR) and the association of this parameter with insulin resistance (IR) and liver histology. Two hundred and three consecutive biopsy proven CHC patients were included in the study. Serum levels of IP-10 were determined using ELISA method. IR was evaluated by homeostasis model assessment-IR (HOMA-IR). Histological features were assessed invasively by liver biopsy and noninvasively using FibroTest, ActiTest and SteatoTest. Predictive factors for SVR and their interrelations were assessed. A cut-off value for IP-10 of 392 pg/ml was obtained to discriminate between responders and non-responders. SVR was obtained in 107 patients (52.70%). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for SVR was 0.875 with a sensitivity of 91.6 per cent, specificity 74.7 per cent, positive predictive value 80.3 per cent and negative predictive value 88.7 per cent. Higher values of IP-10 were associated with increasing stages of fibrosis (P<0.01) and higher grades of inflammation (P=0.02, P=0.07) assessed morphologically and noninvasively through FibroTest and ActiTest. Significant steatosis and IR were also associated with increased levels of IP-10 (P=0.01 and P=0.02). In multivariate analysis, IP-10 levels and fibrosis stages were independently associated with SVR. Our findings showed that the assessment of serum IP-10 level could be a predictive factor for SVR and it was associated with fibrosis, necroinflammatory activity, significant steatosis and IR in patients with chronic HCV infection.

  18. Long-term clinical outcome of human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients with discordant immunologic and virologic responses to a protease inhibitor-containing regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piketty, C; Weiss, L; Thomas, F; Mohamed, A S; Belec, L; Kazatchkine, M D

    2001-05-01

    Within a prospective cohort of 150 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients who began first-line protease inhibitor therapy in 1996, the outcome of 42 patients with discrepant virologic and immunologic responses to antiretroviral treatment at 12 months was analyzed at 30 months of treatment. The incidence of AIDS-defining events and deaths (14%) in the group of patients with immunologic responses in the absence of a virologic response was higher than that in full-responder patients (2%); yet, the incidence in this group was lower than that in patients with no immunologic response, despite a virologic response (21%), and was lower than that in patients without an immunologic or virologic response (67%; P<.0001, log-rank test). Differences in outcome were significant (relative risk, 6.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-39.3) when factors for progression were compared with those of responder patients. The results support the relevance of the CD4 cell marker over plasma HIV load for predicting clinical outcome in patients who do not achieve full immunologic and virologic responses.

  19. Virologic Monitoring of Poliovirus Type 2 after Oral Poliovirus Vaccine Type 2 Withdrawal in April 2016 - Worldwide, 2016-2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diop, Ousmane M; Asghar, Humayun; Gavrilin, Evgeniy; Moeletsi, Nicksy Gumede; Benito, Gloria Rey; Paladin, Fem; Pattamadilok, Sirima; Zhang, Yan; Goel, Ajay; Quddus, Arshad

    2017-05-26

    The Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI) has made substantial progress since its launch in 1988; only 37 wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) cases were detected in 2016, the lowest annual count ever. Wild poliovirus type 3 has not been detected since November 2012, and wild poliovirus type 2 was officially declared eradicated in September 2015. This success is attributable to the wide use of live oral poliovirus vaccines (OPVs). Since 2001, numerous outbreaks were caused by the emergence of genetically divergent vaccine-derived polioviruses (VDPVs) whose genetic drift from the parental OPV strains indicates prolonged replication or circulation (1). In 2015, circulating VDPV type 2 (cVDPV2) outbreaks were detected in five countries worldwide (Nigeria, Pakistan, Guinea, Burma, and South Sudan), and VDPV2 single events were reported in 22 countries. These events prompted the GPEI to withdraw the type 2 component (Sabin2) of trivalent OPV (tOPV) in a globally coordinated, synchronized manner in April 2016 (2,3), at which time all OPV-using countries switched to using bivalent OPV (bOPV), containing Sabin types 1 and 3. This report details for the first time the virologic tracking of elimination of a live vaccine that has been withdrawn from routine and mass immunization systems worldwide (3). To secure elimination, further monitoring is warranted to detect any use of tOPV or monovalent OPV type 2 (mOPV2).

  20. Clinical, virological and immunological responses in Danish HIV patients receiving raltegravir as part of a salvage regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik N Engsig

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Frederik N Engsig1, Jan Gerstoft1, Gitte Kronborg2, Carsten S Larsen3, Gitte Pedersen4, Anne M Audelin5, Louise B Jørgensen5, Niels Obel11Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark; 2Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; 4Department of Infectious Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; 5Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, DenmarkBackground: Raltegravir is the first integrase inhibitor approved for treatment of HIV-infected patients harboring multiresistant viruses.Methods: From a Danish population-based nationwide cohort of HIV patients we identified the individuals who initiated a salvage regimen including raltegravir and a matched cohort of HIV-infected patients initiating HAART for the first time. We compared these two cohorts for virological suppression, gain in CD4 count, and time to first change of initial regimen.Results: We identified 32 raltegravir patients and 64 HIV patients who initiated HAART for the first time in the period 1 January 2006 to 1 July 2009. The virological and immunological responses in the raltegravir patients were comparable to those seen in the control cohort. No patients in the two cohorts died and no patients terminated raltegravir treatment in the observation period. Time to first change of initial regimen was considerably shorter for HAART-naïve patients.Conclusion: We conclude that salvage regimens including raltegravir have high effectiveness in the everyday clinical setting. The effectiveness of the regimens is comparable to that observed for patients initiating HAART for the first time. The risk of change in the salvage regimens after initiation of raltegravir is low.Keywords: HIV, raltegravir, salvage regime, efficacy, matched cohort

  1. Predictors of sustained virological response in Greek and Egyptian patients with hepatitis C genotype 4: does ethnicity matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papastergiou, Vasilios; Dimitroulopoulos, Dimitrios; Skorda, Lamprini; Lisgos, Philippos; Ketikoglou, Ioannis; Kostas, Nikolaos; Karatapanis, Stylianos

    2012-08-01

    Hepatitis C virus genotype 4 (HCV-4) is spreading beyond Africa and the Middle East but data regarding treatment with pegylated interferon alpha and ribavirin of European populations infected with HCV-4 remains limited. Interestingly, European (vs. Egyptian) origin has been associated with lower sustained virological response rates. Hence the aim of this study was to investigate the treatment outcomes of Greek (vs. Egyptian), treatment-naïve patients infected with HCV-4 (subtype a) and to identify factors influencing response rates. One hundred seventy-seven consecutive patients (mean age: 44.6 ± 10.2, males: 143/177; 80.8%, Egyptians: 76/177; 42.9%) treated over a 7-year period at the Hepatology clinics of three tertiary care hospitals in Greece were retrospectively evaluated. Overall, sustained virological response was achieved in 75/177 (42.4%) of the cohort without a significant difference between the two ethnic groups [Greek: 44/101 (43.6%); Egyptian 31/76 (40.8%), P = 0.7598]. In multivariate analysis, it was found that ethnicity was not associated with an impaired response but age ≥45 years [odds ratio (OR): 0.4225, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.2135-0.8133; P = 0.0134], diabetes (OR: 0.2346, 95% CI: 0.0816-0.0674; P = 0.0071), advanced liver fibrosis (OR: 0.3964, 95% CI: 0.1933-0.8133; P = 0.0116), and treatment suspension (OR: 0.1738, 95% CI: 0.0482-0.6262; P = 0.0075) showed an independent negative association with response to antiviral treatment. In contrast to previous European data suggesting Egyptian ethnicity to be a positive predictor for a sustained virological response, there was no influence of Greek versus Egyptian ethnicity on treatment outcomes. Higher age, advanced liver fibrosis, and diabetes have been shown to reduce significantly response rates in patients infected with HCV-4. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Prediction of week 4 virological response in hepatitis C for making decision on triple therapy: the Optim study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Romero-Gómez

    Full Text Available Virological response to peginterferon + ribavirin (P+R at week 4 can predict sustained virological response (SVR. While patients with rapid virological response (RVR do not require triple therapy, patients with a decline <1 log10 IU/ml HCVRNA (D1L should have treatment discontinued due to low SVR rate.To develop a tool to predict first 4 weeks' viral response in patients with hepatitis C genotype 1&4 treated with P+R.In this prospective and multicenter study, HCV mono-infected (n=538 and HCV/HIV co-infected (n=186 patients were included. To develop and validate a prognostic tool to detect RVR and D1L, we segregated the patients as an estimation cohort (to construct the model and a validation cohort (to validate the model.D1L was reached in 509 (80.2% and RVR in 148 (22.5% patients. Multivariate analyses demonstrated that HIV co-infection, Forns' index, LVL, IL28B-CC and Genotype-1 were independently related to RVR as well as D1L. Diagnostic accuracy (AUROC for D1L was: 0.81 (95%CI: 0.76 ̶ 0.86 in the estimation cohort and 0.71 (95%CI: 0.62 ̶ 0.79 in the validation cohort; RVR prediction: AUROC 0.83 (95%CI: 0.78 ̶ 0.88 in the estimation cohort and 0.82 (95%CI: 0.76 ̶ 0.88 in the validation cohort. Cost-analysis of standard 48-week treatment indicated a saving of 30.3% if the prognostic tool is implemented.The combination of genetic (IL28B polymorphism and viral genotype together with viral load, HIV co-infection and fibrosis stage defined a tool able to predict RVR and D1L at week 4. Using this tool would be a cost-saving strategy compared to universal triple therapy for hepatitis C.

  3. Virological response and safety of 24-week telaprevir alone in Japanese patients infected with hepatitis C virus subtype 1b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, J; Ozeki, I; Karino, Y; Asahina, Y; Izumi, N; Takahashi, S; Kawakami, Y; Chayama, K; Kamiya, N; Aoki, K; Yamada, I; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, F; Kumada, H

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) subtype 1b, which infects approximately 70% of Japanese carriers, is likely to be more eradicable by a telaprevir regimen than subtype 1a because of the higher genetic barrier of Val36 and Arg155 substitutions. The aims of this exploratory study were to evaluate the virological response and safety of 24-week oral administration of telaprevir alone in chronic HCV subtype 1b infection. Fifteen treatment-naïve patients were treated with telaprevir 750 mg every 8 h for 24 weeks. All patients were Japanese whose median age was 58.0 years (range: 45–68), and six patients (40%) were men. Median baseline HCV RNA level was 6.80 log10 IU/mL (range: 3.55–7.10). The HCV RNA levels decreased to undetectable in five patients (33%) within 8 weeks. Three patients (20%) with negative HCV RNA by Week 4 achieved end of treatment response. One patient (7%) who achieved sustained virological response had a low baseline viraemia of 3.55 log10 IU/mL. Most of the adverse events including anaemia and skin disorders were mild to moderate. Developed variants were T54A and A156V/T/F/Y with or without secondary substitutions rather than V36M ± R155K. Telaprevir alone for 24 weeks in Japanese patients with HCV subtype 1b resulted in an sustained viral response rate of 7% (1/15) and was well tolerated for 24 weeks. These results will support the implementation of further studies on oral combination of telaprevir with other direct-acting antiviral agents in patients infected with HCV subtype 1b. PMID:23383655

  4. Association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response in hepatitis C treatment, genotypes 1 versus 2 and 3: systematic literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurito, Marcela Pezzoto; Parise, Edison Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Controversial results have been found in literature for the association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response to standard chronic hepatitis C treatment. This study aims to provide a systematic literature review with meta-analysis, in order to evaluate if insulin resistance interferes with sustained virologic response in patients infected by the HCV genotype 1 versus HCV genotypes 2 and 3, undergoing treatment with interferon and ribavirin or pegylated interferon and ribavarin. Systematic search was performed on main electronic databases until May 2012. Primary outcome was sustained virologic response, defined as undetectable levels of HCV-RNA six months after the end of treatment. Meta-analytic measure was estimated using Dersimonian and Laird's method, using Stata software. Thirteen studies involving 2238 infected patients were included. There was a statistically significant association between insulin resistance and lower sustained virologic response rate, and this difference occurred in HCV genotype G1 (OR: 2.23; 95% CI: 1.59-3.13) and G2/G3 (OR: 4.45; 95% CI: 1.59-12.49). In addition, a difference was seen in the cut-offs used for defining insulin resistance by Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance. To minimize this limitation, sub-analysis that excluded the studies that did not use 2 as a cut-off value was performed and the results still demonstrated association between insulin resistance and sustained virologic response, for both genotypic groups. This meta-analysis provides evidence that elevated Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance is associated with a lower sustained virologic response rate in patients with hepatitis C treated with interferon and ribavirin or pegylated interferon and ribavarin, regardless of their genotype. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid virological response assessment by Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus assay for predicting sustained virological responses in patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 1 treated with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-yuan Su

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The lower limits of virus detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV RNA detection assays are continuously improving. We aimed to assess the utility of more precise definition of 4th week viral load [rapid virological response (RVR] in predicting sustained virological response (SVR in HCV genotype 1 patients treated with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN and ribavirin. Clinical data of treatment-naïve HCV genotype 1 patients were retrospectively collected from 2009 to 2014. Patients were grouped according to 4th week viral load as follows: undetectable (n = 90 and detectable but not quantifiable (< 12 IU/mL, n = 27. All patients received PEG-IFNα-2a or -2b and ribavirin for 24 weeks. Serum HCV RNA levels were measured by Abbott RealTime (ART; Abbott Molecular, Abbott Park, IL, USA HCV assay. SVR was 95.5% and 63% in the undetectable group and < 12 IU/mL group of 4th week viral load, respectively. The between-group difference in SVR was significant (p < 0.001. We determined 4th week viral load was independently associated with SVR (odds ratio = 19.28; p = 0.002 and a good predictor of SVR [area under the curve (AUC = 0.775; p = 0.001]. ART HCV assays had a stronger SVR predictive value in HCV genotype 1 patients, indicating that only the undetectable group of 4th week viral load patients measured by ART HCV assay should be considered for shorter treatment time (24 weeks with PEG-IFN and ribavirin.

  6. Impact of body weight on virological and immunological responses to efavirenz-containing regimens in HIV-infected, treatment-naive adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marzolini, Catia; Sabin, Caroline; Raffi, François

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing among HIV-infected patients. Whether standard antiretroviral drug dosage is adequate in heavy individuals remains unresolved. We assessed the virological and immunological responses to initial efavirenz (EFV)-containing regimens...... individuals had significantly higher CD4 cell count at baseline, CD4 cell recovery at 6 and 12 months after EFV initiation was comparable to normal-weight individuals. CONCLUSION: Virological and immunological responses to initial EFV-containing regimens were not impaired in heavy individuals, suggesting...

  7. Antiretroviral therapy initiation before, during, or after pregnancy in HIV-1-infected women: maternal virologic, immunologic, and clinical response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlada V Melekhin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy has been associated with a decreased risk of HIV disease progression in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era. The effect of timing of HAART initiation relative to pregnancy on maternal virologic, immunologic and clinical outcomes has not been assessed.We conducted a retrospective cohort study from 1997-2005 among 112 pregnant HIV-infected women who started HAART before (N = 12, during (N = 70 or after pregnancy (N = 30.Women initiating HAART before pregnancy had lower CD4+ nadir and higher baseline HIV-1 RNA. Women initiating HAART after pregnancy were more likely to receive triple-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Multivariable analyses adjusted for baseline CD4+ lymphocytes, baseline HIV-1 RNA, age, race, CD4+ lymphocyte count nadir, history of ADE, prior use of non-HAART ART, type of HAART regimen, prior pregnancies, and date of HAART start. In these models, women initiating HAART during pregnancy had better 6-month HIV-1 RNA and CD4+ changes than those initiating HAART after pregnancy (-0.35 vs. 0.10 log(10 copies/mL, P = 0.03 and 183.8 vs. -70.8 cells/mm(3, P = 0.03, respectively but similar to those initiating HAART before pregnancy (-0.32 log(10 copies/mL, P = 0.96 and 155.8 cells/mm(3, P = 0.81, respectively. There were 3 (25% AIDS-defining events or deaths in women initiating HAART before pregnancy, 3 (4% in those initiating HAART during pregnancy, and 5 (17% in those initiating after pregnancy (P = 0.01. There were no statistical differences in rates of HIV disease progression between groups.HAART initiation during pregnancy was associated with better immunologic and virologic responses than initiation after pregnancy.

  8. Transmitted drug resistant HIV-1 and association with virologic and CD4 cell count response to combination antiretroviral therapy in the EuroSIDA Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate prevalence of transmitted drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus (TDR) and factors associated with TDR and to compare virological and CD4 count response to combination antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: In this study, 525 mostly chronically infected EuroSIDA patients...

  9. HIV Stigma and Depressive Symptoms are Related to Adherence and Virological Response to Antiretroviral Treatment Among Immigrant and Indigenous HIV Infected Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sumari-de Boer, I. Marion; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Prins, Jan M.; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.

    2012-01-01

    We compared adherence to cART and viro-logical response between indigenous and immigrant HIV-infected patients in the Netherlands, and investigated if a possible difference was related to a difference in the psychosocial variables: HIV-stigma, quality-of-life, depression and beliefs about

  10. Impact of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism F214L on virological response to thymidine analogue based regimens in ART-naïve and experienced patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silberstein, F; Cozzi-Lepri, A; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A negative association between the polymorphism F214L and type 1 thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs) has been observed. However, the virological response to TAs according to the detection of F214L has not been evaluated. METHODS: We studied 590 patients from EuroSIDA who started ...... were observed in patients with M41L/T215Y and mixed TAM profiles detected before the initiation of cART. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that the detection of polymorphism F214L is associated with a favorable virological response to TA-based cART.......BACKGROUND: A negative association between the polymorphism F214L and type 1 thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs) has been observed. However, the virological response to TAs according to the detection of F214L has not been evaluated. METHODS: We studied 590 patients from EuroSIDA who started TA...... therapy for the first time as part of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and who were tested for genotypic resistance within the past 6 months. End points were median reduction in the week 24 viral load and time to virological failure (2 consecutive VL measurements >400 copies/mL after...

  11. Rapid virological response of telaprevir and boceprevir in a Brazilian cohort of HCV genotype 1 patients: a multicenter longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borba HHL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Helena HL Borba,1 Astrid Wiens,1 Laiza M Steimbach,1 Fernanda S Tonin,1 Maria LA Pedroso,2 Cláudia AP Ivantes,3 Fernando Fernandez-Llimos,4 Roberto Pontarolo1 1Pharmaceutical Sciences Postgraduate Research Program, Department of Pharmacy, 2Gastroenterology Service, Hospital de Clínicas, Federal University of Paraná, 3Guidance and Counseling Center, Curitiba City Hall, Curitiba, Paraná, Brazil; 4Department of Social Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Research Institute for Medicines, University of Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal Background: Chronic hepatitis C is a major public health issue, but there is a gap in the literature regarding the effectiveness and safety of direct-acting antiviral agents in the Brazilian population. The main aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of boceprevir and telaprevir in patients treated at public health care institutions in Brazil.Materials and methods: A prospective longitudinal and multicenter study was conducted in five centers in the State of Paraná between September 2014 and June 2016. Data regarding effectiveness and safety were collected from medical records of patients treated with boceprevir or telaprevir. The effectiveness outcome comprised the rapid virological response (RVR. Multivariate analysis was performed to verify the influence of independent variables (ie, age, gender, baseline viral load on RVR achievement.Results: Data were collected from 117 patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infection. Fifteen patients received treatment with boceprevir and 102 received telaprevir. The mean age was 51.6 years, 64.1% were male, 44.4% were infected with HCV subtype 1a, 62.4% had a high baseline viral load (≥800,000 IU/mL and 33% were cirrhotic. Furthermore, 79.5% of patients achieved RVR (26.7% in the boceprevir group and 87.3% in the telaprevir group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the type of protease inhibitor (boceprevir or telaprevir and the baseline viral load

  12. Virological and immunological response to antiretroviral regimens containing maraviroc in HIV type 1-infected patients in clinical practice: role of different tropism testing results and of concomitant treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Barbara; Bianco, Claudia; Bellazzi, Lara Ines; Bruzzone, Bianca; Colao, Grazia; Corsi, Paola; Monno, Laura; Pagano, Gabriella; Paolucci, Stefania; Punzi, Grazia; Setti, Maurizio; Zazzi, Maurizio; De Luca, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the immunovirological response to antiretroviral regimens containing maraviroc in HIV-infected viremic patients with viral tropism predicted by different assays. We selected antiretroviral treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients initiating regimens containing maraviroc after different phenotypic or genotypic viral tropism assays, with at least one HIV-1 RNA determination during follow-up. Survival analysis was employed to assess the virological response as time to HIV-1 RNA immunological response as time to a CD4 cell count increase of ≥ 100/μl from baseline. Predictors of these outcomes were analyzed by multivariate Cox regression models. In 191 treatments with maraviroc, virological response was achieved in 65.4% and the response was modestly influenced by the baseline viral load and concomitant drug activity but not influenced by the type of tropism assay employed. Immunological response was achieved in 58.1%; independent predictors were baseline HIV-1 RNA (per log10 higher: HR 1.29, 95% CI 1.05-1.60) and concomitant therapy with enfuvirtide (HR 2.05, 0.96-4.39) but not tropism assay results. Of 17 patients with baseline R5-tropic virus and available tropism results while viremic during follow-up on maraviroc, seven (41%) showed a tropism switch to non-R5 virus. A significant proportion of experienced patients treated with regimens containing maraviroc achieved virological response. The tropism test type used was not associated with immunovirological response and concomitant treatment with enfuvirtide increased the chance of immunological response. More than half of virological failures with maraviroc were not accompanied by tropism switch.

  13. Detecting virological failure in HIVinfected Tanzanian children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The performance of clinical and immunological criteria to predict virological failure in HIV-infected children receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) is not well documented. Objective. To determine the validity of clinical and immunological monitoring in detecting virological failure in children on ART. Methods.

  14. The role of biochemical variations and genotype testing in determining the virological response of patients infected with hepatitis C virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abid Shoukat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In hepatitis C virus (HCV, infection viral and IL28B genotype along with many clinical and biochemical factors can influence response rates to pegylated interferon plus ribavirin (Peg-IFN-a/R therapy and progression to chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Aims: The present study was conducted to determine the effect of biochemical and risk factors on treatment outcome in CHC patients in relation to their viral and host genotype. Settings and Design: The present study was a prospective Pe- IFN efficacy study consisting of Peg-IFN-a/R therapy for 24–48 weeks including 250 HCV infected patients. Materials and Methods: Biochemical parameters were determined by Beckman Coulter AU680 automated analyzer. HCV and Interleukin 28B (IL28B genotyping were carried out by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism and viral load was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results: Wild outnumbered the variant genotypes in rs 12979860, rs 12980275, and rs 8099917 SNP of IL28B gene. Sustained virological response (SVR SVR and viral genotype were significantly associated with age, hepatic steatosis, low-grade varices, and serum aspartate transaminase levels (at the end of treatment (P < 0.05. In addition, SVR was significantly influenced by body mass index (BMI, insulin resistance, serum low-density lipoprotein , and ferritin levels (P < 0.05. Viral genotype 1 infected patients had higher serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Although the IL28B sequence variation is the major factor that can influence response rates to antiviral therapy, viral and biochemical factors also have a definite role to play in the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment outcome in HCV-infected patients.

  15. Association of sustained virologic response with reduced progression to liver cirrhosis in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tseng CW

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chih-Wei Tseng,1,2 Ting-Tsung Chang,3,4 Shinn-Jia Tzeng,5 Yu-Hsi Hsieh,1,2 Tsung-Hsing Hung,1,2 Hsiang-Ting Huang,6 Shu-Fen Wu,7 Kuo-Chih Tseng1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, Chia-Yi, 2School of Medicine, Tzuchi University, Hualien, 3Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Medical College and Hospital, 4Infectious Disease and Signaling Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 5Department of Agronomy, National Chiayi University, 6Department of Nursing, Dalin Tzu Chi Hospital, Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation, 7Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan Objective: We studied the effect of sustained virologic response (SVR after treatment with pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN plus ribavirin on the development of liver cirrhosis in elderly patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Patients and methods: This retrospective study enrolled 145 elderly CHC patients (aged ≥65 years who were treatment-naïve and were treated with PEG-IFN plus ribavirin for 6 months between January 2005 and December 2011. Abdominal sonography was performed and liver biochemistry was studied at baseline, at the end of treatment, and every 3–6 months thereafter. The development of liver cirrhosis and related complications was evaluated at the follow-ups. The aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index was used as a noninvasive maker for fibrosis. Results: The mean patient age was 69.1±3.3 years, and the average follow-up time was 5.5 years (standard deviation: 2.5 years, range: 1.1–12.3 years. Ninety-five patients (65.5% achieved SVR, and 26 (17.9% discontinued treatment. Twenty-seven patients (18.6% developed liver cirrhosis after treatment. Patients without SVR had significantly greater risk of liver cirrhosis than those with SVR (hazard ratio [HR]: 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.312–8.761, P=0.012. The

  16. Factors predictive of sustained virological response following 72 weeks of combination therapy for genotype 1b hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chayama, Kazuaki; Hayes, C Nelson; Yoshioka, Kentaro; Moriwaki, Hisataka; Okanoue, Takashi; Sakisaka, Shotaro; Takehara, Tetsuo; Oketani, Makoto; Toyota, Joji; Izumi, Namiki; Hiasa, Yoichi; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Nomura, Hideyuki; Seike, Masataka; Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Yotsuyanagi, Hiroshi; Kumada, Hiromitsu

    2011-04-01

    Treatment of genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been improved by extending peg-interferon plus ribavirin combination therapy to 72 weeks, but predictive factors are needed to identify those patients who are likely to respond to long-term therapy. We analyzed amino acid (aa) substitutions in the core protein and the interferon sensitivity determining region (ISDR) of nonstructural protein (NS) 5A in 840 genotype 1b chronic hepatitis C patients with high viral load. We used logistic regression and classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to identify predictive factors for sustained virological response (SVR) for patients undergoing 72 weeks of treatment. When patients were separately analyzed by treatment duration using multivariate logistic regression, several factors, including sex, age, viral load, and core aa70 and ISDR substitutions (P = 0.0003, P = 0.02, P = 0.01, P = 0.0001, and P = 0.0004, respectively) were significant predictive factors for SVR with 48 weeks of treatment, whereas age, previous interferon treatment history, and ISDR substitutions (P = 0.03, P = 0.01, and P = 0.02, respectively) were the only significant predictive factors with 72 weeks of treatment. Using CART analysis, a decision tree was generated that identified age, cholesterol, sex, treatment length, and aa70 and ISDR substitutions as the most important predictive factors. The CART model had a sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 60%, with a positive predictive value of 68.4%. Complementary statistical and data mining approaches were used to identify a subgroup of patients likely to benefit from 72 weeks of therapy.

  17. Costs of telaprevir-based triple therapy for hepatitis C: $189,000 per sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichoupan, Kian; Martel-Laferriere, Valerie; Sachs, David; Ng, Michel; Schonfeld, Emily A; Pappas, Alexis; Crismale, James; Stivala, Alicia; Khaitova, Viktoriya; Gardenier, Donald; Linderman, Michael; Perumalswami, Ponni V; Schiano, Thomas D; Odin, Joseph A; Liu, Lawrence; Moskowitz, Alan J; Dieterich, Douglas T; Branch, Andrea D

    2014-10-01

    In registration trials, triple therapy with telaprevir (TVR), pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN), and ribavirin (RBV) achieved sustained virological response (SVR) rates between 64% and 75%, but the clinical effectiveness and economic burdens of this treatment in real-world practice remain to be determined. Records of 147 patients who initiated TVR-based triple therapy at the Mount Sinai Medical Center (May-December 2011) were reviewed. Direct medical costs for pretreatment, on-treatment, and posttreatment care were calculated using data from Medicare reimbursement databases, RED Book, and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. Costs are presented in 2012 U.S. dollars. SVR (undetectable hepatitis C virus [HCV] RNA 24 weeks after the end of treatment) was determined on an intention-to-treat basis. Cost per SVR was calculated by dividing the median cost by the SVR rate. Median age of the 147 patients was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 51-61), 68% were male, 19% were black, 11% had human immunodeficiency virus/HCV coinfection, 36% had advanced fibrosis/cirrhosis (FIB-4 scores ≥3.25), and 44% achieved an SVR. The total cost of care was $11.56 million. Median cost of care was $83,721 per patient (IQR = $66,652-$98,102). The median cost per SVR was $189,338 (IQR = $150,735-$221,860). Total costs were TVR (61%), IFN (24%), RBV (4%), adverse event management (8%), professional fees (2%), and laboratory tests (1%). TVR and Peg-IFN accounted for 85% of costs. Pharmaceutical prices and the low (44%) SVR rate, in this real-world study, were major contributors to the high cost per SVR. © 2014 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  18. Comparison of genotypic resistance profiles and virological response between patients starting nevirapine and efavirenz in EuroSIDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Ruiz, Lidia; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare virological outcome and genotypic resistance profiles in HIV-1-infected patients starting non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing regimens. METHODS: NNRTI-naive patients were included who started treatment with nevirapine (NVP) or efavirenz (EFV) wi...

  19. Modelled in vivo HIV fitness under drug selective pressure and estimated genetic barrier towards resistance are predictive for virological response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deforche, Koen; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Theys, Kristof

    2008-01-01

    landscapes (nelfinavir [NFV] and zidovudine [AZT] plus lamivudine [3TC]) to predict week 12 viral load (VL) change for 176 treatment change episodes (TCEs) and probability of week 48 virological failure for 90 TCEs, in treatment experienced patients starting these drugs in combination. RESULTS: A higher...

  20. Impact of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase polymorphism F214L on virological response to thymidine analogue-based regimens in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive and ART-experienced patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Ruiz, Lidia

    2007-01-01

    A negative association between the polymorphism F214L and type 1 thymidine analogue (TA) mutations (TAMs) has been observed. However, the virological response to TAs according to the detection of F214L has not been evaluated....

  1. Estimating the clinical and economic benefit associated with incremental improvements in sustained virologic response in chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Phil; Ward, Thomas; Bennett, Hayley; Kalsekar, Anupama; Webster, Samantha; Brenner, Michael; Yuan, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is one of the principle causes of chronic liver disease. Successful treatment significantly decreases the risk of hepatic morbidity and mortality. Current standard of care achieves sustained virologic response (SVR) rates of 40-80%; however, the HCV therapy landscape is rapidly evolving. The objective of this study was to quantify the clinical and economic benefit associated with increasing levels of SVR. A published Markov model (MONARCH) that simulates the natural history of hepatitis C over a lifetime horizon was used. Discounted and non-discounted life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and cost of complication management were estimated for various plausible SVR rates. To demonstrate the robustness of projections obtained, the model was validated to ten UK-specific HCV studies. QALY estimates ranged from 18.0 years for those treated successfully in fibrosis stage F0 to 7.5 years (discounted) for patients in fibrosis stage F4 who remain untreated. Predicted QALY gains per 10% improvement in SVR ranged from 0.23 (F0) to 0.64 (F4) and 0.58 (F0) to 1.35 (F4) in 40 year old patients (discounted and non-discounted results respectively). In those aged 40, projected discounted HCV-related costs are minimised with successful treatment in F0/F1 (at approximately £ 300), increasing to £ 49,300 in F4 patients who remain untreated. Validation of the model to published UK cost-effectiveness studies produce R2 goodness of fit statistics of 0.988, 0.978 and of 0.973 for total costs, QALYs and incremental cost effectiveness ratios, respectively. Projecting the long-term clinical and economic consequences associated with chronic hepatitis C is a necessary requirement for the evaluation of new treatments. The principle analysis demonstrates the significant impact on expected costs, LYs and QALYs associated with increasing SVR. A validation analysis demonstrated the robustness of the results reported.

  2. Immunological dynamics associated with rapid virological response during the early phase of type I interferon therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Won; Kim, Won; Kwon, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Yuri; Shin, Hyun Mu; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Min, Chan-Ki; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Lee, Won-Woo; Choi, Myung-Sik; Kim, Byeong Gwan; Cho, Nam-Hyuk

    2017-01-01

    Type I interferons (IFNs) play an important role in antiviral immunity as well as immunopathogenesis of diverse chronic viral infections. However, the precise mechanisms regulating the multifaceted effects of type I IFNs on the immune system and pathological inflammation still remain unclear. In order to assess the immunological dynamics associated with rapid viral clearance in chronic hepatitis C patients during the acute phase of type I IFN therapy, we analyzed multiple parameters of virological and immunological responses in a cohort of 59 Korean hepatitis C patients who received pegylated IFN-α and ribavirin (IFN/RBV). Most of the Korean patients had favorable alleles in the IFN-λ loci for responsiveness to IFN/RBV (i.e., C/C in rs12979860, T/T in rs8099917, and TT/TT in rs368234815). Rapid virological response (RVR) was determined mainly by the hepatitis C virus genotype. Among the cytokines analyzed, higher plasma levels of IL-17A and FGF were observed in non-RVR patients infected with viral genotype 1 and IP-10 was consistently elevated in RVR group infected with genotype 2 during the early phase of antiviral therapy. In addition, these three cytokines were correlated each other, suggesting a functional linkage of the cytokines in antiviral responses during IFN/RBV therapy. A low baseline frequencies of regulatory T cells and γδ T cells, but high level of group 2 innate lymphoid cells, in peripheral bloods were also significantly associated with the RVR group, implicating a potential role of the cellular immunity during the early phase of IFN/RBV therapy. Therefore, the immunological programs established by chronic hepatitis C and rapid disruption of the delicate balance by exogenous type I IFN might be associated with the subsequent virological outcomes in chronic hepatitis C patients.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of tenofovir instead of zidovudine for use in first-line antiretroviral therapy in settings without virological monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor von Wyl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most recent World Health Organization (WHO antiretroviral treatment guidelines recommend the inclusion of zidovudine (ZDV or tenofovir (TDF in first-line therapy. We conducted a cost-effectiveness analysis with emphasis on emerging patterns of drug resistance upon treatment failure and their impact on second-line therapy. METHODS: We used a stochastic simulation of a generalized HIV-1 epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa to compare two strategies for first-line combination antiretroviral treatment including lamivudine, nevirapine and either ZDV or TDF. Model input parameters were derived from literature and, for the simulation of resistance pathways, estimated from drug resistance data obtained after first-line treatment failure in settings without virological monitoring. Treatment failure and cost effectiveness were determined based on WHO definitions. Two scenarios with optimistic (no emergence; base and pessimistic (extensive emergence assumptions regarding occurrence of multidrug resistance patterns were tested. RESULTS: In the base scenario, cumulative proportions of treatment failure according to WHO criteria were higher among first-line ZDV users (median after six years 36% [95% simulation interval 32%; 39%] compared with first-line TDF users (31% [29%; 33%]. Consequently, a higher proportion initiated second-line therapy (including lamivudine, boosted protease inhibitors and either ZDV or TDF in the first-line ZDV user group 34% [31%; 37%] relative to first-line TDF users (30% [27%; 32%]. At the time of second-line initiation, a higher proportion (16% of first-line ZDV users harboured TDF-resistant HIV compared with ZDV-resistant viruses among first-line TDF users (0% and 6% in base and pessimistic scenarios, respectively. In the base scenario, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio with respect to quality adjusted life years (QALY was US$83 when TDF instead of ZDV was used in first-line therapy (pessimistic scenario: US$ 315

  4. No impact of HIV-1 protease minority resistant variants on the virological response to a first-line PI-based regimen containing darunavir or atazanavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Marine; Visseaux, Benoit; Landman, Roland; Joly, Véronique; Todesco, Eve; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Calvez, Vincent; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Descamps, Diane; Charpentier, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate, in a clinical cohort of HIV-1-infected patients, the prevalence of PI minority resistant variants (MRV) at ART baseline and their impact on the virological response to a first-line PI-based regimen. In an observational single-centre cohort, we assessed all ART-naive patients initiating a first-line regimen including two NRTI and one boosted PI, darunavir/ritonavir or atazanavir/ritonavir, between January 2012 and March 2015. Ultra-deep sequencing of the pol gene was performed using Illumina® technology. Protease mutations were identified using the WHO transmitted drug resistance list and major PI resistance mutations (IAS-USA drug resistance mutations list). Ninety-four and 16 patients initiating a darunavir/ritonavir-based regimen and an atazanavir/ritonavir-based regimen, respectively, were assessed. Twenty-eight percent of the patients were HIV-1 subtype B, 39% CRF02_AG and 33% other non-B subtypes. Thirteen patients (13.8%) in the darunavir group and three patients (18.8%) in the atazanavir group experienced a virological failure (VF). Overall, 13 (11.8%) subjects had PI MRV at baseline in the median proportion of 1.3% (IQR = 1.1-1.7). The most prevalent PI MRV were G73C (n = 5) and M46I (n = 3). The proportion of patients harbouring baseline PI MRV was similar between those with virological success (10.6%) and those experiencing VF (18.8%) (P = 0.40). No difference was observed in the rate of PI MRV by viral subtype (P = 0.51) or by PI drug (P = 0.40). This study showed a prevalence of 11.8% of PI MRV among 110 ART-naive subjects, without significant impact on the virological response to a first-line PI-based regimen containing darunavir or atazanavir. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Immunological responses during a virologically failing antiretroviral regimen are associated with in vivo synonymous mutation rates of HIV type-1 env

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mens, Helene; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Kronborg, Gitte

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the underlying causes of differences in immunological response to antiretroviral therapy during multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV type-1 (HIV-1) infection. This study aimed to identify virological factors associated with immunological response during therapy failure...... for analysis. In a longitudinal mixed-effects model, plasma HIV-1 RNA only tended to predict immunological response (P=0.06), whereas minor protease inhibitor (PI) and nucleoside reverse transcriptase (NRTI) mutations at baseline correlated significantly with CD4+ T-cell count slopes (r= -0.56, P=0.04 and r......= -0.64, P=0.008, respectively). Interestingly, synonymous mutations of env correlated inversely with CD4+ T-cell count slopes (r=-0.60; P=0.01) and individuals with codons under positive selection had significantly better CD4+ T-cell responses than individuals without (0.42 versus -5.34; P=0...

  6. Ribavirin Concentrations Do Not Predict Sustained Virological Response in HIV/HCV-Coinfected Patients Treated with Ribavirin and Pegylated Interferon in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Kovari

    Full Text Available Ribavirin (RBV is an essential component of most current hepatitis C (HCV treatment regimens and still standard of care in the combination with pegylated interferon (pegIFN to treat chronic HCV in resource limited settings. Study results in HIV/HCV-coinfected patients are contradicting as to whether RBV concentration correlates with sustained virological response (SVR.We included 262 HCV treatment naïve HIV/HCV-coinfected Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS participants treated with RBV and pegIFN between 01.01.2001-01.01.2010, 134 with HCV genotype (GT 1/4, and 128 with GT 2/3 infections. RBV levels were measured retrospectively in stored plasma samples obtained between HCV treatment week 4 and end of therapy. Uni- and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between RBV concentration and SVR in GT 1/4 and GT 2/3 infections. The analyses were repeated stratified by treatment phase (week 4-12, 13-24, >24 and IL28B genotype (CC versus CT/TT.SVR rates were 35.1% in GT 1/4 and 70.3% in GT 2/3 infections. Overall, median RBV concentration was 2.0 mg/L in GT 1/4, and 1.9 mg/L in GT 2/3, and did not change significantly across treatment phases. Patients with SVR had similar RBV concentrations compared to patients without SVR in both HCV genotype groups. SVR was not associated with RBV levels ≥2.0 mg/L (GT 1/4, OR 1.19 [0.5-2.86]; GT 2/3, 1.94 [0.78-4.80] and ≥2.5 mg/L (GT 1/4, 1.56 [0.64-3.84]; GT 2/3 2.72 [0.85-8.73], regardless of treatment phase, and IL28B genotype.In HIV/HCV-coinfected patients treated with pegIFN/RBV, therapeutic drug monitoring of RBV concentrations does not enhance the chance of HCV cure, regardless of HCV genotype, treatment phase and IL28B genotype.

  7. Early virologic response and IL28B polymorphisms in patients with chronic hepatitis C genotype 3 treated with peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzer, Thomas-Matthias; Hofer, Harald; Staettermayer, Albert Friedrich; Rutter, Karoline; Beinhardt, Sandra; Steindl-Munda, Petra; Kerschner, Heidrun; Kessler, Harald H; Ferenci, Peter

    2011-05-01

    Polymorphisms of the IL28B gene (rs12979860 and rs8099917) are associated with high sustained virological response (SVR) rates in HCV genotype 1 patients. This study analyzes the impact of these IL28B polymorphisms on early treatment response (weeks 2 and 4) and SVR in HCV genotype 3 patients. rs12979860 and rs8099917 were analyzed by the Step-OnePlus Real-time PCR system in 71 out of 72 Caucasian HCV genotype 3 patients participating, at our center, in a randomized study comparing 400mg with 800 mg ribavirin/day. HCV RNA was determined at weeks 2 and 4 of 180 μg/week peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin treatment. Sixty-nine patients completed the treatment and follow-up. rs12979860 genotyping revealed that 27 (37.5%) patients had C/C, 39 (54.2%) T/C, and 5 (6.9%) T/T. Thirteen patients (18.1%) became HCV RNA negative at week 2 and an additional 30 (41.7%) at week 4 (rapid virologic response; RVR); thus a total of 43 had a RVR (C/C: 77.8%; T/C or T/T: 50.0%). Irrespective of the ribavirin dose, the viral load decline was larger than in those with the T allele (T/C or T/T) (week 2: 4.46; [0.36-6.02] median; [range] vs. 3.50; [0.14-5.62]; log IU HCV-RNA/ml; p<0.001; week 4: 4.97; [1.21-6.20] vs. 4.49; [1.16-6.23]; p=0.003). Despite the faster initial viral response in C/C carriers, SVR rates were not different compared to T-allele carriers. Results of the SNP in the rs8099917 region were similar. IL28B polymorphisms modulate early virologic response to peginterferon/ribavirin treatment. In contrast to HCV genotype 1 patients, no effect on SVR rates was observed in genotype 3 patients. The clinical relevance of an earlier viral decline in C/C patients needs to be determined. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors predicting discordant virological and immunological responses to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 clade C infected Zulu/Xhosa in South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Julg

    Full Text Available Factors predicting suboptimal CD4 cell recovery have been studied in HIV clade-B infected US and European populations. It is, however, uncertain to what extent these results are applicable to HIV clade-C infected African populations. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and longitudinal analyses using mixed models were employed to assess the impact of age, gender, baseline CD4 cell count, hemoglobin, body mass index (BMI, tuberculosis and other opportunistic co-infections, and frequencies of regimen change on CD4 cell recovery at 12 and 30 months and on overtime change in CD4 cells among 442 virologically suppressed South Africans. Despite adequate virological response 37% (95% CI:32%-42% and 83% (95% CI:79%-86% of patients on antiretroviral therapy failed to restore CD4 cell counts ≥ 200 cells/mm(3 after 12 and ≥ 500 cells/mm(3 after 30 months, respectively, in this South African cohort. Critical risk factors for inadequate recovery were older age (p = 0.001 and nadir CD4 cell count at ART initiation (p<0.0001, while concurrent TB co-infection, BMI, baseline hemoglobin, gender and antiretroviral regimen were not significant risk factors. These data suggest that greater efforts are needed to identify and treat HAART-eligible patients prior to severe CD4 cell decline or achievement of advanced age.

  9. Factors predicting discordant virological and immunological responses to antiretroviral therapy in HIV-1 clade C infected Zulu/Xhosa in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julg, Boris; Poole, Danielle; Ghebremichael, Musie; Castilla, Carmen; Altfeld, Marcus; Sunpath, Henry; Murphy, Richard A; Walker, Bruce D

    2012-01-01

    Factors predicting suboptimal CD4 cell recovery have been studied in HIV clade-B infected US and European populations. It is, however, uncertain to what extent these results are applicable to HIV clade-C infected African populations. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and longitudinal analyses using mixed models were employed to assess the impact of age, gender, baseline CD4 cell count, hemoglobin, body mass index (BMI), tuberculosis and other opportunistic co-infections, and frequencies of regimen change on CD4 cell recovery at 12 and 30 months and on overtime change in CD4 cells among 442 virologically suppressed South Africans. Despite adequate virological response 37% (95% CI:32%-42%) and 83% (95% CI:79%-86%) of patients on antiretroviral therapy failed to restore CD4 cell counts ≥ 200 cells/mm(3) after 12 and ≥ 500 cells/mm(3) after 30 months, respectively, in this South African cohort. Critical risk factors for inadequate recovery were older age (p = 0.001) and nadir CD4 cell count at ART initiation (p<0.0001), while concurrent TB co-infection, BMI, baseline hemoglobin, gender and antiretroviral regimen were not significant risk factors. These data suggest that greater efforts are needed to identify and treat HAART-eligible patients prior to severe CD4 cell decline or achievement of advanced age.

  10. Characterization of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 3a Hypervariable region 1 in patients achieved rapid virological response to alpha interferon and Ribavirin Combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badar Sadaf

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus roots a chronic liver disease. Currently approved treatment strategy includes administration of alpha interferon and ribavirin combined therapy for 24-48 weeks. One of the predictor of sustained virological response is an early virological response to treatment characterized as rapid response. Hyper variable region 1 (HVR1 of E2 protein is responsible for viral entry and acts as a target for neutralizing antibodies. Any mutation in this region would effect virus interaction with target cell and viral persistence. Methods Thirty one clones of six pre-treatment samples subjected to combination therapy were investigated. Three of the patients were rapid responders (R1, R2 and R3 and two were breakthrough responders (BT1 and BT2. Envelope 2 gene was amplified, cloned and sequenced. Amino acid substitution, frequency, composition and antigenic properties of HVR 1 of E2 protein were studied. Results In both rapid responders (R.R (14 amino acid sites and breakthrough responders (BT.R (13 amino acid sites half of the amino acid sites were either conserved or resistant to any physiochemical change due to amino acid substitution. It also indicated that average composition of hydrophilic and basic amino acids were comparatively lower in rapid responders than other samples affecting probable interaction of virus with target cells. A central non antigenic region was constant among the breakthrough responders but differed in length significantly among rapid responders reflecting the adaptive nature of HVR1 to the immune response. Conclusions We observed that although HVR1is quite variable region in HCV 3a patients responding differently to treatment it still maintains its physiochemical properties for its proper functioning and viability.

  11. Durability of virologic response, risk of de novo hepatocellular carcinoma, liver function and stiffness two years after treatment with Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir ±Dasabuvir ±Ribavirin in the AMBER, real-world experience study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flisiak, Robert; Janczewska, Ewa; Łucejko, Mariusz; Karpińska, Ewa; Zarębska-Michaluk, Dorota; Nazzal, Khalil; Bolewska, Beata; Białkowska, Jolanta; Berak, Hanna; Fleischer-Stępniewska, Katarzyna; Tomasiewicz, Krzysztof; Karwowska, Kornelia; Simon, Krzysztof; Piekarska, Anna; Tronina, Olga; Tuchendler, Ewelina; Garlicki, Aleksander

    2018-06-11

    We followed for 2 years patients treated with Direct Acting Agents (DAA) to assess long-term durability of virologic response, improvement of liver function, reduction of liver stiffness (LS), and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).The study included patients from 16 hepatologic centers involved in the AMBER, investigators initiated study on treatment of chronic hepatitis C patients within a programme preceding EU registration of Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/ritonavir±Dasabuvir±Ribavirin. A total of 204 patients among 209 from the primary study were enrolled; 200 with available testing at 2 years follow-up (2yFU) with undetectable HCV RNA (198 responders and 2 non-responders retreated). During 2yFU 4 patients died, 17 had hepatic decompensation and 3 needed liver transplantation. De novo hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed in 4 and its recurrence in 3 patients. Significant decreases in bilirubin, MELD, Child-Pugh scores and liver stiffness, and increases in albumin level were observed during 2yFU. Strengths of the study were a fixed period of post treatment follow-up, prospective character of the study and high proportion of available patients from the primary study. The major weaknesses was lack of a comparative arm and relatively insufficient number of patients for subsets analysis. In conclusion, two-years follow-up confirmed durability of virologic response after treatment of HCV infection with Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/ritonavir±Dasabuvir±Ribavirin. It was accompanied by significant improvement of major measures of hepatic function and reduction of hepatic stiffness. Successful therapy did not prevent hepatic decompensation, HCC or death in cirrhotics, that support the need for longer than 2-year monitoring for possible disease progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Four weeks of paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir encountering dengue fever resulted in sustained virological response in an HCV patient: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Feng; Jang, Tyng-Yuan; Lu, Po-Liang; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2016-11-01

    Direct antiviral agent (DAA) has been the standard of care for patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Twelve weeks of paritaprevir/ritonavir/ombitasvir plus dasabuvir (PROD) with or without ribavirin has shown to have a sustained virological response at post-treatment 12 weeks (SVR12) rate of >90% in HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1) patients. We report a HCV-1b patient who received only 25 days of PROD treatment. The patient early terminated treatment due to dengue fever but eventually achieved SVR12. It may attribute to low baseline viral loads and extraordinarily rapid suppression of HCV after treatment day1. The finding may shed light for possible response-guided-therapy for so-called ultra-super-responders in the DAA era. Whether the dengue virus, the Flaviviridae family as with HCV, enhanced the HCV clearance remains unclear and needs further exploration.

  13. Clinical outcome of HIV-infected patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy: long-term follow-up of a multicenter cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Limited information exists on long-term prognosis of patients with sustained virologic response to antiretroviral therapy. We aimed to assess predictors of unfavorable clinical outcome in patients who maintain viral suppression with HAART. METHODS: Using data collected from ten clinic-based cohorts in Spain, we selected all antiretroviral-naive adults who initiated HAART and maintained plasma HIV-1 RNA levels <500 copies/mL throughout follow-up. Factors associated with disease progression were determined by Cox proportional-hazards models. RESULTS: Of 2,613 patients who started HAART, 757 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. 61% of them initiated a protease inhibitor-based HAART regimen, 29.7% a nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based regimen, and 7.8% a triple-nucleoside regimen. During 2,556 person-years of follow-up, 22 (2.9% patients died (mortality rate 0.86 per 100 person-years, and 40 (5.3% died or developed a new AIDS-defining event. The most common causes of death were neoplasias and liver failure. Mortality was independently associated with a CD4-T cell response <50 cells/L after 12 months of HAART (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 4.26 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.68-10.83]; P = .002, and age at initiation of HAART (AHR, 1.06 per year; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09; P = .001. Initial antiretroviral regimen chosen was not associated with different risk of clinical progression. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with sustained virologic response on HAART have a low mortality rate over time. Long-term outcome of these patients is driven by immunologic response at the end of the first year of therapy and age at the time of HAART initiation, but not by the initial antiretroviral regimen selected.

  14. Peginterferon alpha-2a is associated with higher sustained virological response than peginterferon alfa-2b in chronic hepatitis C: systematic review of randomized trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awad, Tahany; Thorlund, Kristian; Hauser, Goran

    2010-01-01

    ) is most effective. We performed a systematic review of head-to-head randomized trials to assess the benefits and harms of the two treatments. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and LILACS through July 2009. Using standardized forms, two reviewers independently...... extracted data from each eligible trial report. We statistically combined data using a random effects meta-analysis according to the intention-to-treat principle. We identified 12 randomized clinical trials, including 5,008 patients, that compared peginterferon alpha-2a plus ribavirin versus peginterferon...... alfa-2b plus ribavirin. Overall, peginterferon alpha-2a significantly increased the number of patients who achieved a sustained virological response (SVR) versus peginterferon alfa-2b (47% versus 41%; risk ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 1.04-1.19; P = 0.004 [eight trials]). Subgroup analyses...

  15. Moderate Sustained Virologic Response Rates With 6-Week Combination Directly Acting Anti-Hepatitis C Virus Therapy in Patients With Advanced Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattakuzhy, Sarah; Wilson, Eleanor; Sidharthan, Sreetha; Sims, Zayani; McLaughlin, Mary; Price, Angie; Silk, Rachel; Gross, Chloe; Akoth, Elizabeth; McManus, Maryellen; Emmanuel, Benjamin; Shrivastava, Shikha; Tang, Lydia; Nelson, Amy; Teferi, Gebeyehu; Chavez, Jose; Lam, Brian; Mo, Hongmei; Osinusi, Anuoluwapo; Polis, Michael A; Masur, Henry; Kohli, Anita; Kottilil, Shyamasundaran

    2016-02-15

    Treatment of genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with combination directly acting antivirals (DAA) for 8-24 weeks is associated with high rates of sustained virologic response (SVR). We previously demonstrated that adding a third DAA to ledipasvir and sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) can result in high SVR rates in patients without cirrhosis. In this study, we investigated whether a similar regimen would yield equivalent rates of cure in patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Fifty patients were enrolled at the Clinical Research Center of the National Institutes of Health and associated healthcare centers. Enrollment and follow-up data from April 2014 to June 2015 are reported here. Eligible participants were aged ≥18 years, had chronic HCV genotype 1 infection (serum HCV RNA ≥2000 IU/mL), and stage 3-4 liver fibrosis. HCV RNA was measured using a reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assay. Of patients treated with LDV, SOF, and the NS3/4A protease inhibitor GS-9451 for 6 weeks, 76% (38 of 50; 95% confidence interval, 60%-85%) had SVR achieved 12 weeks after the end of treatment. There was no statistically significant difference in treatment efficacy between treatment-naive patients (72%, 18 of 25) and those with treatment experience (80%; 20 of 25) (P = .51). Overall, 11 patients (22%) experienced virologic relapse, and 1 (2%) was lost to follow-up at 4 weeks after treatment. No serious adverse events, discontinuations, or deaths were associated with this regimen. Adding a third DAA to LDV/SOF may result in a moderate SVR rate, lower than that observed in patients without cirrhosis. Significant liver fibrosis remains an impediment to achieving SVR with short-duration DAA therapy. CT01805882. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Circulating sCD14 is associated with virological response to pegylated-interferon-alpha/ribavirin treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Marchetti

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT through the gut accounts for immune activation and CD4+ loss in HIV and may influence HCV disease progression in HIV/HCV co-infection. We asked whether increased MT and immune activation may hamper anti-HCV response in HIV/HCV patients.98 HIV/HCV patients who received pegylated-alpha-interferon (peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin were retrospectively analyzed. Baseline MT (lipopolysaccharide, LPS, host response to MT (sCD14, CD38+HLA-DR+CD4+/CD8+, HCV genotype, severity of liver disease were assessed according to Early Virological Response (EVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL at week 12 of therapy or ≥2 log(10 reduction from baseline after 12 weeks of therapy and Sustained Virological Response (SVR: HCV-RNA <50 IU/mL 24 weeks after end of therapy. Mann-Whitney/Chi-square test and Pearson's correlation were used. Multivariable regression was performed to determine factors associated with EVR/SVR.71 patients displayed EVR; 41 SVR. Patients with HCV genotypes 1-4 and cirrhosis presented a trend to higher sCD14, compared to patients with genotypes 2-3 (p = 0.053 and no cirrhosis (p = 0.052. EVR and SVR patients showed lower levels of circulating sCD14 (p = 0.0001, p = 0.026, respectively, but similar T-cell activation compared to Non-EVR (Null Responders, NR and Non-SVR (N-SVR subjects. sCD14 resulted the main predictive factor of EVR (0.145 for each sCD14 unit more, 95%CI 0.031-0.688, p = 0.015. SVR was associated only with HCV genotypes 2-3 (AOR 0.022 for genotypes 1-4 vs 2-3, 95%CI 0.001-0.469, p = 0.014.In HIV/HCV patients sCD14 correlates with the severity of liver disease and predicts early response to peg-INF-alpha/ribavirin, suggesting MT-driven immune activation as pathway of HIV/HCV co-infection and response to therapy.

  17. Effect of HIV type 1 subtype on virological and immunological response to combination antiretroviral therapy: evidence for a more rapid viral suppression for subtype A than subtype B-infected Greek individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevis, Dimirios; Touloumi, Giota; Bakoyannis, Giorgos; Paparizos, Vassilios; Lazanas, Marios; Gargalianos, Panagiotis; Chryssos, Georgios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Psichogiou, Mina; Panos, Georgios; Katsarou, Olga; Sambatakou, Helen; Kordossis, Theodoros; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2013-03-01

    Whether response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) differs between those infected with HIV-1 subtype A or B remains unclear. We compared virological and immunological response to cART in individuals infected with subtype A or B in an ethnically homogeneous population. Data derived from the Athens Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (AMACS) and analysis were restricted to those of Greek origin. Time to virological response (confirmed HIV-RNA 500 copies/ml at any time or no response by month 6) were analyzed using survival models and CD4 changes after cART initiation using piecewise linear mixed effects models. Of the 571 subjects included in the analysis, 412 (72.2%) were infected with subtype B and 159 (27.8%) with subtype A. After adjusting for various prognostic factors, the rate of virological response was higher for those infected with subtype A versus B (adjusted HR: 1.35; 95% CI: 1.08-1.68; p=0.009). Subtype A was also marginally associated with a lower hazard of virological failure compared to subtype B (HR=0.73; 95% CI: 0.53-1.02; p=0.062). Further adjustment for treatment adherence did not substantially changed the main results. No significant differences were observed in the rates of CD4 increases by subtype. The overall median (95% CI) CD4 increase at 2 years of cART was 193 (175, 212) cells/μl. Our study, based on one of the largest homogeneous groups of subtype A and B infections in Europe, showed that individuals infected with subtype A had an improved virological but similar immunological response to cART compared to those infected with subtype B.

  18. Responses of intestinal virome to silver nanoparticles: safety assessment by classical virology, whole-genome sequencing and bioinformatics approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokulan K

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Kuppan Gokulan,1,* Aschalew Z Bekele,1,* Kenneth L Drake,2 Sangeeta Khare1 1Division of Microbiology, US Food and Drug Administration, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, AR, USA; 2Seralogix, Inc., Austin, TX, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Effects of silver nanoparticles (AgNP on the intestinal virome/phage community are mostly unknown. The working hypothesis of this study was that the exposure of pharmaceutical/nanomedicine and other consumer-use material containing silver ions and nanoparticles to the gastrointestinal tract may result in disturbance of the beneficial gut viruses/phages. Methods: This study assesses the impact of AgNP on the survival of individual bacteriophages using classical virology cultivation and electron microscopic techniques. Moreover, how the ingested AgNP may affect the intestinal virus/phages was investigated by conducting whole-genome sequencing (WGS. Results: The viral cultivation methods showed minimal effect on selected viruses during short-term exposure (24 h to 10 nm AgNP. However, long-term exposure (7 days resulted in significant reduction in the viral/phage population. Data obtained from WGS were filtered and compared with a nonredundant viral database composed of the complete viral genomes from NCBI using KRAKEN (confidence scoring threshold of 0.5. To compare the relative differential changes, the sequence counts in each treatment group were normalized to account for differences in DNA sequencing library sizes. Bioinformatics techniques were developed to visualize the virome comparative changes in a phylogenic tree graph. The computed data revealed that AgNP had an impact on several intestinal bacteriophages that prey on bacterial genus Enterobacteria, Yersinia and Staphylococcus as host species. Moreover, there was an independent effect of nanoparticles and released ions. Conclusion: Overall, this study reveals that the small-size AgNP could lead to

  19. Potential Impact of a Free Online HIV Treatment Response Prediction System for Reducing Virological Failures and Drug Costs after Antiretroviral Therapy Failure in a Resource-Limited Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D. Revell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Antiretroviral drug selection in resource-limited settings is often dictated by strict protocols as part of a public health strategy. The objective of this retrospective study was to examine if the HIV-TRePS online treatment prediction tool could help reduce treatment failure and drug costs in such settings. Methods. The HIV-TRePS computational models were used to predict the probability of response to therapy for 206 cases of treatment change following failure in India. The models were used to identify alternative locally available 3-drug regimens, which were predicted to be effective. The costs of these regimens were compared to those actually used in the clinic. Results. The models predicted the responses to treatment of the cases with an accuracy of 0.64. The models identified alternative drug regimens that were predicted to result in improved virological response and lower costs than those used in the clinic in 85% of the cases. The average annual cost saving was $364 USD per year (41%. Conclusions. Computational models that do not require a genotype can predict and potentially avoid treatment failure and may reduce therapy costs. The use of such a system to guide therapeutic decision-making could confer health economic benefits in resource-limited settings.

  20. Immunological and virological response to antiretroviral treatment in migrant and native men and women in Western Europe; is benefit equal for all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in immunovirological response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in migrant and native men and women within a European collaboration of HIV cohorts Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research in Europ (COHERE) in EuroCoord, 2004-2013. Migrants were defined as those with geographical origin (GO) different from the reporting country and were grouped as originating from Western Europe and Western Countries (WEWC), Eastern Europe (EE), North Africa and the Middle East (NAME), sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), Latin America (LA), Caribbean (CRB) and Asia/Oceania (ASIA/OCE). Native (NAT) individuals were defined as those originating from the reporting country. CD4 cell counts were modelled using piecewise linear mixed-effects models with two slopes, whereas models to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios (sHRs) were used for time to virological response (VR) (i.e. time from cART initiation to the first of two successive HIV RNA measurements response to cART in Western Europe varies by GO and sex of patients. ART benefits are not equal for all, underlining the point that efforts need to prioritize those most in need. © 2017 British HIV Association.

  1. Prediction value of serum HBV large surface protein in different phases of HBV infection and virological response of chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Wu, Wennan; Shang, Hongyan; Lin, Sheng; Xun, Zhen; Huang, Er; Lin, Jinpiao; Yang, Bin; Ou, Qishui

    2018-06-01

    Serum HBV large surface protein (HBV-LP) is an envelope protein that has a close relationship with HBV DNA level. This study is to explore the prediction value of HBV-LP in different phase of HBV infection and during antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients. A retrospective study was conducted in 2033 individuals, which included 1677 HBV infected patients in different phases and 356 healthy controls. HBV-LP, HBV serum markers and HBV DNA were detected by ELISA, CMIA and qRT-PCR, respectively. 85 CHB patients receiving PegIFNα or ETV were divided into virological response (VR) and partial virological response (PVR). The dynamic changes of HBV DNA and HBV-LP were observed. The level of HBV-LP in 2033 individuals was shown as: HBeAg-positive hepatitis > HBeAg-positive infection > HBeAg-negative hepatitis > HBeAg-negative infection > healthy controls. HBV-LP was positive in all patients whose HBV DNA > 1.0E + 06 IU/ml. When HBsAg was 1000 IU/ml, HBV DNAs were all negative if HBV-LP HBV-LP with HBV DNA was 100% in case of HBV-LP > 4.0 S/CO in HBeAg-positive patients and HBV-LP > 2.0 S/CO in HBeAg-negative ones. During antiviral therapy, baseline HBV-LP was lower in VR patients than that in PVR patients. The optimal cut-off points to predict VR by baseline HBV-LP were 32.4 and 28.6 S/CO for HBeAg-positive and HBeAg-negative hepatitis patients, respectively. HBV-LP may be a useful marker for distinguishing the different phases of HBV infection. Moreover, baseline HBV-LP level can be used for predicting VR of CHB patients. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. FibroTest is an independent predictor of virologic response in chronic hepatitis C patients retreated with pegylated interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin in the EPIC³ program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynard, Thierry; Munteanu, Mona; Colombo, Massimo; Bruix, Jordi; Schiff, Eugene; Terg, Ruben; Flamm, Steven; Moreno-Otero, Ricardo; Carrilho, Flair; Schmidt, Warren; Berg, Thomas; McGarrity, Thomas; Heathcote, E Jenny; Gonçales, Fernando; Diago, Moises; Craxi, Antonio; Silva, Marcelo; Boparai, Navdeep; Griffel, Louis; Burroughs, Margaret; Brass, Clifford; Albrecht, Janice

    2011-02-01

    EPIC-3 is a prospective, international study that has demonstrated the efficacy of PEG-IFN alfa-2b plus weight-based ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C and significant fibrosis who previously failed any interferon-alfa/ribavirin therapy. The aim of the present study was to assess FibroTest (FT), a validated non-invasive marker of fibrosis in treatment-naive patients, as a possible alternative to biopsy as the baseline predictor of subsequent early virologic (EVR) and sustained virologic response (SVR) in previously treated patients. Of 2312 patients enrolled, 1459 had an available baseline FT, biopsy, and complete data. Uni- (UV) and multi-variable (MV) analyses were performed using FT and biopsy. Baseline characteristics were similar as in the overall population; METAVIR stage: 28% F2, 29% F3, and 43% F4, previous relapsers 29%, previous PEG-IFN regimen 41%, high baseline viral load (BVL) 64%. 506 patients (35%) had undetectable HCV-RNA at TW12 (TW12neg), with 58% achieving SVR. The accuracy of FT was similar to that in naive patients: AUROC curve for the diagnosis of F4 vs F2=0.80 (p<0.00001). Five baseline factors were associated (p<0.001) with SVR in UV and MV analyses (odds ratio: UV/MV): fibrosis stage estimated using FT (4.5/5.9) or biopsy (1.5/1.6), genotype 2/3 (4.5/5.1), BVL (1.5/1.3), prior relapse (1.6/1.6), previous treatment with non-PEG-IFN (2.6/2.0). These same factors were associated (p ≤ 0.001) with EVR. Among patients TW12neg, two independent factors remained highly predictive of SVR by MV analysis (p ≤ 0.001): genotype 2/3 (odds ratio=2.9), fibrosis estimated with FT (4.3) or by biopsy (1.5). FibroTest at baseline is a possible non-invasive alternative to biopsy for the prediction of EVR at 12 weeks and SVR, in patients with previous failures and advanced fibrosis, retreated with PEG-IFN alfa-2b and ribavirin. Copyright © 2010 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Predictors Associated with Increase in Skeletal Muscle Mass after Sustained Virological Response in Chronic Hepatitis C Treated with Direct Acting Antivirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Yoh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims: We aimed to examine changes in skeletal muscle mass in chronic hepatitis C (CHC patients undergoing interferon (IFN-free direct acting antivirals (DAAs therapy who achieved sustained virological response (SVR. Patients and methods: A total of 69 CHC patients treated with DAAs were analyzed. We compared the changes in skeletal muscle index (SMI using bio-impedance analysis at baseline and SMI at SVR. SMI was calculated as the sum of skeletal muscle mass in upper and lower extremities divided by height squared (cm2/m2. Further, we identified pretreatment parameters contributing to the increased SMI at SVR. Results: SMI in males at baseline ranged from 6.73 to 9.08 cm2/m2 (median, 7.65 cm2/m2, while that in females ranged from 4.45 to 7.27 cm2/m2 (median, 5.81 cm2/m2. At SVR, 36 patients (52.2% had increased SMI as compared with baseline. In the univariate analysis, age (p = 0.0392, hyaluronic acid (p = 0.0143, and branched-chain amino acid to tyrosine ratio (BTR (p = 0.0024 were significant pretreatment factors linked to increased SMI at SVR. In the multivariate analysis, only BTR was an independent predictor linked to the increased SMI at SVR (p = 0.0488. Conclusion: Pretreatment BTR level can be helpful for predicting increased SMI after SVR in CHC patients undergoing IFN-free DAAs therapy.

  4. Mucosal immunology and virology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tyring, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    .... A third chapter focuses on the proximal end of the gastrointestinal tract (i.e. the oral cavity). The mucosal immunology and virology of the distal end of the gastrointestinal tract is covered in the chapter on the anogenital mucosa. Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) plays a role in protection against all viral (and other) infections except those that enter the body via a bite (e.g. yellow fever or dengue from a mosquito or rabies from a dog) or an injection or transfusion (e.g. HIV, Hepatitis B). ...

  5. New-onset ascites as a manifestation of virologic relapse in patients with hepatitis C cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua DL

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Lim Chua, Thomas Hahambis, Samuel H SigalDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USABackground: Chronic hepatitis C is the most common cause of cirrhosis in industrialized countries. Successful treatment of chronic hepatitis C in patients with advanced fibrosis or cirrhosis has significant benefits, including improvements in inflammation, fibrosis, and portal hypertension, with prevention of esophageal varices and clinical decompensation.Case: In this report, we present two patients with well-compensated hepatitis C cirrhosis who achieved an end-of-treatment response on a direct-acting antiviral therapy-based triple regimen for hepatitis C virus, but subsequently presented with new-onset ascites associated with virologic relapse.Conclusion: We propose that the development of ascites in this setting is due to the adverse impact of inflammation of the virologic relapse on portal hypertension. Our observation that ascites formation can be a manifestation of virologic relapse has potentially important clinical implications, as it highlights not only the importance of close monitoring of cirrhotic patients after achieving end-of-treatment response but also the impact of active inflammation on the severity of portal hypertension.Keywords: chronic hepatitis C, cirrhosis, virologic relapse, portal hypertension, ascites

  6. Improvement of liver stiffness in patients with hepatitis C virus infection who received direct-acting antiviral therapy and achieved sustained virological response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Toshifumi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Mizuno, Kazuyuki; Sone, Yasuhiro; Kataoka, Saki; Hashinokuchi, Shinichi

    2017-12-01

    There is insufficient research on whether direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapy can improve liver fibrosis in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV). We evaluated sequential changes in liver stiffness using shear wave elastography in patients with HCV who received DAA therapy. A total of 210 patients with HCV who received daclatasvir and asunaprevir therapy and achieved sustained virological response (SVR) were analyzed. Liver stiffness, as evaluated by shear wave elastography, and laboratory data were assessed before treatment (baseline), at end of treatment (EOT), and at 24 weeks after EOT (SVR24). Alanine aminotransferase levels (ALT) decreased over time, and there were significant differences between baseline and EOT and between EOT and SVR24. Although platelet counts did not significantly differ between baseline and EOT, they increased significantly from EOT to SVR24. The median (interquartile range) liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 10.2 (7.7-14.7), 8.8 (7.1-12.1), and 7.6 (6.3-10.3) kPa, respectively (P liver) and Fibrosis-4 index > 2.0 (n = 75), the liver stiffness values at baseline, EOT, and SVR24 were 9.6 (7.7-15.2), 9.2 (7.3-12.1), and 7.7 (6.3-10.1) kPa, respectively (P liver stiffness starts during the administration of DAAs in patients who achieve SVR, and this effect is particularly pronounced in patients with progressive liver fibrosis. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Evaluation of the genotypic prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor use versus a phenotypic assay and correlation with the virological response to maraviroc: the ANRS GenoTropism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Soulié, Cathia; Flandre, Philippe; Descamps, Diane; Lazrek, Mouna; Charpentier, Charlotte; Montes, Brigitte; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Schneider, Véronique; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Tamalet, Catherine; Desbois, Delphine; Macé, Muriel; Ferré, Virginie; Vabret, Astrid; Ruffault, Annick; Pallier, Coralie; Raymond, Stéphanie; Izopet, Jacques; Reynes, Jacques; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Masquelier, Bernard

    2010-08-01

    Genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage need to be evaluated in a clinical setting. We aimed at studying (i) the correlation of genotypic prediction of coreceptor use in comparison with a phenotypic assay and (ii) the relationship between genotypic prediction of coreceptor use at baseline and the virological response (VR) to a therapy including maraviroc (MVC). Antiretroviral-experienced patients were included in the MVC Expanded Access Program if they had an R5 screening result with Trofile (Monogram Biosciences). V3 loop sequences were determined at screening, and coreceptor use was predicted using 13 genotypic algorithms or combinations of algorithms. Genotypic predictions were compared to Trofile; dual or mixed (D/M) variants were considered as X4 variants. Both genotypic and phenotypic results were obtained for 189 patients at screening, with 54 isolates scored as X4 or D/M and 135 scored as R5 with Trofile. The highest sensitivity (59.3%) for detection of X4 was obtained with the Geno2pheno algorithm, with a false-positive rate set up at 10% (Geno2pheno10). In the 112 patients receiving MVC, a plasma viral RNA load of <50 copies/ml was obtained in 68% of cases at month 6. In multivariate analysis, the prediction of the X4 genotype at baseline with the Geno2pheno10 algorithm including baseline viral load and CD4 nadir was independently associated with a worse VR at months 1 and 3. The baseline weighted genotypic sensitivity score was associated with VR at month 6. There were strong arguments in favor of using genotypic coreceptor use assays for determining which patients would respond to CCR5 antagonist.

  8. Protein pathway activation associated with sustained virologic response in patients with chronic hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN) and ribavirin (RBV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younossi, Zobair M; Limongi, Dolores; Stepanova, Maria; Pierobon, Mariaelena; Afendy, Arian; Mehta, Rohini; Baranova, Ancha; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel

    2011-02-04

    Only half of chronic hepatitis C (CH-C) patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin (PEG-IFN+RBV) achieve sustained virologic response) SVR. In addition to known factors, we postulated that activation of key protein signaling networks in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) may contribute to SVR due to inherent patient-specific basal immune cell signaling architecture. In this study, we included 92 patients with CH-C. PBMCs were collected while patients were not receiving treatment and used for phosphoprotein-based network profiling. Patients received a full course of PEG-IFN+RBV with overall SVR of 55%. From PBMC, protein lysates were extracted and then used for Reverse Phase Protein Microarray (RPMA) analysis, which quantitatively measured the levels of cytokines and activation levels of 25 key protein signaling molecules involved in immune cell regulation and interferon alpha signaling. Regression models for predicting SVR were generated by stepwise bidirectional selection. Both clinical-laboratory and RPMA parameters were used as predictor variables. Model accuracies were estimated using 10-fold cross-validation. Our results show that by comparing patients who achieved SVR to those who did not, phosphorylation levels of 6 proteins [AKT(T308), JAK1(Y1022/1023), p70 S6 Kinase (S371), PKC zeta/lambda(T410/403), TYK2(Y1054/1055), ZAP-70(Y319)/Syk(Y352)] and overall levels of 6 unmodified proteins [IL2, IL10, IL4, IL5, TNF-alpha, CD5L] were significantly different (P < 0.05). For SVR, the model based on a combination of clinical and proteome parameters was developed, with an AUC = 0.914, sensitivity of 92.16%, and specificity of 85.0%. This model included the following parameters: viral genotype, previous treatment status, BMI, phosphorylated states of STAT2, AKT, LCK, and TYK2 kinases as well as steady state levels of IL4, IL5, and TNF-alpha. In conclusion, SVR could be predicted by a combination of clinical, cytokine, and protein signaling

  9. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  10. Sustained virological response halts fibrosis progression: A long-term follow-up study of people with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swee Lin G Chen Yi Mei

    Full Text Available Long-term follow-up studies validating the clinical benefit of sustained virological response (SVR in people with chronic hepatitis C (CHC infection are lacking. Our aim was to identify rates and predictors of liver fibrosis progression in a large, well characterized cohort of CHC patients in whom paired liver fibrosis assessments were performed more than 10 years apart.CHC patients who had undergone a baseline liver biopsy pre-2004 and a follow up liver fibrosis assessment more than 10 years later (biopsy or liver stiffness measurement (LSM using transient elastography [FibroScan] were identified. Subjects who had undergone a baseline liver biopsy but had no follow up fibrosis assessment were recalled for LSM. Fibrosis was categorised as mild-moderate (METAVIR F0-2 / LSM result of ≤ 9.5 kPa or advanced (METAVIR F3-4/ LSM >9.5 kPa. The primary objective was to assess the association between SVR and the rate of liver fibrosis progression over at least 10 years, defined as an increase from mild-moderate fibrosis at baseline liver biopsy (METAVIR F0-2 to advanced fibrosis at follow-up liver fibrosis assessment.131 subjects were included in this analysis: 69% male, 82% Caucasian, 60% G1 HCV, 25% G3 HCV. The median age at F/U fibrosis staging was 57 (IQR 54-62 years with median estimated duration of infection 33-years (IQR 29-38. At F/U, liver fibrosis assessment was performed by LSM in 86% and liver biopsy in 14%. The median period between fibrosis assessments was 14-years (IQR 12-17. 109 (83% participants had received interferon-based antiviral therapy. 40% attained SVR. At F/U, there was a significant increase in the proportion of subjects with advanced liver fibrosis: 27% at baseline vs. 46% at F/U (p = 0.002. The prevalence of advanced fibrosis did not change among subjects who attained SVR, 30% at B/L vs 25% at F/U (p = 0.343. However, advanced fibrosis became more common at F/U among subjects with persistent viremia: 10% at B/L vs 31% at F

  11. Sustained virological response halts fibrosis progression: A long-term follow-up study of people with chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen Yi Mei, Swee Lin G; Thompson, Alexander J; Christensen, Britt; Cunningham, Georgina; McDonald, Lucy; Bell, Sally; Iser, David; Nguyen, Tin; Desmond, Paul V

    2017-01-01

    Long-term follow-up studies validating the clinical benefit of sustained virological response (SVR) in people with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection are lacking. Our aim was to identify rates and predictors of liver fibrosis progression in a large, well characterized cohort of CHC patients in whom paired liver fibrosis assessments were performed more than 10 years apart. CHC patients who had undergone a baseline liver biopsy pre-2004 and a follow up liver fibrosis assessment more than 10 years later (biopsy or liver stiffness measurement (LSM) using transient elastography [FibroScan]) were identified. Subjects who had undergone a baseline liver biopsy but had no follow up fibrosis assessment were recalled for LSM. Fibrosis was categorised as mild-moderate (METAVIR F0-2 / LSM result of ≤ 9.5 kPa) or advanced (METAVIR F3-4/ LSM >9.5 kPa). The primary objective was to assess the association between SVR and the rate of liver fibrosis progression over at least 10 years, defined as an increase from mild-moderate fibrosis at baseline liver biopsy (METAVIR F0-2) to advanced fibrosis at follow-up liver fibrosis assessment. 131 subjects were included in this analysis: 69% male, 82% Caucasian, 60% G1 HCV, 25% G3 HCV. The median age at F/U fibrosis staging was 57 (IQR 54-62) years with median estimated duration of infection 33-years (IQR 29-38). At F/U, liver fibrosis assessment was performed by LSM in 86% and liver biopsy in 14%. The median period between fibrosis assessments was 14-years (IQR 12-17). 109 (83%) participants had received interferon-based antiviral therapy. 40% attained SVR. At F/U, there was a significant increase in the proportion of subjects with advanced liver fibrosis: 27% at baseline vs. 46% at F/U (p = 0.002). The prevalence of advanced fibrosis did not change among subjects who attained SVR, 30% at B/L vs 25% at F/U (p = 0.343). However, advanced fibrosis became more common at F/U among subjects with persistent viremia: 10% at B/L vs 31% at F/U (p

  12. Heterogeneity of HVR-1 quasispecies is predictive of early but not sustained virological response in genotype 1b-infected patients undergoing combined treatment with PEG- or STD-IFN plus RBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, I; Cappiello, G; Lo Iacono, O; Longo, R; Ferraro, D; Antonucci, G; Di Marco, V; Di Stefano, R; Craxì, A; Solmone, M C; Spanò, A; Ippolito, G; Capobianchi, M R

    2003-01-01

    ISDR mutation pattern and HVR-1 quasispecies were analyzed in HCV genotype 1b-infected patients treated with either PEG- or STD-IFN plus ribavirin, in order to find virological correlates of therapy outcome. ISDR region analysis, performed at baseline (T0) and at 4 weeks of therapy (T1), indicated that ISDR mutation pattern was not predictive of response to treatment. Moreover, no selection of putative resistant strains in the first month of therapy was observed. Viral load was not correlated with any parameter of HVR-1 heterogeneity. Among the HVR-1 heterogeneity parameters considered, complexity was inversely correlated to viral load decline at T1. In univariate analysis, complexity, proportion of non synonymous substitutions (NS) and NS/S ratio were lower in patients showing virological response at 6 months of treatment. Complexity was the only parameter independently associated with both decline of viral load at T1 and virological response after 6 months, even after adjustment for confounding variables. At the end of treatment or later, these correlations were lost. Evolution pattern of the HVR-1 quasispecies indicated a strong selective pressure in sustained responders, with complete substitution of pre-existing quasispecies, while minor changes occured in non responders. In relapsers both patterns were present at a similar rate. In conclusion, this study shows that HVR-1 heterogeneity may be involved in the early response to combined IFN-RBV therapy. The loss of correlation between viral heterogeneity and therapy outcome at 6 months of therapy, or later, suggests that other factors may play a role in maintaining sustained response to treatment.

  13. Automatic duress alarms through physiological response monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrig, S.C.

    1977-07-01

    Physiological response monitoring under controlled conditions can provide an effective means for passively determining if the wearer is under moderate to severe stresses. By monitoring the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR) of an individual, it is possible to detect in real time the increase in heart rate and GSR levels due to physiological reactions to mental duress. With existing physiological monitoring equipment, however, the work load of the wearer must be well defined since it is impossible, without additional data, to distinguish mental duress responses from those resulting from moderate physical exertion. Similarly, environmental conditions should be constrained within set limits to avoid masking increases in GSR levels due to metntal stress from those associated with increased perspiration. These constraints should not prove overly restrictive and would allow an integrated security system utilizing physiological monitoring equipment to provide an effective real time, automated early warning system for detection of mental duress or death of the wearer

  14. Virological responses to lamivudine or emtricitabine when combined with tenofovir and a protease inhibitor in treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients in the Dutch AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokx, C; Gras, L; van de Vijver, Damc; Verbon, A; Rijnders, Bja

    2016-09-01

    Lamivudine (3TC) and emtricitabine (FTC) are considered interchangeable in recommended tenofovir disoproxil-fumarate (TDF)-containing combination antiretroviral therapies (cARTs). This statement of equivalence has not been systematically studied. We compared the treatment responses to 3TC and FTC combined with TDF in boosted protease inhibitor (PI)-based cART for HIV-1-infected patients. An observational study in the AIDS Therapy Evaluation in the Netherlands (ATHENA) cohort was carried out between 2002 and 2013. Virological failure rates, time to HIV RNA suppression treatment failure were analysed using multivariable logistic regression and Cox proportional hazard models. Sensitivity analyses included propensity score-adjusted models. A total of 1582 ART-naïve HIV-1-infected patients initiated 3TC or FTC with TDF and ritonavir-boosted darunavir (29.6%), atazanavir (41.5%), lopinavir (27.1%) or another PI (1.8%). Week 48 virological failure rates on 3TC and FTC were comparable (8.9% and 5.6%, respectively; P = 0.208). The multivariable adjusted odds ratio of virological failure when using 3TC instead of FTC with TDF in PI-based cART was 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.32-1.79; P = 0.51]. Propensity score-adjusted models showed comparable results. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for treatment failure of 3TC compared with FTC was 1.15 (95% CI 0.58-2.27) within 240 weeks after cART initiation. The time to two consecutive HIV RNA measurements treatment failure after suppression treatment-naïve HIV-1-infected patients starting either 3TC/TDF or FTC/TDF and a ritonavir-boosted PI. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  15. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our

  16. Prevalence and effect of pre-treatment drug resistance on the virological response to antiretroviral treatment initiated in HIV-infected children - a EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC joint project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Wittkop, Linda; Judd, Ali

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Few studies have evaluated the impact of pre-treatment drug resistance (PDR) on response to combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) in children. The objective of this joint EuroCoord-CHAIN-EPPICC/PENTA project was to assess the prevalence of PDR mutations and their association...... algorithm to infer resistance to prescribed drugs. Time to virological failure (VF) was defined as the first of two consecutive HIV-RNA > 500 copies/mL after 6 months cART and was assessed by Cox proportional hazards models. All models were adjusted for baseline demographic, clinical, immunology.......7-5.7). Of 37 children (7.8 %, 95 % confidence interval (CI), 5.5-10.6) harboring a virus with ≥1 PDR mutations, 30 children had a virus resistant to ≥1 of the prescribed drugs. Overall, the cumulative Kaplan-Meier estimate for virological failure was 19.8 % (95 %CI, 16.4-23.9). Cumulative risk for VF tended...

  17. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  18. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  19. Quantum virology : improved management of viral infections through quantitative measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalpoe, Jaijant Satishkumar

    2007-01-01

    Real-time monitoring of PCR has strongly supported the increased diagnostic use of nucleic acid detection assays in clinical virology. Particularly the improvements in the ability to quantify target nucleic acid sequences offer new opportunities in the management of viral infections. Real-time PCR

  20. Mapping of the US Domestic Influenza Virologic Surveillance Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, Barbara; Schwerzmann, Joy; Mustaquim, Desiree; Aden, Tricia; Brammer, Lynnette; Humes, Rosemary; Shult, Pete; Shahangian, Shahram; Gubareva, Larisa; Xu, Xiyan; Miller, Joseph; Jernigan, Daniel

    2018-07-17

    Influenza virologic surveillance is critical each season for tracking influenza circulation, following trends in antiviral drug resistance, detecting novel influenza infections in humans, and selecting viruses for use in annual seasonal vaccine production. We developed a framework and process map for characterizing the landscape of US influenza virologic surveillance into 5 tiers of influenza testing: outpatient settings (tier 1), inpatient settings and commercial laboratories (tier 2), state public health laboratories (tier 3), National Influenza Reference Center laboratories (tier 4), and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laboratories (tier 5). During the 2015-16 season, the numbers of influenza tests directly contributing to virologic surveillance were 804,000 in tiers 1 and 2; 78,000 in tier 3; 2,800 in tier 4; and 3,400 in tier 5. With the release of the 2017 US Pandemic Influenza Plan, the proposed framework will support public health officials in modeling, surveillance, and pandemic planning and response.

  1. Social media monitoring: Responsive governance in the shadow of surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.R. Edwards (Arthur); D. de Kool (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Social media monitoring is gradually becoming a common practice in public organizations in the Netherlands. The main purposes of social media monitoring are strategic control and responsiveness. Social media monitoring poses normative questions in terms of

  2. Molecular virology of feline calicivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Patricia A; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Parker, John S L

    2008-07-01

    Caliciviridae are small, nonenveloped, positive-stranded RNA viruses. Much of our understanding of the molecular biology of the caliciviruses has come from the study of the naturally occurring animal caliciviruses. In particular, many studies have focused on the molecular virology of feline calicivirus (FCV), which reflects its importance as a natural pathogen of cats. FCVs demonstrate a remarkable capacity for high genetic, antigenic, and clinical diversity; "outbreak" vaccine resistant strains occur frequently. This article updates the reader on the current status of clinical behavior and pathogenesis of FCV.

  3. Effect of abacavir on sustained virologic response to HCV treatment in HIV/HCV co-infected patients, Cohere in Eurocoord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Colette; Arends, Joop; Peters, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Contradicting results on the effect of abacavir (ABC) on hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment responses in HIV/HCV co-infected patients have been reported. We evaluated the influence of ABC on the response to pegylated interferon (pegIFN) and ribavirin (RBV)-containing HCV treatment in H...

  4. Role of IL-28B polymorphisms in virologic response to combined pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy in genotype 4 chronic HCV infected patients with and without cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amira Youssef Shaala

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: In Egypt, where chronic HCV genotype 4 and schistosoma coinfection predominate, both schistosoma infection and cirrhosis are more potent than IL28B polymorphisms as strong baseline negative predictors of hepatitis C treatment response.

  5. Determinants of virological response to antiretroviral therapy: socio-economic status still plays a role in the era of cART. Results from the ANRS-VESPA 2 study, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Almeida, Kayigan W; Lert, France; Spire, Bruno; Dray-Spira, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    Disparities in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) outcomes have been consistently reported among people living with HIV (PLWHIV). The present study aims at investigating the mechanisms underlying those disparities among PLWHIV in France. We used data from the Vespa2 survey, a large national cross-sectional survey, representative of HIV-infected people followed at hospitals in 2011. Among participants diagnosed ≥1996, HIV treatment-naive at the time of cART initiation and on cART for at least 12 months, the frequency of sustained virological suppression (SVS; undetectable viral load [accounting for clinical and biological determinants of response to cART. Among 1,246 participants, 77.7% had achieved SVS. SVS was less frequent among those unemployed (0.6 [range 0.3-1.0]) and those with the lowest level of education (0.4 [range 0.2-0.9]). The late presenters, diagnosed at a CD4 + T-cell count 200 but initiating cART at CD4 + T-cell count issues should also be investigated.

  6. Immunological and virological response to antiretroviral treatment in migrant and native men and women in Western Europe; is benefit equal for all?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obel, Niels; Kirk, Ole

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in immunovirological response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in migrant and native men and women within a European collaboration of HIV cohorts Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research in Europ (COHERE) ...

  7. Immunological and virological response to antiretroviral treatment in migrant and native men and women in Western Europe; is benefit equal for all?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monge, S.; Mocroft, A.; Sabin, A.; Touloumi, G.; Sighem, A.; Abgrall, S.; Dray-Spira, R.; Spire, B.; Castagna, A.; Mussini, C.; Zangerle, R.; Hessamfar, M.; Anderson, J.; Hamouda, O.; Ehren, K.; Obel, N.; Kirk, O.; Antinori, A.; Girardi, E.; Saracino, A.; Calmy, A.; Wit, S.; Wittkop, L.; Bucher, C.; Montoliu, A.; Raben, D.; Prins, M. [= Maria; Meyer, L.; Chene, G.; Burns, F.; Amo, J.; Judd, Ali; Zangerle, Robert; Touloumi, Giota; Warszawski, Josiane; Meyer, Laurence; Dabis, François; Krause, Murielle; Ghosn, Jade; Leport, Catherine; Wittkop, Linda; Reiss, Peter; Wit, Ferdinand; Bucher, Heiner; Gibb, Diana; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Amo, Julia; Obel, Niels; Thorne, Claire; Mocroft, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate differences in immunovirological response to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in migrant and native men and women within a European collaboration of HIV cohorts Collaboration of Observational HIV Epidemiological Research in Europ (COHERE) in EuroCoord,

  8. Five-year follow-up of patients with chronic C hepatitis and sustained virological response Seguimiento a 5 años de pacientes con hepatitis crónica C y respuesta viral sostenida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Puig-del-Castillo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess persistence of sustained viral response at 5 years of follow-up in patients with chronic viral hepatitis C treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Design: a descriptive study. Patients: from August 2001 to May 2004, all patients treated at our center with pegylated interferon and ribavirin who achieved a sustained viral response were consecutively enrolled (93 patients. Demographic, histological, biochemical, and virological data were collected during treatment and 5 years after achievement of the sustained viral response. Eighty-six percent of patients enrolled (n = 80 attended the control visit at 5 years. Results: mean age of enrolled patients was 41 years (standard deviation = 10 years, and 30.1% (n = 28 were women. Liver biopsy had been performed before treatment in 68.8% of patients (n = 64, showing no or mild fibrosis in 62.3% (F0 and F1 and significant fibrosis and cirrhosis in 37.7% (F ≥ 3. Genotype distribution was: 58.1% genotype 1 (n = 54; 8.6% genotype 2 (n = 8; 24.7% genotype 3 (n = 23; 7.5% genotype 4 (n = 7, and indeterminate in one patient. Only one patient experienced virological recurrence. All other patients had negative HCV RNA levels and, in the absence of other liver diseases, normal ALT levels. Conclusion: in patients treated with pegylated interferon and ribavirin with sustained viral response, long-term recurrence rate was very low.Objetivo: evaluar la persistencia de respuesta viral sostenida a los 5 años de seguimiento en pacientes con hepatitis crónica por virus C tratados con interferón pegilado y ribavirina. Diseño: estudio descriptivo. Pacientes: desde agosto de 2001 hasta mayo de 2004, se incluyeron de forma consecutiva todos los pacientes de nuestro centro tratados con interferón pegilado y ribavirina que alcanzaron respuesta viral sostenida (93 pacientes. Se recogieron datos demográficos, histológicos, bioquímicos y virológicos durante el tratamiento y a los 5 años de

  9. Dietary Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 and Zinc Oxide Stimulate Immune Reactions to Trivalent Influenza Vaccination in Pigs but Do Not Affect Virological Response upon Challenge Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenya; Burwinkel, Michael; Chai, Weidong; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Breithaupt, Angele; Hoffmann, Bernd; Twardziok, Sven; Rieger, Juliane; Janczyk, Pawel; Pieper, Robert; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) regularly cause significant disease in pigs worldwide. Since there is no causative treatment of SIV, we tested if probiotic Enterococcus (E.) faecium NCIMB 10415 or zinc (Zn) oxide as feed supplements provide beneficial effects upon SIV infection in piglets. Seventy-two weaned piglets were fed three different diets containing either E. faecium or different levels of Zn (2500 ppm, Znhigh; 50 ppm, Znlow). Half of the piglets were vaccinated intramuscularly (VAC) twice with an inactivated trivalent SIV vaccine, while all piglets were then infected intranasally with H3N2 SIV. Significantly higher weekly weight gains were observed in the E. faecium group before virus infection, and piglets in Znhigh and E. faecium groups gained weight after infection while those in the control group (Znlow) lost weight. Using ELISA, we found significantly higher H3N2-specific antibody levels in the E. faecium+VAC group 2 days before and at the day of challenge infection as well as at 4 and 6 days after challenge infection. Higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers were also observed in the Znhigh+VAC and E. faecium+VAC groups at 0, 1 and 4 days after infection. However, there were no significant differences in virus shedding and lung lesions between the dietary groups. Using flow cytometry analysis significantly higher activated T helper cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte percentages in the PBMCs were detected in the Znhigh and E. faecium groups at single time points after infection compared to the Znlow control group, but no prolonged effect was found. In the BAL cells no influence of dietary supplementation on immune cell percentages could be detected. Our results suggest that feeding high doses of zinc oxide and particularly E. faecium could beneficially influence humoral immune responses after vaccination and recovery from SIV infection, but not affect virus shedding and lung pathology. PMID:24489827

  10. Dietary Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 and zinc oxide stimulate immune reactions to trivalent influenza vaccination in pigs but do not affect virological response upon challenge infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenya; Burwinkel, Michael; Chai, Weidong; Lange, Elke; Blohm, Ulrike; Breithaupt, Angele; Hoffmann, Bernd; Twardziok, Sven; Rieger, Juliane; Janczyk, Pawel; Pieper, Robert; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2014-01-01

    Swine influenza viruses (SIV) regularly cause significant disease in pigs worldwide. Since there is no causative treatment of SIV, we tested if probiotic Enterococcus (E.) faecium NCIMB 10415 or zinc (Zn) oxide as feed supplements provide beneficial effects upon SIV infection in piglets. Seventy-two weaned piglets were fed three different diets containing either E. faecium or different levels of Zn (2500 ppm, Zn(high); 50 ppm, Zn(low)). Half of the piglets were vaccinated intramuscularly (VAC) twice with an inactivated trivalent SIV vaccine, while all piglets were then infected intranasally with H3N2 SIV. Significantly higher weekly weight gains were observed in the E. faecium group before virus infection, and piglets in Zn(high) and E. faecium groups gained weight after infection while those in the control group (Zn(low)) lost weight. Using ELISA, we found significantly higher H3N2-specific antibody levels in the E. faecium+VAC group 2 days before and at the day of challenge infection as well as at 4 and 6 days after challenge infection. Higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers were also observed in the Zn(high)+VAC and E. faecium+VAC groups at 0, 1 and 4 days after infection. However, there were no significant differences in virus shedding and lung lesions between the dietary groups. Using flow cytometry analysis significantly higher activated T helper cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte percentages in the PBMCs were detected in the Zn(high) and E. faecium groups at single time points after infection compared to the Zn(low) control group, but no prolonged effect was found. In the BAL cells no influence of dietary supplementation on immune cell percentages could be detected. Our results suggest that feeding high doses of zinc oxide and particularly E. faecium could beneficially influence humoral immune responses after vaccination and recovery from SIV infection, but not affect virus shedding and lung pathology.

  11. Dietary Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 and zinc oxide stimulate immune reactions to trivalent influenza vaccination in pigs but do not affect virological response upon challenge infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenya Wang

    Full Text Available Swine influenza viruses (SIV regularly cause significant disease in pigs worldwide. Since there is no causative treatment of SIV, we tested if probiotic Enterococcus (E. faecium NCIMB 10415 or zinc (Zn oxide as feed supplements provide beneficial effects upon SIV infection in piglets. Seventy-two weaned piglets were fed three different diets containing either E. faecium or different levels of Zn (2500 ppm, Zn(high; 50 ppm, Zn(low. Half of the piglets were vaccinated intramuscularly (VAC twice with an inactivated trivalent SIV vaccine, while all piglets were then infected intranasally with H3N2 SIV. Significantly higher weekly weight gains were observed in the E. faecium group before virus infection, and piglets in Zn(high and E. faecium groups gained weight after infection while those in the control group (Zn(low lost weight. Using ELISA, we found significantly higher H3N2-specific antibody levels in the E. faecium+VAC group 2 days before and at the day of challenge infection as well as at 4 and 6 days after challenge infection. Higher hemagglutination inhibition (HI titers were also observed in the Zn(high+VAC and E. faecium+VAC groups at 0, 1 and 4 days after infection. However, there were no significant differences in virus shedding and lung lesions between the dietary groups. Using flow cytometry analysis significantly higher activated T helper cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte percentages in the PBMCs were detected in the Zn(high and E. faecium groups at single time points after infection compared to the Zn(low control group, but no prolonged effect was found. In the BAL cells no influence of dietary supplementation on immune cell percentages could be detected. Our results suggest that feeding high doses of zinc oxide and particularly E. faecium could beneficially influence humoral immune responses after vaccination and recovery from SIV infection, but not affect virus shedding and lung pathology.

  12. Finding our roots and celebrating our shoots: Plant virology in Virology, 1955-1964.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2015-05-01

    To celebrate the sixtieth anniversary of Virology a survey is made of the plant viruses, virologists and their institutions, and tools and technology described in the first decade of plant virus publications in Virology. This was a period when plant viruses increasingly became tools of discovery as epistemic objects and plant virology became a discipline discrete from plant pathology and other life sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The cost of treatment failure: resource use and costs incurred by hepatitis C virus genotype 1-infected patients who do or do not achieve sustained virological response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backx, M; Lewszuk, A; White, J R; Cole, J; Sreedharan, A; van Sanden, S; Diels, J; Lawson, A; Neal, K R; Wiselka, M J; Ito, T; Irving, W L

    2014-03-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection places a considerable economic burden on health services. Cost-effectiveness analyses of antiviral treatment for patients with chronic HCV infection are dependent on assumptions about cost reductions following sustained virological response (SVR) to therapy. This study quantified the medium-term difference in health resource usage and costs depending on treatment outcome. Retrospective chart review of patients with HCV genotype 1 infection who had received at least 2 months pegylated interferon and ribavirin therapy, with known treatment outcome was conducted. Disease status was categorized as chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis or decompensated liver disease. Health resource use was documented for each patient in each disease state. Unit costs were from the NHS 'Payment by Results' database and the British National Formulary. One hundred and ninety three patients (108 SVR, 85 non-SVR) with mean follow-up of 3.5 (SVR) and 4.9 (non-SVR) years were enrolled. No SVR patient progressed to a more severe liver disease state. Annual transition rates for non-SVR patients were 7.4% (chronic hepatitis to cirrhosis) and 4.9% (cirrhosis to decompensated liver disease). By extrapolation of modelled data over a 5-year post-treatment period, failure of patients with chronic hepatitis to achieve SVR was associated with a 13-fold increase (roughly £2300) in costs, whilst for patients who were retreated, the increase was 56-fold, equating to more than £10 000. Achievement of an SVR has significant effects on health service usage and costs. This work provides real-life data for future cost-effectiveness analyses related to the treatment for chronic HCV infection. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. History of viral suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy as a predictor of virological failure after a treatment change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; Ledergerber, B

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: HIV-infected persons experience different patterns of viral suppression after initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). The relationship between such differences and risk of virological failure after starting a new antiretroviral could help with patient monitoring strategi...

  15. Response comparative study of Rn-222 alpha particles track monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Osvaldo Luiz dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    This work was a comparative study between the responses of three monitors, the NRPB, an acrylic monitor (in thin film geometry) and the aluminum monitor (also thin film geometry) in controlled and mixed environment. The experiments consisted on placing the monitors in a plastic tube, with a radio-226 source internal. Only internal CR-39 plastic detectors were analyzed in this work. It was found that the monitors in thin film geometry had activities response of approximately 15% less than the NRPB monitors. All monitors responded the same way when in controlled environment. Related to the type of material, conductive plastic or dielectric (insulator) plastic, the NRPB, in environments without ventilation, responded in the same way. (author)

  16. Reliability updating based on monitoring of structural response parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leira, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Short- and long-term aspects of measuring structural response parameters are addressed. Two specific examples of such measurements are considered for the purpose of illustration and in order to focus the discussion. These examples are taken from the petroleum industry (monitoring of riser response) and from the shipping industry (monitoring of ice-induced strains in a ship hull). Similarities and differences between the two cases are elaborated with respect to which are the most relevant mechanical limit states. Furthermore, main concerns related to reliability levels within a short-term versus long-term time horizon are highlighted. Quantifying the economic benefits of applying monitoring systems is also addressed. - Highlights: • Two examples of structural response monitoring are described. • Application of measurements is discussed in relation to updating of load and structural parameters. • Quantification of the value of response monitoring is made for both of the examples.

  17. Factors influencing the virological testing of cornea donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Tobias; Beck, Robert; Jürgens, Stefan; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Bramkamp, Matthias; Thaler, Sebastian; Röck, Daniel

    2017-11-01

    To assess the influence of donor, environment, and logistical factors on the results of virological testing of blood samples from cornea donors.Data from 670 consecutive cornea donors were analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the influence of different factors on the results of virological testing of blood samples from cornea donors.The mean annual rate of donors with serology-reactive or not evaluable result was 14.8% (99 of 670) (range 11.9%-16.9%). The cause of donor death by cancer increased the risk of serology-reactive or not evaluable result (P = .0300). Prolonged time between death and post mortem blood removal was associated with a higher rate of serology-reactive or not evaluable result (P donors, sex, and donor age had no significant impact on the results of virological testing of blood samples from cornea donors.The cause of donor death by cancer and a prolonged time between death and post mortem blood removal seem to be mainly responsible for serology-reactive or not evaluable result of blood samples from cornea donors. The percentage of discarded corneas caused by serology-reactive or not evaluable result may be reduced by shortening the period of time between death and post mortem blood removal. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Virologic response to tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimens in antiretroviral therapy experienced HIV-1 patients: a meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomized controlled clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asres Berhan

    Full Text Available The development of tipranavir and darunavir, second generation non-peptidic HIV protease inhibitors, with marked improved resistance profiles, has opened a new perspective on the treatment of antiretroviral therapy (ART experienced HIV patients with poor viral load control. The aim of this study was to determine the virologic response in ART experienced patients to tipranavir-ritonavir and darunavir-ritonavir based regimens.A computer based literature search was conducted in the databases of HINARI (Health InterNetwork Access to Research Initiative, Medline and Cochrane library. Meta-analysis was performed by including randomized controlled studies that were conducted in ART experienced patients with plasma viral load above 1,000 copies HIV RNA/ml. The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CI for viral loads of <50 copies and <400 copies HIV RNA/ml at the end of the intervention were determined by the random effects model. Meta-regression, sensitivity analysis and funnel plots were done. The number of HIV-1 patients who were on either a tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen and achieved viral load less than 50 copies HIV RNA/ml was significantly higher (overall OR = 3.4; 95% CI, 2.61-4.52 than the number of HIV-1 patients who were on investigator selected boosted comparator HIV-1 protease inhibitors (CPIs-ritonavir. Similarly, the number of patients with viral load less than 400 copies HIV RNA/ml was significantly higher in either the tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen treated group (overall OR = 3.0; 95% CI, 2.15-4.11. Meta-regression showed that the viral load reduction was independent of baseline viral load, baseline CD4 count and duration of tipranavir-ritonavir or darunavir-ritonavir based regimen.Tipranavir and darunavir based regimens were more effective in patients who were ART experienced and had poor viral load control. Further studies are required to determine their consistent

  19. Diagnostic virology laboratory within a microbiology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, S J

    1984-01-01

    The virology section at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Connecticut, is not a separate laboratory division but is a part of the microbiology division and is supervised by the same personnel who supervise bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and serology. Current volume is over 1,000 cultures yearly with 12 to 24 percent positive. Isolates are confirmed and typed by the Connecticut State Health Department Laboratory. Specimen distribution, percentage positive specimens, and distribution of viral isolates are similar to those reported from microbiology laboratories with separate virology laboratories directed by a full-time doctoral-level virologist. Our seven years' experience demonstrates that a microbiology laboratory without a full-time doctoral-level virologist can provide clinically useful virologic information.

  20. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  1. Sensor response time monitoring using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Holbert, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Random noise techniques in nuclear power plants have been developed for system surveillance and for analysis of reactor core dynamics. The noise signals also contain information about sensor dynamics, and this can be extracted using frequency, amplitude and time domain analyses. Even though noise analysis has been used for sensor response time testing in some nuclear power plants, an adequate validation of this method has never been carried out. This paper presents the results of limited work recently performed to examine the validity of the noise analysis for sensor response time testing in nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that noise analysis has the potential for detecting gross changes in sensor response but it cannot be used for reliable measurement of response time until more laboratory and field experience is accumulated. The method is more advantageous for testing pressure sensors than it is for temperature sensors. This is because: 1) for temperature sensors, a method called Loop Current Step Response test is available which is quantitatively more exact than noise analysis, 2) no method currently exists for on-line testing of pressure transmitters other than the Power-Interrupt test which is applicable only to force balance pressure transmitters, and 3) pressure sensor response time is affected by sensing line degradation which is inherently taken into account by testing with noise analysis. (author)

  2. Post decommissioning monitoring of uranium mines; a watershed monitoring program based on biological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, C.; Coggan, A.; Ludgate, I.

    2006-01-01

    Rio Algom Limited and Denison Mines own and operated uranium mines in the Elliot Lake area. The mines operated from the late 1950's to the mid 1960's and again for the early 1970's to the 1990's when the mines ceased operations. There are eleven decommissioned mines in the Serpent River watershed. At the time of decommissioning each mine had it's own monitoring program, which had evolved over the operating life of the mine and did not necessarily reflect the objectives associated with the monitoring of decommissioned sites. In order to assess the effectiveness of the decommissioning plans and monitoring the cumulative effects within the watershed, a single watershed monitoring program was developed in 1999: the Serpent River Watershed Monitoring Program which focused on water and sediment quality within the watershed and response of the biological community over time. In order to address other 'source area' monitoring, three complimentary objective-focused programs were developed 1) the In- Basin Monitoring Program, 2) the Source Area Monitoring Program and 3) the TMA Operational Monitoring Program. Through development this program framework and monitoring programs that were objective- focused, more meaningful data has been provided while providing a significant reduction in the cost of monitoring. These programs allow for the reduction in scope over time in response to improvement in the watershed. This talk will describe the development of these programs, their implementation and effectiveness. (author)

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  4. Measuring Emotional Responses to TV Commercials: The Warmth Monitor Modernized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Roy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a lot of interest in measuring emotional responses to advertising. This study focuses on the measurement of a specific emotional response to television advertising; warmth. Nearly thirty years ago, (Aaker, Stayman and Hagerty, 1986 developed a procedure they called the Warmth Monitor; “paper and pencil” self-report process recording method. The Warmth Monitor has been used in a large number of empirical studies in marketing since, but the most recent versions of the procedure are computerized. The two methods of administering the Warmth Monitor are compared in this research.

  5. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  6. Establishing a mobile automatic monitoring station for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A radiological/nuclear emergency event may cause environmental contamination. The emergency response works always need to plan an environmental survey programme incorporating the assessment results to see what is happening. The places where are assessed to have the highest radioactive contamination/radiation dose will catch more concern and need continuous monitoring. It will cause unnecessary dangers and dose to command that personnel conduct surveying in such places when the radiological/nuclear accident become more severe. A mobile automatic monitoring station has been established for emergency response by INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research) to solve the problem practically. The monitoring station involves a HPIC to monitor radiation dose, an anemometer to monitor wind speed and direction, a GPS to get position data, a GPRS/3G communication module to send monitoring and positioning data to the monitoring centre where can show the monitoring result directly on a map shown on the computer. These instruments are integrated in a trailer easy to be towed to the place need to be monitored. The electric power of the station is supplied by s a solar power energy system. It can supply the station working at least 10 days without extra electric power supply designed based on the expected time length of a nuclear power plant event. The HPIC is very sensitive and stable that can discriminate a 10 nSv/hr increasing of dose rate with the monitoring time period every ten seconds. Where the radiological dispersion device events happened is not predictable, it is difficult to get suitable wind monitoring data to assess the result of radiological dispersion device events. The anemometer added on the station can provide the real time wind monitoring data to help assessment works. (author)

  7. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  8. Virological and immunological failure of HAART and associated risk factors among adults and adolescents in the Tigray region of Northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailu, Genet Gebrehiwet; Hagos, Dawit Gebregziabher; Hagos, Amlsha Kahsay; Wasihun, Araya Gebreyesus; Dejene, Tsehaye Asmelash

    2018-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated morbidity and mortality has reduced significantly since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. As a result of increasing access to highly active antiretroviral therapy, the survival and quality of life of the patients has significantly improved globally. Despite this promising result, regular monitoring of people on antiretroviral therapy is recommended to ensure whether there is an effective treatment response or not. This study was designed to assess virological and immunological failure of highly active antiretroviral therapy users among adults and adolescents in the Tigray region of Northern Ethiopia, where scanty data are available. A retrospective follow up study was conducted from September 1 to December 30, 2016 to assess the magnitude and factors associated with virological and immunological failure among 260 adults and adolescents highly active antiretroviral therapy users who started first line ART between January 1, 2008 to March 1, 2016. A standardized questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic and clinical data. SPSS Version21 statistical software was used for analysis. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify factors associated to virological and immunological failure. Statistical association was declared significant if p-value was ≤ 0.05. A total of 30 (11.5%) and 17 (6.5%) participants experienced virological and immunological failure respectively in a median time of 36 months of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Virological failure was associated with non-adherence to medications, aged < 40 years old, having CD4+ T-cells count < 250 cells/μL and male gender. Similarly, immunological failure was associated with non-adherence, tuberculosis co-infection and Human immunodeficiency virus RNA ≥1000 copies/mL. The current result shows that immunological and virological failure is a problem in a setting

  9. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  10. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  11. Diagnostic virology laboratory within a microbiology setting.

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin, S. J.

    1984-01-01

    The virology section at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center, Connecticut, is not a separate laboratory division but is a part of the microbiology division and is supervised by the same personnel who supervise bacteriology, mycology, mycobacteriology, and serology. Current volume is over 1,000 cultures yearly with 12 to 24 percent positive. Isolates are confirmed and typed by the Connecticut State Health Department Laboratory. Specimen distribution, percentage positive specimens, and distr...

  12. Artificial Intelligence and Virology - quo vadis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapshak, Paul; Somboonwit, Charurut; Sinnott, John T

    2017-01-01

    Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, co-robotics (cobots), quantum computers (QC), include surges of scientific endeavor to produce machines (mechanical and software) among numerous types and constructions that are accelerating progress to defeat infectious diseases. There is a plethora of additional applications and uses of these methodologies and technologies for the understanding of biomedicine through bioinformation discovery. Therefore, we briefly outline the use of such techniques in virology.

  13. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos

    2001-01-01

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  14. Comparative virology and AIDS (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, M; Kodama, T

    1996-03-01

    The scientific debate between pros and cons of the HIV criminal theory of AIDS still remains unsettled. The purpose of this review is to promote resolution of the problem by extracting a common principle of the host-virus relation using data resources for each of 4 viruses as follows: a) polyoma virus, b) Marek's disease virus, c) Ebola virus, d) Korean hemorrhagic fever virus. Conclusions drawn from this study are given as follows: i) Environment emerged as the cardinal factor to modify the process of virus infection in all of the 4 viruses studied. Above all, an accelerating effect of environmental stress on the progression of virus infection was noted in vivo in the majority of viral diseases. ii) Evidence is available to indicate that a healthy cell (or a healthy individual) may harbor virus genes of multiple species without manifesting any pathologic sign. iii) Evidence also suggests that the biological property as well as morphological structure of a virus may vary in reponse to a change of the bioenvironment. On the basis of the above information, we propose to renounce 2 assumptions of classical infection model: a) the hereditarily determined virulence of a microorganism (including virus) be the sole determinant of infection to the effect that its invasion into the host should automatically complete the programmed course of infection; b) virus, a quasi-living creature, should reserve its behavioral independence irrespective of a change of the bioenvironment. The new infection model was constructed on the basis of the selfish gene concept that had been invented by Richard Dawkins to explain the altruistic behavior of an individual. That is, the fate of an exogenous or endogenous virus is under the dual control of the host genome (selfish gene) and the outer environment. The progression of virus infection is conditioned by a crosstalk between them. The selfish gene may use virus (a lifeless substance) as a magic bullet to induce a designated host response. In

  15. Monitoring Immune Responses in Organ Recipients by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mukhalafi Zuha

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection remains a major barrier to successful organ transplan-tation. Cellular and humoral immune responses play a critical role in mediating graft rejection. During the last few years, monoclonal antibodies have been used as a new specific therapeutic approach in the prevention of allograft rejection. Recently, the technology of flow cytometry has become a useful tool for monitoring immunological responses in transplant recipients. The application of this valuable tool in clinical transplantation at the present time is aimed at, i determining the extent of immuno-suppressive therapy through T-cell receptor analysis of cellular components, ii monitoring levels of alloreactive antibodies to identify high-risk recipients (sensitized patients in the pre-operative period and iii to predict rejection by monitoring their development post-operatively. In future, further development of this technology may demonstrate greater benefit to the field of organ transplantation.

  16. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.; Osipiyants, I.; Kiselev, V.; Ogar, K; Gavrilov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  17. Applications of Next-Generation Sequencing Technologies to Diagnostic Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Palù

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Novel DNA sequencing techniques, referred to as “next-generation” sequencing (NGS, provide high speed and throughput that can produce an enormous volume of sequences with many possible applications in research and diagnostic settings. In this article, we provide an overview of the many applications of NGS in diagnostic virology. NGS techniques have been used for high-throughput whole viral genome sequencing, such as sequencing of new influenza viruses, for detection of viral genome variability and evolution within the host, such as investigation of human immunodeficiency virus and human hepatitis C virus quasispecies, and monitoring of low-abundance antiviral drug-resistance mutations. NGS techniques have been applied to metagenomics-based strategies for the detection of unexpected disease-associated viruses and for the discovery of novel human viruses, including cancer-related viruses. Finally, the human virome in healthy and disease conditions has been described by NGS-based metagenomics.

  18. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  19. Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Han, X.; Zhou, Y.; Yue, P.; Wang, X.; Lu, J.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Tang, H.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Fan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service(DIMERS) project was kicked off in 2017 in China, with the purpose to improve timely responsive service of the institutions involved in the management of natural disasters and man-made emergency situations with the timely and high-quality products derived from Space-based, Air-based and the in-situ Earth observation. The project team brought together a group of top universities and research institutions in the field of Earth observations as well as the operational institute in typical disaster services at national level. The project will bridge the scientific research and the response services of massive catastrophe in order to improve the emergency response capability of China and provide scientific and technological support for the implementation of the national emergency response strategy. In response to the call for proposal of "Earth Observation and Navigation" of 2017 National Key R&D Program of China, Professor Wu Jianjun, the deputy chairman of Faculty of Geographical Science of Beijing Normal University, submitted the Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service (DIMERS) project, jointly with the experts and scholars from Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan University, China Institute of Earthquake Forecasting of China Earthquake Administration and China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Science. After two round evaluations, the proposal was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  20. Virologic outcome among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy at five hospitals in Haiti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frantz Jean Louis

    Full Text Available Viral load (VL assessment is the preferred method for diagnosing and confirming virologic failure for patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study to evaluate the virologic suppression rate among patients on ART for ≥6 months in five hospitals around Port-au-Prince, Haiti.Plasma VL was measured and patients with VL <1,000 copies/mL were defined as virologically suppressed. A second VL test was performed within at least six months of the first test. Factors associated with virologic suppression were analyzed using logistic regression models accounting for site-level clustering using complex survey procedures.Data were analyzed for 2,313 patients on ART for six months or longer between July 2013 and February 2015. Among them, 1,563 (67.6% achieved virologic suppression at the first VL test. A second VL test was performed within at least six months for 718 (31.0% of the patients. Of the 459 patients with an initial HIV-1 RNA <1,000 copies/mL who had a second VL performed, 394 (85.8% maintained virologic suppression. Virologic suppression was negatively associated with male gender (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.80, 95% CI: 0.74-0.0.86, 23 to 35 months on ART (aOR:0.72[0.54-0.96], baseline CD4 counts of 201-500 cells/mm3 and 200 cells/mm3 or lower (aORs: 0.77 [0.62-0.95] and 0.80 [0.66-0.98], respectively, poor adherence (aOR: 0.69 [0.59-0.81], and TB co-infection (aOR: 0.73 [0.55-0.97].This study showed that over two-thirds of the patients in this evaluation achieved virologic suppression after ≥ six months on ART and the majority of them remained suppressed. These results reinforce the importance of expanding access to HIV-1 viral load testing in Haiti for monitoring ART outcomes.

  1. Hot News: Impact of Low-level Viremia on Treatment Outcomes During ART - Is it Time to Revise the Definition of Virological Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poveda, Eva; Crespo, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    The level of HIV-RNA in plasma (HIV viral load) is the main marker used to monitor the virological response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients. The threshold used to define virological suppression has historically been dictated by the limits of detection of the commercial assays used to quantify the plasma viral load. Thus, as more sensitive assays have proliferated and become more widely available, the definition has shifted from ART is to maintain virological suppression below 200 cop/mL, or even > 1000 cop/mL according to the WHO guidelines for low-income and middle-income countries. Several studies have evaluated the impact of low-level viremia as intermittent episodes (blips) or persistent detectable low-level viremia (50-1000 cop/mL) on treatment outcomes during ART. Some of these studies have suggested a potential role for low-level viremia as a predictor of virological failure, although up to now the data have been insufficient and controversial to guide clinical management. Hermans et al. have recently published the results of a large (n = 70.930 HIV-infected patients) multicenter study (57 clinical sites in South Africa) with a median follow-up for more than 2 years, to evaluate the incidence and impact of low-level viremia (defined as HIV-RNA viral load of 51-999 cop/mL) and its association with virological failure (Hermans et al., Lancet Infect Dis 2018;18:188-97). This large cohort study concludes that overall, patients with low-level viremia are predisposed to subsequent virological failure. The risk of virological failure was 5 times higher for patients with low-level viremia ranging 400-999 cop/mL, and 2 times higher for those with viremia ranging 51-199 cop/mL, compared with patients maintaining viral load suppression (ART should be recognized and considered in clinical decision-making. Furthermore, current WHO guidelines for low-income and middleincome countries should be revised and updated. Although substantial differences

  2. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  4. Paediatric Virology in the Hippocratic Corpus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.

    2016-01-01

    Hippocrates (Island of Kos, 460 B.C.-Larissa, 370 B.C.) is the founder of the most famous Medical School of the classical antiquity. In acknowledgement of his pioneering contribution to the new scientific field of Paediatric Virology, this article provides a systematic analysis of the Hippocratic Corpus, with particular focus on viral infections predominating in neonates and children. A mumps epidemic, affecting the island of Thasos in the 5th century B.C., is described in detail. ‘Herpes’, a medical term derived from the ancient Greek word ‘ἕρπειν’, meaning ‘to creep’ or ‘crawl’, is used to describe the spreading of cutaneous lesions in both childhood and adulthood. Cases of children with exanthema ‘resembling mosquito bites’ are presented in reference to varicella or smallpox infection. A variety of upper and lower respiratory tract viral infections are described with impressive accuracy, including rhinitis, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, laryngitis, bronchiolitis and bronchitis. The ‘cough of Perinthos’ epidemic, an influenza-like outbreak in the 5th century B.C., is also recorded and several cases complicated with pneumonia or fatal outcomes are discussed. Hippocrates, moreover, describes conjunctivitis, otitis, lymphadenitis, meningoencephalitis, febrile convulsions, gastroenteritis, hepatitis, poliomyelitis and skin warts, along with proposed treatment directions. Almost 2,400 years later, Hippocrates' systematic approach and methodical innovations can inspire paediatric trainees and future Paediatric Virology subspecialists. PMID:27446241

  5. Virological Mechanisms in the Coinfection between HIV and HCV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carla Liberto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to shared transmission routes, coinfection with Hepatitis C Virus (HCV is common in patients infected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. The immune-pathogenesis of liver disease in HIV/HCV coinfected patients is a multifactorial process. Several studies demonstrated that HIV worsens the course of HCV infection, increasing the risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Also, HCV might increase immunological defects due to HIV and risk of comorbidities. A specific cross-talk among HIV and HCV proteins in coinfected patients modulates the natural history, the immune responses, and the life cycle of both viruses. These effects are mediated by immune mechanisms and by a cross-talk between the two viruses which could interfere with host defense mechanisms. In this review, we focus on some virological/immunological mechanisms of the pathogenetic interactions between HIV and HCV in the human host.

  6. 寨卡病毒病毒学特征及其引发异常免疫应答机制的研究进展%Virological characteristics of Zika virus and abnormal immune responses induced by Zika virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹璐; 王鑫; 张志刚; 赵勤俭

    2016-01-01

    Zika fever is a self-limiting and acute infectious disease caused by Zika virus infection. It is mainly transmitted through the bite of mosquitoes of the Aedes type. It can also be spread through verti-cal transmission. There is evidence that it can also be sexually transmitted from a man to his sex partners due to the presence of the virus in semen. The re-emergence of the virus in 2015 as a major endemic in the South American countries ( which may spread further) warrants better understanding of Zika virus. The outbreaks, transmission routes, virological characteristics and the diagnosis and treatment of Zika virus infection will be summarized in this review. Moreover, the potential correlations between newborn microcephaly and Zika vi-rus infection as well as the possible molecular mechanisms for causing microcephaly such as cell autophagy will also be discussed.%由寨卡病毒感染引起的寨卡病毒病是一种自限性急性传染病,主要通过伊蚊叮咬传播,也可以垂直传播,最近也有性传播的一些证据。随着寨卡病毒的暴发,对寨卡病毒的认识具有重要的意义。本文就寨卡病毒的传播与暴发史、病原学特征、诊断与治疗、寨卡病毒感染与新生儿小头症的潜在相关性、引发细胞自噬等异常免疫应答的研究进展进行了综述。

  7. Response Monitoring and Adjustment: Differential Relations with Psychopathic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Konrad; Finy, M. Sima; Sprague, Jenessa; Verona, Edelyn

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the relation between psychopathy and cognitive functioning often show mixed results, partially because different factors of psychopathy have not been considered fully. Based on previous research, we predicted divergent results based on a two-factor model of psychopathy (interpersonal-affective traits and impulsive-antisocial traits). Specifically, we predicted that the unique variance of interpersonal-affective traits would be related to increased monitoring (i.e., error-related negativity) and adjusting to errors (i.e., post-error slowing), whereas impulsive-antisocial traits would be related to reductions in these processes. Three studies using a diverse selection of assessment tools, samples, and methods are presented to identify response monitoring correlates of the two main factors of psychopathy. In Studies 1 (undergraduates), 2 (adolescents), and 3 (offenders), interpersonal-affective traits were related to increased adjustment following errors and, in Study 3, to enhanced monitoring of errors. Impulsive-antisocial traits were not consistently related to error adjustment across the studies, although these traits were related to a deficient monitoring of errors in Study 3. The results may help explain previous mixed findings and advance implications for etiological models of psychopathy. PMID:24933282

  8. Gallium 67 imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Front, D.; Lam, M.; Ben-Haim, S.; Kleinhaus, U.; Ben-Shachar, M.; Robinson, E.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of gallium 67 (Ga) imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment was assessed in 25 patients with Ga-avid tumors and compared to body computed tomography (CT), chest radiographs, and palpation of tumor infiltrated peripheral lymph nodes. Ga imaging was negative in 95% (20/21) of the patients who were clinically considered to be in remission and in whom treatment was stopped. The disease did not recur during a follow-up of 12 to 26 months in 15 patients. Six patients developed recurrence of the disease 3 to 12 months after treatment was stopped. In all six patients Ga imaging became positive again at the time of the appearance of active disease. In the group of patients in remission, CT was negative in 57% (11/19), chest x-rays in 55% (6/11) and peripheral lymph nodes were palpated in none of the patients (13/13). In four patients that did not achieve remission after treatment, Ga scans were positive. Ga imaging appears useful in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment. This is probably because Ga imaging monitors tumor cell viability, whereas body CT and chest radiographs show the tumor mass, which may consist of fibrotic or necrotic tissue

  9. Entomologic and virologic investigation of Chikungunya, Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Lee-Ching; Tan, Li-Kiang; Tan, Cheong-Huat; Tan, Sharon S Y; Hapuarachchi, Hapuarachchige C; Pok, Kwoon-Yong; Lai, Yee-Ling; Lam-Phua, Sai-Gek; Bucht, Göran; Lin, Raymond T P; Leo, Yee-Sin; Tan, Boon-Hian; Han, Hwi-Kwang; Ooi, Peng-Lim S; James, Lyn; Khoo, Seow-Poh

    2009-08-01

    Local transmission of chikungunya, a debilitating mosquito-borne viral disease, was first reported in Singapore in January 2008. After 3 months of absence, locally acquired Chikungunya cases resurfaced in May 2008, causing an outbreak that resulted in a total of 231 cases by September 2008. The circulating viruses were related to East, Central, and South African genotypes that emerged in the Indian Ocean region in 2005. The first local outbreak was due to a wild-type virus (alanine at codon 226 of the envelope 1 gene) and occurred in an area where Aedes aegypti mosquitoes were the primary vector. Strains isolated during subsequent outbreaks showed alanine to valine substitution (A226V) and largely spread in areas predominated by Ae. albopictus mosquitoes. These findings led to a revision of the current vector control strategy in Singapore. This report highlights the use of entomologic and virologic data to assist in the control of chikungunya in disease-endemic areas.

  10. Considerations in choosing a primary endpoint that measures durability of virological suppression in an antiretroviral trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, P B; Ribaudo, H J; Greenberg, L; Yu, G; Bosch, R J; Tierney, C; Kuritzkes, D R

    2000-09-08

    At present, many clinical trials of anti-HIV-1 therapies compare treatments by a primary endpoint that measures the durability of suppression of HIV-1 replication. Several durability endpoints are compared. Endpoints are compared by their implicit assumptions regarding surrogacy for clinical outcomes, sample size requirements, and accommodations for inter-patient differences in baseline plasma HIV-1-RNA levels and in initial treatment response. Virological failure is defined by the non-suppression of virus levels at a prespecified follow-up time T(early virological failure), or by relapse. A binary virological failure endpoint is compared with three time-to-virological failure endpoints: time from (i) randomization that assigns early failures a failure time of T weeks; (ii) randomization that extends the early failure time T for slowly responding subjects; and (iii) virological response that assigns non-responders a failure time of 0 weeks. Endpoint differences are illustrated with Agouron's trial 511. In comparing high with low-dose nelfinavir (NFV) regimens in Agouron 511, the difference in Kaplan-Meier estimates of the proportion not failing by 24 weeks is 16.7% (P = 0.048), 6.5% (P = 0.29) and 22.9% (P = 0.0030) for endpoints (i), (ii) and (iii), respectively. The results differ because NFV suppresses virus more quickly at the higher dose, and the endpoints weigh this treatment difference differently. This illustrates that careful consideration needs to be given to choosing a primary endpoint that will detect treatment differences of interest. A time from randomization endpoint is usually recommended because of its advantages in flexibility and sample size, especially at interim analyses, and for its interpretation for patient management.

  11. A search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, K.

    1990-01-01

    The search for an impulsive increase corresponding to a solar neutron response on high-mountain neutron monitors requires control of the stability of the measurement and elimination of other sources of short-time increases of different kinds which are involved in fluctuations of cosmic-ray intensity. For the solar flare of June 3, 1982 the excess of counting rate on the Lomnicky stit neutron monitor is, within a factor or 1.8, equal to that expected from solar neutrons. Superposed epoch analysis of 17 flares with gamma-ray or hard X-ray production gives a slight tendency of an occurring signal in cases of high heliocentric angles, indicating anisotropic production of neutrons on the sun. The low statistical significance of the result indicates that higher temporal resolution, better evaluation of multiplicity, better knowledge of the power spectra of short-term intensity fluctuations on neutron monitors, as well as coordinated measurements of solar gamma-rays and neutrons on satellites, are required. 21 refs

  12. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  13. Nonlinearities in the response of beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Dehning, B.; Matheson, J.; Prochnow, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the LEP e + /e - collider at CERN, Geneva, a Spectrometer is used to determine the beam energy with a relative accuracy of 10 -4 .The Spectrometer measures the change in bending angle in a dipole magnet, the beam trajectory being obtained using beam position monitors (BPMs), which must have an accuracy close to 1 μm in order to achieve the desired precision. The BPMs used feature an aluminum block with an elliptical aperture and capacitive pickup electrodes. The response depends on the electrode geometry and also on the shape of the monitor aperture. In addition, the size of the beam itself contributes if the beam is off-center. The beam size varies according to the beta and dispersion functions at the Spectrometer, so that each BPM may exhibit a systematic shift of the measured beam position. We have investigated the implications of such shifts on the performance of the Spectrometer. We present analytical results, a computer model of the BPM response, and comparison with measurements. The model suggests strategies such as beam-based alignment to minimize the systematic effects arising from the BPMs

  14. Virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshleman, Susan H; Wilson, Ethan A; Zhang, Xinyi C; Ou, San-San; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; Eron, Joseph J; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Gallant, Joel E; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Hakim, James G; Kalonga, Ben; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Godbole, Sheela V; Chotirosniramit, Nuntisa; Santos, Breno Riegel; Shava, Emily; Mills, Lisa A; Panchia, Ravindre; Mwelase, Noluthando; Mayer, Kenneth H; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Fogel, Jessica M

    2017-05-01

    The HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) 052 trial demonstrated that early antiretroviral therapy (ART) prevented 93% of HIV transmission events in serodiscordant couples. Some linked infections were observed shortly after ART initiation or after virologic failure. To evaluate factors associated with time to viral suppression and virologic failure in participants who initiated ART in HPTN 052. 1566 participants who had a viral load (VL) > 400 copies/mL at enrollment were included in the analyses. This included 832 in the early ART arm (CD4 350-550 cells/mm 3 at ART initiation) and 734 in the delayed ART arm (204 with a CD4  1000 copies/mL > 24 weeks after ART initiation. Overall, 93% of participants achieved viral suppression by 12 months. The annual incidence of virologic failure was 3.6%. Virologic outcomes were similar in the two study arms. Longer time to viral suppression was associated with younger age, higher VL at ART initiation, and region (Africa vs. Asia). Virologic failure was strongly associated with younger age, lower educational level, and lack of suppression by three months; lower VL and higher CD4 at ART initiation were also associated with virologic failure. Several clinical and demographic factors were identified that were associated with longer time to viral suppression and virologic failure. Recognition of these factors may help optimize ART for HIV treatment and prevention.

  15. Composition and fundamental requirements of nuclear emergency response monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Huang Weiqi; Wang Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is concrete foundation for accomplishing radiation monitoring in nuclear or radiation accidents. Based on technical report: Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency published by IAEA in 1999, this paper presents the main task and composition of nuclear emergency monitoring briefly, and then the basic equipment and trends of nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is put forward in detail, which is useful to construction and reinforcement of our nuclear emergency monitoring. (authors)

  16. Instrument Response Modeling and Simulation for the GLAST Burst Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, R. M.; Hoover, A. S.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; Kienlin, A. von; Steinle, H.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts and other fast transient sources in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV. The GBM is composed of several unshielded and uncollimated scintillation detectors (twelve NaI and two BGO) that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. As a result, reconstructing source locations, energy spectra, and temporal properties from GBM data requires detailed knowledge of the detectors' response to both direct radiation as well as that scattered from the spacecraft and Earth's atmosphere. This full GBM instrument response will be captured in the form of a response function database that is derived from computer modeling and simulation. The simulation system is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolset, and is being extensively validated against calibrated experimental GBM data. We discuss the architecture of the GBM simulation and modeling system and describe how its products will be used for analysis of observed GBM data. Companion papers describe the status of validating the system

  17. Keeping kids in care: virological failure in a paediatric antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A retrospective file audit determined the cumulative virological failure rate, that is, the sum of all ... Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 12 staff members and a random sample of 21 caregivers and 4 children attending care.

  18. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of direct-acting antiviral (DAA)-based hepatitis C virus (HCV) therapy from the National German HCV registry: does HIV coinfection impair the response to DAA combination therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J; Mauss, S; Cordes, C; Lutz, T; Scholten, S; Moll, A; Jäger, H; Cornberg, M; Manns, M P; Baumgarten, A; Rockstroh, J K

    2018-04-01

    The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) treatment recommendations for hepatitis C no longer discriminate between HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected and HCV-monoinfected patients. However, recent data from Spain are questioning these recommendations on the basis of the findings of higher relapse rates and lower cure rates in HIV/HCV-infected subjects. The aim of our study was to compare HCV cure rates in monoinfected and coinfected patients from Germany. Data acquired from the Deutsches Hepatitis C-Registry were analysed. A total of 5657 HCV-monoinfected subjects and 488 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were included in the study. Rates of sustained virological response 12 weeks after the scheduled end of therapy (SVR12) were collected in both subgroups and in cirrhotic and noncirrhotic patients. HIV/HCV-coinfected patients were more frequently male (84.6% vs. 56.4%, respectively; P  350 cells/μL in 63.1% of HIV-positive subjects and 88.7% were on antiretroviral therapy. SVR12 rates were 90.3% (5111 of 5657) in our HCV-monoinfected cohort and 91.2% (445 of 488) in our coinfected patients. Liver cirrhosis was confirmed in 1667 of 5657 (29.5%) monoinfected patients and 84 of 488 (17.2%; P < 0.001) coinfected patients. SVR12 rates did not differ between HCV-monoinfected and HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with liver cirrhosis (87.8% vs. 89.3%, respectively; P = 0.864). A treatment duration of 8 weeks did not reduce the percentage of patients with SVR12 in either subgroup (93.7% in both groups). We found high SVR12 rates in monoinfected as well as coinfected individuals. No differences were detected between the two subgroups regardless of whether there was accompanying liver cirrhosis or a shortened treatment duration. © 2018 British HIV Association.

  19. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer in Monitoring Glioblastoma (GBM) Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun; Stanisz, Greg J

    2018-02-06

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) was used as a biomarker to monitor glioblastoma (GBM) response to chemo-radiation and identify the earliest time-point qMT could differentiate progressors from non-progressors. Nineteen GBM patients were recruited and MRI-scanned before (Day 0 ), two weeks (Day 14 ), and four weeks (Day 28 ) into the treatment, and one month after the end of the treatment (Day 70 ). Comprehensive qMT data was acquired, and a two-pool MT model was fit to the data. Response was determined at 3-8 months following the end of chemo-radiation. The amount of magnetization transfer ([Formula: see text]) was significantly lower in GBM compared to normal appearing white matter (p GBM are more sensitive to treatment effects compared to clinically used metrics. qMT could assess tumor aggressiveness and identify early progressors even before the treatment. Changes in qMT parameters within the first 14 days of the treatment were capable of separating early progressors from non-progressors, making qMT a promising biomarker to guide adaptive radiotherapy for GBM.

  20. Assays for predicting and monitoring responses to lung cancer immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has become a key strategy for cancer treatment, and two immune checkpoints, namely, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), have recently emerged as important targets. The interaction blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 demonstrated promising activity and antitumor efficacy in early phase clinical trials for advanced solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many cell types in multiple tissues express PD-L1 as well as several tumor types, thereby suggesting that the ligand may play important roles in inhibiting immune responses throughout the body. Therefore, PD-L1 is a critical immunomodulating component within the lung microenvironment, but the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis is controversial. More evidence is required to support the use of PD-L1 as a potential predictive biomarker. Clinical trials have measured PD-L1 in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with different antibodies, but the assessment of PD-L1 is not yet standardized. Some commercial antibodies lack specificity and their reproducibility has not been fully evaluated. Further studies are required to clarify the optimal IHC assay as well as to predict and monitor the immune responses of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway

  1. Paediatric Virology as a new educational initiative: An interview with Nobelist Professor of Virology Harald zur Hausen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Born in Gelsenkirchen-Buer in Germany on March 11th, 1936, Professor Harald zur Hausen, Emeritus Professor of Virology at the University of Freiburg and 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV), which causes cervical cancer, believes that good knowledge of virological methods and diagnostic possibilities are an asset for all young paediatricians. Professor zur Hausen considers that the creation of an educational platform on Paediatric Virology is definitely very beneficial for young paediatricians, as this will greatly enhance their knowledge in the field of Virology. He very actively advocates the vaccination of boys for the eradication of HPV infection and emphasises that male HPV vaccination should be included into the current vaccination programmes. He would have certainly considered Dr George N. Papanicolaou (Kyme, Island of Euboea, Greece, 1883 - Miami, Florida, USA, 1962) as an excellent candidate for the Nobel Prize, stating that the contribution of Dr Papanicolaou did not find sufficient recognition in the past. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor zur Hausen will give his plenary lecture on 'Paediatric Virology and Oncology: Virus persistence and the important first years of life'.

  2. Pretreatment HIV drug resistance results in virological failure and accumulation of additional resistance mutations in Ugandan children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kityo, Cissy; Boerma, Ragna S.; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Kaudha, Elizabeth; Calis, Job C. J.; Musiime, Victor; Balinda, Sheila; Nakanjako, Rita; Boender, T. Sonia; Mugyenyi, Peter N.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pretreatment HIV drug resistance (PDR) can impair virological response to ART, jeopardizing effective treatment for children. Methods: Children aged <12 years initiated first-line ART in Uganda during 2010-11. Baseline and 6 monthly viral load (VL) and genotypic resistance testing if VL.

  3. Biophysical Monitoring and dose response characteristics of irradiated hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshemey, W.M; Selim, N.S.; Desouky, O.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims to move a step forward towards a deeper understanding of the scattering of x-ray, from lyophilized biological samples. Comparative study has been performed using LAXS and UV-visible spectrophotometry for monitoring the dose response characteristics of the hemoglobin molecule of irradiated blood. Blood samples were irradiated at doses ranging from 5 up to 100 Gy. Diluted hemoglobin solution was scanned in the UV- visible range (200-700 nm), and lyophilized hemoglobin was prepared for LAXS measurement. The radiation-induced changes in the hemoglobin structure have been evaluated. The LAXS profile of hemoglobin molecule is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks were found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The obtained results suggest that the 1 s t peak, recorded at 4.65 o , is sensitive to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the globin part, while the major peak, recorded at 10.5 o , appeared to be related to its primary and secondary structure

  4. Monitoring of wind load and response for cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai-yuen; Chan, Wai-Yee K.; Man, King-Leung

    2001-08-01

    Structural health monitoring for the three cable-supported bridges located in the West of Hong Kong or the Tsing Ma Control Area has been carried out since the opening of these bridges to public traffic. The three cable-supported bridges are referred to as the Tsing Ma (suspension) Bridge, the Kap Shui Mun (cable-stayed) Bridge and the Ting Kau (cable-stayed) Bridge. The structural health monitoring works involved are classified as six monitoring categories, namely, wind load and response, temperature load and response, traffic load and response, geometrical configuration monitoring, strains and stresses/forces monitoring and global dynamic characteristics monitoring. As wind loads and responses had been a major concern in the design and construction stages, this paper therefore outlines the work of wind load and response monitoring on Tsing Ma, Kap Shui Mun and Ting Kau Bridges. The paper starts with a brief description of the sensory systems. The description includes the layout and performance requirements of sensory systems for wind load and responses monitoring. Typical results of wind load and response monitoring in graphical forms are then presented. These graphical forms include the plots of wind rose diagrams, wind incidences vs wind speeds, wind turbulence intensities, wind power spectra, gust wind factors, coefficient of terrain roughness, extreme wind analyses, deck deflections/rotations vs wind speeds, acceleration spectra, acceleration/displacement contours, and stress demand ratios. Finally conclusions on wind load and response monitoring on the three cable-supported bridges are drawn.

  5. Determinants of virological failure among patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy in University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayu, Belete; Tariku, Amare; Bulti, Abera Balcha; Habitu, Yohannes Ayanaw; Derso, Terefe; Teshome, Destaw Fetene

    2017-01-01

    Viral load monitoring is used as an important biomarker for diagnosing treatment failure in patients with HIV infection/AIDS. Ethiopia has started targeted viral load monitoring. However, factors leading to virological failure are not well understood and studied. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the determinants of virological failure among HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy at the University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia. A case-control study was conducted from May to June 2015. Cases were subjects who had already experienced virological failure; controls were those without virological failure. Data were extracted from 153 cases and 153 controls through chart review. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out to identify factors associated with virological failure, and variables with a p -value failure was observed among patients aged failure. Therefore, evidence-based intervention should be implemented to improve adherence to ART, which in turn helps to boost immunity (CD4) and suppresses viral replication and load. Moreover, attention should be given to younger patients who have had ART for longer periods.

  6. Timing of pregnancy, postpartum risk of virologic failure and loss to follow-up among HIV-positive women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoya, Dorina; Sineke, Tembeka; Brennan, Alana T; Long, Lawrence; Fox, Matthew P

    2017-07-17

    We assessed the association between the timing of pregnancy with the risk of postpartum virologic failure and loss from HIV care in South Africa. This is a retrospective cohort study of 6306 HIV-positive women aged 15-49 at antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, initiated on ART between January 2004 and December 2013 in Johannesburg, South Africa. The incidence of virologic failure (two consecutive viral load measurements of >1000 copies/ml) and loss to follow-up (>3 months late for a visit) during 24 months postpartum were assessed using Cox proportional hazards modelling. The rate of postpartum virologic failure was higher following an incident pregnancy on ART [adjusted hazard ratio 1.8, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.1-2.7] than among women who initiated ART during pregnancy. This difference was sustained among women with CD4 cell count less than 350 cells/μl at delivery (adjusted hazard ratio 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1-3.0). Predictors of postpartum virologic failure were being viremic, longer time on ART, being 25 or less years old and low CD4 cell count and anaemia at delivery, as well as initiating ART on stavudine-containing or abacavir-containing regimen. There was no difference postpartum loss to follow-up rates between the incident pregnancies group (hazard ratio 0.9, 95% CI: 0.7-1.1) and those who initiated ART in pregnancy. The risk of virologic failure remains high among postpartum women, particularly those who conceive on ART. The results highlight the need to provide adequate support for HIV-positive women with fertility intention after ART initiation and to strengthen monitoring and retention efforts for postpartum women to sustain the benefits of ART.

  7. The national response plan and radioactive incident monitoring network (RIMNET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of the Environment is responsible through Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution for co-ordination of the Government's response to overseas nuclear incidents. This paper describes the contingency arrangements that have been set up for this purpose. (author)

  8. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Chen, Gang S; Hulsey, J Leroy

    2017-10-20

    In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  9. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  10. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    or location has been irradiated to high doses. Among labels available worldwide, a few are suitable for indicating absorbed dose regions of slightly less than 104 Gy (monitoring high dose ranges (i.e., sterilization dose levels of > 104 Gy or > 1 Mrad), and in some cases......, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...... permit somewhat more precise discrimination of dose levels, and may sometimes be useful for monitoring differences in local dose distributions or area monitoring of radiation damage probabilities around particle accelerators or large radionuclide sources....

  11. Serological and Virological Study of Newcastle Disease and Avian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serological survey on the prevalence of Newcastle disease (NCD) virus antibodies using haemagglutination inhibition test (HI) and virological detection by RT-PCR of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, were carried out in 6 regions of Senegal from June to November 2008. Rural chickens were raised in free ...

  12. A Biosafety Level 2 Virology Lab for Biotechnology Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza-Porges, Sigal; Nathan, Dafna

    2017-01-01

    Medical, industrial, and basic research relies heavily on the use of viruses and vectors. Therefore, it is important that bioscience undergraduates learn the practicalities of handling viruses. Teaching practical virology in a student laboratory setup presents safety challenges, however. The aim of this article is to describe the design and…

  13. Virologic responses and tolerance of peginterferon alfa plus ribavirin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The efficacy and safety outcomes were compared between groups. ... heavy social and economic burden worldwide over the past ... others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the ... [7] A survey in the United States has revealed an .... reduction or complete absence of HCV RNA at week 12.

  14. Phonetic Accounts of Timed Responses in Syllable Monitoring Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, A.C.M.; Schiller, N.O.; Caspers, J.; Chen, Y.; Heeren, W.; Pacilly, J.; Schiller, N.O.; Zanten, E. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a syllable monitoring experiment that examines the role of segmental phonetic information in Dutch. Participants were presented with lists of spoken words and were required to detect auditorily specified targets that matched or did not match the initial syllable of the spoken

  15. Superior virologic and treatment outcomes when viral load is measured at 3 months compared to 6 months on antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschberger, Bernhard; Boulle, Andrew M; Kranzer, Katharina; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Schomaker, Michael; Coetzee, David; Goemaere, Eric; Van Cutsem, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Routine viral load (VL) monitoring is utilized to assess antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virologic failure, and it is currently scaled-up in many resource-constrained settings. The first routine VL is recommended as late as six months after ART initiation for early detection of sub-optimal adherence. We aimed to assess the optimal timing of first VL measurement after initiation of ART. This was a retrospective, cohort analysis of routine monitoring data of adults enrolled at three primary care clinics in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, between January 2002 and March 2009. Primary outcomes were virologic failure and switch to second-line ART comparing patients in whom first VL done was at three months (VL3M) and six months (VL6M) after ART initiation. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard models. In total, 6264 patients were included for the time to virologic failure and 6269 for the time to switch to second-line ART analysis. Patients in the VL3M group had a 22% risk reduction of virologic failure (aHR 0.78, 95% CI 0.64-0.95; p=0.016) and a 27% risk reduction of switch to second-line ART (aHR 0.73, 95% CI 0.58-0.92; p=0.008) when compared to patients in the VL6M group. For each additional month of delay of the first VL measurement (up to nine months), the risk of virologic failure increased by 9% (aHR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.15; p=0.008) and switch to second-line ART by 13% (aHR 1.13, 95% CI 1.05-1.21; p<0.001). A first VL at three months rather than six months with targeted adherence interventions for patients with high VL may improve long-term virologic suppression and reduce switches to costly second-line ART. ART programmes should consider the first VL measurement at three months after ART initiation.

  16. The innovation of the subspecialty of Paediatric Virology: An interview with Research Professor of Molecular Virology Anna Kramvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Professor Anna Kramvis, Research Professor of Molecular Virology at the University of the Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, talks about direct-acting antiviral treatments against hepatitis C virus (HCV), as well as the perspective of the development of an effective vaccine against HCV. She emphasises the necessity of vaccination against hepatitis B virus (HBV), highlighting that it is very important that vaccination should be administered at birth in order to prevent mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HBV. Professor Kramvis states that vaccination against HBV is safe and that HBV and HCV infections are not contraindications for breastfeeding. Regarding the challenge of Paediatric Virology, she believes that it is a field that during the last years is increasing exponentially, while she concurs that Paediatric Virology subspecialty will be a popular choice for infectious diseases subspecialists. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens on October 7th, 2017, Professor Kramvis will give her key lecture on MTCT of HBV and HCV.

  17. Virology: The Next Generation from Digital PCR to Single Virion Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Richard A.; Brazelton De Cardenas, Jessica N.; Hayden, Randall T.

    2015-10-01

    In the past 25 years, virology has had major technology breakthroughs stemming first from the introduction of nucleic acid amplification testing, but more recently from the use of next-generation sequencing, digital PCR, and the possibility of single virion genomics. These technologies have and will improve diagnosis and disease state monitoring in clinical settings, aid in environmental monitoring, and reveal the vast genetic potential of viruses. Using the principle of limiting dilution, digital PCR amplifies single molecules of DNA in highly partitioned endpoint reactions and reads each of those reactions as either positive or negative based on the presence or absence of target fluorophore. In this review, digital PCR will be highlighted along with current studies, advantages/disadvantages, and future perspectives with regard to digital PCR, viral load testing, and the possibility of single virion genomics.

  18. PROFILE: Integrating Stressor and Response Monitoring into a Resource-Based Water-Quality Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROUX; KEMPSTER; KLEYNHANS; VAN; DU

    1999-01-01

    / South African water law as well as the country's water resource management policies are currently under review. The Water Law Principles, which were established as part of this review process, indicate a commitment to sustainable development of water resources and the protection of an ecological "reserve." Such policy goals highlight the limitations of traditional and current water-quality management strategies, which rely on stressor monitoring and associated regulation of pollution. The concept of an assimilative capacity is central to the implementation of the current water-quality management approach. Weaknesses inherent in basing water management on the concept of assimilative capacity are discussed. Response monitoring is proposed as a way of addressing some of the weaknesses. Following a global trend, the new policy goals emphasize the need to protect rather than to use the ability of ecosystems to recover from disturbances. This necessitates the adoption of response measurements to quantify ecological condition and monitor ecological change. Response monitoring focuses on properties that are essential to the sustainability of the ecosystem. These monitoring tools can be used to establish natural ranges of ecological change within ecosystems, as well as to quantify conceptually acceptable and unacceptable ranges of change. Through a framework of biological criteria and biological impairment standards, the results of response monitoring can become an integral part of future water resource management strategies in South Africa. KEY WORDS: Stressor monitoring; Response monitoring; Assimilative capacity; Ecosystem stability; Resilience; Biocriteria

  19. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  20. 24 CFR 108.20 - Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... documenting the implementation of the AFHM plan, including sales or rental reports, as required by the.... When sales or rental reports show that 20% of the units covered by the AFHM plan have been sold or... for monitoring plans and reports. 108.20 Section 108.20 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  1. Allocation of responsibilities for monitoring and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic disposal is considered by many to offer a way to achieve the long term isolation required for radioactive wastes. The extremely long timescales, however, have drawn attention to the need for society to plan far ahead into the future. Perhaps for the first time, much thought and debate is being explicitly devoted to the burdens and the benefits which a technology will bring to many generations in the future. The questions to be answered concern not only what the benefits and burdens are, but also who bears the responsibility for defining courses of action affecting future generations and for implementing any measures required to protect society beyond the lifetimes of those initiating activities with far future impacts. In the present paper, the intention is to review the actions which may have to be taken during and after the operation of a disposal facility, to consider who shares responsibility for such actions and to look rationally at how responsibilities can best be allocated to ensure that they will be fulfilled in a way which protects future generations from harm, be it physical or financial. The paper defines the phases in the lifetime of a geologic repository, and postulates that responsibilities are to be shared between governments, regulators, repository implementers, waste producers and potentially also supra-national bodies. The specific responsibilities ranging from conceptual planning through to financial provisions for actions are then listed. The allocation of these responsibilities is then discussed. The broad conclusions are that waste producers are responsible for all financing and for most of the specific actions to be taken. In very far future times, however, responsibility for a closed and sealed national repository must revert to the government of a State. (author)

  2. Are three generations of quantitative molecular methods sufficient in medical virology? Brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Massimo; Bagnarelli, Patrizia

    2015-10-01

    In the last two decades, development of quantitative molecular methods has characterized the evolution of clinical virology more than any other methodological advancement. Using these methods, a great deal of studies has addressed efficiently in vivo the role of viral load, viral replication activity, and viral transcriptional profiles as correlates of disease outcome and progression, and has highlighted the physio-pathology of important virus diseases of humans. Furthermore, these studies have contributed to a better understanding of virus-host interactions and have sharply revolutionized the research strategies in basic and medical virology. In addition and importantly from a medical point of view, quantitative methods have provided a rationale for the therapeutic intervention and therapy monitoring in medically important viral diseases. Despite the advances in technology and the development of three generations of molecular methods within the last two decades (competitive PCR, real-time PCR, and digital PCR), great challenges still remain for viral testing related not only to standardization, accuracy, and precision, but also to selection of the best molecular targets for clinical use and to the identification of thresholds for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions. Future research directions, novel methods and technical improvements could be important to address these challenges.

  3. Hepatitis C Virus: Virology and Genotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed

    2017-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major causative agent of chronic liver disease worldwide. HCV is characterized by genetic heterogeneity, with at least six genotypes identified. The geographic distribution of genotypes has shown variations in different parts of the world over the past decade because of variations in population structure, immigration, and routes of transmission. Genotype differences are of epidemiologic interest and help the study of viral transmission dynamics to trace the source of HCV infection in a given population. HCV genotypes are also of considerable clinical importance because they affect response to antiviral therapy and represent a challenging obstacle for vaccine development.

  4. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  5. Monitoring water supply systems for anomaly detection and response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Lapikas, T.; Tangena, B.H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Water supply systems are vulnerable to damage caused by unintended or intended human actions, or due to aging of the system. In order to minimize the damages and the inconvenience for the customers, a software tool was developed to detect anomalies at an early stage, and to support the responsible

  6. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    biochemical methods, detecting one or more proteins exclusively involved in the specific stress response pathways. The results indicate that the ageing phenotype is a result of an ineffective probability for cells to respond to stress. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2013.08.023...

  7. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  8. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hadidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus; beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus; and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus. The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.Keywords: Next-generation sequencing, NGS, plant virology, plant viruses, viroids, resistance to plant viruses by CRISPR-Cas9

  9. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  10. Noninvasive optical monitoring multiple physiological parameters response to cytokine storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Cancer and other disease originated by immune or genetic problems have become a main cause of death. Gene/cell therapy is a highlighted potential method for the treatment of these diseases. However, during the treatment, it always causes cytokine storm, which probably trigger acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Here we developed a point-of-care device for noninvasive monitoring cytokine storm induced multiple physiological parameters simultaneously. Oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water concentration and deep-tissue/tumor temperature variations were simultaneously measured by extended near infrared spectroscopy. Detection algorithms of symptoms such as shock, edema, deep-tissue fever and tissue fibrosis were developed and included. Based on these measurements, modeling of patient tolerance and cytokine storm intensity were carried out. This custom device was tested on patients experiencing cytokine storm in intensive care unit. The preliminary data indicated the potential of our device in popular and milestone gene/cell therapy, especially, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell immunotherapy (CAR-T).

  11. Low Virologic Failure and Drug Resistance among HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Hospital-Based ART While Care and Outreach through Community in Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shujia; Shen, Zhiyong; Yan, Jing; Liang, Fuxiong; Tang, Zhenzhu; Liu, Wei; Kan, Wei; Liao, Lingjie; Leng, Xuebing; Ruan, Yuhua; Xing, Hui; Shao, Yiming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) virologic suppression and drug resistance among HIV-infected patients receiving first-line antiretroviral treatment (ART) in hospitals while community care and outreach through local health workers in Guangxi, China. This was a series of cross-sectional surveys from 2004 to 2012 in Guangxi, supported by the Chinese National HIVDR Surveillance and Monitoring Network Working Group. Guangxi, China. Demographic, ART, and laboratory data (CD4(+) cell count, viral load, and drug resistance) were analyzed. Factors associated with virologic suppression were identified by logistic regression analysis. A total of 780 patients were included in this study. The median treatment duration was 20.6 months (IQR 6.6-35.9). Of 780 study participants, 95.4% of patients (744/780) had HIV virologic suppression. Among these, of the 143 patients who were infected through drug injection, only 10 (7.0%) experienced virologic failure, and the overall prevalence of HIV drug resistance was 2.8% (22/789). Factors associated with virologic suppression in the final multivariate models included self-reported missing doses in the past month (compared to not missing doses in the past month, AOR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1-0.6) and initial ART regimen without 3TC (compared to initial ART regimen with 3TC, AOR = 0.2, 95% CI: 0.1-0.4). Moreover, the trend chi-square test showed that the proportion of virologic suppression increased over time from 2004 to 2012 (P = 0.002). This study first demonstrated that HIV patients infected through various transmission routes can achieve an excellent treatment outcome in hospitals at or above the county level for free first-line ART in Guangxi. It is an important of ART education and adherence to intervention for achieving better treatment outcomes.

  12. Factors Influencing Antiretroviral Adherence and Virological Outcomes in People Living with HIV in the Highlands of Papua New Guinea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Gare

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART is paramount for virological suppression and positive treatment outcomes. ART has been rapidly scaled up in Papua New Guinea (PNG in recent years, however clinical monitoring of HIV+ individuals on ART is limited. A cross-sectional study was conducted at two major sexual health clinics in high HIV prevalence provinces in the Highlands Region of PNG to assess ART adherence, factors affecting adherence and the relationship between ART adherence and virological outcomes. Ninety-five HIV+ individuals were recruited and administered a questionnaire to gather demographic and ART adherence information whilst clinical data and pill counts were extracted from patient charts and blood was collected for viral load testing. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify independent predictors of ART adherence. Fourteen percent (n = 12 of participants showed evidence of virological failure. Although the majority of participants self-reported excellent ART adherence in the last seven days (78.9%, 75/91, pill count measurements indicated only 40% (34/84 with >95% adherence in the last month. Taking other medications while on ART (p = 0.01 and taking ART for ≥1 year (p = 0.037 were positively associated with adherence by self-report and pill count, respectively. Participants who had never heard of drug resistance were more likely to show virological failure (p = 0.033. Misconception on routes of HIV transmission still persists in the studied population. These findings indicate that non-adherence to ART is high in this region of PNG and continued education and strategies to improve adherence are required to ensure the efficacy of ART and prevent HIV drug resistance.

  13. The Role of Civil Society Organizations in Monitoring the Global AIDS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia; Mallouris, Christoforos; Lee, Kelley; Alfvén, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    Civil society organizations (CSOs) are recognized as playing an exceptional role in the global AIDS response. However, there is little detailed research to date on how they contribute to specific governance functions. This article uses Haas' framework on global governance functions to map CSO's participation in the monitoring of global commitments to the AIDS response by institutions and states. Drawing on key informant interviews and primary documents, it focuses specifically on CSO participation in Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting and in Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria processes. It argues that the AIDS response is unique within global health governance, in that CSOs fulfill both formal and informal monitoring functions, and considers the strengths and weaknesses of these contributions. It concludes that future global health governance arrangements should include provisions and resources for monitoring by CSOs because their participation creates more inclusive global health governance and contributes to strengthening commitments to human rights.

  14. N Springs expedited response action performance monitoring plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Groundwater contained in the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit is contaminated with various radionuclides derived from waste water disposal practices and spills associated with 100-N Reactor operations. Of primary concern is the presence of high levels of 90 Sr in the groundwater and the discharge of 90 Sr-contaminated groundwater to the nearby Columbia River through historic river bank seeps known as ''N Springs.'' A pump-and-treat system is being installed to remove 90 Sr contamination from the groundwater as part of the N Springs expedited response action (ERA). The groundwater extraction system will consist of four extraction and two injection wells with a proposed initial treatment capacity of 50 gal/min. The proposed location of the groundwater extraction system relative to the 90 Sr groundwater plume is presented

  15. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  16. Long-term effectiveness of unboosted atazanavir plus abacavir/lamivudine in subjects with virological suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llibre, Josep M; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Pedersen, Court

    2016-01-01

    Effectiveness data of an unboosted atazanavir (ATV) with abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) switch strategy in clinical routine are scant.We evaluated treatment outcomes of ATV + ABC/3TC in pretreated subjects in the EuroSIDA cohort when started with undetectable plasma HIV-1 viral load (p......VL), performing a time to loss of virological response (TLOVR analysis at 48, 96, and 144 weeks. Virological failure (VF) was defined as confirmed pVL >50 copies/mL.We included 285 subjects, 67% male, with median baseline CD4 530 cells, and 44 months with pVL ≤50 copies/mL. The third......%/67%/59% (snapshot analysis), respectively. The rates of VF were 8%/8%/6%. Rates of adverse events leading to study discontinuation were 0.4%/1%/2%. The multivariable adjusted analysis showed an association between VF and nadir CD4+ (hazard ratio [HR] 0.63 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.42-0.93] per 100 cells...

  17. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: assessing risk, monitoring response, and optimizing outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Naranie; Hiwase, Devendra Keshaorao; Ross, David Morrall

    2017-12-01

    Over the past two decades, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have become the foundation of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment. The choice between imatinib and newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) needs to be balanced against the known toxicity and efficacy data for each drug, the therapeutic goal being to maximize molecular response assessed by BCR-ABL RQ-PCR assay. There is accumulating evidence that the early achievement of molecular targets is a strong predictor of superior long-term outcomes. Early response assessment provides the opportunity to intervene early with the aim of ensuring an optimal response. Failure to achieve milestones or loss of response can have diverse causes. We describe how clinical and laboratory monitoring can be used to ensure that each patient is achieving an optimal response and, in patients who do not reach optimal response milestones, how the monitoring results can be used to detect resistance and understand its origins.

  18. Twitter Seismology: Earthquake Monitoring and Response in a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Smoczyk, G.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The potential uses of Twitter for earthquake response include broadcasting earthquake alerts, rapidly detecting widely felt events, qualitatively assessing earthquake damage effects, communicating with the public, and participating in post-event collaboration. Several seismic networks and agencies are currently distributing Twitter earthquake alerts including the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (@LastQuake), Natural Resources Canada (@CANADAquakes), and the Indonesian meteorological agency (@infogempabmg); the USGS will soon distribute alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts. Beyond broadcasting alerts, the USGS is investigating how to use tweets that originate near the epicenter to detect and characterize shaking events. This is possible because people begin tweeting immediately after feeling an earthquake, and their short narratives and exclamations are available for analysis within 10's of seconds of the origin time. Using five months of tweets that contain the word "earthquake" and its equivalent in other languages, we generate a tweet-frequency time series. The time series clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a simple Short-Term-Average / Long-Term-Average algorithm similar to that commonly used to detect seismic phases. As with most auto-detection algorithms, the parameters can be tuned to catch more or less events at the cost of more or less false triggers. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector found 48 globally-distributed, confirmed seismic events with only 2 false triggers. A space-shuttle landing and "The Great California ShakeOut" caused the false triggers. This number of

  19. Integration of radiation monitoring for nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, J T; Thompson, N Y [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The Canadian Forces have established Nuclear Emergency Response Teams to cope with potential radiation accidents. Previously, only gamma and high-energy beta radiation could be detected. Recently, new radiation sampling, detecting, and analytical equipment has been bought, including air samplers, beta counters, high-purity germanium gamma detectors, and multi-channel analyzers together with Gamma Vision Software to analyze gamma spectra. The purpose of the present study is to propose a way to use the new equipment, to analyze the results from the gamma and beta detectors, and to integrate the results into a format for decision making. Integration is achieved through the creation of a computer program, Radiation Integration Program (RIP). This program analyzes gross beta counts, and uses them to estimate danger to the thyroid. As well the results from Gamma Vision are converted from Bq to dose rate for several parts of the body. Overall gamma results affecting the thyroid are compared to the beta results to verify the initial estimations.

  20. The effect of malnutrition on the pharmacokinetics and virologic outcomes of lopinavir, efavirenz and nevirapine in food insecure HIV-infected children in Tororo, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelink, Imke H.; Savic, Rada M.; Dorsey, Grant; Ruel, Theodore; Gingrich, David; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Capparelli, Edmund; Jullien, Vincent; Young, Sera L.; Achan, Jane; Plenty, Albert; Charlebois, Edwin; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition may impact the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antiretroviral medications and virologic responses in HIV-infected children. The authors therefore evaluated the PK of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir (LPV) in associations with nutritional status in a cohort of HIV-infected

  1. Long term effectiveness of once-daily unboosted atazanavir plus abacavir/lamivudine as a switch strategy in subjects with virological suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Llibre, Josep M; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; La Rosa, Jorge Antonio Valencia

    2014-01-01

    routine however are scant. METHODS: We evaluated treatment outcomes of ATV400+ABC/3TC in pre-treated subjects in the EuroSIDA cohort with undetectable HIV-1 RNA, and previous ABC experience or assumed previous HLA B57*01 testing. We performed a time to loss of virologic response (TLOVR below 50 c...

  2. Omitting cytogenetic assessment from routine treatment response monitoring in chronic myeloid leukemia is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Inge G P; Thielen, Noortje; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Roosma, Tanja J A; Valk, Peter J M; Visser, Otto; Cornelissen, Jan J; Westerweel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    The monitoring of response in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is of great importance to identify patients failing their treatment in order to adjust TKI choice and thereby prevent progression to advanced stage disease. Cytogenetic monitoring has a lower sensitivity, is expensive, and requires invasive bone marrow sampling. Nevertheless, chronic myeloid leukemia guidelines continue to recommend performing routine cytogenetic response assessments, even when adequate molecular diagnostics are available. In a population-based registry of newly diagnosed CML patients in the Netherlands, all simultaneous cytogenetic and molecular assessments performed at 3, 6, and 12 months were identified and response of these matched assessments was classified according to European Leukemia Net (ELN) recommendations. The impact of discrepant cytogenetic and molecular response classifications and course of patients with additional chromosomal abnormalities were evaluated. The overall agreement of 200 matched assessments was 78%. In case of discordant responses, response at 24 months was consistently better predicted by the molecular outcome. Cytogenetic response assessments provided relevant additional clinical information only in some cases of molecular "warning." The development of additional cytogenetic abnormalities was always accompanied with molecular failure. We conclude that it is safe to omit routine cytogenetics for response assessment during treatment and to only use molecular monitoring, in order to prevent ambiguous classifications, reduce costs, and reduce the need for invasive bone marrow sampling. Cytogenetic re-assessment should still be performed when molecular response is suboptimal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Monitors display of radiological images: quality control and response of the observer; Monitores de visualizacion de imagenes radiologicas: control de calidad y respuesta del observador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesares Magaz, O.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, O. C.; Gonzalez Martin, A. E.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis is aimed to determine the possible change experienced by a human reader response to the qualification of a test image on a monitor diagnostic radiographic image when observed before and after calibration of the monitor following the provisions of the AAPM TG18 protocol. It also quantified the change experienced by the monitor as a result of the calibration, by measuring the luminance response as set out in the protocol.

  4. A Prognostic Model for Estimating the Time to Virologic Failure in HIV-1 Infected Patients Undergoing a New Combination Antiretroviral Therapy Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheli Valeria

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 genotypic susceptibility scores (GSSs were proven to be significant prognostic factors of fixed time-point virologic outcomes after combination antiretroviral therapy (cART switch/initiation. However, their relative-hazard for the time to virologic failure has not been thoroughly investigated, and an expert system that is able to predict how long a new cART regimen will remain effective has never been designed. Methods We analyzed patients of the Italian ARCA cohort starting a new cART from 1999 onwards either after virologic failure or as treatment-naïve. The time to virologic failure was the endpoint, from the 90th day after treatment start, defined as the first HIV-1 RNA > 400 copies/ml, censoring at last available HIV-1 RNA before treatment discontinuation. We assessed the relative hazard/importance of GSSs according to distinct interpretation systems (Rega, ANRS and HIVdb and other covariates by means of Cox regression and random survival forests (RSF. Prediction models were validated via the bootstrap and c-index measure. Results The dataset included 2337 regimens from 2182 patients, of which 733 were previously treatment-naïve. We observed 1067 virologic failures over 2820 persons-years. Multivariable analysis revealed that low GSSs of cART were independently associated with the hazard of a virologic failure, along with several other covariates. Evaluation of predictive performance yielded a modest ability of the Cox regression to predict the virologic endpoint (c-index≈0.70, while RSF showed a better performance (c-index≈0.73, p Conclusions GSSs of cART and several other covariates were investigated using linear and non-linear survival analysis. RSF models are a promising approach for the development of a reliable system that predicts time to virologic failure better than Cox regression. Such models might represent a significant improvement over the current methods for monitoring and optimization of cART.

  5. Study of the response of radiation protection monitors in terms of H*(10) in X radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato, Fernanda B.C.; Carvalho, Valdir S.; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The ambient dose equivalent, H * (10), is an operational quantity recommended by the International Commission of radiation Units and Measurements Report 39 for measurements in area monitoring. However, most of the monitoring instruments used in radiation protection in Brazil still use the old quantities exposure rate and absorbed dose rate. Therefore, it is necessary to study how to change the operational quantity to H * (10). In this work, the response of radiation protection monitoring detectors was studied in terms of H * (10) for different energies using standard X-rays (narrow beams) at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. (author)

  6. EMIR: a configurable hierarchical system for event monitoring and incident response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deich, William T. S.

    2014-07-01

    The Event Monitor and Incident Response system (emir) is a flexible, general-purpose system for monitoring and responding to all aspects of instrument, telescope, and general facility operations, and has been in use at the Automated Planet Finder telescope for two years. Responses to problems can include both passive actions (e.g. generating alerts) and active actions (e.g. modifying system settings). Emir includes a monitor-and-response daemon, plus graphical user interfaces and text-based clients that automatically configure themselves from data supplied at runtime by the daemon. The daemon is driven by a configuration file that describes each condition to be monitored, the actions to take when the condition is triggered, and how the conditions are aggregated into hierarchical groups of conditions. Emir has been implemented for the Keck Task Library (KTL) keyword-based systems used at Keck and Lick Observatories, but can be readily adapted to many event-driven architectures. This paper discusses the design and implementation of Emir , and the challenges in balancing the competing demands for simplicity, flexibility, power, and extensibility. Emir 's design lends itself well to multiple purposes, and in addition to its core monitor and response functions, it provides an effective framework for computing running statistics, aggregate values, and summary state values from the primitive state data generated by other subsystems, and even for creating quick-and-dirty control loops for simple systems.

  7. Sensor response monitoring in pressurized water reactors using time series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Random data analysis in nuclear power reactors for purposes of process surveillance, pattern recognition and monitoring of temperature, pressure, flow and neutron sensors has gained increasing attention in view of their potential for helping to ensure safe plant operation. In this study, application of autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) time series modeling for monitoring temperature sensor response characteristrics is presented. The ARMA model is used to estimate the step and ramp response of the sensors and the related time constant and ramp delay time. The ARMA parameters are estimated by a two-stage algorithm in the spectral domain. Results of sensor testing for an operating pressurized water reactor are presented. 16 refs

  8. Utility of CD4 cell counts for early prediction of virological failure during antiretroviral therapy in a resource-limited setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawn Stephen D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral load monitoring is not available for the vast majority of patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. However, the practical utility of CD4 cell count measurements as an alternative monitoring strategy has not been rigorously assessed. Methods In this study, we used a novel modelling approach that accounted for all CD4 cell count and VL values measured during follow-up from the first date that VL suppression was achieved. We determined the associations between CD4 counts (absolute values and changes during ART, VL measurements and risk of virological failure (VL > 1,000 copies/ml following initial VL suppression in 330 patients in South Africa. CD4 count changes were modelled both as the difference from baseline (ΔCD4 count and the difference between consecutive values (CD4 count slope using all 3-monthly CD4 count measurements during follow-up. Results During 7093.2 patient-months of observation 3756 paired CD4 count and VL measurements were made. In patients who developed virological failure (n = 179, VL correlated significantly with absolute CD4 counts (r = - 0.08, P = 0.003, ΔCD4 counts (r = - 0.11, P P P = 0.99, P = 0.92 and P = 0.75, respectively. Moreover, in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve, the association between a negative CD4 count slope and virological failure was poor (area under the curve = 0.59; sensitivity = 53.0%; specificity = 63.6%; positive predictive value = 10.9%. Conclusion CD4 count changes correlated significantly with VL at group level but had very limited utility in identifying virological failure in individual patients. CD4 count is an inadequate alternative to VL measurement for early detection of virological failure.

  9. Modernisation of Radiation Monitoring Room as a Part of Slovenian Emergency Response Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvari, A.; Mitic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the year 2002 the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) moved to the new premises therefore it had to rearrange some of its rooms for the emergency situation. SNSA does not operate with a dedicated Emergency Response Centre (ERC), instead of it the SNSA has to rearrange the existing rooms in case of an emergency. Modernisation of the equipment, with the help of government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for the emergency situation was carried out, especially in the monitoring room. The radiation monitoring system, which is placed in the monitoring room, continuously collects, processes and archives the incoming data of exposure to radiation and meteorological parameters on the Slovenian territory (A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents, IAEA, Vienna, 1993. IAEA-TECDOC-718). In the emergency situation the monitoring room transforms into the room for the Dose Assessment Group (DAG), which is part of ERC (IAEA emergency response network, IAEA, Vienna, 2000, EPR-ERNET (2000)). The modernisation of monitoring room and within the DAG room with new equipment and its purpose is described in this article. Modernisation of the monitoring room and the room for DAG showed to be inevitably needed. Modernisation of the monitoring room has brought the SNSA a sophisticated and reliable system of controlling the external exposure to radiation on the Slovenian territory. The equipment, especially the equipment for the use in the emergency situation, brought novelties for the Dose Assessment Group. The group has now better and easier control of radiation situation in case of an accident. In overall this modernisation has put the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration a step forward in having a dedicated Emergency Response Centre, since it does not need to rearrange the room for the Dose Assessment Group. (author)

  10. Regulating task-monitoring systems in response to variable reward contingencies and outcomes in cocaine addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Kristen P; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Garavan, Hugh; Foxe, John J

    2016-03-01

    We investigated anticipatory and consummatory reward processing in cocaine addiction. In addition, we set out to assess whether task-monitoring systems were appropriately recalibrated in light of variable reward schedules. We also examined neural measures of task-monitoring and reward processing as a function of hedonic tone, since anhedonia is a vulnerability marker for addiction that is obviously germane in the context of reward processing. High-density event-related potentials were recorded while participants performed a speeded response task that systematically varied anticipated probabilities of reward receipt. The paradigm dissociated feedback regarding task success (or failure) from feedback regarding the value of reward (or loss), so that task-monitoring and reward processing could be examined in partial isolation. Twenty-three active cocaine abusers and 23 age-matched healthy controls participated. Cocaine abusers showed amplified anticipatory responses to reward predictive cues, but crucially, these responses were not as strongly modulated by reward probability as in controls. Cocaine users also showed blunted responses to feedback about task success or failure and did not use this information to update predictions about reward. In turn, they showed clearly blunted responses to reward feedback. In controls and users, measures of anhedonia were associated with reward motivation. In cocaine users, anhedonia was also associated with diminished monitoring and reward feedback responses. Findings imply that reward anticipation and monitoring deficiencies in addiction are associated with increased responsiveness to reward cues but impaired ability to predict reward in light of task contingencies, compounded by deficits in responding to actual reward outcomes.

  11. Optimization of in-vivo monitoring program for radiation emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In case of radiation emergencies, internal exposure monitoring for the members of public will be required to confirm internal contamination of each individual. In-vivo monitoring technique using portable gamma spectrometer can be easily applied for internal exposure monitoring in the vicinity of the on-site area. In this study, minimum detectable doses (MDDs) for '1'3'4Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 131}I were calculated adjusting minimum detectable activities (MDAs) from 50 to 1,000 Bq to find out the optimal in-vivo counting condition. DCAL software was used to derive retention fraction of Cs and I isotopes in the whole body and thyroid, respectively. A minimum detectable level was determined to set committed effective dose of 0.1 mSv for emergency response. We found that MDDs at each MDA increased along with the elapsed time. 1,000 Bq for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 100 Bq for {sup 131}I were suggested as optimal MDAs to provide in-vivo monitoring service in case of radiation emergencies. In-vivo monitoring program for emergency response should be designed to achieve the optimal MDA suggested from the present work. We expect that a reduction of counting time compared with routine monitoring program can achieve the high throughput system in case of radiation emergencies.

  12. Meteorological monitoring for dose assessment and emergency response modeling - how much is enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glantz, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Individuals responsible for emergency response or environmental/dose assessment routinely ask if there are enough meteorological data to adequately support their objectives. The answer requires detailed consideration of the intended applications, capabilities of the atmospheric dispersion model data, pollutant release characteristics, terrain in the modeling region, and size and distribution of the human population in the modeling domain. The meteorologist's detailed knowledge of, and experience in, studying atmospheric transport and diffusion can assist in determining the appropriate level of meteorological monitoring

  13. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  14. Laboratory tools for diagnosis and monitoring response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohami, Tali; Nagler, Arnon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematological disease that represents 15-20% of all adult leukemia cases. The study and treatment of CML has contributed pivotal advances to translational medicine and cancer therapy. The discovery that a single chromosomal abnormality, the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is responsible for the etiology of this disease was a milestone for treating and understanding CML. Subsequently, CML became the first disease for which allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice. Currently, CML is one of the few diseases where treatment targeted against the chromosomal abnormality is the sole frontline therapy for newly diagnosed patients. The use of directed therapy for CML challenged disease monitoring during treatment and led to the development of definitions that document response and predict relapse sooner than the former routine methods. These methods relied on classical cytogenetics through molecular cytogenetics (FISH) and, finally, on molecular monitoring assays. This review discusses the laboratory tools used for diagnosing CML, for monitoring during treatment, and for assessing remission or relapse. The advantages and disadvantages of each test, the common definition of response levels, and the efforts to standardize molecular monitoring for CML patient management are discussed.

  15. Risk of triple-class virological failure in children with HIV: a retrospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro, Hannah; Judd, Ali; Gibb, Diana M

    2011-01-01

    In adults with HIV treated with antiretroviral drug regimens from within the three original drug classes (nucleoside or nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NRTIs], non-NRTIs [NNRTIs], and protease inhibitors), virological failure occurs slowly, suggesting that long-term virological...... failure to the three original drugs classes in children....

  16. A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Plant monitoring and emergency response applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.; Tsoukalas, L.; McDonough, T.; Parker, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Monitoring is presented. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered for emergency Response applications. The integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems, is monitored. Representation of the system is in the form of a goal-tree generating a Knowledge-Base searched by an Inference Engine functioning in the forward-chaining mode. The Gaol-tree is built from Fault-Trees based on plant operational information. The system is implemented on a VAX-8500 and is programmed in OPS-5

  17. Monitoring treatment response and metastatic relapse in advanced bladder cancer by liquid biopsy analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Christensen, Emil; Nordentoft, Iver Kristiansen

    2017-01-01

    of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma and urine to detect metastatic relapse after cystectomy and measure treatment efficacy. We exome sequenced tumour and germline DNA from patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and monitored ctDNA in 370 liquid biopsies throughout the disease courses by 84......DNA detection in plasma and diagnosis of relapse was 101 d after cystectomy (range 0-932 d). Early detection of metastatic relapse and treatment response using liquid biopsies represents a novel, highly sensitive tool for monitoring patients, supporting clinicians, and guiding treatment decisions. PATIENT...

  18. Integration of laser trapping for continuous and selective monitoring of photothermal response of a single microparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C K; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2008-12-01

    Photothermal response (PTR) is an established pump and probe technique for real-time sensing of biological assays. Continuous and selective PTR monitoring is difficult owing to the Brownian motion changing the relative position of the target with respect to the beams. Integration of laser trapping with PTR is proposed as a solution. The proposed method is verified on red polystyrene microparticles. PTR is continuously monitored for 30 min. Results show that the mean relaxation time variation of the acquired signals is less than 5%. The proposed method is then applied to human red blood cells for continuous and selective PTR.

  19. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Tolley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared “a human, social and economic crisis” due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers’ commitment to ‘whole of government’ strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. Discussion The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments; and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action

  20. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, Hilary; Snowdon, Wendy; Wate, Jillian; Durand, A Mark; Vivili, Paula; McCool, Judith; Novotny, Rachel; Dewes, Ofa; Hoy, Damian; Bell, Colin; Richards, Nicola; Swinburn, Boyd

    2016-09-10

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared "a human, social and economic crisis" due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers' commitment to 'whole of government' strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA) draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies) and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments); and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action-orientated indicators captured in a NCD Dashboard for

  1. Performance monitoring and response conflict resolution associated with choice stepping reaction tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Tsutou, Kotaro; Saito, Kotaro; Ishida, Kazuto; Tanabe, Shigeo; Nojima, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    Choice reaction requires response conflict resolution, and the resolution processes that occur during a choice stepping reaction task undertaken in a standing position, which requires maintenance of balance, may be different to those processes occurring during a choice reaction task performed in a seated position. The study purpose was to investigate the resolution processes during a choice stepping reaction task at the cortical level using electroencephalography and compare the results with a control task involving ankle dorsiflexion responses. Twelve young adults either stepped forward or dorsiflexed the ankle in response to a visual imperative stimulus presented on a computer screen. We used the Simon task and examined the error-related negativity (ERN) that follows an incorrect response and the correct-response negativity (CRN) that follows a correct response. Error was defined as an incorrect initial weight transfer for the stepping task and as an incorrect initial tibialis anterior activation for the control task. Results revealed that ERN and CRN amplitudes were similar in size for the stepping task, whereas the amplitude of ERN was larger than that of CRN for the control task. The ERN amplitude was also larger in the stepping task than the control task. These observations suggest that a choice stepping reaction task involves a strategy emphasizing post-response conflict and general performance monitoring of actual and required responses and also requires greater cognitive load than a choice dorsiflexion reaction. The response conflict resolution processes appear to be different for stepping tasks and reaction tasks performed in a seated position.

  2. Real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation, which computes a three-dimensional numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 yr within the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project. Faster workstations and real-time instruments allow utilization of more complex three-dimensional models, which provides a foundation for building a real-time monitoring and emergency response workstation for a tritium facility. The stack monitors are two ion chambers per stack

  3. Tracking the harmonic response of magnetically-soft sensors for wireless temperature, stress, and corrosive monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Keat G.; Grimes, Craig A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the application of magnetically-soft ribbon-like sensors for measurement of temperature and stress, as well as corrosive monitoring, based upon changes in the amplitudes of the higher-order harmonics generated by the sensors in response to a magnetic interrogation signal. The sensors operate independently of mass loading, and so can be placed or rigidly embedded inside nonmetallic, opaque structures such as concrete or plastic. The passive harmonic-based sensor is remotely monitored through a single coplanar interrogation and detection coil. Effects due to the relative location of the sensor are eliminated by tracking harmonic amplitude ratios, thereby, enabling wide area monitoring. The wireless, passive, mass loading independent nature of the described sensor platform makes it ideally suited for long-term structural monitoring applications, such as measurement of temperature and stress inside concrete structures. A theoretical model is presented to explain the origin and behavior of the higher-order harmonics in response to temperature and stress. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  5. Cotton Fabric Coated with Conducting Polymers and its Application in Monitoring of Carnivorous Plant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Bajgar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the electrical plant response to mechanical stimulation monitored with the help of conducting polymers deposited on cotton fabric. Cotton fabric was coated with conducting polymers, polyaniline or polypyrrole, in situ during the oxidation of respective monomers in aqueous medium. Thus, modified fabrics were again coated with polypyrrole or polyaniline, respectively, in order to investigate any synergetic effect between both polymers with respect to conductivity and its stability during repeated dry cleaning. The coating was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. The resulting fabrics have been used as electrodes to collect the electrical response to the stimulation of a Venus flytrap plant. This is a paradigm of the use of conducting polymers in monitoring of plant neurobiology.

  6. Meteorological monitoring for environmental/dose assessment and emergency response modeling: How much is enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glantz, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    In evaluation the effectiveness and appropriateness of meteorological monitoring programs, managers responsible for planning and operating emergency response or environmental/dose assessment systems must routinely question whether enough meteorological data are being obtained to adequately support system applications. There is no simple answer or cookbook procedure that can be followed in generating an appropriate answer to this question. The answer must be developed through detailed consideration of the intended applications for the data, the capabilities of the models that would use the data, pollutant release characteristics, terrain in the modeling region, the size of the modeling domain, and the distribution of human population in the modeling domain. It is recommended that manager consult meteorologists when assessing these factors; the meteorologist's detailed knowledge of, and experience in, studying atmospheric transport and diffusion should assist the manager in determining the appropriate level of meteorological monitoring. 1 ref

  7. Study of response of radiation monitors for environmental dose equivalent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Macilene N.; Khoury, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental dose equivalent H * (10), is the magnitude recommended by ICRU 39 for environmental monitoring in fields of radiation of photons. Most of the equipment used for area monitoring, only quantifies the magnitudes exposure or dose not being designed to this new magnitude. In Brazil, particularly, is not yet regulated the use of H * (10). However, with the revision of the standard 3.01 it will necessary the use of monitors that allow the achievement of measures according to H * (10). The transition for using new magnitudes will be a slow process and the contribution that the laboratories of metrology of ionizing radiation in the country can give is, at first, promote and create the habit of using the unit Sievert (Sv) in the calibration of the instruments, and that is the unit recommended for H * (10). In a second step, the tests for determining the response of the instruments for H * (10) should be made and this is the harder step, taking into account the large number of area monitors around the country. These tests will provide information about the limitations of the instrument to the new magnitude, that is, the range where the instrument will have the best performance in quantification of new magnitude. This paper evaluates the performance for H * (10), with the variation of energy and angle of incidence of radiation, of three of the most used monitors in the country

  8. The strategic control of prospective memory monitoring in response to complex and probabilistic contextual cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M; Ball, B Hunter

    2017-07-01

    Participants use simple contextual cues to reduce deployment of costly monitoring processes in contexts in which prospective memory (PM) targets are not expected. This study investigated whether this strategic monitoring pattern is observed in response to complex and probabilistic contextual cues. Participants performed a lexical decision task in which words or nonwords were presented in upper or lower locations on screen. The specific condition was informed that PM targets ("tor" syllable) would occur only in words in the upper location, whereas the nonspecific condition was informed that targets could occur in any location or word type. Context was blocked such that word type and location changed every 8 trials. In Experiment 1, the specific condition used the complex contextual cue to reduce monitoring in unexpected contexts relative to the nonspecific condition. This pattern largely was not evidenced when the complex contextual cue was probabilistic (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 confirmed that strategic monitoring is observed for a complex cue that is deterministic, but not one that is probabilistic. Additionally, Experiments 1 and 3 demonstrated a disadvantage associated with strategic monitoring-namely, that the specific condition was less likely to respond to a PM target in an unexpected context. Experiment 3 provided evidence that this disadvantage is attributable to impaired noticing of the target. The novel findings suggest use of a complex contextual cue per se is not a boundary condition for the strategic, context-specific allocation of monitoring processes to support prospective remembering; however, strategic monitoring is constrained by the predictive utility of the complex contextual cue.

  9. A seismic monitoring system for response and failure of structures with intentionally reduced seismic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, Koichi; Ohi, Kenichi

    1988-01-01

    A group of steel and reinforced concrete scaled structures with intentionally reduced seismic strength to 1/3 to 1/2 were constructed in 1983 for long term observation in order to collect precise data of earthquake response and grasp failure mechanisms during earthquakes. A monitoring system was installed in the structures as well as in the surrounding soil. Some reliable data have been successfully recorded since then, which can be available for verification of analytical models. (author)

  10. A solution to the varying response of the linear power monitor induced by xenon poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godsey, T A; Randall, J D [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    After conversion to FLIP fuel at Texas A and M, the fuel temperatures were examined very carefully. It was observed that the fuel temperature at 1 Mw varied over a wide range during the week. This variation was shown to be due to the variation in response of the linear CIC which was used to establish reactor power level. A modification of the linear power monitor was designed and installed. The response of this system was verified by using cobalt wires, fuel temperature, and a fission chamber located at 6 feet from the reactor core. The system has proven to be operationally satisfactory. (author)

  11. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  12. Faunal and vegetation monitoring in response to harbor dredging in the Port of Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Andre; Stevenson, Rachael; Smith, Erin; Robblee, Michael

    2018-04-11

    Seagrasses are highly productive ecosystems. A before-after-control-impact (BACI) design was used to examine effects of dredging on seagrasses and the animals that inhabit them. The control site North Biscayne Bay and the affected site Port of Miami had seagrass densities decrease during both the before, Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network 2006-2011, and after, Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging 2014-2016, studies. Turbidity levels increased at North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami basins during the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study, especially in 2016. Animal populations decreased significantly in North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami in the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study compared to the Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network study. Predictive modeling shows that numbers of animal populations will likely continue to decrease if the negative trends in seagrass densities continue unabated. There could be effects on several fisheries vital to the south Florida economy. Additional research could determine if animal populations and seagrass densities have rebounded or continued to decrease.

  13. Conflict-triggered goal shielding: response conflicts attenuate background monitoring for prospective memory cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschke, Thomas; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2008-01-01

    Action control in a changing environment requires that one shield current goals from distracting information (goal shielding) and at the same time monitor the environment for potentially significant stimuli that may afford a goal switch (background monitoring). Response conflicts modulate the balance between goal shielding and background monitoring, as indicated by reduced susceptibility to interference after response conflicts. Such conflict-adaptation effects have been attributed to enhanced recruitment of cognitive control on trials following conflicts. Here we show that conflict triggers increased goal shielding on the conflict trial itself. Subjects performed a spatial compatibility task during which they had to notice rare prospective memory cues. Such cues were overlooked more often on conflict trials than on nonconflict trials, a result indicating that shielding of the current goal and inhibition of distractors were increased on the current trial when it involved a response conflict. Thus, evidence for enhanced recruitment of control following conflict may partly reflect aftereffects of goal shielding on the conflict trial itself.

  14. Virological and bacteriological quality of drinking water in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedada, Tesfaye Legesse; Mezemir, Walelign Dessie; Dera, Firehiwot Abera; Sima, Waktole Gobena; Gebre, Samson Girma; Edicho, Redwan Muzeyin; Biegna, Almaz Gonfa; Teklu, Dejenie Shiferaw; Tullu, Kassu Desta

    2018-05-01

    Since unsafe water is responsible for many illness, deaths, and economic failure, water quality monitoring is essential. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 218 drinking waters samples collected between February and June 2016 to assess water quality using phages by the help of CB390 E. coli host, plaque assay; multiple tube fermentation for coliforms and pour plate for heterotrophic bacteria at Ethiopian Public Health Institute. Heterotrophic plate count greater than 100 cfu/ml was noted in 41 samples and detections of total and thermotolerant coliforms and E. coli in 38, 24, and 10 samples, respectively, and no phages detection in chlorinated waters. While heterotrophic plate count greater than 100 cfu/ml was observed in 100 samples and detections of total and thermotolerant coliforms, E. coli, and phages in 75, 60, 42, and 5 samples, respectively, for untreated waters. The majority of the waters contained indicators above standard limits. This indicates that the sources are contaminated and they are potential threats for health. Hence, regular water monitoring should be a priority agenda.

  15. SU-F-J-147: Magnetic Field Dose Response Considerations for a Linac Monitor Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M; Fallone, B [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The impact of magnetic fields on the readings of a linac monitor chamber have not yet been investigated. Herein we examine the total dose response as well as any deviations in the beam parameters of flatness and symmetry when a Varian monitor chamber is irradiated within an applied magnetic field. This work has direct application to the development of Linac-MR systems worldwide. Methods: A Varian monitor chamber was modeled in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field with a phase space generated from a model of a Linac-MR prototype system. The magnetic field strength was stepped from 0 to 3.0T in both parallel and perpendicular directions with respect to the normal surface of the phase space. Dose to each of the four regions in the monitor chamber were scored separately for every magnetic field adaptation to evaluate the effect of the magnetic field on flatness and symmetry. Results: When the magnetic field is perpendicular to the phase space normal we see a change in dose response with a maximal deviation (10–25% depending on the chamber region) near 0.75T. In the direction of electron deflection we expectedly see opposite responses in chamber regions leading to a measured asymmetry. With a magnetic field parallel to the phase space normal we see no measured asymmetries, however there is a monotonic rise in dose response leveling off at about +12% near 2.5T. Conclusion: Attention must be given to correct for the strength and direction of the magnetic field at the location of the linac monitor chamber in hybrid Linac-MR devices. Elsewise the dose sampled by these chambers may not represent the actual dose expected at isocentre; additionally there may be a need to correct for the symmetry of the beam recorded by the monitor chamber. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).

  16. Task-dependent response conflict monitoring and cognitive control in anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chobok; Chung, Chongwook; Kim, Jeounghoon

    2013-11-06

    Previous experience affects our behavior in terms of adjustments. It has been suggested that the conflict monitor-controller system implemented in the prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in such adjustments. Previous studies suggested that there exists multiple conflict monitor-controller systems associated with the level of information (i.e., stimulus and response levels). In this study, we sought to test whether different types of conflicts occur at the same information processing level (i.e., response level) are independently processed. For this purpose, we designed a task paradigm to measure two different types of response conflicts using color-based and location-based conflict stimuli and measured the conflict adaptation effects associated with the two types of conflicts either independently (i.e., single conflict conditions) or simultaneously (i.e., a double-conflict condition). The behavioral results demonstrated that performance on current incongruent trials was faster only when the preceding trial was the same type of response conflict regardless of whether they included a single- or double-conflict. Imaging data also showed that anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices operate in a task-specific manner. These findings suggest that there may be multiple monitor-controller loops for color-based and location-based conflicts even at the same response level. Importantly, our results suggest that double-conflict processing is qualitatively different from single-conflict processing although double-conflict shares the same sources of conflict with two single-conflict conditions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Performance Monitoring and Response Inhibition in a Saccadic Countermanding Task in High and Low proficient bilinguals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika eSingh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared Hindi-English bilinguals differing in their L2 fluency on a saccadic countermanding task which taps inhibitory control as well as monitoring. We particularly explored whether response inhibition and performance monitoring within the oculomotor domain are affected by language proficiency in bilinguals. There were two different oculomotor redirect tasks: Visually Guided Redirect (VGR task (Experiment1 and Memory Guided Redirect (MGR task (Experiment 2. In this task typically a target is presented to which subject must make saccade (No step trials, unless a new target appears on the other location after some delay from the first target onset (Step trials. On such trials participants are required to inhibit and cancel the saccade to the first instead program a saccade to the new target. Using trial switch reaction time (TSRT, which is the time taken to inhibit the initiated saccade to the first target, as a measure of response inhibition, and post-stop slowing as a measure of performance monitoring, we observed two important results. It was found that high proficiency bilinguals showed more post-stop slowing on the no-step trials as compared to the low proficiency bilinguals for both VGR and MGR. Secondly, high and low proficiency bilingual exhibited comparable TSRT in both VGR and MGR, showing no altering effect of language proficiency on the response inhibition in bilinguals. These results suggest that bilingualism impacts performance monitoring which is modulated by language proficiency if not the inhibitory control system. Higher fluency may lead to superior cognitive flexibility, and ability to adjust behaviour that facilitates attainment of cognitive goal. These findings are in consonance with other current studies that suggest a top-down effect of bilingualism on action control systems.

  18. Using Item Response Theory to Develop Measures of Acquisitive and Protective Self-Monitoring From the Original Self-Monitoring Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, Michael P; Kostal, Jack W; Stillwell, David; Kosinski, Michal

    2017-07-01

    For the past 40 years, the conventional univariate model of self-monitoring has reigned as the dominant interpretative paradigm in the literature. However, recent findings associated with an alternative bivariate model challenge the conventional paradigm. In this study, item response theory is used to develop measures of the bivariate model of acquisitive and protective self-monitoring using original Self-Monitoring Scale (SMS) items, and data from two large, nonstudent samples ( Ns = 13,563 and 709). Results indicate that the new acquisitive (six-item) and protective (seven-item) self-monitoring scales are reliable, unbiased in terms of gender and age, and demonstrate theoretically consistent relations to measures of personality traits and cognitive ability. Additionally, by virtue of using original SMS items, previously collected responses can be reanalyzed in accordance with the alternative bivariate model. Recommendations for the reanalysis of archival SMS data, as well as directions for future research, are provided.

  19. A multi-detector neutron spectrometer with nearly isotropic response for environmental and workplace monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M., E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bedogni, R. [INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratory-U.F. Fisica Sanitaria, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Moraleda, M.; Delgado, A.; Romero, A. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Esposito, A. [INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratory-U.F. Fisica Sanitaria, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2010-01-21

    This communication describes an improved design for a neutron spectrometer consisting of {sup 6}Li thermoluminescent dosemeters located at selected positions within a single moderating polyethylene sphere. The spatial arrangement of the dosemeters has been designed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the response matrix for 56 log-equidistant energies from 10{sup -9} to 100 MeV, looking for a configuration that permits to obtain a nearly isotropic response for neutrons in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. The feasibility of the proposed spectrometer and the isotropy of its response have been evaluated by simulating exposures to different reference and workplace neutron fields. The FRUIT code has been used for unfolding purposes. The results of the simulations as well as the experimental tests confirm the suitability of the prototype for environmental and workplace monitoring applications.

  20. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  1. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Low-complexity Wireless Monitoring of Respiratory Movements Using Ultra-wideband Impulse Response Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2014-03-01

    In this paper; we present a comprehensive scheme for wireless monitoring of the respiratory movements in humans. Our scheme overcomes the challenges low signal-to-noise ratio, background clutter and high sampling rates. It is based on the estimation of the ultra-wideband channel impulse response. We suggest techniques for dealing with background clutter in situations when it might be time variant. We also present a novel methodology for reducing the required sampling rate of the system significantly while achieving the accuracy offered by the Nyquist rate. Performance results from simulations conducted with pre-recorded respiratory signals demonstrate the robustness of our scheme for tackling the above challenges and providing a low-complexity solution for the monitoring of respiratory movements.

  3. Salient features, response and operation of Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mufti, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Ishtiaq, P.M.; Darzi, M.A.; Mir, T.A.; Shah, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor (LFGNM) provides continuous ground level intensity measurements of atmospheric secondary neutrons produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with the Earth's constituent atmosphere. We report the LFGNM detector salient features and simulation of its energy response for 10"−"1"1 MeV to 10"4 MeV energy incident neutrons using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. An empirical calibration of the LFGNM detector carried out with a Pu–Be neutron source for maximising its few MeV neutron counting sensitivity is also presented. As an illustration of its functionality a single representative transient solar modulation event recorded by LFGNM depicting Forbush decrease in integrated neutron data for which the geospace consequences are well known is also presented. Performance of LFGNM under actual observation conditions for effectively responding to transient solar modulation is seen to compare well with other world-wide conventional neutron monitors.

  4. Auditory brainstem evoked responses and temperature monitoring during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R A; Edmonds, H L; Auden, S M; Austin, E H

    1999-09-01

    To examine the effects of temperature on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in infants during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass for total circulatory arrest (TCA). The relationship between ABRs (as a surrogate measure of core-brain temperature) and body temperature as measured at several temperature monitoring sites was determined. In a prospective, observational study, ABRs were recorded non-invasively at normothermia and at every 1 or 2 degrees C change in ear-canal temperature during cooling and rewarming in 15 infants (ages: 2 days to 14 months) that required TCA. The ABR latencies and amplitudes and the lowest temperatures at which an ABR was identified (the threshold) were measured during both cooling and rewarming. Temperatures from four standard temperature monitoring sites were simultaneously recorded. The latencies of ABRs increased and amplitudes decreased with cooling (P < 0.01), but rewarming reversed these effects. The ABR threshold temperature as related to each monitoring site (ear-canal, nasopharynx, esophagus and bladder) was respectively determined as 23 +/- 2.2 degrees C, 20.8 +/- 1.7 degrees C, 14.6 +/- 3.4 degrees C, and 21.5 +/- 3.8 degrees C during cooling and 21.8 +/- 1.6 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.0 degrees C, 27.6 +/- 3.6 degrees C, and 23.0 +/- 2.4 degrees C during rewarming. The rewarming latencies were shorter and Q10 latencies smaller than the corresponding cooling values (P < 0.01). Esophageal and bladder sites were more susceptible to temperature variations as compared with the ear-canal and nasopharynx. No temperature site reliably predicted an electrophysiological threshold. A faster latency recovery during rewarming suggests that body temperature monitoring underestimates the effects of rewarming in the core-brain. ABRs may be helpful to monitor the effects of cooling and rewarming on the core-brain during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

  5. Gallium-67 scintigraphy for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of paracoccidioidomycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, L.Y.; Watanabe, T.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.; Cerri, G.; Benard, G.; Shikanai-Yasuda, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The current tools to evaluate patients' therapy response in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are based on clinical, immunological and radiological data. However, these criteria may be of limited value in the follow-up of asymptomatic lesions, negative pre-treatment serological tests and in severe pulmonary involvement whose chest radiography usually doesn't differentiate active from fibrotic lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of Ga imaging for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of PCM patients. Methods: We studied 45 patients with confirmed PCM. Each patient underwent 2 to 7 Ga scintigraphies (total:147 scans) during a follow-up period of 4 months to 8,5 years. The Ga findings were compared to the clinical outcome and serum specific antibody levels. Results: Most patients showed improvement in the sequential Ga scans during the treatment with progressive decrease in number and intensity of sites with active infectious process. Ga scan was performed in nine patients with clinical cure and negative or persistently low levels of serum antibody following prolonged treatment. The scintigraphy confirmed the absence of inflammatory disease in all of these cases. Three patients with clinically suspected recurrence after irregular treatment showed positive Ga scans, confirming disease reactivation. Conclusion: Ga imaging is helpful in monitoring therapy response of PCM patients. Moreover, this method may be used to evaluate disease activity by confirming apparent cure and clinical recurrence

  6. Implementation of distributed computing system for emergency response and contaminant spill monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, T.O.; Sterling, M.C.Jr.; Bonner, J.S.; Fuller, C.B.; Kelly, F.; Page, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The availability and use of real-time environmental data greatly enhances emergency response and spill monitoring in coastal and near shore environments. The data would include surface currents, wind speed, wind direction, and temperature. Model predictions (fate and transport) or forensics can also be included. In order to achieve an integrated system suitable for application in spill or emergency response situations, a link is required because this information exists on many different computing platforms. When real-time measurements are needed to monitor a spill, the use of a wide array of sensors and ship-based post-processing methods help reduce the latency in data transfer between field sampling stations and the Incident Command Centre. The common thread linking all these modules is the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and the result is an integrated distributed computing system (DCS). The in-situ sensors are linked to an onboard computer through the use of a ship-based local area network (LAN) using a submersible device server. The onboard computer serves as both the data post-processor and communications server. It links the field sampling station with other modules, and is responsible for transferring data to the Incident Command Centre. This link is facilitated by a wide area network (WAN) based on wireless broadband communications facilities. This paper described the implementation of the DCS. The test results for the communications link and system readiness were also included. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  7. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  8. An error-related negativity potential investigation of response monitoring function in individuals with Internet addiction disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe eZhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction disorder (IAD is an impulse disorder or at least related to impulse control disorder. Deficits in executive functioning, including response monitoring, have been proposed as a hallmark feature of impulse control disorders. The error-related negativity (ERN reflects individual’s ability to monitor behavior. Since IAD belongs to a compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder, theoretically, it should present response monitoring functional deficit characteristics of some disorders, such as substance dependence, ADHD or alcohol abuse, testing with an Erikson flanker task. Up to now, no studies on response monitoring functional deficit in IAD were reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics in a modified Erikson flanker task.23 subjects were recruited as IAD group. 23 matched age, gender and education healthy persons were recruited as control group. All participants completed the modified Erikson flanker task while measured with event-related potentials (ERPs. IAD group made more total error rates than did controls (P < 0.01; Reactive times for total error responses in IAD group were shorter than did controls (P < 0.01. The mean ERN amplitudes of total error response conditions at frontal electrode sites and at central electrode sites of IAD group were reduced compared with control group (all P < 0.01. These results revealed that IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics and shares ERN characteristics of compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder.

  9. MR Imaging in Monitoring and Predicting Treatment Response in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Àlex

    2017-05-01

    MR imaging is the most sensitive tool for identifying lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). MR imaging has also acquired an essential role in the detection of complications arising from these treatments and in the assessment and prediction of efficacy. In the future, other radiological measures that have shown prognostic value may be incorporated within the models for predicting treatment response. This article examines the role of MR imaging as a prognostic tool in patients with MS and the recommendations that have been proposed in recent years to monitor patients who are treated with disease-modifying drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring Cancer Response to Treatment with Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldirdiri, Abubakr

    , and the patient is exposed to ionizing radiation. The introduction of hyperpolarized 13C MRS has opened completely new possibilities to study the biochemical changes in disease processes. Numerous 13C-labeled compounds were proposed to interrogate various aspects of cancer cell metabolism. The aim of this study......Monitoring the cancer response to treatment, non-invasively, by medical imaging is a key element in the management of cancer. For patients undergoing treatment, it is crucial to determine responders from non-responders in order to guide treatment decisions. Currently, PET is the most widely used...

  11. Persistent disparities in antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and virological suppression across Europe, 2004 to 2015

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laut, Kamilla; Shepherd, Leah; Radoi, Roxana

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Direct comparisons between countries in core HIV care parameters are often hampered by differences in data collection. AIM: Within the EuroSIDA study, we compared levels of antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and virological suppression (HIV RNA ...-specific estimates of ART coverage and virological suppression. Underlying reasons for this variation warrant further analysis to identify a best practice and benchmark HIV care across EuroSIDA....

  12. On-line acquisition of plant related and environmental parameters (plant monitoring) in gerbera: determining plant responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, R.; Slootweg, G.

    2004-01-01

    For on-line plant monitoring equipment to be functional in commercial glasshouse horticulture, relations between sensor readings and plant responses on both the short (days) and long term (weeks) are required. For this reason, systems were installed to monitor rockwool grown gerbera plants on a

  13. A new solution of measuring thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-01-01

    This study develops a novel buckling-based mechanism to measure the thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders under continuous temperature changes for structural health monitoring. The measuring device consists of a bilaterally constrained beam and a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride transducer that is attached to the beam. Under thermally induced displacement, the slender beam is buckled. The post-buckling events are deployed to convert the low-rate and low-frequency excitations into localized high-rate motions and, therefore, the attached piezoelectric transducer is triggered to generate electrical signals. Attaching the measuring device to concrete bridge girders, the electrical signals are used to detect the thermal response of concrete bridges. Finite element simulations are conducted to obtain the displacement of prestressed concrete girders under thermal loads. Using the thermal-induced displacement as input, experiments are carried out on a 3D printed measuring device to investigate the buckling response and corresponding electrical signals. A theoretical model is developed based on the nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and large deformation assumptions to predict the buckling mode transitions of the beam. Based on the presented theoretical model, the geometry properties of the measuring device can be designed such that its buckling response is effectively controlled. Consequently, the thermally induced displacement can be designed as limit states to detect excessive thermal loads on concrete bridge girders. The proposed solution sufficiently measures the thermal response of concrete bridges. (paper)

  14. A new solution of measuring thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    This study develops a novel buckling-based mechanism to measure the thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders under continuous temperature changes for structural health monitoring. The measuring device consists of a bilaterally constrained beam and a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride transducer that is attached to the beam. Under thermally induced displacement, the slender beam is buckled. The post-buckling events are deployed to convert the low-rate and low-frequency excitations into localized high-rate motions and, therefore, the attached piezoelectric transducer is triggered to generate electrical signals. Attaching the measuring device to concrete bridge girders, the electrical signals are used to detect the thermal response of concrete bridges. Finite element simulations are conducted to obtain the displacement of prestressed concrete girders under thermal loads. Using the thermal-induced displacement as input, experiments are carried out on a 3D printed measuring device to investigate the buckling response and corresponding electrical signals. A theoretical model is developed based on the nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and large deformation assumptions to predict the buckling mode transitions of the beam. Based on the presented theoretical model, the geometry properties of the measuring device can be designed such that its buckling response is effectively controlled. Consequently, the thermally induced displacement can be designed as limit states to detect excessive thermal loads on concrete bridge girders. The proposed solution sufficiently measures the thermal response of concrete bridges.

  15. Prevalence of HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance and Its Impacts on HIV-1 Virological Failures in Jiangsu, China: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy (ART has been shown to improve survival of patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection and to reduce HIV-1 transmission. Therefore, the Chinese central government initiated a national program to provide ART free of charge to HIV-1 patients. We conducted a cross-sectional survey in Jiangsu province to determine the level of drug resistance (DR in HIV-1 infected patients and the correlates of DR in virological failures in 2012. Approximately 10.4% of the HIV-1 patients in the study experienced virological failure after one year of ART and were divided into drug sensitive and drug resistant groups based on genotype determination. The viral loads (VLs in the drug resistant group were significantly lower than the drug sensitive group. There were two independent predictors of virological failure: male gender and increasing duration of treatment. The primary mutations observed in the study were against nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs which were M184V (79.45% and K103N (33.70% in nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs. The overall rate of DR in Jiangsu province is still relatively low among treated patients. However, close monitoring of drug resistance in male patients in the early stages of treatment is vital to maintaining and increasing the benefits of HIV ART achieved to date.

  16. Monitoring the response to rTMS in depression with visual analog scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, Leon; Dolberg, Ornah T; Polak, Dana; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2002-10-01

    Visual analog scales (VAS) administered on a daily basis provide a fast and reliable method for assessing clinical change during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We treated 40 patients with major depression with TMS and assessed their clinical condition with VAS. Response to TMS was defined with the Hamilton rating scale for depression and the Global assessment of function scale. Nineteen patients of 40 were responders to TMS (when the whole sample was considered) whereas 17 of 29 responded when only the non-psychotic patients were considered. Patients who eventually responded to TMS demonstrated early changes in the VAS scores. We conclude that monitoring with VAS scores can detect early response to TMS. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate sensors with enhanced piezoelectric response for cutaneous pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Joe, Pauline; Yona, Raissa; Liu, Yuhao; Kim, Yun-Soung; Huang, YongAn; Damadoran, Anoop R; Xia, Jing; Martin, Lane W; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-08-05

    The ability to measure subtle changes in arterial pressure using devices mounted on the skin can be valuable for monitoring vital signs in emergency care, detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and continuously assessing health status. Conventional technologies are well suited for use in traditional clinical settings, but cannot be easily adapted for sustained use during daily activities. Here we introduce a conformal device that avoids these limitations. Ultrathin inorganic piezoelectric and semiconductor materials on elastomer substrates enable amplified, low hysteresis measurements of pressure on the skin, with high levels of sensitivity (~0.005 Pa) and fast response times (~0.1 ms). Experimental and theoretical studies reveal enhanced piezoelectric responses in lead zirconate titanate that follow from integration on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements of pressure variations of blood flow in near-surface arteries demonstrate capabilities for measuring radial artery augmentation index and pulse pressure velocity.

  18. Computational Model and Numerical Simulation for Submerged Mooring Monitoring Platform’s Dynamical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Kongde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational model and numerical simulation for submerged mooring monitoring platform were formulated aimed at the dynamical response by the action of flow force, which based on Hopkinson impact load theory, taken into account the catenoid effect of mooring cable and revised the difference of tension and tangential direction action force by equivalent modulus of elasticity. Solved the equation by hydraulics theory and structural mechanics theory of oceaneering, studied the response of buoy on flow force. The validity of model were checked and the results were in good agreement; the result show the buoy will engender biggish heave and swaying displacement, but the swaying displacement got stable quickly and the heaven displacement cause vibration for the vortex-induced action by the flow.

  19. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use

  20. Treatment dose-response in amblyopia therapy: the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2004-09-01

    Amblyopia is the commonest visual disorder of childhood. Yet the contributions of the two principal treatments (spectacle wear and occlusion) to outcome are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the dose-response relationship of amblyopia therapy. The study comprised three distinct phases: baseline, in which repeat measures of visual function were undertaken to confirm the initial visual deficit; refractive adaptation: an 18-week period of spectacle wear with six weekly measurements of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity; occlusion: in which participants were prescribed 6 hours of "patching" per day. In the latter phase, occlusion was objectively monitored and logMAR visual acuity recorded at 2-week intervals until any observed gains had ceased. Data were obtained from 94 participants (mean age, 5.1 +/- 1.4 years) with amblyopia associated with strabismus (n = 34), anisometropia (n = 23), and both anisometropia and strabismus (n = 37). Eighty-six underwent refractive adaptation. Average concordance with patching was 48%. The relationship between logMAR visual acuity gain and total occlusion dose was monotonic and linear. Increasing dose rate beyond 2 h/d hastened the response but did not improve outcome. More than 80% of the improvement during occlusion occurred within 6 weeks. Treatment outcome was significantly better for children younger than 4 years (n = 17) than in those older than 6 years (n = 24; P = 0.0014). Continuous objective monitoring of the amount of patching therapy received has provided insight into the dose-response relationship of occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Patching is most effective within the first few weeks of treatment, even for those in receipt of a relatively small dose. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural basis for the dose-response functions. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  1. Monte carlo calculation of energy-dependent response of high-sensitive neutron monitor, HISENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Ebisawa, Tohru; Kobayashi, Keiji; Koide, Hiroaki; Seo, Takeshi; Kawano, Shinji

    1988-01-01

    A highly sensitive neutron monitor system, HISENS, has been developed to measure leakage neutrons from nuclear facilities. The counter system of HISENS contains a detector bank which consists of ten cylindrical proportional counters filled with 10 atm 3 He gas and a paraffin moderator mounted in an aluminum case. The size of the detector bank is 56 cm high, 66 cm wide and 10 cm thick. It is revealed by a calibration experiment using an 241 Am-Be neutron source that the sensitivity of HISENS is about 2000 times as large as that of a typical commercial rem-counter. Since HISENS is designed to have a high sensitivity in a wide range of neutron energy, the shape of its energy dependent response curve cannot be matched to that of the dose equivalent conversion factor. To estimate dose equivalent values from neutron counts by HISENS, it is necessary to know the energy and angular characteristics of both HISENS and the neutron field. The area of one side of the detector bank is 3700 cm 2 and the detection efficiency in the constant region of the response curve is about 30 %. Thus, the sensitivity of HISENS for this energy range is 740 cps/(n/cm 2 /sec). This value indicates the extremely high sensitivity of HISENS as compared with exsisting highly sensitive neutron monitors. (Nogami, K.)

  2. A report on upgraded seismic monitoring stations in Myanmar: Station performance and site response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Hrin Nei; Min Htwe, Yin Myo; Kyaw, Tun Lin; Tun, Pa Pa; Min, Zaw; Htwe, Sun Hninn; Aung, Tin Myo; Lin, Kyaw Kyaw; Aung, Myat Min; De Cristofaro, Jason; Franke, Mathias; Radman, Stefan; Lepiten, Elouie; Wolin, Emily; Hough, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Myanmar is in a tectonically complex region between the eastern edge of the Himalayan collision zone and the northern end of the Sunda megathrust. Until recently, earthquake monitoring and research efforts have been hampered by a lack of modern instrumentation and communication infrastructure. In January 2016, a major upgrade of the Myanmar National Seismic Network (MNSN; network code MM) was undertaken to improve earthquake monitoring capability. We installed five permanent broadband and strong‐motion seismic stations and real‐time data telemetry using newly improved cellular networks. Data are telemetered to the MNSN hub in Nay Pyi Taw and archived at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center. We analyzed station noise characteristics and site response using noise and events recorded over the first six months of station operation. Background noise characteristics vary across the array, but indicate that the new stations are performing well. MM stations recorded more than 20 earthquakes of M≥4.5 within Myanmar and its immediate surroundings, including an M 6.8 earthquake located northwest of Mandalay on 13 April 2016 and the Mw 6.8 Chauk event on 24 August 2016. We use this new dataset to calculate horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratios, which provide a preliminary characterization of site response of the upgraded MM stations.

  3. Drought is Coming: Monitoring Vegetation Response to Water Scarcity through Variable Chlorophyll a Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, C. R.; Beverly, D.; Pleban, J. R.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.; Weinig, C.

    2017-12-01

    Aridity is one of the most pronounced environmental limits to plant survival, and understanding how plants respond to drought and recovery is crucial for predicting impacts on managed and natural ecosystems. Changes in soil moisture conditions induce a suite of physiological responses from the cell to ecosystem scale, complicating the assessment of drought effects. Characterizing early indicators of water scarcity across species can inform biophysical models with improved understanding of plant hydraulics. While indexes exist for drought monitoring across scales, many are unable to identify imminent vegetative drought. We explore a method of early diagnosis using leaf-level and kinetic imaging measures of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence. This is a fast and reliable tool capturing leaf physiological changes in advance of changes in NDVI or passive solar induced fluorescence. Both image and leaf level Pulse Amplitude Method (PAM) measurements illustrate the utility of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence for monitoring vegetative drought. Variable fluorescence was monitored across populations of crops, desert shrubs, montane conifers and riparian deciduous trees under variable water regimes. We found a strong correlation (R = 0.85) between the maximum efficiency of photosystem II measured using variable fluorescence (Fv'Fm') and leaf level electrolyte leakage, a proximal cause of drought stress induced by cellular damage in leaves. This association was confirmed in two gymnosperm species (Picea engelmannii and Pinus contorta) and for diverse varieties of the crop species Brassica rapa. The use of chlorophyll a fluorescence per image also allowed for early detection of drought in aspen (Populus tremuloides). These results provide evidence that variable chlorophyll fluorescence decreases between 25% and 70% in mild and severely droughted twigs with respect to ones collected from trees in wet soil conditions. While current systems for monitoring variable fluorescence

  4. Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system in Ireland: methods and response rates

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Keeffe, Linda M.

    2014-06-01

    To describe response rates and characteristics associated with response to the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System study in Ireland (PRAMS Ireland). Using hospital discharge records of live births at a large, urban, obstetric hospital, a sampling frame of approximately 2,400 mother-infant pairs were used to alternately sample 1,200 women. Mothers’ information including name, address, parity, age and infant characteristics such as sex and gestational age at delivery were extracted from records. Modes of contact included an invitation letter with option to opt out of the study, three mail surveys, a reminder letter and text message reminder for remaining non-respondents. Sixty-one per cent of women responded to the PRAMS Ireland survey over a 133 day response period. Women aged <30, single women, multiparous women and women with a preterm delivery were less likely to respond. Women participating in PRAMS Ireland were similar to the national birth profile in 2011 which had a mean age of 32, were 40 % primiparous, 33 % single or never married and had a 28 % caesarean section rate. Survey and protocol changes are required to increase response rates above recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) thresholds of 65 % within the recommended 90 day data collection cycle. Additional efforts such as stratification and over-sampling are required to increase representativeness among hard to reach groups such as younger, single and multiparous women before expanding the project to an ongoing, national surveillance system in Ireland.

  5. Effect of pretreatment HIV-1 drug resistance on immunological, virological, and drug-resistance outcomes of first-line antiretroviral treatment in sub-Saharan Africa: a multicentre cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Schuurman, Rob; Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Wallis, Carole L.; Kityo, Cissy; Siwale, Margaret; Mandaliya, Kishor; Ive, Prudence; Botes, Mariette E.; Wellington, Maureen; Osibogun, Akin; Wit, Ferdinand W.; van Vugt, Michèle; Stevens, Wendy S.; de Wit, Tobias F. Rinke

    2012-01-01

    Background The effect of pretreatment HIV-1 drug resistance on the response to first-line combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in sub-Saharan Africa has not been assessed. We studied pretreatment drug resistance and virological, immunological, and drug-resistance treatment outcomes in a large

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28–83) provided informed consent. T 2 - and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm 2 /s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6–8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs ( −3 mm 2 /s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p 23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2–4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HVSR Response Evolution due to Seasonal Variation: Observations from 2 Years of Continuous Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, K. B.; Milkereit, B.

    2017-12-01

    The seismic Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio analysis technique reliably gives overburden depth to bedrock, for an independently determined Vs, based on the frequency of the main resonance peak. Above this, smaller resonances reflect the velocity structure within the overburden itself. This range in the HVSR response shows sufficient sensitivity to be exploited as a monitoring tool, to detect change in seismic physical properties and from that, change in overburden conditions. To explore the variation of the response, several 3C geophones have been deployed in southern Ontario, Canada since December 2015 (and ongoing). The local geology is a sedimentary basin with 30m of overburden, a simple 2D environment well suited for the HVSR method. Data are collected for 15s per minute, with an effective frequency band of 2-400Hz. HVSR estimates are produced for each sampling period and archived. Over these two years, winter freeze/thaw, saturated spring and summer draught conditions were sampled. H/V daily averages are dominated by the stable 3Hz resonance due to the overall surface layer, but smaller spectral peaks up to 100Hz are clear and evolve in frequency and amplitude over the collection period. Ground freeze/thaw cycles are clearly evident by significant reduction in the horizontal field, but also the changing of the soil moisture content throughout the year causes subtle shifts in the response (correlated to rain events and water table variation). The long term sampling does show a sensitivity of the HVSR method to the overburden in proximity to the sensor, and suggests a possibility for its use in monitoring soil / water-table conditions. But it also highlights that the estimate from an isolated H/V acquisition does include this variability and needs to be adequately quantified in VS30 estimates.

  9. Differential stress response of Saccharomyces hybrids revealed by monitoring Hsp104 aggregation and disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Claudia; Lengeler, Klaus; Wendland, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Proteotoxic stress may occur upon exposure of yeast cells to different stress conditions. The induction of stress response mechanisms is important for cells to adapt to changes in the environment and ensure survival. For example, during exposure to elevated temperatures the expression of heat shock proteins such as Hsp104 is induced in yeast. Hsp104 extracts misfolded proteins from aggregates to promote their refolding. We used an Hsp104-GFP reporter to analyze the stress profiles of Saccharomyces species hybrids. To this end a haploid S. cerevisiae strain, harboring a chromosomal HSP104-GFP under control of its endogenous promoter, was mated with stable haploids of S. bayanus, S. cariocanus, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae, S. paradoxus and S. uvarum. Stress response behaviors in these hybrids were followed over time by monitoring the appearance and dissolution of Hsp104-GFP foci upon heat shock. General stress tolerance of these hybrids was related to the growth rate detected during exposure to e.g. ethanol and oxidizing agents. We observed that hybrids were generally more resistant to high temperature and ethanol stress compared to their parental strains. Amongst the hybrids differential responses regarding the appearance of Hsp104-foci and the time required for dissolving these aggregates were observed. The S. cerevisiae/S. paradoxus hybrid, combining the two most closely related strains, performed best under these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Monitoring and evaluation of disaster response efforts undertaken by local health departments: a rapid realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossip, Kate; Gouda, Hebe; Lee, Yong Yi; Firth, Sonja; Bermejo, Raoul; Zeck, Willibald; Jimenez Soto, Eliana

    2017-06-29

    Local health departments are often at the forefront of a disaster response, attending to the immediate trauma inflicted by the disaster and also the long term health consequences. As the frequency and severity of disasters are projected to rise, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) efforts are critical to help local health departments consolidate past experiences and improve future response efforts. Local health departments often conduct M&E work post disaster, however, many of these efforts fail to improve response procedures. We undertook a rapid realist review (RRR) to examine why M&E efforts undertaken by local health departments do not always result in improved disaster response efforts. We aimed to complement existing frameworks by focusing on the most basic and pragmatic steps of a M&E cycle targeted towards continuous system improvements. For these purposes, we developed a theoretical framework that draws on the quality improvement literature to 'frame' the steps in the M&E cycle. This framework encompassed a M&E cycle involving three stages (i.e., document and assess, disseminate and implement) that must be sequentially completed to learn from past experiences and improve future disaster response efforts. We used this framework to guide our examination of the literature and to identify any context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configurations which describe how M&E may be constrained or enabled at each stage of the M&E cycle. This RRR found a number of explanatory CMO configurations that provide valuable insights into some of the considerations that should be made when using M&E to improve future disaster response efforts. Firstly, to support the accurate documentation and assessment of a disaster response, local health departments should consider how they can: establish a culture of learning within health departments; use embedded training methods; or facilitate external partnerships. Secondly, to enhance the widespread dissemination of lessons learned and facilitate

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), US response to major radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    radiological materials from: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Space Craft Launches, Weapon (Department of Defence or DOE) Transportation, Weapon Production Facilities, Spacecraft Re-entry (domestic or foreign), Terrorist Incidents, High-Level Waste Transportation, Nuclear Power Plants. Key to the FRERP would be the establishment of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Development and implementation was assigned to DOE as the agency most capable of providing sufficient resources, assets, and support. In 1987, DOE subsequently assigned programmatic responsibility, with limited funding, to the Nevada Operations Office in Las Vegas, Nevada. (author)

  12. Rapid response sensor to monitor the temperature and flow of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Two forms of a sensor capable of simultaneously monitoring the temperature and flow of liquid metal coolants within a reactor are described. They operate by measuring the coupling impedances between the sensor and the surrounding electrically conductive coolant. Since the system utilises electrical rather than thermal properties, the response to perturbations is rapid, typically displaying the changed conditions within a few milliseconds. The first form of the sensor was designed to operate whilst protected by a thick walled service tube positioned in the reactor coolant. Providing bends in the tube had a radius greater than 70 cm, the sensor could be removed for inspection and maintenance if necessary. The second sensor was fitted inside a streamlined NaK proof capsule. This was inserted directly into the coolant outlet stream of a fuel pin assembly in the Dounreay Fast Reactor. In this form the sensor successfully monitored flow, entrained gas and temperature excursions during the final operating cycle of D.F.R. (author)

  13. A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project

  14. Monitoring and modeling shoreline response due to shoreface nourishment on a high-energy coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Shoreface nourishment can be an efficient technique to feed sediment into the littoral zone without the order of magnitude cost increase incurred by directly nourishing the beach. An erosion hot spot at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, California, USA, threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location, a new beneficial reuse plan was implemented in May 2005 for the sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. From 2005 to 2007, approximately 230,000 m of sand was placed annually at depths between 9 and 14 m, in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves could potentially feed sediment onto the section of beach experiencing critical erosion. The evolution of the disposal mound and adjacent beach were monitored with 12 multibeam bathymetric surveys, and over 40 high-resolution beach topographic surveys. In addition, sediment transport processes were investigated using sediment grab samples, acoustic Doppler profilers, and two separate models: a cross-shore profile model (UNIBEST-TC) and a coastal area model (Delft3D). The results of the monitoring and modeling demonstrate that the disposal mound may be effective in dissipating wave energy striking this vulnerable stretch of coast with negligible shadowing effects, but a positive shoreline response can only be achieved by placing the sediment in water depths less than 5 m. 

  15. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  16. The effect of malnutrition on the pharmacokinetics and virologic outcomes of lopinavir, efavirenz and nevirapine in food insecure HIV-infected children in Tororo, Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelink, Imke H; Savic, Rada M; Dorsey, Grant; Ruel, Theodore; Gingrich, David; Scherpbier, Henriette J; Capparelli, Edmund; Jullien, Vincent; Young, Sera L; Achan, Jane; Plenty, Albert; Charlebois, Edwin; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca

    2015-03-01

    Malnutrition may impact the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of antiretroviral medications and virologic responses in HIV-infected children. The authors therefore evaluated the PK of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir (LPV) in associations with nutritional status in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan children. Sparse dried blood spot samples from Ugandan children were used to estimate plasma concentrations. Historical PK data from children from 3 resource-rich countries (RRC) were utilized to develop the PK models. Concentrations in 330 dried blood spot from 163 Ugandan children aged 0.7-7 years were analyzed in reference to plasma PK data (1189 samples) from 204 children from RRC aged 0.5-12 years. Among Ugandan children, 48% was malnourished (underweight, thin or stunted). Compared to RRC, Ugandan children exhibited reduced bioavailability of EFV and LPV; 11% (P=0.045) and 18% (P=0.008), respectively. In contrast, NVP bioavailability was 46% higher in Ugandan children (PChildren receiving LPV, EFV or NVP had comparable risk of virologic failure. Among children on NVP, low height and weight for age Z scores were associated with reduced risk of virologic failure (P=0.034, P=0.068, respectively). Ugandan children demonstrated lower EFV and LPV and higher NVP exposure compared to children in RRC, perhaps reflecting the consequence of malnutrition on bioavailability. In children receiving NVP, the relation between exposure, malnutrition and outcome turned out to be marginally significant. Further investigations are warranted using more intensive PK measurements and adequate adherence assessments, to further assess causes of virologic failure in Ugandan children.

  17. Central hemodynamic responses during serial exercise tests in heart failure patients using implantable hemodynamic monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, A; Steinhaus, D; Kjellström, B; Ryden, L; Bennett, T

    2003-06-01

    Exercise testing is commonly used in patients with congestive heart failure for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Such testing may be even more valuable if invasive hemodynamics are acquired. However, this will make the test more complex and expensive and only provides information from isolated moments. We studied serial exercise tests in heart failure patients with implanted hemodynamic monitors allowing recording of central hemodynamics. Twenty-one NYHA Class II-III heart failure patients underwent maximal exercise tests and submaximal bike or 6-min hall walk tests to quantify their hemodynamic responses and to study the feasibility of conducting exercise tests in patients with such devices. Patients were followed for 2-3 years with serial exercise tests. During maximal tests (n=70), heart rate increased by 52+/-19 bpm while S(v)O(2) decreased by 35+/-10% saturation units. RV systolic and diastolic pressure increased 29+/-11 and 11+/-6 mmHg, respectively, while pulmonary artery diastolic pressure increased 21+/-8 mmHg. Submaximal bike (n=196) and hall walk tests (n=172) resulted in S(v)O(2) changes of 80 and 91% of the maximal tests, while RV pressures ranged from 72 to 79% of maximal responses. An added potential value of implantable hemodynamic monitors in heart failure patients may be to quantitatively determine the true hemodynamic profile during standard non-invasive clinical exercise tests and to compare that to hemodynamic effects of regular exercise during daily living. It would be of interest to study whether such information could improve the ability to predict changes in a patient's clinical condition and to improve tailoring patient management.

  18. The results of virological surveillance for intrauterine infections in Saint-Petersburg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Murina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of researchis the determiningthe etiological structure ofintrauterine infections in Saint-Petersburg pediatric patients, pregnant women andinfants born to them using a variety of virological methods.Methods: serum from 164 children aged from 1 month to 14 years with diagnosis of «intrauterine infection». Serum from 80 pregnant women, collected in each trimester (total – 240 samples, their 42 children (at the age of 1–2 and 4–6  months of life, total – 82 samples. Immunoglobulin Mand G (IgM and IgGto herpes virus type 1, cytomegalovirus (CMV, Toxoplasma gondii, mycoplasma and chlamydia, rubella, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV and parvovirus B19, as well as IgG avidity,were determined by ELISA in all these samples. Theimmunoblot (Western blot, using the «Immunoblot2000» with test kits from «Euroimmun AG» (Germany, was applied to confirm cases. Statistical analysis wasperformed with theprograms Microsoft Excel, Statistica6.Results: cytomegalovirus, herpes virus 1st type and Epstein-Barr virus infections are dominate in the structure of intrauterine ones (45%, 23% and 14%, respectively. Laboratory evidence ofreactivationof cytomegalovirus (35% ofpregnant womenin the 2nd and/or 3rd trimesters and acuteparvovirus infection (15% of cases were found. Specific IgM to cytomegalovirus were detected in 6,2% ofchildren in the firstsix months of life.Conclusions: with the aim of early detection of cytomegalovirus reactivation and acute parvovirus infection it isnecessary to monitor pregnant women with the definition of specific IgM, IgG and avidity IgG. The procedure to using immunoblotting in the diagnosis of intrauterine infectionsneeds to be further study.

  19. Dynamics of response-conflict monitoring and individual differences in response control and behavioral control: an electrophysiological investigation using a stop-signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Jutta; Gibbons, Henning

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of error (related) negativity Ne/ERN and individual differences in human action monitoring. A response-conflict model of Ne/ERN should be tested applying a stop-signal paradigm. After a few modifications of Ne/ERN response-conflict theory (Yeung N, Botvinick MM, Cohen JD. The neural basis of error detection: conflict monitoring and the error-related negativity. Psychological Review 2004:111(4);931-959), strength and time course of response conflict could be modeled as a function of stop-signal delay. In Experiment 1, 35 participants performed a visual two-choice response-time task but tried to withhold the response if an auditory stop signal was presented. Probability of stopping errors was held at 50% using variable delays between visual and auditory stimuli. Experiment 2 (n=10) employed both auditory go and stop signals and confirmed that Ne/ERN effects are due to conflict induced by the auditory stop signal, and not the mere presence or absence of an additional stimulus. As predicted, amplitudes of both the stimulus-locked and response-locked Ne/ERN were largest for non-stopped responses, followed by successfully stopped and go responses. However, independently of response type Ne/ERN also increased with increasing stop-signal delay. Since longer delay invokes stronger response conflict, results specifically support the notion of Ne/ERN reflecting response-conflict monitoring. Furthermore, individual differences related to measures of response control and behavioral control were observed. Both low response control estimated from stop-task performance and high psychometric impulsivity were accompanied by smaller Ne/ERN amplitude on stop trials, suggesting reduced response-conflict monitoring. The present study supported the response-conflict view of Ne/ERN. Furthermore, the observed relationship between impulsivity and Ne/ERN amplitude suggested that individuals with low behavioral

  20. On-line acquisition of plant related and environmental parameters (plant monitoring) in gerbera: determining plant responses

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, R.; Slootweg, G.

    2004-01-01

    For on-line plant monitoring equipment to be functional in commercial glasshouse horticulture, relations between sensor readings and plant responses on both the short (days) and long term (weeks) are required. For this reason, systems were installed to monitor rockwool grown gerbera plants on a minute-to-minute basis from July 2002 until April 2003. Data collected included, amongst others, crop transpiration from lysimeter data (2 m2), canopy temperature using infrared sensors, rockwool water...

  1. Characterization and monitoring of host immune responses to infectious agents: what a future for microbiological diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dolcetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying microbial pathogenesis and host-microbe interactions has greatly improved over the last decade. In particular, the development of new and specific analytical methods has allowed the detailed characterization of innate and adaptive immune responses against clinically relevant microbial infections. Immunogenetic studies are continuously providing new insights on the genetic bases of individual differences in susceptibility to specific pathogens and most of the genetic markers identified so far include polymorphisms in genes controlling both innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, new standardized T cell assays allow reliable and reproducible evaluations of T cell phenotype and functions (i.e.: ELISPOT, including the identification of distinct functional signatures that are associated with the control of the infection.Although the number of these assays currently used in clinical practice is limited, a considerable increase is foreseen for the near future.This perspective constitutes an unprecedented opportunity for Clinical Microbiologists, who may now develop and apply integrated microbiologic/immunologic assays that may be useful for a more precise diagnostic definition and a more accurate clinical monitoring of the disease.

  2. Immunological monitoring for prediction of clinical response to antitumor vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Irina N; Shubina, Irina Zh; Chkadua, George Z; Petenko, Natalia N; Morozova, Lidia F; Burova, Olga S; Beabelashvili, Robert Sh; Parsunkova, Kermen A; Balatskaya, Natalia V; Chebanov, Dmitrii K; Pospelov, Vadim I; Nazarova, Valeria V; Vihrova, Anastasia S; Cheremushkin, Evgeny A; Molodyk, Alvina A; Kiselevsky, Mikhail V; Demidov, Lev V

    2018-05-11

    Immunotherapy has shown promising results in a variety of cancers, including melanoma. However, the responses to therapy are usually heterogeneous, and understanding the factors affecting clinical outcome is still not achieved. Here, we show that immunological monitoring of the vaccine therapy for melanoma patients may help to predict the clinical course of the disease. We studied cytokine profile of cellular Th1 (IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ) and humoral Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) immune response, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), transforming growth factor-β 2 (TGF-β 2), S100 protein (S100A1B and S100BB), adhesion molecule CD44 and serum cytokines β2-microglobulin to analyze different peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopuations of patients treated with dendritic vaccines and/or cyclophosphamide in melanoma patients in the course of adjuvant treatment. The obtained data indicate predominance of cellular immunity in the first adjuvant group of patients with durable time to progression and shift to humoral with low cellular immunity in patients with short-term period to progression (increased levels of IL-4 and IL- 10). Beta-2 microglobulin was differentially expressed in adjuvant subgroups: its higher levels correlated with shorter progression-free survival and the total follow-up time. Immunoregulatory index was overall higher in patients with disease progression compared to the group of patients with no signs of disease progression.

  3. Response-cue interval effects in extended-runs task switching: memory, or monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Erik M

    2017-09-26

    This study investigated effects of manipulating the response-cue interval (RCI) in the extended-runs task-switching procedure. In this procedure, a task cue is presented at the start of a run of trials and then withdrawn, such that the task has to be stored in memory to guide performance until the next task cue is presented. The effects of the RCI manipulation were not as predicted by an existing model of memory processes in task switching (Altmann and Gray, Psychol Rev 115:602-639, 2008), suggesting that either the model is incorrect or the RCI manipulation did not have the intended effect. The manipulation did produce a theoretically meaningful pattern, in the form of a main effect on response time that was not accompanied by a similar effect on the error rate. This pattern, which replicated across two experiments, is interpreted here in terms of a process that monitors for the next task cue, with a longer RCI acting as a stronger signal that a cue is about to appear. The results have implications for the human factors of dynamic task environments in which critical events occur unpredictably.

  4. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  5. MONITORING TRAINING LOADS, STRESS, IMMUNE-ENDOCRINE RESPONSES AND PERFORMANCE IN TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vitasovic Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to investigate the effect of a periodised pre-season training plan on internal training load and subsequent stress tolerance, immune-endocrine responses and physical performance in tennis players. Well-trained young tennis players (n = 10 were monitored across the pre-season period, which was divided into 4 weeks of progressive overloading training and a 1-week tapering period. Weekly measures of internal training load, training monotony and stress tolerance (sources and symptoms of stress were taken, along with salivary testosterone, cortisol and immunoglobulin A. One repetition maximum strength, running endurance, jump height and agility were assessed before and after training. The periodised training plan led to significant weekly changes in training loads (i.e. increasing in weeks 3 and 4, decreasing in week 5 and post-training improvements in strength, endurance and agility (P < 0.05. Cortisol concentration and the symptoms of stress also increased in weeks 3 and/or 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05. Conversely, the testosterone to cortisol ratio decreased in weeks 3 and 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05. In conclusion, the training plan evoked adaptive changes in stress tolerance and hormonal responses, which may have mediated the improvements in physical performance.

  6. Methods for Monitoring Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Samali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR. The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  7. From feedback- to response-based performance monitoring in active and observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, Christian; Colosio, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Humans can adapt their behavior by learning from the consequences of their own actions or by observing others. Gradual active learning of action-outcome contingencies is accompanied by a shift from feedback- to response-based performance monitoring. This shift is reflected by complementary learning-related changes of two ACC-driven ERP components, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the error-related negativity (ERN), which have both been suggested to signal events "worse than expected," that is, a negative prediction error. Although recent research has identified comparable components for observed behavior and outcomes (observational ERN and FRN), it is as yet unknown, whether these components are similarly modulated by prediction errors and thus also reflect behavioral adaptation. In this study, two groups of 15 participants learned action-outcome contingencies either actively or by observation. In active learners, FRN amplitude for negative feedback decreased and ERN amplitude in response to erroneous actions increased with learning, whereas observational ERN and FRN in observational learners did not exhibit learning-related changes. Learning performance, assessed in test trials without feedback, was comparable between groups, as was the ERN following actively performed errors during test trials. In summary, the results show that action-outcome associations can be learned similarly well actively and by observation. The mechanisms involved appear to differ, with the FRN in active learning reflecting the integration of information about own actions and the accompanying outcomes.

  8. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  9. An audit on virological efficacy of anti-retroviral therapy in a specialist infectious disease clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reyad, A

    2009-06-01

    We have assessed the efficacy of anti retroviral therapy (ART) using undetectable viral load (VL) (<50 RNA copies\\/ml) as a marker of virological success, in patients who have Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) attending the Department of Infectious Disease. A cross-sectional review of patients\\' case notes was used to obtain their demographics and treatment details. 79% (253) of the hospital case notes of clinic population was available for analysis, which represents 90% of those receiving ART in the clinic. 166\\/253 of the cohort were receiving treatment at the time of this study and 95% (157\\/166) of these were on treatment for greater than 6 months. The total virological success rate is 93%, which is comparable to other centres and are as good as those from published clinical trials. 56% of those on therapy who have virological failure were Intravenous Drug Users (IVDUs). Case by case investigation for those with treatment failure is warranted.

  10. Characterization of HIV-1 from patients with virological failure to a boosted protease inhibitor regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillemark, Marie Rathcke; Gerstoft, Jan; Obel, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) regimens with unboosted protease inhibitors (PIs) has resulted in a high level of virological failure primarily due to the development of resistant virus. Current boosted PI regimens combine successfully low-dose ritonavir (r) with a second.......3%) experienced virological failure, of whom 19 (83%) started PI/r treatment before 2001. Patients from Copenhagen (n=19) were selected to study the development of protease (PR) and gag cleavage site (CS) mutations during PI/r treatment and PI plasma levels at the time of virological failure. Three patients (16......%) developed major PI resistance mutations. Mutations in the p7/p1 and p1/p6 gag CS only developed in patients with major or minor mutations in PR. Drug concentrations were low or undetectable in 10 out of the 19 patients. In total PR resistance mutations and low drug levels could account for 12 (63...

  11. High rate of virologic suppression with darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy among highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients: results of a prospective cohort study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Vidal

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the virologic and immunological response of darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy in highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients in Brazil. METHODS: Prospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary center in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three-class antiretroviral-experienced patients with confirmed virologic failure began darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy (nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± raltegravir ± enfuvirtide ± maraviroc after performing a genotypic resistance assay. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests were collected at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, and 48. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of virologic response at 48 weeks. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients were included. The median of darunavir resistant mutation was 1 (range 0-6. The median genotypic sensitivity score in the optimized background therapy was 2 (interquartile range 1-2. At week 48, 83% (95% CI: 75-90% had an HIV RNA level 100 000 copies/mL was inversely associated with virologic success at week 48 (HR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.85, p = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS: Darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy was a highly effective salvage regimen under clinical routine conditions in a referral center in Brazil, which is similar to the reported in high-income countries.

  12. High rate of virologic suppression with darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy among highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients: results of a prospective cohort study in São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ernesto Vidal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the virologic and immunological response of darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy in highly antiretroviral-experienced HIV-infected patients in Brazil. METHODS: Prospective cohort study carried out in a tertiary center in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Three-class antiretroviral-experienced patients with confirmed virologic failure began darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy (nucleoside/tide reverse transcriptase inhibitors ± raltegravir ± enfuvirtide ± maraviroc after performing a genotypic resistance assay. Clinical evaluation and laboratory tests were collected at baseline and at weeks 12, 24, and 48. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify predictors of virologic response at 48 weeks. RESULTS: Ninety-two patients were included. The median of darunavir resistant mutation was 1 (range 0-6. The median genotypic sensitivity score in the optimized background therapy was 2 (interquartile range 1-2. At week 48, 83% (95% CI: 75-90% had an HIV RNA level 100 000 copies/mL was inversely associated with virologic success at week 48 (HR: 0.22, 95% CI: 0.06-0.85, p = 0.028. CONCLUSIONS: Darunavir/ritonavir plus optimized background therapy was a highly effective salvage regimen under clinical routine conditions in a referral center in Brazil, which is similar to the reported in high-income countries.

  13. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka’aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes. PMID:29326977

  14. Additive effects prevail: The response of biota to multiple stressors in an intensively monitored watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieswein, Alexander; Hering, Daniel; Feld, Christian K

    2017-09-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are impacted by a range of stressors arising from diverse human-caused land and water uses. Identifying the relative importance of single stressors and understanding how multiple stressors interact and jointly affect biology is crucial for River Basin Management. This study addressed multiple human-induced stressors and their effects on the aquatic flora and fauna based on data from standard WFD monitoring schemes. For altogether 1095 sites within a mountainous catchment, we used 12 stressor variables covering three different stressor groups: riparian land use, physical habitat quality and nutrient enrichment. Twenty-one biological metrics calculated from taxa lists of three organism groups (fish, benthic invertebrates and aquatic macrophytes) served as response variables. Stressor and response variables were subjected to Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis to identify stressor hierarchy and stressor interactions and subsequently to Generalised Linear Regression Modelling (GLM) to quantify the stressors standardised effect size. Our results show that riverine habitat degradation was the dominant stressor group for the river fauna, notably the bed physical habitat structure. Overall, the explained variation in benthic invertebrate metrics was higher than it was in fish and macrophyte metrics. In particular, general integrative (aggregate) metrics such as % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa performed better than ecological traits (e.g. % feeding types). Overall, additive stressor effects dominated, while significant and meaningful stressor interactions were generally rare and weak. We concluded that given the type of stressor and ecological response variables addressed in this study, river basin managers do not need to bother much about complex stressor interactions, but can focus on the prevailing stressors according to the hierarchy identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. FDG PET/CT for therapeutic response monitoring in multi-site non-respiratory tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Tian; Yong Xiao; Bin Chen; Jun Xia; Hong Guan; Qunyi Deng

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) can produce positive signals during 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning. Until now, there has been no better method than clinical assessment to evaluate the therapeutic response of non-respiratory TB (NRTB). Purpose: To retrospectively assess the ability of FDG PET/CT to evaluate the response to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB. Material and Methods: Three patients with multi-site NRTB underwent repeat PET/CT scans during anti-TB treatment. Changes in maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the TB lesions on PET/CT images were analyzed between two scans. Initial PET/CT scans were performed before the start of anti-TB treatment, and later scans were performed after completion of the treatment. Results: Patient 1, a 63-year-old female, and patient 2, a 50-year-old male, were diagnosed as multi-site NRTB by biopsy. Patient 3, a 37-year-old male was diagnosed clinically. These patients demonstrated multiple FDG-avid lesions in whole body on initial PET/CT images. The highest SUVmax of patient 1, 2, and 3 were 13.6, 17.7, and 13.9 separately. After completion of the treatment, all positive signals of patient 1, 2, and 3 decreased to undetectable value on repeated PET/CT scans with intervals of 318 days, 258 days, and 182 days separately. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT scan may be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB

  16. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Monitoring Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanetz, Priscilla J; Moy, Linda; Baron, Paul; diFlorio, Roberta M; Green, Edward D; Heller, Samantha L; Holbrook, Anna I; Lee, Su-Ju; Lewin, Alana A; Lourenco, Ana P; Niell, Bethany; Stuckey, Ashley R; Trikha, Sunita; Vincoff, Nina S; Weinstein, Susan P; Yepes, Monica M; Newell, Mary S

    2017-11-01

    Patients with locally advanced invasive breast cancers are often treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgical intervention. The primary aims of this approach are to: 1) reduce tumor burden thereby permitting breast conservation rather than mastectomy; 2) promptly treat possible metastatic disease, whether or not it is detectable on preoperative staging; and 3) potentially tailor future chemotherapeutic decisions by monitoring in-vivo tumor response. Accurate radiological assessment permits optimal management and planning in this population. However, assessment of tumor size and response to treatment can vary depending on the modality used, the measurement technique (such as single longest diameter, 3-D measurements, or calculated tumor volume), and varied response of different tumor subtypes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (such as concentric shrinkage or tumor fragmentation). As discussed in further detail, digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, US and MRI represent the key modalities with potential to help guide patient management. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes.

  18. Improving staff response to seizures on the epilepsy monitoring unit with online EEG seizure detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommens, Nicole; Geertsema, Evelien; Jansen Holleboom, Lisanne; Cox, Fieke; Visser, Gerhard

    2018-05-11

    User safety and the quality of diagnostics on the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) depend on reaction to seizures. Online seizure detection might improve this. While good sensitivity and specificity is reported, the added value above staff response is unclear. We ascertained the added value of two electroencephalograph (EEG) seizure detection algorithms in terms of additional detected seizures or faster detection time. EEG-video seizure recordings of people admitted to an EMU over one year were included, with a maximum of two seizures per subject. All recordings were retrospectively analyzed using Encevis EpiScan and BESA Epilepsy. Detection sensitivity and latency of the algorithms were compared to staff responses. False positive rates were estimated on 30 uninterrupted recordings (roughly 24 h per subject) of consecutive subjects admitted to the EMU. EEG-video recordings used included 188 seizures. The response rate of staff was 67%, of Encevis 67%, and of BESA Epilepsy 65%. Of the 62 seizures missed by staff, 66% were recognized by Encevis and 39% by BESA Epilepsy. The median latency was 31 s (staff), 10 s (Encevis), and 14 s (BESA Epilepsy). After correcting for walking time from the observation room to the subject, both algorithms detected faster than staff in 65% of detected seizures. The full recordings included 617 h of EEG. Encevis had a median false positive rate of 4.9 per 24 h and BESA Epilepsy of 2.1 per 24 h. EEG-video seizure detection algorithms may improve reaction to seizures by improving the total number of seizures detected and the speed of detection. The false positive rate is feasible for use in a clinical situation. Implementation of these algorithms might result in faster diagnostic testing and better observation during seizures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. On switching response surface models, with applications to the structural health monitoring of bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, K.; Cross, E. J.

    2018-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is the engineering discipline of diagnosing damage and estimating safe remaining life for structures and systems. Often, SHM is accomplished by detecting changes in measured quantities from the structure of interest; if there are no competing explanations for the changes, one infers that they are the result of damage. If the structure of interest is subject to changes in its environmental or operational conditions, one must understand the effects of these changes in order that one does not falsely claim that damage has occurred when changes in measured quantities are observed. This problem - the problem of confounding influences - is particularly pressing for civil infrastructure where the given structure is usually openly exposed to the weather and may be subject to strongly varying operational conditions. One approach to understanding confounding influences is to construct a data-based response surface model that can represent measurement variations as a function of environmental and operational variables. The models can then be used to remove environmental and operational variations so that change detection algorithms signal the occurrence of damage alone. The current paper is concerned with such response surface models in the case of SHM of bridges. In particular, classes of response surface models that can switch discontinuously between regimes are discussed. Recently, it has been shown that Gaussian Process (GP) models are an effective means of developing response surface or surrogate models. However, the GP approach runs into difficulties if changes in the latent variables cause the structure of interest to abruptly switch between regimes. A good example here, which is well known in the SHM literature, is given by the Z24 Bridge in Switzerland which completely changed its dynamical behaviour when it cooled below zero degrees Celsius as the asphalt of the deck stiffened. The solution proposed here is to adopt the recently

  20. Monitoring bottlenose dolphin leukocyte cytokine mRNA responsiveness by qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Kirsten C.; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K.; Jensen, Eric D.; Porter, Tracy J.; Waters, Theresa E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2017-01-01

    Both veterinarians caring for dolphins in managed populations and researchers monitoring wild populations use blood-based diagnostics to monitor bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) health. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to assess cytokine transcription patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This can supplement currently available blood tests with information on immune status. Full realization of this potential requires establishment of normal ranges of cytokine gene transcription levels in bottlenose dolphins. We surveyed four dolphins over the span of seven months by serial bleeds. PBMC were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL) and concanavalin A (1 μg/mL) for 48 H in vitro. RNA from these cultures was probed by qPCR using Tursiops truncatus-specific primers (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ and TNF-α). Two blood samples from an additional bottlenose dolphin diagnosed with acute pulmonary disease add further perspective to the data. We observed that mitogen choice made a significant difference in the magnitude of gene transcription observed. On the other hand, most cytokines tested exhibited limited intra-animal variation. However, IL-6 and IL-12p40 differed between older and younger dolphins. Furthermore, the magnitude of mitogenic response clusters the tested cytokines into three groups. The data provide a reference for the selection of target cytokine mRNAs and their expected range of mitogen-stimulated cytokine gene transcription for future studies. PMID:29272269

  1. Recorded earthquake responses from the integrated seismic monitoring network of the Atwood Building, Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated seismic monitoring system with a total of 53 channels of accelerometers is now operating in and at the nearby free-field site of the 20-story steel-framed Atwood Building in highly seismic Anchorage, Alaska. The building has a single-story basement and a reinforced concrete foundation without piles. The monitoring system comprises a 32-channel structural array and a 21-channel site array. Accelerometers are deployed on 10 levels of the building to assess translational, torsional, and rocking motions, interstory drift (displacement) between selected pairs of adjacent floors, and average drift between floors. The site array, located approximately a city block from the building, comprises seven triaxial accelerometers, one at the surface and six in boreholes ranging in depths from 15 to 200 feet (???5-60 meters). The arrays have already recorded low-amplitude shaking responses of the building and the site caused by numerous earthquakes at distances ranging from tens to a couple of hundred kilometers. Data from an earthquake that occurred 186 km away traces the propagation of waves from the deepest borehole to the roof of the building in approximately 0.5 seconds. Fundamental structural frequencies [0.58 Hz (NS) and 0.47 Hz (EW)], low damping percentages (2-4%), mode coupling, and beating effects are identified. The fundamental site frequency at approximately 1.5 Hz is close to the second modal frequencies (1.83 Hz NS and 1.43 EW) of the building, which may cause resonance of the building. Additional earthquakes prove repeatability of these characteristics; however, stronger shaking may alter these conclusions. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  2. Reducing uncertainty in dust monitoring to detect aeolian sediment transport responses to land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; Chappell, A.; Van Zee, J.; Toledo, D.; Duniway, M.; Billings, B.; Tedela, N.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use and land cover change (LULCC) influence global rates of wind erosion and dust emission, yet our understanding of the magnitude of the responses remains poor. Field measurements and monitoring provide essential data to resolve aeolian sediment transport patterns and assess the impacts of human land use and management intensity. Data collected in the field are also required for dust model calibration and testing, as models have become the primary tool for assessing LULCC-dust cycle interactions. However, there is considerable uncertainty in estimates of dust emission due to the spatial variability of sediment transport. Field sampling designs are currently rudimentary and considerable opportunities are available to reduce the uncertainty. Establishing the minimum detectable change is critical for measuring spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport, detecting potential impacts of LULCC and land management, and for quantifying the uncertainty of dust model estimates. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of common sampling designs (e.g., simple random sampling, systematic sampling) used to measure and monitor aeolian sediment transport rates. Using data from the US National Wind Erosion Research Network across diverse rangeland and cropland cover types, we demonstrate how only large changes in sediment mass flux (of the order 200% to 800%) can be detected when small sample sizes are used, crude sampling designs are implemented, or when the spatial variation is large. We then show how statistical rigour and the straightforward application of a sampling design can reduce the uncertainty and detect change in sediment transport over time and between land use and land cover types.

  3. Track-monitoring from the dynamic response of an operational train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, George; Chen, Siheng; Garrett, James; Kovačević, Jelena; Noh, Hae Young; Bielak, Jacobo

    2017-03-01

    We explore a data-driven approach for monitoring rail infrastructure from the dynamic response of a train in revenue-service. Presently, track inspection is performed either visually or with dedicated track geometry cars. In this study, we examine a more economical approach where track inspection is performed by analyzing vibration data collected from an operational passenger train. The high frequency with which passenger trains travel each section of track means that faults can be detected sooner than with dedicated inspection vehicles, and the large number of passes over each section of track makes a data-driven approach statistically feasible. We have deployed a test-system on a light-rail vehicle and have been collecting data for the past two years. The collected data underscores two of the main challenges that arise in train-based track monitoring: the speed of the train at a given location varies from pass to pass and the position of the train is not known precisely. In this study, we explore which feature representations of the data best characterize the state of the tracks despite these sources of uncertainty (i.e., in the spatial domain or frequency domain), and we examine how consistently change detection approaches can identify track changes from the data. We show the accuracy of these different representations, or features, and different change detection approaches on two types of track changes, track replacement and tamping (a maintenance procedure to improve track geometry), and two types of data, simulated data and operational data from our test-system. The sensing, signal processing, and data analysis we propose in the study could facilitate safer trains and more cost-efficient maintenance in the future. Moreover, the proposed approach is quite general and could be extended to other parts of the infrastructure, including bridges.

  4. Monitoring bottlenose dolphin leukocyte cytokine mRNA responsiveness by qPCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ruth Hofstetter

    Full Text Available Both veterinarians caring for dolphins in managed populations and researchers monitoring wild populations use blood-based diagnostics to monitor bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus health. Quantitative PCR (qPCR can be used to assess cytokine transcription patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. This can supplement currently available blood tests with information on immune status. Full realization of this potential requires establishment of normal ranges of cytokine gene transcription levels in bottlenose dolphins. We surveyed four dolphins over the span of seven months by serial bleeds. PBMC were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL and concanavalin A (1 μg/mL for 48 H in vitro. RNA from these cultures was probed by qPCR using Tursiops truncatus-specific primers (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ and TNF-α. Two blood samples from an additional bottlenose dolphin diagnosed with acute pulmonary disease add further perspective to the data. We observed that mitogen choice made a significant difference in the magnitude of gene transcription observed. On the other hand, most cytokines tested exhibited limited intra-animal variation. However, IL-6 and IL-12p40 differed between older and younger dolphins. Furthermore, the magnitude of mitogenic response clusters the tested cytokines into three groups. The data provide a reference for the selection of target cytokine mRNAs and their expected range of mitogen-stimulated cytokine gene transcription for future studies.

  5. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Tojo, Arinobu; Sekine, Rieko; Soda, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Nomura, Akiko; Izawa, Kiyoko; Kitamura, Toshio; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-01-01

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  6. Differences in Virological and Immunological Risk Factors for Non-Hodgkin and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Leah; Ryom, Lene; Law, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Background: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are increased in populations with immune dysfunction, including people living with HIV; however, there is little evidence for to what degree immunological and virological factors differently affect NHL and HL risk. Methods: Data from...... the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs Study cohort were analyzed to identify independent risk factors for NHL and HL using hazard ratios (HRs), focusing on current and cumulative area under the curve (AUC) measures of immunological and virological status. Variables with different...

  7. prevalence of clinical, immunological and virological failure among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    ABSTRACT. Background: There is increasing evidence that the current clinical and immunological monitoring tools are not sufficient to identify early enough patients who are failing on treatment. Development of resistance to the limited treatment options for children and premature switching are the dangers. The objective of ...

  8. Lung clearance index to monitor treatment response in pulmonary exacerbations in preschool children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayment, Jonathan H; Stanojevic, Sanja; Davis, Stephanie D; Retsch-Bogart, George; Ratjen, Felix

    2018-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment for pulmonary symptoms in preschool children with cystic fibrosis (CF) varies among clinicians. The lung clearance index (LCI) is sensitive to early CF lung disease, but its utility to monitor pulmonary exacerbations in young children has not been assessed. We aim to (1) understand how LCI changes during lower respiratory tract symptoms relative to a recent clinically stable measurement, (2) determine whether LCI can identify antibiotic treatment response and (3) compare LCI changes to changes in spirometric indices. LCI and spirometry were measured at quarterly clinic visits over a 12-month period in preschool children with CF. Symptomatic visits were identified and classified as treated or untreated. Treatment response was estimated using propensity score matching methods. 104 symptomatic visits were identified in 78 participants. LCI increased from baseline in both treated (mean relative change +23.8% (95% CI 16.2 to 31.4)) and untreated symptomatic visits (mean relative change +11.2% (95% CI 2.4 to 19.9)). A significant antibiotic treatment effect was observed when LCI was used as the outcome measure (average treatment effect -15.5% (95% CI -25.4 to -5.6)) but not for z-score FEV 1 . LCI significantly deteriorated with pulmonary symptoms relative to baseline and improved with antibiotic treatment. These data suggest that LCI may have a role in the routine clinical care of preschool children with CF. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. A cross-sectional study to evaluate second line virological failure and elevated bilirubin as a surrogate for adherence to atazanavir/ritonavir in two urban HIV clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongubo, Dennis Miyoge; Lim, Robertino; Tweya, Hannock; Stanley, Christopher Chikhosi; Tembo, Petros; Broadhurst, Richard; Gugsa, Salem; Ngongondo, McNeil; Speight, Colin; Heller, Tom; Phiri, Sam; Hosseinipour, Mina C

    2017-07-03

    Malawi's national antiretroviral therapy program provides atazanavir/ritonavir-based second line regimens which cause concentration-dependent rise in indirect bilirubin. We sought to determine if elevated bilirubin, as a surrogate of atazanavir/ritonavir adherence, can aid in the evaluation of second line virological failure in Malawi. We conducted a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected patients ≥15 years who were on boosted protease inhibitor-based second line antiretroviral therapy for at least 6 months in two urban HIV clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi. Antiretroviral therapy history and adherence data were extracted from the electronic medical records and blood was drawn for viral load, complete blood count, total bilirubin, and CD4 cell count at a clinic visit. Factors associated with virological failure were assessed using multivariate logistic regression model. Out of 376 patients on second line antiretroviral therapy evaluated, 372 (98.9%) were on atazanavir/ritonavir-based therapy and 142 (37.8%) were male. Mean age was 40.9 years (SD ± 10.1), mean duration on second line antiretroviral therapy was 41.9 months (SD ± 27.6) and 256 patients (68.1%) had elevated bilirubin >1.3 mg/dL. Overall, 35 (9.3%) patients had viral load >1000 copies/ml (virological failure). Among the virologically failing vs. non-failing patients, bilirubin was elevated in 34.3% vs. 72.0% respectively (p bilirubin levels (aOR 5.4, p bilirubin levels better predicted virological failure than pill count adherence. Therefore, strategic use of bilirubin and viral load testing to target adherence counseling and support may be cost-effective in monitoring second line antiretroviral therapy adherence and virological failure. Drug resistance testing targeted for patients with virological failure despite elevated bilirubin levels would facilitate timely switch to third line antiretroviral regimens whenever available.

  10. Clinical trials using IFN-α as a vaccine adjuvant: new strategies for the molecular monitoring of the immune response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belardelli, F.; Arico, E.; Marincola, F.; Wang, E.

    2009-01-01

    The main general objective of this project was to define immunotherapy protocols based on the new concept of using IFN-a as and immune adjuvant, developing innovative methodologies suitable for predicting and monitoring the immunological and clinical responses. Specific aim of developing new micro arrays technologies particularly suitable for a molecular tracking and prediction of the response to IFN of cytokine-treated patients

  11. Monitoring Space Radiation Hazards with the Responsive Environmental Assessment Commercially Hosted (REACH) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, J. E.; Guild, T. B.; Crain, W.; Crain, S.; Holker, D.; Quintana, S.; O'Brien, T. P., III; Kelly, M. A.; Barnes, R. J.; Sotirelis, T.

    2017-12-01

    The Responsive Environmental Assessment Commercial Hosting (REACH) project uses radiation dosimeters on a commercial satellite constellation in low Earth orbit to provide unprecedented spatial and time sampling of space weather radiation hazards. The spatial and time scales of natural space radiation environments coupled with constraints for the hosting accommodation drove the instrumentation requirements and the plan for the final orbital constellation. The project has delivered a total of thirty two radiation dosimeter instruments for launch with each instrument containing two dosimeters with different passive shielding and electronic thresholds to address proton-induced single-event effects, vehicle charging, and total ionizing dose. There are two REACH instruments currently operating with four more planned for launch by the time of the 2017 meeting. Our aim is to field a long-lived system of highly-capable radiation detectors to monitor the hazards of single-event effects, total ionizing dose, and spacecraft charging with maximized spatial coverage and with minimal time latency. We combined a robust detection technology with a commercial satellite hosting to produce a new demonstration for satellite situational awareness and for other engineering and science applications.

  12. Efficacy of 24-Hour Blood Pressure Monitoring in Evaluating Response to Percutaneous Transluminal Renal Angioplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jujo, Kentaro; Saito, Katsumi; Ishida, Issei; Furuki, Yuho; Ouchi, Taisuke; Kim, Ahsung; Suzuki, Yuki; Sekiguchi, Haruki; Yamaguchi, Junichi; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Hagiwara, Nobuhisa

    2016-08-25

    Percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty (PTRA) improves patency in atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS), but improvement in clinic blood pressure (BP) is seen in only 20-40% of patients who undergo PTRA. This study investigated the effects of PTRA on BP lowering, assessed on 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), and identified preoperative features predictive of satisfactory BP improvement after PTRA. Of 1,753 consecutive patients undergoing coronary angiography, 31 patients with angiographically significant ARAS and translesional pressure gradient (TLPG) >20 mmHg underwent PTRA. ABPM was performed before, at 1 month and at 1 year after PTRA; patients with average systolic ABPM-BP decrease >10 mmHg at 1 month from baseline were categorized as responders. There was no obvious relationship between clinic BP and ABPM-BP at baseline. ABPM-BP was significantly higher in responders at baseline (SBP: 148 vs. 126 mmHg, PABPM-BP achieved a larger decrease in ABPM-BP, but the severity of stenosis reflected by TLPG; renal duplex findings; and neurohumoral parameters other than baseline renal function, did not differ between the groups. Clinic BP does not represent daily hemodynamic status, whereas high ABPM-BP is a potent predictor of satisfactory BP response to PTRA. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1922-1930).

  13. Monitoring sperm mitochondrial respiration response in a laser trap using ratiometric fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Adrian; Botvinick, Elliot; Berns, Michael

    2005-08-01

    Sperm motility is an important area in understanding male infertility. Various techniques, such as the Computer Assisted Sperm Analysis (CASA), have been used to understand sperm motility. Sperm motility is related to the energy (ATP) production of sperm. ATP is produced by the depolarization of the membrane potential of the inner membrane of the mitochondria. In this study, a mitochondrial dye, JC-1, has been used to monitor the energetics of the mitochondria. This fluorescent dye can emit at two different wavelengths, depending on the membrane potential of the mitochondria. It can fluoresce green at low membrane potential and red at high membrane potential. The ratio of the two colors (red/green) allows for an accurate measurement of the change of membrane potential. Various experiments were conducted to quantify the behavior of the dye within the sperm and the reaction of the sperm to trap. Sperm were trapped using laser tweezers. Results have shown that the ratio drops dramatically when sperm are trapped, indicating a depolarization of the membrane. The physiological response to this depolarization is yet to be determined, but the studies indicate that the sperm could have been slightly damaged by the laser. However, knowing that sperm depolarizes their membrane when trapped can help understand how sperm react to their environment and consequently help treat male infertility.

  14. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  15. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J Russell

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to "get by" before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians' practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD.

  16. The Trauma Patient Tracking System: implementing a wireless monitoring infrastructure for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan; C Ng, Thomas; Li, Dustin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Kang; Bergeron, William; Martin, Ron; Budinger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In mass trauma situations, emergency personnel are challenged with the task of prioritizing the care of many injured victims. We propose a trauma patient tracking system (TPTS) where first-responders tag all patients with a wireless monitoring device that continuously reports the location of each patient. The system can be used not only to prioritize patient care, but also to determine the time taken for each patient to receive treatment. This is important in training emergency personnel and in identifying bottlenecks in the disaster response process. In situations where biochemical agents are involved, a TPTS may be employed to determine sites of cross-contamination. In order to track patient location in both outdoor and indoor environments, we employ both Global Positioning System (GPS) and Television/ Radio Frequency (TVRF) technologies. Each patient tag employs IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi)/TCP/IP networking to communicate with a central server via any available Wi-Fi basestation. A key component to increase TPTS fault-tolerance is a mobile Wi-Fi basestation that employs redundant Internet connectivity to ensure that tags at the disaster scene can send information to the central server even when local infrastructure is unavailable for use. We demonstrate the robustness of the system in tracking multiple patients in a simulated trauma situation in an urban environment.

  17. The response of the radionuclide monitoring programme for agricultural products in Great Britain to the accident at Chernobyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The overall objective of the radiation monitoring and control programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Great Britain is to ensure the safety of foodstuffs. The particular responsibility of my department within the Ministry is the analysis of agricultural products for the presence of radionuclides entering the human food chain from atmospheric releases. The Ministry also has a laboratory which monitors the marine environment. This presentation describes the surveillance programme for agricultural foodstuffs and show how it was used to monitor the deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and shows some of the monitoring data obtained and indicate how the information was used in formulating protective measures. It also mentions future plans

  18. The response of the radionuclide monitoring programme for agricultural products in Great Britain to the accident at Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J A [Central Veterinary Laboratory, Weybridge, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1986-07-01

    The overall objective of the radiation monitoring and control programme of the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food in Great Britain is to ensure the safety of foodstuffs. The particular responsibility of my department within the Ministry is the analysis of agricultural products for the presence of radionuclides entering the human food chain from atmospheric releases. The Ministry also has a laboratory which monitors the marine environment. This presentation describes the surveillance programme for agricultural foodstuffs and show how it was used to monitor the deposition from the Chernobyl accident, and shows some of the monitoring data obtained and indicate how the information was used in formulating protective measures. It also mentions future plans.

  19. Analytical investigation of response of birefringent fiber Bragg grating sensors in distributed monitoring system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, D.; Murayama, H.

    2014-01-01

    When Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are used as strain sensors, both longitudinal and lateral strain can be applied uniformly or non-uniformly over the length of the FBGs. In order for the demodulation of such FBG signal, this paper investigates the response of birefringent FBGs which are monitored by distributed measurement system based on optical frequency domain reflectometry. A numerical model of the distributed measurement system is built based on piece-wise uniform approach, which considers polarization states of propagating lights. The numerical model simulates analytical response of birefringent FBGs especially when birefringence induces power fluctuations in the distributed spectra, which can be noise or new opportunity for sensitive monitoring of birefringence. Simulation results show the relationships between the power fluctuations and the polarization states of the propagating lights. Consequently, appropriate methods of polarization control for sensitive distributed birefringent FBG monitoring are discussed.

  20. Response-guided telaprevir combination treatment for hepatitis C virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sherman, Kenneth E.; Flamm, Steven L.; Afdhal, Nezam H.; Nelson, David R.; Sulkowski, Mark S.; Everson, Gregory T.; Fried, Michael W.; Adler, Michael; Reesink, Hendrik W.; Martin, Marie; Sankoh, Abdul J.; Adda, Nathalie; Kauffman, Robert S.; George, Shelley; Wright, Christopher I.; Poordad, Fred; Adler, M.; Delwaide, Jean; Horsmans, Y.; van Vlierberghe, H.; Richter, C.; Afdhal, N.; Araya, V.; Arora, S.; Balart, L.; Bennett, M.; Berk, B.; Bernstein, D.; Bloomer, J.; Brown, R.; Bzowej, N.; Chasen, R.; Cochran, J.; Crippin, J.; Davis, G.; Davis, M.; Dejesus, E.; Di Bisceglie, A.; Dieterich, D.; Esposito, S.; Everson, G.; Flamm, S. L.; Franco, J.; Freilich, B.; Fried, M. W.; Ghalib, R.; Godofsky, E.; Gordon, S.; Howell, C.; Hutson, W.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 often need 48 weeks of peginterferon-ribavirin treatment for a sustained virologic response. We designed a noninferiority trial (noninferiority margin, -10.5%) to compare rates of sustained virologic response among patients

  1. Preparedness for response to the challenges from orphan sources: nationwide environmental radiation mapping with state of the art monitoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saindane, Shashank S.; Pradeepkumar, K.S.; Suri, M.M.K.; Sharma, D.N.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the various international reports on orphan sources, the potential for radiological emergencies in public domain is recognized as a cause of concern. To detect the presence of any such orphan sources and to strengthen the preparedness for response to any radiological emergencies in public domain, a nationwide radiation mapping programme was initiated in India. Various radiation monitoring systems, few of them integrated with Global Positioning System (GPS) installed in mobile monitoring vans were used for this purpose. This monitoring also helped in generating the base line dose rate data of the cities and also in demonstrating the methodology of environmental monitoring for locating the presence of orphan sources, if any. During the detailed monitoring of various cities of the country, different systems such as GSM based Radiation Monitoring System (GRaMS), Compact Radiation Monitoring system, Portable Mobile Gamma Spectrometry System, Gamma Tracer System etc. installed in a vehicle were made to continuously acquire the data at a varying rate from 10 sec to 1 minute acquisition time. These systems can measure dose rate in the range of 0.01 - 100 μGy h -1 and can detect 7.4 MBq (200 μCi) of 60 Co and 25 MBq (675 μCi) of 137 Cs from a distance of 5 metre. Average dose rate recorded during these environmental monitoring was 81 ± 07 nGy h -1 with a maximum of 210 ± 11 nGyh -1 at Bangalore (attributed to the presence of K-40). The digital topographic map and the data acquired from the radiation mapping are used to generate terrestrial radiation map. This radiation profile stored in the database can be used as reference while carrying out the impact assessment following any nuclear / radiological emergencies. These systems also help to tag the radiation levels along with positional coordinates online onto the GIS map of the area. GRaMS also demonstrated its capability for online transmission of the data to the centralized data acquisition Base Station

  2. The heuristics of nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in a private room neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Rohan; Mortel, Heidi van de; Feijs, Loe; Andriessen, Peter; Pul, Carola van

    2017-01-01

    Alarm fatigue is a well-recognized patient safety concern in intensive care settings. Decreased nurse responsiveness and slow response times to alarms are the potentially dangerous consequences of alarm fatigue. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that modulate nurse responsiveness to critical patient monitor and ventilator alarms in the context of a private room neonatal intensive care setting. The study design comprised of both a questionnaire and video monitoring of nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms. The Likert scale questionnaire, comprising of 50 questions across thematic clusters (critical alarms, yellow alarms, perception, design, nursing action, and context) was administered to 56 nurses (90% response rate). Nearly 6000 critical alarms were recorded from 10 infants in approximately 2400 hours of video monitoring. Logistic regression was used to identify patient and alarm-level factors that modulate nurse-responsiveness to critical alarms, with a response being defined as a nurse entering the patient's room within the 90s of the alarm being generated. Based on the questionnaire, the majority of nurses found critical alarms to be clinically relevant even though the alarms did not always mandate clinical action. Based on video observations, for a median of 34% (IQR, 20-52) of critical alarms, the nurse was already present in the room. For the remaining alarms, the response rate within 90s was 26%. The median response time was 55s (IQR, 37-70s). Desaturation alarms were the most prevalent and accounted for more than 50% of all alarms. The odds of responding to bradycardia alarms, compared to desaturation alarms, were 1.47 (95% CI = 1.21-1.78; heuristics in determining whether or not to respond to the alarm. Amongst other factors, the category and duration of critical alarms along with the clinical status of the patient determine nurse-responsiveness to alarms.

  3. 12 CFR 361.5 - What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the FDIC's oversight and monitoring responsibilities in administering this program? 361.5 Section 361.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY MINORITY AND WOMEN OUTREACH PROGRAM CONTRACTING § 361...

  4. Camera-based microswitch technology to monitor mouth, eyebrow, and eyelid responses of children with profound multiple disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lancioni, G.E.; Bellini, D.; Oliva, D.; Singh, N.N.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Sigafoos, J.; Lang, R.B.; Didden, H.C.M.

    2011-01-01

    A camera-based microswitch technology was recently used to successfully monitor small eyelid and mouth responses of two adults with profound multiple disabilities (Lancioni et al., Res Dev Disab 31:1509-1514, 2010a). This technology, in contrast with the traditional optic microswitches used for

  5. Development of lichen response indexes using a regional gradient modeling approach for large-scale monitoring of forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Will-Wolf; Peter Neitlich

    2010-01-01

    Development of a regional lichen gradient model from community data is a powerful tool to derive lichen indexes of response to environmental factors for large-scale and long-term monitoring of forest ecosystems. The Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service includes lichens in its national inventory of forests of...

  6. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M. Th; Teixeira, Suzana C.; Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T. F. D.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were acquired

  7. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Teixeira, Suzana C; Pengel, Kenneth E; Loo, Claudette E; Vogel, Wouter V; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Sonke, Gabe S; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and

  8. Comparison of HIV-1 genotypic resistance test interpretation systems in predicting virological outcomes over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Frentz (Dineke); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); M. Assel (Matthias); A. de Luca (Andrea); M. Fabbiani (Massimiliano); F. Incardona (Francesca); P. Libin (Pieter); N. Manca (Nino); V. Müller (Viktor); B.O. Nualláin (Breanndán); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Prosperi (Mattia); E. Quiros-Roldan (Eugenia); L. Ruiz (Lidia); P.M.A. Sloot (Peter); C. Torti (Carlo); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); K. Laethem (Kristel); M. Zazzi (Maurizio); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Several decision support systems have been developed to interpret HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping results. This study compares the ability of the most commonly used systems (ANRS, Rega, and Stanford's HIVdb) to predict virological outcome at 12, 24, and 48 weeks.

  9. The value of Institute of Human Virology meeting abstracts and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This month Retrovirology publishes the meeting abstracts from the 10th annual Institute of Human Virology conference held August 29th to September 2nd, 2005 in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. In this editorial, the rationale for publishing meeting abstracts is discussed.

  10. Rift Valley fever outbreak, Mauritania, 1998: seroepidemiologic, virologic, entomologic, and zoologic investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabeth, P; Kane, Y; Abdalahi, M O; Diallo, M; Ndiaye, K; Ba, K; Schneegans, F; Sall, A A; Mathiot, C

    2001-01-01

    A Rift Valley fever outbreak occurred in Mauritania in 1998. Seroepidemiologic and virologic investigation showed active circulation of the Rift Valley fever virus, with 13 strains isolated, and 16% (range 1.5%-38%) immunoglobulin (Ig) M-positivity in sera from 90 humans and 343 animals (sheep, goats, camels, cattle, and donkeys). One human case was fatal.

  11. Multi-Scale Monitoring and Prediction of System Responses to Biostimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan Hubbard; Jill Banfield; Jinsong Chen; Mark Conrad; Jenny Druhan; Andreas Englert; Andreas Kemna; LiLi; Phil Long; Michael O'Brien; Dimtrios Ntarlagiannis; Yves Personna; Steve Pride; Lee Slater; Carl Steefel; Ken William

    2007-01-01

    To advance solutions needed for remediation of DOE contaminated sites, approaches are needed that can elucidate and predict reactions associated with coupled biological, geochemical, and hydrological processes over a variety of spatial scales and in heterogeneous environments. Our previous laboratory experimental experiments, which were conducted under controlled and homogeneous conditions, suggest that geophysical methods have the potential for elucidating system transformations that often occur during remediation. Examples include tracking the onset and aggregation of precipitates associated with sulfate reduction using seismic and complex resistivity methods (Williams et al., 2005; Ntarlagiannis et al., 2005) as well as estimating the volume of evolved gas associated with denitrification using radar velocity. These exciting studies illustrated that geophysical responses correlated with biogeochemical changes, but also that multiple factors could impact the geophysical signature and thus a better understanding as well as integration tools were needed to advance the techniques to the point where they can be used to provide quantitative estimates of system transformations. Our current research includes theoretical, numerical, and experimental investigations, performed at the laboratory and the field scales, to determine if geophysical methods can be used to uniquely monitor system transformations. Our work is geared toward the Uranium Mill Tailings site at Rifle, CO, site (Figure 1), where ERSP-sponsored investigations are exploring the efficacy of electron-donor amendments for facilitating sustainable microbial reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) through a series of local-scale field experiments conducted in 2002-2005 (Anderson et al., 2003; Vrionis et al, 2005) Early experiments at the site showed that U(VI) loss from groundwater occurred synchronously with growth of Geobacter after acetate amendment, and illustrated the importance of maintaining iron-reducing conditions

  12. Immuno-Virological Discordance and the Risk of NonAIDS and AIDS Events in a Large Observational Cohort of HIV-Patients in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zoufaly, Alexander; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Reekie, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    The impact of immunosuppression despite virological suppression (immuno-virological discordance, ID) on the risk of developing fatal and non-fatal AIDS/non-AIDS events is unclear and remains to be elucidated....

  13. But I Trust My Teen: Parents' Attitudes and Response to a Parental Monitoring Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Metzger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Parental knowledge gained from monitoring activities protects against adolescent risk involvement. Parental monitoring approaches are varied and may be modified with successful interventions but not all parents or adolescents respond to monitoring programs the same way. 339 parent-adolescent dyads randomized to receive a parental monitoring intervention and 169 parent-adolescent dyads in the control group were followed for one year over four measurement periods. Parent attitudes about the usefulness of monitoring, the importance of trust and respecting their teens’ privacy, and the appropriateness of adolescent risk-taking behavior and experimentation were examined as predictors of longitudinal change in parental monitoring and open communication. Similar effects were found in both the intervention and control group models regarding open communication. Parental attitudes impacted longitudinal patterns of teen-reported parent monitoring, and these patterns differed across experimental groups. In the intervention group, parents’ beliefs about the importance of trust and privacy were associated with a steeper decline in monitoring across time. Finally, parents’ attitudes about the normative nature of teen experimentation were associated with a quadratic parental monitoring time trend in the intervention but not the control group. These findings suggest that parental attitudes may impact how families respond to an adolescent risk intervention.

  14. Baseline natural killer and T cell populations correlation with virologic outcome after regimen simplification to atazanavir/ritonavir alone (ACTG 5201.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E McKinnon

    Full Text Available Simplified maintenance therapy with ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r provides an alternative treatment option for HIV-1 infection that spares nucleoside analogs (NRTI for future use and decreased toxicity. We hypothesized that the level of immune activation (IA and recovery of lymphocyte populations could influence virologic outcomes after regimen simplification.Thirty-four participants with virologic suppression ≥ 48 weeks on antiretroviral therapy (2 NRTI plus protease inhibitor were switched to ATV/r alone in the context of the ACTG 5201 clinical trial. Flow cytometric analyses were performed on PBMC isolated from 25 patients with available samples, of which 24 had lymphocyte recovery sufficient for this study. Assessments included enumeration of T-cells (CD4/CD8, natural killer (NK (CD3+CD56+CD16+ cells and cell-associated markers (HLA-DR, CD's 38/69/94/95/158/279.Eight of the 24 patients had at least one plasma HIV-1 RNA level (VL >50 copies/mL during the study. NK cell levels below the group median of 7.1% at study entry were associated with development of VL >50 copies/mL following simplification by regression and survival analyses (p = 0.043 and 0.023, with an odds ratio of 10.3 (95% CI: 1.92-55.3. Simplification was associated with transient increases in naïve and CD25+ CD4+ T-cells, and had no impact on IA levels.Lower NK cell levels prior to regimen simplification were predictive of virologic rebound after discontinuation of nucleoside analogs. Regimen simplification did not have a sustained impact on markers of IA or T lymphocyte populations in 48 weeks of clinical monitoring.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00084019.

  15. A detection method in living plant cells for rapidly monitoring the response of plants to exogenous lanthanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mengzhu; Wang, Lihong; Yang, Qing; Huang, Xiaohua

    2018-08-30

    The pollution of rare earth elements (REEs) in ecosystem is becoming more and more serious, so it is urgent to establish methods for monitoring the pollution of REEs. Monitoring environmental pollution via the response of plants to pollutants has become the most stable and accurate method compared with traditional methods, but scientists still need to find the primary response of plants to pollutants to improve the sensitivity and speed of this method. Based on the facts that the initiation of endocytosis is the primary cellular response of the plant leaf cells to REEs and the detection of endocytosis is complex and expensive, we constructed a detection method in living plant cells for rapidly monitoring the response of plants to exogenous lanthanum [La(III), a representative of REEs] by designing a new immuno-electrochemical method for detecting the content change in extracellular vitronectin-like protein (VN) that are closely related to endocytosis. Results showed that when 30 μM La(III) initiated a small amount of endocytosis, the content of extracellular VN increased by 5.46 times, but the structure and function of plasma membrane were not interfered by La(III); when 80 μM La(III) strongly initiated a large amount of endocytosis, the content of extracellular VN increased by 119 times, meanwhile, the structure and function of plasma membrane were damaged. In summary, the detection method can reflect the response of plants to La(III) via detecting the content change in extracellular VN, which provides an effective and convenient way to monitor the response of plants to exogenous REEs. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsay JR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available J Russell Ramsay Adult ADHD Treatment & Research Program, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. Keywords: adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, adult ADHD, pharmacotherapy, psychosocial treatment, symptoms, functional impairments, executive functions

  17. Longitudinal monitoring of bottlenose dolphin leukocyte cytokine mRNA responsiveness by qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both veterinarians caring for bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in managed populations and researchers monitoring wild populations use blood-based diagnostics to monitor bottlenose dolphin health. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to assess cytokine expression patterns of peripheral blood m...

  18. Response of consumer and research grade indoor air quality monitors to residential sources of fine particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, B C; Delp, W W

    2018-04-23

    The ability to inexpensively monitor PM 2.5 to identify sources and enable controls would advance residential indoor air quality (IAQ) management. Consumer IAQ monitors incorporating low-cost optical particle sensors and connections with smart home platforms could provide this service if they reliably detect PM 2.5 in homes. In this study, particles from typical residential sources were generated in a 120 m 3 laboratory and time-concentration profiles were measured with 7 consumer monitors (2-3 units each), 2 research monitors (Thermo pDR-1500, MetOne BT-645), a Grimm Mini Wide-Range Aerosol Spectrometer (GRM), and a Tapered Element Oscillating Microbalance with Filter Dynamic Measurement System (FDMS), a Federal Equivalent Method for PM 2.5 . Sources included recreational combustion (candles, cigarettes, incense), cooking activities, an unfiltered ultrasonic humidifier, and dust. FDMS measurements, filter samples, and known densities were used to adjust the GRM to obtain time-resolved mass concentrations. Data from the research monitors and 4 of the consumer monitors-AirBeam, AirVisual, Foobot, Purple Air-were time correlated and within a factor of 2 of the estimated mass concentrations for most sources. All 7 of the consumer and both research monitors substantially under-reported or missed events for which the emitted mass was comprised of particles smaller than 0.3 μm diameter. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The role of interferon gamma release assays in the monitoring of response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Junaid; Pillay, Manormoney; Jeena, Prakash

    2014-09-01

    Successful control of childhood TB requires early diagnosis, effective chemotherapy and a method of evaluating the response to therapy. Identification of suitable biomarkers that predict the response to anti-TB therapy may allow the duration of treatment to be shortened. The majority of biomarker studies in paediatric TB have focused on the role of T cell-based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) in the diagnosis of either latent or active disease. Little has been published on the role of IGRAs in the monitoring response to therapy in children. We reviewed the available literature to ascertain the value of IGRAs in the monitoring of response to anti-TB therapy in children. We explored the results of the few studies that have investigated the role of IGRAs as markers of response to anti-TB treatment in children. We conclude that the role of IGRAs as surrogate markers appears promising. Robust clinical trials are, however, needed to entrench the value of IGRAs as surrogate biomarkers of response to anti-TB therapy in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Monitoring T-Cell Responses in Translational Studies: Optimization of Dye-Based Proliferation Assay for Evaluation of Antigen-Specific Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ten Brinke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with regulatory T cells or tolerance-inducing antigen (Ag-presenting cells is innovative and promising therapeutic approach to control undesired and harmful activation of the immune system, as observed in autoimmune diseases, solid organ and bone marrow transplantation. One of the critical issues to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for success or failure of these therapies and define the specificity of the therapy is the evaluation of the Ag-specific T-cell responses. Several efforts have been made to develop suitable and reproducible assays. Here, we focus on dye-based proliferation assays. We highlight with practical examples the fundamental issues to take into consideration for implementation of an effective and sensitive dye-based proliferation assay to monitor Ag-specific responses in patients. The most critical points were used to design a road map to set up and analyze the optimal assay to assess Ag-specific T-cell responses in patients undergoing different treatments. This is the first step to optimize monitoring of tolerance induction, allowing comparison of outcomes of different clinical studies. The road map can also be applied to other therapeutic interventions, not limited to tolerance induction therapies, in which Ag-specific T-cell responses are relevant such as vaccination approaches and cancer immunotherapy.

  1. Low-complexity Wireless Monitoring of Respiratory Movements Using Ultra-wideband Impulse Response Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh; Ballal, Tarig; Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    In this paper; we present a comprehensive scheme for wireless monitoring of the respiratory movements in humans. Our scheme overcomes the challenges low signal-to-noise ratio, background clutter and high sampling rates. It is based on the estimation

  2. Assessment of the Initial Response from Tsunami Monitoring Services Provided to the Northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Cordero, L.; Meltzer, A.

    2014-12-01

    A mag 6.4 earthquake offshore northern Puerto Rico earlier this year (1/13/14) is a reminder of the high risk of earthquakes and tsunamis in the northeastern Caribbean. Had the magnitude of this event been 0.1 larger (M 6.5) a tsunami warning would have been issued for the Puerto Rico-Virgin Islands (PRVI) region based on the West Coast Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (WCATWC) and Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN) response procedures at the time. Such an alert level would have led local authorities to issue evacuation orders for all PRVI coastal areas. Since the number of deaths associated with tsunamis in the Caribbean region is greater than the total casualties from tsunamis in the entire US (including Hawaii and Alaska coasts) having an effective and redundant warning system is critical in order to save lives and to minimize false alarms that could result in significant economic costs and loss of confidence of Caribbean residents. We are evaluating three fundamental components of tsunami monitoring protocols currently in place in the northeastern Caribbean: 1) preliminary earthquake parameters (used to determine the potential that a tsunami will be generated and the basis of tsunami alert levels), 2) adequacy of the tsunami alert levels, and 3) tsunami message dissemination. We compiled a catalog of earthquake locations (2007-2014) and dissemination times from the PTWC, WCATWC and NEIC (final locations). The events were classified into 3 categories: local [17°-20°N, 63.5°-69°W], regional (Caribbean basin) and distant/teleseismic (Atlantic basin). A total of 104 local earthquakes, 31 regional and 25 distant events were analyzed. We found that in general preliminary epicentral locations have an accuracy of 40 km. 64% of local events were located with an accuracy of 20 km. The depth accuracy of local events shallower than 50 km, regional and distant earthquakes is usually smaller than 30 km. For deeper local events the error distribution shows more variability

  3. Nevirapine Concentration in Hair Samples Is a Strong Predictor of Virologic Suppression in a Prospective Cohort of HIV-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv M Baxi

    Full Text Available Effective antiretroviral (ARV therapy depends on adequate drug exposure, yet methods to assess ARV exposure are limited. Concentrations of ARV in hair are the product of steady-state pharmacokinetics factors and longitudinal adherence. We investigated nevirapine (NVP concentrations in hair as a predictor of treatment response in women receiving ARVs. In participants of the Women's Interagency HIV Study, who reported NVP use for >1 month from 2003-2008, NVP concentrations in hair were measured via liquid-chromatography-tandem mass-spectrometry. The outcome was virologic suppression (plasma HIV RNA below assay threshold at the time of hair sampling and the primary predictor was nevirapine concentration categorized into quartiles. We controlled for age, race/ethnicity, pre-treatment HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, and self-reported adherence over the 6-month visit interval (categorized ≤ 74%, 75%-94% or ≥ 95%. We also assessed the relation of NVP concentration with changes in hepatic transaminase levels via multivariate random intercept logistic regression and linear regression analyses. 271 women contributed 1089 person-visits to the analysis (median 3 of semi-annual visits. Viral suppression was least frequent in concentration quartile 1 (86/178 (48.3% and increased in higher quartiles (to 158/204 (77.5% for quartile 4. The odds of viral suppression in the highest concentration quartile were 9.17 times (95% CI 3.2-26, P < 0.0001 those in the lowest. African-American race was associated with lower rates of virologic suppression independent of NVP hair concentration. NVP concentration was not significantly associated with patterns of serum transaminases. Concentration of NVP in hair was a strong independent predictor of virologic suppression in women taking NVP, stronger than self-reported adherence, but did not appear to be strongly predictive of hepatotoxicity.

  4. The Virological and Immunological Characteristics of the HIV-1-Infected Population in Brazil: From Initial Diagnosis to Impact of Antiretroviral Use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Sobhie Diaz

    Full Text Available Immunological and virological status of HIV-infected individuals entering the Brazilian public system over time was analyzed. We evaluated the impact of ART on virological, immunological and antiretroviral resistance over time.CD4+ T cell counts, viral loads and genotypes from patients over 13 years old from 2001-2011 were analyzed according to demographic data. We compared groups using parametric t-tests and linear regression analysis in the R statistical software language.Mean baseline CD4+ T cell counts varied from 348 (2003 to 389 (2009 and was higher among women (p = 1.1 x 10(-8, lower in older patients (p< 1 x 10(-8 and lower in less developed regions (p = 1.864 x 10(-5. Percentage of treated patients with undetectable viral loads increased linearly from 46% (2001 to 77% (2011, was lower among women (p = 2.851 x 10(-6, younger ages (p = 1 x 10(-3, and in less developed regions (p = 1.782 x 10(-4. NRTI acquired resistance was 86% in 2001-3 and decreased over time. NNRTI resistance increased from 2001-3(50% to 2006-9 (60%, PI resistance decreased from 2001-3 (60% to 2009 (40%, and 3-class resistance was stable over time around 25%. Subtype prevalence comprised B (75.3%, B/F recombinants (12.2%, C (5.7%, F (5.3% and B/C recombinants (1.5%, with regional variations. Three-class resistance was 26.5% among Bs, 22.4% among Fs and 17.2% among Cs.HIV diagnosis occurs late, especially among elderly Brazilians. Younger individuals need special attention due to poor virological response to treatment. Antiretroviral Resistance profile is subtype related.

  5. Beta response of CaSO4:Dy based TLD badge and its angular dependence studies for personnel monitoring applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Munish; Rakesh, R.B.; Sneha, C.; Ratna, P.; Bakshi, A.K.; Datta, D.

    2016-01-01

    In India, shallow/skin doses received by radiation workers from beta particles are measured using CaSO 4 :Dy based Teflon embedded TLD badge. The beta particles having maximum energy E max > 0.6 MeV - ≥ 3.54 MeV are monitored. The ratio of the response of discs under open and plastic regions (D Open/ D Perspex ) is used to estimate the energy of the beta source and to apply response correction factor. This is required as the disc dosimeters are thick and exhibit energy dependent response. Due to lack of comprehensive information regarding disc ratios and associated beta multiplication/response correction factors, present study was performed

  6. Antiretroviral treatment interruptions induced by the Kenyan postelection crisis are associated with virological failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Marita; Diero, Lameck; Kemboi, Emmanuel; Mambo, Fidelis; Rono, Mary; Injera, Wilfred; Delong, Allison; Schreier, Leeann; Kaloustian, Kara W; Sidle, John; Buziba, Nathan; Kantor, Rami

    2013-10-01

    Antiretroviral treatment interruptions (TIs) cause suboptimal clinical outcomes. Data on TIs during social disruption are limited. We determined effects of unplanned TIs after the 2007-2008 Kenyan postelection violence on virological failure, comparing viral load (VL) outcomes in HIV-infected adults with and without conflict-induced TI. Two hundred and one patients were enrolled, median 2.2 years after conflict and 4.3 years on treatment. Eighty-eight patients experienced conflict-related TIs and 113 received continuous treatment. After adjusting for preconflict CD4, patients with TIs were more likely to have detectable VL, VL >5,000 and VL >10,000. Unplanned conflict-related TIs are associated with increased likelihood of virological failure.

  7. Potential use of salivary markers for longitudinal monitoring of inflammatory immune responses to vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, Pei Wen; Garssen, Johan; Sandalova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination, designed to trigger a protective immune response against infection, is a trigger for mild inflammatory responses. Vaccination studies can address the question of inflammation initiation, levels, and resolution as well as its regulation for respective studied pathogens. Such studies

  8. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip J Palumbo

    Full Text Available Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART. We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008. The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  9. Association of HIV diversity and virologic outcomes in early antiretroviral treatment: HPTN 052.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Philip J; Wilson, Ethan A; Piwowar-Manning, Estelle; McCauley, Marybeth; Gamble, Theresa; Kumwenda, Newton; Makhema, Joseph; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Chariyalertsak, Suwat; Hakim, James G; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Melo, Marineide G; Godbole, Sheela V; Pilotto, Jose H; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Panchia, Ravindre; Chen, Ying Q; Cohen, Myron S; Eshleman, Susan H; Fogel, Jessica M

    2017-01-01

    Higher HIV diversity has been associated with virologic outcomes in children on antiretroviral treatment (ART). We examined the association of HIV diversity with virologic outcomes in adults from the HPTN 052 trial who initiated ART at CD4 cell counts of 350-550 cells/mm3. A high resolution melting (HRM) assay was used to analyze baseline (pre-treatment) HIV diversity in six regions in the HIV genome (two in gag, one in pol, and three in env) from 95 participants who failed ART. We analyzed the association of HIV diversity in each genomic region with baseline (pre-treatment) factors and three clinical outcomes: time to virologic suppression after ART initiation, time to ART failure, and emergence of HIV drug resistance at ART failure. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we did not find any association of baseline HIV diversity with demographic, laboratory, or clinical characteristics. For the 18 analyses performed for clinical outcomes evaluated, there was only one significant association: higher baseline HIV diversity in one of the three HIV env regions was associated with longer time to ART failure (p = 0.008). The HRM diversity assay may be useful in future studies exploring the relationship between HIV diversity and clinical outcomes in individuals with HIV infection.

  10. Enhanced sealing project: monitoring the THM response of a full-scale shaft seal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Holowick, B.; Priyanto, D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Closure of the subsurface facilities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) was completed in 2010 with installation of a concrete surface cap. Additionally, as part of decommissioning, seals were installed at the penetration of the shafts through the major hydro-geological feature known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2). The seal construction was funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The shaft seals at the URL were based on the composite seal concept developed for application in a deep geological repository for disposal of used nuclear fuel. The access shaft seal consists of two 3-m thick concrete segments that rigidly confine a 6-m long section of swelling clay-based material (40% bentonite clay - 60% sand by dry mass). Monitoring of the regional groundwater recovery following flooding of the lower shaft is a closure requirement and was included in the design. It was widely recognized that the installation of the seals at the URL represented a unique opportunity to monitor the evolution of the type of seal that might be installed in an actual repository but the NLLP mandate did not include any monitoring of shaft seal evolution. As a result the Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP) partnership composed of NWMO, Posiva, SKB and ANDRA was established and a set of 68 instruments (containing 100 sensors) were installed to monitor the evolution of the seal. In the first year of operation sensors have monitored the following parameters in the ESP: thermal evolution and strain of the concrete components, thermal, hydraulic and mechanical changes in the clay component and its contacts with the rock and concrete confinement. Additionally, monitoring of the near-field and regional groundwater evolution has been undertaken. Monitoring of the short-term thermal-mechanical evolution of the concrete components was successfully accomplished and only a small temperature rise occurred due to

  11. Enhanced sealing project: monitoring the THM response of a full-scale shaft seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, D.A.; Martino, J.B.; Holowick, B.; Priyanto, D.

    2011-01-01

    Closure of the subsurface facilities at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Underground Research Laboratory (URL) was completed in 2010 with installation of a concrete surface cap. Additionally, as part of decommissioning, seals were installed at the penetration of the shafts through the major hydro-geological feature known as Fracture Zone 2 (FZ2). The seal construction was funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) under the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The shaft seals at the URL were based on the composite seal concept developed for application in a deep geological repository for disposal of used nuclear fuel. The access shaft seal consists of two 3-m thick concrete segments that rigidly confine a 6-m long section of swelling clay-based material (40% bentonite clay - 60% sand by dry mass). Monitoring of the regional groundwater recovery following flooding of the lower shaft is a closure requirement and was included in the design. It was widely recognized that the installation of the seals at the URL represented a unique opportunity to monitor the evolution of the type of seal that might be installed in an actual repository but the NLLP mandate did not include any monitoring of shaft seal evolution. As a result the Enhanced Sealing Project (ESP) partnership composed of NWMO, Posiva, SKB and ANDRA was established and a set of 68 instruments (containing 100 sensors) were installed to monitor the evolution of the seal. In the first year of operation sensors have monitored the following parameters in the ESP: thermal evolution and strain of the concrete components, thermal, hydraulic and mechanical changes in the clay component and its contacts with the rock and concrete confinement. Additionally, monitoring of the near-field and regional groundwater evolution has been undertaken. Monitoring of the short-term thermal-mechanical evolution of the concrete components was successfully accomplished and only a small temperature rise occurred due to

  12. Gender-specific risk factors for virologic failure in KwaZulu-Natal: automobile ownership and financial insecurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Anna Q; Ordóñez, Claudia E; Johnson, Brent A; Del Rio, Carlos; Kearns, Rachel A; Wu, Baohua; Hampton, Jane; Wu, Peng; Sunpath, Henry; Marconi, Vincent C

    2014-11-01

    We sought to examine which socioeconomic indicators are risk factors for virologic failure among HIV-1 infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A case-control study of virologic failure was conducted among patients recruited from the outpatient clinic at McCord Hospital in Durban, South Africa between October 1, 2010 and June 30, 2012. Cases were those failing first-line ART, defined as viral load >1,000 copies/mL. Univariate logistic regression was performed on sociodemographic data for the outcome of virologic failure. Variables found significant (p ownership was a risk factor among males, while variables of financial insecurity (unemployment, non-spouse family paying for care, staying with family) were risk factors for women. In this cohort, financial insecurity among women and automobile ownership among men were risk factors for virologic failure. Risk factor differences between genders demonstrate limitations of generalized risk factor analysis.

  13. Association of Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence With Inflammation in Virologically Suppressed Individuals Enrolled in the SMART Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Phillips, Andrew N; Neaton, James D

    2018-01-01

    Suboptimal (ie, <100%) antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence has been associated with heightened inflammation in cohort studies, even among people with virologic suppression. We aimed to evaluate this association among participants in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMAR...

  14. Determinants of virological outcome and adverse events in African children treated with paediatric nevirapine fixed-dose-combination tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bienczak, A.; Denti, P.; Cook, A.; Wiesner, L.; Mulenga, V.; Kityo, C.; Kekitiinwa, A.; Gibb, D.M.; Burger, D.M.; Walker, A.S.; McIlleron, H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nevirapine is the only nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor currently available as a paediatric fixed-dose-combination tablet and is widely used in African children. Nonetheless, the number of investigations into pharmacokinetic determinants of virological suppression in African

  15. Development of a Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring Network for Emergency Response at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoldo, N; Hunter, S; Fertig, R; Laguna, G; MacQueen, D

    2004-01-01

    A real-time radiological sensor network for emergency response was developed and deployed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The Real-Time Radiological Area Monitoring (RTRAM) network is comprised of 16 Geiger-Mueller (GM) sensors positioned on the LLNL Livermore site perimeter to continuously monitor for a radiological condition resulting from a terrorist threat to site security and the health and safety of LLNL personnel. The RTRAM network sensor locations coincide with wind sector directions to provide thorough coverage of the one square mile site. These loW--power sensors are supported by a central command center (CCC) and transmit measurement data back to the CCC computer through the LLNL telecommunications infrastructure. Alarm conditions are identified by comparing current data to predetermined threshold parameters and are validated by comparison with plausible dispersion modeling scenarios and prevailing meteorological conditions. Emergency response personnel are notified of alarm conditions by automatic radio and computer based notifications. A secure intranet provides emergency response personnel with current condition assessment data that enable them to direct field response efforts remotely. The RTRAM network has proven to be a reliable system since initial deployment in August 2001 and maintains stability during inclement weather conditions

  16. The national response for preventing healthcare-associated infections: data and monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Katherine L; Weinberg, Daniel A; Leuschner, Kristin J; Gall, Elizabeth M; Siegel, Sari; Mendel, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Historically, the ability to accurately track healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) was hindered due to a lack of coordination among data sources and shortcomings in individual data sources. This paper presents the results of the evaluation of the HAI data and the monitoring component of the Action Plan, focusing on context (goals), inputs, and processes. We used the Content-Input-Process-Product framework, together with the HAI prevention system framework, to describe the transformative processes associated with data and monitoring efforts. Six HAI priority conditions in the 2009 Action Plan created a focus for the selection of goals and activities. Key Action Plan decisions included a phased-in data and monitoring approach, commitment to linking the selection of priority HAIs to highly visible national 5-year prevention targets, and the development of a comprehensive HAI database inventory. Remaining challenges relate to data validation, resources, and the opportunity to integrate electronic health and laboratory records with other provider data systems. The Action Plan's data and monitoring program has developed a sound infrastructure that builds upon technological advances and embodies a firm commitment to prioritization, coordination and alignment, accountability and incentives, stakeholder engagement, and an awareness of the need for predictable resources. With time, and adequate resources, it is likely that the investment in data-related infrastructure during the Action Plan's initial years will reap great rewards.

  17. Monitoring stream sediment loads in response to agriculture in Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Ashley; St-Hilaire, Andre; Courtenay, Simon C; van den Heuvel, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Increased agricultural land use leads to accelerated erosion and deposition of fine sediment in surface water. Monitoring of suspended sediment yields has proven challenging due to the spatial and temporal variability of sediment loading. Reliable sediment yield calculations depend on accurate monitoring of these highly episodic sediment loading events. This study aims to quantify precipitation-induced loading of suspended sediments on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Turbidity is considered to be a reasonably accurate proxy for suspended sediment data. In this study, turbidity was used to monitor suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and was measured for 2 years (December 2012-2014) in three subwatersheds with varying degrees of agricultural land use ranging from 10 to 69 %. Comparison of three turbidity meter calibration methods, two using suspended streambed sediment and one using automated sampling during rainfall events, revealed that the use of SSC samples constructed from streambed sediment was not an accurate replacement for water column sampling during rainfall events for calibration. Different particle size distributions in the three rivers produced significant impacts on the calibration methods demonstrating the need for river-specific calibration. Rainfall-induced sediment loading was significantly greater in the most agriculturally impacted site only when the load per rainfall event was corrected for runoff volume (total flow minus baseflow), flow increase intensity (the slope between the start of a runoff event and the peak of the hydrograph), and season. Monitoring turbidity, in combination with sediment modeling, may offer the best option for management purposes.

  18. Sensitivity and environmental response of the CMS RPC gas gain monitoring system

    CERN Document Server

    Benussi, L.; Colafranceschi, S.; Fabbri, F.L.; Giardoni, M.; Ortenzi, B.; Paolozzi, A.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Russo, A.; Colaleo, A.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, M.; Ranieri, A.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Marangelli, B.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pugliese, G.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Guida, R.; Polese, G.; Sharma, A.; Cimmino, A.; Lomidze, D.; Paolucci, D.; Piccolo, P.; Baesso, P.; Necchi, M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S.P.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.

    Results from the gas gain monitoring (GGM) system for the muon detector using RPC in the CMS experiment at the LHC is presented. The system is designed to provide fast and accurate determination of any shift in the working point of the chambers due to gas mixture changes.

  19. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume

  20. Effects of Interactive Voice Response Self-Monitoring on Natural Resolution of Drinking Problems: Utilization and Behavioral Economic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Jalie A.; Roth, David L.; Huang, Jin; Scott Crawford, M.; Simpson, Cathy A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Most problem drinkers do not seek help, and many recover on their own. A randomized controlled trial evaluated whether supportive interactive voice response (IVR) self-monitoring facilitated such “natural” resolutions. Based on behavioral economics, effects on drinking outcomes were hypothesized to vary with drinkers’ baseline “time horizons,” reflecting preferences among commodities of different value available over different delays and with their IVR utilization. Method: Recently resolved untreated problem drinkers were randomized to a 24-week IVR self-monitoring program (n = 87) or an assessment-only control condition (n = 98). Baseline interviews assessed outcome predictors including behavioral economic measures of reward preferences (delay discounting, pre-resolution monetary allocation to alcohol vs. savings). Six-month outcomes were categorized as resolved abstinent, resolved nonabstinent, unresolved, or missing. Complier average causal effect (CACE) models examined IVR self-monitoring effects. Results: IVR self-monitoring compliers (≥70% scheduled calls completed) were older and had greater pre-resolution drinking control and lower discounting than noncompliers (moderation than abstinent resolutions compared with predicted compliers in the control group with shorter time horizons and with all noncompliers. Intention-to-treat analytical models revealed no IVR-related effects. More balanced spending on savings versus alcohol predicted moderation in both approaches. Conclusions: IVR interventions should consider factors affecting IVR utilization and drinking outcomes, including person-specific behavioral economic variables. CACE models provide tools to evaluate interventions involving extended participation. PMID:22630807

  1. Noradrenaline and acetylcholine responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Bernadett; Szabó, István; Csetényi, Bettina; Hormay, Edina; Papp, Szilárd; Keresztes, Dóra; Karádi, Zoltán

    2014-01-16

    The mediodorsal prefrontal cortex (mdPFC), as part of the forebrain glucose-monitoring (GM) system, plays important role in several regulatory processes to control the internal state of the organism and to initiate behavioral outputs accordingly. Little is known, however, about the neurochemical sensitivity of neurons located in this area. Substantial evidence indicates that the locus ceruleus - noradrenaline (NA) projection system and the nucleus basalis magnocellularis - cholinergic projection system regulate behavioral state and state dependent processing of sensory information, various cognitive functions already associated with the mdPFC. The main goal of the present study was to examine noradrenergic and cholinergic responsiveness of glucose-monitoring and glucose-insensitive (GIS) neurons in the mediodorsal prefrontal cortex. One fifth of the neurons tested changed in firing rate to microelectrophoretically applied NA. Responsiveness of the GM cells to this catecholamine proved to be significantly higher than that of the GIS units. Microiontophoretic application of acetylcholine (Ach) resulted in activity changes (predominantly facilitation) of more than 40% of the mdPFC neurons. Proportion of Ach sensitive units among the GM and the GIS neurons was found to be similar. The glucose-monitoring neurons of the mdPFC and their distinct NA and remarkable Ach sensitivity are suggested to be of particular significance in prefrontal control of adaptive behaviors. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. The Effect of Malnutrition on the Pharmacokinetics and Virologic Outcomes of Lopinavir, Efavirenz and Nevirapine in Food Insecure HIV-Infected Children in Tororo, Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelink, Imke H.; Savic, Rada M.; Dorsey, Grant; Ruel, Theodore; Gingrich, David; Scherpbier, Henriette J.; Capparelli, Edmund; Jullien, Vincent; Young, Sera L.; Achan, Jane; Plenty, Albert; Charlebois, Edwin; Kamya, Moses; Havlir, Diane; Aweeka, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Background Malnutrition may impact the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antiretroviral medications and virologic responses in HIV-infected children. We therefore evaluated the PK of nevirapine (NVP), efavirenz (EFV) and lopinavir (LPV) in associations with nutritional status in a cohort of HIV-infected Ugandan children. Methods Sparse dried blood spot (DBS) samples from Ugandan children were used to estimate plasma concentrations. Historical PK data from children from three resource-rich countries (RRC) were utilized to develop the PK models. Results Concentrations in 330 DBS from 163 Ugandan children aged 0.7–7 years were analyzed in reference to plasma PK data (1189 samples) from 204 children from RRC aged 0.5–12 years. Among Ugandan children 48% was malnourished (underweight, thin or stunted). Compared to RRC, Ugandan children exhibited reduced bioavailability of EFV and LPV; 11% (P=0.045) and 18% (P=0.008) respectively. In contrast, NVP bioavailability was 46% higher in Ugandan children (Pmalnutrition on bioavailability. In children receiving NVP, the relation between exposure, malnutrition and outcome turned out to be marginally significant. Further investigations are warranted using more intensive PK measurements and adequate adherence assessements, to further assess causes of virologic failure in Ugandan children. PMID:25742090

  3. Design of overload vehicle monitoring and response system based on DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Liu, Yiheng; Zhao, Xuefeng

    2014-03-01

    The overload vehicles are making much more damage to the road surface than the regular ones. Many roads and bridges are equipped with structural health monitoring system (SHM) to provide early-warning to these damage and evaluate the safety of road and bridge. However, because of the complex nature of SHM system, it's expensive to manufacture, difficult to install and not well-suited for the regular bridges and roads. Based on this application background, this paper designs a compact structural health monitoring system based on DSP, which is highly integrated, low-power, easy to install and inexpensive to manufacture. The designed system is made up of sensor arrays, the charge amplifier module, the DSP processing unit, the alarm system for overload, and the estimate for damage of the road and bridge structure. The signals coming from sensor arrays go through the charge amplifier. DSP processing unit will receive the amplified signals, estimate whether it is an overload signal or not, and convert analog variables into digital ones so that they are compatible with the back-end digital circuit for further processing. The system will also restrict certain vehicles that are overweight, by taking image of the car brand, sending the alarm, and transferring the collected pressure data to remote data center for further monitoring analysis by rain-flow counting method.

  4. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K K

    2018-01-23

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO₂), and oxidants (O x ) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO₂ and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  5. Monitoring long-term evolution of engineered barrier systems using magnets: Magnetic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigonat, N; Isnard, O; Harley, S L; Butler, I B

    2018-01-05

    Remote and non-destructive monitoring of the stability and performance of Engineered Barrier Systems for Geological Disposal Facility of is gaining considerable importance in establishing the safety cases for Higher Activity Wastes disposal. This study offers an innovative use of mineral magnetism for monitoring groundwater saturation of the barrier. Four mixtures of permanent magnets (Nd-Fe-B, coated and uncoated; SmCo and AlNiCo) and bentonite were reacted for 4, 8 and 12 months with mildly-saline, high-pH leachates, representing the fluids saturating a time-evolved engineered barrier. Coupled hysteresis and thermomagnetic analyses demonstrate how Nd-Fe-B feature a time-dependent transition from square-like ferromagnetic to superparamagnetic loop via pot-bellied and wasp-waist loops, whereas SmCo and AlNiCo do not show so extensive corrosion-related variations of the intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties. This study allowed to identify magnetic materials suitable for shorter- (Nd-Fe-B) and longer-term (SmCo and AlNiCo) monitoring purposes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-Source Autonomous Response for Targeting and Monitoring of Volcanic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ashley G.; Doubleday, Joshua R.; Tran, Daniel Q.

    2014-01-01

    The study of volcanoes is important for both purely scientific and human survival reasons. From a scientific standpoint, volcanic gas and ash emissions contribute significantly to the terrestrial atmosphere. Ash depositions and lava flows can also greatly affect local environments. From a human survival standpoint, many people live within the reach of active volcanoes, and therefore can be endangered by both atmospheric (ash, debris) toxicity and lava flow. There are many potential information sources that can be used to determine how to best monitor volcanic activity worldwide. These are of varying temporal frequency, spatial regard, method of access, and reliability. The problem is how to incorporate all of these inputs in a general framework to assign/task/reconfigure assets to monitor events in a timely fashion. In situ sensing can provide a valuable range of complementary information such as seismographic, discharge, acoustic, and other data. However, many volcanoes are not instrumented with in situ sensors, and those that have sensor networks are restricted to a relatively small numbers of point sensors. Consequently, ideal volcanic study synergistically combines space and in situ measurements. This work demonstrates an effort to integrate spaceborne sensing from MODIS (Terra and Aqua), ALI (EO-1), Worldview-2, and in situ sensing in an automated scheme to improve global volcano monitoring. Specifically, it is a "sensor web" concept in which a number of volcano monitoring systems are linked together to monitor volcanic activity more accurately, and this activity measurement automatically tasks space assets to acquire further satellite imagery of ongoing volcanic activity. A general framework was developed for evidence combination that accounts for multiple information sources in a scientist-directed fashion to weigh inputs and allocate observations based on the confidence of an events occurrence, rarity of the event at that location, and other scientists

  7. The development of artificial neural networks to predict virological response to combination HIV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larder, Brendan; Wang, Dechao; Revell, Andrew; Montaner, Julio; Harrigan, Richard; de Wolf, Frank; Lange, Joep; Wegner, Scott; Ruiz, Lidia; Pérez-Elías, Maria Jésus; Emery, Sean; Gatell, Jose; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Torti, Carlo; Zazzi, Maurizio; Lane, Clifford

    2007-01-01

    When used in combination, antiretroviral drugs are highly effective for suppressing HIV replication. Nevertheless, treatment failure commonly occurs and is generally associated with viral drug resistance. The choice of an alternative regimen may be guided by a drug-resistance test. However,

  8. Consistent haul road condition monitoring by means of vehicle response normalisation with Gaussian processes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Heyns, T

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Suboptimal haul road management policies such as routine, periodic and urgent maintenance may result in unnecessary cost, both to roads and vehicles. A recent idea is to continually access haul road condition based on measured vehicle response...

  9. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Wei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series for carbon monoxide (CO, nitric oxide (NO, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and oxidants (Ox were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO2 and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor.

  10. Monitoring shifts in plant diversity in response to climate change: A method for landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Owen, A.J.; Lee, M.

    2000-01-01

    Improved sampling designs are needed to detect, monitor, and predict plant migrations and plant diversity changes caused by climate change and other human activities. We propose a methodology based on multi-scale vegetation plots established across forest ecotones which provide baseline data on patterns of plant diversity, invasions of exotic plant species, and plant migrations at landscape scales in Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA. We established forty two 1000-m2 plots in relatively homogeneous forest types and the ecotones between them on 14 vegetation transects. We found that 64% of the variance in understory species distributions at landscape scales were described generally by gradients of elevation and under-canopy solar radiation. Superimposed on broad-scale climatic gradients are small-scale gradients characterized by patches of light, pockets of fertile soil, and zones of high soil moisture. Eighteen of the 42 plots contained at least one exotic species; monitoring exotic plant invasions provides a means to assess changes in native plant diversity and plant migrations. Plant species showed weak affinities to overstory vegetation types, with 43% of the plant species found in three or more vegetation types. Replicate transects along several environmental gradients may provide the means to monitor plant diversity and species migrations at landscape scales because: (1) ecotones may play crucial roles in expanding the geophysiological ranges of many plant species; (2) low affinities of understory species to overstory forest types may predispose vegetation types to be resilient to rapid environmental change; and (3) ecotones may help buffer plant species from extirpation and extinction.

  11. Citizen Science for Earth Observation: Applications in Environmental Monitoring and Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotovirta, V.; Toivanen, T.; Tergujeff, R.; Hame, T.; Molinier, M.

    2015-04-01

    Citizen science is a promising way to increase temporal and spatial coverages of in-situ data, and to aid in data processing and analysis. In this paper, we present how citizen science can be used together with Earth observation, and demonstrate its value through three pilot projects focusing on forest biomass analysis, data management in emergencies and water quality monitoring. We also provide recommendations and ideas for follow-up activities. In the forest biomass analysis pilot, in the state of Durango (Mexico), local volunteers make in-situ forest inventory measurements with mobile devices. The collected data is combined with Landsat-8 imagery to derive forest biomass map of the area. The study area includes over 390 permanent sampling plots that will provide reference data for concept validation and verification. The emergency data management pilot focuses in the Philippines, in the areas affected by the typhoons Haiyan in November 2013 and Hagupit in December 2014. Data collected by emergency workers and citizens are combined with satellite data (Landsat-8, VHR if available) to intensify the disaster recovery activities and the coordination efforts. Simple processes for citizens, nongovernmental organisations and volunteers are developed to find and utilize up to date and freely available satellite imagery for coordination purposes and for building new not-for-profit services in disaster situations. In the water quality monitoring pilot, citizens around the Baltic Sea area contribute to the algae situation awareness by collecting algae observations using a mobile application. In-situ observations are compared with surface algal bloom products based on the satellite imagery, e.g. Aqua MODIS images with 500 meter resolution. As an outcome, the usability of the citizen observations together with satellite data in the algae monitoring will be evaluated.

  12. Impact Analysis of Temperature and Humidity Conditions on Electrochemical Sensor Response in Ambient Air Quality Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhi; Ye, Sheng; Sun, Li; Yang, Fenhuan; Wong, Ka Chun; Westerdahl, Dane; Louie, Peter K. K.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing applications of low-cost air sensors promises more convenient and cost-effective systems for air monitoring in many places and under many conditions. However, the data quality from such systems has not been fully characterized and may not meet user expectations in research and regulatory uses, or for use in citizen science. In our study, electrochemical sensors (Alphasense B4 series) for carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and oxidants (Ox) were evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions to identify the influencing factors and quantify their relation with sensor outputs. Based on the laboratory tests, we developed different correction methods to compensate for the impact of ambient conditions. Further, the sensors were assembled into a monitoring system and tested in ambient conditions in Hong Kong side-by-side with regulatory reference monitors, and data from these tests were used to evaluate the performance of the models, to refine them, and validate their applicability in variable ambient conditions in the field. The more comprehensive correction models demonstrated enhanced performance when compared with uncorrected data. One over-arching observation of this study is that the low-cost sensors may promise excellent sensitivity and performance, but it is essential for users to understand and account for several key factors that may strongly affect the nature of sensor data. In this paper, we also evaluated factors of multi-month stability, temperature, and humidity, and considered the interaction of oxidant gases NO2 and ozone on a newly introduced oxidant sensor. PMID:29360749

  13. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristonmaa, S.

    2000-04-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  14. Emergency preparedness incident response and radiation monitoring in Finland. Annual report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristonmaa, S.

    1999-03-01

    The Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) publishes annually a report about STUK's preparedness measures. The report describes notifications received by STUK's on duty system and further measures carried out after receiving a message. In addition, the emergence exercises STUK participated in during the year are described. The radiation situation in Finland is continuously monitored. STUK is the authority who carries out a wide range of environmental measurements, sampling and sensitive laboratory analyses. The measurement results are presented in the form of tables and graphically. (editor)

  15. Response monitoring of breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound, texture, and molecular features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanan Sannachi

    Full Text Available Pathological response of breast cancer to chemotherapy is a prognostic indicator for long-term disease free and overall survival. Responses of locally advanced breast cancer in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC settings are often variable, and the prediction of response is imperfect. The purpose of this study was to detect primary tumor responses early after the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound (QUS, textural analysis and molecular features in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.The study included ninety six patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Breast tumors were scanned with a clinical ultrasound system prior to chemotherapy treatment, during the first, fourth and eighth week of treatment, and prior to surgery. Quantitative ultrasound parameters and scatterer-based features were calculated from ultrasound radio frequency (RF data within tumor regions of interest. Additionally, texture features were extracted from QUS parametric maps. Prior to therapy, all patients underwent a core needle biopsy and histological subtypes and biomarker ER, PR, and HER2 status were determined. Patients were classified into three treatment response groups based on combination of clinical and pathological analyses: complete responders (CR, partial responders (PR, and non-responders (NR. Response classifications from QUS parameters, receptors status and pathological were compared. Discriminant analysis was performed on extracted parameters using a support vector machine classifier to categorize subjects into CR, PR, and NR groups at all scan times.Of the 96 patients, the number of CR, PR and NR patients were 21, 52, and 23, respectively. The best prediction of treatment response was achieved with the combination mean QUS values, texture and molecular features with accuracies of 78%, 86% and 83% at weeks 1, 4, and 8, after treatment respectively. Mean QUS parameters or clinical receptors status alone predicted the

  16. Strategy for monitoring T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in patients with any HLA class I allele

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnjatic, Sacha; Nagata, Yasuhiro; Jäger, Elke; Stockert, Elisabeth; Shankara, Srinivas; Roberts, Bruce L.; Mazzara, Gail P.; Lee, Sang Yull; Dunbar, P. Rod; Dupont, Bo; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Ritter, Gerd; Chen, Yao-Tseng; Knuth, Alexander; Old, Lloyd J.

    2000-01-01

    NY-ESO-1 elicits frequent antibody responses in cancer patients, accompanied by strong CD8+ T cell responses against HLA-A2-restricted epitopes. To broaden the range of cancer patients who can be assessed for immunity to NY-ESO-1, a general method was devised to detect T cell reactivity independent of prior characterization of epitopes. A recombinant adenoviral vector encoding the full cDNA sequence of NY-ESO-1 was used to transduce CD8-depleted peripheral blood lymphocytes as antigen-presenting cells. These modified antigen-presenting cells were then used to restimulate memory effector cells against NY-ESO-1 from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Specific CD8+ T cells thus sensitized were assayed on autologous B cell targets infected with a recombinant vaccinia virus encoding NY-ESO-1. Strong polyclonal responses were observed against NY-ESO-1 in antibody-positive patients, regardless of their HLA profile. Because the vectors do not cross-react immunologically, only responses to NY-ESO-1 were detected. The approach described here allows monitoring of CD8+ T cell responses to NY-ESO-1 in the context of various HLA alleles and has led to the definition of NY-ESO-1 peptides presented by HLA-Cw3 and HLA-Cw6 molecules. PMID:11005863

  17. A comparison of computational models with and without genotyping for prediction of response to second-line HIV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revell, A. D.; Boyd, M. A.; Wang, D.; Emery, S.; Gazzard, B.; Reiss, P.; van Sighem, A. I.; Montaner, J. S.; Lane, H. C.; Larder, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the use of computational models developed with and without HIV genotype vs. genotyping itself to predict effective regimens for patients experiencing first-line virological failure. Two sets of models predicted virological response for 99 three-drug regimens for patients on a failing

  18. Monitoring the response of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere to a greenhouse gas scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, J.M.; Cox, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    During the past two years a system has been under development to contribute to this monitoring process by making measurement of the downwelling infrared radiance field at moderate spectral resolution. Sensitivity of the measurements to the presence of cirrus cloudiness, and effective particle size in cirrus clouds has been demonstrated. Sensitivity of the measurements to concentration of C0 2 and to the gross temperature structure of a 2CO 2 atmosphere have been modeled, and measurements have been made at various locations to provide a data base for further system evaluation. A temperature retrieval algorithm has been acquired and examined concerning its potential for monitoring temperature and gaseous concentration profiles. A continue research program is described herein that may be divided into three parts. First, continued system development must be pursued. This includes continued attention to the absolute accuracy of the measurements, and implementation of the Path Characterization Algorithm (retrieval code). Second, the value of long term deployment of the system at a site of considerable elevation is necessary. Third, inclusion of a solar transmission capability at moderate resolution is proposed

  19. Hepatic fat quantification magnetic resonance for monitoring treatment response in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hong; Kim, Seung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Kim, Hyun Gi; Shin, Hyun Joo; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2015-09-07

    To evaluate the possibility of treatment effect monitoring using hepatic fat quantification magnetic resonance (MR) in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who received educational recommendations and vitamin E for NASH and underwent hepatic fat quantification MR from 2011 to 2013. Hepatic fat fraction (%) was measured using dual- and triple-echo gradient-recalled-echo sequences at 3T. The compliant and non-compliant groups were compared clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. Twenty seven patients (M:F = 24:3; mean age: 12 ± 2.3 years) were included (compliant group = 22, non-compliant = 5). None of the baseline findings differed between the 2 groups, except for triglyceride level (compliant vs non-compliant, 167.7 mg/dL vs 74.2 mg/dL, P = 0.001). In the compliant group, high-density lipoprotein increased and all other parameters decreased after 1-year follow-up. However, there were various changes in the non-compliant group. Dual-echo fat fraction (-19.2% vs 4.6, P fat fraction (-13.4% vs 3.5, P fat fraction showed a positive correlation (ρ = 0.418, P = 0.030). Hepatic fat quantification MR can be a non-invasive, quantitative and useful tool for monitoring treatment effects in pediatric NASH.

  20. Computed neutron response of spherical moderator-detector systems for radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhairyawan, M.P.

    1979-01-01

    Neutrons of energies below 500 keV are important from the point of view of radiation protection of personnel working around reactors. However, as no neutron sources are available at lower energies, no measured values of neutron energy response are available between thermal and 0.5 MeV (but for Sb-Be source at 24 keV). The response functions in this range are, therefore, arrived at theoretically. After giving a comprehensive review of the work done in the field of response of moderated neutron detectors, a Monte Carlo method developed for this purpose is described and used to calculate energy response functions of the two spherical moderator-detector systems, namely, one using a central BF 3 counter and the other using 6 LiI(Eu) scintillator of 0.490 dia crystal. The polythene sphere diameter ranged from 2'' to 12''. The results obtained follow the trend predicted by other calculations and experiments, but are a definite improvement over them, because the most recent data on cross sections and angular distribution are used and the opacity of the detector i.e. the presence and size of the detector within the moderator is taken into account in the present calculations. The reasons for the discrepancies in the present results and those obtained earlier by other methods are discussed. The response of the Leake counter arrived at by the present method agrees very well with experimental calibration. (M.G.B.)

  1. Analytical expression for position sensitivity of linear response beam position monitor having inter-electrode cross talk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshk@rrcat.gov.in [Beam Diagnostics Section, Indus Operations, Beam Dynamics & Diagnostics Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Ojha, A.; Garg, A.D.; Puntambekar, T.A. [Beam Diagnostics Section, Indus Operations, Beam Dynamics & Diagnostics Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India); Senecha, V.K. [Homi Bhabha National Institute, Training School Complex, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, 452013 MP (India)

    2017-02-01

    According to the quasi electrostatic model of linear response capacitive beam position monitor (BPM), the position sensitivity of the device depends only on the aperture of the device and it is independent of processing frequency and load impedance. In practice, however, due to the inter-electrode capacitive coupling (cross talk), the actual position sensitivity of the device decreases with increasing frequency and load impedance. We have taken into account the inter-electrode capacitance to derive and propose a new analytical expression for the position sensitivity as a function of frequency and load impedance. The sensitivity of a linear response shoe-box type BPM has been obtained through simulation using CST Studio Suite to verify and confirm the validity of the new analytical equation. Good agreement between the simulation results and the new analytical expression suggest that this method can be exploited for proper designing of BPM.

  2. Response of monitors of surface contamination to internal exposition control from 131I in the 'nuclear medicine services'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puerta, Nancy; Rojo, Ana M.; Villella, Adrian; Gossio, Sebastian; Parada, Ines Gomez; Acosta, Norma; Arenas, German

    2013-01-01

    The IAEA, in its publication RS-G-1.2, proposes individual control of workers occupationally exposed with risk of internal exposure when the potential exposure provided by incorporation leads to a value of annual committed effective dose equal to or greater than 1 mSv. Because the radionuclide 131 I is the most important to control internal exposure in Nuclear Medicine Services, it is evaluated if the surface contamination monitors, commonly used in nuclear medicine centers of Argentina, would implement individual control of internal exposure to 131 I. Selected detectors were calibrated with a dummy neck and thyroid with calibrated sources of 131 I and 133 Ba reference. For each detector is was estimated the detection efficiency for 131 I and its detection limit. Each instrument was evaluated for the lowest effective dose possible to detect compromised by individual routine monitoring with different measurement intervals . We analyzed the response of each team for determining conditions that may be effective for the control of internal exposure of 131 I. Finally , we conclude that the daily individual monitoring surface contamination detectors available in the Nuclear Medicine Services is feasible to implement and ensures detection of significant additions of 131 I

  3. Estimation of groundwater flow from temperature monitoring in a borehole heat exchanger during a thermal response test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Mayumi; Takakura, Shinichi; Uchida, Youhei

    2018-05-01

    To estimate the groundwater flow around a borehole heat exchanger (BHE), thermal properties of geological core samples were measured and a thermal response test (TRT) was performed in the Tsukuba upland, Japan. The thermal properties were measured at 57 points along a 50-m-long geological core, consisting predominantly of sand, silt, and clay, drilled near the BHE. In this TRT, the vertical temperature in the BHE was also monitored during and after the test. Results for the thermal properties of the core samples and from the monitoring indicated that groundwater flow enhanced thermal transfers, especially at shallow depths. The groundwater velocities around the BHE were estimated using a two-dimensional numerical model with monitoring data on temperature changes. According to the results, the estimated groundwater velocity was generally consistent with hydrogeological data from previous studies, except for the data collected at shallow depths consisting of a clay layer. The reasons for this discrepancy at shallow depths were predicted to be preferential flow and the occurrence of vertical flow through the BHE grout, induced by the hydrogeological conditions.

  4. Time from HIV infection to virological suppression: dramatic fall from 2007 to 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medland, Nicholas A; Nicholson, Suellen; Chow, Eric P F; Read, Timothy R H; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Denham, Ian; Fairley, Christopher K

    2017-11-13

    Time from HIV infection to virological suppression: dramatic fall from 2007 to 2016. We examined the time from HIV infection to virological suppression in MSM who were first diagnosed at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre between 2007 and 2016. Retrospective cohort. Date of infection was imputed from the testing history or serological evidence of recent infection (negative or indeterminate western blot) or baseline CD4 cell count. Date of virological suppression was determined using clinical viral load data. We analysed predictors of diagnosis with serological evidence of recent infection (logistic regression) and time from diagnosis to suppression and from infection to suppression (Cox regression) using demographic, clinical, and behavioral covariates. Between 2007 and 2016, the median time from HIV infection to diagnosis fell from 6.8 to 4.3 months (P = 0.001), from diagnosis to suppression fell from 22.7 to 3.2 months (P < 0.0001), and from infection to suppression fell from 49.0 to 9.6 months (P < 0.0001). Serological evidence of recent infection increased from 15.6 to 34.3% (P < 0.0001) of diagnoses. In the multivariate analyses, age, being recently arrived from a non-English speaking country, history of IDU, other sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk were not associated with any of these measures. The duration of infectiousness in MSM diagnosed with HIV infection at Melbourne Sexual Health Centre in Victoria has fallen dramatically between 2007 and 2016 and the proportion diagnosed with serological evidence of recent infection has increased. This effect is observed across all population subgroups and marks a positive milestone for the treatment as prevention paradigm.

  5. Illness Representations of HIV Positive Patients Are Associated with Virologic Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Daniela; Borghi, Lidia; Lamiani, Giulia; Barlascini, Luca; Bini, Teresa; d'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Vegni, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It is important for HIV positive patients to be engaged in their care and be adherent to treatment in order to reduce disease progression and mortality. Studies found that illness representations influence adherence through the mediating role of coping behaviors. However, no study has ever tested if patient engagement to the visits mediate the relationship between illness perceptions and adherence. This study aimed to explore illness representations of HIV positive patients and test the hypothesis that illness representations predict adherence through the mediating role of a component of behavioral engagement. Methods: HIV-positive patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for at least one year and presenting to a check-up visit were eligible to participate in the study. Patients completed the Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised. Behavioral engagement was measured based on the patients' clinical attendance to the check-up visits; adherence to HAART was measured by viral load. Undetectable viral load or HIV-RNA perception that the disease does not have serious consequences on patient's life and the prevalence of negative emotions toward HIV were associated with virologic success. On the contrary, the patient's perception that the disease has serious consequences on his/her life and the prevalence of positive emotions were associated with virologic failure. This model showed good fit indexes (CFI = 1; TLI = 1; RMSEA = 0.00; and WRMSR = 0.309). Discussion: Results do not support the mediating role of behavioral engagement in the relationship between illness representations and adherence. As perception of serious consequences coupled with positive emotions are directly associated with virologic failure, clinicians should take them into account to promote treatment adherence.

  6. Use of FDG-PET to monitor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaeel, N. George

    2006-01-01

    Lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of diseases with many curable subtypes. Primary treatment cures a significant proportion of, but not all, patients. Patients not achieving a complete remission with primary treatment, or those who relapse later, have a second chance of cure with high-dose chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Response assessment is therefore crucial in the management of lymphomas. FDG-PET has an emerging role in assessing response, both at the end of and during treatment. This article will review the current published evidence and offer some suggestions on future directions from a clinician's viewpoint. (orig.)

  7. Simplified response monitoring criteria for multiple myeloma in patients undergoing therapy with novel agents using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabel, Christoph; Horger, Marius; Kum, Sara [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Department of Internal Medicine II – Hematology & Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Otfried-Müller-Str. 5, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Ioanoviciu, Sorin D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Municipal Hospital Timisoara, Gheorghe Dima Str. 5, 300079 Timisoara (Romania); Bier, Georg, E-mail: georg.bier@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A simplified method for response monitoring of multiple myeloma is proposed. • Medullary bone lesions of all limbs were included and analysed. • Diameters of ≥2 medullary bone lesions are sufficient for therapy monitoring. - Abstract: Introduction: Multiple myeloma is a malignant hematological disorder of the mature B-cell lymphocytes originating in the bone marrow. While therapy monitoring is still mainly based on laboratory biomarkers, the additional use of imaging has been advocated due to inaccuracies of serological biomarkers or in a-secretory myelomas. Non-enhanced CT and MRI have similar sensitivities for lesions in yellow marrow-rich bone marrow cavities with a favourable risk and cost-effectiveness profile of CT. Nevertheless, these methods are still limited by frequently high numbers of medullary lesions and its time consumption for proper evaluation. Objective: To establish simplified response criteria by correlating size and CT attenuation changes of medullary multiple myeloma lesions in the appendicular skeleton with the course of lytic bone lesions in the entire skeleton. Furthermore to evaluate these criteria with respect to established hematological myeloma-specific parameters for the prediction of treatment response to bortezomib or lenalidomide. Materials and methods: Non-enhanced reduced-dose whole-body CT examinations of 78 consecutive patients (43 male, 35 female, mean age 63.69 ± 9.2 years) with stage III multiple myeloma were retrospectively re-evaluated. On per patient basis, size and mean CT attenuation of 2–4 representative lesions in the limbs were measured at baseline and at a follow-up after a mean of 8 months. Results were compared with the course of lytical bone lesions as well with that of specific hematological biomarkers. Myeloma response was assessed according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) uniform response criteria. Testing for correlation between response of medullary lesions (Resp

  8. Impact of previous virological treatment failures and adherence on the outcome of antiretroviral therapy in 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ballif

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral treatment (cART has been very successful, especially among selected patients in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to describe outcomes of cART on the population level in a large national cohort. METHODS: Characteristics of participants of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study on stable cART at two semiannual visits in 2007 were analyzed with respect to era of treatment initiation, number of previous virologically failed regimens and self reported adherence. Starting ART in the mono/dual era before HIV-1 RNA assays became available was counted as one failed regimen. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for virological failure between the two consecutive visits. RESULTS: Of 4541 patients 31.2% and 68.8% had initiated therapy in the mono/dual and cART era, respectively, and been on treatment for a median of 11.7 vs. 5.7 years. At visit 1 in 2007, the mean number of previous failed regimens was 3.2 vs. 0.5 and the viral load was undetectable (4 previous failures compared to 1 were 0.9 (95% CI 0.4-1.7, 0.8 (0.4-1.6, 1.6 (0.8-3.2, 3.3 (1.7-6.6 respectively, and 2.3 (1.1-4.8 for >2 missed cART doses during the last month, compared to perfect adherence. From the cART era, odds ratios with a history of 1, 2 and >2 previous failures compared to none were 1.8 (95% CI 1.3-2.5, 2.8 (1.7-4.5 and 7.8 (4.5-13.5, respectively, and 2.8 (1.6-4.8 for >2 missed cART doses during the last month, compared to perfect adherence. CONCLUSIONS: A higher number of previous virologically failed regimens, and imperfect adherence to therapy were independent predictors of imminent virological failure.

  9. Biomarkers to Stratify Risk Groups among Children with Malnutrition in Resource-Limited Settings and to Monitor Response to Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Christine J; Arndt, Michael B; Walson, Judd L

    2017-01-01

    Despite global efforts to reduce childhood undernutrition, current interventions have had little impact on stunting and wasting, and the mechanisms underlying growth faltering are poorly understood. There is a clear need to distinguish populations of children most likely to benefit from any given intervention and to develop tools to monitor response to therapy prior to the development of morbid sequelae. In resource-limited settings, environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is common among children, contributing to malnutrition and increasing childhood morbidity and mortality risk. In addition to EED, early alterations in the gut microbiota can adversely affect growth through nutrient malabsorption, altered metabolism, gut inflammation, and dysregulation of the growth hormone axis. We examined the evidence linking EED and the gut microbiome to growth faltering and explored novel biomarkers to identify subgroups of children at risk of malnutrition due to underlying pathology. These and other biomarkers could be used to identify specific groups of children at risk of malnutrition and monitor response to targeted interventions. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Assay in Monitoring Response to Anti-Fungal Therapy in Fungal Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Jihad; Saling, Christopher; Szabela, Maria; Brown, Melinda; Johnson, Tamara; Goldfarb, Irvin

    2017-03-01

    A case is reported of Candida glabrata infective endocarditis (IE) treated without surgical intervention. The study aim was to: (i) briefly discuss the outcomes of other documented cases of fungal IE managed medically with fluconazole; (ii) discuss the (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay and its previously studied role in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections; and (iii) examine a possible application of the (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay to monitor response to antifungal treatment in patients with Candida endocarditis. The serum Fungitell assay was used to trend (1→3)-β-D-glucan in a patient with Candida endocarditis to determine treatment effectiveness with fluconazole, to provide an appropriate end date for antifungal therapy, and to survey infection suppression while off treatment. The (1→03)-β-D-glucan assay began trending downwards at 197 days into treatment with oral fluconazole. After 16 months of therapy, fluconazole was stopped due to transaminitis. (1→3)-β-Dglucan levels were checked six weeks after the discontinuation of treatment and were negative. The patient has now been off therapy for 21 weeks with no signs of clinical disease, and values remain negative. The present case indicates that a trending (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay may have valuable application in monitoring treatment response and infection suppression for Candida endocarditis.

  11. Full scale monitoring of wind and traffic induced response of a suspension bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheynet Etienne

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a full-scale analysis of wind and traffic-induced vibrations of a long-span suspension bridge in complex terrain. Several wind and acceleration sensors have been installed along the main span on Lysefjord Bridge in Norway. In the present study, three days of continuous records are analysed. Traffic-induced vibrations are dominant at low and moderated wind speed, with non-negligible effects on the overall bridge response for heavy vehicles only. Traffic and wind-induced vibrations are compared in terms of root mean square of the acceleration response, and three simples approaches are proposed to isolate records dominated by wind-induced vibration. The first one relies on the separation of nocturnal and diurnal samples. The second one is based on the evaluation of the time-varying root mean square of the acceleration response. The last one evaluates the relative importance of the high frequency domain of the acceleration bridge response. It appears that traffic-induced vibrations may have to be taken into account for the buffeting analysis of long-span bridge under moderated wind.

  12. Use of PET to monitor the response of lung cancer to radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdi, Y.E.; Humm, J.L.; Erdi, A.K.; Yorke, E.D.; Macapinlac, H.; Larson, S.M.; Rosenzweig, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 170,000 people are diagnosed with lung cancer in the United States each year. Many of these patients receive external beam radiation for treatment. Fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) is increasingly being used in evaluating non-small cell lung cancer and may be of clinical utility in assessing response to treatment. In this report, we present FDG PET images and data from two patients who were followed with a total of eight and seven serial FDG PET scans, respectively, through the entire course of their radiation therapy. Changes in several potential response parameters are shown versus time, including lesion volume (V FDG ) by PET, SUV av , SUV max , and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) during the course of radiotherapy. The response parameters for patient 1 demonstrated a progressive decrease; however, the response parameters for patient 2 showed an initial decrease followed by an increase. The data presented here may suggest that the outcome of radiation therapy can be predicted by PET imaging, but this observation requires a study of additional patients. (orig.)

  13. The role of ABO blood groups in Crohn's disease and in monitoring response to infliximab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiao; Wang, Lingyun; Zhang, Shenghong; Feng, Ting; Li, Li; Chen, Baili; Chen, Minhu

    2016-09-01

    The variation in ABO blood groups is reported to be associated with multiple diseases. Infliximab (IFX) has been widely used in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). We aim to investigate the distribution of ABO blood groups in Chinese patients with CD and to explore its impact on response to IFX. Patients with CD were consecutively recruited to the study between 2007 and 2014. CD patients receiving IFX therapy were followed for at least two years. In 293 patients with CD, most patients (40.6%) had blood type O (119/293). The odds ratio (OR) of CD in blood type O patients was 1.06 (95%CI: 0.6-1.86; p=0.84) compared to all other blood types. Among those CD patients, 107 patients received IFX treatment. One year after the first course of IFX, a significant association was found between the overall ABO system and outcomes of IFX treatment (pblood type AB (OR=4.42, 95% CI: 1.04-18.76; p=0.044) were more likely to achieve mucosal healing, while CD patients with blood type A had a high risk of losing response (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.15-0.96; p=0.040). ABO blood groups are not associated with prevalence of CD. Patients with blood type AB had a better response to IFX while those with blood type A appeared to have a risk of losing response to IFX.

  14. Monitoring the Performance of Human and Automated Scores for Spoken Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Zechner, Klaus; Sun, Yu

    2018-01-01

    As automated scoring systems for spoken responses are increasingly used in language assessments, testing organizations need to analyze their performance, as compared to human raters, across several dimensions, for example, on individual items or based on subgroups of test takers. In addition, there is a need in testing organizations to establish…

  15. Towards enhanced risk management: Planning, decision making and monitoring of US wildfire response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher J. Dunn; David E. Calkin; Matthew P. Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Wildfire’s economic, ecological and social impacts are on the rise, fostering the realisation that business-as-usual fire management in the United States is not sustainable. Current response strategies may be inefficient and contributing to unnecessary responder exposure to hazardous conditions, but significant knowledge gaps constrain clear and comprehensive...

  16. A generalized Web Service response time metric to support collaborative and corroborative Web Service monitoring

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makitla, I

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the development of a generalized metric for computing response time of a web service. Such a generalized metric would help to develop consensus with regards to the meanings of contracted Quality of Service (QoS) parameters...

  17. Artificial Neural Network-Based Early-Age Concrete Strength Monitoring Using Dynamic Response Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Junkyeong; Lee, Chaggil; Park, Seunghee

    2017-06-07

    Concrete is one of the most common materials used to construct a variety of civil infrastructures. However, since concrete might be susceptible to brittle fracture, it is essential to confirm the strength of concrete at the early-age stage of the curing process to prevent unexpected collapse. To address this issue, this study proposes a novel method to estimate the early-age strength of concrete, by integrating an artificial neural network algorithm with a dynamic response measurement of the concrete material. The dynamic response signals of the concrete, including both electromechanical impedances and guided ultrasonic waves, are obtained from an embedded piezoelectric sensor module. The cross-correlation coefficient of the electromechanical impedance signals and the amplitude of the guided ultrasonic wave signals are selected to quantify the variation in dynamic responses according to the strength of the concrete. Furthermore, an artificial neural network algorithm is used to verify a relationship between the variation in dynamic response signals and concrete strength. The results of an experimental study confirm that the proposed approach can be effectively applied to estimate the strength of concrete material from the early-age stage of the curing process.

  18. Moral concerns increase attention and response monitoring during IAT performance: ERP evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellemers, Naomi; Derks, Belle; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that people value morality as a more important person characteristic than competence. In this study, we tested whether people adjust their less explicit behavior more to moral than competence values. Participants performed an Implicit Association Test (IAT) that was either framed as a test of their morality or as a test of their competence. The behavioral results revealed a smaller IAT effect (i.e. a weaker negative implicit bias toward Muslims) in the morality condition than in the competence condition. Moreover, event-related potentials indicated increased social categorization of faces (as indexed by the N1 and P150) and enhanced conflict- and error monitoring (N450 and error-related negativity) in the morality condition compared to the competence condition. These findings indicate that an emphasis on morality can increase attentional and motivational processes that help to improve people’s task performance. PMID:23175679

  19. Collaboratively Adaptive Vibration Sensing System for High-fidelity Monitoring of Structural Responses Induced by Pedestrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shijia Pan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a collaboratively adaptive vibration monitoring system that captures high-fidelity structural vibration signals induced by pedestrians. These signals can be used for various human activities’ monitoring by inferring information about the impact sources, such as pedestrian footsteps, door opening and closing, and dragging objects. Such applications often require high-fidelity (high resolution and low distortion signals. Traditionally, expensive high resolution and high dynamic range sensors are adopted to ensure sufficient resolution. However, for sensing systems that use low-cost sensing devices, the resolution and dynamic range are often limited; hence this type of sensing methods is not well explored ubiquitously. We propose a low-cost sensing system that utilizes (1 a heuristic model of the investigating excitations and (2 shared information through networked devices to adapt hardware configurations and obtain high-fidelity structural vibration signals. To further explain the system, we use indoor pedestrian footstep sensing through ambient structural vibration as an example to demonstrate the system performance. We evaluate the application with three metrics that measure the signal quality from different aspects: the sufficient resolution rate to present signal resolution improvement without clipping, the clipping rate to measure the distortion of the footstep signal, and the signal magnitude to quantify the detailed resolution of the detected footstep signal. In experiments conducted in a school building, our system demonstrated up to 2× increase on the sufficient resolution rate and 2× less error rate when used to locate the pedestrians as they walk along the hallway, compared to a fixed sensing setting.

  20. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of Seismic Response Trends from Long-Term Monitoring of Two Instrumented RC Buildings Including Soil-Structure Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faheem Butt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents analyses of the seismic responses of two reinforced concrete buildings monitored for a period of more than two years. One of the structures was a three-storey reinforced concrete (RC frame building with a shear core, while the other was a three-storey RC frame building without a core. Both buildings are part of the same large complex but are seismically separated from the rest of it. Statistical analysis of the relationships between maximum free field accelerations and responses at different points on the buildings was conducted and demonstrated strong correlation between those. System identification studies using recorded accelerations were undertaken and revealed that natural frequencies and damping ratios of the building structures vary during different earthquake excitations. This variation was statistically examined and relationships between identified natural frequencies and damping ratios, and the peak response acceleration at the roof level were developed. A general trend of decreasing modal frequencies and increasing damping ratios was observed with increased level of shaking and response. Moreover, the influence of soil structure interaction (SSI on the modal characteristics was evaluated. SSI effects decreased the modal frequencies and increased some of the damping ratios.

  2. On the detection and monitoring of reduced water content in plants using spectral responses in the visible domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoski, Gladimir V. G.; Van Leeuwen, Spencer; Chen, Tenn F.

    2016-05-01

    The water status of cultivated plants can have a significant impact not only on food production, but also on the appropriate usage of increasingly scarce freshwater supplies. Accordingly, the cost-effective detection and monitoring of changes in their water content are longstanding remote sensing goals. Existing procedures employed to achieve these goals are largely based on the spectral responses of plant leaves in the infrared domain where the light absorption within the foliar tissues is dominated by water. Recently, it has been suggested that such procedures could be implemented using spectral responses, more specifically spectral subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios, obtained in the visible domain. The basis for this proposition resides on the premise that a reduced water content (RWC) can result in histological changes whose effects on the foliar optical properties may not be limited to the infrared domain. However, the experiments leading to this proposition were performed on detached leaves, which were not influenced by the whole plant's adaptation mechanisms to water stress. In this work, we investigate whether the spectral responses of living plant leaves in the visible domain can lead to reliable RWC estimations. We employ measured biophysical data and predictive light transport simulations in order to extend qualitatively and quantitatively the scope of previous studies in this area. Our findings indicate that the living specimens' physiological responses to water stress should be taken into account in the design of new procedures for the cost-effective RWC estimation using visible subsurface reflectance to transmittance ratios.

  3. MONITORING AND ASSESSING THE RESEARCH ON CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY PUBLISHED IN ROMANIAN ECONOMIC JOURNALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana-Cristina GĂNESCU

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims to evaluate the interest of Romanian economic journals towards issues related to corporate social responsibility. The research began with drafting a list of Romanian economic journals, according to official classifications. We used content analysis to determine the characteristics of articles that address the issue of corporate social responsibility, based on the following criteria: number of articles whose titles include the term „corporate social responsibility”, ratio of pages devoted to CSR issues in the total number of pages, type of research, geographical area of research, authors’ affiliation, CSR issues being addressed. The research results helped create an indicator that measures the interest of Romanian economic journals towards issues related to CSR. According to the values of this indicator, we ranked the analysed publications.

  4. Predicting HIV RNA virologic outcome at 52-weeks follow-up in antiretroviral clinical trials. The INCAS and AVANTI Study Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboud, J M; Rae, S; Montaner, J S

    2000-08-15

    To determine the ability of intermediate plasma viral load (pVL) measurements to predict virologic outcome at 52 weeks of follow-up in clinical trials of antiretroviral therapy. Individual patient data from three clinical trials (INCAS, AVANTI-2 and AVANTI-3) were combined into a single database. Virologic success was defined to be plasma viral load (pVL) <500 copies/ml at week 52. The sensitivity and specificity of intermediate pVL measurements below the limit of detection, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 copies/ml to predict virologic success were calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of a pVL measurement <1000 copies/ml at week 16 to predict virologic outcome at week 52 were 74%, 74%, 48%, and 90%, respectively, for patients on double therapy. For patients on triple therapy, the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of a pVL measurement <50 copies/ml at week 16 to predict virologic outcome were 68%, 68%, 80%, and 47%, respectively. For patients receiving double therapy, a poor virologic result at an intermediate week of follow-up is a strong indicator of virologic failure at 52 weeks whereas intermediate virologic success is no guarantee of success at 1 year. For patients on triple therapy, disappointing intermediate results do not preclude virologic success at 1 year and intermediate successes are more likely to be sustained.

  5. Watchdogs of the Invisible Hand: NGO Monitoring, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Industry Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Gani Aldashev; Michela Limardi; Thierry Verdier

    2013-01-01

    Globalization has been accompanied by rising pressure from advocacy non-governmental organizations (NGOs) on multinational firms to act in socially-responsible manner. We analyze how NGO pressure interacts with industry structure, using a simple model of NGO-firm interaction embedded in an industry environment with endogenous markups and entry. We characterize the effect of NGO pressure on the industry equilibrium (intensity of competition, market structure, and the share of socially responsi...

  6. Volcview: A Web-Based Platform for Satellite Monitoring of Volcanic Activity and Eruption Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. J.; Randall, M.; Parker, T.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with University and State partners, operates five volcano observatories that employ specialized software packages and computer systems to process and display real-time data coming from in-situ geophysical sensors and from near-real-time satellite sources. However, access to these systems both inside and from outside the observatory offices are limited in some cases by factors such as software cost, network security, and bandwidth. Thus, a variety of Internet-based tools have been developed by the USGS Volcano Science Center to: 1) Improve accessibility to data sources for staff scientists across volcano monitoring disciplines; 2) Allow access for observatory partners and for after-hours, on-call duty scientists; 3) Provide situational awareness for emergency managers and the general public. Herein we describe VolcView (volcview.wr.usgs.gov), a freely available, web-based platform for display and analysis of near-real-time satellite data. Initial geographic coverage is of the volcanoes in Alaska, the Russian Far East, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. Coverage of other volcanoes in the United States will be added in the future. Near-real-time satellite data from NOAA, NASA and JMA satellite systems are processed to create image products for detection of elevated surface temperatures and volcanic ash and SO2 clouds. VolcView uses HTML5 and the canvas element to provide image overlays (volcano location and alert status, annotation, and location information) and image products that can be queried to provide data values, location and measurement capabilities. Use over the past year during the eruptions of Pavlof, Veniaminof, and Cleveland volcanoes in Alaska by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the National Weather Service, and the U.S. Air Force has reinforced the utility of shared situational awareness and has guided further development. These include overlay of volcanic cloud trajectory and

  7. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC. The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3 following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  8. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Martinez, Gary V; Cornnell, Heather H; Hart, Charles P; Baker, Amanda F; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  9. Monitoring cognitive and emotional processes through pupil and cardiac response during dynamic versus logical task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causse, Mickaël; Sénard, Jean-Michel; Démonet, Jean François; Pastor, Josette

    2010-06-01

    The paper deals with the links between physiological measurements and cognitive and emotional functioning. As long as the operator is a key agent in charge of complex systems, the definition of metrics able to predict his performance is a great challenge. The measurement of the physiological state is a very promising way but a very acute comprehension is required; in particular few studies compare autonomous nervous system reactivity according to specific cognitive processes during task performance and task related psychological stress is often ignored. We compared physiological parameters recorded on 24 healthy subjects facing two neuropsychological tasks: a dynamic task that require problem solving in a world that continually evolves over time and a logical task representative of cognitive processes performed by operators facing everyday problem solving. Results showed that the mean pupil diameter change was higher during the dynamic task; conversely, the heart rate was more elevated during the logical task. Finally, the systolic blood pressure seemed to be strongly sensitive to psychological stress. A better taking into account of the precise influence of a given cognitive activity and both workload and related task-induced psychological stress during task performance is a promising way to better monitor operators in complex working situations to detect mental overload or pejorative stress factor of error.

  10. Effects of mental workload on physiological and subjective responses during traffic density monitoring: A field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Majid; Motamedzade, Majid; Heidarimoghadam, Rashid; Soltanian, Ali Reza; Miyake, Shinji

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated operators' mental workload while monitoring traffic density in a city traffic control center. To determine the mental workload, physiological signals (ECG, EMG) were recorded and the NASA-Task Load Index (TLX) was administered for 16 operators. The results showed that the operators experienced a larger mental workload during high traffic density than during low traffic density. The traffic control center stressors caused changes in heart rate variability features and EMG amplitude, although the average workload score was significantly higher in HTD conditions than in LTD conditions. The findings indicated that increasing traffic congestion had a significant effect on HR, RMSSD, SDNN, LF/HF ratio, and EMG amplitude. The results suggested that when operators' workload increases, their mental fatigue and stress level increase and their mental health deteriorate. Therefore, it maybe necessary to implement an ergonomic program to manage mental health. Furthermore, by evaluating mental workload, the traffic control center director can organize the center's traffic congestion operators to sustain the appropriate mental workload and improve traffic control management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Human biological monitoring for exposure assessment in response to an incident involving hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Paul T J; van Brederode, Nelly E; Bos, Peter M J; Nijhuis, Nicole J; van de Weerdt, Rik H J; van der Woude, Irene; Eggens, Martin L

    2014-12-15

    Biological monitoring in humans (HBM) is widely used in the field of occupational and environmental health. In the situation of an unexpected release of hazardous materials HBM may contribute to the medical support and treatment of exposed individuals from the general population or of emergency responders. Such exposure information may also be used to respond to individual concerns such as questions about a possible relationship between the chemicals released during the incident and health effects. In The Netherlands a guideline was prepared to support early decision-making about the possible use of HBM for exposure assessment during or as soon as possible following a chemical incident. The application of HBM in such an emergency setting is not much different from situations where HBM is normally used but there are some issues that need extra attention such as the choice of the biomarker, the biological media to be sampled, the time point at which biological samples should be collected, the ethics approval and technical implementation of the study protocol and the interpretation and communication of the study results. These issues addressed in the new guideline will support the use of HBM in the management of chemical disasters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Oxidative stress and antioxidant status response of handball athletes: implications for sport training monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Douglas Popp; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Campoio, Thais Regina; Guerra, Beatriz Alves; Otton, Rosemari

    2013-10-01

    The chronic exposure to regular exercise training seems to improve antioxidant defense systems. However, the intense physical training imposed on elite athletes may lead to overtraining associated with oxidative stress. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of different training loads and competition on oxidative stress, biochemical parameters and antioxidant enzymatic defense in handball athletes during 6-months of monitoring. Ten male elite handball athletes were recruited to the study. Blood samples were collected four times every six weeks throughout the season. During most intense periods of training and competitions there were significant changes in plasma indices of oxidative stress (increased TBARS and decreased thiols). Conversely, chronic adaptations to exercise training demonstrated a significant protective effect against oxidative stress in erythrocyte (decrease in TBARs and carbonyl group levels). Erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly increased, suggesting a training-induced antioxidant adaptation. Biomarkers of skeletal muscle damage were significantly increased during high-intensity training period (creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase). No significant changes were observed in plasma IL-6, TNF-α and uric acid, whereas a significant reduction was found in the IL-1β concentration and gamma-glutamyl transferase activity. Oxidative stress and antioxidant biomarkers can change throughout the season in competitive athletes, reflecting the physical stress and muscle damage that occurs as the result of competitive handball training. In addition, these biochemical measurements can be applied in the physiological follow-up of athletes. © 2013.

  13. The proposal of Paediatric Virology and its perspectives: An interview with Professor of Paediatrics Maria Theodoridou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    Professor Maria Theodoridou, Emeritus Professor of Paediatrics at the University of Athens, is one of the few paediatricians in Greece, who have experienced almost all the infectious diseases of the second half of the 20th century and their severe consequences, prior to the widespread adoption of immunisations. A milestone during her career was the establishment of a specialised National Reference Unit for the care of paediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the 'Aghia Sophia' Children's Hospital in Athens, Greece. According to Professor Theodoridou, training on the prevention, management and treatment of neonatal and paediatric viral infections represents a new educational challenge for both community as well as hospital-based paediatric health professionals. The debate of the potential strategically principal role of Paediatric Virology subspecialists in the primary, secondary and tertiary clinical practice is definitely necessary and needs further discussion and evaluation, she adds. She describes the difficulties that Greece, a country under a long-standing financial crisis, faces for the hospital-based management of paediatric viral infections and refers to the future advances, which are expected in the field of diagnosis and treatment of viral infections in neonates and children. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens on October 7th, 2017, Professor Theodoridou will focus on the immigration crisis and vaccination policy.

  14. The educational challenge of Paediatric Virology: An interview with Professor of Neonatology Anne Greenough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-10-01

    According to Professor Anne Greenough, Professor of Neonatology and Clinical Respiratory Physiology at the King's College London (London, UK), Paediatric Virology is indeed a rapidly increasing educational challenge. Professor Greenough, who in 1992 wrote her book on congenital, perinatal and neonatal infections, believes that during the past 3 decades, paediatric health professionals are becoming increasingly involved in specialised care and follow-up of paediatric patients with viral diseases, who require advanced medical care and innovative technological services. Moreover, she highlights the expected role of new vaccines and antiviral agents that are currently under investigation, as well as the impact of emerging viral diseases that require novel prevention strategies and therapeutic protocols. However, she notes that the number of Paediatric Virologists in any one country is likely to be small; hence, a separate paediatric subspecialty needs to be considered carefully. In the context of the 3rd Workshop on Paediatric Virology, which will be held in Athens, Greece, on October 7th, 2017, Professor Greenough will give her plenary lecture on the impact of viral infections on the long term outcomes of prematurely born infants.

  15. Optofluidic technology for monitoring rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus responses to regular light pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartlidge, Rhys; Campana, Olivia; Nugegoda, Dayanthi; Wlodkowic, Donald

    2016-12-01

    Behavioural alterations can occur as a result of a toxicant exposure at concentrations significantly lower than lethal effects that are commonly measured in acute toxicity testing. The use of alternating light and dark photoperiods to test phototactic responses of aquatic invertebrates in the presence of environmental contaminants provides an attractive analytical avenue. Quantification of phototactic responses represents a sublethal endpoint that can be employed as an early warning signal. Despite the benefits associated with the assessment of these endpoints, there is currently a lack of automated and miniaturized bioanalytical technologies to implement the development of toxicity testing with small aquatic species. In this study we present a proof-of-concept microfluidic Lab-on-a-Chip (LOC) platform for the assessment of rotifer swimming behavior in the presence of the toxicant copper sulfate. The device was designed to assess impact of toxicants at sub-lethal concentrations on freshwater crustacean Brachionus calyciflorus, testing behavioral endpoints such as animal swimming distance, speed and acceleration. The LOC device presented in this work enabled straightforward caging of microscopic crustaceans as well as non-invasive analysis of rapidly swimming animals in a focal plane of a video-microscopy system. The chip-based technology was fabricated using a new photolithography method that enabled formation of thick photoresist layers with minimal distortion. Photoresist molds were then employed for replica molding of LOC devices with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer. The complete bioanalytical system consisted of: (i) microfluidic PDMS chip-based device; (ii) peristaltic microperfusion pumping manifold; (iii) miniaturized CMOS camera for video data acquisition; and (iv) video analysis software algorithms for quantification of changes in swimming behaviour of B. calyciflorus in response to reference toxicants.

  16. Optimal antiretroviral therapy adherence as evaluated by CASE index score tool is associated with virological suppression in HIV-infected adults in Dakar, Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byabene, A K; Fortes-Déguénonvo, L; Niang, K; Manga, M N; Bulabula, A N H; Nachega, J B; Seydi, M

    2017-06-01

    To determine the prevalence and factors associated with optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and virological failure (VLF) among HIV-infected adults enrolled in the national ART programme at the teaching hospital of Fann, Dakar, Senegal. Cross-sectional study from 1 September 2013 to 30 January 2014. (1) optimal ART adherence by the Center for Adherence Support Evaluation (CASE) Index Score (>10) and (2) VLF (HIV RNA > 1000 copies/ml). Diagnostic accuracy of CASE Index Score assessed using sensitivity (Se), specificity (Sp), positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with optimal adherence and VLF. Of 98 HIV-infected patients on ART, 68% were female. The median (IQR) age was 42 (20-50) years. A total of 57 of 98 (60%) were on ART more than 3 years, and majority (88%) were on NNRTI-based first-line ART regimen. A total of 79 of 98 (80%) patients reported optimal ART adherence, and only five of 84 (5.9%) had documented VLF. Patients with VLF were significantly more likely to have suboptimal ART adherence (17.7% vs. 2.9%; P = 0.02). CASE Index Score showed the best trade-off in Se (78.9%, 95% CI: 54.4-93.9%), Sp (20.0%, 95% CI: 11.1-31.7), PPV (22.4, 95% CI: 13.1-34.2%) and NPV (76.5%, 95% CI: 50.1-93.2), when used VLF threshold of HIV RNA >50 copies/ml. Factors independently associated with VLF were CASE Index Score CASE Index Score was independently associated with virological outcomes, supporting usefulness of this low-cost ART adherence monitoring tool in this setting. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cytogenetic monitoring, radiosensitivity study and adaptive response of workers exposed to low level ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peitl Junior, Paulo

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were: To determine the frequencies of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes from individuals belonging to professionally exposed groups, under normal conditions; to determine the possible differences in radiosensitivity between the lymphocytes of technicians and controls after in vitro irradiation with gamma rays during the G 1 phase of the cell cycle (radiosensitivity study), and to examine the influence of in vivo and in vitro pre-exposure to low doses of radiation on the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in vitro by high doses (study of the adaptive response) in a group of technicians (T) compared to controls (C). (author)

  18. Echographic monitoring of response of extraocular muscles to irradiation in graves' ophthalmopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, Beth A.; Harris, Gerald J.; Lewandowski, Michael F.; Murray, Kevin J.; Massaro, Bruce M.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Confirmation of the efficacy of orbital irradiation in Graves' ophthalmopathy is needed due to the unpredictable natural history of the disease, the variation in individual clinical presentations, the contribution of other simultaneous treatments, and the lack of controlled studies using objective criteria to classify and assess response over time. Orbital echography before and at select intervals following orbital irradiation is proposed as an objective parameter of tissue response to orbital irradiation over time. Methods and Materials: From January, 1983 to September, 1993, 55 patients with progressive Graves' ophthalmopathy underwent 20 Gy retrobulbar irradiation. On retrospective review, standardized orbital echography was performed randomly prior to irradiation in 37 of the 55 patients to assess the acoustic characteristics of the extraocular muscles and to quantitate their individual and summed diameters. Twenty-one patients had at least one follow-up echographic evaluation at random intervals of 0 to 27.5 months following completion of irradiation. Twelve patients received steroids before or during irradiation, which were tapered in proximity to completion of radiation. Follow-up ranged from 2 to 65 months with the majority followed at least 6 months (18 patients). Results: Of the 21 patients with serial studies, 18 showed an interval decrease in individual and summed muscle size over time and return of symmetry. Interval improvement was documented as early as the 1 month follow-up study, with continued improvement seen during the 3-9 month studies, with stability typically achieved within 12 months. One patient had further changes between the 21 and 27.5 month follow-up studies. Exacerbation of disease was, however, echographically demonstrated in three patients at 6.5, 8.5, and 13 months. Follow-up studies in two of these patients again revealed improvement, one following tapered steroids. The third patient required orbital decompression

  19. Monitoring the electrochemical responses of neurotransmitters through localized surface plasmon resonance using nanohole array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nantao; Lu, Yanli; Li, Shuang; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Jiajia; Jiang, Jing; Liu, Gang Logan; Liu, Qingjun

    2017-07-15

    In this study, a novel spectroelectrochemical method was proposed for neurotransmitters detection. The central sensing device was a hybrid structure of nanohole array and gold nanoparticles, which demonstrated good conductivity and high localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensitivity. By utilizing such specially-designed nanoplasmonic sensor as working electrode, both electrical and spectral responses on the surface of the sensor could be simultaneously detected during the electrochemical process. Cyclic voltammetry was implemented to activate the oxidation and recovery of dopamine and serotonin, while transmission spectrum measurement was carried out to synchronously record to LSPR responses of the nanoplasmonic sensor. Coupling with electrochemistry, LSPR results indicated good integrity and linearity, along with promising accuracy in qualitative and quantitative detection even for mixed solution and in brain tissue homogenates. Also, the detection results of other negatively-charged neurotransmitters like acetylcholine demonstrated the selectivity of our detection method for transmitters with positive charge. When compared with traditional electrochemical signals, LSPR signals provided better signal-to-noise ratio and lower detection limits, along with immunity against interference factors like ascorbic acid. Taking the advantages of such robustness, the coupled detection method was proved to be a promising platform for point-of-care testing for neurotransmitters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. iFall: an Android application for fall monitoring and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposaro, Frank; Tyson, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Injuries due to falls are among the leading causes of hospitalization in elderly persons, often resulting in a rapid decline in quality of life or death. Rapid response can improve the patients outcome, but this is often lacking when the injured person lives alone and the nature of the injury complicates calling for help. This paper presents an alert system for fall detection using common commercially available electronic devices to both detect the fall and alert authorities. We use an Android-based smart phone with an integrated tri-axial accelerometer. Data from the accelerometer is evaluated with several threshold based algorithms and position data to determine a fall. The threshold is adaptive based on user provided parameters such as: height, weight, and level of activity. The algorithm adapts to unique movements that a phone experiences as opposed to similar systems which require users to mount accelerometers to their chest or trunk. If a fall is suspected a notification is raised requiring the user's response. If the user does not respond, the system alerts pre-specified social contacts with an informational message via SMS. If a contact responds the system commits an audible notification, automatically connects, and enables the speakerphone. If a social contact confirms a fall, an appropriate emergency service is alerted. Our system provides a realizable, cost effective solution to fall detection using a simple graphical interface while not overwhelming the user with uncomfortable sensors.

  1. The political (and physiological) divide: Political orientation, performance monitoring, and the anterior cingulate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissflog, Meghan; Choma, Becky L; Dywan, Jane; van Noordt, Stefon J R; Segalowitz, Sidney J

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to test a model of sociopolitical attitudes that posits a relationship between individual differences in liberal versus conservative political orientation and differential levels of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) responsivity. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) while participants who varied along a unidimensional liberal-conservative continuum engaged in a standard Go/NoGo task. We also measured component attitudes of political orientation in the form of traditionalism (degree of openness to social change) and egalitarianism (a preference for social equality). Generally, participants who reported a more liberal political orientation made fewer errors and produced larger ACC-generated ERPs (the error-related negativity, or ERN and the NoGo N2). This ACC activation, especially as indicated by a larger NoGo N2, was most strongly associated with greater preference for social equality. Performance accuracy, however, was most strongly associated with greater openness to social change. These data are consistent with a social neuroscience view that sociopolitical attitudes are related to aspects of neurophysiological responsivity. They also indicate that a bidimensional model of political orientation can enhance our interpretation of the nature of these associations.

  2. Radiation Response of Forward Biased Float Zone and Magnetic Czochralski Silicon Detectors of Different Geometry for 1-MeV Neutron Equivalent Fluence Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Mekki, J; Dusseau, Laurent; Roche, Nicolas Jean-Henri; Saigne, Frederic; Mekki, Julien; Glaser, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    Aiming at evaluating new options for radiation monitoring sensors in LHC/SLHC experiments, the radiation responses of FZ and MCz custom made silicon detectors of different geometry have been studied up to about 4 x 10(14) n(eq)/cm(2). The radiation response of the devices under investigation is discussed in terms of material type, thickness and active area influence.

  3. Use of an activity monitor to detect response to treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Boston, Raymond C.; Farrar, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an activity monitor (AM) could be used to detect changes in activity in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with carprofen or a placebo. Design Randomized controlled trial. Animals 70 dogs with no clinically important abnormalities other than osteoarthritis for which they were not currently being treated. Procedures Dogs wore an AM continuously for 21 days. On days 8 through 21, the dogs were treated with carprofen (n = 35) or a placebo (35). Total activity counts for days 1 through 7 (baseline) were compared with total activity counts for days 15 through 21 (endpoint). The change in total activity count from baseline to endpoint was assessed within each treatment group as well as between groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for an association between treatment and percentage change in activity counts while controlling for other variables. Results For placebo-treated dogs, median baseline total activity count was not significantly different from median endpoint total activity count (1,378,408 vs 1,310,112, respectively). For dogs receiving carprofen, there was a significant increase in median activity count from baseline to endpoint (1,276,427 vs 1,374,133). When age and baseline activity counts were controlled for, dogs in the carpofen-treated group had a 20% increase in activity counts, compared with placebo-treated dogs (95% confidence interval, 10% to 26%). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results suggested that the AM used in the present study may be a valid outcome assessment tool for documenting improved activity associated with treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis. PMID:20590496

  4. Water quantity and quality response of a green roof to storm events: Experimental and monitoring observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Corey M G; Todorov, Dimitar; Driscoll, Charles T; Montesdeoca, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Syracuse, New York is working under a court-ordered agreement to limit combined sewer overflows (CSO) to local surface waters. Green infrastructure technologies, including green roofs, are being implemented as part of a CSO abatement strategy and to develop co-benefits of diminished stormwater runoff, including decreased loading of contaminants to the wastewater system and surface waters. The objective of this study was to examine the quantity and quality of discharge associated with precipitation events over an annual cycle from a green roof in Syracuse, NY and to compare measurements from this monitoring program with results from a roof irrigation experiment. Wet deposition, roof drainage, and water quality were measured for 87 storm events during an approximately 12 month period over 2011-2012. Water and nutrient (total phosphorus, total nitrogen, and dissolved organic carbon) mass balances were conducted on an event basis to evaluate retention annually and during the growing and non-growing seasons. These results are compared with a hydrological manipulation experiment, which comprised of artificially watering of the roof. Loadings of nutrients were calculated for experimental and actual storms using the concentration of nutrients and the flow data of water discharging the roof. The green roof was effective in retaining precipitation quantity from storm events (mean percent retention 96.8%, SD = 2.7%, n = 87), although the relative fraction of water retained decreased with increases in the size of the event. There was no difference in water retention of the green roof for the growing and non-growing seasons. Drainage waters exhibited high concentration of nutrients during the warm temperature growing season, particularly total nitrogen and dissolved organic carbon. Overall, nutrient losses were low because of the strong retention of water. However, there was marked variation in the retention of nutrients by season due to variations in concentrations in roof

  5. Organophosphorus pollutants (OPP) in aquatic environment at Damietta Governorate, Egypt: implications for monitoring and biomarker responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Halim, K Y; Salama, A K; El-Khateeb, E N; Bakry, N M

    2006-06-01

    The study was carried out from spring 1999 to spring 2001 to monitor the residue levels of organophosphorus pollutants (OPP) in aquatic environment of the drainage canal surrounding a pesticide factory at Damietta Governorate. Water, sediment, and fish samples were collected at six different seasonal periods. OPPs were analyzed by GLC and confirmed using GC-MS. Chlorpyrifos, chlorpyrifos-methyl, malathion, diazinon, pirimiphos-methyl and profenofos were detected in most samples. Chlorpyrifos was dominant in all water and sediment samples. It was ranged from 24.5 to 303.8 and 0.9 to 303.8 ppb in water and sediment samples, respectively. Diazinon level was slightly similar to chlorpyrifos in fish samples. Data based on the grand total concentration of OPP showed that the most polluted samples were collected either at spring 1999 or autumn 2000. They were 675.5 and 303.8 ppb in water samples and 43.0 and 52.2 ppb in fish collected at spring 1999 and autumn 2000, respectively. The obtained results are in parallel to that found in case of cholinesterase activity where the activity of both acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was declined at these seasonal period. The activity levels of AChE and BuChE were found to be 77.18% and 59.67% of control at spring 1999 and 78.62% and 85.80% of control, at autumn 2000, respectively. Thus, AChE and BuChE could be used as biomarkers for tracing and biomonitoring OPP pollution.

  6. Response of Jupiter's Aurora to Plasma Mass Loading Rate Monitored by the Hisaki Satellite During Volcanic Eruptions at Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Hiraki, Y.; Tao, C.; Tsuchiya, F.; Delamere, P. A.; Yoshioka, K.; Murakami, G.; Yamazaki, A.; Kita, H.; Badman, S. V.; Fukazawa, K.; Yoshikawa, I.; Fujimoto, M.

    2018-03-01

    The production and transport of plasma mass are essential processes in the dynamics of planetary magnetospheres. At Jupiter, it is hypothesized that Io's volcanic plasma carried out of the plasma torus is transported radially outward in the rotating magnetosphere and is recurrently ejected as plasmoid via tail reconnection. The plasmoid ejection is likely associated with particle energization, radial plasma flow, and transient auroral emissions. However, it has not been demonstrated that plasmoid ejection is sensitive to mass loading because of the lack of simultaneous observations of both processes. We report the response of plasmoid ejection to mass loading during large volcanic eruptions at Io in 2015. Response of the transient aurora to the mass loading rate was investigated based on a combination of Hisaki satellite monitoring and a newly developed analytic model. We found that the transient aurora frequently recurred at a 2-6 day period in response to a mass loading increase from 0.3 to 0.5 t/s. In general, the recurrence of the transient aurora was not significantly correlated with the solar wind, although there was an exceptional event with a maximum emission power of 10 TW after the solar wind shock arrival. The recurrence of plasmoid ejection requires the precondition that an amount comparable to the total mass of magnetosphere, 1.5 Mt, is accumulated in the magnetosphere. A plasmoid mass of more than 0.1 Mt is necessary in case that the plasmoid ejection is the only process for mass release.

  7. Synchronization of dynamic response measurements for the purpose of structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maes, K.; Reynders, E.; De Roeck, G.; Lombaert, G.; Rezayat, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for offline time synchronization of data acquisition systems for linear structures with proportional damping. The technique can be applied when direct synchronization of data acquisition systems is impossible or not sufficiently accurate. The synchronization is based on the acquired dynamic response of the structure only, and does not require the acquisition of a shared sensor signal or a trigger signal. The time delay is identified from the spurious phase shift of the mode shape components that are obtained from system identification. A demonstration for a laboratory experiment on a cantilever steel beam shows that the proposed methodology can be used for accurate time synchronization, resulting in a significant improvement of the accuracy of the identified mode shapes. (paper)

  8. Monitoring and evaluation of corporate social responsibility programmes in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renitha Rampersad

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The South African corporate sector invests millions to support community development and social programs. One of the more fundamental issues about sustainability in a business context is the fact that directors have a fiduciary duty to take into account interests of those stakeholders other than investors/shareholders. This therefore places major importance on sustainability reporting through reports on governance, economic, social and environmental performance and is increasingly being regarded as a key form of stakeholder engagement, and the most accepted formal way of communicating measured outcomes to all stakeholders. A number of methodologies may exist for the development of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR strategies or “how-to guides” for community engagement and investment, however, it lacks development in the field of CSR Programme Evaluation. Integrated approaches to the measurement thereof are still in expanding stages of development and statistical data and/or empirical evidence is lacking at this point. Trust and relationships take time to build but are valuable assets, therefore a company must show it has listened and acted in response to stakeholder concerns, this means that ongoing communication and reporting back to stakeholders is a very important component in any engagement strategy. It is therefore important for the corporate sector to not only evaluate the effectiveness of their CSR Programmes, but also to measure the impact on both their beneficiary communities and their business and subsequently on the Return on Investment (ROI. This paper will highlight a case of the South African corporate sectors attempts to evaluate its effectiveness and impact on beneficiary communities and how they quantify the impact of the investment through successful CSR interventions.

  9. Permafrost and climate in Europe: Monitoring and modelling thermal, geomorphological and geotechnical responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles; Arenson, Lukas U.; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Etzelmüller, Bernd; Frauenfelder, Regula; Gruber, Stephan; Haeberli, Wilfried; Hauck, Christian; Hölzle, Martin; Humlum, Ole; Isaksen, Ketil; Kääb, Andreas; Kern-Lütschg, Martina A.; Lehning, Michael; Matsuoka, Norikazu; Murton, Julian B.; Nötzli, Jeanette; Phillips, Marcia; Ross, Neil; Seppälä, Matti; Springman, Sarah M.; Vonder Mühll, Daniel

    2009-02-01

    We present a review of the changing state of European permafrost within a spatial zone that includes the continuous high latitude arctic permafrost of Svalbard and the discontinuous high altitude mountain permafrost of Iceland, Fennoscandia and the Alps. The paper focuses on methodological developments and data collection over the last decade or so, including research associated with the continent-scale network of instrumented permafrost boreholes established between 1998 and 2001 under the European Union PACE project. Data indicate recent warming trends, with greatest warming at higher latitudes. Equally important are the impacts of shorter-term extreme climatic events, most immediately reflected in changes in active layer thickness. A large number of complex variables, including altitude, topography, insolation and snow distribution, determine permafrost temperatures. The development of regionally calibrated empirical-statistical models, and physically based process-oriented models, is described, and it is shown that, though more complex and data dependent, process-oriented approaches are better suited to estimating transient effects of climate change in complex mountain topography. Mapping and characterisation of permafrost depth and distribution requires integrated multiple geophysical approaches and recent advances are discussed. We report on recent research into ground ice formation, including ice segregation within bedrock and vein ice formation within ice wedge systems. The potential impacts of climate change on rock weathering, permafrost creep, landslides, rock falls, debris flows and slow mass movements are also discussed. Recent engineering responses to the potentially damaging effects of climate warming are outlined, and risk assessment strategies to minimise geological hazards are described. We conclude that forecasting changes in hazard occurrence, magnitude and frequency is likely to depend on process-based modelling, demanding improved

  10. Application of the UNECE Recommendations on Monitoring and Response Procedures for Radioactive Scrap Metal: From Theory to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magold, M.; Mansourian-Stephenson, S., E-mail: stephanie.mansourian-stephenson@unece.org [United Nations Economic Council for Europe, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-07-15

    The work of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) in addressing the issue of radioactive material appearing inadvertently in scrap metal is summarized. After hosting several meetings of national and international representatives of the scrap metal industry and radiation protection experts, the UNECE issued recommendations in 2006 on Monitoring and Response Procedures for Radioactive Scrap Metal. Since then, the UNECE has been exploring, with its Member States, the extent to which the Recommendations have been utilized - by means of a questionnaire. In this paper the results of the questionnaire are presented and, on the basis of the results of the questionnaire, conclusions are drawn and recommendations made for international action in this field for the future. (author)

  11. Emergency response monitoring activities and environmental impact of the K-Reactor aqueous tritium release of December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamby, D.M.; Addis, R.P.; Beals, D.M.; Cadieux, J.R.; Carlton, W.H.; Dunn, D.L.; Hall, G.; Hayes, D.W.; Lorenz, R.; Kantelo, M.V.; Taylor, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 150 gallons of tritiated water leaked from one of the K-Reactor heat exchangers between December 22 and December 25, 1991. Upon notification, the Environmental Technology Section (ETS) activated its emergency response team to provide predictions of river concentrations, transport times, and radiological effects to downstream water users. Additionally, within a few days of the release, ETS and the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) began a comprehensive program to collect and analyze surface water samples from SRS down to the Savannah River estuary. The TRAC mobile laboratory was deployed to the Beaufort-Jasper water treatment plant to provide initial analyses for downriver water samples. This document discusses the results of the sampling activities. Concentration levels are provided along with hypothetical maximum individual doses

  12. Triple Bioluminescence Imaging for In Vivo Monitoring of Cellular Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casey A Maguire

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence imaging (BLI has shown to be crucial for monitoring in vivo biological processes. So far, only dual bioluminescence imaging using firefly (Fluc and Renilla or Gaussia (Gluc luciferase has been achieved due to the lack of availability of other efficiently expressed luciferases using different substrates. Here, we characterized a codon-optimized luciferase from Vargula hilgendorfii (Vluc as a reporter for mammalian gene expression. We showed that Vluc can be multiplexed with Gluc and Fluc for sequential imaging of three distinct cellular phenomena in the same biological system using vargulin, coelenterazine, and D-luciferin substrates, respectively. We applied this triple imaging system to monitor the effect of soluble tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (sTRAIL delivered using an adeno-associated viral vector (AAV on brain tumors in mice. Vluc imaging showed efficient sTRAIL gene delivery to the brain, while Fluc imaging revealed a robust antiglioma therapy. Further, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activation in response to sTRAIL binding to glioma cells death receptors was monitored by Gluc imaging. This work is the first demonstration of trimodal in vivo bioluminescence imaging and will have a broad applicability in many different fields including immunology, oncology, virology, and neuroscience.

  13. Preclinical Evaluation and Monitoring of the Therapeutic Response of a Dual Targeted Hyaluronic Acid Nanodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a powerful cancer treatment but suffers from poor biocompatibility and a lack of tumor targeting. Here, we developed a CD44-targeted polymeric nanocomplex by encapsulating 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT into hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANP for targeted cancer therapy. In vitro, the HANP/HCPT showed improved cytotoxicity to five cancer cell lines including HT29, A549, MDA-MB-231, HepG2, and MDA-MB-435 versus free HCPT. After systemic administration into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft, tumor growth was significantly inhibited 5.25 ± 0.21 times in the HANP/HCPT treated group relative to the nontreated group. In addition, the treatment response was also accessed and confirmed by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F] FDG positron emission tomography (PET. The MDA-MB-231 tumors responded to HANP/HCPT 7 days after the first treatment, which benefits treatment strategy adjustment and personalization. No apparent systemic toxic effects were seen in mice treated with HANP/HCPT. In summary, the HANPs have great promise as a targeted drug carrier for cancer chemotherapy. Our HANP platform can also deliver other hydrophobic chemotherapy agents.

  14. Monitoring responses of Mason Pine to acid rain in China based on remote sensing vegetation index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Jiaxin; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Wang, Ying; Hou, Chunliang

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s, acid rain has remained in the public spotlight in both Europe and the United States and recently has emerged as an important problem in other regions such as Southeast Asia. To reveal responses of Masson Pine to acid rain during a long time series in central China, we used the interpolation dataset of acid rain and the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to derive the monthly pH and NDVI trajectories based on acidity gradients from 1992 to 2006. Then we analyzed inter-annual and seasonal variation of vegetation growth by improved sinusoidal fitting and regression analysis. In the environment of strong acidity and moderate acidity, the growth of Masson Pine was inhibited during the study period, while the slight acidity promoted growth of Masson Pine to some extent. For the multi-year monthly changing trend of NDVI, late spring to mid autumn, the NDVI showed a decreasing trend, especially in June, while from late autumn to the following spring, the NDVI showed a rising tendency, specifically in December and March

  15. Circulating Tumour DNA for Monitoring Treatment Response to Anti-PD-1 Immunotherapy in Melanoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Ashida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anti-programmed cell death-1 (anti-PD-1 antibody shows high therapeutic efficacy in patients with advanced melanoma. However, assessment of its therapeutic activity can be challenging because of tumour enlargement associated with intratumoural inflammation. Because circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA correlates with tumour burden, we assessed the value of ctDNA levels as an indicator of tumour changes. Quantification of ctDNA (BRAFmutant or NRASmutant levels by droplet digital PCR in 5 patients with BRAF or NRAS mutant melanoma during the treatment course showed dynamic changes corresponding to radiological and clinical alterations. In 3 cases in which the anti-PD-1 antibody was effective, ctDNA levels decreased within 2–4 weeks after treatment initiation. In 2 cases in which the anti-PD-1 antibody was ineffective, ctDNA levels did not decrease after treatment initiation. ctDNA could be a useful biomarker to predict early response to treatment in patients with advanced melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 immunotherapy.

  16. High cortisol awakening response is associated with impaired error monitoring and decreased post-error adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Duan, Hongxia; Qin, Shaozheng; Yuan, Yiran; Buchanan, Tony W; Zhang, Kan; Wu, Jianhui

    2015-01-01

    The cortisol awakening response (CAR), a rapid increase in cortisol levels following morning awakening, is an important aspect of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis activity. Alterations in the CAR have been linked to a variety of mental disorders and cognitive function. However, little is known regarding the relationship between the CAR and error processing, a phenomenon that is vital for cognitive control and behavioral adaptation. Using high-temporal resolution measures of event-related potentials (ERPs) combined with behavioral assessment of error processing, we investigated whether and how the CAR is associated with two key components of error processing: error detection and subsequent behavioral adjustment. Sixty university students performed a Go/No-go task while their ERPs were recorded. Saliva samples were collected at 0, 15, 30 and 60 min after awakening on the two consecutive days following ERP data collection. The results showed that a higher CAR was associated with slowed latency of the error-related negativity (ERN) and a higher post-error miss rate. The CAR was not associated with other behavioral measures such as the false alarm rate and the post-correct miss rate. These findings suggest that high CAR is a biological factor linked to impairments of multiple steps of error processing in healthy populations, specifically, the automatic detection of error and post-error behavioral adjustment. A common underlying neural mechanism of physiological and cognitive control may be crucial for engaging in both CAR and error processing.

  17. Metabolic Discrimination of Select List Agents by Monitoring Cellular Responses in a Multianalyte Microphysiometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Wikswo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Harnessing the potential of cells as complex biosensors promises the potential to create sensitive and selective detectors for discrimination of biodefense agents. Here we present toxin detection and suggest discrimination using cells in a multianalyte microphysiometer (MMP that is capable of simultaneously measuring flux changes in four extracellular analytes (acidification rate, glucose uptake, oxygen uptake, and lactate production in real-time. Differential short-term cellular responses were observed between botulinum neurotoxin A and ricin toxin with neuroblastoma cells, alamethicin and anthrax protective antigen with RAW macrophages, and cholera toxin, muscarine, 2,4-dinitro-phenol, and NaF with CHO cells. These results and the post exposure dynamics and metabolic recovery observed in each case suggest the usefulness of cell-based detectors to discriminate between specific analytes and classes of compounds in a complex matrix, and furthermore to make metabolic inferences on the cellular effects of the agents. This may be particularly valuable for classifying unknown toxins.

  18. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  19. Gender parity trends for invited speakers at four prominent virology conference series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejta, Robert F; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2017-06-07

    Scientific conferences are most beneficial to participants when they showcase significant new experimental developments, accurately summarize the current state of the field, and provide strong opportunities for collaborative networking. A top-notch slate of invited speakers, assembled by conference organizers or committees, is key to achieving these goals. The perceived underrepresentation of female speakers at prominent scientific meetings is currently a popular topic for discussion, but one that often lacks supportive data. We compiled the full rosters of invited speakers over the last 35 years for four prominent international virology conferences, the American Society for Virology Annual Meeting (ASV), the International Herpesvirus Workshop (IHW), the Positive-Strand RNA Virus Symposium (PSR), and the Gordon Research Conference on Viruses & Cells (GRC). The rosters were cross-indexed by unique names, gender, year, and repeat invitations. When plotted as gender-dependent trends over time, all four conferences showed a clear proclivity for male-dominated invited speaker lists. Encouragingly, shifts toward parity are emerging within all units, but at different rates. Not surprisingly, both selection of a larger percentage of first time participants and the presence of a woman on the speaker selection committee correlated with improved parity. Session chair information was also collected for the IHW and GRC. These visible positions also displayed a strong male dominance over time that is eroding slowly. We offer our personal interpretation of these data to aid future organizers achieve improved equity among the limited number of available positions for session moderators and invited speakers. IMPORTANCE Politicians and media members have a tendency to cite anecdotes as conclusions without any supporting data. This happens so frequently now, that a name for it has emerged: fake news. Good science proceeds otherwise. The under representation of women as invited

  20. Response monitoring using quantitative ultrasound methods and supervised dictionary learning in locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Fung, Brandon; Tadayyon, Hadi; Tran, William T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive computer-aided-theragnosis (CAT) system was developed for the early assessment of responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The CAT system was based on quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy methods comprising several modules including feature extraction, a metric to measure the dissimilarity between "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans, and a supervised learning algorithm for the classification of patients to responders/non-responders. One major requirement for the successful design of a high-performance CAT system is to accurately measure the changes in parametric maps before treatment onset and during the course of treatment. To this end, a unified framework based on Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC) was used for the design of feature extraction from parametric maps and the dissimilarity measure between the "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans. For the feature extraction, HSIC was used to design a supervised dictionary learning (SDL) method by maximizing the dependency between the scans taken from "pre-" and "mid-treatment" with "dummy labels" given to the scans. For the dissimilarity measure, an HSIC-based metric was employed to effectively measure the changes in parametric maps as an indication of treatment effectiveness. The HSIC-based feature extraction and dissimilarity measure used a kernel function to nonlinearly transform input vectors into a higher dimensional feature space and computed the population means in the new space, where enhanced group separability was ideally obtained. The results of the classification using the developed CAT system indicated an improvement of performance compared to a CAT system with basic features using histogram of intensity.

  1. Monitoring Salivary Immunoglobulin A Responses to Official and Simulated Matches In Elite Young Soccer Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freitas Camila G.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to examine SIgA responses (concentration [SIgAabs] and a secretion rate [SIgArate] to official and simulated competitive matches in young soccer players. The sample was composed of 26 male soccer players (age 15.6 ± 1.1 yrs, stature 177.0 ± 6.1 cm, body mass 70.5 ± 5.7 kg. Four soccer matches (two simulated matches [SM] and two official matches [OM] were conducted. The matches consisted of two halves of 35 min with a 10 min rest interval. Each assessed player participated in only one SM and one OM. All matches were performed in the same week, during the competitive season, and at the same time of the day (9:00 am, separated by 48 h. Saliva samples were collected before and after every match. The session rating of perceived exertion was reported 30 min after each match in order to determine the internal training load (ITL. A significant decrease in SIgAabs and SIgArate after OM was observed when compared to the pre-match value. In addition, the SIgArate was higher at pre-OM when compared to pre-SM. A higher ITL for OM was observed compared to SM. The current findings indicate that OM may lead to a decrease in the main mucosal immunity function parameter of young soccer players that could increase the risk of URTI. Coaches should be aware of it in order to plan appropriate training loads and recovery procedures to avoid or minimize the likelihood of upper respiratory tract infection occurrences.

  2. Limitations and potential of satellite imagery to monitor environmental response to coastal flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Elijah W.; Werle, Dirk; Suzuoki, Yukihiro; Rangoonwala, Amina; Lu, Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Storm-surge flooding and marsh response throughout the coastal wetlands of Louisiana were mapped using several types of remote sensing data collected before and after Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in 2008. These included synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data obtained from the (1) C-band advance SAR (ASAR) aboard the Environmental Satellite, (2) phased-array type L-band SAR (PALSAR) aboard the Advanced Land Observing Satellite, and (3) optical data obtained from Thematic Mapper (TM) sensor aboard the Land Satellite (Landsat). In estuarine marshes, L-band SAR and C-band ASAR provided accurate flood extent information when depths averaged at least 80 cm, but only L-band SAR provided consistent subcanopy detection when depths averaged 50 cm or less. Low performance of inundation mapping based on C-band ASAR was attributed to an apparent inundation detection limit (>30 cm deep) in tall Spartina alterniflora marshes, a possible canopy collapse of shoreline fresh marsh exposed to repeated storm-surge inundations, wind-roughened water surfaces where water levels reached marsh canopy heights, and relatively high backscatter in the near-range portion of the SAR imagery. A TM-based vegetation index of live biomass indicated that the severity of marsh dieback was linked to differences in dominant species. The severest impacts were not necessarily caused by longer inundation but rather could be caused by repeated exposure of the palustrine marsh to elevated salinity floodwaters. Differential impacts occurred in estuarine marshes. The more brackish marshes on average suffered higher impacts than the more saline marshes, particularly the nearshore coastal marshes occupied by S. alterniflora.

  3. Building the vegetation drought response index for Canada (VegDRI-Canada) to monitor agricultural drought: first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Tsegaye; Champagne, Catherine; Wardlow, Brian D.; Hadwen, Trevor A.; Brown, Jesslyn; Demisse, Getachew B.; Bayissa, Yared A.; Davidson, Andrew M.

    2017-01-01

    Drought is a natural climatic phenomenon that occurs throughout the world and impacts many sectors of society. To help decision-makers reduce the impacts of drought, it is important to improve monitoring tools that provide relevant and timely information in support of drought mitigation decisions. Given that drought is a complex natural hazard that manifests in different forms, monitoring can be improved by integrating various types of information (e.g., remote sensing and climate) that is timely and region specific to identify where and when droughts are occurring. The Vegetation Drought Response Index for Canada (VegDRI-Canada) is a recently developed drought monitoring tool for Canada. VegDRI-Canada extends the initial VegDRI concept developed for the conterminous United States to a broader transnational coverage across North America. VegDRI-Canada models are similar to those developed for the United States, integrating satellite observations of vegetation status, climate data, and biophysical information on land use and land cover, soil characteristics, and other environmental factors. Collectively, these different types of data are integrated into the hybrid VegDRI-Canada to isolate the effects of drought on vegetation. Twenty-three weekly VegDRI-Canada models were built for the growing season (April–September) through the weekly analysis of these data using a regression tree-based data mining approach. A 15-year time series of VegDRI-Canada results (s to 2014) was produced using these models and the output was validated by randomly selecting 20% of the historical data, as well as holdout year (15% unseen data) across the growing season that the Pearson’s correlation ranged from 0.6 to 0.77. A case study was also conducted to evaluate the VegDRI-Canada results over the prairie region of Canada for two drought years and one non-drought year for three weekly periods of the growing season (i.e., early-, mid-, and late season). The comparison of the Veg

  4. Calendar time trends in the incidence and prevalence of triple-class virologic failure in antiretroviral drug-experienced people with HIV in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakagawa, Fumiyo; Lodwick, Rebecca; Costagliola, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), virologic failure of the 3 original classes [triple-class virologic failure, (TCVF)] still develops in a small minority of patients who started therapy in the triple combination ART era. Trends in the incidence and prevalence of TCVF...

  5. Pharmacy refill adherence compared with CD4 count changes for monitoring HIV-infected adults on antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory P Bisson

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for monitoring HIV-infected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in resource-limited settings recommend using CD4(+ T cell (CD4 count changes to monitor treatment effectiveness. In practice, however, falling CD4 counts are a consequence, rather than a cause, of virologic failure. Adherence lapses precede virologic failure and, unlike CD4 counts, data on adherence are immediately available to all clinics dispensing cART. However, the accuracy of adherence assessments for predicting future or detecting current virologic failure has not been determined. The goal of this study therefore was to determine the accuracy of adherence assessments for predicting and detecting virologic failure and to compare the accuracy of adherence-based monitoring approaches with approaches monitoring CD4 count changes.We conducted an observational cohort study among 1,982 of 4,984 (40% HIV-infected adults initiating non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based cART in the Aid for AIDS Disease Management Program, which serves nine countries in southern Africa. Pharmacy refill adherence was calculated as the number of months of cART claims submitted divided by the number of complete months between cART initiation and the last refill prior to the endpoint of interest, expressed as a percentage. The main outcome measure was virologic failure defined as a viral load > 1,000 copies/ml (1 at an initial assessment either 6 or 12 mo after cART initiation and (2 after a previous undetectable (i.e., 0.5. In addition, adherence levels assessed 3 mo prior to viral load assessments were as accurate for virologic failure occurring approximately 3 mo later as were CD4 count changes calculated from cART initiation to the actual time of the viral load assessments, indicating the potential utility of adherence assessments for predicting future, rather than simply detecting current, virologic failure. Moreover

  6. Gulf of Mexico offshore operations monitoring experiment (GOOMEX), phase I : sublethal responses to contaminant exposure - introduction and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennicutt, M.C.; Green, R.H.; Montagna, P.

    1996-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Offshore Operations Monitoring Experiment (GOOMEX) is a three-phase study to test and evaluate a range of biological, biochemical, and chemical methodologies to detect and assess chronic sublethal biological impacts in the vicinity of long-duration activities associated with oil and gas exploration and production. A chronic impact is defined as an effect on the biota caused by exposure to the long-term accumulation of chemicals in the environment. The basic program, comprising four field activities over a 2-yr period, was designed to detect nearfield impacts and contaminant gradients extending out from each site. Five test sites were evaluated and three selected as most appropriate for long-term study: MU-A85, MAI-686, and HI-A389. The sampling design included a radial pattern with stations at 30-50, 100, 200, 500, and 3000 m distance and employed a dose-response model to test the hypotheses that biological, chemical, and biochemical variations are due to platform-derived contaminants. Study components included contaminant (trace metals and hydrocarbons) analysis in sediments, pore waters, and biological tissues; assemblage analysis of benthic meiofauna, infauna, and epifauna, assessment of community health based on life history and reproduction studies; and the induction of detoxification responses. (author). 57 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs

  7. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    -naive individuals starting combination antiretroviral therapy from 1998 to 2006. OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from combination antiretroviral therapy initiation to HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml (virological response), CD4 increase of more than 100 cells/microl (immunological response) and new AIDS/death were analysed...... response. The probability of virological response was lower in those aged 6-12 (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.87) and 13-17 (0.78) years, but was higher in those aged 50-54 (1.24), 55-59 (1.24) and at least 60 (1.18) years. The probability of immunological response was higher in children and younger adults...... and reduced in those 60 years or older. Those aged 55-59 and 60 years or older had poorer clinical outcomes after adjusting for the latest CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: Better virological responses but poorer immunological responses in older individuals, together with low precombination antiretroviral therapy...

  8. Bioinformatics Meets Virology: The European Virus Bioinformatics Center's Second Annual Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Bashar; Arkhipova, Ksenia; Andeweg, Arno C; Posada-Céspedes, Susana; Enault, François; Gruber, Arthur; Koonin, Eugene V; Kupczok, Anne; Lemey, Philippe; McHardy, Alice C; McMahon, Dino P; Pickett, Brett E; Robertson, David L; Scheuermann, Richard H; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Zwart, Mark P; Schönhuth, Alexander; Dutilh, Bas E; Marz, Manja

    2018-05-14

    The Second Annual Meeting of the European Virus Bioinformatics Center (EVBC), held in Utrecht, Netherlands, focused on computational approaches in virology, with topics including (but not limited to) virus discovery, diagnostics, (meta-)genomics, modeling, epidemiology, molecular structure, evolution, and viral ecology. The goals of the Second Annual Meeting were threefold: (i) to bring together virologists and bioinformaticians from across the academic, industrial, professional, and training sectors to share best practice; (ii) to provide a meaningful and interactive scientific environment to promote discussion and collaboration between students, postdoctoral fellows, and both new and established investigators; (iii) to inspire and suggest new research directions and questions. Approximately 120 researchers from around the world attended the Second Annual Meeting of the EVBC this year, including 15 renowned international speakers. This report presents an overview of new developments and novel research findings that emerged during the meeting.

  9. Detection of resistance mutations and CD4 slopes in individuals experiencing sustained virological failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultze, Anna; Paredes, Roger; Sabin, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    during the episode were included. Mutations were identified using the IAS-US (2013) list, and were presumed to be present from detection until the end of an episode. Multivariable linear mixed models with a random intercept and slope adjusted for age, baseline CD4 count, hepatitis C, drug type, RNA (log...... mutations on CD4 slopes in patients undergoing episodes of viral failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients from the EuroSIDA and UK CHIC cohorts undergoing at least one episode of virological failure (>3 consecutive RNA measurements >500 on ART) with at least three CD4 measurements and a resistance test......-scale), risk group and subtype were used to estimate CD4 slopes. Individual mutations with a population prevalence of >10% were tested for their effect on the CD4 slope. RESULTS: A total of 2731 patients experiencing a median of 1 (range 1-4) episodes were included in this analysis. The prevalence of any...

  10. Una Perspectiva sobre la Situación Actual de la Virología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Solans, Esteban

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Not available

    La Virología se ha desarrollado durante la última parte del siglo XX en paralelo con las nuevas técnicas de análisis y manipulación genética y con el auxilio de técnicas físicas e informáticas. En España se han formado núcleos activos tanto en genética viral como en virus patógenos de animales y plantas. Contrariamente a predicciones de hace tan solo tres décadas, las enfermedades víricas siguen siendo un importante problema en medicina, veterinaria y agricultura. Un gran número de enfermedades víricas emergentes constituyen un importante desafío para el siglo XXI.

  11. [Caprine arthritis-encephalitis: trial of an adjuvant vaccine preparation. I. Clinical and virological study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, P; Vitu, C; Fontaine, J J; Vignoni, M

    1993-04-01

    In purpose to protect goats against caprine arthritis encephalitis virus (CAEV), the first group of kids (I) was inoculated with purified, inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions, the second group (II) with adjuvant and the third one (III) with culture medium. 2-4 months later, the three groups were challenged with virulent CAEV by intraarticular route. On the clinical level, vaccinated and challenged kids show more early and severe arthritis than other groups. On the virological level, isolation of lentivirus from white blood cells and different organs is more important in group I than groups II and III. Therefore, vaccinations with inactivated and adjuvant-treated virions do not protect against a virulent challenge; there is an enhancement of lesions. We note that the adjuvant elicits a mild non-specific protection against virulent challenge.

  12. Porting of Bio-Informatics Tools for Plant Virology on a Computational Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzalone, G.; Lombardo, A.; Muoio, A.; Iacono-Manno, M.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of Tri Grid Project and PI2S2 is the creation of the first Sicilian regional computational Grid. In particular, it aims to build various software-hardware interfaces between the infrastructure and some scientific and industrial applications. In this context, we have integrated some among the most innovative computing applications in virology research inside these Grid infrastructure. Particularly, we have implemented in a complete work flow, various tools for pairwise or multiple sequence alignment and phylogeny tree construction (ClustalW-MPI), phylogenetic networks (Splits Tree), detection of recombination by phylogenetic methods (TOPALi) and prediction of DNA or RNA secondary consensus structures (KnetFold). This work will show how the ported applications decrease the execution time of the analysis programs, improve the accessibility to the data storage system and allow the use of metadata for data processing. (Author)

  13. Evolution of drug resistance in HIV infected patients remaining on a virologically failing cART regimen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cozzi-Lepri, A; Phillips, AN; Ruiz, L

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the extent of drug resistance accumulation in patients kept on a virologically failing regimen and its determinants in the clinical setting. DESIGN: The study focused on 110 patients of EuroSIDA on an unchanged regimen who had two genotypic tests performed at two time points...

  14. Predictors of having a resistance test following confirmed virological failure of combination antiretroviral therapy: data from EuroSIDA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Zoe V; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    these recommendations. Methods: In EuroSIDA, virological failure (VF) was defined as confirmed VL>1,000 copies/ml after =4 months continuous use of any antiretroviral in a =3-drug regimen started during or after 2002. We assessed whether a resistance test was performed around VF (from 4 months before to 1 year after VF...

  15. Impact of CD4 and CD8 dynamics and viral rebounds on loss of virological control in HIV controllers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chereau, Fanny; Madec, Yoann; Sabin, Caroline

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: HIV controllers (HICs) spontaneously maintain HIV viral replication at low level without antiretroviral therapy (ART), a small number of whom will eventually lose this ability to control HIV viremia. The objective was to identify factors associated with loss of virological control. MET...

  16. The effect of efavirenz versus nevirapine-containing regimens on immunologic, virologic and clinical outcomes in a prospective observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, H.-C.; Koopmans †, P.P.; Brouwer, A.M.; Dofferhoff, A.S.M.; Flier, M. van der; Groot, R. de; Hofstede, H.J.M. ter; Keuter, M.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der; et al.,

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare regimens consisting of either efavirenz or nevirapine and two or more nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) among HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naive, and AIDS-free individuals with respect to clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes. DESIGN: Prospective

  17. Factors associated with HIV-1 virological failure in an outpatient clinic for HIV-infected people in Haiphong, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huong, D T M; Bannister, W; Phong, P T

    2011-01-01

    starting ART, 23% had detectable HIV-1 viral load (= 400 copies/mL). Patients who had developed a World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 4 condition at the time of initiation of ART were more likely to experience virological failure than those in stages 1-3, odds ratio (OR): 5.20 (95% confidence...

  18. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with "1"8F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E.; Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of "1"8F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k_3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K_1) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k_3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K_1. The k_3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k_3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k_3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed characterization of the

  19. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with {sup 18}F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k{sub 3} and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K{sub 1}) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k{sub 3} and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K{sub 1}. The k{sub 3} -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k{sub 3} and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k{sub 3} indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET

  20. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with 18F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovski, Milan; Lee, Nancy Y; Schöder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D; Beattie, Bradley J; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E; O'Donoghue, Joseph A; Humm, John L

    2017-09-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∼95 min and ∼160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k 3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K 1 ) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k 3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K 1 . The k 3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k 3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k 3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed

  1. Clinical Outcomes of Virologically-Suppressed Patients with Pre-existing HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Switching to Rilpivirine/Emtricitabine/Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate in the SPIRIT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Danielle P; Toma, Jonathan; Tan, Yuping; Solberg, Owen; Cai, Suqin; Kulkarni, Rima; Andreatta, Kristen; Lie, Yolanda; Chuck, Susan K; Palella, Frank; Miller, Michael D; White, Kirsten L

    2016-02-01

    Antiretroviral regimen switching may be considered for HIV-1-infected, virologically-suppressed patients to enable treatment simplification or improve tolerability, but should be guided by knowledge of pre-existing drug resistance. The current study examined the impact of pre-existing drug resistance mutations on virologic outcomes among virologically-suppressed patients switching to Rilpivirine (RPV)/emtricitabine (FTC)/tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF). SPIRIT was a phase 3b study evaluating the safety and efficacy of switching to RPV/FTC/TDF in virologically-suppressed HIV-1-infected patients. Pre-existing drug resistance at baseline was determined by proviral DNA genotyping for 51 RPV/FTC/TDF-treated patients with known mutations by historical RNA genotype and matched controls and compared with clinical outcome at Week 48. Drug resistance mutations in protease or reverse transcriptase were detected in 62.7% of patients by historical RNA genotype and in 68.6% by proviral DNA genotyping at baseline. Proviral DNA sequencing detected 89% of occurrences of NRTI and NNRTI resistance-associated mutations reported by historical genotype. Mutations potentially affecting RPV activity, including E138A/G/K/Q, Y181C, and H221Y, were detected in isolates from 11 patients by one or both assays. None of the patients with single mutants had virologic failure through Week 48. One patient with pre-existing Y181Y/C and M184I by proviral DNA genotyping experienced virologic failure. Nineteen patients with K103N present by historical genotype were confirmed by proviral DNA sequencing and 18/19 remained virologically-suppressed. Virologic success rates were high among virologically-suppressed patients with pre-existing NRTI and NNRTI resistance-associated mutations who switched to RPV/FTC/TDF in the SPIRIT study. While plasma RNA genotyping remains preferred, proviral DNA genotyping may provide additional value in virologically-suppressed patients for whom historical resistance

  2. Using LiCSAR as a fast-response system for the detection and the monitoring of volcanic unrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albino, F.; Biggs, J.; Hatton, E. L.; Spaans, K.; Gaddes, M.; McDougall, A.

    2017-12-01

    Based on the Smithsonian Institution volcano database, a total of 13256 volcanoes exist on Earth with 1273 having evidence of eruptive or unrest activity during the Holocene. InSAR techniques have proven their ability to detect and to quantify volcanic ground deformation on a case-by-case basis. However, the use of InSAR for the daily monitoring of every active volcano requires the development of automatic processing that can provide information in a couple of hours after a new radar acquisition. The LiCSAR system (http://comet.nerc.ac.uk/COMET-LiCS-portal/) answers this requirement by processing the vast amounts of data generated daily by the EU's Sentinel-1 satellite constellation. It provides now high-resolution deformation data for the entire Alpine-Himalayan seismic belt. The aim of our study is to extend LiCSAR system to the purpose of volcano monitoring. For each active volcano, the last Sentinel products calculated (phase, coherence and amplitude) will be available online in the COMET Volcano Deformation Database. To analyse this large amount of InSAR products, we develop an algorithm to automatically detect ground deformation signals as well as changes in coherence and amplitude in the time series. This toolbox could be a powerful fast-response system for helping volcanological observatories to manage new or ongoing volcanic crisis. Important information regarding the spatial and the temporal evolution of each ground deformation signal will also be added to the COMET database. This will benefit to better understand the conditions in which volcanic unrest leads to an eruption. Such worldwide survey enables us to establish a large catalogue of InSAR products, which will also be suitable for further studies (mapping of new lava flows, modelling of magmatic sources, evaluation of stress interactions).

  3. Socioeconomic position and ten-year survival and virologic outcomes in a Ugandan HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew G Flynn

    Full Text Available Lifelong ART is essential to reducing HIV mortality and ending the epidemic, however the interplay between socioeconomic position and long-term outcomes of HIV-infected persons receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART in sub-Saharan Africa is unknown. Furthering the understanding of factors related to long-term ART outcomes in this important region will aid the successful scale-up of ART programs. We enrolled 559 HIV-infected Ugandan adults starting ART in 2004-2005 at the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda and followed them for 10 years. We documented baseline employment status, regular household income, education level, housing description, physical ability, and CD4 count. Viral load was measured every six months. Proportional hazard regression tested for associations between baseline characteristics and 1 mortality, 2 virologic failure, and 3 mortality or virologic failure as a composite outcome. Over ten years 23% (n = 127 of participants died, 6% (n = 31 were lost-to-follow-up and 23% (107/472 experienced virologic treatment failure. In Kaplan-Meier analysis we observed an association between employment and mortality, with the highest cumulative probability of death occurring in unemployed individuals. In univariate analysis unemployment and disease severity were associated with mortality, but in multivariable analysis the only association with mortality was disease severity. We observed an association between higher household income and an increased incidence of both virologic failure and the combined outcome, and an association between self-employment and lower incidence of virologic failure and the combined outcome when compared to unemployment. Formal education level and housing status were unrelated to outcomes. It is feasible to achieve good ten-year survival, retention-in-care, and viral suppression in a socioeconomically diverse population in a resource-limited setting. Unemployment appears to be related to adverse 10

  4. Three-Dimensional Vibration Isolator for Suppressing High-Frequency Responses for Sage III Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Cutright, S.; Dyke, R.; Templeton, J.; Gasbarre, J.; Novak, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III - International Space Station (ISS) instrument will be used to study ozone, providing global, long-term measurements of key components of the Earth's atmosphere for the continued health of Earth and its inhabitants. SAGE III is launched into orbit in an inverted configuration on SpaceX;s Falcon 9 launch vehicle. As one of its four supporting elements, a Contamination Monitoring Package (CMP) mounted to the top panel of the Interface Adapter Module (IAM) box experiences high-frequency response due to structural coupling between the two structures during the SpaceX launch. These vibrations, which were initially observed in the IAM Engineering Development Unit (EDU) test and later verified through finite element analysis (FEA) for the SpaceX launch loads, may damage the internal electronic cards and the Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) sensors mounted on the CMP. Three-dimensional (3D) vibration isolators were required to be inserted between the CMP and IAM interface in order to attenuate the high frequency vibrations without resulting in any major changes to the existing system. Wire rope isolators were proposed as the isolation system between the CMP and IAM due to the low impact to design. Most 3D isolation systems are designed for compression and roll, therefore little dynamic data was available for using wire rope isolators in an inverted or tension configuration. From the isolator FEA and test results, it is shown that by using the 3D wire rope isolators, the CMP high-frequency responses have been suppressed by several orders of magnitude over a wide excitation frequency range. Consequently, the TQCM sensor responses are well below their qualification environments. It is indicated that these high-frequency responses due to the typical instrument structural coupling can be significantly suppressed by a vibration passive control using the 3D vibration isolator. Thermal and contamination

  5. Failure to achieve immunological recovery in HIV-infected patients with clinical and virological success after 10 years of combined ART: role of treatment course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffi, François; Le Moing, Vincent; Assuied, Alex; Habak, Sofiane; Spire, Bruno; Cazanave, Charles; Billaud, Eric; Dellamonica, Pierre; Ferry, Tristan; Fagard, Catherine; Leport, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    We assessed factors, including treatment course, associated with failure to obtain a 10 year immunological response after starting first-generation PI-containing combined ART (cART). In the prospective COPILOTE cohort of HIV-infected patients started on a first-generation PI-containing regimen in 1997-99, the impact of cART history on the failure to achieve immunological response measured at 10 years was assessed by multivariate logistic regression models in the 399 patients with clinical and virological success of cART. Failure of CD4 response (CD4 >500/mm 3 ) was associated with age ≥40 years at baseline (P failure to achieve complete immunological response (CD4 >500/mm 3 and CD4:CD8 ratio >1) were CD4:CD8 ratio ≤0.8 at month 8 (P success. Lack of treatment interruption may improve long-term immunological outcome in HIV infection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Hyperpolarized 13C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam M. Chaumeil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate produced from [1-13C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of 13C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo.

  7. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Text Messaging Intervention to Promote Virologic Suppression and Retention in Care in an Urban Safety-Net HIV Clinic: The Connect4Care (C4C) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulos, Katerina A; Riley, Elise D; Carrico, Adam W; Tulsky, Jacqueline; Moskowitz, Judith T; Dilworth, Samantha; Coffin, Lara S; Wilson, Leslie; Peretz, Jason Johnson; Hilton, Joan F

    2018-02-21

    Text messaging is a promising strategy to support HIV care engagement, but little is known about its efficacy in urban safety-net HIV clinic populations. We conducted a randomized controlled trial of a supportive and motivational text messaging intervention, Connect4Care (C4C), among viremic patients who had a history of poor retention or were new to clinic. Participants were randomized (stratified by new HIV diagnosis status) to receive one of the following for 12 months: 1) thrice-weekly intervention messages, plus texted primary care appointment reminders and a monthly text message requesting confirmation of study participation, or; 2) texted reminders and monthly messages alone. Viral load was assessed at 6 and 12 months. The primary outcome was virologic suppression (<200 copies/mL) at 12 months, estimated via repeated measures log-binomial regression, adjusted for new diagnosis status. The secondary outcome was retention in clinic care. Between August 2013-November 2015, 230 participants were randomized. Virologic suppression at 12 months was similar between intervention and control participants (48.8% vs. 45.8%), with negligible change from 6-month estimates, yielding RR 1.07 (95% CI: 0.82, 1.39). Suppression was higher in the newly diagnosed (78.3% vs. 45.3%). There were no intervention effects on the secondary outcome. Exploratory analyses suggested that patients with more responses to study text messages had better outcomes, regardless of arm. The C4C text messaging intervention did not significantly increase virologic suppression or retention in care. Response to text messages may be a useful way for providers to gauge risk for poor HIV outcomes. NCT01917994.

  8. Diesel injector dynamic modelling and estimation of injection parameters from impact response part 2: prediction of injection parameters from monitored vibration

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Fengshou; Ball, Andrew; Rao, K K

    1996-01-01

    Part 2 of this paper presents the experimental and analytical procedures used in the estimation of injection parameters from monitored vibration. The mechanical and flow‐induced sources of vibration in a fuel injector are detailed and the features of the resulting vibration response of the injector body are discussed. Experimental engine test and data acquisition procedures are described, and the use of an out‐of‐the‐engine test facility to confirm injection dependent vibration response is ou...

  9. Monitoring of treatment response after chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer using in vivo 1H MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Ann D.; Yeung, David K.W.; Bhatia, Kunwar S.; Wong, Jeffrey K.T.; Ahuja, Anil T.; Yu, Kwok-hung; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Hu, Chen-wen; Tse, Gary M.K.; Vlantis, Alexander C.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated choline (Cho) level has been documented on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and therefore percentage changes in Cho levels after chemoradiotherapy may serve as a marker of residual cancer in a post-treatment mass (PTM). Forty-six patients underwent 1 H MRS before treatment and the 30 patients with a PTM underwent repeat 1 H MRS at 6 weeks post-treatment. The percentage change in Cho/creatine and Cho/water ratios were correlated with residual cancer. The mean pretreatment Cho/creatine and Cho/water ratios were 2.24 and 1.20 x 10 -3 , respectively. Cho persisted in four out of nine PTMs with residual cancer. Cho was absent in five out of nine PTMs with residual cancer and 21/21 PTMs without cancer. The number of PTMs with persistent Cho was too small to allow analysis of percentage change in ratios but the presence of Cho in a PTM showed significant correlation with residual cancer (p=0.0046), producing a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 44%, 100%, 100% and 81%, respectively. Therefore, the presence of Cho in a PTM may serve as a marker of residual cancer. Furthermore since so few PTMs contain Cho, a percentage change in Cho ratios may not be a useful method for monitoring treatment response. (orig.)

  10. A system for radiation monitoring at the site for emergency planning and response in a nuclear station potentialities and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakov, V.; Moskovska, N.; Madzharov, M.; Angelov, V.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes the existing system for radiation monitoring of the NPP region. The location of the devices puts a number of problems as maintenance of the radiometric equipment and urgent collecting and processing of the measuring data. Undeniably, to get an effective and timely decision, it is necessary to have on hand information as complete and prompt as possible, about the radiological situation in the regions, towns, villages and sites. As a result of daily observation and registration, an amount of enough in volume data could be accumulated. This data may be used as a base in case of a sudden change of the radiological situation and/or in case of arising of some local contaminations as a result of a volley type of emission, accidents at the nuclear power stations and releases fractions of radioactive and rare gases. The data obtained for a comparatively large region (about 700 square kilometers) with a high degree of gamma detectors distribution density are discussed. In the conditions of a progressively complicating radiological situation, they allow to determine the possible directions of the emission and also to undertake some response actions for protection of the population in time. (author)

  11. The influence of water chemistry and biocide additions on the response of an on-line biofilm monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Licina, G.J.; Nekoksa, G.

    1995-01-01

    Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) is a significant cause of degradation of piping and heat transfer surfaces in cooling water systems. The interaction between the metabolic processes of microorganisms attached to metallic surfaces and corrosion processes can lead to localized corrosion and rapid penetration of piping and heat exchanger tubes. On-line Monitoring of biofilm formation on Metallic Surfaces is a key both for automatic control equipment and for system operators so that mitigation activities can be initiated well before the structural integrity of piping or components is jeopardized. In addition, tracking of biofilm activity on line provides feedback useful for evaluating the effectiveness of biocide additions and optimizing the concentrations and addition schedules of biocides and other control chemicals. A probe has been developed to provide a method for determining the onset of biofilm formation on metal surfaces and tracking biofilm activity on line in a power plant or industrial environment; in fresh water and seawater environments. Experience with the system in a variety of water chemistries, and system responses to biofilm growth and subsequent destruction by biocide additions are described

  12. One-year monitoring of core biomarker and digestive enzyme responses in transplanted zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palais, F; Dedourge-Geffard, O; Beaudon, A; Pain-Devin, S; Trapp, J; Geffard, O; Noury, P; Gourlay-Francé, C; Uher, E; Mouneyrac, C; Biagianti-Risbourg, S; Geffard, A

    2012-04-01

    A 12-month active biomonitoring study was performed in 2008-2009 on the Vesle river basin (Champagne-Ardenne, France) using the freshwater mussel Dreissena polymorpha as a sentinel species; allochthonous mussels originating from a reference site (Commercy) were exposed at four sites (Bouy, Sept-Saulx, Fismes, Ardre) within the Vesle river basin. Selected core biomarkers (acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity, glutathione-S transferase (GST) activity, metallothionein concentration), along with digestive enzyme activities (amylase, endocellulase) and energy reserve concentrations (glycogen, lipids), were monitored throughout the study in exposed mussels. At the Fismes and Ardre sites (downstream basin), metallic and organic contamination levels were low but still high enough to elicit AChE and GST activity induction in exposed mussels (chemical stress); besides, chemical pollutants had no apparent deleterious effects on mussel condition. At the Bouy and Sept-Saulx sites (upstream basin), mussels obviously suffered from adverse food conditions which seriously impaired individual physiological state and survival (nutritional stress); food scarcity had however no apparent effects on core biomarker responses. Digestive enzyme activities responded to both chemical and nutritional stresses, the increase in energy outputs (general adaptation syndrome-downstream sites) or the decrease in energy inputs (food scarcity-upstream sites) leading to mid- or long-term induction of digestive carbohydrase activities in exposed mussels (energy optimizing strategy). Complex regulation patterns of these activities require nevertheless the use of a multi-marker approach to allow data interpretation. Besides, their sensitivity to natural confounding environmental factors remains to be precised.

  13. Brain Activation in Response to Personalized Behavioral and Physiological Feedback From Self-Monitoring Technology: Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maxine E; Morgan, Paul S; Sherar, Lauren B; Kingsnorth, Andrew P; Magistro, Daniele; Esliger, Dale W

    2017-11-08

    The recent surge in commercially available wearable technology has allowed real-time self-monitoring of behavior (eg, physical activity) and physiology (eg, glucose levels). However, there is limited neuroimaging work (ie, functional magnetic resonance imaging [fMRI]) to identify how people's brains respond to receiving this personalized health feedback and how this impacts subsequent behavior. Identify regions of the brain activated and examine associations between activation and behavior. This was a pilot study to assess physical activity, sedentary time, and glucose levels over 14 days in 33 adults (aged 30 to 60 years). Extracted accelerometry, inclinometry, and interstitial glucose data informed the construction of personalized feedback messages (eg, average number of steps per day). These messages were subsequently presented visually to participants during fMRI. Participant physical activity levels and sedentary time were assessed again for 8 days following exposure to this personalized feedback. Independent tests identified significant activations within the prefrontal cortex in response to glucose feedback compared with behavioral feedback (Pbrain activation when compared with behavior. Participants reduced time spent sedentary at follow-up. Research on deploying behavioral and physiological feedback warrants further investigation. ©Maxine E Whelan, Paul S Morgan, Lauren B Sherar, Andrew P Kingsnorth, Daniele Magistro, Dale W Esliger. Originally published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research (http://www.jmir.org), 08.11.2017.

  14. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, S.W.; Gallegos, G.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Tate, P.J.; Balke, B.K.; Biermann, A.H.; Hoppes, W.G.; Fields, B.C.; Gouveia, F.J.; Berger, R.L.; Miller, F.S.; Rueppel, D.W.; Sims, J.M.

    1992-04-01

    The primary tasks of the environmental monitoring section (EMS) Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are: effluent monitoring of air, sewer, and NPDES water. Surveillance monitoring of soil, vegetation and foodstuff, water, air particulate, and air tritium. Radiation monitoring, dose assessment, emergency response, quality assurance, and reporting. This report describes LLNL and the monitoring plan

  15. Monitoring Initial Response to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Based Regimens An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis From Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, Katy J. L.; Hayen, Andrew; Macaskill, Petra; Craig, Jonathan C.; Neal, Bruce C.; Fox, Kim M.; Remme, Willem J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; MacMahon, Stephen; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Teo, Koon K.; Irwig, Les

    Most clinicians monitor blood pressure to estimate a patient's response to blood pressure-lowering therapy. However, the apparent change may not actually reflect the effect of the treatment, because a person's blood pressure varies considerably even without the administration of drug therapy. We

  16. Virological and clinical characteristics of hepatitis delta virus in South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moatter Tariq

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aims There is a paucity of data on the impact of hepatitis D virus (HDV in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection from South Asia. We studied the impact of HDV co-infection on virological and clinical characteristics. Methods We collected data of 480 patients with HBsAg positive and a detectable HBV DNA PCR, who presented to the Aga Khan University, Karachi and Isra University in Hyderabad, Pakistan in the last 5 years. HDV co-infection was diagnosed on the basis of anti-HDV. ALT, HBeAg, HBeAb and HBV DNA PCR quantitative levels were checked in all patients. We divided all patients into two groups based on anti-HDV, and compared their biochemical, serological & virological labs and clinical spectrum. Clinical spectrum of disease included asymptomatic carrier (AC, chronic active hepatitis (CAH, immuno-tolerant phase (IP, and compensated cirrhosis (CC. Results HDV co-infection was found in 169 (35.2%. There were 164 (34.6% HBeAg positive and 316 (65.4% HBeAg negative patients. Mean ALT level was 66 ± 73 IU. 233 (48.5% had raised ALT. HBV DNA level was ≥ 10e5 in 103(21.5% patients. Overall, among HBV/HDV co-infection, 146/169 (86.4% had suppressed HBV DNA PCR as compared to 231/311 (74.3% patients with HBV mono-infection; p-value = 0.002. Among HBeAg negative patients 71/128(55.5% had raised ALT levels among HBV/HDV co-infection as compared to 71/188 (37.8% with HBV mono-infection (p-value = 0.002; levels of HBV DNA were equal in two groups; there were 27/128 (21% patients with CC among HBV/HDV co-infection as compared to 23 (12% in HBV mono-infection (p-value = 0.009; there were less AC (p-value = 0.009 and more CAH (p-value = 0.009 among HBV/HDV co-infection patients. Among HBeAg positive patients, serum ALT, HBV DNA levels and the spectrum of HBV were similar in the two groups. Conclusions HBV/HDV co-infection results in the suppression of HBV DNA. A fair proportion of HBV/HDV co-infected patients with HBe