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Sample records for monitoring tumor response

  1. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Cisplatin Using Optical Spectroscopy

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    Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Evers, Daniel J.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Rottenberg, Sven; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Anatomic imaging alone is often inadequate for tuning systemic treatment for individual tumor response. Optically based techniques could potentially contribute to fast and objective response monitoring in personalized cancer therapy. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy–autofluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-AFS) to monitor the effects of systemic treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer. METHODS: Brca1−/−; p53−/− mammary tumors were grown in 36 mice, half of which were treated with a single dose of cisplatin. Changes in the tumor physiology and morphology were measured for a period of 1 week using dual-modality DRS-AFS. Liver and muscle tissues were also measured to distinguish tumor-specific alterations from systemic changes. Model-based analyses were used to derive different optical parameters like the scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as sources of intrinsic fluorescence. Histopathologic analysis was performed for cross-validation with trends in optically based parameters. RESULTS: Treated tumors showed a significant decrease in Mie-scattering slope and Mie-to-total scattering fraction and an increase in both fat volume fraction and tissue oxygenation after 2 days of follow-up. Additionally, significant tumor-specific changes in the fluorescence spectra were seen. These longitudinal trends were consistent with changes observed in the histopathologic analysis, such as vital tumor content and formation of fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that dual-modality DRS-AFS provides quantitative functional information that corresponds well with the degree of pathologic response. DRS-AFS, in conjunction with other imaging modalities, could be used to optimize systemic cancer treatment on the basis of early individual tumor response. PMID:24726234

  2. Immunologic Monitoring of Cellular Responses by Dendritic/Tumor Cell Fusion Vaccines

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    Shigeo Koido

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Although dendritic cell (DC- based cancer vaccines induce effective antitumor activities in murine models, only limited therapeutic results have been obtained in clinical trials. As cancer vaccines induce antitumor activities by eliciting or modifying immune responses in patients with cancer, the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST and WHO criteria, designed to detect early effects of cytotoxic chemotherapy in solid tumors, may not provide a complete assessment of cancer vaccines. The problem may, in part, be resolved by carrying out immunologic cellular monitoring, which is one prerequisite for rational development of cancer vaccines. In this review, we will discuss immunologic monitoring of cellular responses for the evaluation of cancer vaccines including fusions of DC and whole tumor cell.

  3. Tumor response to ionizing radiation and combined 2-deoxy-D-glucose application in EATC tumor bearing mice: monitoring of tumor size and microscopic observations

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    Latz, D. (Dept. of Radiotherapy, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany)); Thonke, A. (Inst. of Biophysics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany)); Jueling-Pohlit, L. (Inst. of Biophysics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany)); Pohlit, W. (Inst. of Biophysics, Frankfurt Univ. (Germany))

    1993-07-01

    The present study deals with the changes induced by two fractionation schedules (5x9 Gy and 10x4.5 Gy; 30 MeV-electrons) of ionizing radiations and 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) application on EATC tumor bearing swiss albino mice. The monitoring of tumor response was carried out by means of calliper measurement on the macroscopic level and by histopathological examination of tumor preparations stained with hematoxiline and eosine on the microscopic level. The tumor material was assessed at suitable intervals after treatment by killing the animals. The tumor response was analysed in the histological preparations and the thickness of the tumor band was determined quantitatively by an ocularmicrometric technique. Tumor damage was most extensive in the combined treated animals (5x9 Gy + 2-DG). Only in this group local tumor control was achievable. The histological analysis of tumor preparations revealed additional data about treatment-induced changes in the tumor compared to the measurement of the tumor volume with mechanical callipers. We also found that the treatment outcome could be predicted from the histopathological analysis. It is concluded that studies involving histopathological examinations may give some insight into the way cancer is controlled by radiotherapy and may be of value in prognosis and selection of treatment in patients. (orig.)

  4. 18F-FLT PET/CT for early response monitoring and dose escalation in oropharyngeal tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troost, E.G.C.; Bussink, J.; Hoffmann, A.L.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Accelerated tumor cell proliferation is an important mechanism adversely affecting therapeutic outcome in head and neck cancer. 3'-deoxy-3'-(18)F-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) is a PET tracer to noninvasively image tumor cell proliferation. The aims of this study were to monitor early tumor response b

  5. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors.

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    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-10-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume in response to anticancer drug therapy in vivo. In this protocol, we describe how to monitor the response of murine B-cell lymphomas to an inducer of apoptosis, the anticancer drug vorinostat (a histone deacetylase inhibitor). B-cell lymphoma cells are injected into recipient mice and, on tumor formation, the mice are treated with vorinostat. The tracer ¹⁸F-FDG is then injected into the mice at several time points, and its uptake is monitored using PET. Because the uptake of ¹⁸F-FDG is not a direct measure of apoptosis, an additional direct method proving that apoptotic cells are present should also be performed.

  6. Using diffuse optical tomograpy to monitor tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer patients

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    Gunther, Jacqueline E.; Lim, Emerson; Kim, Hyun Keol; Flexman, Molly; Brown, Mindy; Refrice, Susan; Kalinsky, Kevin; Hershman, Dawn; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2013-03-01

    Breast cancer patients often undergo neoadjuvant chemotherapy to reduce the size of the tumor before surgery. Tumors which demonstrate a pathologic complete response associate with improved disease-free survival; however, as low as 10% of patients may achieve this status. The goal is to predict response to anti-cancer therapy early, so as to develop personalized treatments and optimize the patient's results. Previous studies have shown that tumor response can be predicted within a few days of treatment initiation. We have developed a diffuse optical tomography (DOT) imaging system for monitoring the response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Our breast imaging system is a continuous wave system that uses four wavelengths in the near-infrared spectrum (765 nm, 808 nm, 827 nm, and 905 nm). Both breasts are imaged simultaneously with a total of 64 sources and 128 detectors. Three dimensional reconstructions for oxy-hemoglobin concentration ([HbO2]), deoxy-hemoglobin ([Hb]) concentrations, and water are performed using a PDE-constrained multispectral imaging method that uses the diffusion approximation as a model for light propagation. Each patient receives twelve weekly treatments of Taxane followed by four cycles of Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide (AC) given every other week. There are six DOT imaging time points: baseline, week 3 and 5 of Paclitaxel, before cycle 1 and 2 of AC, and before surgery. Preliminary results show that there is statistical significance for the percent change of [HbO2], [Hb], [HbT], and percent water at week 2 from the baseline between patients with a pathologic response to chemotherapy.

  7. Choline molecular imaging with small-animal PET for monitoring tumor cellular response to photodynamic therapy of cancer

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    Fei, Baowei; Wang, Hesheng; Wu, Chunying; Meyers, Joseph; Xue, Liang-Yan; MacLennan, Gregory; Schluchter, Mark

    2009-02-01

    We are developing and evaluating choline molecular imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) for monitoring tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in animal models. Human prostate cancer (PC-3) was studied in athymic nude mice. A second-generation photosensitizer Pc 4 was used for PDT in tumor-bearing mice. MicroPET images with 11C-choline were acquired before PDT and 48 h after PDT. Time-activity curves of 11C-choline uptake were analyzed before and after PDT. For treated tumors, normalized choline uptake decreased significantly 48 h after PDT, compared to the same tumors pre-PDT (p detect early tumor response to PDT in the animal model of human prostate cancer.

  8. Monitoring Disease Progression and Therapeutic Response in a Disseminated Tumor Model for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma by Bioluminescence Imaging

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    Margarethe Köberle

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Xenograft tumor models are widely studied in cancer research. Our aim was to establish and apply a model for aggressive CD20-positive B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, enabling us to monitor tumor growth and shrinkage in a noninvasive manner. By stably transfecting a luciferase expression vector, we created two bioluminescent human non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines, Jeko1(luci and OCI-Ly3(luci, that are CD20 positive, a prerequisite to studying rituximab, a chimeric anti-CD20 antibody. To investigate the therapy response in vivo, we established a disseminated xenograft tumor model injecting these cell lines in NOD/SCID mice. We observed a close correlation of bioluminescence intensity and tumor burden, allowing us to monitor therapy response in the living animal. Cyclophosphamide reduced tumor burden in mice injected with either cell line in a dose-dependent manner. Rituximab alone was effective in OCI-Ly3(luci-injected mice and acted additively in combination with cyclophosphamide. In contrast, it improved the therapeutic outcome of Jeko1(luci-injected mice only in combination with cyclophosphamide. We conclude that well-established bioluminescence imaging is a valuable tool in disseminated xenograft tumor models. Our model can be translated to other cell lines and used to examine new therapeutic agents and schedules.

  9. Circulating tumor cell status monitors the treatment responses in breast cancer patients: a meta-analysis

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    Yan, Wen-Ting; Cui, Xiang; Chen, Qing; Li, Ya-Fei; Cui, You-Hong; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Whether circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can be used as an indicator of treatment response in breast cancer (BC) needs to be clarified. We addressed this issue by a meta-analysis. PubMed, EMBase and Cochrane library databases were searched in June 2016. Effect measures were estimated as pooled risk ratio (RR), odds ratio (OR) or mean difference by fixed- or random-effect models, according to heterogeneity of included studies. In total, 50 studies with 6712 patients were recruited. Overall analysis showed that there was a significant reduction of CTC-positive rate (RR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.61–0.76, P < 0.00001) after treatment. Subgroup analyses revealed that neoadjuvant treatment, adjuvant treatment, metastatic treatment or combination therapy could reduce the CTC-positive rate, but surgery could not; moreover, the reduction was only found in HER2+ or HER2- patients but not in the triple-negative ones. Reduction of CTC-positive rate was associated with lower probability of disease progression (OR = 0.54, 95% CI: 0.33–0.89, P = 0.01) and longer overall survival period (mean difference = 11.61 months, 95% CI: 8.63–14.59, P < 0.00001) as well as longer progression-free survival period (mean difference = 5.07 months, 95% CI: 2.70–7.44, P < 0.0001). These results demonstrate that CTC status can serve as an indicator to monitor the effectiveness of treatments and guide subsequent therapies in BC. PMID:28337998

  10. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

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    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  11. Positron emission tomography imaging of tumor cell metabolism and application to therapy response monitoring

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    Amarnath eChallapalli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells do reprogramme their energy metabolism to enable several functions such as generation of biomass including membrane biosynthesis, and overcoming bioenergetic and redox stress. In this article we review both established and evolving radioprobes developed in association with positron emission tomography (PET to detect tumor cell metabolism and effect of treatment. Measurement of enhanced tumor cell glycolysis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]-fluoro-D-glucose is well established in the clinic. Analogues of choline including [11C]-choline and various fluorinated derivatives are being tested in several cancer types clinically with PET. In addition to these, there is an evolving array of metabolic tracers for measuring intracellular transport of glutamine and other amino acids or for measuring glycogenesis, as well as probes used as surrogates for fatty acid synthesis or precursors for fatty acid oxidation. In addition to providing us with opportunities for examining the complex regulation of reprogrammed energy metabolism in living subjects, the PET methods open up opportunities for monitoring pharmacological activity of new therapies that directly or indirectly inhibit tumor cell metabolism.

  12. Proton MR Spectroscopy and Diffusion MR Imaging Monitoring to Predict Tumor Response to Interstitial Photodynamic Therapy for Glioblastoma

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    Toussaint, Magali; Pinel, Sophie; Auger, Florent; Durieux, Nicolas; Thomassin, Magalie; Thomas, Eloise; Moussaron, Albert; Meng, Dominique; Plénat, François; Amouroux, Marine; Bastogne, Thierry; Frochot, Céline; Tillement, Olivier; Lux, François; Barberi-Heyob, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent progress in conventional therapeutic approaches, the vast majority of glioblastoma recur locally, indicating that a more aggressive local therapy is required. Interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT) appears as a very promising and complementary approach to conventional therapies. However, an optimal fractionation scheme for iPDT remains the indispensable requirement. To achieve that major goal, we suggested following iPDT tumor response by a non-invasive imaging monitoring. Nude rats bearing intracranial glioblastoma U87MG xenografts were treated by iPDT, just after intravenous injection of AGuIX® nanoparticles, encapsulating PDT and imaging agents. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) allowed us an original longitudinal follow-up of post-treatment effects to discriminate early predictive markers. We successfully used conventional MRI, T2 star (T2*), Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and MRS to extract relevant profiles on tissue cytoarchitectural alterations, local vascular disruption and metabolic information on brain tumor biology, achieving earlier assessment of tumor response. From one day post-iPDT, DWI and MRS allowed us to identify promising markers such as the Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) values, lipids, choline and myoInositol levels that led us to distinguish iPDT responders from non-responders. All these responses give us warning signs well before the tumor escapes and that the growth would be appreciated. PMID:28255341

  13. Monitoring tumor response with [18F]FMAU in a sarcoma-bearing mouse model after liposomal vinorelbine treatment.

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    Chan, Pei-Chia; Wu, Chun-Yi; Chang, Wei-Ting; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tseng, Yun-Long; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Alauddin, Mian M; Lin, Wuu-Jyh; Wang, Hsin-Ell

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the accumulation level of FMAU in tumor is proportional to its proliferation rate. This study demonstrated that 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-β-d-arabinofuranosyluracil ([(18)F]FMAU) is a promising PET probe for noninvasively monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of 6% PEGylated liposomal vinorelbine (lipo-VNB) in a subcutaneous murine NG4TL4 sarcoma mouse model. Female syngenic FVB/N mice were inoculated with NG4TL4 cells in the right flank. After tumor size reached 150 ± 50 mm(3) (day 0), lipo-VNB (5mg/kg) was intravenously administered on days 0, 3 and 6. To monitor the therapeutic efficacy of lipo-VNB, [(18)F]FMAU PET was employed to evaluate the proliferation rate of tumor, and it was compared with that observed from [(18)F]FDG/[(18)F]fluoroacetate PET. The expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumor during treatment was determined by semiquantitative analysis of immunohistochemical staining. A significant inhibition (plipo-VNB-treated group declined from 2.33 ± 0.16 to 1.26 ± 0.03 after three doses of treatment, while that of the control remained steady. The retarded proliferation rate of lipo-VNB-treated sarcoma was confirmed by PCNA immunohistochemistry staining. However, both [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]fluoroacetate microPET imaging did not show significant difference in T/M between the therapeutic and the control groups throughout the entire experimental period. Lipo-VNB can effectively impede the growth of NG4TL4 sarcoma. [(18)F]FMAU PET is an appropriate modality for early monitoring of the tumor response during the treatment course of lipo-VNB. © 2013.

  14. Computer-Aided Evaluation of Breast MRI for the Residual Tumor Extent and Response Monitoring in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

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    Lyou, Chae Yeon; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung [Seoul National University Hospital and the Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun Mi; Jang, Mi Jung [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jeong Seon [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Seung Yon [School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    To evaluate the accuracy of a computer-aided evaluation program (CAE) of breast MRI for the assessment of residual tumor extent and response monitoring in breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Fifty-seven patients with breast cancers who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy before surgery and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI before and after chemotherapy were included as part of this study. For the assessment of residual tumor extent after completion of chemotherapy, the mean tumor diameters measured by radiologists and CAE were compared to those on histopathology using a paired student t-test. Moreover, the agreement between unidimensional (1D) measurement by radiologist and histopathological size or 1D measurement by CAE and histopathological size was assessed using the Bland-Altman method. For chemotherapy monitoring, we evaluated tumor response through the change in the 1D diameter by a radiologist and CAE and three-dimensional (3D) volumetric change by CAE based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Agreement between the 1D response by the radiologist versus the 1D response by CAE as well as by the 3D response by CAE were evaluated using weighted kappa (k) statistics. For the assessment of residual tumor extent after chemotherapy, the mean tumor diameter measured by radiologists (2.0 {+-} 1.7 cm) was significantly smaller than the mean histological diameter (2.6 {+-} 2.3 cm) (p = 0.01), whereas, no significant difference was found between the CAE measurements (mean = 2.2 {+-} 2.0 cm) and histological diameter (p = 0.19). The mean difference between the 1D measurement by the radiologist and histopathology was 0.6 cm (95% confidence interval: -3.0, 4.3), whereas the difference between CAE and histopathology was 0.4 cm (95% confidence interval: -3.9, 4.7). For the monitoring of response to chemotherapy, the 1D measurement by the radiologist and CAE showed a fair agreement (k = 0.358), while the 1D measurement by the radiologist

  15. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Radio-Chemotherapy of Esophageal Carcinoma by F-18-FDG-PET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeterTheissen; PaulM.Schneider; StephanE.Baldus; AlexandraJost; MarkusDietlein; RolfP.Miiller; ArnulfH.Hoelscher; HaraldSchicha

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: For clinical assessment of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy of esophageal cancer reliable in-vivo methods are necessary. Therefore, the capabilities of F-18-Fluorodesoxyglucose-PET in comparison to histomorphological grading of tumor regression were studied. Methods: In 33 patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma (uT3, uN0-1, cM0) F-18-FDG-PET was performed before and 2 weeks after radiochemotherapy. All tumors were resected by transthoracic en-bloc esophagectomy 3-4 weeks after induction therapy. A subgroup of 11 patients underwent weekly PET scan during neoadjuvant therapy.PET was performed in a dedicated scanner 1.3 h after administration of 370 MBq F-18-FDG. Data analysis based on maximum SUV data derived from individual regions of interest in pre- and posttherapeutic images. PET data were compared to histomorphological grading parameters for tumor regression whithin the resected tissues. Results: The comparison of histopathological tumor regression after neoadjuvant therapy and PET SUV differences showed a significant x2 P-value of 0.006. There was a significant decrease of the SUV data from 9.14-3.5 to 4.3±1.9 (P<0.0001). In therapy responders SUV was diminished by 59% and in non-responders by 34 %. Longitudinal SUV measurement during neoadjuvant therapy showed a strong SUV decrease already after one and two weeks (P=0.021 and 0.003). Conclusion: The recent data of the FDG-PET follow-up after neoadjuvant therapy show that PET is able to predict therapy response.Longitudinal PET data advocate that it may be possible to recognize response also very early during radiochemotherapy.

  16. Monitoring of Biological Responses of Tumor Cells after Irradiation with 99mTc-MIBI —— An In Vitro Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore the possibility to employ 99mTc-MIBI to monitor biological response of tumor cells after irradiation and to observe the relation between the radiation doses and the uptake levels of 99mTc-MIBI in tumor cells, the cells were irradiated with a single dose of 2 Gy, 10 Gy and 20 Gy respectively. The uptake of 99mTc-MIBI in each dosage group was determined before and 24, 48, 72 h after irradiation respectively. Apoptosis index (AI), plating efficiency (PE) of tumor cells was simultaneously determined. There was a positive correlation between uptake levels of 99mTc-MIBI and AI(r=-0.91, P<0.05). A negative correlation was noted between the uptake levels and PE (r=-0.86, P<0.05). It is suggested that 99mTc-MIBI may be used as a tracer to monitor the change of viability state of tumor cells after being irradiated with different doses.

  17. Multiparametric Monitoring of Early Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy: A Sequential Perfusion CT and PET/CT Study in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

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    Jung Im Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To perform dual analysis of tumor perfusion and glucose metabolism using perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT for the purpose of monitoring the early response to bevacizumab therapy in rabbit VX2 tumor models and to assess added value of FDG-PET to perfusion CT. Methods. Twenty-four VX2 carcinoma tumors implanted in bilateral back muscles of 12 rabbits were evaluated. Serial concurrent perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT were performed before and 3, 7, and 14 days after bevacizumab therapy (treatment group or saline infusion (control group. Perfusion CT was analyzed to calculate blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface area product (PS; FDG-PET was analyzed to calculate SUVmax, SUVmean, total lesion glycolysis (TLG, entropy, and homogeneity. The flow-metabolic ratio (FMR was also calculated and immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD was performed. Results. On day 14, BF and BV in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group. There were no significant differences in all FDG-PET-derived parameters between both groups. In the treatment group, FMR prominently decreased after therapy and was positively correlated with MVD. Conclusions. In VX2 tumors, FMR could provide further insight into the early antiangiogenic effect reflecting a mismatch in intratumor blood flow and metabolism.

  18. Multimodality Imaging of Tumor Response to Doxil

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    Fan Zhang, Lei Zhu, Gang Liu, Naoki Hida, Guangming Lu, Henry S. Eden, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Early assessment of tumor responses to chemotherapy could enhance treatment outcomes by ensuring that, from the beginning, treatments meet the individualized needs of patients. In this study, we applied multiple modality molecular imaging techniques to pre-clinical monitoring of early tumor responses to Doxil, focusing on imaging of apoptosis.Methods: Mice bearing UM-SCC-22B human head and neck squamous cancer tumors received either PBS or 1 to 2 doses of Doxil® (doxorubicin HCl liposome injection (10 mg/kg/dose. Bioluminescence signals from an apoptosis-responsive reporter gene were captured for apoptosis evaluation. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by 18F-FDG and 3'-18F-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine (18F-FLT positron emission tomography. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI was performed to calculate averaged apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs for the whole tumor volume. After imaging, tumor samples were collected for histological evaluation, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, anti-CD31, and Ki-67 immunostaining.Results: Two doses of Doxil significantly inhibited tumor growth. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI indicated apoptosis of tumor cells after just 1 dose of Doxil treatment, before apparent tumor shrinkage. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT PET imaging identified decreased tumor metabolism and proliferation at later time points than those at which BLI indicated apoptosis. MRI measurements of ADC altered in response to Doxil, but only after tumors were treated with 2 doses. Decreased tumor proliferation and increased apoptotic cells were confirmed by changes of Ki-67 index and apoptotic ratio.Conclusion: Our study of tumor responses to different doses of Doxil demonstrated that it is essential to combine apoptosis imaging strategies with imaging of other critical biological or pathological pathways, such as metabolism and proliferation, to improve clinical decision making

  19. Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: Monitoring Response to Chemotherapy and Predicting Progression-Free Survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping Cheng; Ying Yan; Xiang-yi Wang; Yuan-li Lu; Yan-hua Yuan; Xiao-li Wang; Jun Jia; Jun Ren

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to explore RT-PCR method to set up the examination platform for detecting circulating tumor cells(CTC) in peripheral blood from metastatic breast cancer patients.The primary endpoint is to find out the correlation of existence of CTC with clinical responses and progression-free survival (PFS).Methods: The breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was serially diluted into the peripheral blood from 45 healthy donors to set up the sensitivity of RT-PCR assay.The expression of CK19 mRNA was amplified from both 49 patients and 45 healthy donors respectively.The CK19 protein quantity from plasma was measured by competitive inhibition ELISA assay.Results: The sensitivity of RT-PCR could reach 1/106-107 white blood cells with specificity of 95.6%.The objective response rate(ORR) of patients with CK19 mRNA-negative undertaken one cycle chemotherapy was significantly higher than those with positive(P<0.0001).PFS among CK19 mRNA-negative patients was also increased,although there was no significance(P=0.098).The results of ELISA assay showed that CK19 protein was decreased significantly after one cycle chemotherapy,which gave rise to a little higher ORR(P=0.015) and increased PFS(P=0.016).Conclusion: Patients with unamplified CK19 mRNA after one cycle chemotherapy could achieve better radiographic evaluation and increased PFS,which was showed to be of consistency with the CK19 protein assay among the patients treated.

  20. Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer:Monitoring Response to Chemotherapy and Predicting Progression-Free Survival

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-ping Cheng; Ying Yan; Xiang-yi Wang; Yuan-li Lu; Yan-hua Yuan; Xiao-li Wang; Jun Jia; Jun Ren

    2010-01-01

    Objective:The purpose of this study is to explore RT-PCR method to set up the examination platform for detecting circulating tumor cells(CTC)in peripheral blood from metastatic breast cancer patients.The primary endpoint is to find out the correlation of existence of CTC with clinical responses and progression-free survival(PFS).Methods:The breast cancer cell line MCF-7 was serially diluted into the peripheral blood from 45 healthy donors to set up the sensitivity of RT-PCR assay.The expression of CK19 mRNA was amplified from both 49patients and 45 healthy donors respectively.The CK19 protein quantity from plasma was measured by competitive inhibition ELISA assay.Results:The sensitivity of RT-PCR could reach 1/106-107 white blood cells with specificity of 95.6%.The objective response rate(ORR)of patients with CK19 mRNA-negative undertaken one cycle chemotherapy was significantly higher than those with positive(P<0.0001).PFS among CK19 mRNA-negative patients was also increased,although there was no significance(P=0.098).The results of ELISA assay showed that CK19 protein was decreased significantly after one cycle chemotherapy,which gave rise to a little higher ORR(P=0.015)and increased PFS(P=0.016).Conclusion:Patients with unamplified CK19 mRNA after one cycle chemotherapy could achieve better radiographic evaluation and increased PFS,which was showed to be of consistency with the CK19 protein assay among the patients treated.

  1. Monitoring Radiographic Brain Tumor Progression

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    John H. Sampson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Determining radiographic progression in primary malignant brain tumors has posed a significant challenge to the neuroncology community. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO Grade IV through its inherent heterogeneous enhancement, growth patterns, and irregular nature has been difficult to assess for progression. Our ability to detect tumor progression radiographically remains inadequate. Despite the advanced imaging techniques, detecting tumor progression continues to be a clinical challenge. Here we review the different criteria used to detect tumor progression, and highlight the inherent challenges with detection of progression.

  2. Tumor microenvironment and therapeutic response.

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    Wu, Ting; Dai, Yun

    2017-02-28

    The tumor microenvironment significantly influences therapeutic response and clinical outcome. Microenvironment-mediated drug resistance can be induced by soluble factors secreted by tumor or stromal cells. The adhesion of tumor cells to stromal fibroblasts or to components of the extracellular matrix can also blunt therapeutic response. Microenvironment-targeted therapy strategies include inhibition of the extracellular ligand-receptor interactions and downstream pathways. Immune cells can both improve and obstruct therapeutic efficacy and may vary in their activation status within the tumor microenvironment; thus, re-programme of the immune response would be substantially more beneficial. The development of rational drug combinations that can simultaneously target tumor cells and the microenvironment may represent a solution to overcome therapeutic resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Monitoring of the tumor response to nano-graphene oxide-mediated photothermal/photodynamic therapy by diffusion-weighted and BOLD MRI

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    Cao, Jianbo; An, Hengqing; Huang, Xinglu; Fu, Guifeng; Zhuang, Rongqiang; Zhu, Lei; Xie, Jin; Zhang, Fan

    2016-05-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are promising cancer treatment modalities. Because each modality has its own set of advantages and limitations, there has been interest in developing methods that can co-deliver the two regimens for enhanced tumor treatment. Among the efforts, nano-graphene oxide-mediated phototherapies have recently attracted much attention. Nano-graphene oxide has a broad absorbance spectrum and can be loaded with photosensitizers, such as chlorin e6, with high efficiency. Chlorin e6-loaded and PEGylated nano-graphene (GO-PEG-Ce6) can be excited at 660 nm, 808 nm, or both, to induce PDT, PTT, or PDT/PTT combination. Despite the potential of the treatments, there is a lack of a diagnostic tool which can monitor their therapeutic response in a non-invasive and prognostic manner; such an ability is urgently needed for the transformation and translation of the technologies. In this study, we performed diffusion-weighted and blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after GO-PEG-Ce6-mediated PTT, PDT, or PTT/PDT. We found that after efficient PTT, there is a significant increase of the tumor apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) maps; meanwhile, an efficient PDT led to an increase of in BOLD images. In both the cases, the amplitude of the increase was correlated with the treatment outcomes. More interestingly, a synergistic treatment efficacy was observed when the PTT/PDT combination was applied, and the combination was associated with a greater ADC and increase than when either modality was used alone. In particular, the PTT/PDT condition that induced the most dramatic short-term increase of the ADC value (>70%) caused the most effective tumor control in the long-run, with 60% of the treated animals being tumor-free after 60 days. These results suggest the great promise of the combination of DWI and BOLD MRI as a tool for accurate monitoring and prognosis

  4. Dual-Energy CT in Patients Treated with Anti-Angiogenic Agents for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: New Method of Monitoring Tumor Response?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na; Lee, Ho Yun; Lee, Kyung Soo; Chung, Myung Jin; Ahn, Myung Ju; Park, Keun Chil; Kim, Tae Sung; Yi, Chin A [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Joon Beom [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    To evaluate tumor responses in patients treated with anti-angiogenic agents for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by assessing intratumoral changes using a dual-energy CT (DECT) (based on Choi's criteria) and to compare it to traditional Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Ten NSCLC patients treated with bevacizumab underwent DECT. Tumor responses to anti-angiogenic therapy were assessed and compared with the baseline CT results using both RECIST (size changes only) and Choi's criteria (reflecting net tumor enhancement). Kappa statistics was used to evaluate agreements between tumor responses assessed by RECIST and Choi's criteria. The weighted {kappa} value for the comparison of tumor responses between the RECIST and Choi's criteria was 0.72. Of 31 target lesions (21 solid nodules, 8 lymph nodes, and two ground-glass opacity nodules [GGNs]), five lesions (16%) showed discordant responses between RECIST and Choi's criteria. Iodine-enhanced images allowed for a distinction between tumor enhancement and hemorrhagic response (detected in 14% [4 of 29, excluding GGNs] of target lesions on virtual nonenhanced images). DECT may serve as a useful tool for response evaluation after anti-angiogenic treatment in NSCLC patients by providing information on the net enhancement of target lesions without obtaining non-enhanced images.

  5. Monitoring tumor response of prostate cancer to radiation therapy by multi-parametric 1H and hyperpolarized 13C magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Vickie Yi

    Radiation therapy is one of the most common curative therapies for patients with localized prostate cancer, but despite excellent success rates, a significant number of patients suffer post- treatment cancer recurrence. The accurate characterization of early tumor response remains a major challenge for the clinical management of these patients. Multi-parametric MRI/1H MR spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) has been shown to increase the diagnostic performance in evaluating the effectiveness of radiation therapy. 1H MRSI can detect altered metabolic profiles in cancerous tissue. In this project, the concentrations of prostate metabolites from snap-frozen biopsies of recurrent cancer after failed radiation therapy were correlated with histopathological findings to identify quantitative biomarkers that predict for residual aggressive versus indolent cancer. The total choline to creatine ratio was significantly higher in recurrent aggressive versus indolent cancer, suggesting that use of a higher threshold tCho/Cr ratio in future in vivo 1H MRSI studies could improve the selection and therapeutic planning for patients after failed radiation therapy. Varying radiation doses may cause a diverse effect on prostate cancer micro-environment and metabolism, which could hold the key to improving treatment protocols for individual patients. The recent development and clinical translation of hyperpolarized 13C MRI have provided the ability to monitor both changes in the tumor micro-environment and its metabolism using a multi-probe approach, [1-13C]pyruvate and 13C urea, combined with 1H Multi-parametric MRI. In this thesis, hyperpolarized 13C MRI, 1H dynamic contrast enhancement, and diffusion weighted imaging were used to identify early radiation dose response in a transgenic prostate cancer model. Hyperpolarized pyruvate to lactate metabolism significantly decreased in a dose dependent fashion by 1 day after radiation therapy, prior to any changes observed using 1H DCE and diffusion

  6. Immunological monitoring of the tumor immunoenvironment for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyguine, Anatoli M; Strobl, Susan L; Shurin, Michael R

    2012-02-01

    Monitoring of immunotherapeutic clinical trials has undergone a considerable change in the last decade resulting in a general agreement that immune monitoring should guide the development of cancer vaccines. The emphasis on immune cell functions and quantitation of antigen-specific T cells have been playing a major role in the attempts to establish meaningful correlations between therapy-induced alterations in immune responses and clinical endpoints. However, one significant unresolved issue in modern immunotherapy is that when a tumor-specific cellular immune response is observed following the course of immunotherapy, it does not always lead to clinically proven cancer regression. This disappointing lack of a correlation between the tumor-specific cytotoxic immune responses and the clinical efficacy of immunotherapy may be explained, among other reasons, by the notion that the analysis of any single immunological parameter is not sufficient to provide clinically feasible information about the complex interactions between different cell subsets in the peripheral blood and immune, tumor, and stromal cells in the tumor milieu. By contrast, a systemic approach is required for improving the quality of a serial monitoring to ensure that it adequately and reliably measures potential changes induced in patients by administered vaccines or immunomodulators. Comprehensive evaluation of the balance between the immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive compartments of the immune system could be critical for a better understanding of how a given immunotherapy works or does not work in a particular clinical trial. New approaches to characterize tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, their phenotypic, biochemical, and genetic characteristics within the tumor microenvironment need to be developed and validated and should complement current monitoring techniques. These immune-monitoring assays for the local tumor immunoenvironment should be developed, validated, and standardized for

  7. Molecular Imaging System for Monitoring Tumor Angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytac, Esra; Burcin Unlu, Mehmet

    2012-02-01

    In cancer, non-invasive imaging techniques that monitor molecular processes associated with the tumor angiogenesis could have a central role in the evaluation of novel antiangiogenic and proangiogenic therapies as well as early detection of the disease. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) can serve as specific biological targets for imaging of angiogenesis since expression of MMPs is required for angiogenesis and has been found to be upregulated in every type of human cancer and correlates with stage, invasive, metastatic properties and poor prognosis. However, for most cancers it is still unknown when, where and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis [1]. Development of high-resolution, high sensitivity imaging techniques in parallel with the tumor models could prove invaluable for assessing the physical location and the time frame of MMP enzymatic acitivity. The goal of this study is to understand where, when and how MMPs are involved in the tumor angiogenesis. We will accomplish this goal by following two objectives: to develop a high sensitivity, high resolution molecular imaging system, to develop a virtual tumor simulator that can predict the physical location and the time frame of the MMP activity. In order to achieve our objectives, we will first develop a PAM system and develop a mathematical tumor model in which the quantitative data obtained from the PAM can be integrated. So, this work will develop a virtual tumor simulator and a molecular imaging system for monitoring tumor angiogenesis. 1.Kessenbrock, K., V. Plaks, and Z. Werb, MMP:regulators of the tumor microenvironment. Cell, 2010. 141(1)

  8. Long-term progression and therapeutic response of visceral metastatic disease non-invasively monitored in mouse urine using beta-human choriogonadotropin secreting tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francia, Giulio; Emmenegger, Urban; Lee, Christina R; Shaked, Yuval; Folkins, Christopher; Mossoba, Miriam; Medin, Jeffrey A; Man, Shan; Zhu, Zhenping; Witte, Larry; Kerbel, Robert S

    2008-10-01

    Historically, the use of mouse models of metastatic disease to evaluate anticancer therapies has been hampered because of difficulties in detection and quantification of such lesions without sacrificing the mice, which in turn may also be dictated by institutional or ethical guidelines. Advancements in imaging technologies have begun to change this situation. A new method to non-invasively measure tumor burden, as yet untested to monitor spontaneous metastases, is the use of transplanted tumors expressing secretable human beta-chorionic gonadotropin (beta-hCG) that can be measured in urine. We describe examples of beta-hCG-transfected tumor cell lines for evaluating the effect of different therapies on metastatic disease, which in some cases involved monitoring tumor growth for >100 days. We used beta-hCG-tagged mouse B16 melanoma and erbB-2/Her-2-expressing human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 models, and drug treatments included metronomic low-dose cyclophosphamide chemotherapy with or without a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-targeting antibody (DC101) or trastuzumab, the erbB-2/Her-2-targeting antibody. Both experimental and spontaneous metastasis models were studied; in the latter case, an increase in urine beta-hCG always foreshadowed the development of lung, liver, brain, and kidney metastases. Metastatic disease was unresponsive to DC101 or trastuzumab monotherapy treatment, as assessed by beta-hCG levels. Our results also suggest that beta-hCG levels may be set as an end point for metastasis studies, circumventing guidelines, which have often hampered the use of advanced disease models. Collectively, our data indicates that beta-hCG is an effective noninvasive preclinical marker for the long term monitoring of untreated or treated metastatic disease.

  9. Liquid biopsies: tumor diagnosis and treatment monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binh Thanh Vu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease with high evolutionary, i.e., malignant, characteristics that change under selective pressure from therapy. Characterization based on molecular or primary tumor properties or clinicopathological staging does not fully reflect the state of cancer, especially when cancer cells metastasize. This is the major reason for failure of cancer treatment. Currently, there is an urgent need for new approaches that allow more effective, but less invasive, monitoring of cancer status, thereby improving the efficacy of treatments. With recent technological advances, and ldquo;liquid biopsies, and rdquo; the isolation of intact cells or analysis of components that are secreted from cells, such as nucleic acids or exosomes, could be implemented easily. This approach would facilitate real-time monitoring and accurate measurement of critical biomarkers. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in the identification of circulating tumor cells using new high-resolution approaches and discuss new circulating tumor nucleic acid- and exosome-based approaches. The information obtained through liquid biopsies could be used to gain a better understanding of cancer cell invasiveness and metastatic competence, which would then benefit translational applications such as personalized medicine. [Biomed Res Ther 2016; 3(8.000: 745-756

  10. Monitoring and assessment of tumor hemodynamics during pleural PDT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Yi Hong; Kim, Michele M.; Penjweini, Rozhin; Rodriguez, Carmen E.; Dimofte, Andrea; Finlay, Jarod C.; Busch, Theresa M.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Cengel, Keith A.; Singhal, Sunil; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Intrapleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used in combination with lung sparing surgery to treat patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. The light, photosensitizers and tissue oxygen are the three most important factors required by type II PDT to produce singlet oxygen, 1O2, which is the main photocytotoxic agent that damages the tumor vasculature and stimulates the body's anti-tumor immune response. Although light fluence rate and photosensitizer concentrations are routinely monitored during clinical PDT, there is so far a lack of a Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved non-invasive technique that can be employed clinically to monitor tissue oxygen in vivo. In this paper, we demonstrated that blood flow correlates well with tissue oxygen concentration during PDT and can be used in place of [3O2] to calculate reacted singlet oxygen concentration [1O2]rx using the macroscopic singlet oxygen model. Diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) was used to monitor the change in tissue blood flow non-invasively during pleural PDT. A contact probe with three source and detectors separations, 0.4, 0.7 and 1.0-cm, was sutured to the pleural cavity wall of the patients after surgical resection of the pleural mesothelioma tumor to monitor the tissue blood flow during intraoperative PDT treatment. The changes of blood flow during PDT of 2 patients are found to be in good correlation with the treatment light fluence rate recorded by the isotropic detector placed adjacent to the DCS probe. [1O2]rx calculated based on light fluence, mean photosensitizer concentration, and relative blood flow was found to be 32% higher in patient #4 (0.50mM) than that for patient #3 (0.38mM).

  11. Clinical predictive factors of pathologic tumor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chi Hwan; Kim, Won Dong; Lee, Sang Jeon; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The aim of this study was to identify clinical predictive factors for tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. The study involved 51 patients who underwent preoperative CRT followed by surgery between January 2005 and February 2012. Radiotherapy was delivered to the whole pelvis at a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions, followed by a boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions to the primary tumor with 5 fractions per week. Three different chemotherapy regimens were used. Tumor responses to preoperative CRT were assessed in terms of tumor downstaging and pathologic complete response (ypCR). Statistical analyses were performed to identify clinical factors associated with pathologic tumor response. Tumor downstaging was observed in 28 patients (54.9%), whereas ypCR was observed in 6 patients (11.8%). Multivariate analysis found that predictors of downstaging was pretreatment relative lymphocyte count (p = 0.023) and that none of clinical factors was significantly associated with ypCR. Pretreatment relative lymphocyte count (%) has a significant impact on the pathologic tumor response (tumor downstaging) after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Enhancement of lymphocyte-mediated immune reactions may improve the effect of preoperative CRT for rectal cancer.

  12. An experimental research on monitoring the tumor response to125I seeds with18F-FDG%18F-FDG评价放射性125I治疗肿瘤疗效的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳曦; 彭阳红; 张晓军; 刘健; 周乃康; 张锦明

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of 18F-FDG PET/CT imaging in assessing the tumor response to iodine-125 brachytherapy, and to investigate the mechanism of 125I seeds effect on tumor. Methods A total of 20 A549 xenografts mice were treated with seeds, one groups(10)were treated with 125Iseeds, other groups(10)were control seeds. The volume of tumors were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8 weeks with calipers. The 18F-FDG Micro PET/CT imaging was performed at the same time. The tumor to muscle(T/NT) ratio was calculated according to the SUV max. All mice were sacrificed at 2 months, and the tumors were evaluated with HE stained. Results There was no obvious difference between the T/NT of treated group and the control group after 1-2 weeks in 18F-FDG images(t = 1.813, P = 0.0721), nor was there any difference found in the measured volume of tumor(t = 1.271, P = 0.111). The T/NT and the volume of tumor in the treated group, however, were significantly different from the control group at and after 4 weeks(P < 0.01). Large number of tumor cells were found toundergo apoptosis after treated with 125I seeds, while the tumor cells in the control group were intact. Both groups had a survival rate of 9/10 after 8 weeks. Conclusion The 125I seeds was found to induce apoptosis to tumor cells. 18F-FDG PET imaging can be used to monitor the tumor response after 125I seeds treated after 4 weeks.%目的:研究18F-FDG对放射性125I粒子治疗恶性肿瘤疗效评价,探索125I粒子对肿瘤细胞杀伤的机理。方法建立A549肿瘤的动物模型(n= 20),分成2组,治疗组(n= 10)肿瘤内植入放射性125I粒子,对照组肿瘤植入空白粒子;分别于1周、2周、4周和8周测量肿瘤的大小,同时注射18F-FDG后Micro PET/CT显像,根据最大标准摄取值(SUVmax)计算肿瘤/肌肉摄取比,2个月后处死小鼠,常规HE染色后观察肿瘤细胞形态。结果荷瘤鼠植入125I粒子后1 ~ 2周,18F-FDG PET

  13. Monitoring of cycling hypoxia and angiogenesis in FaDu head and neck tumors using a side-firing sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing; Shah, Amy; Wang, Bingqing; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Wang, Quanli; Ramanujam, Nirmala; Palmer, Gregory M.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-03-01

    Many studies have found that hypoxia, particularly cycling hypoxia (CH), can lead to enhanced tumor metastasis and resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. It was also reported that tumor total hemoglobin content (THb), which is directly related to tumor angiogenesis, can have significant impact on tumor's response to radiation and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. There is a growing demand for technologies to measure tumor hypoxia and angiogenesis temporally in vivo. In this paper, a side-firing fiber optic sensor based on a multi-wavelength frequency-domain near infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) instrument was used to quantify tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin concentrations in nude rats bearing human FaDu head and neck (H and N) tumors during normoxia and forced hyperoxia and cyclic hypoxia. Significant increase (with carbogen gas inhalation) or decrease (with reduced O2 supply) in tumor oxygenation was observed. The studies demonstrated the feasibility of the technology for longitudinal monitoring of H and N tumor's response to therapy.

  14. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W. [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Mougenot, Charles [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Philips Systemes Medicaux, Suresnes (France); Grenier, Nicolas [CNRS/Universite Bordeaux 2, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging: From Physiology to Therapy, Bordeaux (France); Service de Radiologie-CHU Pellegrin, Bordeaux (France)

    2007-09-15

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  15. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  16. Bioluminescence-Based Tumor Quantification Method for Monitoring Tumor Progression and Treatment Effects in Mouse Lymphoma Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosette, Jeremie; Ben Abdelwahed, Rym; Donnou-Triffault, Sabrina; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Flaud, Patrice; Fisson, Sylvain

    2016-07-07

    Although bioluminescence imaging (BLI) shows promise for monitoring tumor burden in animal models of cancer, these analyses remain mostly qualitative. Here we describe a method for bioluminescence imaging to obtain a semi-quantitative analysis of tumor burden and treatment response. This method is based on the calculation of a luminoscore, a value that allows comparisons of two animals from the same or different experiments. Current BLI instruments enable the calculation of this luminoscore, which relies mainly on the acquisition conditions (back and front acquisitions) and the drawing of the region of interest (manual markup around the mouse). Using two previously described mouse lymphoma models based on cell engraftment, we show that the luminoscore method can serve as a noninvasive way to verify successful tumor cell inoculation, monitor tumor burden, and evaluate the effects of in situ cancer treatment (CpG-DNA). Finally, we show that this method suits different experimental designs. We suggest that this method be used for early estimates of treatment response in preclinical small-animal studies.

  17. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  18. Breast tumor oxygenation in response to carbogen intervention assessed simultaneously by three oxygen-sensitive parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yueqing; Bourke, Vincent; Kim, Jae Gwan; Xia, Mengna; Constantinescu, Anca; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2003-07-01

    Three oxygen-sensitive parameters (arterial hemoglobin oxygen saturation SaO2, tumor vascular oxygenated hemoglobin concentration [HbO2], and tumor oxygen tension pO2) were measured simultaneously by three different optical techniques (pulse oximeter, near infrared spectroscopy, and FOXY) to evaluate dynamic responses of breast tumors to carbogen (5% CO2 and 95% O2) intervention. All three parameters displayed similar trends in dynamic response to carbogen challenge, but with different response times. These response times were quantified by the time constants of the exponential fitting curves, revealing the immediate and the fastest response from the arterial SaO2, followed by changes in global tumor vascular [HbO2], and delayed responses for pO2. The consistency of the three oxygen-sensitive parameters demonstrated the ability of NIRS to monitor therapeutic interventions for rat breast tumors in-vivo in real time.

  19. Methylated DNA for monitoring tumor growth and regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Nielsen, Dorte; Söletormos, Georg

    2014-01-01

    with benign diseases. In contrast, evidence has accumulated that suggests that modified methylated DNA is strongly related to the cancer phenotype. The modifications found in modified methylated DNA include a global loss of methylation in the genomes of the tumor cells as well as focal hypermethylation...... of gene promoters. Because tumor cells naturally secrete DNA and upon cell death leak DNA, modified methylated DNA can be detected in blood, urine, sputum and other body fluids. At present international guidelines do not include recommendations for monitoring modified methylated DNA. The low level...... of evidence can partly be explained by incomplete collection of serial blood samples, by analytical challenges, and by lack of knowledge of how monitoring studies should be designed and how serial marker data obtained from individual patients should be interpreted. Here, we review the clinical validity...

  20. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  1. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: tumor response to sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacchiotti Silvia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMCS is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of uncertain differentiation, characterized in most cases by a translocation that results in the fusion protein EWSR1-CHN (the latter even called NR4A3 or TEC. EMCS is marked by >40% incidence of metastases in spite of its indolent behaviour. It is generally resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and, to the best of our knowledge, no data have been reported to date about the activity of tirosin-kinase inhibitor (TKI in this tumor. We report on two consecutive patients carrying an advanced EMCS treated with sunitinib. Methods Since July 2011, 2 patients with progressive pretreated metastatic EMCS (Patient1: woman, 58 years, PS1; Patient2: man, 63 years, PS1 have been treated with continuous SM 37.5 mg/day, on an individual use basis. Both patients are evaluable for response. In both cases diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of the typical EWSR1-CHN translocation. Results Both patients are still on treatment (11 and 8 months. Patient 1 got a RECIST response after 4 months from starting sunitinib, together with a complete response by PET. An interval progression was observed after stopping sunitinib for toxicity (abscess around previous femoral fixation, but response was restored after restarting sunitinib. Patient 2 had an initial tumor disease stabilization detected by CT scan at 3 months. Sunitinib was increased to 50 mg/day, with evidence of a dimensional response 3 months later. Conclusions Sunitinib showed antitumor activity in 2 patients with advanced EMCS. Further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

  2. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  3. The early antitumor immune response is necessary for tumor growth

    OpenAIRE

    Parmiani, Giorgio; Maccalli, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Early events responsible of tumor growth in patients with a normal immune system are poorly understood. Here, we discuss, in the context of human melanoma, the Prehn hypothesis according to which a weak antitumor immune response may be required for tumor growth before weakly or non-immunogenic tumor cell subpopulations are selected by the immune system.

  4. Control of the adaptive immune response by tumor vasculature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eMauge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The endothelium is nowadays described as an entire organ that regulates various processes: vascular tone, coagulation, inflammation, and immune cell trafficking, depending on the vascular site and its specific microenvironment as well as on endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms like epigenetic changes. In this review, we will focus on the control of the adaptive immune response by the tumor vasculature. In physiological conditions, the endothelium acts as a barrier regulating cell trafficking by specific expression of adhesion molecules enabling adhesion of immune cells on the vessel, and subsequent extravasation. This process is also dependent on chemokine and integrin expression, and on the type of junctions defining the permeability of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can also regulate immune cell activation. In fact, the endothelial layer can constitute immunological synapses due to its close interactions with immune cells, and the delivery of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In tumor conditions, the vasculature is characterized by abnormal vessel structure and permeability, and by specific phenotype of endothelial cells. All these abnormalities lead to a modulation of intratumoral immune responses and contribute to the development of intratumoral immunosuppression, which is a major mechanism for promoting the development, progression and treatment resistance of tumors. The in-depth analysis of these various abnormalities will help defining novel targets for the development of antitumoral treatments. Furthermore, eventual changes of the endothelial cell phenotype identified by plasma biomarkers could secondarily be selected to monitor treatment efficacy.

  5. Relationship between thermometry results and tumor response in thermoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yasumasa [Kinki Univ., Sayama, Osaka (Japan). School of Medicine; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1998-09-01

    Clinical results of thermoradiotherapy for various tumors at Kyoto University were reviewed with a special attention to the relationship between thermometry results and tumor response. Thermometry for superficial and subsurface tumors were satisfactory, and continuous multipoint thermometry could be performed for the tumors. Thermal parameters predicting complete tumor regression were minimum tumor temperature, minimum equivalent time at 43degC, and number of the treatment goal heat sessions. On the other hand, thermal data obtained were insufficient for deep-seated tumors, and no significant relationship could be demonstrated between tumor response and thermal parameters for deep-seated tumors. On the other hand, significant correlation between tumor degeneration and intravesical temperatures was demonstrated for bladder tumors. Until non-invasive thermometry is available clinically, temperature measurements of bladder or rectal cavity can be an alternative method of direct insertion of thermal probes into the pelvic tumors. Because a significant relationship between certain thermal parameters and tumor response was demonstrated for superficial tumors, stringent quality control of thermometry is required for the success of clinical hyperthermia of both superficial and deep-seated tumors. (author)

  6. Chemotherapeutic (cyclophosphamide) effects on rat breast tumor hemodynamics monitored by multi-channel NIRS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae G.; Zhao, Dawen; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    We previously suggested that the two time constants quantified from the increase of tumor oxyhemoglobin concentration, ▵ [HbO2], during hyperoxic gas intervention are associated with two blood flow/perfusion rates in well perfused and poorly perfused regions of tumors. In this study, our hypothesis is that when cancer therapy is applied to a tumor, changes in blood perfusion will occur and be detected by the NIRS. For experiments, systemic chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide (CTX), was applied to two groups of rats bearing syngeneic 13762NF mammary adenocarcinomas: one group received a single high dose i. p. (200 mg/kg CTX) and the other group continuous low doses (20 mg/kg CTX i. p. for 10 days). Time courses of changes in tumor ▵ [HbO2] were measured at four different locations on the breast tumors non-invasively with an inhaled gas sequence of air-oxygen-air before and after CTX administration. Both rat body weight and tumor volume decreased after administration of high dose CTX, but continuous low doses showed decrease of tumor volume only. Baselines (without any therapy) intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity of vascular oxygenation during oxygen inhalation were similar to our previous observations. After CTX treatment, significant changes in vascular hemodynamic response to oxygen inhalation were observed from both groups. By fitting the increase of ▵ [HbO2] during oxygen inhalation, we have obtained changes of vascular structure ratio and also of perfusion rate ratio before and after chemotherapy. The preliminary results suggest that cyclophosphamide has greatest effect on the well perfused tumor vasculature. Overall, our study supports our earlier hypothesis, proving that the effects of chemotherapy in tumor may be monitored non-invasively by using NIRS to detect changes of hemodynamics induced with respiratory challenges.

  7. Recommendations for imaging tumor response in neurofibromatosis clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombi, Eva; Ardern-Holmes, Simone L; Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica; Barker, Fred G; Connor, Steve; Evans, D Gareth; Fisher, Michael J; Goutagny, Stephane; Harris, Gordon J; Jaramillo, Diego; Karajannis, Matthias A; Korf, Bruce R; Mautner, Victor; Plotkin, Scott R; Poussaint, Tina Y; Robertson, Kent; Shih, Chie-Schin; Widemann, Brigitte C

    2013-11-19

    Neurofibromatosis (NF)-related benign tumors such as plexiform neurofibromas (PN) and vestibular schwannomas (VS) can cause substantial morbidity. Clinical trials directed at these tumors have become available. Due to differences in disease manifestations and the natural history of NF-related tumors, response criteria used for solid cancers (1-dimensional/RECIST [Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors] and bidimensional/World Health Organization) have limited applicability. No standardized response criteria for benign NF tumors exist. The goal of the Tumor Measurement Working Group of the REiNS (Response Evaluation in Neurofibromatosis and Schwannomatosis) committee is to propose consensus guidelines for the evaluation of imaging response in clinical trials for NF tumors. Currently used imaging endpoints, designs of NF clinical trials, and knowledge of the natural history of NF-related tumors, in particular PN and VS, were reviewed. Consensus recommendations for response evaluation for future studies were developed based on this review and the expertise of group members. MRI with volumetric analysis is recommended to sensitively and reproducibly evaluate changes in tumor size in clinical trials. Volumetric analysis requires adherence to specific imaging recommendations. A 20% volume change was chosen to indicate a decrease or increase in tumor size. Use of these criteria in future trials will enable meaningful comparison of results across studies. The proposed imaging response evaluation guidelines, along with validated clinical outcome measures, will maximize the ability to identify potentially active agents for patients with NF and benign tumors.

  8. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Neoadjuvant Radio-Chemotherapy of Esophageal Carcinoma by F-18-FDG-PET%F-18-FDG-PET监测新辅助疗法食管癌的反应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter Theissen; Paul M.Schneider; Stephan E.Baldus; Alexandra Jost; Markus Dietlein; Rolf P.Müller; Arnulf H.H(o)lscher; Harald Schicha

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: For clinical assessment of neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy of esophageal cancer reliable in-vivo methods are necessary. Therefore, the capabilities of F-18-Fluorodesoxyglucose-PET in comparison to histomorphological grading of tumor regression were studied. Methods: In 33 patients with locally advanced esophageal carcinoma (uT3, uN0-1, cM0) F-18-FDG-PET was performed before and 2weeks after radiochemotherapy. All tumors were resected by transthoracic en-bloc esophagectomy 3-4 weeks after induction therapy. A subgroup of 11 patients underwent weekly PET scan during neoadjuvant therapy.PET was performed in a dedicated scanner 1.3 h after administration of 370 MBq F-18-FDG. Data analysis based on maximum SUV data derived from individual regions of interest in pre- and posttherapeutic images. PET data were compared to histomorphological grading parameters for tumor regression whithin the resected tissues. Results: The comparison of histopathological tumor regression after neoadjuvant therapy and PET SUV differences showed a significant X2 P-value of 0.006. There was a significant decrease of the SUV data from 9.1±3.5 to 4.3±1.9 (P<0.0001). In therapy responders SUV was diminished by 59% and in non-responders by 34 %. Longitudinal SUV measurement during neoadjuvant therapy showed a strong SUV decrease already after one and two weeks (P=-0.021 and 0.003). Conclusion: The recent data of the FDG-PET follow-up after neoadjuvant therapy show that PET is able to predict therapy response.Longitudinal PET data advocate that it may be possible to recognize response also very early during radiochemotherapy.

  9. Monitoring changes of tumor microenvironment in colorectal submucosa using multiphoton microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jingting; Jiang, Weizhong; Yang, Yinghong; Feng, Changyin; Chen, Zhifen; Guan, Guoxian; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Recently, targeting tumor microenvironment has become a novel approach for cancer therapy. Collagen is one of important components of tissue microenvironment, and has been considered as a new visible target for cancer therapy. In this work, multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was used to monitor the changes of collagen in tumor microenvironment during tumor progression. It was found that MPM facilitates imaging of tumor cells and collagen. MPM images in different tumor microenvironment during tumor progression shows obvious increase in cell number and collagen degration. In addition, the quantitative analysis of collagen content and orientation index in tumor microenvironment shows significant alteration during tumor progression. These results suggest that MPM has the ability to monitor the changes of collagen morphology in tumor microenvironment and quantify content and orientation index of collagen during tumor progression. Therefore this technique is a powerful imaging tool for the investigation of targeting tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A model of hemodynamic responses of rat tumors to hyperoxic gas challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mengna; Mason, Ralph P.; Liu, Hanli

    2005-04-01

    We measured the changes of oxy-hemoglobin (Δ[HbO2]) and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration (Δ[Hb]) in rat breast 13762NF tumors with respect to oxygen or carbogen inhalation using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). The changes in tumor blood flow can be estimated from the NIRS data provided with certain model assumptions. In the theoretical approach, we modified the Windkessel model so as to associate the mathematical model with such physiological parameters of tumor vasculature as total hemoglobin concentration ([HbT]), tumor blood flow (TBF), and tumor metabolic rate of oxygen (TMRO2). The computational results show that hyperoxic gas administration to the rat tumors always gave rise to improvement of tumor Δ[HbO2], while the same hyperoxic gas intervention could result in different responses in tumor [HbT], TBF, and TMRO2. This preliminary study has demonstrated that NIRS, a noninvasive tool to monitor tumor oxygenation, may also be used to estimate tumor perfusion and oxygen consumption rate in response to therapeutic interventions, if a suitable mathematical model is provided.

  11. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  12. Assessment of tumor response to radiation and vascular targeting therapy in mice using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tran, William Tyler; Czarnota, Gregory J., E-mail: gregory.czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Zhou, Stephanie; Fernandes, Jason; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Hashim, Amr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    analysis presented in this study confirm that acute tumor response is linked to a vascular effect following high doses of radiation therapy. Overall, this is in agreement with previous reports suggesting that acute tumor radiation response is regulated by a vascular-driven response. Data also suggest that Sunitinib may enhance tumor radiosensitivity through a vascular remodeling process, and that QUS may be sensitive to changes in tissue properties associated with vascular remodeling. Finally, the work also demonstrates the ability of QUS methods to monitor response to radiation-based vascular strategies.

  13. A novel method for monitoring high-risk breast cancer with tumor markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An early and reliable diagnosis of metastatic spread has increased interest in serum tumor markers. This study investigated the ability of CA 15.3, CEA, and TPA to identify, predict, and exclude metastases in bone/viscera during adjuvant treatment and follow-up of high-risk breast...... cancer. METHODS: Ninety females with high-risk breast cancer were included in the study. Response evaluation was based upon clinical examination, x-rays or histology and elaborated marker criteria. RESULTS: During the marker monitoring period, metastases in four patients were confined to skin or lymph...

  14. Anti-tumor immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due a number of factors including: the acute inflammatory response caused by PDT, release of antigens from PDT-damaged tumor cells, priming of the adaptive immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy as it would allow the treatment of tumors that may have already metastasized. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. We have carried out in vivo PDT with a BPD-mediated vascular regimen using a pair of BALB/c mouse colon carcinomas: CT26 wild type expressing the naturally occurring retroviral antigen gp70 and CT26.CL25 additionally expressing beta-galactosidase (b-gal) as a model tumor rejection antigen. PDT of CT26.CL25 cured 100% of tumors but none of the CT26WT tumors (all recurred). Cured CT26.CL25 mice were resistant to rechallenge. Moreover mice with two bilateral CT26.CL25 tumors that had only one treated with PDT demonstrated spontaneous regression of 70% of untreated contralateral tumors. T-lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of PDT cured mice that recognized a particular peptide specific to b-gal antigen. T-lymphocytes from LN were able to kill CT26.CL25 target cells in vitro but not CT26WT cells as shown by a chromium release assay. CT26.CL25 tumors treated with PDT and removed five days later had higher levels of Th1 cytokines than CT26 WT tumors showing a higher level of immune response. When mice bearing CT26WT tumors were treated with a regimen of low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) 2 days before, PDT led to 100% of cures (versus 0% without CY) and resistance to rechallenge. Low dose CY is thought to deplete regulatory T-cells (Treg, CD4+CD25+foxp

  15. A diaCEST MRI approach for monitoring liposomal accumulation in tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Yu, Tao; Qiao, Yuan; Liu, Qiang; Yang, Ming; Patel, Himatkumar; Liu, Guanshu; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Vogelstein, Bert; Bulte, Jeff W M; van Zijl, Peter C M; Hanes, Justin; Zhou, Shibin; McMahon, Michael T

    2014-04-28

    Nanocarrier-based chemotherapy allows preferential delivery of therapeutics to tumors and has been found to improve the efficacy of cancer treatment. However, difficulties in tracking nanocarriers and evaluating their pharmacological fates in patients have limited judicious selection of patients to those who might most benefit from nanotherapeutics. To enable the monitoring of nanocarriers in vivo, we developed MRI-traceable diamagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (diaCEST) liposomes. The diaCEST liposomes were based on the clinical formulation of liposomal doxorubicin (i.e. DOXIL®) and were loaded with barbituric acid (BA), a small, organic, biocompatible diaCEST contrast agent. The optimized diaCEST liposomal formulation with a BA-to-lipid ratio of 25% exhibited 30% contrast enhancement at B1=4.7μT in vitro. The contrast was stable, with ~80% of the initial CEST signal sustained over 8h in vitro. We used the diaCEST liposomes to monitor the response to tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), an agent in clinical trials that increases vascular permeability and uptake of nanocarriers into tumors. After systemic administration of diaCEST liposomes to mice bearing CT26 tumors, we found an average diaCEST contrast at the BA frequency (5ppm) of 0.4% at B1=4.7μT while if TNF-α was co-administered the contrast increased to 1.5%. This novel approach provides a non-radioactive, non-metallic, biocompatible, semi-quantitative, and clinically translatable approach to evaluate the tumor targeting of stealth liposomes in vivo, which may enable personalized nanomedicine.

  16. Monitoring perfusion changes in laser-treated tumors using laser doppler flowmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Abby; Hess, Linda; Koss, Michael; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Laser Doppler perfusion monitors are effect tools in understanding blood flow in many different types of biological studies. Because the low-intensity lasers used in Doppler perfusion measurements must interact with moving blood cells, the depth of probe-able tissue is limited to the volume of tissue within the hemisphere of radius ~1mm from the probe tip. In addition, heterogeneities in surface perfusion make precise probe placement very important if one is comparing successive measurements. Consequently, useful tissue perfusion measurements have been difficult to obtain, especially in deep tissues. In this study, a new method was developed for monitoring deep-tissue blood perfusion directionally with the Laserflo laser Doppler perfusion probe. The probe was inserted just under the skin superficially to a rat prostatic tumor through the shaft of a 16-gauge needle, which was modified to allow the probe to be exposed without extending beyond the beveled needle tip. Perfusion measurements of the tumor surface or the skin were made by rotating the bevel to face either inside or outside. Using this technique, tumor tissue can be differentiated from either skin or muscle. To study the responses of tumor to light stimulation, an 805nm biomedical treatment laser was used to irradiate the tumor. The perfusion of the tumor surface was shown to decrease slightly with short treatment laser applications (1W for 30 seconds or 1 minute). After a longer treatment session (5 minutes), the perfusion of the tumor tissue increased significantly. However, with an even longer (10 minutes) treatment, the perfusion of the tumor surface was shown to decrease once again. This trend indicates that before laser heating becomes significant, the perfusion decreases for as yet poorly understood reasons. When laser heating becomes significant, after the five-minute session, the perfusion increases dramatically, corresponding to the expected dilation of blood vessels during tissue heating. After

  17. Perfusion-CT monitoring of cryo-ablated renal cells tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vespasiani Giuseppe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No single and thoroughly validated imaging method in monitoring of cryoablated renal cell carcinoma (RCC is available. The purpose of our study was to determine the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced perfusion CT (pCT in evaluating the hemodynamic response of RCC. Methods 15 patients (14 male, 1 female; age range, 43-81 years; mean age, 62 years with cryoablated RCC via a transperitoneal approach, underwent to pCT 6-8 months after cryo-therapy. pCT was performed for 65 seconds after intravenous injection of contrast medium (80 mL, 370 mg iodine per millilitre, 4 mL/sec. Perfusion parameters (Time/Density curve; Blood flow, BF; Blood Volume, BV; Mean Transit Time, MTT; Permeability-Surface Area Product, PS were sampled in the cryoablated tumor area and in ipsilateral renal cortex using deconvolution-based method. A tumor was considered to be not responsive to treatment by CT evidence of pathological contrast enhancement in the cryoablated area or renal mass persistence compared with the preoperative CT control. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants before the study. Results After cryotherapy, successfully ablated tumor (n = 13 showed decrease in BV (5,39 +/- 1,28 mL/100 g, BF (69,92 +/- 20,12 mL/100 g/min and PS (16,66 +/- 5,67 mL/100 g/min value and increased value of MTT (25,35 +/- 4,3 sec compared with those of normal renal cortex (BV: 117,86 +/- 31,87 mL/100 g/min; BF: 392,39 +/- 117,32 mL/100 g/min; MTT: 18,02 +/- 3,6 sec; PS: 81,68 +/- 22,75 mL/100 g/min. In one patient, assessment of perfusion parameters was not feasible for breathing artifacts. One tumor showed poor response to treatment by the evidence of nodular contrast enhancement in the region encompassing the original lesion. Two typical enhancement patterns were obtained comparing the Time-Density curves of responsive and not responsive ablated tumors. Conclusion Perfusion CT seems to be a feasible and promising technique in

  18. The Link Between Oxidative Stress Response and Tumor Necrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Link Between Oxidative Stress Response and Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha ... Also, to investigate how this can affect normal hepatic tissues. ... A complex relationship exists between the thyroid gland and the liver in health and disease.

  19. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  20. Assays for predicting and monitoring responses to lung cancer immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Teixid; Niki Karachaliou; Maria Gonzlez-Cao; Daniela Morales-Espinosa; Rafael Rosell

    2015-01-01

    AbstrAct Immunotherapy has become a key strategy for cancer treatment, and two immune checkpoints, namely, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), have recently emerged as important targets. hTe interaction blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 demonstrated promising activity and antitumor effcacy in early phase clinical trials for advanced solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many cell types in multiple tissues express PD-L1 as well as several tumor types, thereby suggesting that the ligand may play important roles in inhibiting immune responses throughout the body. hTerefore, PD-L1 is a critical immunomodulating component within the lung microenvironment, but the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis is controversial. More evidence is required to support the use of PD-L1 as a potential predictive biomarker. Clinical trials have measured PD-L1 in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with different antibodies, but the assessment of PD-L1 is not yet standardized. Some commercial antibodies lack speciifcity and their reproducibility has not been fully evaluated. Further studies are required to clarify the optimal IHC assay as well as to predict and monitor the immune responses of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway.

  1. Tumor Microenvironment Targeting and Responsive Peptide-Based Nanoformulations for Improved Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hao; Ding, Yanping; Mujeeb, Ayeesha; Zhao, Ying; Nie, Guangjun

    2017-09-01

    The tumor microenvironment participates in all stages of tumor progression and has emerged as a promising therapeutic target for cancer therapy. Rapid progress in the field of molecular self-assembly using various biologic molecules has resulted in the fabrication of nanoformulations that specifically target and regulate microenvironment components to inhibit tumor growth. This inhibition process is based on differentiating between biophysicochemical cues guiding tumor and normal tissue microenvironments. Peptides and peptide derivatives, owing to their biocompatibility, chemical versatility, bioactivity, environmental sensitivity, and biologic recognition abilities, have been widely used as building blocks to construct multifunctional nanostructures for targeted drug delivery and controlled release. Several groups of peptides have been identified as having the ability to penetrate plasma membranes, regulate the essential signaling pathways of angiogenesis and immune reactions, and recognize key components in the tumor microenvironment (such as vascular systems, stromal cells, and abnormal tumor biophysicochemical features). Thus, using different modules, various functional peptides, and their derivatives can be integrated into nanoformulations specifically targeting the tumor microenvironment with increased selectivity, on-demand response, elevated cellular uptake, and improved tumor therapy. In this review, we introduce several groups of functional peptides and highlight peptide-based nanoformulations that specifically target the tumor microenvironment. We also provide our perspective on the development of smart drug-delivery systems with enhanced therapeutic efficacy. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  2. Longitudinal optical monitoring of blood flow in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. M.; Chung, S. H.; Leproux, A.; Baker, W. B.; Busch, D. R.; DeMichele, A. M.; Tchou, J.; Tromberg, B. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    We measure tissue blood flow markers in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and investigate their correlation to pathologic complete response in a pilot longitudinal patient study (n  =  4). Tumor blood flow is quantified optically by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and tissue optical properties, blood oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration are derived from concurrent diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). The study represents the first longitudinal DCS measurement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in humans over the entire course of treatment; it therefore offers a first correlation between DCS flow indices and pathologic complete response. The use of absolute optical properties measured by DOSI facilitates significant improvement of DCS blood flow calculation, which typically assumes optical properties based on literature values. Additionally, the combination of the DCS blood flow index and the tissue oxygen saturation from DOSI permits investigation of tissue oxygen metabolism. Pilot results from four patients suggest that lower blood flow in the lesion-bearing breast is correlated with pathologic complete response. Both absolute lesion blood flow and lesion flow relative to the contralateral breast exhibit potential for characterization of pathological response. This initial demonstration of the combined optical approach for chemotherapy monitoring provides incentive for more comprehensive studies in the future and can help power those investigations.

  3. Insulin-responsiveness of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantelau, Ernst

    2009-05-01

    In October 2008, the 2nd International Insulin & Cancer Workshop convened roughly 30 researchers from eight countries in Düsseldorf/Germany. At this meeting, which was industry-independent like the preceding one in 2007, the following issues were discussed a) association between certain cancers and endogenous insulin production in humans, b) growth-promoting effects of insulin in animal experiments, c) mitogenic and anti-apoptotic activity of pharmaceutic insulin and insulin analogues in in vitro experiments, d) potential mechanisms of insulin action on cell growth, mediated by IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling, and e) IGF-1 receptor targeting for inhibition of tumor growth. It was concluded that further research is necessary to elucidate the clinical effects of these observations, and their potential for human neoplastic disease and treatment.

  4. Social media monitoring: Responsive governance in the shadow of surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.R. Edwards (Arthur); D. de Kool (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Social media monitoring is gradually becoming a common practice in public organizations in the Netherlands. The main purposes of social media monitoring are strategic control and responsiveness. Social media monitoring poses normative questions in terms of transparency

  5. Visualization of tumor vascular reactivity in response to respiratory challenges by optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon Sup; Lee, Songhyun; Lee, Kiri; Eom, Tae Joong; Kim, Jae G.

    2016-02-01

    We previously reported the potential of using vascular reactivity during respiratory challenges as a marker to predict the response of breast tumor to chemotherapy in a rat model by using a continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy. However, it cannot visualize how the vascular reactivity from tumor vessel can predict the tumor response to its treatment. In this study, we utilized a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system to visualize vascular reactivity of both tumor and normal vasculature during respiratory challenges in a mouse model. We adapted intensity based Doppler variance algorithm to draw angiogram from the ear of mouse (8-week-old Balb/c nu/nu). Animals were anesthetized using 1.5% isoflurane, and the body temperature was maintained by a heating pad. Inhalational gas was switched from air (10min) to 100% oxygen (10min), and a pulse oximeter was used to monitor arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate. OCT angiograms were acquired 5 min after the onset of each gas. The vasoconstriction effect of hyperoxic gas on vasculature was shown by subtracting an en-face image acquired during 100% oxygen from the image acquired during air inhalation. The quantitative change in the vessel diameter was measured from the en-face OCT images of the individual blood vessels. The percentage of blood vessel diameter reduction varied from 1% to 12% depending on arterial, capillary, or venous blood vessel. The vascular reactivity change during breast tumor progression and post chemotherapy will be monitored by OCT angiography.

  6. Microfluidic Biopsy Trapping Device for the Real-Time Monitoring of Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Angela Babetski; Sinatra, Francy L; Kreahling, Jenny; Conway, Amy J; Landis, David A; Altiok, Soner

    2017-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is composed of cellular and stromal components such as tumor cells, mesenchymal cells, immune cells, cancer associated fibroblasts and the supporting extracellular matrix. The tumor microenvironment provides crucial support for growth and progression of tumor cells and affects tumor response to therapeutic interventions. To better understand tumor biology and to develop effective cancer therapeutic agents it is important to develop preclinical platforms that can faithfully recapitulate the tumor microenvironment and the complex interaction between the tumor and its surrounding stromal elements. Drug studies performed in vitro with conventional two-dimensional cancer cell line models do not optimally represent clinical drug response as they lack true tumor heterogeneity and are often performed in static culture conditions lacking stromal tumor components that significantly influence the metabolic activity and proliferation of cells. Recent microfluidic approaches aim to overcome such obstacles with the use of cell lines derived in artificial three-dimensional supportive gels or micro-chambers. However, absence of a true tumor microenvironment and full interstitial flow, leads to less than optimal evaluation of tumor response to drug treatment. Here we report a continuous perfusion microfluidic device coupled with microscopy and image analysis for the assessment of drug effects on intact fresh tumor tissue. We have demonstrated that fine needle aspirate biopsies obtained from patient-derived xenograft models of adenocarcinoma of the lung can successfully be analyzed for their response to ex vivo drug treatment within this biopsy trapping microfluidic device, wherein a protein kinase C inhibitor, staurosporine, was used to assess tumor cell death as a proof of principle. This approach has the potential to study tumor tissue within its intact microenvironment to better understand tumor response to drug treatments and eventually to choose the

  7. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-C. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jeng-Jong [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw; Ting, G. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Y.-L. [Taiwan Liposome Company, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, J. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China)

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R {sup 2}=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm{sup 3} (R {sup 2}=0.907). {gamma} Scintigraphy combined with [{sup 131}I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  8. Hypoxia Responsive Drug Delivery Systems in Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimoradi, Houman; Matikonda, Siddharth S; Gamble, Allan B; Giles, Gregory I; Greish, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of solid tumors. It is mainly determined by low levels of oxygen resulting from imperfect vascular networks supplying most tumors. In an attempt to improve the present chemotherapeutic treatment and reduce associated side effects, several prodrug strategies have been introduced to achieve hypoxia-specific delivery of cytotoxic anticancer agents. With the advances in nanotechnology, novel delivery systems activated by the consequent outcomes of hypoxia have been developed. However, developing hypoxia responsive drug delivery systems (which only depend on low oxygen levels) is currently naïve. This review discusses four main hypoxia responsive delivery systems: polymeric based drug delivery systems, oxygen delivery systems combined with radiotherapy and chemotherapy, anaerobic bacteria which are used for delivery of genes to express anticancer proteins such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α) and hypoxia-inducible transcription factors 1 alpha (HIF1α) responsive gene delivery systems.

  9. Pharmacokinetic Monitoring of Indocyanine Green for Tumor Detection Using Photoacoustic Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Si-Hua; YIN Guang-Zhi; XING Da

    2010-01-01

    @@ We report tumor detection using a photoacoustic technique for the imaging of angiogenesis and monitoring of agent pharmacokinetics on an animal model.We take 532-nm laser pulses to excite photoacoustic signals of blood vessels with acquisition by a broadband hydrophone,and the morphological characteristics of tumor angiogenesis are successfully image depicted.Furthermore,tumor pharmacokinetics is preformed and analyzed with fast multielement photoacoustic imaging of the intravenous-injected indocyanine green (ICG).

  10. Intra-procedural Transcatheter Intraarterial Perfusion MRI as a Predictor of Tumor Response to Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingxin; Gaba, Ron C.; Jin, Brian; Riaz, Ahsun; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T.; Ragin, Ann B.; Kulik, Laura M.; Mulcahy, Mary F.; Salem, Riad; Larson, Andrew C.; Omary, Reed A.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives To prospectively test the hypothesis that transcatheter intraarterial perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (TRIP-MRI) measured semi-quantitative perfusion reductions during transcatheter arterial chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are associated with tumor response. Materials and Methods Twenty eight patients (mean age 63 years; range 47–87 years) with 29 tumors underwent chemoembolization in a combined MR-interventional radiology suite. Intra-procedural tumor perfusion reductions during chemoembolization were monitored using TRIP-MRI. Pre- and post-–chemoembolization semi-quantitative area under the time-signal enhancement curve (AUC) tumor perfusion was measured. Mean tumor perfusion pre- and post-chemoembolization were compared using a paired t-test. Imaging follow-up was performed one to three months after chemoembolization. We studied the relationship between short-term tumor imaging response and intra-procedural perfusion reductions using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results Intra-procedural AUC perfusion value decreased significantly after chemoembolization (342.1 versus 158.6 arbitrary unit, P < 0.001). Twenty six patients with 27 HCCs (n = 27) had follow-up imaging at mean 39 days post-chemoembolization. Favorable response was present in 67% of these treated tumors according to necrosis criteria. 15 of 16 (94%) tumors with 25–75% perfusion reductions showed necrosis treatment response compared to only 3 of 11 (27%) tumors with perfusion reductions outside the above range (P = 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression indicated that intra-procedural tumor perfusion reduction and Child-Pugh class were independent factors associated significantly with tumor response (P = 0.012 and 0.047, respectively). Conclusion TRIP-MRI can successfully measure semi-quantitative changes in HCC perfusion during chemoembolization. Intra-procedural tumor perfusion reductions are associated with future tumor response. PMID

  11. Advances in identification and application of tumor antigen inducing anti-cancer responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor antigen is one of the important bases of tumor immunotherapy[1]. With the discovery of novel tumor antigens, interest in specific immunotherapy for treatment of malignancies has increased substantially. Nowadays more and more scientists paid close attention to various tumor antigens with their roles or/and applications in anti-cancer immune responses, immune tolerance, tumor markers, tumor immunotherapy and so on. Here we discussed the classification of tumor antigens and summarized the technologies of identification and application of tumor antigens.

  12. Differential vascular response and relationship to tumor response with photodynamic therapy using WST-09 (TOOKAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbo, Greta M.; Kik, Peter K.; Harrison, Linda T.; Brun, Pierre H.; Blanc, Dominique; Paulin, Pamela S.; Wieman, Thomas J.; Fingar, Victor H.

    2004-06-01

    Bacteriopheophorbide molecules are second-generation photosensitizers with promise for PHotodynamic Therapy applications due largely to their absorption peaks in the near-Infrared region. Palladium bcteriopheophorbide, also called TOOKAD, has been successfully evaluated in several pre-clinical animal models. In this study the effect on tumor and normal vasculature was evaluated using an intravital vascular model on mouse cremaster muscle implanted with the RIF tumor. For tumor response studies, the same RIF tumor was implanted intradermally on the right flank and regression was evaluated for 42 days or until the tumor reached a 12 mm diameter. A light dose 300 J/cm2 were delivered at 763 nm with power density of 100 mW/cm2. Photosensitizer dose was 4 mg/kg body weight. Mice were treated immediately, 10 minutes, 30 minutes, or 24 hours after injection. Only the higher light dose (300 J/cm2) delivered 10 minutes after injection produced a reproducible and complete vascular and tumor response after PDT in these animals. In the cremaster-tumor model, arterioles and venules partially shutdown as early as 40 minutes after the beginning of treatment, while tumor neovasculature was irreversibly closed within 20 minutes of treatment. Tumor response studies demonstrated that the magnitude of vascular stasis correlates with tumor regression studies. Further studies using this photosensitizer are warranted, given its short clearance time and its near-Infrared activation wavelength.

  13. Monitoring host responses to the gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtman, Joshua S; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Elias, Joshua E

    2015-09-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) ecosystem is increasingly understood to be a fundamental component of health, and has been identified as a new focal point for diagnosing, correcting and preventing countless disorders. Shotgun DNA sequencing has emerged as the dominant technology for determining the genetic and microbial composition of the gut microbiota. This technology has linked microbiota dysbioses to numerous GI diseases including inflammatory bowel disease, obesity and allergy, and to non-GI diseases like autism and depression. The importance of establishing causality in the deterioration of the host-microbiota relationship is well appreciated; however, discovery of candidate molecules and pathways that underlie mechanisms remains a major challenge. Targeted approaches, transcriptional assays, cytokine panels and imaging analyses, applied to animals, have yielded important insight into host responses to the microbiota. However, non-invasive, hypothesis-independent means of measuring host responses in humans are necessary to keep pace with similarly unbiased sequencing efforts that monitor microbes. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has served this purpose in many other fields, but stool proteins exist in such diversity and dynamic range as to overwhelm conventional proteomics technologies. Focused analysis of host protein secretion into the gut lumen and monitoring proteome-level dynamics in stool provides a tractable route toward non-invasively evaluating dietary, microbial, surgical or pharmacological intervention efficacies. This review is intended to guide GI biologists and clinicians through the methods currently used to elucidate host responses in the gut, with a specific focus on mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics applied to the study of host protein dynamics within the GI ecosystem.

  14. Non-invasive monitoring of hemodynamic changes in orthotropic brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Dheerendra; Sharma, Vikrant; Liu, Hanli

    2007-02-01

    Radio surgical interventions such as Gamma Knife and Cyberknife have become attractive as therapeutic interventions. However, one of the drawbacks of cyberknife is radionecrosis, which is caused by excessive radiation to surrounding normal tissues. Radionecrosis occurs in about 10-15% of cases and could have adverse effects leading to death. Currently available imaging techniques have failed to reliably distinguish radionecrosis from tumor growth. Development of imaging techniques that could provide distinction between tumor growth and radionecrosis would give us ability to monitor effects of radiation therapy non-invasively. This paper investigates the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a new technique to monitor the growth of brain tumors. Brain tumors (9L glioma cell line) were implanted in right caudate nucleus of rats (250-300 gms, Male Fisher C) through a guide screw. A new algorithm was developed, which used broadband steady-state reflectance measurements made using a single source-detector pair, to quantify absolute concentrations of hemoglobin derivatives and reduced scattering coefficients. Preliminary results from the brain tumors indicated decreases in oxygen saturation, oxygenated hemoglobin concentrations and increases in deoxygenated hemoglobin concentrations with tumor growth. The study demonstrates that NIRS technology could provide an efficient, noninvasive means of monitoring vascular oxygenation dynamics of brain tumors and further facilitate investigations of efficacy of tumor treatments.

  15. Diffuse optical spectroscopy monitoring of oxygen state and hemoglobin concentration during SKBR-3 tumor model growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, A. G.; Kirillin, M. Yu; Volovetsky, A. B.; Shilyagina, N. Yu; Sergeeva, E. A.; Golubiatnikov, G. Yu; Turchin, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor oxygenation and hemoglobin content are the key indicators of the tumor status which can be efficiently employed for prognosis of tumor development and choice of treatment strategy. We report on monitoring of these parameters in SKBR-3 (human breast adenocarcinoma) tumors established as subcutaneous tumor xenografts in athymic nude mice by diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS). A simple continuous wave fiber probe DOS system is employed. Optical properties extraction approach is based on diffusion approximation. Statistically significant difference between measured values of normal tissue and tumor are demonstrated. Hemoglobin content in tumor increases from 7.0  ±  4.2 μM to 30.1  ±  16.1 μM with tumor growth from 150  ±  80 mm3 to 1300  ±  650 mm3 which is determined by gradual increase of deoxyhemoglobin content while measured oxyhemoglobin content does not demonstrate any statistically significant variations. Oxygenation in tumor falls quickly from 52.8  ±  24.7% to 20.2  ±  4.8% preceding acceleration of tumor growth. Statistical analysis indicated dependence of oxy-, deoxy- and total hemoglobin on tumor volume (p  Pearson’s correlation coefficient equals 0.8).

  16. TUMOR-SPECIFIC IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. N. Anokhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased incidence of malignancies requires a search for new therapeutic approaches. E.g., photodynamic therapy (PDT is an effective anti-cancer treatment that involves administration of a photosensitizing dye followed by visible light irradiation of the tumor. Pre-clinical studies have shown that local photodynamic therapy enhances systemic antitumor immunity. Moreover, it is well known that the long-term effects of PDT depend on functioning of intact adaptive immune response. In this context, the immune system plays a fundamental role. Interestingly, the PDT action is associated with stimulation of systemic immune response against a locally treated tumor. In fact, PDT has been shown to effectively stimulate both innate and adaptive immune systems of the host, by triggering the release of various pro-inflammatory and acutephase response mediators thus leading to massive infiltration of the treated site with neutrophils, dendritic cells and other inflammatory cells. PDT efficacy depends, in part, on induction of tumor-specific immune response which is dependent on cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer (NK cells. The set of specific receptors enables NK cells to recognize surface molecules on the target cells. Expression of the latter molecules is indicative of viral infection, tumor formation, or cell stress (e.g., DNA damage. The NK cells are also involved into various biological processes in the organism, playing a critical role in immune surveillance, thus representing a potential tool for cancer therapy. It was shown that the tumor cells have increased sensitivity to NK cell-mediated lytic action following PDT. In this review, we further discuss potential relationships between PDT and antitumor immune response.

  17. MGMT expression predicts response to temozolomide in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, J; Hentic, O; Rebours, V; Zappa, M; Gille, N; Theou-Anton, N; Vernerey, D; Maire, F; Lévy, P; Bedossa, P; Paradis, V; Hammel, P; Ruszniewski, P; Couvelard, A

    2016-08-01

    Temozolomide (TEM) showed encouraging results in well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (WDPNETs). Low O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression and MGMT promoter methylation within tumors correlate with a better outcome under TEM-based chemotherapy in glioblastoma. We aimed to assess whether MGMT expression and MGMT promoter methylation could help predict the efficacy of TEM-based chemotherapy in patients with WDPNET. Consecutive patients with progressive WDPNET and/or liver involvement over 50% who received TEM between 2006 and 2012 were retrospectively studied. Tumor response was assessed according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 guidelines. Nuclear expression of MGMT was assessed by immunochemistry (H-score, 0-300) and MGMT promoter methylation by pyrosequencing. Forty-three patients (21 men, 58years (27-84)) with grade 1 WDPNET (n=6) or 2 (n=36) were analyzed. Objective response, stable disease, and progression rates were seen in 17 patients (39.5%), 18 patients (41.9%), and 8 patients (18.6%), respectively. Low MGMT expression (≤50) was associated with radiological objective response (P=0.04) and better progression-free survival (PFS) (HR=0.35 (0.15-0.81), P=0.01). Disease control rate at 18months of treatment remained satisfying with an MGMT score up to 100 (74%) but dropped with a higher expression. High MGMT promoter methylation was associated with a low MGMT expression and longer PFS (HR=0.37 (0.29-1.08), P=0.05). Low MGMT score (≤50) appears to predict an objective tumor response, whereas an intermediate MGMT score (50-100) seems to be associated with prolonged stable disease.

  18. Responsiveness of human prostate carcinoma bone tumors to interleukin-2 therapy in a mouse xenograft tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocheril, S V; Grignon, D J; Wang, C Y; Maughan, R L; Montecillo, E J; Talati, B; Tekyi-Mensah, S; Pontes, J e; Hillman, G G

    1999-01-01

    We have tested an immunotherapy approach for the treatment of metastatic prostate carcinoma using a bone tumor model. Human PC-3 prostate carcinoma tumor cells were heterotransplanted into the femur cavity of athymic Balb/c nude mice. Tumor cells replaced marrow cells in the bone cavity, invaded adjacent bone and muscle tissues, and formed a palpable tumor at the hip joint. PC-3/IF cell lines, generated from bone tumors by serial in vivo passages, grew with faster kinetics in the femur and metastasized to inguinal lymph nodes. Established tumors were treated with systemic interleukin-2 (IL-2) injections. IL-2 significantly inhibited the formation of palpable tumors and prolonged mouse survival at nontoxic low doses. Histologically IL-2 caused vascular damage and infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes in the tumor as well as necrotic areas with apoptotic cells. These findings suggest destruction of tumor cells by systemic IL-2 therapy and IL-2 responsiveness of prostate carcinoma bone tumors.

  19. Immunologic response to tumor ablation with irreversible electroporation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiang Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irreversible electroporation (IRE is a promising technique for the focal treatment of pathologic tissues, which involves placing minimally invasive electrodes within the targeted region. However, the knowledge about the therapeutic efficacy and immune reactions in response to IRE remains in its infancy. METHODS: In this work, to detect whether tumor ablation with IRE could trigger the immunologic response, we developed an osteosarcoma rat model and applied IRE directly to ablate the tumor. In the experiment, 118 SD rats were randomized into 4 groups: the control, sham operation, surgical resection, and IRE groups. Another 28 rats without tumor cell implantation served as the normal non-tumor-bearing group. We analyzed the changes in T lymphocyte subsets, sIL-2R and IL-10 levels in the peripheral blood one day before operation, as well as at 1, 3, 7,14 and 21 days after the operation. Moreover, splenocytes were assayed for IFN-γ and IL-4 production using intracellular cytokine staining one day before the operation, as well as at 7 and 21 days after operation. RESULTS: We found that direct IRE completely ablated the tumor cells. A significant increase in peripheral lymphocytes, especially CD3(+ and CD4(+ cells, as well as an increased ratio of CD4(+/CD8(+ were detectable 7 days after operation in both the IRE and surgical resection groups. Compared with the surgical resection group, the IRE group exhibited a stronger cellular immune response. The sIL-2R level of the peripheral blood in the IRE group decreased with time and was significantly different from that in the surgical resection group. Moreover, ablation with IRE significantly increased the percentage of IFN-γ-positive splenocytes. CONCLUSION: These findings indicated that IRE could not only locally destroy the tumor but also change the status of cellular immunity in osteosarcoma-bearing rats. This provides experimental evidence for the clinical application of IRE in

  20. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  1. Monitoring of tumor radio frequency ablation using derivative spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spliethoff, J.W.; Tanis, E.; Evers, Daniel James; Hendriks, B.H.; Prevoo, W.; Ruers, T.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of radio frequency (RF) ablation, an effective way to assess thermal tissue damage during and after the procedure is still lacking. We present a method for monitoring RF ablation efficacy based on thermally induced methemoglobin as a marker for full tissue ablation. Diffus

  2. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors. Predictive value of tumor response as evaluated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Miyagi, Koichi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Yamashiro, Katsumi; Sawada, Satoshi [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome in patients with intracranial germ-cell tumors to determine whether tumor response during radiation therapy can predict achievement of primary local with radiation therapy alone. Between 1983 and 1993, 22 patients with untreated primary intracranial germ cell tumors received a total whole brain radiation dose of between 18 Gy and 45 Gy (mean 31.3 Gy) with or without a localized field of 10 to 36.4 Gy (mean, 22.4 Gy), or local irradiation only (1 patient). In 10 patients with pineal tumor only, who were treated first with radiation therapy, tumor response to radiation therapy was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) (at baseline, and approximately 20 Gy and 50 Gy). Areas of calcification in the tumor were subtracted from total tumor volume. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 12 years. Five-year actuarial survival rates for patients with germinoma were 71%, 100% for patients with a teratoma component, and 100% for patients without histologic verification. Patients with germinomas or tumors suspected of being germinomas who were given more than 50 Gy had no local relapse. There was no correlation between primary local control by radiation therapy alone and initial tumor volume. The rate of tumor volume response to irradiation assessed by CT was significantly different in those patients who relapsed compared to those who did not relapse. Tumor response during radiation therapy using CT was considered to be predictive of primary local control with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  3. Assessment of lung tumor response by perfusion CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2013-01-01

    Perfusion CT permits evaluation of lung cancer angiogenesis and response to therapy by demonstrating alterations in lung tumor vascularity. It is advocated that perfusion CT performed shortly after initiating therapy may provide a better evaluation of physiological changes rather than the conventional size assessment obtained with RECIST. The radiation dose,the volume of contrast medium delivered to the patient and the reproducibility of blood flow parameters remain an issue for this type of investigation.

  4. Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Emmons, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Little Rock, Arkansas 72205 REPORT DATE: August 2005 TYPE OF REPORT...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Maximizing Immune Response to Carbohydrate Antigens on Breast Tumors 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-01-1-0366 5c. PROGRAM...binding affinities of peptide and carbohyd- Hollingsworth, M. A. 1997. Oligosaccharides expressed on MUCl rate with I-A’ will be illuminating. However

  5. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  6. A Comparison of Imaging Techniques to Monitor Tumor Growth and Cancer Progression in Living Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Laure Puaux

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Purpose. Monitoring solid tumor growth and metastasis in small animals is important for cancer research. Noninvasive techniques make longitudinal studies possible, require fewer animals, and have greater statistical power. Such techniques include FDG positron emission tomography (FDG-PET, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and optical imaging, comprising bioluminescence imaging (BLI and fluorescence imaging (FLI. This study compared the performance and usability of these methods in the context of mouse tumor studies. Methods. B16 tumor-bearing mice (n=4 for each study were used to compare practicality, performance for small tumor detection and tumor burden measurement. Using RETAAD mice, which develop spontaneous melanomas, we examined the performance of MRI (n=6 mice and FDG-PET (n=10 mice for tumor identification. Results. Overall, BLI and FLI were the most practical techniques tested. Both BLI and FDG-PET identified small nonpalpable tumors, whereas MRI and FLI only detected macroscopic, clinically evident tumors. FDG-PET and MRI performed well in the identification of tumors in terms of specificity, sensitivity, and positive predictive value. Conclusion. Each of the four methods has different strengths that must be understood before selecting them for use.

  7. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  8. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Shona A.; Farnsworth, Rae H.; Solomon, Benjamin; Achen, Marc G.; Stacker, Steven A.; Fox, Stephen B.

    2016-01-01

    Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however, the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response and can be targeted through the use of antiangiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells, controlling the microenvironment, and modulating the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with antiangiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review, we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion. PMID:28066431

  9. The Role of the Tumor Vasculature in the Host Immune Response: Implications for Therapeutic Strategies Targeting the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shona A Hendry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed cancer immunotherapy approaches including immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cell transfer are showing promising results both in trials and in clinical practice. These approaches reflect increasing recognition of the crucial role of the tumor microenvironment in cancer development and progression. Cancer cells do not act alone, but develop a complex relationship with the environment in which they reside. The host immune response to tumors is critical to the success of immunotherapy; however the determinants of this response are incompletely understood. The immune cell infiltrate in tumors varies widely in density, composition, and clinical significance. The tumor vasculature is a key component of the microenvironment that can influence tumor behavior and treatment response, and can be targeted through the use of anti-angiogenic drugs. Blood vascular and lymphatic endothelial cells have important roles in the trafficking of immune cells and controlling the microenvironment, and modulate the immune response. Improving access to the tumor through vascular alteration with anti-angiogenic drugs may prove an effective combinatorial strategy with immunotherapy approaches, and might be applicable to many tumor types. In this review we briefly discuss the host’s immune response to cancer and the treatment strategies utilizing this response, before focusing on the pathological features of tumor blood and lymphatic vessels and the contribution these might make to tumor immune evasion.

  10. Microfluidic culture models to study the hydrodynamics of tumor progression and therapeutic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Cara; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2013-08-01

    The integration of tissue engineering strategies with microfluidic technologies has enabled the design of in vitro microfluidic culture models that better adapt to morphological changes in tissue structure and function over time. These biomimetic microfluidic scaffolds accurately mimic native 3D microenvironments, as well as permit precise and simultaneous control of chemical gradients, hydrodynamic stresses, and cellular niches within the system. The recent application of microfluidic in vitro culture models to cancer research offers enormous potential to aid in the development of improved therapeutic strategies by supporting the investigation of tumor angiogenesis and metastasis under physiologically relevant flow conditions. The intrinsic material properties and fluid mechanics of microfluidic culture models enable high-throughput anti-cancer drug screening, permit well-defined and controllable input parameters to monitor tumor cell response to various hydrodynamic conditions or treatment modalities, as well as provide a platform for elucidating fundamental mechanisms of tumor physiology. This review highlights recent developments and future applications of microfluidic culture models to study tumor progression and therapeutic targeting under conditions of hydrodynamic stress relevant to the complex tumor microenvironment.

  11. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  12. [Research advances of anti-tumor immune response induced by pulse electric field ablation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guang-ying; Diao, Hong-yan

    2015-11-01

    As a novel tumor therapy, pulse electric field has shown a clinical perspective. This paper reviews the characteristics of tumor ablation by microsecond pulse and nanosecond pulse electric field, and the research advances of anti-tumor immune response induced by pulse electric field ablation. Recent researches indicate that the pulse electric field not only leads to a complete ablation of local tumor, but also stimulates a protective immune response, thereby inhibiting tumor recurrence and metastasis. These unique advantages will show an extensive clinical application in the future. However, the mechanism of anti-tumor immune response and the development of related tumor vaccine need further studies.

  13. [The mechanism of anti-tumor immune response against mouse melanoma to xenogeneic vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Feng; Mao, Yong-qiu; Kan, Bing; He, Qiu-Ming; Jiang, Yu; Peng, Feng; Yang, Li; Tian, Ling

    2004-11-01

    To investigate the immunological mechanism for inhibiting melanoma growth in mouse by vaccination with xenogeneic melanocytes. Xenogeneic vaccine was prepared from pig eye melanocytes. By means of indirect ELISA the antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in immunized mice sera were detected and the immunoglobulin subclass were analyzed. Then after purification, the immunoglobulins were used for the inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro. Analyses of cross-reactive antigen in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells were performed by Western blot. Xenogeneic vaccine was used before B16 melanoma challenge in C57 BL/c mice and then the growth of tumor was monitored. Meanwhile, other mice immunized with xenogeneic vaccine were depleted of NK cells or CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocytes. The antibodies against pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells in mice sera were not detected by indirect ELISA until 2 weeks after first xenogeneic vaccination, and after the first finding, the antibody titers increased with the time of immunization. The anti-tumor activity and production of autoantibodies, conspicuously those of the elevated IgG, could be abrogated by the depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. The cross-reactive antigen with 180 kda protein in both pig melanocytes and B16 melanoma cells was confirmed. Xenogeneic vaccination resulted in inhibition of tumor growth in 90% of the immunized mice. The protective immune response elicited in this fashion was dispelled in the mice depleted of CD4+ T lymphocytes. However this response was found in 70% of the mice depleted of CD8+ T lymphocytes, and the depletion NK cells did not influence the anti-tumor effect of the vaccine. The anti-tumor immune response is capable of inhibiting melanoma growth; both humoral immunity and cellular immunity could be induced by xenogeneic melanocytes vaccination. This immune response is mainly mediated by CD4+ T lymphocytes.

  14. Mechanical disruption of tumors by iron particles and magnetic field application results in increased anti-tumor immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam N Bouchlaka

    Full Text Available The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer.

  15. Differential response of idiopathic sporadic tumoral calcinosis to bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Balachandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tumoral calcinosis is a disorder of phosphate metabolism characterized by ectopic calcification around major joints. Surgery is the current treatment of choice, but a suboptimal choice in recurrent and multicentric lesions. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of bisphosphonates for the management of tumoral calcinosis on optimized medical treatment. Settings and Design: The study was done in the endocrine department of a tertiary care hospital in South India. We prospectively studied two patients with recurrent tumoral calcinosis who had failed therapy with phosphate lowering measures. Materials and Methods: After informed consent, we treated both patients with standard age adjusted doses of bisphosphonates for 18 months. The response was assessed by X ray and whole body 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan at the beginning of therapy and at the end of 1 year. We also estimated serum phosphate levels and urinary phosphate to document serial changes. Results: Two patients (aged 19 and 5 years with recurrent idiopathic hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis, following surgery were studied. Both patients had failed therapy with conventional medical management − low phosphate diet and phosphate binders. They had restriction of joint mobility. Both were given standard doses of oral alendronate and parenteral pamidronate respectively for more than a year, along with phosphate lowering measures. At the end of 1 year, one of the patients had more than 95% and 90% reduction in the size of the lesions in right and left shoulder joints respectively with total improvement in range of motion. In contrast, the other patient (5-year-old had shown no improvement, despite continuing to maintain normophosphatemia following treatment. Conclusions: Bisphosphonate therapy in tumoral calcinosis is associated with lesion resolution and may be used as a viable alternative to surgery, especially in cases with multicentric recurrence or treatment failure to other

  16. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  17. Characterization of the inflammatory response during Ehrlich ascitic tumor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Patrícia Dias; Guerra, Fabiana S; Sales, Natália M; Sardella, Thais B; Jancar, Sonia; Neves, Josiane S

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlich tumor is a mammary adenocarcinoma with aggressive behavior. Inoculated in mice peritoneal cavity, the Ehrlich tumor grows in ascitic form (EAT). Since inflammation modulates tumor progression we further investigated the inflammatory response during EAT growth. Balb/C mice were intraperitoneal inoculated with 5×10(5) Ehrlich cells and after every 2days, blood samples were collected for hemoglobin, hematocrit, platelets and leukocytes counts. The ascitic fluid was collected for protein concentration and cell count. Phenotype analysis of the peritoneal cells was made by FACS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and cytokines by ELISA, nitric oxide (NO) by nitrate conversion protocol, and cyclooxygenase-1 (COX1), COX2 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by immunoblotting. Following EAT inoculation into the peritoneal cavity there was a rapid increase in ascitis volume and protein concentration. The cell number in ascitis remained stable until day 8 (lag phase) followed by a sharp increase. As tumor progressed, blood leukocytes increased and erythrocyte decreased. Phenotypic analysis showed that during the lag phase the percentage of F4/80(+) cells remained similar to control levels and around 7% of this population was also positive for the GR1 marker. These double-positive cells (probably inflammatory monocytes) markedly increased at day 6. The percentage of F4/80-GR1(+)cells (probably neutrophils) was low and did not significantly vary during tumor progression. CD4(+) and CD8(+) cells were not detected in the time points analyzed. iNOS and COX1 expression increased after day 2 reaching peak levels on day 10. COX2 enzyme expression did not change significantly over time. Sustained increase in PGE2 and NO levels was observed. IL-10 and MCP-1 peaked at day 14 and IL-1β increased progressively till day 10. IFN-γ levels were low till day 10, increasing progressively after that. These data extended the characterization of the inflammatory response during Ehrlich

  18. Gaussia Luciferase for Bioluminescence Tumor Monitoring in Comparison with Firefly Luciferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Inoue

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Gaussia luciferase (Gluc is a secreted reporter, and its expression in living animals can be assessed by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI or blood assays. We characterized Gluc as an in vivo reporter in comparison with firefly luciferase (Fluc. Mice were inoculated subcutaneously with tumor cells expressing both Fluc and Gluc and underwent Flue BLI, Gluc BLI, blood assays of Glue activity, and caliper measurement. In Gluc BLI, the signal from the tumor peaked immediately and then decreased rapidly. In the longitudinal monitoring, all measures indicated an increase in tumor burden early after cell inoculation. However, the increase reached plateaus in Gluc BLI and Fluc BLI despite a continuous increase in the caliper measurement and Gluc blood assay. Significant correlations were found between the measures, and the correlation between the blood signal and caliper volume was especially high. Gluc allows tumor monitoring in mice and should be applicable to dual-reporter assessment in combination with Fluc. The Gluc blood assay appears to provide a reliable indicator of viable tumor burden, and the combination of a blood assay and in vivo BLI using Glue should be promising for quantifying and localizing the tumors.

  19. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  20. The tumor suppressor ARF regulates innate immune responses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Través, Paqui G; López-Fontal, Raquel; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2011-12-15

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading organisms, and TLRs are the main sensors of microbial components, initiating signaling pathways that induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines and type I IFNs. An antiviral action for the tumor suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) has been reported; however, the precise role of ARF in innate immunity is unknown. In this study, we show that ARF plays an important role in regulation of inflammatory responses. In peritoneal macrophages and bone marrow-derived macrophages from ARF-deficient animals, the induction of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines by TLR ligands was severely impaired. The altered responses of ARF(-/-) cells to TLR ligands result from aberrant activation of intracellular signaling molecules including MAPKs, IκBα degradation, and NF-κB activation. Additionally, animals lacking ARF were resistant to LPS-induced endotoxic shock. This impaired activation of inflammation in ARF(-/-) mice was not restricted to TLRs, as it was also shown in response to non-TLR signaling pathways. Thus, ARF(-/-) mice were also unable to trigger a proper inflammatory response in experimental peritonitis or in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced edema. Overexpression of ARF, but not its downstream target p53, rescued the ARF-deficient phenotype, increasing TLR4 levels and restoring inflammatory reaction. An increase in the E2F1 protein levels observed in ARF(-/-) macrophages at basal condition and after LPS stimulation may be involved in the impaired response in this system, as E2F1 has been described as an inflammatory suppressor. These results indicate that tumor suppressor ARF is a new regulator of inflammatory cell signaling.

  1. Photoacoustic monitoring of clot formation during surgery and tumor surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    When a blood vessel is injured, the normal physiological response of the body is to form a clot (thrombus) to prevent blood loss. Alternatively, even without injury to the blood vessel, the pathological condition called thromboembolism may lead to the formation of circulating blood clots (CBCs), also called emboli, which can clog blood vessels throughout the body. Veins of the extremities (venous thromboembolism), lungs (pulmonary embolism ), brain (embolic stroke), heart (myocardial infarction), kidneys, and gastrointestinal tract are often affected. Emboli are also common complications of infection, inflammation, cancer, surgery, radiation and coronary artery bypass grafts. Despite the clear medical significance of CBCs, however, little progress has been made in the development of methods for real-time detection and identification of CBCs. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new modification of in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) for real-time detection of white, red, and mixed clots through a transient decrease, increase or fluctuation of PA signal amplitude, respectively. In this work, using PAFC and mouse models, we present for the first time direct evidence that some medical procedures, such as conventional or cancer surgery may initiate the formation of CBCs. In conclusion, the PA diagnostic platform can be used in real-time to define risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, assist in the prognosis and potential prevention of stroke by using a well-timed therapy or as a clot count as a marker of therapy efficacy.

  2. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Breast Tumor Oxygenation: A Key to Tumor Therapy Planning and Tumor Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    of the (1986). newborn infants as a function of inter optode spacing," Adv. Exp. 24. H. Liu, A. H. Hielscher , F. K. Tittel, S. L. Jacques, and B...infrared monitoring of human skeletal muscle oxygenation during forearm ischemia", J. Appl. Physiol, 64, 2449-2457 (1988). 23 Liu, H., Hielscher , A. H...modification and role in hyperthermia", IEEE Trans. Sonics Ultrasonics , SU-31, 504-526 (1984). 25. Song, C. W., "Effect of local hyperthermia on blood flow and

  3. Effective monitoring of agriculture: a response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sachs, J.; Remans, R.; Smukler, S.M.; Winowiecki, L.; Andelman, S.J.; Cassman, K.G.; Castle, D.; DeFries, R.; Denning, G.; Fanzo, J.; Jackson, L.E.; Leemans, R.; Lehmann, J.; Milder, J.C.; Naeem, S.; Nziguheba, G.; Palm, C.A.; Pingali, P.L.; Reganold, J.P.; Richter, D.D.; Scherr, S.J.; Sircely, J.; Sullivan, C.; Tomich, T.P.; Sanchez, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of effective agricultural monitoring networks is essential to track, anticipate and manage changes in the social, economic and environmental aspects of agriculture. We welcome the perspective of Lindenmayer and Likens (J. Environ. Monit., 2011, 13, 1559) as published in the Journal

  4. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides for Pan Anti-Tumor Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKieber-Emmons

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology which transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience in bringing a tumor-associated carbohydrate mimetic peptide to the clinic. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor associated carbohydrate antigens and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to pan-glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells.

  5. Characterizing tumor response to chemotherapy at various length scales using temporal diffusion spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junzhong Xu

    Full Text Available Measurements of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI have been suggested as potential imaging biomarkers for monitoring tumor response to treatment. However, conventional pulsed-gradient spin echo (PGSE methods incorporate relatively long diffusion times, and are usually sensitive to changes in cell density and necrosis. Diffusion temporal spectroscopy using the oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE sequence is capable of probing short length scales, and may detect significant intracellular microstructural changes independent of gross cell density changes following anti-cancer treatment. To test this hypothesis, SW620 xenografts were treated by barasertib (AZD1152, a selective inhibitor of Aurora B kinase which causes SW620 cancer cells to develop polyploidy and increase in size following treatment, ultimately leading to cell death through apoptosis. Following treatment, the ADC values obtained by both the PGSE and low frequency OGSE methods increased. However, the ADC values at high gradient frequency (i.e. short diffusion times were significantly lower in treated tumors, consistent with increased intracellular restrictions/hindrances. This suggests that ADC values at long diffusion times are dominated by tumor microstructure at long length scales, and may not convey unambiguous information of subcellular space. While the diffusion temporal spectroscopy provides more comprehensive means to probe tumor microstructure at various length scales. This work is the first study to probe intracellular microstructural variations due to polyploidy following treatment using diffusion MRI in vivo. It is also the first observation of post-treatment ADC changes occurring in opposite directions at short and long diffusion times. The current study suggests that temporal diffusion spectroscopy potentially provides pharmacodynamic biomarkers of tumor early response which distinguish microstructural variations following

  6. Digital holographic microscopy for imaging growth and treatment response in 3D tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-03-01

    While three-dimensional tumor models have emerged as valuable tools in cancer research, the ability to longitudinally visualize the 3D tumor architecture restored by these systems is limited with microscopy techniques that provide only qualitative insight into sample depth, or which require terminal fixation for depth-resolved 3D imaging. Here we report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, non-destructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro 3D tumor models. Following established methods we prepared 3D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple timepoints throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify nodule thickness over time under normal growth, and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  7. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  8. Hypoxic Tumor Can be More Responsive to Fractionated Irradiation Combined with SR 4233 (Tirapazamine)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il Han [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Brown, J. Martin [Stanford Univ., Stanford (United States)

    1994-02-15

    Hypothesis that hypoxic tumors should be more responsive to the addition of preferential hypoxic cell cytotoxin SR 4233 (tirapazamine) to fractionated irradiation was tested in the mouse SCCVII carcinoma and RIF-1 sarcoma, Model of hypoxic tumor was established using the tumor bed effect; tumors growing in the preirradiated tissue (preirradiated tumors) were more hypoxic than tumors growing in the unirradiated tissue (unirradiated tumors). When the tumors reached a mean volume of 100 mm{sup 3}, both unirradiated and preirradiated tumors were treated with a fractionated course of 6 x 2 Gy in 3 days or 8 x2.5 Gy in 4 days with SR 4233 (0.08m mol/kg/injection) given 30 minutes before each irradiation or without SR 4233. Compared to the unirradiated tumors, hypoxic preirradiated tumors were approximately 5 times more resistant to fractionated irradiation alone but were approximately 5 times more responsive to SR 4233. Addition of SR 4233 potentiated the effect of fractionated irradiation in both unirradiated and preirradiated tumors. Potentiation in the preirradiated tumors was morequal to or greater than that in the unirradiated tumors and seemed to be higher for more fractionated treatment. We confirm the hypothesis in a transplantable mouse tumor. Present results suggest that radioresistance of some hypoxic tumors can be overcome with hypoxic cytotoxin.

  9. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  10. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal {sup 1}H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P [MRI Unit, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S [CERVOxy Group, CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen, Normandy (France); Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C [Paris-Sud 11 University-CNRS, Orsay (France); Gauduel, Y A [LOA, Ecole Polytechnique - ENSTA ParisTech, Palaiseau (France); Dou, W [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ruan, S [CReSTIC EA 3804, IUT Troyes, Troyes (France); Barre, L [GDMTEP, Group CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen (France); Rioult, F [CNRS UMR 6072, GREYC, Caen, Normandy (France); Derlon, J M [Neurosurgery and Neurology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Chapon, F [Pathology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Fong, V [Caen University (France); Kauffmann, F, E-mail: constans-jm@chu-caen.fr [Mathematics LMNO CNRS UMR 6139, Caen University, Caen, Normandy (France)

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  12. 24 CFR 108.20 - Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports. 108.20 Section 108.20 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY,...

  13. Tumor characterization and treatment monitoring of postsurgical human breast specimens using harmonic motion imaging (HMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yang; Wang, Shutao; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Taback, Bret; Konofagou, Elisa

    2016-05-09

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is a noninvasive technique used in the treatment of early-stage breast cancer and benign tumors. To facilitate its translation to the clinic, there is a need for a simple, cost-effective device that can reliably monitor HIFU treatment. We have developed harmonic motion imaging (HMI), which can be used seamlessly in conjunction with HIFU for tumor ablation monitoring, namely harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU). The overall objective of this study was to develop an all ultrasound-based system for real-time imaging and ablation monitoring in the human breast in vivo. HMI was performed in 36 specimens (19 normal, 15 invasive ductal carcinomas, and 2 fibroadenomas) immediately after surgical removal. The specimens were securely embedded in a tissue-mimicking agar gel matrix and submerged in degassed phosphate-buffered saline to mimic in vivo environment. The HMI setup consisted of a HIFU transducer confocally aligned with an imaging transducer to induce an oscillatory radiation force and estimate the resulting displacement. 3D HMI displacement maps were reconstructed to represent the relative tissue stiffness in 3D. The average peak-to-peak displacement was found to be significantly different (p = 0.003) between normal breast tissue and invasive ductal carcinoma. There were also significant differences before and after HMIFU ablation in both the normal (53.84 % decrease) and invasive ductal carcinoma (44.69 % decrease) specimens. HMI can be used to map and differentiate relative stiffness in postsurgical normal and pathological breast tissues. HMIFU can also successfully monitor thermal ablations in normal and pathological human breast specimens. This HMI technique may lead to a new clinical tool for breast tumor imaging and HIFU treatment monitoring.

  14. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Leten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683 in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1 outliers can be detected earlier, (2 GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3 a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents.

  15. Tumor response to radiotherapy is dependent on genotype-associated mechanisms in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Jerry R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously shown that in vitro radiosensitivity of human tumor cells segregate non-randomly into a limited number of groups. Each group associates with a specific genotype. However we have also shown that abrogation of a single gene (p21 in a human tumor cell unexpectedly sensitized xenograft tumors comprised of these cells to radiotherapy while not affecting in vitro cellular radiosensitivity. Therefore in vitro assays alone cannot predict tumor response to radiotherapy. In the current work, we measure in vitro radiosensitivity and in vivo response of their xenograft tumors in a series of human tumor lines that represent the range of radiosensitivity observed in human tumor cells. We also measure response of their xenograft tumors to different radiotherapy protocols. We reduce these data into a simple analytical structure that defines the relationship between tumor response and total dose based on two coefficients that are specific to tumor cell genotype, fraction size and total dose. Methods We assayed in vitro survival patterns in eight tumor cell lines that vary in cellular radiosensitivity and genotype. We also measured response of their xenograft tumors to four radiotherapy protocols: 8 × 2 Gy; 2 × 5Gy, 1 × 7.5 Gy and 1 × 15 Gy. We analyze these data to derive coefficients that describe both in vitro and in vivo responses. Results Response of xenografts comprised of human tumor cells to different radiotherapy protocols can be reduced to only two coefficients that represent 1 total cells killed as measured in vitro 2 additional response in vivo not predicted by cell killing. These coefficients segregate with specific genotypes including those most frequently observed in human tumors in the clinic. Coefficients that describe in vitro and in vivo mechanisms can predict tumor response to any radiation protocol based on tumor cell genotype, fraction-size and total dose. Conclusions We establish an analytical

  16. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  17. Assessment and Monitoring Tumor Vascularity With Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Maximum Intensity Persistence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pysz, Marybeth A.; Foygel, Kira; Panje, Cedric M.; Needles, Andrew; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging is increasingly being used in the clinic for assessment of tissue vascularity. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the effect of different contrast administration parameters on the in vivo ultrasound imaging signal in tumor-bearing mice using a maximum intensity persistence (MIP) algorithm and to evaluate the reliability of in vivo MIP imaging in assessing tumor vascularity. The potential of in vivo MIP imaging for monitoring tumor vascularity during antiangiogenic cancer treatment was further evaluated. Materials and Methods In intraindividual experiments, varying contrast microbubble concentrations (5 × 105, 5 × 106, 5 × 107, 5 × 108 microbubbles in 100 µL saline) and contrast injection rates (0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min) in subcutaneous tumor-bearing mice were applied and their effects on in vivo contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values were obtained using a dedicated small animal ultrasound imaging system (40 MHz). Reliability of MIP ultrasound imaging was tested following 2 injections of the same micro-bubble concentration (5 × 107 microbubbles at 1.2 mL/min) in the same tumors. In mice with subcutaneous human colon cancer xenografts, longitudinal contrast-enhanced ultrasound MIP imaging plateau values (baseline and at 48 hours) were compared between mice with and without antiangiogenic treatment (anti-vascular endothelial growth factor antibody). Ex vivo CD31 immunostaining of tumor tissue was used to correlate in vivo MIP imaging plateau values with microvessel density analysis. Results In vivo MIP imaging plateau values correlated significantly (P = 0.001) with contrast microbubble doses. At 3 different injection rates of 0.6, 1.2, and 2.4 mL/min, MIP imaging plateau values did not change significantly (P = 0.61). Following 2 injections with the same microbubble dose and injection rate, MIP imaging plateau values were obtained with high reliability with an intraclass correlation

  18. Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Hegde, Samarth; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-associated fibrosis is characterized by unchecked pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory signaling. The components of fibrosis including significant numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, dense collagen deposition, and extracellular matrix stiffness, are well appreciated regulators of tumor progression but may also be critical regulators of immune surveillance. While this suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy may be limited in highly fibrotic cancers like pancreas, it also suggests a therapeutic opportunity to target fibrosis in these tumor types to reawaken anti-tumor immunity. This review discusses the mechanisms by which fibrosis might subvert tumor immunity and how to overcome these mechanisms.

  19. Study on Clinical Application of Nerve Monitor in Parotid Tumor Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Liang-peng; JIA Bao-jun; AO Jian-hua; QU Dan-yang; SHENG Yan-jiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of the study is to explore the application value of the nerve monitor adopted to pinpoint facial nerves before anatomization during a parotid tumor surgery. Methods Facial nerves of 36 patients were pinpointed by N800 nerve monitor produced by Shandong Weigao Group Medical Polymer Co. Ltd before being anatomized and exposed in parotid surgeries in order to protect the corresponding facial nerve branch and complete the related surgery. Results All the facial nerves of the 36 patients were located precisely and 108 related facial nerves were suc-cessfully anatomized and protected without any damage. Conclusion Pinpointing the facial nerve branch with a nerve monitor before anatomization pro-motes not only the efficiency of the surgery but also the safety of it and is proved to be more significant in a secondary surgery.

  20. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2{+-}0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5{+-}0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0{+-}0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5{+-}0.6 vs. 2.0{+-}0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7{+-}0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  1. Carbohydrate-Mimetic Peptides for Pan Anti-Tumor Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Saha, Somdutta; Pashov, Anastas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Murali, Ramachandran

    2014-01-01

    Molecular mimicry is fundamental to biology and transcends to many disciplines ranging from immune pathology to drug design. Structural characterization of molecular partners has provided insight into the origins and relative importance of complementarity in mimicry. Chemical complementarity is easy to understand; amino acid sequence similarity between peptides, for example, can lead to cross-reactivity triggering similar reactivity from their cognate receptors. However, conformational complementarity is difficult to decipher. Molecular mimicry of carbohydrates by peptides is often considered one of those. Extensive studies of innate and adaptive immune responses suggests the existence of carbohydrate mimicry, but the structural basis for this mimicry yields confounding details; peptides mimicking carbohydrates in some cases fail to exhibit both chemical and conformational mimicry. Deconvolution of these two types of complementarity in mimicry and its relationship to biological function can nevertheless lead to new therapeutics. Here, we discuss our experience examining the immunological aspects and implications of carbohydrate–peptide mimicry. Emphasis is placed on the rationale, the lessons learned from the methodologies to identify mimics, a perspective on the limitations of structural analysis, the biological consequences of mimicking tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens, and the notion of reverse engineering to develop carbohydrate-mimetic peptides in vaccine design strategies to induce responses to glycan antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:25071769

  2. Significance of serum tumor markers monitoring in carcinomas of unknown primary site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejčić Ivica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Unknown primary tumors represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies that are indicative of ominous prognosis. Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is defined as the lack of any detectable primary site after full evaluation, and accounts for approximately 3-5% of all newly diagnosed patients with malignancies. The aim of this report was to present the prognostic and predictive value of 8 serum tumor markers in this group of patients. Methods. The study involved 63 patients. On histological examination, all the patients were presented with metastatic tumors whose primary site (origin could not be detected with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. Following the routine light microscopy, all histological findings were classified into one of the following three groups: plano-cellular carcinoma - 8 patients; adenocarcinoma - 33 patients; unclassifiable (undifferentiated carcinoma - 22 patients. In all the cases we evaluated 8 serum tumor markers: alpha-fetoproteins (AFP, chronic gonadotrophin beta submit, human (beta-HCG, neuron specific enolase (NSE, marker of malignant ovarian tumors (CA 125, prostate-specific antigene (PSA, marker of malignant brest tumor (CA 15-3, marker of malignant pancreas tumor and gastrointestinal tumor (Ca 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA at the time of diagnosis. The patients on chemotherapy had the markers determined after the third and sixth chemocycle, i.e. at the time of illness progression observation, if present. The patients responding to chemotherapy with complete response (CR, partial response (PR or stable disease (SD had the markers determined after three-month periods until the time of relapse or progression. Chemotherapy was applied in 32 patients (20 females and 12 males, aged 29-70 years, who met the inclusion criteria. The following chemotherapy regimen was used: doxorubicin 50mg/m2 (day 1, cisplatin 60mg/m2 (day 1, and etoposide 120 mg/m2 (days 1-3. The period between two chemotherapy

  3. The Necrosis-Avid Small Molecule HQ4-DTPA as a Multimodal Imaging Agent for Monitoring Radiation Therapy-Induced Tumor Cell Death

    OpenAIRE

    Marieke A. Stammes; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; Scollard, Deborah A.; Kulbatski, Iris; Medeiros, Philip J; Sinisi, Riccardo; Dubikovskaya, Elena A.; Thomas J A Snoeks; van Beek, Ermond R.; Chan, Alan B.; Löwik, Clemens W. G. M.; DaCosta, Ralph S.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Most effective antitumor therapies induce tumor cell death. Non-invasive, rapid and accurate quantitative imaging of cell death is essential for monitoring early response to antitumor therapies. To facilitate this, we previously developed a biocompatible necrosis-avid near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging probe, HQ4, which was radiolabeled with 111Indium-chloride (111In-Cl3) via the chelate diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA), to enable clinical translation. T...

  4. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  5. Vascular Profile Characterization of Liver Tumors by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Using Hemodynamic Response Imaging in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifat Edrei

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, we have demonstrated the feasibility of using hemodynamic response imaging (HRI, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI method combined with hypercapnia and hyperoxia, for monitoring vascular changes during liver pathologies without the need of contrast material. In this study, we evaluated HRI ability to assess changes in liver tumor vasculature during tumor establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic therapy. Colorectal adenocarcinoma cells were injected intrasplenically to model colorectal liver metastasis (CRLM and the Mdr2 knockout mice were used to model primary hepatic tumors. Hepatic perfusion parameters were evaluated using the HRI protocol and were compared with contrast-enhanced (CE MRI. The hypovascularity and the increased arterial blood supply in well-defined CRLM were demonstrated by HRI. In CRLM-bearing mice, the entire liver perfusion was attenuated as the HRI maps were significantly reduced by 35%. This study demonstrates that the HRI method showed enhanced sensitivity for small CRLM (1–2 mm detection compared with CE-MRI (82% versus 38%, respectively. In addition, HRI could demonstrate the vasculature alteration during CRLM progression (arborized vessels, which was further confirmed by histology. Moreover, HRI revealed the vascular changes induced by rapamycin treatment. Finally, HRI facilitates primary hepatic tumor characterization with good correlation to the pathologic differentiation. The HRI method is highly sensitive to subtle hemodynamic changes induced by CRLM and, hence, can function as an imaging tool for understanding the hemodynamic changes occurring during CRLM establishment, progression, and antiangiogenic treatment. In addition, this method facilitated the differentiation between different types of hepatic lesions based on their vascular profile noninvasively.

  6. Integrin-mediated active tumor targeting and tumor microenvironment response dendrimer-gelatin nanoparticles for drug delivery and tumor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guanlian; Zhang, Huiqing; Zhang, Li; Ruan, Shaobo; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2015-12-30

    Due to the high morbidity and mortality of cancer, it has become an urgent matter to develop an effective and a safe treatment strategy. Nanoparticles (NP) based drug delivery systems have gained much attention nowadays but they faced a paradoxical issue in delivering drugs into tumors: NP with large size were characterized with weak tumor penetration, meanwhile NP with small size resulted in poor tumor retention. To solve this problem, we proposed a multistage drug delivery system which could intelligently shrink its size from large size to small size in the presence of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) which were highly expressed in tumor tissues, therefore the multistage system could benefit from its large size for better retention effect in tumor and then shrunk to small size to contribute to better penetration efficiency. The multistage drug delivery system, RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP, was constructed by 155.4nm gelatin NP core (the substrate of MMP-2) and surface decorated with doxorubicin (DOX) and RGD peptide conjugated dendritic poly-l-lysine (DGL, 34.3nm in diameter). In vitro, the size of multistage NP could effectively shrink in the presence of MMP-2. Thus, the RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP could penetrate deep into tumor spheroids. In vivo, this multistage drug delivery system showed higher tumor retention and deeper penetration than both DOX-DGL and DOX-GNP. Consequently, RGD-DOX-DGL-GNP successfully combined the advantages of dendrimers and GNP in vivo, resulting in an outstanding anti-tumor effect. In conclusion, the multistage drug delivery system could intelligently shrink from large size to small size in the tumor microenvironment and displayed better retention and penetration efficiency, making it an impressing system for cancer treatment.

  7. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  8. Is human hepatocellular carcinoma a hormone-responsive tumor?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Massimo Di Maio; Bruno Daniele; Sandra Pignata; Ciro Gallo; Ermelinda De Maio; Alessandro Morabito; Maria Carmela Piccirillo; Francesco Perrone

    2008-01-01

    Before the positive results recently obtained with multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib, there was no standard systemic treatment for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sex hormones receptors are expressed in a significant proportion of HCC samples. Following preclinical and epidemiological studies supporting a relationship between sex hormones and HCC tumorigenesis, several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) tested the efficacy of the anti-estrogen tamoxifen as systemic treatment. Largest among these trials showed no survival advantage from the administration of tamoxifen, and the recent Cochrane systematic review produced a completely negative result. This questions the relevance of estrogen receptor-mediated pathways in HCC. However, a possible explanation for these disappointing results is the lack of proper patients selection according to sex hormones receptors expression, but unfortunately the interaction between this expression and efficacy of tamoxifen has not been studied adequately. It has been also proposed that negative results might be explained if tamoxifen acts in HCC via an estrogen receptor-independent pathway, that requires higher doses than those usually administered, but an Asian RCT conducted to assess dose-response effect was completely negative. Interesting, preliminaryresults have been obtained when hormonal treatment (tamoxifen or megestrol) has been selected according to the presence of wild-type or variant estrogen receptors respectively, but no large RCTs are available to support this strategy. Negative results have been obtained also with anti-androgen therapy. In conclusion, there is no robust evidence to consider HCC a hormone-responsive tumor. Hormonal treatments should not be part of the current management of HCC.

  9. Portal vein thrombosis and arterioportal shunts: Effects on tumor response after chemoembolization of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas J Vogl; Nour-Eldin Nour-Eldin; Sally Emad-Eldin; Nagy NN Naguib; Joerg Trojan; Hans Ackermann; Omar Abdelaziz

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of portal vein thrombosis and arterioportal shunts on local tumor response in advanced cases of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma treated by transarterial chemoembolization. METHODS: A retrospective study included 39 patients (mean age: 66.4 years, range: 45-79 years, SD: 7) with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who were treated with repetitive transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in the period between March 2006 and October 2009. The effect of portal vein thrombosis (PVT) (in 19 out of 39 patients), the presence of arterioportal shunt (APS) (in 7 out of 39), the underlying liver pathology, Child-Pugh score, initial tumor volume, number of tumors and tumor margin definition on imaging were correlated with the local tumor response after TACE. The initial and end therapy local tumor responses were evaluated according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) and magnetic resonance imaging volumetric measurements. RESULTS: The treatment protocols were well tolerated by all patients with no major complications. Local tumor response for all patients according to RECIST criteria were partial response in one patient (2.6%), stable disease in 34 patients (87.1%), and progressive disease in 4 patients (10.2%). The MR volumetric measurements showed that the PVT, APS, underlying liver pathology and tumor margin definition were statistically significant prognostic factors for the local tumor response (P = 0.018, P = 0.008, P = 0.034 and P = 0.001, respectively). The overall 6-, 12- and 18-mo survival rates from the initial TACE were 79.5%, 37.5% and 21%, respectively. CONCLUSION: TACE may be exploited safely for palliative tumor control in patients with advanced unresectable HCC; however, tumor response is significantly affected by the presence or absence of PVT and APS.

  10. Video methods for evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafide, Christopher P; Zander, Miriam; Graham, Christian Sarkis; Weirich Paine, Christine M; Rock, Whitney; Rich, Andrew; Roberts, Kathryn E; Fortino, Margaret; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Lin, Richard; Keren, Ron

    2014-01-01

    False physiologic monitor alarms are extremely common in the hospital environment. High false alarm rates have the potential to lead to alarm fatigue, leading nurses to delay their responses to alarms, ignore alarms, or disable them entirely. Recent evidence from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and The Joint Commission has demonstrated a link between alarm fatigue and patient deaths. Yet, very little scientific effort has focused on the rigorous quantitative measurement of alarms and responses in the hospital setting. We developed a system using multiple temporarily mounted, minimally obtrusive video cameras in hospitalized patients' rooms to characterize physiologic monitor alarms and nurse responses as a proxy for alarm fatigue. This allowed us to efficiently categorize each alarm's cause, technical validity, actionable characteristics, and determine the nurse's response time. We describe and illustrate the methods we used to acquire the video, synchronize and process the video, manage the large digital files, integrate the video with data from the physiologic monitor alarm network, archive the video to secure servers, and perform expert review and annotation using alarm "bookmarks." We discuss the technical and logistical challenges we encountered, including the root causes of hardware failures as well as issues with consent, confidentiality, protection of the video from litigation, and Hawthorne-like effects. The description of this video method may be useful to multidisciplinary teams interested in evaluating physiologic monitor alarms and alarm responses to better characterize alarm fatigue and other patient safety issues in clinical settings.

  11. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  12. The combined status of ATM and p53 link tumor development with therapeutic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hai; Reinhardt, H Christian; Bartkova, Jirina;

    2009-01-01

    commonly used by tumors to bypass early neoplastic checkpoints ultimately determine chemotherapeutic response and generate tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited with targeted therapies. Specifically, evaluation of the combined status of ATM and p53, two commonly mutated tumor suppressor...... genes, can help to predict the clinical response to genotoxic chemotherapies. We show that in p53-deficient settings, suppression of ATM dramatically sensitizes tumors to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, whereas, conversely, in the presence of functional p53, suppression of ATM or its downstream target Chk2......While the contribution of specific tumor suppressor networks to cancer development has been the subject of considerable recent study, it remains unclear how alterations in these networks are integrated to influence the response of tumors to anti-cancer treatments. Here, we show that mechanisms...

  13. Sequential monitoring of response-adaptive randomized clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hongjian; 10.1214/10-AOS796

    2010-01-01

    Clinical trials are complex and usually involve multiple objectives such as controlling type I error rate, increasing power to detect treatment difference, assigning more patients to better treatment, and more. In literature, both response-adaptive randomization (RAR) procedures (by changing randomization procedure sequentially) and sequential monitoring (by changing analysis procedure sequentially) have been proposed to achieve these objectives to some degree. In this paper, we propose to sequentially monitor response-adaptive randomized clinical trial and study it's properties. We prove that the sequential test statistics of the new procedure converge to a Brownian motion in distribution. Further, we show that the sequential test statistics asymptotically satisfy the canonical joint distribution defined in Jennison and Turnbull (\\citeyearJT00). Therefore, type I error and other objectives can be achieved theoretically by selecting appropriate boundaries. These results open a door to sequentially monitor res...

  14. Complete clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in a 54-year-old male with Askin tumor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, J

    2012-02-01

    Askin tumor is a tumor of the thoracopulmonary region that most commonly affects children and adolescents. These rare tumors are a form of primitive neuroectodermal tumor and typically carry a poor prognosis. Treatment is multimodal and consists of a combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, radical resection, and adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy or all of the above. Surgery is advocated in most cases. We report a case of Askin tumor in a 54-year-old male who showed rapid and complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This allowed potentially radical surgery to be avoided. At one-year follow-up he remains disease-free.

  15. Biosensors and nanobiosensors for therapeutic drug and response monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeating, Kristy S; Aubé, Alexandra; Masson, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-21

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is required for pharmaceutical drugs with dosage limitations or toxicity issues where patients undergoing treatment with these drugs require frequent monitoring. This allows for the concentration of such pharmaceutical drugs in a patient's biofluid to be closely monitored in order to assess the pharmacokinetics, which could result in an adjustment of dosage or in medical intervention if the situation becomes urgent. Biosensors are a class of analytical techniques competent in the rapid quantification of therapeutic drugs and recent developments in instrumental platforms and in sensing schemes, as well as the emergence of nanobiosensors, have greatly contributed to the principal examples of these sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring. Based on initial success stories, it is clear that (nano)biosensors could pave the way for therapeutic drug monitoring of many commonly administered drugs and for new drugs that will be introduced to the market allowing for safe and optimal dosing across a wide range of pharmaceuticals. In this review, we report on the recent developments in biosensing and nanobiosensing techniques and, focussing mainly on anti-cancer agents and antibiotics, we discuss the different classes of molecules upon which therapeutic drug monitoring has already been successfully applied. The potential contributions of (nano)biosensors are also reviewed for the emerging areas of therapeutic response monitoring, where markers are monitored to ensure compliance of a patient to a treatment and in the area of cellular response to therapeutic drugs in order to identify cytotoxic effects of drugs on cells or to identify patients responding to a drug.

  16. Monitoring the complexity of ventricular response in atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Käsmacher

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation does not present a uniform extent of variability of the ventricular response exemplifying periodicities and more complex fluctuations, due to varying number and shape of atrial wavelets and aberrant conduction in the AV-junction. It was sought to categorise different degrees of complexity introducing an uncomplicated monitoring method for that objective.

  17. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC. The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3 following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  18. The potential of tumor-derived exosomes for noninvasive cancer monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) are emerging as a new type of cancer biomarker. TEX are membrane-bound, virus-size vesicles of endocytic origin present in all body fluids of cancer patients. Based on the expanding albeit incomplete knowledge of their biogenesis, secretion by tumor cells and cancer cell-specific molecular and genetic contents, TEX are viewed as promising, clinically-relevant surrogates of cancer progression and response to therapy. Preliminary proteomic, genetic and functional profiling of tumor cell-derived or cancer plasma-derived exosomes confirms their unique characteristics. Alterations in protein or nucleic acid profiles of exosomes in plasma of cancer patients responding to therapies appear to correlate with clinical endpoints. However, methods for TEX isolation and separation from the bulk of human plasma-derived exosomes are not yet established and their role as biomarkers remains to be confirmed. Further development and validation of TEX as noninvasive, liquid equivalents of tumor biopsies are necessary to move this effort forward.

  19. Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008479 Preliminary study of MR elastography in brain tumors. XU Lei(徐磊), et al.Neurosci Imaging Center, Beijing Tiantan Hosp, Capital Med Univ, Beijing 100050.Chin J Radiol 2008;42(6):605-608. Objective To investigate the potential values of magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) for evaluating the brain tumor consistency in vivo. Methods Fourteen patients with known solid brain tumor (5 male, 9 female; age range: 16-63 years)

  20. Anti-tumor response induced by immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and laser irradiation using rat mammary tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Hasanjee, Aamr M.; Bahavar, Cody F.; Zhou, Fefian; Liu, Hong; Howard, Eric W.; Bullen, Liz C.; Silvy, Ricardo P.; Chen, Wei R.

    2015-03-01

    Laser immunotherapy (LIT) is being developed as a treatment modality for metastatic cancer which can destroy primary tumors and induce effective systemic anti-tumor responses by using a targeted treatment approach in conjunction with the use of a novel immunoadjuvant, glycated chitosan (GC). In this study, Non-invasive Laser Immunotherapy (NLIT) was used as the primary treatment mode. We incorporated single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into the treatment regimen to boost the tumor-killing effect of LIT. SWNTs and GC were conjugated to create a completely novel, immunologically modified carbon nanotube (SWNT-GC). To determine the efficacy of different laser irradiation durations, 5 minutes or 10 minutes, a series of experiments were performed. Rats were inoculated with DMBA-4 cancer cells, a highly aggressive metastatic cancer cell line. Half of the treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 10 minutes survived without primary or metastatic tumors. The treatment group of rats receiving laser irradiation for 5 minutes had no survivors. Thus, Laser+SWNT-GC treatment with 10 minutes of laser irradiation proved to be effective at reducing tumor size and inducing long-term anti-tumor immunity.

  1. Macrophage biology plays a central role during ionizing radiation-elicited tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuji Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for most solid tumors. The anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy consists of the direct tumor cell killing, as well as the modulation of tumor microenvironment and the activation of immune response against tumors. Radiation therapy has been shown to promote immunogenic cells death, activate dendritic cells and enhance tumor antigen presentation and anti-tumor T cell activation. Radiation therapy also programs innate immune cells such as macrophages that leads to either radiosensitization or radioresistance, according to different tumors and different radiation regimen studied. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced macrophage activation remain largely elusive. Various molecular players such as NF-κB, MAPKs, p53, reactive oxygen species, inflammasomes have been involved in these processes. The skewing to a pro-inflammatory phenotype thus results in the activation of anti-tumor immune response and enhanced radiotherapy effect. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced macrophage activation and its role in tumor response to radiation therapy is crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies to enhance radiation therapy efficacy.

  2. Invited review--neuroimaging response assessment criteria for brain tumors in veterinary patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmeisl, John H; Garcia, Paulo A; Daniel, Gregory B; Bourland, John Daniel; Debinski, Waldemar; Dervisis, Nikolaos; Klahn, Shawna

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of therapeutic response using cross-sectional imaging techniques, particularly gadolinium-enhanced MRI, is an integral part of the clinical management of brain tumors in veterinary patients. Spontaneous canine brain tumors are increasingly recognized and utilized as a translational model for the study of human brain tumors. However, no standardized neuroimaging response assessment criteria have been formulated for use in veterinary clinical trials. Previous studies have found that the pathophysiologic features inherent to brain tumors and the surrounding brain complicate the use of the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) assessment system. Objectives of this review are to describe strengths and limitations of published imaging-based brain tumor response criteria and propose a system for use in veterinary patients. The widely used human Macdonald and response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria are reviewed and described as to how they can be applied to veterinary brain tumors. Discussion points will include current challenges associated with the interpretation of brain tumor therapeutic responses such as imaging pseudophenomena and treatment-induced necrosis, and how advancements in perfusion imaging, positron emission tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy have shown promise in differentiating tumor progression from therapy-induced changes. Finally, although objective endpoints such as MR imaging and survival estimates will likely continue to comprise the foundations for outcome measures in veterinary brain tumor clinical trials, we propose that in order to provide a more relevant therapeutic response metric for veterinary patients, composite response systems should be formulated and validated that combine imaging and clinical assessment criteria.

  3. Validation of Heat Shock Protein 70 as a Tumor-Specific Biomarker for Monitoring the Outcome of Radiation Therapy in Tumor Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christine; Liebhardt, Michael E.; Schmid, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Hube, Kathrin; Specht, Hanno M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Schilling, Daniela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany); Gehrmann, Mathias; Stangl, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Siveke, Jens T. [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele, E-mail: Gabriele.multhoff@lrz.tum.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, frequently overexpress heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the cytosol, present it on their cell surface, and actively release it. Therefore, soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) was investigated as a potential tumor biomarker for monitoring the outcome of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plasma from mice bearing membrane Hsp70 (mHsp70)-positive FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and spontaneous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) was investigated. A cohort of mice with FaDu tumors (0.32 cm{sup 3}) was irradiated with 30 Gy, and plasma was collected 24 hours after irradiation, after the tumors had shrunk to 50% of their starting volume and after complete remission. sHsp70 levels in the plasma were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: sHsp70 levels were significantly higher in the blood of tumor-bearing mice than that of control animals. A correlation between increasing sHsp70 plasma levels and tumor volume in the range of 0.01 cm{sup 3} to 0.66 cm{sup 3} was observed. Radiation-induced regression of the tumors was associated with significantly decreased sHsp70 levels, which returned to the level of control animals after complete remission. Conclusion: We propose sHsp70 as an innovative biomarker for detecting tumors and for monitoring the clinical outcome of radiation therapy in cancer patients.

  4. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Miao-Fen, E-mail: miaofen@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Ching-Chuan [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Department of General Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); Chen, Wen-Cheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China); College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Lai, Chia-Hsuan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6-neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6-silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6-silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  5. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Inti; Zlobec; Francesca; Molinari; Vittoria; Martin; Luca; Mazzucchelli; Piercarlo; Saletti; Rosangela; Trezzi; Sara; De; Dosso; Tatjana; Vlajnic; Milo; Frattini; Alessandro; Lugli

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS:Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had...

  6. [Peculiarities of urinary bladder cancer tumor cells apoptosis response on neoadjuvant chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatsyna, A I; Stakhovskiĭ, É A; Sheremet, Ia A; Spivak, S I; Stakhovskiĭ, A É; Gavriliuk, O N; Vitruk, Iu V; Emets, A I; Blium, Ia B

    2011-01-01

    Induced apoptosis in urinary bladder cancer tumor cells of patients was studied using TUNEL reaction. It was shown that increase in induced apoptosis value had a definite correlation between corresponding features of tumor reaction as a response on Gemcitabine-Cisplatin neoadjuvant chemotherapy application. It was found that evaluation of induced apoptosis in urinary bladder cancer tumor cells using TUNEL method allows forecasting the effectiveness of chemotherapy on the cellular level in patients with this type of cancer.

  7. Questioning the value of {sup 99m}Tc-HYNIC-annexin V based response monitoring after docetaxel treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beekman, Chantal A.C.; Buckle, Tessa; Leeuwen, Anne C. van; Valdes Olmos, Renato A. [Division of Diagnostic Oncology, Netherland Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Division of Radiotherapy, Netherland Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rottenberg, Sven [Division of Molecular Biology, Netherland Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam (Netherlands); Leeuwen, Fijs W.B. van, E-mail: fw.v.leeuwen@nki.n [Division of Diagnostic Oncology, Netherland Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Plesmanlaan 121, 1066CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    Annexin V imaging is suggested to provide a good indication of cancer treatment efficacy. To study the accuracy of {sup 99m}Tc-AnxV imaging, we monitored chemo-sensitive and chemo-resistant tumors in a mouse breast cancer model after treatment with docetaxel. Sensitive tumors showed a slight peak in {sup 99m}Tc-AnxV uptake one day post-treatment, while uptake in resistant tumors remained constant. In contrast to immunohistochemical analysis, {sup 99m}Tc-AnxV imaging could not be used to predict tumor response, due to large variation between animals.

  8. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I., E-mail: iespinoza@fis.puc.cl [Institute of Physics, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago 7820436, Chile and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Peschke, P. [Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany); Karger, C. P. [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg 69120 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  9. Sickle erythrocytes target cytotoxics to hypoxic tumor microvessels and potentiate a tumoricidal response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Terman

    Full Text Available Resistance of hypoxic solid tumor niches to chemotherapy and radiotherapy remains a major scientific challenge that calls for conceptually new approaches. Here we exploit a hitherto unrecognized ability of sickled erythrocytes (SSRBCs but not normal RBCs (NLRBCs to selectively target hypoxic tumor vascular microenviroment and induce diffuse vaso-occlusion. Within minutes after injection SSRBCs, but not NLRBCs, home and adhere to hypoxic 4T1 tumor vasculature with hemoglobin saturation levels at or below 10% that are distributed over 70% of the tumor space. The bound SSRBCs thereupon form microaggregates that obstruct/occlude up to 88% of tumor microvessels. Importantly, SSRBCs, but not normal RBCs, combined with exogenous prooxidant zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP induce a potent tumoricidal response via a mutual potentiating mechanism. In a clonogenic tumor cell survival assay, SSRBC surrogate hemin, along with H(2O(2 and ZnPP demonstrate a similar mutual potentiation and tumoricidal effect. In contrast to existing treatments directed only to the hypoxic tumor cell, the present approach targets the hypoxic tumor vascular environment and induces injury to both tumor microvessels and tumor cells using intrinsic SSRBC-derived oxidants and locally generated ROS. Thus, the SSRBC appears to be a potent new tool for treatment of hypoxic solid tumors, which are notable for their resistance to existing cancer treatments.

  10. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-11-19

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  11. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Cui

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME. It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome.

  12. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome. PMID:27869779

  13. T-cell response to p53 tumor-associated antigen in patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueter, Marco; Gasser, Martin; Schramm, Nicolai; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Tocco, Georges; Gerstlauer, Christiane; Grimm, Martin; Nichiporuk, Ekaterina; Thalheimer, Andreas; Thiede, Arnulf; Meyer, Detlef; Benichou, Gilles; Waaga-Gasser, Ana Maria

    2006-02-01

    Despite the radical surgical resection performed in patients with colorectal carcinoma, there is a high rate of tumor recurrence. Over an observation period of 3 years, 18% of the patients in our collective suffered a tumor relapse with local or distinct metastases after initial R0-resection. Some evidence suggests that this may be due to suppression of anti-tumor responses, a phenomenon that might be attributed to regulatory T cells. The aim of our study was to investigate the tumor-specific immune response depending on the UICC stage of patients with colorectal cancer. The cellular immune responses against defined antigens that are overexpressed in most of the patients with colorectal cancer were characterized. For this purpose, the tumor suppressor gene, p53, was chosen as the tumor-associated antigen that exhibits mutations and overexpression in up to 60% of colorectal carcinoma. We observed that p53 induced both IFN-gamma and IL-10 secretion. The predominance of IL-10 production indicated that regulatory T cells directly participate in modulating the anti-tumor immune response. IL-10 levels in the blood as well as the expression of regulatory T-cell specific genes at the tumor site correlate with the UICC stage of the disease. These results may provide an explanation for the poor prognosis and increased recurrence rate in patients with advanced carcinoma.

  14. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha augmented tumor response in B16BL6 melanoma-bearing mice treated with stealth liposomal doxorubicin (Doxil) correlates with altered Doxil pharmacokinetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouckaert, P.; Takahashi, N.; Tiel, S.T.; Hostens, J.; Eggermont, A.M.M.; Seynhaeve, A.L.; Fiers, W.; Hagen, T.L.M. ten

    2004-01-01

    The application of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) for the treatment of solid tumors is limited by its severe, life-threatening, toxicity. Therefore, only low dosages of this cytokine can be applied systemically, which results in poor tumor response. It has been demonstrated previously that

  15. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  16. Molecular determinants of treatment response in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Mayer; J.A. Stoop (Hans); G.L. Scheffer (George); R. Scheper; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This feature is unexplained, as is the intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas and the resistant phenotype of a minority of refractory GCTs. Various cellular pathways ma

  17. Molecular determinants of treatment response in human germ cell tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Mayer; J.A. Stoop (Hans); G.L. Scheffer (George); R. Scheper; J.W. Oosterhuis (Wolter); L.H.J. Looijenga (Leendert); C. Bokemeyer

    2003-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This feature is unexplained, as is the intrinsic chemotherapy resistance of mature teratomas and the resistant phenotype of a minority of refractory GCTs. Various cellular pathways

  18. Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis: response to acetazolamide and postulated mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finer, Gal; Price, Heather E; Shore, Richard M; White, Kenneth E; Langman, Craig B

    2014-06-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is characterized by enhanced renal phosphate absorption, hyperphosphatemia, and tumor-like extraosseous calcifications due to inactivating mutations in FGF23 or associated proteins. Surgical excision is needed when low phosphate diet and phosphate binders are ineffective. Sporadic reports have supported acetazolamide use. We report on a 7-year-old African American boy who presented with severe HFTC requiring numerous surgical excisions. Tumors continued to appear and others reoccurred despite phosphate restriction and sevelamer carbonate. At the age of 9.5 years, acetazolamide (40 mg/kg/day) was added and resulted in mild metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 25.3 mEq/L vs. 21.4 mEq/L, P < 0.001; serum pH 7.38 vs. 7.31, P = 0.013, pre- and post-acetazolamide, respectively) but no change in tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) (96.9% vs. 95.9%, P = 0.34) or serum phosphate (6.6 mg/dl vs. 6.9 mg/dl, P = 0.52 pre- and post-acetazolamide, respectively). Following the initiation of acetazolamide therapy, the patient experienced significant improvement in disease course as indicated by resolution of localized bone pain, cessation of tumor formation, and no tumor recurrence. Despite mild metabolic acidosis, our patient had improved linear growth and did not develop any other side effects related to therapy. Intact FGF23 remained abnormally low throughout disease course, while C-terminal FGF23 increased with acetazolamide. We conclude that acetazolamide can control severe HFTC by inducing mild metabolic acidosis despite no change in serum phosphate or TRP. This effect may be exerted though improved calcium-phosphate complex solubility and increased FGF23 locally.

  19. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  20. Immune response against large tumors eradicated by treatment with cyclophosphamide and IL-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, K; Meko, J B; Tsung, Y L; Peplinski, G R; Norton, J A

    1998-02-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated eradication of small (4-8 mm) established murine MCA207 sarcomas by treatment with systemic IL-12. Analysis of the mechanism has revealed a cellular and molecular immune response at the tumor typical of a Th1 cell-mediated, macrophage-effected, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. In the current study we investigate the immune response against long term established, large MCA207 tumors induced by combined treatment with IL-12 and cyclophosphamide (Cy), an agent known to potentiate the DTH response. Our results demonstrate that s.c. large MCA207 tumors (15-20 mm) that are refractory to treatment by either IL-12 or Cy alone can be completely eradicated by the combination of Cy and IL-12. IL-12 is apparently the only cytokine capable of mediating tumor eradication, and the effect is dependent on IFN-gamma. The contribution of Cy is probably due to immunopotentiation of DTH rather than to direct cytotoxicity to the tumor. The regression of these large tumors takes >4 wk and, in many cases, is self-sustained, in that little or no additional IL-12 is needed beyond the initial week of administration. Analysis of the cellular and molecular events at the tumor site suggests that the mechanism is a Th1-mediated antitumor immune response.

  1. Enhanced responses to tumor immunization following total body irradiation are time-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Diab

    Full Text Available The development of successful cancer vaccines is contingent on the ability to induce effective and persistent anti-tumor immunity against self-antigens that do not typically elicit immune responses. In this study, we examine the effects of a non-myeloablative dose of total body irradiation on the ability of tumor-naïve mice to respond to DNA vaccines against melanoma. We demonstrate that irradiation followed by lymphocyte infusion results in a dramatic increase in responsiveness to tumor vaccination, with augmentation of T cell responses to tumor antigens and tumor eradication. In irradiated mice, infused CD8(+ T cells expand in an environment that is relatively depleted in regulatory T cells, and this correlates with improved CD8(+ T cell functionality. We also observe an increase in the frequency of dendritic cells displaying an activated phenotype within lymphoid organs in the first 24 hours after irradiation. Intriguingly, both the relative decrease in regulatory T cells and increase in activated dendritic cells correspond with a brief window of augmented responsiveness to immunization. After this 24 hour window, the numbers of dendritic cells decline, as does the ability of mice to respond to immunizations. When immunizations are initiated within the period of augmented dendritic cell activation, mice develop anti-tumor responses that show increased durability as well as magnitude, and this approach leads to improved survival in experiments with mice bearing established tumors as well as in a spontaneous melanoma model. We conclude that irradiation can produce potent immune adjuvant effects independent of its ability to induce tumor ablation, and that the timing of immunization and lymphocyte infusion in the irradiated host are crucial for generating optimal anti-tumor immunity. Clinical strategies using these approaches must therefore optimize such parameters, as the correct timing of infusion and vaccination may mean the difference

  2. Evaluation of lung tumor response to therapy: Current and emerging techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coche, E

    2016-10-01

    Lung tumor response to therapy may be evaluated in most instances by morphological criteria such as RECIST 1.1 on computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, those criteria are limited because they are based on tumoral dimensional changes and do not take into account other morphologic criteria such as density evaluation, functional or metabolic changes that may occur following conventional or targeted chemotherapy. New techniques such as dual-energy CT, PET-CT, MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI has to be considered into the new technical armamentarium for tumor response evaluation. Integration of all informations provided by the different imaging modalities has to be integrated and represents probably the future goal of tumor response evaluation. The aim of the present paper is to review the current and emerging imaging criteria used to evaluate the response of therapy in the field of lung cancer.

  3. Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM Analysis of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR in Formalin Fixed Tumor Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hembrough Todd

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of key therapeutic targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in clinical tissue samples is typically done by immunohistochemistry (IHC and is only subjectively quantitative through a narrow dynamic range. The development of a standardized, highly-sensitive, linear, and quantitative assay for EGFR for use in patient tumor tissue carries high potential for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from EGFR-targeted therapies. Methods A mass spectrometry-based Selected Reaction Monitoring (SRM assay for the EGFR protein (EGFR-SRM was developed utilizing the Liquid Tissue®-SRM technology platform. Tissue culture cells (n = 4 were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to establish quantitative EGFR levels. Matching formalin fixed cultures were analyzed by the EGFR-SRM assay and benchmarked against immunoassay of the non-fixed cultured cells. Xenograft human tumor tissue (n = 10 of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC origin and NSCLC patient tumor tissue samples (n = 23 were microdissected and the EGFR-SRM assay performed on Liquid Tissue lysates prepared from microdissected tissue. Quantitative curves and linear regression curves for correlation between immunoassay and SRM methodology were developed in Excel. Results The assay was developed for quantitation of a single EGFR tryptic peptide for use in FFPE patient tissue with absolute specificity to uniquely distinguish EGFR from all other proteins including the receptor tyrosine kinases, IGF-1R, cMet, Her2, Her3, and Her4. The assay was analytically validated against a collection of tissue culture cell lines where SRM analysis of the formalin fixed cells accurately reflects EGFR protein levels in matching non-formalin fixed cultures as established by ELISA sandwich immunoassay (R2 = 0.9991. The SRM assay was applied to a collection of FFPE NSCLC xenograft tumors where SRM data range from 305amol/μg to 12,860amol/μg and

  4. Tumor Interstitial Fluid Pressure as an Early-Response Marker for Anticancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Ferretti

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days or later (6 or 7 days lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P ≤ .005 correlated with late changes in tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  5. Tumor interstitial fluid pressure as an early-response marker for anticancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Stephane; Allegrini, Peter R; Becquet, Mike M; McSheehy, Paul Mj

    2009-09-01

    Solid tumors have a raised interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) due to high vessel permeability, low lymphatic drainage, poor perfusion, and high cell density around the blood vessels. To investigate tumor IFP as an early-response biomarker, we have tested the effect of seven anticancer chemotherapeutics including cytotoxics and targeted cytostatics in 13 experimental tumor models. IFP was recorded with the wick-in-needle method. Models were either ectopic or orthotopic and included mouse and rat syngeneic as well as human xenografts in nude mice. The mean basal IFP was between 4.4 and 15.2mm Hg; IFP was lowest in human tumor xenografts and highest in rat syngeneic models. Where measured, basal IFP correlated positively with relative tumor blood volume (rTBV) determined by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. Most chemotherapeutics sooner (2 or 3 days) or later (6 or 7 days) lowered tumor IFP significantly, and the cytotoxic patupilone caused the greatest decrease in IFP. In rat mammary orthotopic BN472 tumors, significant drug-induced decreases in IFP and rTBV correlated positively with each other for both patupilone and the cytostatic vatalanib. In the two orthotopic models studied, early decreases in IFP were significantly (P tumor volume. Thus, drug-induced decreases in tumor IFP are an early marker of response to therapy, which could aid clinical development.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of a malignant granular cell tumor with metabolic response to pazopanib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Song; Conroy, Jeffrey; Wang, Jianmin; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; Glenn, Sean T.; Murakami, Mitsuko; Liu, Lu; Hu, Qiang; Conroy, Jacob; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Nowak, David E.; Liu, Biao; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Omilian, Angela R.; Head, Karen; Bianchi, Michael; Burgher, Blake; Darlak, Christopher; Kane, John; Merzianu, Mihai; Cheney, Richard; Fabiano, Andrew; Salerno, Kilian; Talati, Chetasi; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Morrison, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are an uncommon soft tissue neoplasm. Malignant granular cell tumors comprise T transitions, particularly when immediately preceded by a 5′ G. A loss-of-function mutation was detected in a newly recognized tumor suppressor candidate, BRD7. No mutations were found in known targets of pazopanib. However, we identified a receptor tyrosine kinase pathway mutation in GFRA2 that warrants further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a malignant granular cell tumor exhibiting a response to pazopanib, and the first whole-genome sequencing of this uncommon tumor type. The findings provide insight into the genetic basis of malignant granular cell tumors and identify potential targets for further investigation. PMID:27148567

  7. Bacteriolytic therapy can generate a potent immune response against experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Nishant; Bettegowda, Chetan; Cheong, Ian; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Drake, Charles G; Hipkiss, Edward L; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Dang, Long H; Diaz, Luis A; Pomper, Martin; Abusedera, Mohammad; Wahl, Richard L; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Zhou, Shibin; Huso, David L; Vogelstein, Bert

    2004-10-19

    When spores of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi-NT are systemically injected into animals, they germinate exclusively within the hypoxic regions of cancers. The germinated bacteria destroy adjacent tumor cells but spare a rim of well oxygenated tumor cells that subsequently expand. Surprisingly, we found that approximately 30% of mice treated with such spores were cured of their cancers despite the viable tumor rim initially remaining after spore germination. The mechanism underlying this effect was shown to be immune-mediated, because cured animals rejected a subsequent challenge of the same tumor. Similar effects were observed in rabbits with intrahepatic tumors. It was particularly notable that the induced immune response, when combined with the bacteriolytic effects of C. novyi-NT, could eradicate large established tumors.

  8. Individualized monitoring of drug bioavailability and immunogenicity in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with the tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor infliximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus; Geborek, Pierre; Svenson, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) antibody, is effective in the treatment of several immunoinflammatory diseases. However, many patients experience primary or secondary response failure, suggesting that individualization of treatment regimens may be beneficial...

  9. Monitoring Tumor Targeting and Treatment Effects of IRDye 800CW and GX1-Conjugated Polylactic Acid Nanoparticles Encapsulating Endostar on Glioma by Optical Molecular Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqian; Du, Yang; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Qian; Jing, Lijia; Liang, Xiaolong; Chi, Chongwei; Dai, Zhifei; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Molecular imaging used in cancer diagnosis and therapeutic response monitoring is important for glioblastoma (GBM) research. Antiangiogenic therapy currently is one of the emerging approaches for GBM treatment. In this study, a multifunctional nanoparticle was fabricated that can facilitate the fluorescence imaging of tumor and deliver a therapeutic agent to the tumor region in vivo and therefore possesses broad application in cancer diagnosis and treatment. This particle was polylactic acid (PLA) nanoparticles encapsulating Endostar, which was further conjugated with GX1 peptide and the near-infrared (NIR) dye IRDye 800CW (IGPNE). We demonstrated noninvasive angiogenesis targeting and therapy of IGPNE on U87MG xenografts in vivo using dual-modality optical molecular imaging including NIR fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The NIR FMI results demonstrated that IGPNE had more accumulation to the tumor site compared to free IRDye 800CW. To further evaluate the antitumor treatment efficacy of IGPNE, BLI and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed on tumor-bearing mice. With the aid of molecular imaging, the results confirmed that IGPNE enhanced antitumor treatment efficacy compared to free Endostar. In conclusion, IGPNE realizes real-time imaging of U87MG tumors and improves the antiangiogenic therapeutic efficacy in vivo.

  10. Necrosis avid near infrared fluorescent cyanines for imaging cell death and their use to monitor therapeutic efficacy in mouse tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bangwen; Stammes, Marieke A; van Driel, Pieter B A A; Cruz, Luis J; Knol-Blankevoort, Vicky T; Löwik, Martijn A M; Mezzanotte, Laura; Que, Ivo; Chan, Alan; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P H M; Siebes, Maria; Gottschalk, Sven; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Keereweer, Stijn; Horobin, Richard W; Hoehn, Mathias; Kaijzel, Eric L; van Beek, Ermond R; Snoeks, Thomas J A; Löwik, Clemens W G M

    2015-11-17

    Quantification of tumor necrosis in cancer patients is of diagnostic value as the amount of necrosis is correlated with disease prognosis and it could also be used to predict early efficacy of anti-cancer treatments. In the present study, we identified two near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) carboxylated cyanines, HQ5 and IRDye 800CW (800CW), which possess strong necrosis avidity. In vitro studies showed that both dyes selectively bind to cytoplasmic proteins of dead cells that have lost membrane integrity. Affinity for cytoplasmic proteins was confirmed using quantitative structure activity relations modeling. In vivo results, using NIRF and optoacoustic imaging, confirmed the necrosis avid properties of HQ5 and 800CW in a mouse 4T1 breast cancer tumor model of spontaneous necrosis. Finally, in a mouse EL4 lymphoma tumor model, already 24 h post chemotherapy, a significant increase in 800CW fluorescence intensity was observed in treated compared to untreated tumors. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, that the NIRF carboxylated cyanines HQ5 and 800CW possess strong necrosis avid properties in vitro and in vivo. When translated to the clinic, these dyes may be used for diagnostic or prognostic purposes and for monitoring in vivo tumor response early after the start of treatment.

  11. Microchips and their Significance in Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells and Monitoring of Cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahmani, Mehdi; Vatanmakanian, Mousa; Goudarzi, Mehdi; Mobarra, Naser; Azad, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    In micro-fluid systems, fluids are injected into extremely narrow polymer channels in small amounts such as micro-, nano-, or pico-liter scales. These channels themselves are embedded on tiny chips. Various specialized structures in the chips including pumps, valves, and channels allow the chips to accept different types of fluids to be entered the channel and along with flowing through the channels, exert their effects in the framework of different reactions. The chips are generally crystal, silicon, or elastomer in texture. These highly organized structures are equipped with discharging channels through which products as well as wastes of the reactions are secreted out. A particular advantage regarding the use of fluids in micro-scales over macro-scales lies in the fact that these fluids are much better processed in the chips when they applied as micro-scales. When the laboratory is miniaturized as a microchip and solutions are injected on a micro-scale, this combination makes a specialized construction referred to as "lab-on-chip". Taken together, micro-fluids are among the novel technologies which further than declining the costs; enhancing the test repeatability, sensitivity, accuracy, and speed; are emerged as widespread technology in laboratory diagnosis. They can be utilized for monitoring a wide spectrum of biological disorders including different types of cancers. When these microchips are used for cancer monitoring, circulatory tumor cells play a fundamental role.

  12. Plasticity of gamma delta T cells: impact on the anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eLafont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of gamma and delta chains (gamma delta T cells are of particular interest. gamma delta T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary and prostate cancer directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that gamma delta T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating gamma deltaT cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating DC maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to gamma delta T cells and promote their differentiation into gamma delta T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of gamma delta T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying gamma delta T cell expansion, differentiation and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment.

  13. Temporal variation in the response of tumors to hyperoxia with breathing carbogen and oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-gang Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hyperoxygenation with carbogen (95% O 2 + 5% CO 2 and 100% oxygen inhalation on partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1 tumor was investigated. RIF-1 tumors were innoculated in C3H mice, and aggregates of oximetry probe, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc, was implanted in each tumor. A baseline tumor pO 2 was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oximetry for 20 minutes in anesthetized mice breathing 30% O 2 and then the gas was switched to carbogen or 100 % oxygen for 60 minutes. These experiments were repeated for 10 days. RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a baseline tissue pO 2 of 6.2-8.3 mmHg in mice breathing 30% O 2 . Carbogen and 100% oxygen significantly increased tumor pO 2 on days 1 to 5, with a maximal increase at approximately 32-45 minutes on each day. However, the extent of increase in pO 2 from the baseline declined significantly on day 5 and day 10. The results provide quantitative information on the effect of hyperoxic gas inhalation on tumor pO 2 over the course of 10 days. EPR oximetry can be effectively used to repeatedly monitor tumor pO 2 and test hyperoxic methods for potential clinical applications.

  14. Physiological Imaging-Defined, Response-Driven Subvolumes of a Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, Reza [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Tsien, Christina I.; Feng, Felix Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Gomez-Hassan, Diana [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A.; Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cao, Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To develop an image analysis framework to delineate the physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of a tumor in relating to treatment response and outcome. Methods and Materials: Our proposed approach delineates the subvolumes of a tumor based on its heterogeneous distributions of physiological imaging parameters. The method assigns each voxel a probabilistic membership function belonging to the physiological parameter classes defined in a sample of tumors, and then calculates the related subvolumes in each tumor. We applied our approach to regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and Gd-DTPA transfer constant (K{sup trans}) images of patients who had brain metastases and were treated by whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT). A total of 45 lesions were included in the analysis. Changes in the rCBV (or K{sup trans})–defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2 weeks after the start of WBRT (2W) were evaluated for differentiation of responsive, stable, and progressive tumors using the Mann-Whitney U test. Performance of the newly developed metrics for predicting tumor response to WBRT was evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The percentage decrease in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was significantly greater in the group of responsive tumors than in the group of stable and progressive tumors (P<.007). The change in the high-CBV-defined subvolumes of the tumors from pre-RT to 2W was a predictor for post-RT response significantly better than change in the gross tumor volume observed during the same time interval (P=.012), suggesting that the physiological change occurs before the volumetric change. Also, K{sup trans} did not add significant discriminatory information for assessing response with respect to rCBV. Conclusion: The physiological imaging-defined subvolumes of the tumors delineated by our method could be candidates for boost target, for which further development and evaluation

  15. Potential biomarkers for monitoring therapeutic response in patients with CIDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakas, Marinos C

    2011-06-01

    Although the majority of patients with CIDP variably respond to intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), steroids, or plasmapheresis, 30% of them are unresponsive or insufficiently responsive to these therapies. The heterogeneity in therapeutic responses necessitates the need to search for biomarkers to determine the most suitable therapy from the outset and explore the best means for monitoring disease activity. The ICE study, which led to the first FDA-approved indication for IVIg in CIDP, has shown that maintenance therapy prevents relapses and axonal loss. In this paper, the multiple actions exerted by IVIg on the immunoregulatory network of CIDP are discussed as potential predictors of response to therapies. Emerging molecular markers, promising in identifying responders to IVIg from non-responders, include modulation of FcγRIIB receptors on monocytes and genome-wide transcription studies related to inflammatory mediators, demyelination, or axonal degeneration. Skin biopsies, Peripheral Blood Lymhocytes, CSF, and sera are accessible surrogate tissues for further exploring these molecules during therapies.

  16. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  17. Monitoring the cytoskeletal EGF response in live gastric carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Felkl

    Full Text Available Altered cell motility is considered to be a key factor in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. Epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling has been implicated in this process by affecting cytoskeletal organization and dynamics in multiple ways. To sort the temporal and spatial regulation of EGF-dependent cytoskeletal re-organization in relation to a cell's motile behavior time-lapse microscopy was performed on EGF-responsive gastric carcinoma-derived MKN1 cells co-expressing different fluorescently labeled cytoskeletal filaments and focal adhesion components in various combinations. The experiments showed that EGF almost instantaneously induces a considerable increase in membrane ruffling and lamellipodial activity that can be inhibited by Cetuximab EGF receptor antibodies and is not elicited in non-responsive gastric carcinoma Hs746T cells. The transient cell extensions are rich in actin but lack microtubules and keratin intermediate filaments. We show that this EGF-induced increase in membrane motility can be measured by a simple image processing routine. Microtubule plus-ends subsequently invade growing cell extensions, which start to accumulate focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum junction. Such paxillin-positive complexes mature into focal adhesions by tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of zyxin. These adhesions then serve as nucleation sites for keratin filaments which are used to enlarge the neighboring peripheral keratin network. Focal adhesions are either disassembled or give rise to stable zyxin-rich fibrillar adhesions which disassemble in the presence of EGF to support formation of new focal adhesion sites in the cell periphery. Taken together the results serve as a basis for modeling the early cytoskeletal EGF response as a tightly coordinated and step-wise process which is relevant for the prediction of the effectiveness of anti-EGF receptor-based tumor therapy.

  18. Monitoring Cancer Response to Treatment with Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldirdiri, Abubakr

    Monitoring the cancer response to treatment, non-invasively, by medical imaging is a key element in the management of cancer. For patients undergoing treatment, it is crucial to determine responders from non-responders in order to guide treatment decisions. Currently, PET is the most widely used......, and the patient is exposed to ionizing radiation. The introduction of hyperpolarized 13C MRS has opened completely new possibilities to study the biochemical changes in disease processes. Numerous 13C-labeled compounds were proposed to interrogate various aspects of cancer cell metabolism. The aim of this study...... is to investigate the relevance of [1-13C]pyruvate and [1,4-13C2]fumarate in monitoring the changes in cellular metabolism and necrosis that may occur as a result of cancer therapy. This project also aims to improve existing 13C MRSI methods to efficiently utilize the signal from hyperpolarized 13C substrates...

  19. Tyrosine Phosphorylation Modulates the Vascular Responses of Mesenteric Arteries from Human Colorectal Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ferrero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze whether tyrosine phosphorylation in tumoral arteries may modulate their vascular response. To do this, mesenteric arteries supplying blood flow to colorectal tumors or to normal intestine were obtained during surgery and prepared for isometric tension recording in an organ bath. Increasing tyrosine phosphorylation with the phosphatase inhibitor, sodium orthovanadate produced arterial contraction which was lower in tumoral than in control arteries, whereas it reduced the contraction to noradrenaline in tumoral but not in control arteries and reduced the relaxation to bradykinin in control but not in tumoral arteries. Protein expression of VEGF-A and of the VEGF receptor FLT1 was similar in control and tumoral arteries, but expression of the VEGF receptor KDR was increased in tumoral compared with control arteries. This suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation may produce inhibition of the contraction in tumoral mesenteric arteries, which may increase blood flow to the tumor when tyrosine phosphorylation is increased by stimulation of VEGF receptors.

  20. Emergency response networks for disaster monitoring and detection from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirova, Tanya; Sweeting, Martin N.; Vitanov, Ivan; Vitanov, Valentin I.

    2009-05-01

    Numerous man-made and natural disasters have stricken mankind since the beginning of the new millennium. The scale and impact of such disasters often prevent the collection of sufficient data for an objective assessment and coordination of timely rescue and relief missions on the ground. As a potential solution to this problem, in recent years constellations of Earth observation small satellites and in particular micro-satellites (techniques. For a large number of applications the resulting delay between image capture and delivery is not acceptable, in particular for rapid response remote sensing aiming at disaster monitoring and detection. In such cases almost instantaneous data availability is a strict requirement to enable an assessment of the situation and instigate an adequate response. Examples include earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, flooding, forest fires and oil spills. The proposed solution to this issue are low-cost networked distributed satellite systems in low Earth orbit capable of connecting to terrestrial networks and geostationary Earth orbit spacecraft in real time. This paper discusses enabling technologies for rapid response disaster monitoring and detection from space such as very small satellite design, intersatellite communication, intelligent on-board processing, distributed computing and bio-inspired routing techniques.

  1. The GLAST burst monitor instrument response simulation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, A. S.; Kippen, R. M.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson, R. B.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; von Kienlin, A.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Schoenfelder, V.; Steinle, H.; Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.; Connaughton, V.

    2005-07-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts from 10keV to 25MeV. The GBM is composed of twelve NaI and two BGO detectors that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. Reconstructing burst locations and energy spectra from these separated detectors requires detailed knowledge of the response to direct and scattered burst radiation. A simulation software package based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolset is being developed to fulfill this requirement. We will discuss the architecture of our simulation system and evaluate the scientific capabilities of the GBM.

  2. Monitoring trends in violence: a delayed response to Estrada (2006).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Pauline; Langley, John; Cryer, Colin

    2013-11-01

    Reliable and valid indicators of assault are required to effectively monitor population trends and ensure that resources are targeted effectively. Trends in assault, reported by the media, based on crime statistics, or on victim surveys, are substantively affected by extraneous factors. In 2006, Estrada offered up solutions to the difficulties posed by crime statistics and victim surveys, by proposing the development of indicators based on hospital discharge data, albeit with identified limitations. This article is a response to Estrada's proposition, and works through each of Estrada's identified limitations of hospital discharge data. Potential problems with Estrada's suggestions are highlighted in our article and solutions, based on the current evidence, are proposed.

  3. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  4. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Høgh Hansen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the ...

  5. A kinetic model of tumor growth and its radiation response with an application to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    CERN Document Server

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin Z; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to simulate the growth of tumor volume and its response to a single fraction of high dose irradiation. We made several key assumptions of the model. Tumor volume is composed of proliferating (or dividing) cancer cells and non-dividing (or dead) cells. Tumor growth rate (or tumor volume doubling time, Td) is proportional to the ratio of the volumes of tumor vasculature and the tumor. The vascular volume grows slower than the tumor by introducing the vascular growth retardation factor, theta. Upon irradiation the proliferating cells gradually die over a fixed time period after irradiation. Dead cells are cleared away with cell clearance time, Tcl. The model was applied to simulate pre-treatment growth and post-treatment radiation response of rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and metastatic brain tumors of five patients who were treated by Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). By selecting appropriate model parameters, we showed the temporal variation of the tumors for both th...

  6. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Bodo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Gayou, Olivier [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Parda, David S [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15212 (United States)

    2008-02-21

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  7. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S.; Miften, Moyed

    2008-02-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins.

  8. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. CADrx for GBM Brain Tumors: Predicting Treatment Response from Changes in Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Brown

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a computer-aided therapeutic response (CADrx system for early prediction of drug treatment response for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM brain tumors with diffusion weighted (DW MR images. In conventional Macdonald assessment, tumor response is assessed nine weeks or more post-treatment. However, we will investigate the ability of DW-MRI to assess response earlier, at five weeks post treatment. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor’s microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. ADC values in treated brain tumors could theoretically both increase due to the cell kill (and thus reduced cell density and decrease due to inhibition of edema. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that quantify changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. There are three parts to this study: first, tumor regions were segmented on T1w contrast enhanced images by Otsu’s thresholding method, and mapped from T1w images onto ADC images by a 3D region of interest (ROI mapping tool using DICOM header information; second, ADC histograms of the tumor region were extracted from both pre- and five weeks post-treatment scans, and fitted by a two-component Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The GMM features as well as standard histogram-based features were extracted. Finally, supervised machine learning techniques were applied for classification of responders or non-responders. The approach was evaluated with a dataset of 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 39 responded and 46 did not, based on tumor volume reduction. We compared adaBoost, random forest and support vector machine classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in the best accuracy of 69.41% and the corresponding area under the curve (Az of 0.70.

  10. Quantitative ultrasound evaluation of tumor cell death response in locally advanced breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Papanicolau, Naum; Falou, Omar; Zubovits, Judit; Dent, Rebecca; Verma, Sunil; Trudeau, Maureen; Boileau, Jean Francois; Spayne, Jacqueline; Iradji, Sara; Sofroni, Ervis; Lee, Justin; Lemon-Wong, Sharon; Yaffe, Martin; Kolios, Michael C; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2013-04-15

    Quantitative ultrasound techniques have been recently shown to be capable of detecting cell death through studies conducted on in vitro and in vivo models. This study investigates for the first time the potential of early detection of tumor cell death in response to clinical cancer therapy administration in patients using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods. Patients (n = 24) with locally advanced breast cancer received neoadjuvant chemotherapy treatments. Ultrasound data were collected before treatment onset and at 4 times during treatment (weeks 1, 4, and 8, and preoperatively). Quantitative ultrasound parameters were evaluated for clinically responsive and nonresponding patients. Results indicated that quantitative ultrasound parameters showed significant changes for patients who responded to treatment, and no similar alteration was observed in treatment-refractory patients. Such differences between clinically and pathologically determined responding and nonresponding patients were statistically significant (P < 0.05) after 4 weeks of chemotherapy. Responding patients showed changes in parameters related to cell death with, on average, an increase in mid-band fit and 0-MHz intercept of 9.1 ± 1.2 dBr and 8.9 ± 1.9 dBr, respectively, whereas spectral slope was invariant. Linear discriminant analysis revealed a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 83.3% for distinguishing nonresponding patients by the fourth week into a course of chemotherapy lasting several months. This study reports for the first time that quantitative ultrasound spectroscopic methods can be applied clinically to evaluate cancer treatment responses noninvasively. The results form a basis for monitoring chemotherapy effects and facilitating the personalization of cancer treatment.

  11. Acute Tumor Response to ZD6126 Assessed by Intrinsic Susceptibility Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P. Robinson

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The effective magnetic resonance imaging (MRI transverse relaxation rate R2* was investigated as an early acute marker of the response of rat GH3 prolactinomas to the vascular-targeting agent, ZD6126. Multigradient echo (MGRE MRI was used to quantify R2*, which is sensitive to tissue deoxyhemoglobin levels. Tumor R2* was measured prior to, and either immediately for up to 35 minutes, or 24 hours following administration of 50 mg/kg ZD6126. Following MRI, tumor perfusion was assessed by Hoechst 33342 uptake. Tumor R2* significantly increased to 116 ± 4% of baseline 35 minutes after challenge, consistent with an ischemic insult induced by vascular collapse. A strong positive correlation between baseline R2* and the subsequent increase in R2* measured 35 minutes after treatment was obtained, suggesting that the baseline R2* is prognostic for the subsequent tumor response to ZD6126. In contrast, a significant decrease in tumor R2* was found 24 hours after administration of ZD6126. Both the 35-minute and 24-hour R2* responses to ZD6126 were associated with a decrease in Hoechst 33342 uptake. Interpretation of the R2* response is complex, yet changes in tumor R2* may provide a convenient and early MRI biomarker for detecting the antitumor activity of vascular-targeting agents.

  12. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Fang; Lin, Yi-Yu; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Liu, Ren-Shen; Pang, Fei; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1- tk) and luciferase ( luc). Both 131I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/ tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  13. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  14. Targeting amino acid metabolism in cancer growth and anti-tumor immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elitsa; Ananieva

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in amino acid metabolism have revealed that targeting amino acid metabolic enzymes in cancer therapy is a promising strategy for the development of novel therapeutic agents. There are currently several drugs in clinical trials that specifically target amino acid metabolic pathways in tumor cells. In the context of the tumor microenvironment,however,tumor cells form metabolic relationships with immune cells,and they oftencompete for common nutrients. Many tumors evolved to escape immune surveillance by taking advantage of their metabolic flexibility and redirecting nutrients for their own advantage. This review outlines the most recent advances in targeting amino acid metabolic pathways in cancer therapy while giving consideration to the impact these pathways may have on the anti-tumor immune response.

  15. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-02-24

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced "RNA disruption" is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3'-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues and is

  16. Stationary monitoring of glacier response to climate change in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiawen; Li, Zhongqin; Qin, Xiang; He, Yuanqing; He, Xiaobo; Li, Huilin

    2016-04-01

    At present, there are about 48571 glaciers with a total area of about 51.8×103 km2 and a volume of about 5.6×103 km3 in China. They are distributed widely in the high mountains in and surrounding the Tibetan Plateau and other high mountains such as Tianshan, Altay and Pamir. In view of differences in climatic conditions and glacier types, stationary monitoring of the glacier variations has been ongoing in different regions in order to investigate the glacier response to climate change. The monitoring results show that all the monitoring glaciers have been in retreat during the past decades and especially since 1990's the retreat rate has an accelerating trend. The accumulative mass balance is much negative and has a large annual variability for the monsoonal maritime glaciers in comparison with the continental and sub-continental glaciers. Under climate warming background, the acceleration of glacier melting is mainly attributed to rise in air temperature, ice temperature augment and albedo reduction of glacier surface. Particularly, the albedo reduction has a positive feedback effect on the glacier melting. Based on long term observation of glacier variations and physical properties, a simple dynamics model is coupled with mass balance modeling to make a projection of a typical glacier change in future. The primary modeling results suggest that the glacier will continue in shrinkage until vanishing within 50-90 years.

  17. miRNAs modulate the drug response of tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments of malignant carcinomas. However,its efficiency is affected by both intrinsic and acquired resistance to anticancer drugs. The cellular mechanisms of drug resistance include the overexpression of energy-dependent transporters that eject anticancer drugs from cells such as p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance related protein (MRP),the mutation of drug targets,the activation of DNA repair pathways,the defects in cellular death pathways and so on. The genetic and epigenetic changes of these genes can lead to cancer drug resistance. Among these mechanisms,microRNAs (miRNAs) which are critical and essential for many important processes such as development,differentiation,and even carcinogenesis have been reported to regulate the chemosen-sitivity of tumor cells. In this paper we briefly review the relationship between miRNA and cancer drug resistance.

  18. miRNAs modulate the drug response of tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy is one of the major treatments of malignant carcinomas. However, its efficiency is af-fected by both intrinsic and acquired resistance to anticancer drugs. The cellular mechanisms of drug resistance include the overexpression of energy-dependent transporters that eject anticancer drugs from cells such as p-glycoprotein and multidrug resistance related protein (MRP), the mutation of drug targets, the activation of DNA repair pathways, the defects in cellular death pathways and so on. The genetic and epigenetic changes of these genes can lead to cancer drug resistance. Among these mechanisms, microRNAs (miRNAs) which are critical and essential for many important processes such as development, differentiation, and even carcinogenesis have been reported to regulate the chemo-sensitivity of tumor cells. In this paper we briefly review the relationship between miRNA and cancer drug resistance.

  19. Loss of CSL Unlocks a Hypoxic Response and Enhanced Tumor Growth Potential in Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike-Benjamin Braune

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Notch signaling is an important regulator of stem cell differentiation. All canonical Notch signaling is transmitted through the DNA-binding protein CSL, and hyperactivated Notch signaling is associated with tumor development; thus it may be anticipated that CSL deficiency should reduce tumor growth. In contrast, we report that genetic removal of CSL in breast tumor cells caused accelerated growth of xenografted tumors. Loss of CSL unleashed a hypoxic response during normoxic conditions, manifested by stabilization of the HIF1α protein and acquisition of a polyploid giant-cell, cancer stem cell-like, phenotype. At the transcriptome level, loss of CSL upregulated more than 1,750 genes and less than 3% of those genes were part of the Notch transcriptional signature. Collectively, this suggests that CSL exerts functions beyond serving as the central node in the Notch signaling cascade and reveals a role for CSL in tumorigenesis and regulation of the cellular hypoxic response.

  20. Survivin-specific T-cell reactivity correlates with tumor response and patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads H; Hofmeister-Müller, Valeska

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination directed to induce an anti-tumoral T-cell response is a field of extensive investigation in the treatment of melanoma. However, many vaccination trials in melanoma failed to demonstrate a correlation between the vaccine-specific immune response and therapy outcome. This ha...

  1. Brain tumor vessel response to synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy: a short-term in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serduc, Raphael; Christen, Thomas; Farion, Regine; Bouchet, Audrey; Sanden, Boudewijn van der; Segebarth, Christoph; Remy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L [INSERM, U836, F38043 Grenoble (France); Laissue, Jean [Institute of Pathology, University of Bern (Switzerland); Braeuer-Krisch, Elke; Duc, Geraldine Le; Bravin, Alberto [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F38043 Grenoble (France)], E-mail: serduc@esrf.fr

    2008-07-07

    The aim of this work focuses on the description of the short-term response of a 9L brain tumor model and its vasculature to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rat 9L gliosarcomas implanted in nude mice brains were irradiated by MRT 13 days after tumor inoculation using two orthogonal arrays of equally spaced 28 planar microbeams (25 {mu}m width, 211 {mu}m spacing and dose 500 Gy). At 1, 7 and 14 days after MRT, apparent diffusion coefficient, blood volume and vessel size index were mapped by MRI. Mean survival time after tumor inoculation increased significantly between MRT-treated and untreated groups (23 and 28 days respectively, log-rank test, p < 0.0001). A significant increase of apparent diffusion coefficient was observed 24 h after MRT in irradiated tumors versus non-irradiated ones. In the untreated group, both tumor size and vessel size index increased significantly (from 7.6 {+-} 2.2 to 19.2 {+-} 4.0 mm{sup 2} and +23%, respectively) between the 14th and the 21st day after tumor cell inoculation. During the same period, in the MRT-treated group, no difference in tumor size was observed. The vessel size index measured in the MRT-treated group increased significantly (+26%) between 14 and 28 days of tumor growth. We did not observe the significant difference in blood volume between the MRT-treated and untreated groups. MRT slows 9L tumor growth in a mouse brain but MRI results suggest that the increase in survival time after our MRT approach may be rather due to a cytoreduction than to early direct effects of ionizing radiation on tumor vessels. These results suggest that MRT parameters need to be optimized to further damage tumor vessels.

  2. A comparative assessment of preclinical chemotherapeutic response of tumors using quantitative non-Gaussian diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junzhong; Li, Ke; Smith, R Adam; Waterton, John C; Zhao, Ping; Ding, Zhaohua; Does, Mark D; Manning, H Charles; Gore, John C

    2017-04-01

    Diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) signal attenuation is often not mono-exponential (i.e. non-Gaussian diffusion) with stronger diffusion weighting. Several non-Gaussian diffusion models have been developed and may provide new information or higher sensitivity compared with the conventional apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) method. However the relative merits of these models to detect tumor therapeutic response is not fully clear. Conventional ADC, and three widely-used non-Gaussian models, (bi-exponential, stretched exponential, and statistical model), were implemented and compared for assessing SW620 human colon cancer xenografts responding to barasertib, an agent known to induce apoptosis via polyploidy. Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) was used for model selection among all three non-Gaussian models. All of tumor volume, histology, conventional ADC, and three non-Gaussian DWI models could show significant differences between control and treatment groups after four days of treatment. However, only the non-Gaussian models detected significant changes after two days of treatment. For any treatment or control group, over 65.7% of tumor voxels indicate the bi-exponential model is strongly or very strongly preferred. Non-Gaussian DWI model-derived biomarkers are capable of detecting tumor earlier chemotherapeutic response of tumors compared with conventional ADC and tumor volume. The bi-exponential model provides better fitting compared with statistical and stretched exponential models for the tumor and treatment models used in the current work. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-05-18

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0-37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment.

  4. A Fast Hydrogen Sulfide-Releasing Donor Increases the Tumor Response to Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Preter, Géraldine; Deriemaeker, Caroline; Danhier, Pierre; Brisson, Lucie; Cao Pham, Thanh Trang; Grégoire, Vincent; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Sonveaux, Pierre; Gallez, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is the last gaseous transmitter identified in mammals, and previous studies have reported disparate conclusions regarding the implication of H2S in cancer progression. In the present study, we hypothesized that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a fast H2S-releasing donor, might interfere with the mitochondrial respiratory chain of tumor cells, increase tumor oxygenation, and potentiate the response to irradiation. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, we found a rapid increase in tumor pO2 after NaHS administration (0.1 mmol/kg) in two human tumor models (breast MDA-MB-231 and cervix SiHa), an effect that was due to a decreased oxygen consumption and an increased tumor perfusion. Tumors irradiated 15 minutes after a single NaHS administration were more sensitive to irradiation compared with those that received irradiation alone (increase in growth delay by 50%). This radiosensitization was due to the oxygen effect, as the increased growth delay was abolished when temporarily clamped tumors were irradiated. In contrast, daily NaHS injection (0.1 mmol/kg/day for 14 days) did not provide any effect on tumor growth in vivo. To understand these paradoxical data, we analyzed the impact of external factors on the cellular response to NaHS. We found that extracellular pH had a dramatic effect on the cell response to NaHS, as the proliferation rate (measured in vitro by BrdU incorporation) was increased at pH = 7.4, but decreased at pH = 6.5. Overall, our study highlights the complex role of environmental components in the response of cancer cells to H2S and suggests a new approach for the use of H2S donors in combination with radiotherapy.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging in assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xiao; ZHANG Xue-ning; ZHANG Yun-ting; YU Chun-shui; XU De-sheng

    2011-01-01

    Objective To review the applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques in assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors.Data sources Published articles about assessing treatment response to gamma knife radiosurgery for brain tumors were selected using PubMed. The search terms were "MRI", "gamma knife" and "brain tumors".Study selection Articles regarding the MRI techniques using for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife were selected.Results MRI techniques, especially diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, are useful for early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife by detecting the hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. Moreover, they can also provide important information on prognosis.Conclusions Diffusion weighted imaging, perfusion weighted imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can provide early assessment of treatment response of gamma knife for brain tumors, and also information of tumor progression or recurrence earlier than conventional MRI. But there are still many questions to be answered which should be based on the development and advancement of MRI and related disciplines.

  6. 3D culture broadly regulates tumor cell hypoxia response and angiogenesis via pro-inflammatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelNero, Peter; Lane, Maureen; Verbridge, Scott S; Kwee, Brian; Kermani, Pouneh; Hempstead, Barbara; Stroock, Abraham; Fischbach, Claudia

    2015-07-01

    Oxygen status and tissue dimensionality are critical determinants of tumor angiogenesis, a hallmark of cancer and an enduring target for therapeutic intervention. However, it is unclear how these microenvironmental conditions interact to promote neovascularization, due in part to a lack of comprehensive, unbiased data sets describing tumor cell gene expression as a function of oxygen levels within three-dimensional (3D) culture. Here, we utilized alginate-based, oxygen-controlled 3D tumor models to study the interdependence of culture context and the hypoxia response. Microarray gene expression analysis of tumor cells cultured in 2D versus 3D under ambient or hypoxic conditions revealed striking interdependence between culture dimensionality and hypoxia response, which was mediated in part by pro-inflammatory signaling pathways. In particular, interleukin-8 (IL-8) emerged as a major player in the microenvironmental regulation of the hypoxia program. Notably, this interaction between dimensionality and oxygen status via IL-8 increased angiogenic sprouting in a 3D endothelial invasion assay. Taken together, our data suggest that pro-inflammatory pathways are critical regulators of tumor hypoxia response within 3D environments that ultimately impact tumor angiogenesis, potentially providing important therapeutic targets. Furthermore, these results highlight the importance of pathologically relevant tissue culture models to study the complex physical and chemical processes by which the cancer microenvironment mediates new vessel formation.

  7. Automated detection of breast tumor in MRI and comparison of kinetic features for assessing tumor response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Zheng, Bin

    2015-03-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced breast magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is used increasingly in diagnosis of breast cancer and assessment of treatment efficacy in current clinical practice. The purpose of this preliminary study is to develop and test a new quantitative kinetic image feature analysis method and biomarker to predict response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using breast MR images acquired before the chemotherapy. For this purpose, we developed a computer-aided detection scheme to automatically segment breast areas and tumors depicting on the sequentially scanned breast MR images. From a contrast-enhancement map generated by subtraction of two image sets scanned pre- and post-injection of contrast agent, our scheme computed 38 morphological and kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal regions. We applied a number of statistical data analysis methods to identify effective image features in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy. Based on the performance assessment of individual features and their correlations, we applied a fusion method to generate a final image biomarker. A breast MR image dataset involving 68 patients was used in this study. Among them, 25 had complete response and 43 had partially response to the chemotherapy based on the RECIST guideline. Using this image feature fusion based biomarker, the area under a receiver operating characteristic curve is AUC = 0.850±0.047. This study demonstrated that a biomarker developed from the fusion of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired pre-chemotherapy has potentially higher discriminatory power in predicting response of the patients to the chemotherapy.

  8. RG7212 anti-TWEAK mAb inhibits tumor growth through inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and survival signaling and by enhancing the host antitumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuefeng; Luistro, Leopoldo; Zhong, Hua; Smith, Melissa; Nevins, Tom; Schostack, Kathleen; Hilton, Holly; Lin, Tai-An; Truitt, Theresa; Biondi, Denise; Wang, Xiaoqian; Packman, Kathryn; Rosinski, Jim; Berkofsky-Fessler, Windy; Tang, Jian-Ping; Pant, Saumya; Geho, David; Vega-Harring, Suzana; Demario, Mark; Levitsky, Hy; Simcox, Mary

    2013-10-15

    To explore the role of TWEAK in tumor growth and antitumor immune response and the activity and mechanism of RG7212, an antagonistic anti-TWEAK antibody, in tumor models. TWEAK-induced signaling and gene expression were explored in tumor cell lines and inhibition of these effects and antitumor efficacy with RG7212 treatment was assessed in human tumor xenograft-, patient-derived xenograft, and syngeneic tumor models and phase I patients. Genetic features correlated with antitumor activity were characterized. In tumor cell lines, TWEAK induces proliferation, survival, and NF-κB signaling and gene expression that promote tumor growth and suppress antitumor immune responses. TWEAK-inducible CD274, CCL2, CXCL-10 and -11 modulate T-cell and monocyte recruitment, T-cell activation, and macrophage differentiation. These factors and TWEAK-induced signaling were decreased, and tumor, blood, and spleen immune cell composition was altered with RG7212 treatment in mice. RG7212 inhibits tumor growth in vivo in models with TWEAK receptor, Fn14, expression, and markers of pathway activation. In phase I testing, signs of tumor shrinkage and stable disease were observed without dose-limiting toxicity. In a patient with advanced, Fn14-positive, malignant melanoma with evidence of tumor regression, proliferation markers were dramatically reduced, tumor T-cell infiltration increased, and tumor macrophage content decreased. Antitumor activity, a lack of toxicity in humans and animals and no evidence of antagonism with standard of care or targeted agents in mice, suggests that RG7212 is a promising agent for use in combination therapies in patients with Fn14-positive tumors. ©2013 AACR.

  9. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  10. Effect of b value on monitoring therapeutic response by diffusion-weighted imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-Xia Jiang; Wei-Jun Peng; Wen-Tao Li; Feng Tang; Shi-Yuan Liu; Xu-Dong Qu; Jian-Hua Wang; Hong-Feng Lu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the diffusion gradient b-factor that optimizes both apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurement and contrast-to-noise (CNR) for assessing tumor response to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in a rabbit model. METHODS: Twelve New Zealand white rabbits bearing VX2 tumors in the liver were treated withT ACE. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with various b values was performed using the same protocol before and 3 d after treatment with TACE. ADC values and CNR of each tumor pre- and post-treatment with different b factors were analyzed. Correlation between ADC values and extent of necrosis in histological specimens was analyzed by a Pearson's correlation test.RESULTS: The quality of diffusion-weighted images diminished as the b value increased. A substantial decrease in the mean lesion-to-liver CNR was observed on both pre- and post-treatment DW images, the largest difference in CNR pre- and post-treatment was manifested at a b value of 1000 s/mm2 (P = 0.036 ). The effect of therapy on diffusion early after treatment was shown by a significant increase in ADCs (P= 0.007), especially with large b factors (≥ 600 s/mm2). The mean percentage of necrotic cells present within the tumor was 76.3%-97.5%. A significant positive correlation was found between ADC values and the extent of necrosis with all b values except for b200, a higher relative coefficient between ADC values and percentage of necrosis was found on DWI with bl000 and b2000 (P=0.002 and 0.006, respectively).CONCLUSION: An increasing b value of up to 600 s/mm2 would increase ADC contrast pre-and post-treatment, but decrease image quality. Taking into account both CNR and ADC measurement, diffusion-weighted imaging obtained with a b value of 1000 s/mm2 is recommended for monitoring early hepatic tumor response to TACE.

  11. Local tumor irradiation augments the response to IL-2 therapy in a murine renal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, E; Haas, G P; Dezso, B; Ali, E; Maughan, R L; Kukuruga, M A; Montecillo, E; Pontes, J E; Hillman, G G

    1995-10-15

    We have previously demonstrated that local tumor irradiation effectively enhanced the therapeutic effect of IL-2 therapy on pulmonary metastases from a murine renal adenocarcinoma, Renca. Irradiation with 300 rad to the left lung only, followed by systemic IL-2 therapy, results in increased tumor reduction in both lungs, suggesting that radiation enhances the systemic effect of immunotherapy. In this study, we show that irradiation of the tumor-bearing organ is essential for the combined effect of both modalities. This effect is radiation dose-dependent as increases in the radiation dosage result in greater tumor reduction in the irradiated field as well as systemically in nonirradiated fields when combined with immunotherapy. We find that irradiation has a direct inhibitory effect on Renca cell growth in vitro. Irradiation of Renca cells also causes an upregulation in H-2Kd class I MHC antigen detectable at 300 rad and more pronounced with 800 rad. By in vivo selective depletion of lymphocyte subsets, we demonstrate the involvement of Lyt-2+ and L3T4+ T cell subsets and AsGM1+ cells, including NK cells, in the antitumor effect mediated by tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Immunohistochemistry studies, performed on lung sections, showed a significant infiltration of CD3+ T cells and macrophages in the tumor nodules following treatment with tumor irradiation and IL-2 therapy. Our studies indicate that the mechanism of interaction between tumor irradiation and immunotherapy may include radiation-induced alterations in the tumor growth and antigenicity which may enhance or trigger an anti-tumor response elicited by IL-2 and mediated by T cells, AsGM1+ cells, and macrophages.

  12. Impact of Stromal Sensitivity on Radiation Response of Tumors Implanted in SCID Hosts Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Barros, Mónica; Thin, Tin Htwe; Maj, Jerzy; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice carry a germ-line mutation in DNA-PK, associated with deficiency in recognition and repair DNA double strand breaks. Thus, SCID cells and tissues display increased sensitivity to radiation-induced post-mitotic (clonogenic) cell death. Nonetheless, the single radiation doses required for 50% permanent local control (TCD50) of tumors implanted in SCID mice are not significantly different from the TCD50 values of the same tumors in wild-type hosts. Whereas the tumor stroma is derived from the host, the observation that tumors implanted in SCID mice do not exhibit hypersensitivity to radiation might imply that stromal endothelial elements do not contribute substantially to tumor cure by ionizing radiation. Here we challenge this notion, testing the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)-mediated endothelial apoptosis, which results from plasma membrane alterations, not DNA damage, is a crucial element in the cure of tumors in SCID mice by single dose radiotherapy (SDRT). We show that endothelium in MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16 melanomas exhibit a wild-type apoptotic phenotype in SCID hosts, abrogated in tumors in SCIDasmase−/− littermates, which also acquire resistance to SDRT. Conversion into a radioresistant tumor phenotype when implanted in SCIDasmase−/− hosts provides compelling evidence that cell membrane ASMase-mediated microvascular dysfunction, rather than DNA damage-mediated endothelial clonogenic lethality, plays a mandatory role in the complex pathophysiologic mechanism of tumor cure by SDRT, and provides an explanation for the wild-type SDRT responses reported in tumors implanted in SCID mice. PMID:20924105

  13. Strong spontaneous tumor neoantigen responses induced by a natural human carcinogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creaney, Jenette; Ma, Shaokang; Sneddon, Sophie A; Tourigny, Michelle R; Dick, Ian M; Leon, Justine S; Khong, Andrea; Fisher, Scott A; Lake, Richard A; Lesterhuis, W Joost; Nowak, Anna K; Leary, Shay; Watson, Mark W; Robinson, Bruce W

    2015-01-01

    A key to improving cancer immunotherapy will be the identification of tumor-specific “neoantigens” that arise from mutations and augment the resultant host immune response. In this study we identified single nucleotide variants (SNVs) by RNA sequencing of asbestos-induced murine mesothelioma cell lines AB1 and AB1-HA. Using the NetMHCpan 2.8 algorithm, the theoretical binding affinity of predicted peptides arising from high-confidence, exonic, non-synonymous SNVs was determined for the BALB/c strain. The immunoreactivity to 20 candidate mutation-carrying peptides of increased affinity and the corresponding wild-type peptides was determined using interferon-γ ELISPOT assays and lymphoid organs of non-manipulated tumor-bearing mice. A strong endogenous immune response was demonstrated to one of the candidate neoantigens, Uqcrc2; this response was detected in the draining lymph node and spleen. Antigen reactive cells were not detected in non-tumor bearing mice. The magnitude of the response to the Uqcrc2 neoantigen was similar to that of the strong influenza hemagglutinin antigen, a model tumor neoantigen. This work confirms that the approach of RNAseq plus peptide prediction and ELISPOT testing is sufficient to identify natural tumor neoantigens. PMID:26140232

  14. Gene expression signature of fibroblast serum response predicts human cancer progression: similarities between tumors and wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Y Chang

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer invasion and metastasis have been likened to wound healing gone awry. Despite parallels in cellular behavior between cancer progression and wound healing, the molecular relationships between these two processes and their prognostic implications are unclear. In this study, based on gene expression profiles of fibroblasts from ten anatomic sites, we identify a stereotyped gene expression program in response to serum exposure that appears to reflect the multifaceted role of fibroblasts in wound healing. The genes comprising this fibroblast common serum response are coordinately regulated in many human tumors, allowing us to identify tumors with gene expression signatures suggestive of active wounds. Genes induced in the fibroblast serum-response program are expressed in tumors by the tumor cells themselves, by tumor-associated fibroblasts, or both. The molecular features that define this wound-like phenotype are evident at an early clinical stage, persist during treatment, and predict increased risk of metastasis and death in breast, lung, and gastric carcinomas. Thus, the transcriptional signature of the response of fibroblasts to serum provides a possible link between cancer progression and wound healing, as well as a powerful predictor of the clinical course in several common carcinomas.

  15. Semiautomated volumetric response evaluation as an imaging biomarker in superior sulcus tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vos, C.G.; Paul, M.A. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dahele, M.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bahce, I.; Smit, E.F. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Pulmonary Diseases, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Thunnissen, E. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Pathology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hartemink, K.J. [VU University Medical Center, Departments of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-02-15

    Volumetric response to therapy has been suggested as a biomarker for patient-centered outcomes. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was associated with pathological complete response (pCR) or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. The secondary aim was to evaluate a semiautomated method for serial volume assessment. In this retrospective study, treatment outcomes were obtained from a departmental database. The tumor was delineated on the computed tomography (CT) scan used for radiotherapy planning, which was typically performed during the first cycle of chemotherapy. These contours were transferred to the post-chemoradiotherapy diagnostic CT scan using deformable image registration (DIR) with/without manual editing. CT scans from 30 eligible patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 51 months. Neither absolute nor relative reduction in tumor volume following chemoradiotherapy correlated with pCR or 2-year survival. The tumor volumes determined by DIR alone and DIR + manual editing correlated to a high degree (R{sup 2} = 0.99, P < 0.01). Volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was not correlated with pCR or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. DIR-based contour propagation merits further evaluation as a tool for serial volumetric assessment. (orig.)

  16. Storey building early monitoring based on rapid seismic response analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julius, Musa, Admiral; Sunardi, Bambang; Rudyanto, Ariska

    2016-05-01

    Within the last decade, advances in the acquisition, processing and transmission of data from seismic monitoring has contributed to the growth in the number structures instrumented with such systems. An equally important factor for such growth can be attributed to the demands by stakeholders to find rapid answers to important questions related to the functionality or state of "health" of structures during and immediately of a seismic events. Consequently, this study aims to monitor the storey building based on seismic response i. e. earthquake and tremor analysis at short time lapse using accelerographs data. This study used one of storey building (X) in Jakarta city that suffered the effects of Kebumen earthquake January 25th 2014, Pandeglang earthquake July 9th 2014, and Lebak earthquake November 8th 2014. Tremors used in this study are tremors after the three following earthquakes. Data processing used to determine peak ground acceleration (PGA), peak ground velocity (PGV), peak ground displacement (PGD), spectral acceleration (SA), spectral velocity (SV), spectral displacement (SD), A/V ratio, acceleration amplification and effective duration (te). Then determine the natural frequency (f0) and peak of H/V ratio using H/V ratio method.The earthquakes data processing result shows the value of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio and acceleration amplification increases with height, while the value of the effective duration give a different viewpoint of building dynamic because duration of Kebumen earthquake shows the highest energy in the highest floor but Pandeglang and Lebak earthquake in the lowest floor. Then, tremors data processing result one month after each earthquakes shows the natural frequency of building in constant value. Increasing of peak ground motion, spectrum response, A/V ratio, acceleration amplification, then decrease of effective duration following the increase of building floors shows that the building construction supports the

  17. Application of Circulating Tumor DNA as a Non-Invasive Tool for Monitoring the Progression of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaolin Zhou

    Full Text Available Liquid biopsy has been proposed to be a promising noninvasive tool to obtain information on tumor progression. Through a clinical observation of a case series of 6 consecutive patients, we aim to determine the value of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA for monitoring the tumor burden during the treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC.We used capture sequencing of 545 genes to identify somatic alternations in primary tumor tissues of the six CRC patients who underwent radical surgery and in 23 plasma samples collected at serial time points. We compared the mutation patterns and variant allele frequencies (VAFs between the matched tissue and the plasma samples and evaluated the potential advantage of using ctDNA as a better tumor load indicator to detect disease relapse over carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, cancer antigen (CA 19-9 and imaging studies.We identified low-frequency mutations with a mean VAF of 0.88% (corresponding to a mean tumor burden of 0.20ng/mL in the preoperative plasmas of four patients with locally advanced CRC and a subset of mutations shared by their primary tumors. The tumor loads appeared a sudden decrease upon surgery or other adjuvant treatments and then generally maintained at low levels (0.092ng/mL until disease recurred. ctDNA increased by 13-fold when disease relapsed in one patient while the CEA and CA 19-9 levels remained normal. In this patient, all six somatic mutations identified in the preoperative plasma were detected in the recrudescent plasma again, with five mutations showing allele fraction increase.We described a multi-time-point profile of ctDNA of CRC patients during the course of comprehensive treatment and observed a correlation of ctDNA level with the clinically evaluated tumor progression. This demonstrated a new strategy by analyzing the heterogeneous ctDNA to evaluate and monitor the tumor burden in the treatment and follow-up of CRC patients, with potentially better potency than conventional biomarkers.

  18. Measurement of response of pulmonal tumors in 64-slice MDCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohns, Christian; Sossalla, Samuel (Dept. of Cardiology and Pneumology/Heart Center, Georg-August-Univ., Goettingen (Germany)), e-mail: christian.sohns@gmx.de; Mangelsdorf, Johanna; Obenauer, Silvia (Dept. of Radiology, Georg-August-Univ., Goettingen (Germany)); Konietschke, Frank (Dept. of Medical Statistics, Georg-August-Univ., Goettingen (Germany))

    2010-06-15

    Background: Advances in CT technology from single to multi-detector row CT (MDCT) permit a high resolution and volumetric presentation of pulmonary lesions. This implicates emerging measurement techniques that need to be contrasted with established methods. Purpose: To compare bidimensional, unidimensional, and volumetric methods for evaluation of treatment response in patients with lung lesions. Material and Methods: This study comprised 68 patients with pulmonary lesions who underwent a total of 276 64-MDCTs of chest at baseline and follow-up. RECIST and WHO criteria were used for unidimensional and bidimensional methods and region growing (RG) for volumetry. Patients were classified into four response categories. Respectively, two measurement techniques were contrasted and the kappa index was calculated. For intra-observer reproducibility the relative measurement error (RME) and kappa index with regard to agreement of response categories were evaluated. Results: Comparison of WHO und RECIST criteria achieves high correlation with kappa indices of 0.76 and 0.82. In particular, lesions with moderate increase of size in the range of 25-44% for bidimensional and 12-29% for unidimensional measurement result in different response categories when applying WHO and RECIST criteria. WHO criteria delivered PD more often than RECIST. kappa indices of 0.79 and 0.87 were attained in comparison of RECIST and RG, and 0.83 and 0.84 for WHO and RG. RME was 2.82% for RECIST, 7.53% for WHO, and 8.97% for RG. Intra-observer reproducibility was 95% for RECIST, 95% for WHO, and 96% for RG. Conclusion: The comparison of all methods resulted in no statistically significant differences. WHO criteria seemed to diverge the most, they declared several lesions prematurely as progression, and showed no benefit in comparison to RECIST. RG showed the best reproducibility, considered irregular lesions, was slightly superior to RECIST, and could be applied uniformly. Unidimensional measurement

  19. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  20. Monitoring KRAS mutations in circulating DNA and tumor cells using digital droplet PCR during treatment of KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibert, Nicolas; Pradines, Anne; Farella, Magali; Casanova, Anne; Gouin, Sandrine; Keller, Laura; Favre, Gilles; Mazieres, Julien

    2016-10-01

    Liquid biopsies are a new non-invasive strategy to detect and monitor the biology of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the era of personalized medicine. KRAS is an oncogenic driver that is mutated in 30% of NSCLCs and is associated with a poor prognosis. 62 samples from 32 patients, treated for metastatic KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma, had DNA extracted from plasma and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) prospectively tested for the presence of KRAS mutations using droplet digital PCR. A KRAS mutation was detected in 82% of patients. Sensitivity was 78% for circulating free DNA (cfDNA) and 34% for CTCs. The presence of a KRAS mutation in cfDNA was correlated with a poor response to chemotherapy or targeted therapy. When a KRAS-mutated-DNA was detected and then monitored in cfDNA, its variation during targeted or conventional therapy was correlated with response, according to RECIST criteria, in 87.5% of cases (n=14/16), whereas this correlation was observed in 37.5% of cases for CTCs (n=3/8). We report the usefulness of using digital droplet PCR on liquid biopsies to predict and monitor responses to treatment of KRAS-mutated lung adenocarcinoma. ctDNA was much more sensitive than CTCs in this context.

  1. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  2. Role of Gene Methylation in Antitumor Immune Response: Implication for Tumor Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximino Redondo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer immunosurveillance theory has emphasized the role of escape mechanisms in tumor growth. In this respect, a very important factor is the molecular characterization of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade immune recognition and destruction. Among the many escape mechanisms identified, alterations in classical and non-classical HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens class I and class II expression by tumor cells are of particular interest. In addition to the importance of HLA molecules, tumor-associated antigens and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules are also involved in immune recognition. The loss of HLA class I antigen expression and of co-stimulatory molecules can occur at genetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Epigenetic defects are involved in at least some mechanisms that preclude mounting a successful host-antitumor response involving the HLA system, tumor-associated antigens, and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of methylation in the regulation of molecules involved in the tumor immune response.

  3. Role of Gene Methylation in Antitumor Immune Response: Implication for Tumor Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Alfonso; Castro-Vega, Isabel [Department of Immunology, Hospital Clinico Universitario, Campus Universitario Teatinos S/N, 29010 Malaga (Spain); Redondo, Maximino, E-mail: mredondo@hcs.es [Department of Biochemistry, CIBER ESP, Hospital Costa del Sol, Marbella, Málaga, Carretera de Cadiz km 187, 29603 (Spain)

    2011-03-29

    Cancer immunosurveillance theory has emphasized the role of escape mechanisms in tumor growth. In this respect, a very important factor is the molecular characterization of the mechanisms by which tumor cells evade immune recognition and destruction. Among the many escape mechanisms identified, alterations in classical and non-classical HLA (Human Leucocyte Antigens) class I and class II expression by tumor cells are of particular interest. In addition to the importance of HLA molecules, tumor-associated antigens and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules are also involved in immune recognition. The loss of HLA class I antigen expression and of co-stimulatory molecules can occur at genetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Epigenetic defects are involved in at least some mechanisms that preclude mounting a successful host-antitumor response involving the HLA system, tumor-associated antigens, and accessory/co-stimulatory molecules. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of methylation in the regulation of molecules involved in the tumor immune response.

  4. "The Lower Threshold" phenomenon in tumor cells toward endogenous digitalis-like compounds: Responsible for tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun Weidemann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their first discovery as potential anti-cancer drugs decades ago, there is increasing evidence that digitalis-like compounds (DLC have anti-tumor effects. Less is known about endogenous DLC (EDLC metabolism and regulation. As stress hormones synthesized in and secreted from the adrenal gland, they likely take part in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. In a previous study, we revealed reduced EDLC concentrations in plasma and organs from immune-compromised animals and proposed that a similar situation of a deregulated HPA axis with "adrenal EDLF exhaustion" may contribute to tumorigenesis in chronic stress situations. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that a lowered EDLC response threshold of tumor cells as compared with normal cells increases the risk of tumorigenesis, especially in those individuals with reduced EDLC plasma concentrations after chronic stress exposure. We will evaluate this hypothesis by (a summarizing the effects of different DLC concentrations on tumor as compared with normal cells and (b reviewing some essential differences in the Na/K-ATPase of tumor as compared with normal cells (isoform pattern, pump activity, mutations of other signalosome receptors. We will conclude that (1 tumor cells, indeed, seem to have their individual "physiologic" EDLC response range that already starts at pmolar levels and (2 that individuals with markedly reduced (pmolar EDLC plasma levels are predisposed to cancer because these EDLC concentrations will predominantly stimulate the proliferation of tumor cells. Finally, we will summarize preliminary results from our department supporting this hypothesis.

  5. Evaluation of bioluminescent imaging for noninvasive monitoring of colorectal cancer progression in the liver and its response to immunogene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Aparicio Manuela

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioluminescent imaging (BLI is based on the detection of light emitted by living cells expressing a luciferase gene. Stable transfection of luciferase in cancer cells and their inoculation into permissive animals allows the noninvasive monitorization of tumor progression inside internal organs. We have applied this technology for the development of a murine model of colorectal cancer involving the liver, with the aim of improving the pre-clinical evaluation of new anticancer therapies. Results A murine colon cancer cell line stably transfected with the luciferase gene (MC38Luc1 retains tumorigenicity in immunocompetent C57BL/6 animals. Intrahepatic inoculation of MC38Luc1 causes progressive liver infiltration that can be monitored by BLI. Compared with ultrasonography (US, BLI is more sensitive, but accurate estimation of tumor mass is impaired in advanced stages. We applied BLI to evaluate the efficacy of an immunogene therapy approach based on the liver-specific expression of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12. Individualized quantification of light emission was able to determine the extent and duration of antitumor responses and to predict long-term disease-free survival. Conclusion We show that BLI is a rapid, convenient and safe technique for the individual monitorization of tumor progression in the liver. Evaluation of experimental treatments with complex mechanisms of action such as immunotherapy is possible using this technology.

  6. Monitoring therapeutic response of human ovarian cancer to 17-DMAG by noninvasive PET imaging with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Gang; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Zibo [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Keck School of Medicine, USC Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, has been intensively investigated for cancer therapy and is undergoing clinical trials. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is one of the client proteins of Hsp90 and its expression is decreased upon 17-DMAG treatment. In this study, we aimed to noninvasively monitor the HER-2 response to 17-DMAG treatment in xenografted mice. The sensitivity of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells to 17-DMAG in vitro was measured by MTT assay. HER-2 expression in SKOV-3 cells was determined by flow cytometry. Nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumors were treated with 17-DMAG and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by tumor size measurement. Both treated and control mice were imaged with microPET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab and {sup 18}F-FDG. Biodistribution studies and immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the microPET results. SKOV-3 cells are sensitive to 17-DMAG treatment, in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC{sub 50} value of 24.72 nM after 72 h incubation. The tumor growth curve supported the inhibition effect of 17-DMAG on SKOV-3 tumors. Quantitative microPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab had prominent tumor accumulation in untreated SKOV-3 tumors, which was significantly reduced in 17-DMAG-treated tumors. There was no uptake difference detected by FDG PET. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the significant reduction in tumor HER-2 level upon 17-DMAG treatment. The early response to anti-Hsp90 therapy was successfully monitored by quantitative PET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab. This approach may be valuable in monitoring the therapeutic response in HER-2-positive cancer patients under 17-DMAG treatment. (orig.)

  7. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Maeda

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  8. In vivo optical imaging of tumor and microvascular response to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Azusa; Leung, Michael K K; Conroy, Leigh; Chen, Yonghong; Bu, Jiachuan; Lindsay, Patricia E; Mintzberg, Shani; Virtanen, Carl; Tsao, Julissa; Winegarden, Neil A; Wang, Yanchun; Morikawa, Lily; Vitkin, I Alex; Jaffray, David A; Hill, Richard P; DaCosta, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a widely used cancer treatment. However, understanding how ionizing radiation affects tumor cells and their vasculature, particularly at cellular, subcellular, genetic, and protein levels, has been limited by an inability to visualize the response of these interdependent components within solid tumors over time and in vivo. Here we describe a new preclinical experimental platform combining intravital multimodal optical microscopy for cellular-level longitudinal imaging, a small animal x-ray microirradiator for reproducible spatially-localized millimeter-scale irradiations, and laser-capture microdissection of ex vivo tissues for transcriptomic profiling. Using this platform, we have developed new methods that exploit the power of optically-enabled microscopic imaging techniques to reveal the important role of the tumor microvasculature in radiation response of tumors. Furthermore, we demonstrate the potential of this preclinical platform to study quantitatively--with cellular and sub-cellular details--the spatio-temporal dynamics of the biological response of solid tumors to ionizing radiation in vivo.

  9. An effective immuno-PET imaging method to monitor CD8-dependent responses to immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavaré, Richard; Escuin-Ordinas, Helena; Mok, Stephen; McCracken, Melissa N.; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Salazar, Felix B.; Witte, Owen N.; Ribas, Antoni; Wu, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly advancing field of cancer immunotherapy is currently limited by the scarcity of noninvasive and quantitative technologies capable of monitoring the presence and abundance of CD8+ T cells and other immune cell subsets. In this study, we describe the generation of 89Zr-desferrioxamine-labeled anti-CD8 cys-diabody (89Zr-malDFO-169 cDb) for noninvasive immuno-positron emission tomography (immuno-PET) tracking of endogenous CD8+ T cells. We demonstrate that anti-CD8 immuno-PET is a sensitive tool for detecting changes in systemic and tumor-infiltrating CD8 expression in preclinical syngeneic tumor immunotherapy models including antigen-specific adoptive T cell transfer, agonistic antibody therapy (anti-CD137/4-1BB), and checkpoint blockade antibody therapy (anti-PD-L1). The ability of anti-CD8 immuno-PET to provide whole body information regarding therapy-induced alterations of this dynamic T cell population provides new opportunities to evaluate antitumor immune responses of immunotherapies currently being evaluated in the clinic. PMID:26573799

  10. Language Control in Bilinguals: Monitoring and Response Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branzi, Francesca M; Della Rosa, Pasquale A; Canini, Matteo; Costa, Albert; Abutalebi, Jubin

    2016-06-01

    Language control refers to the cognitive mechanism that allows bilinguals to correctly speak in one language avoiding interference from the nontarget language. Bilinguals achieve this feat by engaging brain areas closely related to cognitive control. However, 2 questions still await resolution: whether this network is differently engaged when controlling nonlinguistic representations, and whether this network is differently engaged when control is exerted upon a restricted set of lexical representations that were previously used (i.e., local control) as opposed to control of the entire language system (i.e., global control). In the present event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated these 2 questions by employing linguistic and nonlinguistic blocked switching tasks in the same bilingual participants. We first report that the left prefrontal cortex is driven similarly for control of linguistic and nonlinguistic representations, suggesting its domain-general role in the implementation of response selection. Second, we propose that language control in bilinguals is hierarchically organized with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex/presupplementary motor area acting as the supervisory attentional system, recruited for increased monitoring demands such as local control in the second language. On the other hand, prefrontal, inferior parietal areas and the caudate would act as the response selection system, tailored for language selection for both local and global control.

  11. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET Imaging for Monitoring Everolimus Effect on Tumor-Growth in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Munk Jensen, Mette; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen;

    2014-01-01

    .027). CONCLUSION: Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders...... and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging. METHODS: The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline...... with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily) for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10. RESULTS: Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative...

  12. Interstitial fluid pressure: A novel biomarker to monitor photo-induced drug uptake in tumor and normal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavin, Sabrina; Wang, Xingyu; Zellweger, Matthieu; Gonzalez, Michel; Bensimon, Michaël; Wagnières, Georges; Krueger, Thorsten; Ris, Hans-Beat; Gronchi, Fabrizio; Perentes, Jean Y

    2017-10-01

    Low-dose photodynamic therapy PDT (photoinduction) can modulate tumor vessels and enhance the uptake of liposomal cisplatin (Lipoplatin®) in pleural malignancies. However, the photo-induction conditions must be tightly controlled as overtreatment shuts down tumor vessels and enhances normal tissue drug uptake. In a pleural sarcoma and adenocarcinoma rat model (n = 12/group), we applied photoinduction (0.0625 mg/kg Visudyne®, 10 J/cm(2) ) followed by intravenous Lipoplatin® (5 mg/kg) administration. Tumor and normal tissue IFP were assessed before and up to 1 hour following photoinduction. Lipoplatin® uptake was determined 60 minutes following photoinduction. We then treated the pleura of tumor-free minipigs with high dose photodynamic therapy (PDT) (0.0625 mg/kg Visudyne®, 30 J/cm(2) , n = 5) followed by Lipoplatin (5 mg/kg) administration. In rodents, photoinduction resulted in a significant decrease of IFP (P parabola. In minipigs, high dose photodynamic treatment resulted in pleural IFP increase of some animals which predicted higher Lipoplatin® uptake levels. Normal and tumor vasculatures react differently to PDT. Continuous IFP monitoring in normal and tumor tissues is a promising biomarker of vessel photoinduction. Moderate drop in tumor with no change in normal tissue IFP are predictive of specific Lipoplatin® uptake by cancer following PDT. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:773-780, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

  14. Enhancement of radiation and chemotherapeutic drug responses by 2-deoxy-D-glucose in animal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Seema

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of an approach based on the energy-linked modification of DNA repair and cellular recovery processes using 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG; inhibitor of glycolytic ATP production has shown promising results in a number of model systems of cancer. Following encouraging results on the tolerance and toxicity (acute as well as late effects of the combination (2-DG and hypofractionated radiotherapy in Phase I and II clinical trials, its efficacy is currently under evaluation in Phase III clinical trials for glioma patients. Since heterogeneous physiologic and metabolic status in tumors as well as host-tumor interactions influence the local tumor control, which coupled with systemic disturbances could determine the cure (long-term tumor free survival, investigations on the in vivo responses of tumors to the combined treatment have received considerable attention. This communication provides a brief overview on the in vivo studies related to radio- and chemosensitization of tumors by 2-DG, besides the normal tissue toxicity induced by the combined treatment of 2-DG and radiation or chemotherapeutic drugs.

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Poggi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  16. Current diagnostic approach of bone tumors in childhood; Abordagem diagnostica atual dos tumores osseos na infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre, Marcia Barbosa; Scatigno Neto, Andre [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    1995-09-01

    The authors analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients with bone tumors or soft tissue tumors. The advent of such a sensitive imaging modality is fortuitous and coincides with a recent change in the therapeutic approach to primary bone tumors. MRI is extremely valuable in monitoring the tumor response to the initial chemotherapy and is accurate defining the margins of tumor, facilitating planning of limb salvage surgical procedures. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs.

  17. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α -and Interleukin-1-Induced Cellular Responses: Coupling Proteomic and Genomic Information

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediate the innate immune response. Dysregulation of the innate immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer, arthritis, and congestive heart failure. TNFα- and IL-1-induced changes in gene expression are mediated by similar transcription factors; however, TNFα and IL-1 receptor knock-out mice differ in their sensitivities to a known initiator (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) of the innate immune...

  18. Enzyme responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles for targeted tumor therapy in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Zhang, Beilu; Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Li, Jinghua; Dai, Liangliang; Zhou, Jun; Zhao, Xiaojing; Ye, Jingya; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-02-01

    This study reports a biocompatible controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for tumor microenvironment responsive drug delivery. It was fabricated by grafting phenylboronic acid conjugated human serum albumin (PBA-HSA) onto the surfaces of MSNs as a sealing agent, via an intermediate linker of a functional polypeptide, which was composed of two functional units: the polycation cell penetrating peptide (CPP) polyarginine, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) substrate peptide. A series of characterizations confirmed that the system had been successfully constructed. In vitro tests proved that the anticancer drug loading system could efficiently induce cell apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, the in vivo tumor experiments confirmed that the anticancer loading system could efficiently inhibit tumor growth with minimal side effects.This study reports a biocompatible controlled drug release system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) for tumor microenvironment responsive drug delivery. It was fabricated by grafting phenylboronic acid conjugated human serum albumin (PBA-HSA) onto the surfaces of MSNs as a sealing agent, via an intermediate linker of a functional polypeptide, which was composed of two functional units: the polycation cell penetrating peptide (CPP) polyarginine, and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) substrate peptide. A series of characterizations confirmed that the system had been successfully constructed. In vitro tests proved that the anticancer drug loading system could efficiently induce cell apoptosis in vitro. More importantly, the in vivo tumor experiments confirmed that the anticancer loading system could efficiently inhibit tumor growth with minimal side effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra, TGA curves, BET and BJH parameters, zeta potentials of nanoparticles; cleavage assay of the peptide detected by HPLC and MS; dose-dependent cytotoxicity of MSNs

  19. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  20. Unidimensional measurement may be superior to assess primary tumor response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanben; Lin, Xiurong; Xu, Yuanji; Bai, Penggang; Xiao, Youping; Pan, Yuhui; Li, Chao; Lin, Zhizhong; Zhang, Mingwei; Chen, Yunbin

    2017-02-01

    Application of current response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) for assessment of irregularly shaped nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a gray area with much ambiguity. Our aim was to compare unidimensional measurements (UDM) and bidimensional measurements (BDM) on magnetic resonance images in alternative planes for measurement of tumor response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) in patients with locally advanced NPC. 59 patients with untreated non-metastatic NPC were prospectively enrolled. The size or change in size of the primary tumor and retropharyngeal nodes was assessed by UDM and BDM on axial and coronal planes before and after 2 cycles of NACT. Tumor volume was considered as the reference standard. Correlation between volume and diameter was analyzed using a general linear model. The degree of agreement and discordance of response classification based on different measures were evaluated with κ statistic and McNemar's test, respectively. Both axial UDM (RECIST 1.1) and axial BDM (WHO) showed a significant association with volumetric standard. However, the agreement of axial UDM with VM was better than that of axial BDM (κ value: 0.514 to 0.372). In addition, when increasing coronal planes to evaluate tumor response with UDM and BDM, an inferior agreement between coronal BDM and VM was still observed. Notably, coronal UDM showed the best consistency with volume (κ = 0.585). Hence, axial UDM showed better correlation with volumetric measurements than axial BDM. Since coronal UDM showed high correlation to VM, we suggest further research to assess its use for response assessment of NPC after NACT.

  1. Real-time monitoring of hemodynamic changes in tumor vessels during photoimmunotherapy using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chia-Pin; Nakajima, Takahito; Watanabe, Rira; Sato, Kazuhide; Choyke, Peter L.; Chen, Yu; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2014-09-01

    Photoimmunotherapy (PIT) is a cell-specific cancer therapy based on an armed antibody conjugate that induces rapid and highly selective cancer cell necrosis after exposure to near-infrared (NIR) light. The PIT treatment also induces the superenhanced permeability and retention effect, which allows high concentrations of nanoparticles to accumulate in the tumor bed. In our pilot studies, optical coherence tomography (OCT) reveals dramatic hemodynamic changes during PIT. We developed and applied speckle variance analysis, Doppler flow measurement, bulk motion removal, and automatic region of interest selection to quantify vessel diameter and blood velocity within tumors in vivo. OCT imaging reveals that blood velocity in peripheral tumor vessels quickly drops below the detection limit while the vessel lumen remains open (4 vessels from 3 animals). On the other hand, control tumor vessels (receive NIR illumination but no PIT drug) do not show the sustained blood velocity drop (5 vessels from 3 animals). Ultraslow blood velocity could result in a long drug circulation time in tumor. Increase of the blood pool volume within the central tumor (shown in histology) may be the leading cause of the periphery blood velocity drop and could also increase the drug pool volume in tumor vessels.

  2. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8648 (Japan); Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the

  3. Prophylactic vaccines are potent activators of monocyte-derived dendritic cells and drive effective anti-tumor responses in melanoma patients at the cost of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Kalijn F; Aarntzen, Erik H J G; Pots, Jeanette M; Olde Nordkamp, Michel A M; van de Rakt, Mandy W M M; Scharenborg, Nicole M; de Boer, Annemiek J; van Oorschot, Tom G M; Croockewit, Sandra A J; Blokx, Willeke A M; Oyen, Wim J G; Boerman, Otto C; Mus, Roel D M; van Rossum, Michelle M; van der Graaf, Chantal A A; Punt, Cornelis J A; Adema, Gosse J; Figdor, Carl G; de Vries, I Jolanda M; Schreibelt, Gerty

    2016-03-01

    Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy is explored worldwide in cancer patients, predominantly with DC matured with pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandin E2. We studied the safety and efficacy of vaccination with monocyte-derived DC matured with a cocktail of prophylactic vaccines that contain clinical-grade Toll-like receptor ligands (BCG, Typhim, Act-HIB) and prostaglandin E2 (VAC-DC). Stage III and IV melanoma patients were vaccinated via intranodal injection (12 patients) or combined intradermal/intravenous injection (16 patients) with VAC-DC loaded with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and mRNA encoding tumor antigens gp100 and tyrosinase. Tumor antigen-specific T cell responses were monitored in blood and skin-test infiltrating-lymphocyte cultures. Almost all patients mounted prophylactic vaccine- or KLH-specific immune responses. Both after intranodal injection and after intradermal/intravenous injection, tumor antigen-specific immune responses were detected, which coincide with longer overall survival in stage IV melanoma patients. VAC-DC induce local and systemic CTC grade 2 and 3 toxicity, which is most likely caused by BCG in the maturation cocktail. The side effects were self-limiting or resolved upon a short period of systemic steroid therapy. We conclude that VAC-DC can induce functional tumor-specific responses. Unfortunately, toxicity observed after vaccination precludes the general application of VAC-DC, since in DC maturated with prophylactic vaccines BCG appears to be essential in the maturation cocktail.

  4. Optical properties of tumor tissues grown on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken eggs: tumor model to assay of tumor response to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Norihiro; Kariyama, Yoichiro; Hazama, Hisanao; Ishii, Takuya; Kitajima, Yuya; Inoue, Katsushi; Ishizuka, Masahiro; Tanaka, Tohru; Awazu, Kunio

    2015-12-01

    Herein, the optical adequacy of a tumor model prepared with tumor cells grown on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of a chicken egg is evaluated as an alternative to the mouse tumor model to assess the optimal irradiation conditions in photodynamic therapy (PDT). The optical properties of CAM and mouse tumor tissues were measured with a double integrating sphere and the inverse Monte Carlo technique in the 350- to 1000-nm wavelength range. The hemoglobin and water absorption bands observed in the CAM tumor tissue (10 eggs and 10 tumors) are equal to that of the mouse tumor tissue (8 animals and 8 tumors). The optical intersubject variability of the CAM tumor tissues meets or exceeds that of the mouse tumor tissues, and the reduced scattering coefficient spectra of CAM tumor tissues can be equated with those of mouse tumor tissues. These results confirm that the CAM tumor model is a viable alternative to the mouse tumor model, especially for deriving optimal irradiation conditions in PDT.

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, C E

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in monitoring response of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The role of MRI with respect to achieving personalized breast cancer treatment by improving response monitoring is examined. Our findings demonstrate the potential clinical relevance of contrast-enhanced MRI for monitoring response of breast cancer during and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. We defined MRI criteria ( reduction < 25%...

  6. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  7. Acid-Responsive Therapeutic Polymer for Prolonging Nanoparticle Circulation Lifetime and Destroying Drug-Resistant Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Ji-Gang; Gao, Feng; Yang, Lihua

    2016-01-13

    How to destroy drug-resistant tumor cells remains an ongoing challenge for cancer treatment. We herein report on a therapeutic nanoparticle, aHLP-PDA, which has an acid-activated hemolytic polymer (aHLP) grafted onto photothermal polydopamine (PDA) nanosphere via boronate ester bond, in efforts to ablate drug-resistant tumors. Upon exposure to oxidative stress and/or near-infrared laser irradiation, aHLP-PDA nanoparticle responsively releases aHLP, likely via responsive cleavage of boronate ester bond, and thus responsively exhibits acid-facilitated mammalian-membrane-disruptive activity. In vitro cell studies with drug-resistant and/or thermo-tolerant cancer cells show that the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle demonstrates preferential cytotoxicity at acidic pH over physiological pH. When administered intravenously, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle exhibits significantly prolonged blood circulation lifetime and enhanced tumor uptake compared to bare PDA nanosphere, likely owing to aHLP's stealth effects conferred by its zwitterionic nature at blood pH. As a result, the aHLP-PDA nanoparticle effectively ablates drug-resistant tumors, leading to 100% mouse survival even on the 32nd day after suspension of photothermal treatment, as demonstrated with the mouse model. This work suggests that a combination of nanotechnology with lessons learned in bacterial antibiotic resistance may offer a feasible and effective strategy for treating drug-resistant cancers often found in relapsing patients.

  8. Targeting the tumor-draining area : local immunotherapy and its effect on the systemic T cell response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herbert-Fransen, Marieke Fernande

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the role of local immune stimulation in the lymph node and tumor microenvironment and its effect on systemic CD8+ T cell responses, in particular the anti-tumor CD8+ T cell responses. In chapter 2 the use of a slow-release system is described to deliver the immune-acti

  9. Immunological responses induced by the combination of phototherapy and immunotherapy in the treatment of metastatic tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei R.; Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Liu, Hong

    2008-02-01

    Combination therapy using laser photothermal interaction and immunological stimulation has demonstrated its ability to induce immunological responses. Glycated chitosan (GC), an immunological stimulant, and imiquimod, a new type of immune response modifier (IRM), when used in conjunction with laser phototherapy, have shown to have a great immunological stimulation function. Specifically, imiquimod can help release cytokines from immunocompetent cells, stimulate TH1 lymphocyte responses (CD8+ T-cells), and recruit additional dendritic cells. To study the effects of immunoadjuvnats in combination of laser photo-irradiation, we treated animal tumors with laser-ICG-GC combination and late-stage melanoma patients with laser-ICG-imiquimod combination. At designated times, tumors, blood, and spleens in both treated and untreated animals were colleted for analysis. The major immunological indicators, such as IL-6, IL-12, IFN-gamma, CD4, and CD8 were analyzed. The same immunological analysis was also performed for melanoma patients treated by the laser-imiquimod combination.

  10. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  11. Prognostication and response assessment in liver and pancreatic tumors: The new imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Robertis, Riccardo; Tinazzi Martini, Paolo; Demozzi, Emanuele; Puntel, Gino; Ortolani, Silvia; Cingarlini, Sara; Ruzzenente, Andrea; Guglielmi, Alfredo; Tortora, Giampaolo; Bassi, Claudio; Pederzoli, Paolo; D’Onofrio, Mirko

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) and perfusion computed tomography (CT) are technical improvements of morphologic imaging that can evaluate functional properties of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors during conventional MRI or CT examinations. Nevertheless, the term “functional imaging” is commonly used to describe molecular imaging techniques, as positron emission tomography (PET) CT/MRI, which still represent the most widely used methods for the evaluation of functional properties of solid neoplasms; unlike PET or single photon emission computed tomography, functional imaging techniques applied to conventional MRI/CT examinations do not require the administration of radiolabeled drugs or specific equipments. Moreover, DWI and DCE-MRI can be performed during the same session, thus providing a comprehensive “one-step” morphological and functional evaluation of hepato-bilio-pancreatic tumors. Literature data reveal that functional imaging techniques could be proposed for the evaluation of these tumors before treatment, given that they may improve staging and predict prognosis or clinical outcome. Microscopic changes within neoplastic tissues induced by treatments can be detected and quantified with functional imaging, therefore these techniques could be used also for post-treatment assessment, even at an early stage. The aim of this editorial is to describe possible applications of new functional imaging techniques apart from molecular imaging to hepatic and pancreatic tumors through a review of up-to-date literature data, with a particular emphasis on pathological correlations, prognostic stratification and post-treatment monitoring. PMID:26078555

  12. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Patrick; Hartmann, Linda; Wenz, Frederik; Herskind, Carsten

    2016-01-14

    During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  13. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  14. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  15. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  16. Pattern of Retained Contrast on Immediate Postprocedure Computed tomography (CT) After Particle Embolization of Liver Tumors Predicts Subsequent Treatment Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaodong, E-mail: wangxde@gmail.com; Erinjeri, Joseph P., E-mail: erinjerj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States); Jia Xiaoyu, E-mail: jiax@mskcc.org; Gonen, Mithat, E-mail: gonenm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Brown, Karen T., E-mail: brown6@mskcc.org; Sofocleous, Constantinos T., E-mail: sofoclec@mskcc.org; Getrajdman, George I., E-mail: getrajdg@mskcc.org; Brody, Lynn A., E-mail: brodyl@mskcc.org; Thornton, Raymond H., E-mail: throntor@mskcc.org; Maybody, Majid, E-mail: maybodym@mskcc.org; Covey, Ann M., E-mail: covey@mskcc.org; Siegelbaum, Robert H., E-mail: siegelbr@mskcc.org; Alago, William, E-mail: alagow@mskcc.org; Solomon, Stephen B., E-mail: solomons@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Interventional Radiology Service, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo determine if the pattern of retained contrast on immediate postprocedure computed tomography (CT) after particle embolization of hepatic tumors predicts modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST) response.Materials and MethodsThis study was approved by the Institutional Review Board with a waiver of authorization. One hundred four liver tumors were embolized with spherical embolic agents (Embospheres, Bead Block, LC Bead) and polyvinyl alcohol. Noncontrast CT was performed immediately after embolization to assess contrast retention in the targeted tumors, and treatment response was assessed by mRECIST criteria on follow-up CT (average time 9.0 {+-} 7.7 weeks after embolization). Tumor contrast retention (TCR) was determined based on change in Hounsfield units (HUs) of the index tumors between the preprocedure and immediate postprocedure scans; vascular contrast retention (VCR) was rated; and defects in contrast retention (DCR) were also documented. The morphology of residual enhancing tumor on follow-up CT was described as partial, circumferential, or total. Association between TCR variables and tumor response were assessed using multivariate logistic regression.ResultsOf 104 hepatic tumors, 51 (49 %) tumors had complete response (CR) by mRECIST criteria; 23 (22.1 %) had partial response (PR); 21 (20.2 %) had stable disease (SD); and 9 (8.7 %) had progressive disease (PD). By multivariate analysis, TCR, VCR, and tumor size are independent predictors of CR (p = 0.02, 0.05, and 0.005 respectively). In 75 tumors, DCR was found to be an independent predictor of failure to achieve complete response (p < 0.0001) by imaging criteria.ConclusionTCR, VCR, and DCR on immediate posttreatment CT are independent predictors of CR by mRECIST criteria.

  17. Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) elevation gastric adenocarcinoma and importance of AFP change in tumor response evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatli, Ali Murat; Urakci, Zuhat; Kalender, Mehmet Emin; Arslan, Harun; Tastekin, Didem; Kaplan, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Elevated serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) levels in adults are considered abnormal. This parameter is used mostly in the diagnosis and follow-up of hepatocellular carcinomas and yolk sac tumors. Among the other rare tumors accompanied with elevated serum AFP levels, gastric cancer is the most common. In this study, we evaluated the follow-up and comparison of the treatment and marker response of patients with metastatic gastric cancer who had elevated serum AFP levels. We performed a retrospective study, including all consecutive patients with advanced gastric cancer, who received systemic chemotherapy with elevated AFP level. Seventeen metastatic gastric cancer patients with elevated AFP levels at the time of diagnosis were evaluated. Fourteen (82.4%) were males and three (17.6%) were females. The primary tumor localization was the gastric body in 8 (76.4%), cardia in 7 (41.2%), and antrum in 2 (11.8%). Hepatic metastasis was observed in 13 (76.4%) at the time of diagnosis. When the relationship of AFP levels and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) response of the patients with their radiologic responses was evaluated, it was found that the radiologic response was compatible with AFP response in 16 (94.1%) patients and with CEA response in 12 (70.6%); however, in 5 (29.4%) patients no accordance was observed between radiological and CEA responses. Follow-up of AFP levels in metastatic gastric cancer patients with elevated AFP levels may allow prediction of early treatment response and could be more useful than the CEA marker for follow-up in response evaluation.

  18. Expansion and Activation of CD103(+) Dendritic Cell Progenitors at the Tumor Site Enhances Tumor Responses to Therapeutic PD-L1 and BRAF Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Hélène; Idoyaga, Juliana; Rahman, Adeeb; Leboeuf, Marylène; Remark, Romain; Jordan, Stefan; Casanova-Acebes, Maria; Khudoynazarova, Makhzuna; Agudo, Judith; Tung, Navpreet; Chakarov, Svetoslav; Rivera, Christina; Hogstad, Brandon; Bosenberg, Marcus; Hashimoto, Daigo; Gnjatic, Sacha; Bhardwaj, Nina; Palucka, Anna Karolina; Brown, Brian D; Brody, Joshua; Ginhoux, Florent; Merad, Miriam

    2016-04-19

    Large numbers of melanoma lesions develop resistance to targeted inhibition of mutant BRAF or fail to respond to checkpoint blockade. We explored whether modulation of intratumoral antigen-presenting cells (APCs) could increase responses to these therapies. Using mouse melanoma models, we found that CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) were the only APCs transporting intact antigens to the lymph nodes and priming tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells. CD103(+) DCs were required to promote anti-tumoral effects upon blockade of the checkpoint ligand PD-L1; however, PD-L1 inhibition only led to partial responses. Systemic administration of the growth factor FLT3L followed by intratumoral poly I:C injections expanded and activated CD103(+) DC progenitors in the tumor, enhancing responses to BRAF and PD-L1 blockade and protecting mice from tumor rechallenge. Thus, the paucity of activated CD103(+) DCs in tumors limits checkpoint-blockade efficacy and combined FLT3L and poly I:C therapy can enhance tumor responses to checkpoint and BRAF blockade.

  19. Strategies for the identification of T cell-recognized tumor antigens in hematological malignancies for improved graft-versus-tumor responses after allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Jenny; Feinman, Rena; Korngold, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is an effective immunotherapeutic treatment that can provide partial or complete remission for patients with hematological malignancies. Mature donor T cells in the donor inoculum play a central role in mediating graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses by destroying residual tumor cells that persist after conditioning regimens. Alloreactivity towards minor histocompatibility antigens (miHA), which are varied tissue-related self-peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on recipient cells, some of which may be shared on tumor cells, is a dominant factor for the development of GVT. Potentially, GVT can also be directed to tumor-associated antigens or tumor-specific antigens that are more specific to the tumor cells themselves. The full exploitation of allo-BMT, however, is greatly limited by the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is mediated by the donor T cell response against the miHA expressed in the recipient's cells of the intestine, skin, and liver. Because of the significance of GVT and GVHD responses in determining the clinical outcome of patients, miHA and tumor antigens have been intensively studied, and one active immunotherapeutic approach to separate these two responses has been cancer vaccination after allo-BMT. The combination of these two strategies has an advantage over vaccination of the patient without allo-BMT because his or her immune system has already been exposed and rendered unresponsive to the tumor antigens. The conditioning for allo-BMT eliminates the patient's existing immune system, including regulatory elements, and provides a more permissive environment for the newly developing donor immune compartment to selectively target the malignant cells. Utilizing recent technological advances, the identities of many human miHA and tumor antigenic peptides have been defined and are currently being evaluated in clinical and basic

  20. Strategies for the Identification of T Cell–Recognized Tumor Antigens in Hematological Malignancies for Improved Graft-versus-Tumor Responses after Allogeneic Blood and Marrow Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberberg, Jenny; Feinman, Rena; Korngold, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic blood and marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) is an effective immunotherapeutic treatment that can provide partial or complete remission for patients with hematological malignancies. Mature donor T cells in the donor inoculum play a central role in mediating graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses by destroying residual tumor cells that persist after conditioning regimens. Alloreactivity towards minor histocompatibility antigens (miHA), which are varied tissue-related self-peptides presented in the context of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on recipient cells, some of which may be shared on tumor cells, is a dominant factor for the development of GVT. Potentially, GVT can also be directed to tumor-associated antigens or tumor-specific antigens that are more specific to the tumor cells themselves. The full exploitation of allo-BMT, however, is greatly limited by the development of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is mediated by the donor T cell response against the miHA expressed in the recipient’s cells of the intestine, skin, and liver. Because of the significance of GVT and GVHD responses in determining the clinical outcome of patients, miHA and tumor antigens have been intensively studied, and one active immunotherapeutic approach to separate these two responses has been cancer vaccination after allo-BMT. The combination of these two strategies has an advantage over vaccination of the patient without allo-BMT because his or her immune system has already been exposed and rendered unresponsive to the tumor antigens. The conditioning for allo-BMT eliminates the patient’s existing immune system, including regulatory elements, and provides a more permissive environment for the newly developing donor immune compartment to selectively target the malignant cells. Utilizing recent technological advances, the identities of many human miHA and tumor antigenic peptides have been defined and are currently being evaluated in clinical and basic

  1. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liya [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States); Dept. of Radiology, Baoan Hospital, Shenzhen (China); Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui [Dept. of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States)], e-mail: hmao@emory.edu; Dandan, Chen [Dept. of Physics, Emory Univ., Atlanta, (United States); School of Radiation Medicine and Protection, Soochow Univ., Suzhou (China); Olson, Jeffrey [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Emory Univ., School of Medicine, Atlanta (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  2. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  3. Ball-in-ball ZrO2 nanostructure for simultaneous CT imaging and highly efficient synergic microwave ablation and tri-stimuli-responsive chemotherapy of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dan; Niu, Meng; Tan, Longfei; Fu, Changhui; Ren, Xiangling; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Hongshan; Wang, Jingzhuo; Li, Laifeng; Meng, Xianwei

    2017-06-29

    Combined thermo-chemotherapy displays outstanding synergically therapeutic efficiency when compared with standalone thermotherapy and chemotherapy. Herein, we developed a smart tri-stimuli-responsive drug delivery system involving X@BB-ZrO2 NPs (X represents loaded IL, DOX, keratin and tetradecanol) based on novel ball-in-ball-structured ZrO2 nanoparticles (BB-ZrO2 NPs). The microwave energy conversion efficiency of BB-ZrO2 NPs was 41.2% higher than that of traditional single-layer NPs due to the cooperative action of self-reflection and spatial confinement effect of the special two-layer hollow nanostructure. The tri-stimuli-responsive controlled release strategy indicate that integrated pH, redox and microwaves in single NPs based on keratin and tetradecanol could effectively enhance the specific controlled release of DOX. The release of DOX was only 8.1% in PBS with pH = 7.2 and GSH = 20 μM. However, the release could reach about 50% at the tumor site (pH = 5.5, GSH = 13 mM) under microwave ablation. The as-made X@BB-ZrO2 NPs exhibited perfect synergic therapy effect of chemotherapy and microwave ablation both in subcutaneous tumors (H22 tumor-bearing mice) and deep tumors (liver transplantation VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model). There was no recurrence and death in the X@BB-ZrO2 + MW group during the therapy of subcutaneous tumors even on the 42(nd) day. The growth rates in the deep tumor of the control, MW and X@BB-ZrO2 + MW groups were 290.1%, 14.1% and -42% 6 days after ablation, respectively. Dual-source CT was used to monitor the metabolism behavior of the as-made BB-ZrO2 NPs and traditional CT was utilized to monitor the tumor growth in rabbits. Frozen section examination and ICP results indicated the precise control of drug delivery and enhanced cytotoxicity by the tri-stimuli-responsive controlled release strategy. The ball-in-ball ZrO2 NPs with high microwave energy conversion efficiency were first developed for synergic microwave ablation and tri-stimuli-responsive

  4. Nanomedicine targeting the tumor microenvironment: Therapeutic strategies to inhibit angiogenesis, remodel matrix, and modulate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Siegler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to the tumor microenvironment (TME, which includes cellular and structural components such as fibroblasts, immune cells, vasculature, and extracellular matrix (ECM that surround tumor sites. These components contribute to tumor growth and metastasis and are one reason why traditional chemotherapy often is insufficient to eradicate the tumor completely. Newer treatments that target aspects of the TME, such as antiangiogenic and immunostimulatory therapies, have seen limited clinical success despite promising preclinical results. This can be attributed to a number of reasons, including a lack of drug penetration deeper into the necrotic tumor core, nonspecific delivery, rapid clearance from serum, or toxic side effects at high doses. Nanoparticles offer a potential solution to all of these obstacles, and many recent studies have shown encouraging results using nanomedicine to target TME vasculature, ECM, and immune response. While few of these platforms have made it to clinical trials to date, these strategies are relatively new and may offer a way to improve the effects of anticancer therapies.

  5. Tumor Cells Upregulate Normoxic HIF-1α in Response to Doxorubicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yiting; Eble, Joseph M.; Moon, Ejung; Yuan, Hong; Weitzel, Douglas H.; Landon, Chelsea D.; Nien, Charleen Yu-Chih; Hanna, Gabi; Rich, Jeremy N.; Provenzale, James M.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is a master transcription factor that controls cellular homeostasis. While its activation benefits normal tissue, HIF-1 activation in tumors is a major risk factor for angiogenesis, therapeutic resistance and poor prognosis. HIF-1 activity is usually suppressed under normoxic conditions because of rapid oxygen-dependent degradation of HIF-1α. Here we show that under normoxic conditions HIF-1α is upregulated in tumor cells in response to doxorubicin, a chemotherapy used to treat many cancers. Doxorubicin also enhanced VEGF secretion by normoxic tumor cells and stimulated tumor angiogenesis. Doxorubicin-induced accumulation of HIF-1α in normoxic cells was caused by increased expression and activation of STAT1, the activation of which stimulated expression of iNOS and its synthesis of NO in tumor cells. Mechanistic investigations established that blocking NO synthesis or STAT1 activation was sufficient to attenuate the HIF-1α accumulation induced by doxorubicin in normoxic cancer cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report that a chemotherapeutic drug can induce HIF-1α accumulation in normoxic cells, an efficacy-limiting activity. Our results argue that HIF-1α targeting strategies may enhance doxorubicin efficacy. More generally, they suggest a broader perspective on the design of combination chemotherapy approaches with immediate clinical impact. PMID:23959856

  6. Brain tumor vessel response to synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy: a short-term in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serduc, Raphaël; Christen, Thomas; Laissue, Jean; Farion, Régine; Bouchet, Audrey; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Segebarth, Christoph; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; LeDuc, Géraldine; Bravin, Alberto; Rémy, Chantal; Barbier, Emmanuel L.

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this work focuses on the description of the short-term response of a 9L brain tumor model and its vasculature to microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Rat 9L gliosarcomas implanted in nude mice brains were irradiated by MRT 13 days after tumor inoculation using two orthogonal arrays of equally spaced 28 planar microbeams (25 µm width, 211 µm spacing and dose 500 Gy). At 1, 7 and 14 days after MRT, apparent diffusion coefficient, blood volume and vessel size index were mapped by MRI. Mean survival time after tumor inoculation increased significantly between MRT-treated and untreated groups (23 and 28 days respectively, log-rank test, p brain but MRI results suggest that the increase in survival time after our MRT approach may be rather due to a cytoreduction than to early direct effects of ionizing radiation on tumor vessels. These results suggest that MRT parameters need to be optimized to further damage tumor vessels.

  7. Role of Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Parameters in the Evaluation of Treatment Response in Malignant Tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing-Gang Xu; Jun-Fang Xian

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To elaborate the role of quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) parameters in the evaluation of treatment response in malignant tumors.Data Sources:Data cited in this review were obtained mainly from PubMed in English from 1999 to 2014,with keywords "dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI," "diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)," "microcirculation," "apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC)," "treatment response" and "oncology."Study Selection:Articles regarding principles of DCE-MRI,principles of DWI,clinical applications as well as opportunity and aspiration were identified,retrieved and reviewed.Results:A significant correlation between ADC values and treatment response was reported in most DWI studies.Most quantitative DCE-MRI studies showed a significant correlation between K~s values and treatment response.However,in different tumors and studies,both high and low pretreatment ADC or K~s values were found to be associated with response rate.Both DCE-MRI and DWI demonstrated changes in their parameters hours to days after treatment,showing a decrease in K~ns or an increase in ADC associated with response in most cases.Conclusions:Combinations of quantitative MRI play an important role in the evaluation of treatment response of malignant tumors and hold promise for use as a cancer treatment response biomarker.However,validation is hampered by the lack of reproducibility and standardization.MRI acquisition protocols and quantitative image analysis approaches should be properly addressed prior to further testing the clinical use of quantitative MRI parameters in the assessment of treatments.

  8. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  9. In vivo anti-tumor efficacy of docetaxel-loaded thermally responsive nanohydrogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jian; Gu Yueqing [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, China Pharmaceutical University, Tongjia Lane No. 24, Nanjing 210009 (China); Qian Zhiyu, E-mail: cpuyueqing@163.co, E-mail: guyueqing@hotmail.co [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Automation, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2009-08-12

    Thermally responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) (P(NIPA-co-AAm)) nanohydrogel (NHG) with a diameter of about 50 nm and a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of about 40 {sup 0}C was synthesized by a previously reported precipitation polymerization method. The physical properties including LCST, diameter and morphology were characterized. Four hydrophobic model drugs (5-fluorouracil (5-FU), fluorescein, docetaxel (DTX) and near-infrared dye-12 (NIRD-12)) with different hydrophilicities were respectively entrapped into the nanoparticles and their in vitro release kinetics from NHG was investigated. DTX was ultimately chosen as the goal anti-tumor drug and optimally entrapped into NHG with a drug loading content (DLC) of 7.38% and encapsulation efficiency (EE) of 73.8%. An in vitro drug release test indicated that DTX-loaded NHG had zero-order release kinetics at 43 {sup 0}C. The respective anti-tumor efficacy of DTX-loaded NHG with or without hyperthermia on tumor tissue was evaluated in Kunming mice-bearing S180 sarcoma. The inhibition rates of DTX-loaded NHG with or without hyperthermia were 78.15% and 48.78%, respectively. DTX-loaded NHG also showed much lower toxicity during the therapeutic procedure. Results indicated that this kind of thermally responsive, drug-loaded NHG could be used as a promising strategy for tumor therapy with the help of local hyperthermia treatment.

  10. Evaluation of Tl-201 SPECT for monitoring the treatment of pulmonary and mediastinal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Ryuichiro; Narabayashi, Isamu; Matsui, Ritsuo; Sueyoshi, Kozo; Nakata, Yasunobu; Tabuchi, Kojiro; Komori, Tsuyoshi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)

    1995-05-01

    Tl-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 88 patients with pulmonary or mediastinal tumors in order to evaluate its usefulness for the detection of disease and for the assessment of the effect of treatment. We also examined mediastinal and hilar lymph node metastasis from lung cancer. Tl-201 SPECT showed abnormal accumulation on delayed images in all lung cancer patients with tumor diameters more than 12 mm. In the 14 operated lung cancer patients, mediastinal and hilar lymph node metastases with diameters of more than 15 mm were imaged, but one with a diameter of 9 mm was missed. The retention index (RI) was 27.52{+-}31.58 in malignant tumors and -13.67{+-}8.15 in benign tumors (p<0.05). The RI was significantly lower after treatment than before treatment. The interval until tumor recurrence or reactivation tended to be longer in patients who showed a significant decrease in the RI after therapy. These findings suggest the usefulness of the RI as an index of therapeutic efficacy. (author).

  11. The strength of the T cell response against a surrogate tumor antigen induced by oncolytic VSV therapy does not correlate with tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janelle, Valérie; Langlois, Marie-Pierre; Lapierre, Pascal; Charpentier, Tania; Poliquin, Laurent; Lamarre, Alain

    2014-06-01

    Cancer therapy using oncolytic viruses has gained interest in the last decade. Vesicular stomatitis virus is an attractive candidate for this alternative treatment approach. The importance of the immune response against tumor antigens in virotherapy efficacy is now well recognized, however, its relative contribution versus the intrinsic oncolytic capacity of viruses has been difficult to evaluate. To start addressing this question, we compared glycoprotein and matrix mutants of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), showing different oncolytic potentials for B16/B16gp33 melanoma tumor cells in vitro, with the wild-type virus in their ability to induce tumor-specific CD8(+) T cell responses and control tumor progression in vivo. Despite the fact that wild-type and G mutants induced a stronger gp33-specific immune response compared to the MM51R mutant, all VSV strains showed a similar capacity to slow down tumor progression. The effectiveness of the matrix mutant treatment proved to be CD8(+) dependent and directed against tumor antigens other than gp33 since adoptive transfer of isolated CD8(+) T lymphocytes from treated B16gp33-bearing mice resulted in significant protection of naive mice against challenge with the parental tumor. Remarkably, the VSV matrix mutant induced the upregulation of major histocompatibility class-I antigen at the tumor cell surface thus favoring recognition by CD8(+) T cells. These results demonstrate that VSV mutants induce an antitumor immune response using several mechanisms. A better understanding of these mechanisms will prove useful for the rational design of viruses with improved therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Functional membrane androgen receptors in colon tumors trigger pro-apoptotic responses in vitro and reduce drastically tumor incidence in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Föller Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane androgen receptors (mAR have been implicated in the regulation of cell growth, motility and apoptosis in prostate and breast cancer. Here we analyzed mAR expression and function in colon cancer. Results Using fluorescent mAR ligands we showed specific membrane staining in colon cell lines and mouse xenograft tumor tissues, while membrane staining was undetectable in healthy mouse colon tissues and non-transformed intestinal cells. Saturation/displacement assays revealed time- and concentration-dependent specific binding for testosterone with a KD of 2.9 nM. Stimulation of colon mAR by testosterone albumin conjugates induced rapid cytoskeleton reorganization and apoptotic responses, even in the presence of anti-androgens. The actin cytoskeleton drug cytochalasin B effectively inhibited the pro-apoptotic responses and caspase-3 activation. Interestingly, in vivo studies revealed that mAR activation resulted in a 65% reduction of tumor incidence in chemically induced Balb/c mice colon tumors. Conclusion Our results demonstrate for the first time that functional mARs are predominantly expressed in colon tumors and that their activation results in induction of anti-tumor responses in vitro and extensive reduction of tumor incidence in vivo.

  13. Chemosensitivity assay in mice prostate tumor: Preliminary report of flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, ion ratiometric methods of anti-neoplastic drug monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kline Richard

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, ion ratiomateric analysis and NMR peaks characterized drug chemosensitivity of antineoplastic drugs. Hypotheses were: 1. The chemosensitive effect of different cancer cell lines is characteristic; 2. DNA fragmentation, ion ratiometric analysis suggest apoptosis status of tumor cells. Methods PC-3 cell lines were compared with DU-145, LNCaP cell lines in culture for the [Na]i and [Ca]i ion sensing dyes, cell death, NMR peaks and apoptosis staining for chemotherapeutic action of different drugs. Results DNA fragmentation, ratiometric ions and fluorescence endlabelling plots were characteristic for cell lines and drug response. 31P-23Na NMR spectra showed characteristic high phospho-choline and sodium peaks. Conclusion Flow cytometry, DNA fragmentation, ion ratiometric methods and NMR peaks indicated apoptosis and offered in vivo drug monitoring method.

  14. Enhanced antitumoral efficacy and immune response following conditionally replicative adenovirus containing constitutive HSF1 delivery to rodent tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Rong

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncolytic adenoviruses are promising as anticancer agents but have limited clinical responses. Our previous study showed that heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 overexpression could increase the anti-tumor efficacy of E1B55kD deleted oncolytic adenovirus through increasing the viral burst. Due to the important roles of heat shock proteins (HSPs in eliciting innate and adaptive immunity, we reasoned that besides increasing the viral burst, HSF1 may also play a role in increasing tumor specific immune response. Methods In the present study, intra-dermal murine models of melanoma (B16 and colorectal carcinoma (CT26 were treated with E1B55kD deleted oncolytic adenovirus Adel55 or Adel55 incorporated with cHSF1, HSF1i, HSP70, or HSP90 by intra-tumoral injection. Tumors were surgically excised 72 h post injection and animals were analyzed for tumor resistance and survival rate. Results Approximately 95% of animals in the Adel55-cHSF1 treated group showed sustained resistance upon re-challenge with autologous tumor cells, but not in PBS, Adel55, or Adel55-HSF1i treated groups. Only 50–65% animals in the Adel55-HSP70 and Adel55-HSP90 treated group showed tumor resistance. Tumor resistance was associated with development of tumor type specific cellular immune responses. Adel55-cHSF1 treatment also showed higher efficacy in diminishing progression of the secondary tumor focus than Adel55-HSP70 or Adel55-HSP90 treatment. Conclusions Besides by increasing its burst in tumor cells, cHSF1 could also augment the potential of E1B55kD deleted oncolytic adenovirus by increasing the tumor-specific immune response, which is beneficial to prevent tumor recurrence. cHSF1 is a better gene for neoadjuvant immunotherapy than other heat shock protein genes.

  15. Comparison of the RECIST and EORTC PET criteria in the tumor response assessment: a pooled analysis and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Han; Kim, Bum Jun; Jang, Hyun Joo; Kim, Hyeong Su

    2017-08-05

    The EORTC PET criteria (EORTC criteria) are used to assess metabolic tumor response in patients with solid tumors. We conducted this pooled study to compare tumor responses according to the RECIST and EORTC criteria. Electronic databases were searched for eligible articles with the terms of "RECIST" or "EORTC criteria". We found seven articles with the data on the comparison of tumor responses by the RECIST and EORTC criteria. A total of 181 patients were recruited from the seven studies. Ninety-two patients (50.8%) received cytotoxic chemotherapy and 89 were treated with targeted agents. The agreement of tumor responses between the RECIST and EORTC criteria was moderate (k = 0.493). Of 181 patients, 66 (36.5%) showed disagreement in the tumor responses: tumor response was upgraded in 54 patients and downgraded in 12 when adopting the EORTC criteria. The estimated overall response rates were significantly different between the two criteria (52.5% by the EORTC vs. 29.8% by the RECIST, P EORTC criteria is not excellent. When adopting the EORTC criteria instead of the RECIST, the overall response rate was significantly increased.

  16. Predicting tumor responses to mitomycin C on the basis of DT-diaphorase activity or drug metabolism by tumor homogenates: implications for enzyme-directed bioreductive drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, R M; Burger, A M; Loadman, P M; Jarrett, C M; Swaine, D J; Fiebig, H H

    2000-11-15

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a clinically used anticancer drug that is reduced to cytotoxic metabolites by cellular reductases via a process known as bioreductive drug activation. The identification of key enzymes responsible for drug activation has been investigated extensively with the ultimate aim of tailoring drug administration to patients whose tumors possess the biochemical machinery required for drug activation. In the case of MMC, considerable interest has been centered upon the enzyme DT-diaphorase (DTD) although conflicting reports of good and poor correlations between enzyme activity and response in vitro and in vivo have been published. The principle aim of this study was to provide a definitive answer to the question of whether tumor response to MMC could be predicted on the basis of DTD activity in a large panel of human tumor xenografts. DTD levels were measured in 45 human tumor xenografts that had been characterized previously in terms of their sensitivity to MMC in vitro and in vivo (the in vivo response profile to MMC was taken from work published previously). A poor correlation between DTD activity and antitumor activity in vitro as well as in vivo was obtained. This study also assessed the predictive value of an alternative approach based upon the ability of tumor homogenates to metabolize MMC. This approach is based on the premise that the overall rate of MMC metabolism may provide a better indicator of response than single enzyme measurements. MMC metabolism was evaluated in tumor homogenates (clarified by centrifugation at 1000 x g for 1 min) by measuring the disappearance of the parent compound by HPLC. In responsive [T/C 50%) tumors, the mean half life of MMC was 75+/-48.3 and 280+/-129.6 min, respectively. The difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.005). In conclusion, these results unequivocally demonstrate that response to MMC in vivo cannot be predicted on the basis of DTD activity. Measurement of MMC

  17. Endothelial cells undergo morphological, biomechanical, and dynamic changes in response to tumor necrosis factor-α

    OpenAIRE

    Stroka, Kimberly M.; Vaitkus, Janina A.; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-01-01

    The immune response triggers a complicated sequence of events, one of which is release of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from stromal cells such as monocytes and macrophages. In this work we explored the biophysical effects of TNF-α on endothelial cells (ECs), including changes in cell morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that TNF-α induces a wide distribution of cell area and aspect ratio, with these properties increasing on average during tr...

  18. T cell-mediated antitumor immune response eliminates skin tumors induced by mouse papillomavirus, MmuPV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joh, Joongho; Chilton, Paula M; Wilcher, Sarah A; Zahin, Maryam; Park, Jino; Proctor, Mary L; Ghim, Shin-Je; Jenson, Alfred B

    2017-09-19

    Previous studies of naturally occurring mouse papillomavirus (PV) MmuPV1-induced tumors in B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu/nu) mice suggest that T cell deficiency is necessary and sufficient for the development of such tumors. To confirm this, MmuPV1-induced tumors were transplanted from T cell-deficient mice into immunocompetent congenic mice. Consequently, the tumors regressed and eventually disappeared. The elimination of MmuPV1-infected skin/tumors in immunocompetent mice was consistent with the induction of antitumor T cell immunity. This was confirmed by adoptive cell experiments using hyperimmune splenocytes collected from graft-recipient mice. In the present study, such splenocytes were injected into T cell-deficient mice infected with MmuPV1, and they eliminated both early-stage and fully formed tumors. We clearly show that anti-tumor T cell immunity activated during tumor regression in immunocompetent mice effectively eliminates tumors developing in T cell-deficient congenic mice. The results corroborate the notion that PV-induced tumors are strongly linked to the immune status of the host, and that PV antigens are major anti-tumor antigens. Successful anti-PV T cell responses should, therefore, lead to effective anti-tumor immune therapy in human PV-infected patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI for monitoring response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loo, C.E.

    2016-01-01

    The general aim of this thesis is to investigate the role of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in monitoring response of breast cancer during neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The role of MRI with respect to achieving personalized breast cancer treatment by improving response monitoring is examined. Our finding

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α -and Interleukin-1-Induced Cellular Responses: Coupling Proteomic and Genomic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Lee W.; Resing, Katheryn A.; Sizemore, Alecia W.; Heyen, Joshua W.; Cocklin, Ross R.; Pedrick, Nathan M.; Woods, H. Cary; Chen, Jake Y.; Goebl, Mark G.; Witzmann, Frank A.; Harrington, Maureen A.

    2010-01-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFα) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediate the innate immune response. Dysregulation of the innate immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer, arthritis, and congestive heart failure. TNFα- and IL-1-induced changes in gene expression are mediated by similar transcription factors; however, TNFα and IL-1 receptor knock-out mice differ in their sensitivities to a known initiator (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) of the innate immune response. The contrasting responses to LPS indicate that TNFα and IL-1 regulate different processes. A large-scale proteomic analysis of TNFα- and IL-1-induced responses was undertaken to identify processes uniquely regulated by TNFα and IL-1. When combined with genomic studies, our results indicate that TNFα, but not IL-1, mediates cell cycle arrest. PMID:17503796

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha- and interleukin-1-induced cellular responses: coupling proteomic and genomic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Lee W; Resing, Katheryn A; Sizemore, Alecia W; Heyen, Joshua W; Cocklin, Ross R; Pedrick, Nathan M; Woods, H Cary; Chen, Jake Y; Goebl, Mark G; Witzmann, Frank A; Harrington, Maureen A

    2007-06-01

    The pro-inflammatory cytokines, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediate the innate immune response. Dysregulation of the innate immune response contributes to the pathogenesis of cancer, arthritis, and congestive heart failure. TNFalpha- and IL-1-induced changes in gene expression are mediated by similar transcription factors; however, TNFalpha and IL-1 receptor knock-out mice differ in their sensitivities to a known initiator (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) of the innate immune response. The contrasting responses to LPS indicate that TNFalpha and IL-1 regulate different processes. A large-scale proteomic analysis of TNFalpha- and IL-1-induced responses was undertaken to identify processes uniquely regulated by TNFalpha and IL-1. When combined with genomic studies, our results indicate that TNFalpha, but not IL-1, mediates cell cycle arrest.

  2. microRNA expression pattern modulates temozolomide response in GBM tumors with cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcan, Gulcin; Tunca, Berrin; Bekar, Ahmet; Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Egeli, Unal; Cecener, Gulsah; Ricken, Gerda; Budak, Ferah; Taskapılıoglu, Mevlut Ozgur; Kocaeli, Hasan; Tolunay, Sahsine

    2014-07-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is widely used to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Although the MGMT gene methylation status is postulated to correlate with TMZ response, some patients with a methylated MGMT gene still do not benefit from TMZ therapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be one of the causes of therapeutic resistance, but the molecular mechanism underlying this resistance is unclear. microRNA (miRNA) deregulation has been recognized as another chemoresistance modulating mechanism. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the miRNA expression patterns associated with chemoresistance that is dependent on the CSC status in GBM tumors to identify therapeutic biomarkers. CSCs were identified in 5 of 20 patients' tumor tissues using magnetic separation. CSC (+) tumors displayed a significant induction of CpG island methylation in the MGMT gene promoter (p = 0.009). Using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 9 miRNAs related to GBM (mir-181b, miR-153, miR-137, miR-145, miR-10a, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-9, and miR-455-3p), which are associated with cell cycle and invasion was analyzed in tumor samples. Low miR-181b and high miR-455-3p expression levels were detected (p = 0.053, p = 0.004; respectively) in CSC (+) tumors. Analysis revealed a significant correlation between miR-455-3p expression and Smad2 protein levels as analyzed by immunohistochemistry in CSC (+) tumors (p = 0.002). Thus, miR-455-3p may be involved in TMZ resistance in MGMT methylated CSC (+) GBM patients. Further studies and evaluations are required, but this miRNA may provide novel therapeutic molecular targets for GBM treatment and new directions for the development of anticancer drugs.

  3. Rapid in vivo Taxotere quantitative chemosensitivity response by 4.23 Tesla sodium MRI and histo-immunostaining features in N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea induced breast tumors in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ed X

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium weighted images can indicate sodium signal intensities from different features in the tumor before and 24 hours following administration of Taxotere. Aim To evaluate the association of in vivo intracellular sodium magnetic resonance image intensities with immuno-biomarkers and histopathological features to monitor the early tumor response to Taxotere chemotherapy in Methyl-Nitroso-Urea induced rat xenograft breast tumors. Methods and Materials Methyl-Nitroso-Urea (MNU induced rat xenograft breast tumors were imaged for sodium MRI and compared with tumor histology, immunostaining after 24 hours chemotherapy. Results Sodium MRI signal intensities represented sodium concentrations. Excised tumor histological sections showed different in vitro histological end points i.e. single strand DNA content of cell nuclei during cell cycle (G1/S-G2/M, distinct S or M histograms (Feulgen labeling to nuclear DNA content by CAS 200, mitotic figures and apoptosis at different locations of breast tumors. Necrosis and cystic fluid appeared gray on intracellular (IC sodium images while apoptosis rich regions appeared brighter on IC sodium images. After 24 hours Taxotere-treated tumors showed lower 'IC/EC ratio' of viable cells (65–76% with higher mitotic index; apoptotic tumor cells at high risk due to cytotoxicity (>70% with high apoptotic index; reduced proliferation index (270 vs 120 per high power field associated with enhanced IC sodium in vivo MR image intensities and decreased tumor size (3%; p in vivo associated with apoptosis and different pre-malignant features within 24 hours of exposure of cancer cells to anti-neoplastic Taxotere drug. Conclusion Sodium MRI imaging may be used as in vivo rapid drug monitoring method to evaluate Taxotere chemosensitivity response associated with neoplasia, apoptosis and tumor histology features.

  4. Neuroanesthesia management of neurosurgery of brain stem tumor requiring neurophysiology monitoring in an iMRI OT setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabbagh Abdulrahman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a rare case of ventrally exophytic pontine glioma describing operative and neuroanesthesia management. The combination of intraoperative neuromonitoring was used. It constituted: Brain stem evoked responses/potentials, Motor EP: recording from cranial nerve supplied muscle, and Sensory EP: Medial/tibial. Excision of the tumor was done with intra-operative magnatic resonance imaging (iMRI, which is considered a new modality.

  5. Sulforaphane reduces molecular response to hypoxia in ovarian tumor cells independently of their resistance to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorek, Michal; Simko, Veronika; Takacova, Martina; Barathova, Monika; Bartosova, Maria; Hunakova, Luba; Sedlakova, Olga; Hudecova, Sona; Krizanova, Olga; Dequiedt, Franck; Pastorekova, Silvia; Sedlak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    One of the recently emerging anticancer strategies is the use of natural dietary compounds, such as sulforaphane, a cancer-chemopreventive isothiocyanate found in broccoli. Based on the growing evidence, sulforaphane acts through molecular mechanisms that interfere with multiple oncogenic pathways in diverse tumor cell types. Herein, we investigated the anticancer effects of bioavailable concentrations of sulforaphane in ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its two derivatives, adriamycin-resistant A2780/ADR and cisplatin-resistant A2780/CP cell lines. Since tumor microenvironment is characterized by reduced oxygenation that induces aggressive tumor phenotype (such as increased invasiveness and resistance to chemotherapy), we evaluated the effects of sulforaphane in ovarian cancer cells exposed to hypoxia (2% O2). Using the cell-based reporter assay, we identified several oncogenic pathways modulated by sulforaphane in hypoxia by activating anticancer responses (p53, ARE, IRF-1, Pax-6 and XRE) and suppressing responses supporting tumor progression (AP-1 and HIF-1). We further showed that sulforaphane decreases the level of HIF-1α protein without affecting its transcription and stability. It can also diminish transcription and protein level of the HIF-1 target, CA IX, which protects tumor cells from hypoxia-induced pH imbalance and facilitates their migration/invasion. Accordingly, sulforaphane treatment leads to diminished pH regulation and reduced migration of ovarian carcinoma cells. These effects occur in all three ovarian cell lines suggesting that sulforaphane can overcome the chemoresistance of cancer cells. This offers a path potentially exploitable in sensitizing resistant cancer cells to therapy, and opens a window for the combined treatments of sulforaphane either with conventional chemotherapy, natural compounds, or with other small molecules.

  6. Advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumor patients with complete response after treatment with imatinib mesylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun-Chun Chiang; Tsung-Wen Chen; Chun-Nan Yeh; Feng-Yuan Liu; Hsiang-Lin Lee; Yi-Yin Jan

    2006-01-01

    AIM: Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs)express constitutively activated mutant isoforms of kit kinase or platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA), which are potential therapeutic targets for imatinib mesylate (Glivec). Partial response occurred in almost two thirds of GIST patients treated with Glivec.However, complete response (CR) after Glivec therapy was sporadically reported. Here we illustrated advanced GIST patients with CR after Glivec treatment.METHODS: Between January 2001 and June 2005,42 advanced GIST patients were treated with Glivec.Patients were administered 400 mg of Glivec in 100-mg capsules, taken orally daily with food. The response of the tumor to Glivec was evaluated after one month, three months, and every three months thereafter or whenever medical need was indicated. Each tumor of patients was investigated for mutations of kit or PDGFRA.RESULTS: The median follow-up time of the 42 ad-vanced GIST patients treated with Glivec was 16.9 months (range, 1.0- 47.0 months). Overall, 3patients had complete response CR (7.1%), 26 partial response (67.8%), 5 stationary disease (11.9%), and 3 progressive disease (11.9%). The median duration of Glivec administration for the three patients was 36months (range, 23-36 months). The median time to CR after Glivec treatment was 20 months (range, 9-26months). Deletion and insertion mutations of c-kit exon 11 and insertion mutation of c-kit exon 9 were found in two cases and one case, respectively.CONCLUSION: Complete response (CR) can be achieyed in selected advanced GIST patients treated with Glivec. The median time to CR after Glivec treatment was 20 months. Deletion and insertion mutations of kit exon 11 and insertion mutation of kit exon 9 contribute to the genetic features in these selected cases.

  7. Investigation on the effect of peptides mixture from tumor cells inducing anti-tumor specific immune response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯作化; 黄波; 张桂梅; 李东; 王洪涛

    2002-01-01

    The peptides mixture was prepared from tumor cells by freezing-thawing cells, precipitation by heating, followed by acidification of the solution. The activation and proliferation of mouse splenocytes by HSP70-peptide complex, formed by the binding of HSP70 and peptides in vitro, were observed, so was the specific cytotoxicity of the proliferative lymphocytes to tumor cells. The phenotypes of the proliferative lymphocytes were analyzed by a flow cytometer. BALB/c mice inoculated with H22 hepatocarcinoma cells in peritoneal cavity or hind thigh were immunized by injection with HSP70-peptides complex to observe the inhibitory effect of the immunization on tumor and lifetime of tumor-bearing mice. On the other hand, blood samples were collected from the immunized mice to check the functions of liver and kidney. The results showed that the peptides mixture from tumor cells contained tumor-specific antigen peptides which could be presented by HSP70 to activate lymphocytes in vitro, the proliferative lymphocytes were T cells which were specifically cytotoxic to tumor cells, the in vivo growth of both ascitic and solid carcinoma could be suppressed by immunization with HSP70-peptides and the lifetime of tumor-bearing mice was prolonged, the in vivo immunization with HSP70-H22-peptides had no impact on the function of mouse liver and kidney, suggesting that there was no occurrence of autoimmunity in vivo after immunization.

  8. CyberKnife for hilar lung tumors: report of clinical response and toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins Sean P

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To report clinical efficacy and toxicity of fractionated CyberKnife radiosurgery for the treatment of hilar lung tumors. Methods Patients presenting with primary and metastatic hilar lung tumors, treated using the CyberKnife system with Synchrony fiducial tracking technology, were retrospectively reviewed. Hilar location was defined as abutting or invading a mainstem bronchus. Fiducial markers were implanted by conventional bronchoscopy within or adjacent to tumors to serve as targeting references. A prescribed dose of 30 to 40 Gy to the gross tumor volume (GTV was delivered in 5 fractions. Clinical examination and PET/CT imaging were performed at 3 to 6-month follow-up intervals. Results Twenty patients were accrued over a 4 year period. Three had primary hilar lung tumors and 17 had hilar lung metastases. The median GTV was 73 cc (range 23-324 cc. The median dose to the GTV was 35 Gy (range, 30 - 40 Gy, delivered in 5 fractions over 5 to 8 days (median, 6 days. The resulting mean maximum point doses delivered to the esophagus and mainstem bronchus were 25 Gy (range, 11 - 39 Gy and 42 Gy (range, 30 - 49 Gy, respectively. Of the 17 evaluable patients with 3 - 6 month follow-up, 4 patients had a partial response and 13 patients had stable disease. AAT t a median follow-up of 10 months, the 1-year Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival estimates were 63% and 54%, respectively. Toxicities included one patient experiencing grade II radiation esophagitis and one patient experiencing grade III radiation pneumonitis. One patient with gross endobronchial tumor within the mainstem bronchus developed a bronchial fistula and died after receiving a maximum bronchus dose of 49 Gy. Conclusion CyberKnife radiosurgery is an effective palliative treatment option for hilar lung tumors, but local control is poor at one year. Maximum point doses to critical structures may be used as a guide for limiting toxicities. Preliminary results

  9. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced and Diffusion MRI Show Rapid and Dramatic Changes in Tumor Microenvironment in Response to Inhibition of HIF-1α Using PX-478

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénédicte F. Jordan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available PX-478 is a new agent known to inhibit the hypoxiaresponsive transcription factor, HIF-1α, in experimental tumors. The current study was undertaken in preparation for clinical trials to determine which noninvasive imaging endpoint(s is sensitive to this drug's actions. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion-weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor hemodynamics and cellularity, respectively. Mice bearing human xenografts were treated either with PX-478 or vehicle, and imaged over time. DW imaging was performed at three b values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADCw maps. For DCE-MRI, a macromolecular contrast reagent, BSA-Gd-DTPA, was used to determine vascular permeability and vascular volume fractions. PX-478 induced a dramatic reduction in tumor blood vessel permeability within 2 hours after treatment, which returned to baseline by 48 hours. The anti-VEGF antibody, Avastin, reduced both the permeability and vascular volume. PX-478 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of a drug-resistant tumor system, A-549. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADCw, was significantly decreased 24 and 36 hours after treatment. This is the earliest significant response of ADC to therapy yet reported. Based on these preclinical findings, both of these imaging endpoints will be included in the clinical trial of PX-478.

  10. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  11. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Amy B; Newsome, Dave; Wang, Yuxin; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M; Pollard, John R

    2014-07-30

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients.

  12. T2-weighted MRI signal predicts hormone and tumor responses to somatostatin analogs in acromegaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potorac, Iulia; Petrossians, Patrick; Daly, Adrian F; Alexopoulou, Orsalia; Borot, Sophie; Sahnoun-Fathallah, Mona; Castinetti, Frederic; Devuyst, France; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie-Lise; Briet, Claire; Luca, Florina; Lapoirie, Marion; Zoicas, Flavius; Simoneau, Isabelle; Diallo, Alpha M; Muhammad, Ammar; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Nazzari, Elena; Centeno, Rogelio Garcia; Webb, Susan M; Nunes, Marie-Laure; Hana, Vaclav; Pascal-Vigneron, Véronique; Ilovayskaya, Irena; Nasybullina, Farida; Achir, Samia; Ferone, Diego; Neggers, Sebastian J C M M; Delemer, Brigitte; Petit, Jean-Michel; Schöfl, Christof; Raverot, Gerald; Goichot, Bernard; Rodien, Patrice; Corvilain, Bernard; Brue, Thierry; Schillo, Franck; Tshibanda, Luaba; Maiter, Dominique; Bonneville, Jean-François; Beckers, Albert

    2016-11-01

    GH-secreting pituitary adenomas can be hypo-, iso- or hyper-intense on T2-weighted MRI sequences. We conducted the current multicenter study in a large population of patients with acromegaly to analyze the relationship between T2-weighted signal intensity on diagnostic MRI and hormonal and tumoral responses to somatostatin analogs (SSA) as primary monotherapy. Acromegaly patients receiving primary SSA for at least 3 months were included in the study. Hormonal, clinical and general MRI assessments were performed and assessed centrally. We included 120 patients with acromegaly. At diagnosis, 84, 17 and 19 tumors were T2-hypo-, iso- and hyper-intense, respectively. SSA treatment duration, cumulative and mean monthly doses were similar in the three groups. Patients with T2-hypo-intense adenomas had median SSA-induced decreases in GH and IGF-1 of 88% and 59% respectively, which were significantly greater than the decreases observed in the T2-iso- and hyper-intense groups (P < 0.001). Tumor shrinkage on SSA was also significantly greater in the T2-hypo-intense group (38%) compared with the T2-iso- and hyper-intense groups (8% and 3%, respectively; P < 0.0001). The response to SSA correlated with the calculated T2 intensity: the lower the T2-weighted intensity, the greater the decrease in random GH (P < 0.0001, r = 0.22), IGF-1 (P < 0.0001, r = 0.14) and adenoma volume (P < 0.0001, r = 0.33). The T2-weighted signal intensity of GH-secreting adenomas at diagnosis correlates with hormone reduction and tumor shrinkage in response to primary SSA treatment in acromegaly. This study supports its use as a generally available predictive tool at diagnosis that could help to guide subsequent treatment choices in acromegaly. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. High-throughput screening using patient-derived tumor xenografts to predict clinical trial drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Korn, Joshua M; Ferretti, Stéphane; Monahan, John E; Wang, Youzhen; Singh, Mallika; Zhang, Chao; Schnell, Christian; Yang, Guizhi; Zhang, Yun; Balbin, O Alejandro; Barbe, Stéphanie; Cai, Hongbo; Casey, Fergal; Chatterjee, Susmita; Chiang, Derek Y; Chuai, Shannon; Cogan, Shawn M; Collins, Scott D; Dammassa, Ernesta; Ebel, Nicolas; Embry, Millicent; Green, John; Kauffmann, Audrey; Kowal, Colleen; Leary, Rebecca J; Lehar, Joseph; Liang, Ying; Loo, Alice; Lorenzana, Edward; Robert McDonald, E; McLaughlin, Margaret E; Merkin, Jason; Meyer, Ronald; Naylor, Tara L; Patawaran, Montesa; Reddy, Anupama; Röelli, Claudia; Ruddy, David A; Salangsang, Fernando; Santacroce, Francesca; Singh, Angad P; Tang, Yan; Tinetto, Walter; Tobler, Sonja; Velazquez, Roberto; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Von Arx, Fabian; Wang, Hui Qin; Wang, Zongyao; Wiesmann, Marion; Wyss, Daniel; Xu, Fiona; Bitter, Hans; Atadja, Peter; Lees, Emma; Hofmann, Francesco; Li, En; Keen, Nicholas; Cozens, Robert; Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Pryer, Nancy K; Williams, Juliet A; Sellers, William R

    2015-11-01

    Profiling candidate therapeutics with limited cancer models during preclinical development hinders predictions of clinical efficacy and identifying factors that underlie heterogeneous patient responses for patient-selection strategies. We established ∼1,000 patient-derived tumor xenograft models (PDXs) with a diverse set of driver mutations. With these PDXs, we performed in vivo compound screens using a 1 × 1 × 1 experimental design (PDX clinical trial or PCT) to assess the population responses to 62 treatments across six indications. We demonstrate both the reproducibility and the clinical translatability of this approach by identifying associations between a genotype and drug response, and established mechanisms of resistance. In addition, our results suggest that PCTs may represent a more accurate approach than cell line models for assessing the clinical potential of some therapeutic modalities. We therefore propose that this experimental paradigm could potentially improve preclinical evaluation of treatment modalities and enhance our ability to predict clinical trial responses.

  14. Safety and Tumor Responses with Lambrolizumab (Anti–PD-1) in Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Omid; Robert, Caroline; Daud, Adil; Hodi, F. Stephen; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Kefford, Richard; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Hersey, Peter; Joseph, Richard W.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Dronca, Roxana; Gangadhar, Tara C.; Patnaik, Amita; Zarour, Hassane; Joshua, Anthony M.; Gergich, Kevin; Elassaiss-Schaap, Jeroen; Algazi, Alain; Mateus, Christine; Boasberg, Peter; Tumeh, Paul C.; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Ebbinghaus, Scot W.; Li, Xiaoyun Nicole; Kang, S. Peter; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor is a negative regulator of T-cell effector mechanisms that limits immune responses against cancer. We tested the anti–PD-1 antibody lambrolizumab (previously known as MK-3475) in patients with advanced melanoma. METHODS We administered lambrolizumab intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 or 3 weeks or 2 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks in patients with advanced melanoma, both those who had received prior treatment with the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab and those who had not. Tumor responses were assessed every 12 weeks. RESULTS A total of 135 patients with advanced melanoma were treated. Common adverse events attributed to treatment were fatigue, rash, pruritus, and diarrhea; most of the adverse events were low grade. The confirmed response rate across all dose cohorts, evaluated by central radiologic review according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), version 1.1, was 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25 to 44), with the highest confirmed response rate observed in the cohort that received 10 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks (52%; 95% CI, 38 to 66). The response rate did not differ significantly between patients who had received prior ipilimumab treatment and those who had not (confirmed response rate, 38% [95% CI, 23 to 55] and 37% [95% CI, 26 to 49], respectively). Responses were durable in the majority of patients (median follow-up, 11 months among patients who had a response); 81% of the patients who had a response (42 of 52) were still receiving treatment at the time of analysis in March 2013. The overall median progression-free survival among the 135 patients was longer than 7 months. CONCLUSIONS In patients with advanced melanoma, including those who had had disease progression while they had been receiving ipilimumab, treatment with lambrolizumab resulted in a high rate of sustained tumor regression, with mainly grade 1 or 2 toxic effects

  15. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    biological tissue, and allow for detection of specific light-absorbing chromophores in human in vivo, such as oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin...spectra from tumor tissue. Briefly, continuous wave (CW) light from a 20 W tungsten-halogen light source (HL-2000HP, ocean optics, FL) is coupled...spectrometer (USB2000, Ocean optics, FL). The broadband light diffuse spectrometer provides reflectance spectra from 400 to 900 nm. According to

  16. A clinical and radiological objective tumor response with somatostatin analogs (SSA in well-differentiated neuroendocrine metastatic tumor of the ileum: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Divitiis C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chiara De Divitiis,1 Claudia von Arx,2 Roberto Carbone,3 Fabiana Tatangelo,4 Elena di Girolamo,5 Giovanni Maria Romano,1 Alessandro Ottaiano,1 Elisabetta de Lutio di Castelguidone,3 Rosario Vincenzo Iaffaioli,1 Salvatore Tafuto1 On behalf of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS Center of Excellence Multidisciplinary Group for Neuroendocrine Tumors in Naples (Italy 1Department of Abdominal Oncology, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Endoscopy, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G Pascale”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Somatostatin analogs (SSAs are typically used to treat the symptoms caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs, but they are not used as the primary treatment to induce tumor shrinkage. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a symptomatic metastatic NET of the ileum. Complete symptomatic response was achieved after 1 month of treatment with SSAs. In addition, there was an objective response in the liver, with the disappearance of secondary lesions noted on computed tomography scan after 3 months of octreotide treatment. Our experience suggests that SSAs could be useful for downstaging and/or downsizing well-differentiated NETs, and they could allow surgery to be performed. Such presurgery therapy could be a promising tool in the management of patients with initially inoperable NETs. Keywords: neuroendocrine tumor, somatostatin analogs, octreotide, metastatic tumor of the ileum, radiological tumor response

  17. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the kidney with inferior vena cava tumor thrombus during pregnancy response to sorafenib

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yun-jian; YANG Yu-ru; ZENG Hao; ZHU Yu-chun; CHEN Hui; HUANG Ying; WEI Qiang; CHEN Hui-jiao; XIE Xi; LI Xiang; ZHOU Qiao

    2010-01-01

    @@ Primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) most often presents as a bone or soft tissue mass in the trunk or axial skeleton in adolescents and young adults.1 It is highly aggressive and rarely arises in the kidney.2 A combined therapy, consisting of surgical resection,chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is needed to treat this tumor but long-term survival remains poor.3,4 In the current study, we describe a case of 26-year-old woman (primigravida) who presented with a PNET of the right kidney with inferior vena cava (IVC) tumor thrombus.

  18. Human tumor-derived genomic DNA transduced into a recipient cell induces tumor-specific immune responses ex vivo

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a DNA-based vaccination strategy evaluated ex vivo with human cells. The vaccine was prepared by transferring tumor-derived genomic DNA to PCI-13 cells, a highly immunogenic tumor cell line (“recipient cell”), which had been genetically modified to secrete IL-2 (PCI-13/IL-2). PCI-13 cells expressed class I MHC determinants (HLA-A2) shared with the tumor from which the DNA was obtained as well as allogeneic determinants. DNA from a gp100+ melanoma ce...

  19. Rapamycin Impairs Antitumor CD8+ T-cell Responses and Vaccine-Induced Tumor Eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaoul, Nada; Fayolle, Catherine; Desrues, Belinda; Oberkampf, Marine; Tang, Alexandre; Ladant, Daniel; Leclerc, Claude

    2015-08-15

    The metabolic sensor mTOR broadly regulates cell growth and division in cancer cells, leading to a significant focus on studies of rapamycin and its analogues as candidate anticancer drugs. However, mTOR inhibitors have failed to produce useful clinical efficacy, potentially because mTOR is also critical in T cells implicated in immunosurveillance. Indeed, recent studies using rapamycin have demonstrated the important role of mTOR in differentiation and induction of the CD8+ memory in T-cell responses associated with antitumor properties. In this study, we demonstrate that rapamycin harms antitumor immune responses mediated by T cells in the setting of cancer vaccine therapy. Specifically, we analyzed how rapamycin affects the antitumor efficacy of a human papilloma virus E7 peptide vaccine (CyaA-E7) capable of eradicating tumors in the TC-1 mouse model of cervical cancer. In animals vaccinated with CyaA-E7, rapamycin administration completely abolished recruitment of CD8+ T cells into TC-1 tumors along with the ability of the vaccine to reduce infiltration of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Moreover, rapamycin completely abolished vaccine-induced cytotoxic T-cell responses and therapeutic activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate the powerful effects of mTOR inhibition in abolishing T-cell-mediated antitumor immune responses essential for the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines.

  20. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. Methods MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively. PMID:26717416

  1. Systematic Review of Biomarkers To Monitor Therapeutic Response in Leishmaniasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kip, Anke E; Balasegaram, Manica; Beijnen, Jos H; Schellens, Jan H M; de Vries, Peter J; Dorlo, Thomas P C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the development of new drugs for the treatment of leishmaniasis. This has spurred the need for pharmacodynamic markers to monitor and compare therapies specifically for visceral leishmaniasis, in which the primary recrudescence of parasites is a particu

  2. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  3. Epidermal growth factor receptor as a predictor of tumor response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirak, I.; Petera, J.; Vosmik, M.; Melichar, B.; Dvorak, J.; Zoul, Z. [Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hatlova, J.; Tycova, V. [Dept. of Pathology, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Lesko, M. [Dept. of Surgery, Charles Univ. Medical School and Univ. Hospital, Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Hajduch, M. [Lab. of Molecular Pathology, Inst. of Pathology, Palacky Univ., Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: the purpose of our study was a retrospective evaluation whether the intensity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression predicts tumor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced gastric carcinoma. Patients and methods: thirty-six patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (cT2-4 or N+) were studied. Preoperative treatment consisted of 30-45 Gy of gastric irradiation with continuous 5-fluorouracil and weekly cisplatin. Surgical resection was performed 4-6 weeks later. EGFR expression in pretreatment tumor biopsies was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Level of EGFR expression was determined from the intensity and extent of staining. Tumor response was defined as a reduction of at least one T-stage level and/or finding of intense tumor regression in histopathologic examination. Results: seventeen patients responded to preoperative chemoradiation - 8 patients (22%) had pathologic complete response, 9 patients (25%) were downstaged. Positive EGFR expression was found in 8 tumors (22%), and represented a significant predictive marker of poor tumor response in multivariate logistic regression analysis (p = 0.015). Response to chemoradiotherapy was found in 60% (16/28) of EGFR negative patients and in 13% (1/8) of EGFR positive patients (p = 0.044). None of the eight EGFR positive patients achieved pathologic complete response in comparison with 8/28 (29%) of patients with EGFR negative staining (p = 0.16). Conclusion: EGFR may represent a molecular marker predictive for poor response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced gastric carcinoma. (orig.)

  4. Correction: Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sub; Kim, Jiyoung; Lee, Joo Young; Matsuda, Shofu; Hideshima, Sho; Mori, Yasurou; Osaka, Tetsuya; Na, Kun

    2016-06-01

    Correction for `Stimuli-responsive magnetic nanoparticles for tumor-targeted bimodal imaging and photodynamic/hyperthermia combination therapy' by Kyoung Sub Kim, et al., Nanoscale, 2016, DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02273a.

  5. Digital holographic microscopy for longitudinal volumetric imaging of growth and treatment response in three-dimensional tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyu; Petrovic, Ljubica; La, Jeffrey; Celli, Jonathan P.; Yelleswarapu, Chandra S.

    2014-11-01

    We report the use of digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a viable microscopy approach for quantitative, nondestructive longitudinal imaging of in vitro three-dimensional (3-D) tumor models. Following established methods, we prepared 3-D cultures of pancreatic cancer cells in overlay geometry on extracellular matrix beds and obtained digital holograms at multiple time points throughout the duration of growth. The holograms were digitally processed and the unwrapped phase images were obtained to quantify the nodule thickness over time under normal growth and in cultures subject to chemotherapy treatment. In this manner, total nodule volumes are rapidly estimated and demonstrated here to show contrasting time-dependent changes during growth and in response to treatment. This work suggests the utility of DHM to quantify changes in 3-D structure over time and suggests the further development of this approach for time-lapse monitoring of 3-D morphological changes during growth and in response to treatment that would otherwise be impractical to visualize.

  6. Modulation of tumor response to photodynamic therapy in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice by adoptively transferred lymphoid cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Krosl, Jana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment, consisting of intravenous injection of PhotofrinR (10 mg/kg) followed by exposure to 110 J/cm2 of 630 plus or minus 10 nm light 24 hours later, cured 100% of EMT6 tumors (murine mammary sarcoma) growing in syngeneic immunocompetent BALB/C mice. In contrast, the same treatment produced no cures of EMT6 tumors growing in either nude or SCID mice (immunodeficient strains). EMT6 tumors growing in BALB/C and SCID mice showed no difference in either the level of PhotofrinR accumulated per gram of tumor tissue, or the extent of tumor cell killing during the first 24 hours post photodynamic therapy (PDT). In an attempt to improve the sensitivity to PDT of EMT6 tumors growing in SCID mice, these hosts were given either splenic T lymphocytes or whole bone marrow from BALB/C mice. The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes 9 days before PDT was successful in delaying tumor recurrence but produced no cures. A better improvement in PDT response was obtained with tumors growing in SCID mice reconstituted with BALB/C bone marrow (tumor cure rate of 63%). The results of this study demonstrate that, at least with the EMT6 tumor model, antitumor immune activity mediated by lymphoid cell populations makes an important contribution to the curative effect of PDT.

  7. Patterns of DNA damage response in intracranial germ cell tumors versus glioblastomas reflect cell of origin rather than brain environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Krizova, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) machinery becomes commonly activated in response to oncogenes and during early stages of development of solid malignancies, with an exception of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The active DDR signaling evokes cell death or senescence but this anti-tumor barrier...... can be breached by defects in DDR factors, such as the ATM-Chk2-p53 pathway, thereby allowing tumor progression. The DDR barrier is strongly activated in brain tumors, particularly gliomas, due to oxidative damage and replication stress. Here, we took advantage of rare human primary intracranial germ...... cell tumors (PIGCTs), to address the roles of cell-intrinsic factors including cell of origin, versus local tissue environment, in the constitutive DDR activation in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of 7 biomarkers on a series of 21 PIGCTs (germinomas and other subtypes), 20 normal brain specimens...

  8. In situ crosslinked smart polypeptide nanoparticles for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Huqiang; Liu, Peng; Sheng, Nan; Gong, Ping; Ma, Yifan; Cai, Lintao

    2016-03-01

    Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible zeta potential around -30 mV at pH 7.4, but switched to +15 mV at pH 5.0. Moreover, FD-NPs effectively loaded DOX with a loading capacity at 15.7 wt%. At pH 7.4, only 24.5% DOX was released within 60 h. However, at pH 5.0, the presence of 10 mM DTT dramatically accelerated DOX release with over 90% of DOX released within 10 h. Although the FD-NPs only enhanced DOX uptake in FA receptor positive (FR+) cancer cells at pH 7.4, a weak acidic condition promoted FD-NP-facilitated DOX uptake in both FR+ HeLa and FR- A549 cells, as well as significantly improving cellular binding and end/lysosomal escape. In vivo studies in a HeLa cancer model demonstrated that the charge-reversible FD-NPs delivered DOX into tumors more effectively than charge-irreversible nanoparticles. Hence, these multistage responsive FD-NPs would serve as highly efficient drug vectors for targeted cancer chemotherapy.Smart tumor-targeted drug delivery is crucial for improving the effect of chemotherapy and reducing the adverse effects. Here, we synthesized a smart polypeptide copolymer based on n-butylamine-poly(l-lysine)-b-poly(l-cysteine) (PLL-PLC) with functionalization of folic acid (FA) and 1,2-dicarboxylic-cyclohexene anhydride (DCA) for multistage responsive tumor-targeted drug delivery. The copolymers (FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC) spontaneously crosslinked in situ to form redox and pH dual responsive FA-PLL(DCA)-PLC nanoparticles (FD-NPs), which had a reversible

  9. Assessment of TPS tumor marker with ELISA for early detection and monitoring of gastrointestinal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salehi Nodeh A.R

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: TPS is one of the tumor markers which has specially been considered due to its exclusive physiological characteristics like its easy measurement in serum of cancer patients. This study has been due to evaluate the efficiency of this tumor marker in the prognosis, treatment control and follow up of patients with gastrointestinal cancers including esophagus, stomach and colorectal. Methods: TPS has been measured in 109 persons including 28 healthy people and 81 patients with different gastrointestinal malignancies which were composed of 38 patients with esophageal cancer, 20 ones with stomach cancer and 23 ones with colorectal cancer. Sampling has been done in three times depending on treatment methods. TPS has been measured with ELISA in samples which contend of 2 to 3 ml of serum from patients and the health. Results: The obtained results, demonstrate the obvious changes in TPS serum level in patients underwent various treatment procedures. Conclusion: The results have revealed that the serum TPS is not only as a measure of prognosis but also would be helpful in follow up and treatment control of the disease. Moreover the results has shown that serological analysis can be settled in the diagnosis and follow up with production of polyclonal antibody against TPS gene family and planning appropriate pattern.

  10. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  11. Monitoring asthma in childhood: lung function, bronchial responsiveness and inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moeller

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the methods available for measuring reversible airways obstruction, bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR and inflammation as hallmarks of asthma, and their role in monitoring children with asthma. Persistent bronchial obstruction may occur in asymptomatic children and is considered a risk factor for severe asthma episodes and is associated with poor asthma outcome. Annual measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s using office based spirometry is considered useful. Other lung function measurements including the assessment of BHR may be reserved for children with possible exercise limitations, poor symptom perception and those not responding to their current treatment or with atypical asthma symptoms, and performed on a higher specialty level. To date, for most methods of measuring lung function there are no proper randomised controlled or large longitudinal studies available to establish their role in asthma management in children. Noninvasive biomarkers for monitoring inflammation in children are available, for example the measurement of exhaled nitric oxide fraction, and the assessment of induced sputum cytology or inflammatory mediators in the exhaled breath condensate. However, their role and usefulness in routine clinical practice to monitor and guide therapy remains unclear, and therefore, their use should be reserved for selected cases.

  12. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles suppress tumor by interferon-γ-mediated antitumor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Dinh, Nhung Thi Hong; Choi, Seng Jin; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seung-Woo; Gho, Yong Song

    2017-09-20

    Gram-negative bacteria actively secrete outer membrane vesicles, spherical nano-meter-sized proteolipids enriched with outer membrane proteins, to the surroundings. Outer membrane vesicles have gained wide interests as non-living complex vaccines or delivery vehicles. However, no study has used outer membrane vesicles in treating cancer thus far. Here we investigate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as therapeutic agents to treat cancer via immunotherapy. Our results show remarkable capability of bacterial outer membrane vesicles to effectively induce long-term antitumor immune responses that can fully eradicate established tumors without notable adverse effects. Moreover, systematically administered bacterial outer membrane vesicles specifically target and accumulate in the tumor tissue, and subsequently induce the production of antitumor cytokines CXCL10 and interferon-γ. This antitumor effect is interferon-γ dependent, as interferon-γ-deficient mice could not induce such outer membrane vesicle-mediated immune response. Together, our results herein demonstrate the potential of bacterial outer membrane vesicles as effective immunotherapeutic agent that can treat various cancers without apparent adverse effects.Bacterial outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) contain immunogens but no study has yet examined their potential in treating cancer. Here, the authors demonstrate that OMVs can suppress established tumours and prevent tumour metastasis by an interferon-γ mediated antitumor response.

  13. SU-E-J-273: Simulation of the Radiation Response of Hypoxic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Peschke, P; Karger, C [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumour to irradiation prior to the treatment. Mathematical modelling of tumour control probability (TCP) based on the dose distribution, medical imaging and other biological information may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to develop an image based 3D multiscale radiobiological model, which describes the growth and the response to radiotherapy of hypoxic tumors. Methods: The computer model is based on voxels, containing tumour, normal (including capillary) and dead cells. Killing of tumour cells due to irradiation is calculated by the Linear Quadratic Model (extended for hypoxia), and the proliferation and resorption of cells are modelled by exponential laws. The initial shape of the tumours is taken from CT images and the initial vascular and cell density information from PET and/or MR images. Including the fractionation regime and the physical dose distribution of the radiation treatment, the model simulates the spatial-temporal evolution of the tumor. Additionally, the dose distribution may be biologically optimized. Results: The model describes the appearance of hypoxia during tumour growth and the reoxygenation processes during radiotherapy. Among other parameters, the TCP is calculated for different dose distributions. The results are in accordance with published results. Conclusion: The simulation model may contribute to the understanding of the influence of biological parameters on tumor response during treatment, and specifically on TCP. It may be used to implement dose-painting approaches. Experimental and clinical validation is needed. This study is supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education of Chile, Programa Mece Educacion Superior (2)

  14. Monitoring the intracellular calcium response to a dynamic hypertonic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaowen; Yue, Wanqing; Liu, Dandan; Yue, Jianbo; Li, Jiaqian; Sun, Dong; Yang, Mengsu; Wang, Zuankai

    2016-03-01

    The profiling of physiological response of cells to external stimuli at the single cell level is of importance. Traditional approaches to study cell responses are often limited by ensemble measurement, which is challenging to reveal the complex single cell behaviors under a dynamic environment. Here we report the development of a simple microfluidic device to investigate intracellular calcium response to dynamic hypertonic conditions at the single cell level in real-time. Interestingly, a dramatic elevation in the intracellular calcium signaling is found in both suspension cells (human leukemic cell line, HL-60) and adherent cells (lung cancer cell line, A549), which is ascribed to the exposure of cells to the hydrodynamic stress. We also demonstrate that the calcium response exhibits distinct single cell heterogeneity as well as cell-type-dependent responses to the same stimuli. Our study opens up a new tool for tracking cellular activity at the single cell level in real time for high throughput drug screening.

  15. Nonrigid registration algorithm for longitudinal breast MR images and the preliminary analysis of breast tumor response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xia; Dawant, Benoit M.; Welch, E. Brian; Chakravarthy, A. Bapsi; Freehardt, Darla; Mayer, Ingrid; Kelley, Mark; Meszoely, Ingrid; Gore, John C.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.

    2009-02-01

    Although useful for the detection of breast cancers, conventional imaging methods, including mammography and ultrasonography, do not provide adequate information regarding response to therapy. Dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) has emerged as a promising technique to provide relevant information on tumor status. Consequently, accurate longitudinal registration of breast MR images is critical for the comparison of changes induced by treatment at the voxel level. In this study, a nonrigid registration algorithm is proposed to allow for longitudinal registration of breast MR images obtained throughout the course of treatment. We accomplish this by modifying the adaptive bases algorithm (ABA) through adding a tumor volume preserving constraint in the cost function. The registration results demonstrate the proposed algorithm can successfully register the longitudinal breast MR images and permit analysis of the parameter maps. We also propose a novel validation method to evaluate the proposed registration algorithm quantitatively. These validations also demonstrate that the proposed algorithm constrains tumor deformation well and performs better than the unconstrained ABA algorithm.

  16. Immunotherapy for prostate cancer: Lessons from responses to tumor-associated antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm eWestdorp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men and the second most common cause of cancer-related death in men. In recent years, novel therapeutic options for prostate cancer have been developed and studied extensively in clinical trials. Sipuleucel-T is the first cell-based immunotherapeutic vaccine for treatment of cancer. This vaccine consists of autologous mononuclear cells stimulated and loaded with an immunostimulatory fusion protein containing the prostate tumor antigen prostate acid posphatase. The choice of antigen might be key for the efficiency of cell-based immunotherapy. Depending on the treatment strategy, target antigens should be immunogenic, abundantly expressed by tumor cells, and preferably functionally important for the tumor to prevent loss of antigen expression. Autoimmune responses have been reported against several antigens expressed in the prostate, indicating that prostate cancer is a suitable target for immunotherapy. In this review, we will discuss prostate cancer antigens that exhibit immunogenic features and/or have been targeted in immunotherapeutic settings with promising results, and we highlight the hurdles and opportunities for cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  18. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Cellular stress response is a crucial factor in maintaining efficient homeodynamics for survival, health and longevity. Both the immediate and delayed responses to external and internal stressors effectively determine the molecular biochemical and physiological stability in a dynamic and interact......Cellular stress response is a crucial factor in maintaining efficient homeodynamics for survival, health and longevity. Both the immediate and delayed responses to external and internal stressors effectively determine the molecular biochemical and physiological stability in a dynamic...... and interactive manner. There are three main aspects of stress responses: (i) immediate stress response involving extra- and intra-cellular signaling during the period of disturbance and exposure to the stressors; (ii) delayed stress response involving sensors and modulators in the presence of stressors or after......, development and ageing. Our aim is to define and establish the immediate and delayed stress profiles of normal human skin fibroblasts undergoing ageing in vitro. This is done efficiently by using various cellular, molecular and antibody-based detection methods, combined with functional assays, such as wound...

  19. Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-08-1-0503 TITLE: Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Therapy 5b. GRANT...SUBTITLE Noninvasive Subharmonic Pressure Estimation for Monitoring Breast Cancer 5. FUNDING NUMBERS W81XWH-08-1-0503 6. AUTHOR(S) Flemming

  20. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  1. Serum tumor marker CA 125 for monitoring ovarian cancer during follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Sölétormos, G; Dombernowsky, P

    2002-01-01

    CA 125 is currently widely applied in the management of patients with ovarian cancer. However, a change in results of CA 125, which should be considered significant, has not been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of CA 125 to signal progressive ovarian cancer during fo...... utility of serological tumor markers in patients with ovarian cancer.......CA 125 is currently widely applied in the management of patients with ovarian cancer. However, a change in results of CA 125, which should be considered significant, has not been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of CA 125 to signal progressive ovarian cancer during...... follow-up after first-line chemotherapy. The study patients were selected retrospectively among 255 patients with stage IC-IV ovarian cancer. The evaluation of the CA 125 information was based on the analytical imprecision, the normal intra-individual biological variation, the sampling interval...

  2. T cell responses against tumor associated antigens and prognosis in colorectal cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivoltini Licia

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Spontaneous T cell responses against specific tumor-associated antigens (TAA are frequently detected in peripheral blood of tumor patients of various histiotypes. However, little is known about whether these circulating, spontaneously occurring, TAA-reactive T cells influence the clinical course of disease. Methods Fifty-four HLA-A2 positive colorectal cancer patients had been analyzed for the presence of T cell responses against epitopes derived from the TAA Ep-CAM, her-2/neu, and CEA either by ELISPOT assay or by intracellular cytokine staining. Then, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed comparing T-cell-responders and T-cell-non-responders. For comparison, a group of T-cell-non-responders was compiled stringently matched to T-cell-responders based on clinical criteria and also analyzed for survival. Results Sixteen out of 54 patients had a detectable T cell response against at least one of the three tested TAA. Two out of 21 patients (9.5% with limited stage of disease (UICC I and II and 14 out of 33 patients (42.4% with advanced disease (UICC III and IV were T cell response positive. Comparing all T-cell-responders (n = 16 and all T-cell-non-responders (n = 38, no survival difference was found. In an attempt to reduce the influence of confounding clinical factors, we then compared 16 responders and 16 non-responders in a matched group survival analysis; and again no survival difference was found (p = 0.7. Conclusion In summary, we found no evidence that spontaneous peripheral T cell responses against HLA-A2-binding epitopes of CEA, her-2/neu and Ep-CAM are a strong prognostic factor for survival.

  3. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (pdiagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  4. Nanoparticles for nasal delivery of vaccines : monitoring adaptive immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, C.

    2013-01-01

    The continuous emergence of new pathogens and growing drug resistance of microorganisms asks for innovative vaccination strategies. An alternative to conventional multiple injection vaccines is the nasal route of vaccine delivery. The immune response induced following nasal antigen delivery depends

  5. Monitoring of Tumor Promotion and Progression in a Mouse Model of Inflammation-Induced Colon Cancer with Magnetic Resonance Colonography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Young

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Early detection of precancerous tissue has significantly improved survival of most cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC. Animal models designed to study the early stages of cancer are valuable for identifying molecular events and response indicators that correlate with the onset of disease. The goal of this work was to investigate magnetic resonance (MR colonography in a mouse model of CRC on a clinical MR imager. Mice treated with azoxymethane and dextran sulfate sodium were imaged by serial MR colonography (MRC from initiation to euthanasia. Magnetic resonance colonography was obtained with both T1- and T2-weighted images after administration of a Fluorinert enema to remove residual luminal signal and intravenous contrast to enhance the colon wall. Individual tumor volumes were calculated and validated ex vivo. The Fluorinert enema provided a clear differentiation of the lumen of the colon from the mucosal lining. Inflammation was detected 3 days after dextran sulfate sodium exposure and subsided during the next week. Tumors as small as 1.2 mm3 were detected and as early as 29 days after initiation. Individual tumor growths were followed over time, and tumor volumes were measured by MR imaging correlated with volumes measured ex vivo. The use of a Fluorinert enema during MRC in mice is critical for differentiating mural processes from intraluminal debris. Magnetic resonance colonography with Fluorinert enema and intravenous contrast enhancement will be useful in the study of the initial stages of colon cancer and will reduce the number of animals needed for preclinical trials of prevention or intervention.

  6. Categorizing extent of tumor cell death response to cancer therapy using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy and maximum mean discrepancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Diu, Michael; Tadayyon, Hadi; Kamel, Mohamed S; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2014-06-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) spectroscopic techniques in conjunction with maximum mean discrepancy (MMD) have been proposed to detect, and to classify noninvasively the levels of cell death in response to cancer therapy administration in tumor models. Evaluation of xenograft tumor responses to cancer treatments were carried out using conventional-frequency ultrasound at different times after chemotherapy exposure. Ultrasound data were analyzed using spectroscopic techniques and multi-parametric QUS spectral maps were generated. MMD was applied as a distance criterion, measuring alterations in each tumor in response to chemotherapy, and the extent of cell death was classified into less/more than 20% and 40% categories. Statistically significant differences were observed between "pre-" and "post-treatment" groups at different times after chemotherapy exposure, suggesting a high capability of proposed framework for detecting tumor response noninvasively. Promising results were also obtained for categorizing the extent of cell death response in each tumor using the proposed framework, with gold standard histological quantification of cell death as ground truth. The best classification results were obtained using MMD when applied on histograms of QUS parametric maps. In this case, classification accuracies of 84.7% and 88.2% were achieved for categorizing extent of tumor cell death into less/more than 20% and 40%, respectively.

  7. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  8. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  9. TIP-1 translocation onto the cell plasma membrane is a molecular biomarker of tumor response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailun Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tumor response to treatment has been generally assessed with anatomic and functional imaging. Recent development of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging showed promise in time-efficient assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of a prescribed regimen. Currently, the in vivo molecular imaging is limited with shortage of biomarkers and probes with sound biological relevance. We have previously shown in tumor-bearing mice that a hexapeptide (HVGGSSV demonstrated potentials as a molecular imaging probe to distinguish the tumors responding to ionizing radiation (IR and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment from those of non-responding tumors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we have studied biological basis of the HVGGSSV peptide binding within the irradiated tumors by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells. The results indicated that Tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1BP3 is a molecular target that enables the selective binding of the HVGGSSV peptide within irradiated xenograft tumors. Optical imaging and immunohistochemical staining indicated that a TIP-1 specific antibody demonstrated similar biodistribution as the peptide in tumor-bearing mice. The TIP-1 antibody blocked the peptide from binding within irradiated tumors. Studies on both of human and mouse lung cancer cells showed that the intracellular TIP-1 relocated to the plasma membrane surface within the first few hours after exposure to IR and before the onset of treatment associated apoptosis and cell death. TIP-1 relocation onto the cell surface is associated with the reduced proliferation and the enhanced susceptibility to the subsequent IR treatment. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells suggested that imaging of the radiation-inducible TIP-1 translocation onto the cancer cell surface may predict the tumor responsiveness to radiation in a time-efficient manner and thus tailor

  10. Assessment of early tumor response to cytotoxic chemotherapy with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound in human breast cancer xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Wei Wang

    Full Text Available There is a strong need to assess early tumor response to chemotherapy in order to avoid adverse effects from unnecessary chemotherapy and allow early transition to second-line therapy. This study was to quantify tumor perfusion changes with dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS in the evaluation of early tumor response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Sixty nude mice bearing with MCF-7 breast cancer were administrated with either adriamycin or sterile saline. CEUS was performed on days 0, 2, 4 and 6 of the treatment, in which time-signal intensity (SI curves were obtained from the intratumoral and depth-matched liver parenchyma. Four perfusion parameters including peak enhancement (PE, area under the curve of wash-in (WiAUC, wash-in rate (WiR and wash-in perfusion index (WiPI were calculated from perfusion curves and normalized with respect to perfusion of adjacent liver parenchyma. Histopathological analysis was conducted to evaluate tumor perfusion, tumor cell density, microvascular density (MVD and proliferating cell density. Significant decreases of tumor normalized perfusion parameters (i.e., nPE, nWiAUC, nWiR and nWiPI were noticed between adriamycin-treated and control groups (P0.05. Significant decreases of tumor perfusion, tumor cell density, MVD and proliferating cell density were seen in adrianycin-treated group 2 days after therapy when compared to control group (P<0.001. Dynamic CEUS for quantification of tumor perfusion could be used for early detection of cancer response to cytotoxic chemotherapy prior to notable tumor shrinkage.

  11. Heterogeneous response of different tumor cell lines to methotrexate-coupled nanoparticles in presence of hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapf, Marcus; Pömpner, Nadine; Teichgräber, Ulf; Hilger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Today, the therapeutic efficacy of cancer is restricted by the heterogeneity of the response of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Since those therapies are also associated with severe side effects in nontarget organs, the application of drugs in combination with nanocarriers for targeted therapy has been suggested. Here, we sought to assess whether the coupling of methotrexate (MTX) to magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) could serve as a valuable tool to circumvent the heterogeneity of tumor cell response to MTX by the combined treatment with hyperthermia. To this end, we investigated five breast cancer cell lines of different origin and with different mutational statuses, as well as a bladder cancer cell line in terms of their response to exposure to MTX as a free drug or after its coupling to MNP as well as in presence/absence of hyperthermia. We also assessed whether the effects could be connected to the cell line-specific expression of proteins related to the uptake and efflux of MTX and MNP. Our results revealed a very heterogeneous and cell line-dependent response to an exposure with MTX-coupled MNP (MTX-MNP), which was almost comparable to the efficacy of free MTX in the same cell line. Moreover, a cell line-specific and preferential uptake of MTX-MNP compared with MNP alone was found (probably by receptor-mediated endocytosis), agreeing with the observed cytotoxic effects. Opposed to this, the expression pattern of several cell membrane transport proteins noted for MTX uptake and efflux was only by tendency in agreement with the cellular toxicity of MTX-MNP in different cell lines. Higher cytotoxic effects were achieved by exposing cells to a combination of MTX-MNP and hyperthermal treatment, compared with MTX or thermo-therapy alone. However, the heterogeneity in the response of the tumor cell lines to MTX could not be completely abolished - even after its combination with MNP and/or hyperthermia - and the application of higher thermal dosages might be

  12. Prediction of outcome in buccal cancers treated with radical radiotherapy based on the early tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G V Giri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: Aim was to assess the clinical significance of the rate of tumor regression in carcinoma buccal mucosa undergoing radical radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: Sixty six patients were enrolled in the study with proven buccal cancers requiring radical radiotherapy, from 1990 to 1996. Radiotherapy was delivered using a combination of external beam and brachytherapy with preloaded cesium 137 needles. The response to the radiation was assessed at the completion of external beam radiation and 6 weeks after brachytherapy. An analysis correlating various parameters influencing the long term disease free survival and overall survival was done. Results: Response assessed at the end of external beam radiation correlated strongly with the overall survival and the disease free interval (P=0.000. No other factor influenced the survival. Conclusion: The rate of the tumor regression can predict the overall outcome in patients with buccal cancers treated with radiation. Completion of the planned course of radiation in patients who do not show a substantial reduction in size by 4.5 weeks of conventional radiation does not improve the results.

  13. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...... by TNFR1 deficiency. Overall, these results suggest that TNFR1 is involved in the early establishment of the inflammatory response and that its deficiency causes a decreased inflammatory response and tissue damage following brain injury....

  14. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Xin; Mei, Zhen-Yang; Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+) T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Assessment of serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer after DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei-Fan Li; Xiu-Yun Wang; Hui-Qiong Xu; Xia Liu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy on serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer.Methods:A total of 79 patients with advanced colon cancer conservatively treated in our hospital between May 2012 and October 2015 were retrospectively studied and divided into DC-CIK group and intravenous chemotherapy group according to different therapeutic regimens, DC-CIK group received DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy and intravenous chemotherapy group received conventional intravenous chemotherapy. After three cycles of chemotherapy, the content of tumor markers in serum, expression levels of apoptotic molecules in tumor lesions as well as immune function indexes were determined.Results:After 3 cycles of chemotherapy, CEA, CA199, CA242, HIF-1α, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group;p53, FAM96B, PTEN, PHLPP, ASPP2and RASSF10 mRNA content in tumor lesions of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; the fluorescence intensity of CD3, CD4 and CD56 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell surface of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while the fluorescence intensity of CD8 and CD25 were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; IL-2 and IFN-γ content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group.Conclusions: DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy has better effect on killing colon cancer cells and inducing colon cancer cell apoptosis than conventional intravenous chemotherapy, and can also improve the body's anti-tumor immune response.

  17. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baek NH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available NamHuk Baek,1,* Ok Won Seo,1,* Jaehwa Lee,1 John Hulme,2 Seong Soo A An2 1Department of Research and Development, NanoEntek Inc., Seoul, 2Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145, testis (F9, embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3, muscle (C2C12, embryonic kidney (293T, neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549, cervical cancer (HeLa, HeLa contaminant (HEp2, pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3, embryonic cell (PA317, and osteosarcoma (U-2OS cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 µM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be

  18. Experimental monitoring of geotechnical response of railway track systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsabhan, Abdullah H.

    An important issue that compromises rail track operations and safety is ballast fouling. Ballast fouling may lead to track deformation, reduction of track load capacity and train speed, and ultimately train derailment. This problem is quite costly for the railway industry thus, assessing and controlling ballast fouling and then preventing train derailment while optimizing maintenance operation is very important for reducing the overall cost of freight and passenger transportation. This study presents a proposed holistic methodology that extends assessing fouling while monitoring rail track deformation. The techniques uses deformation monitoring instruments (e.g., fiber optic (FO) sensors and LVDTs) coupled with Electromagnetic (EM) surveying: Ground penetrating radar (GPR) and a time domain reflectometry (TDR). The methodology aims at gathering data to create an early warning system that would allow railway engineers to develop a symptomatic approach to ballast maintenance procedures. This proposed methodology was tested on a full scale track model (FSTM). This model comprises 2.45 m rail supported by five ties embedded in ballast layer that was fouled under controlled conditions. The testing program considered three common types of fouling: mineral fouling, clay fouling, and silica sand fouling. A comparison between rail settlement measurements measured by LVDTs and rail bending strain measurement measured by FO sensors showed that FO sensors do not provide an indication of track deterioration due to cyclic loading, moisture content, and fouling depth. In addition, results showed a high correlation between rate of plastic settlement and amount of fouling detected by EM survey. Experimental results also showed that EM survey results can be used to determine depth and type of fouling.

  19. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers and LEDs to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalize the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy di-photon resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This talk describes how the monitoring system ...

  20. Monitoring water supply systems for anomaly detection and response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Lapikas, T.; Tangena, B.H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Water supply systems are vulnerable to damage caused by unintended or intended human actions, or due to aging of the system. In order to minimize the damages and the inconvenience for the customers, a software tool was developed to detect anomalies at an early stage, and to support the responsible s

  1. A mass spectrometer for pain-response monitoring in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.

    2017-06-01

    A mass spectrometer with a membrane interface has been used for measuring the relative concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) released from rat skin in response to thermal irritation and pain stimulus during intraperitoneal propofol-lidocaine anesthesia. It is established that the local anesthetic lidocaine directly influences the central nervous system and induces antinociceptive reaction to thermal irritation.

  2. Ex vivo treatment response of primary tumors and/or associated metastases for preclinical and clinical development of therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corben, Adriana D; Uddin, Mohammad M; Crawford, Brooke; Farooq, Mohammad; Modi, Shanu; Gerecitano, John; Chiosis, Gabriela; Alpaugh, Mary L

    2014-10-02

    The molecular analysis of established cancer cell lines has been the mainstay of cancer research for the past several decades. Cell culture provides both direct and rapid analysis of therapeutic sensitivity and resistance. However, recent evidence suggests that therapeutic response is not exclusive to the inherent molecular composition of cancer cells but rather is greatly influenced by the tumor cell microenvironment, a feature that cannot be recapitulated by traditional culturing methods. Even implementation of tumor xenografts, though providing a wealth of information on drug delivery/efficacy, cannot capture the tumor cell/microenvironment crosstalk (i.e., soluble factors) that occurs within human tumors and greatly impacts tumor response. To this extent, we have developed an ex vivo (fresh tissue sectioning) technique which allows for the direct assessment of treatment response for preclinical and clinical therapeutics development. This technique maintains tissue integrity and cellular architecture within the tumor cell/microenvironment context throughout treatment response providing a more precise means to assess drug efficacy.

  3. The response to epidermal growth factor of human maxillary tumor cells in terms of tumor growth, invasion and expression of proteinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizoguchi, H; Komiyama, S; Matsui, K; Hamanaka, R; Ono, M; Kiue, A; Kobayashi, M; Shimizu, N; Welgus, H G; Kuwano, M

    1991-11-11

    Three cancer cell lines, IMC-2, IMC-3 and IMC-4, were established from a single tumor of a patient with maxillary cancer. We examined responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF) of these 3 cell lines with regard to cell growth and tumor invasion. The growth rate of IMC-2 in nude mice was markedly faster than that of the IMC-3 and IMC-4 cell lines. Assay for invasion through fibrin gels showed significantly enhanced invasive capacity of IMC-2 cells in response to EGF, but no change for IMC-3 and IMC-4 cells. We examined response to EGF of IMC-2 cells with regard to expression of a growth-related oncogene (c-fos), proteinases and their inhibitors. Expression of c-fos was transiently increased in IMC-2 cells at rates comparable to those seen in the 2 other lines in the presence of EGF. There was no apparent effect of EGF on the expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator and 72-kDa type-IV collagenase in IMC-2 cells. In contrast, EGF specifically enhanced the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-I (PAI-I) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-I (TIMP-I) in IMC-2 cells. Our data suggest that proteinase inhibitors or other related factors may play an important role in tumor growth and invasion in response to EGF.

  4. Early Detection of Tumor Response by FLT/MicroPET Imaging in a C26 Murine Colon Carcinoma Solid Tumor Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chi Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET imaging demonstrated the change of glucose consumption of tumor cells, but problems with specificity and difficulties in early detection of tumor response to chemotherapy have led to the development of new PET tracers. Fluorine-18-fluorothymidine (18F-FLT images cellular proliferation by entering the salvage pathway of DNA synthesis. In this study, we evaluate the early response of colon carcinoma to the chemotherapeutic drug, lipo-Dox, in C26 murine colorectal carcinoma-bearing mice by 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT. The male BALB/c mice were bilaterally inoculated with 1×105 and 1×106 C26 tumor cells per flank. Mice were intravenously treated with 10 mg/kg lipo-Dox at day 8 after 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT imaging. The biodistribution of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT were followed by the microPET imaging at day 9. For the quantitative measurement of microPET imaging at day 9, 18F-FLT was superior to 18F-FDG for early detection of tumor response to Lipo-DOX at various tumor sizes (<0.05. The data of biodistribution showed similar results with those from the quantification of SUV (standard uptake value by microPET imaging. The study indicates that 18F-FLT/microPET is a useful imaging modality for early detection of chemotherapy in the colorectal mouse model.

  5. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pereira

    Full Text Available High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools.Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival.Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic dilemma and a potential

  6. Monitoring human melanocytic cell responses to piperine using multispectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samatham, Ravikant; Phillips, Kevin G.; Sonka, Julia; Yelma, Aznegashe; Reddy, Neha; Vanka, Meenakshi; Thuillier, Philippe; Soumyanath, Amala; Jacques, Steven

    2011-03-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmentary disease characterized by melanocyte loss attributed most commonly to autoimmune mechanisms. Currently vitiligo has a high incidence (1% worldwide) but a poor set of treatment options. Piperine, a compound found in black pepper, is a potential treatment for the depigmentary skin disease vitiligo, due to its ability to stimulate mouse epidermal melanocyte proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The present study investigates the use of multispectral imaging and an image processing technique based on local contrast to quantify the stimulatory effects of piperine on human melanocyte proliferation in reconstructed epidermis. We demonstrate the ability of the imaging method to quantify increased pigmentation in response to piperine treatment. The quantization of melanocyte stimulation by the proposed imaging technique illustrates the potential use of this technology to quickly assess therapeutic responses of vitiligo tissue culture models to treatment non-invasively.

  7. Optical Aptamer Probes of Fluorescent Imaging to Rapid Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yeon Hwang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence detecting of exogenous EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule or muc1 (mucin1 expression correlated to cancer metastasis using nanoparticles provides pivotal information on CTC (circulating tumor cell occurrence in a noninvasive tool. In this study, we study a new skill to detect extracellular EpCAM/muc1 using quantum dot-based aptamer beacon (QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB (aptamer linker beacon. The QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB was designed using QDs (quantum dots and probe. The EpCAM/muc1-targeting aptamer contains a Ep-CAM/muc1 binding sequence and BHQ1 (black hole quencher 1 or BHQ2 (black hole quencher2. In the absence of target EpCAM/muc1, the QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB forms a partial duplex loop-like aptamer beacon and remained in quenched state because the BHQ1/2 quenches the fluorescence signal-on of the QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB. The binding of EpCAM/muc1 of CTC to the EpCAM/muc1 binding aptamer sequence of the EpCAM/muc1-targeting oligonucleotide triggered the dissociation of the BHQ1/2 quencher and subsequent signal-on of a green/red fluorescence signal. Furthermore, acute inflammation was stimulated by trigger such as caerulein in vivo, which resulted in increased fluorescent signal of the cy5.5-EpCAM/muc1 ALB during cancer metastasis due to exogenous expression of EpCAM/muc1 in Panc02-implanted mouse model.

  8. Value of continuous leakage monitoring with radioactive iodine-131-labeled human serum albumin during hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha and melphalan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, RJ; Limburg, PC; Piers, DA; Hoekstra, HJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    Background: The aim of this study was to analyze the value of continuous leakage monitoring with radioactive iodine-131-labeled human serum albumin (RISA) in patients treated with hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) and melphalan. Methods: Forty-eight

  9. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Nielsen, Dorte; Sölétormos, György

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring.

  10. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells modulate immune responses independently of NADPH oxidase in the ovarian tumor microenvironment in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi E Godoy

    Full Text Available The phagocyte NADPH oxidase generates superoxide anion and downstream reactive oxidant intermediates in response to infectious threat, and is a critical mediator of antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory responses. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs are a heterogeneous population of immature myeloid cells that are recruited by cancer cells, accumulate locally and systemically in advanced cancer, and can abrogate anti-tumor immunity. Prior studies have implicated the phagocyte NADPH oxidase as being an important component promoting MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in cancer. We therefore used engineered NADPH oxidase-deficient (p47 (phox-/- mice to delineate the role of this enzyme complex in MDSC accumulation and function in a syngeneic mouse model of epithelial ovarian cancer. We found that the presence of NADPH oxidase did not affect tumor progression. The accumulation of MDSCs locally and systemically was similar in tumor-bearing wild-type (WT and p47 (phox-/- mice. Although MDSCs from tumor-bearing WT mice had functional NADPH oxidase, the suppressive effect of MDSCs on ex vivo stimulated T cell proliferation was NADPH oxidase-independent. In contrast to other tumor-bearing mouse models, our results show that MDSC accumulation and immunosuppression in syngeneic epithelial ovarian cancer is NADPH oxidase-independent. We speculate that factors inherent to the tumor, tumor microenvironment, or both determine the specific requirement for NADPH oxidase in MDSC accumulation and function.

  11. MiR-27b targets PPARγ to inhibit growth, tumor progression and the inflammatory response in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-J; Drakaki, A; Iliopoulos, D; Struhl, K

    2012-08-16

    The peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor (PPAR)γ pathway is involved in cancer, but it appears to have both tumor suppressor and oncogenic functions. In neuroblastoma cells, miR-27b targets the 3' untranslated region of PPARγ and inhibits its mRNA and protein expression. miR-27b overexpression or PPARγ inhibition blocks cell growth in vitro and tumor growth in mouse xenografts. PPARγ activates expression of the pH regulator NHE1, which is associated with tumor progression. Lastly, miR-27b through PPARγ regulates nuclear factor-κB activity and transcription of inflammatory target genes. Thus, in neuroblastoma, miR-27b functions as a tumor suppressor by inhibiting the tumor-promoting function of PPARγ, which triggers an increased inflammatory response. In contrast, in breast cancer cells, PPARγ inhibits NHE1 expression and the inflammatory response, and it functions as a tumor suppressor. We suggest that the ability of PPARγ to promote or suppress tumor formation is linked to cell type-specific differences in regulation of NHE1 and other target genes.

  12. In vivo imaging using fluorescent antibodies to tumor necrosis factor predicts therapeutic response in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atreya, Raja; Neumann, Helmut; Neufert, Clemens; Waldner, Maximilian J; Billmeier, Ulrike; Zopf, Yurdagül; Willma, Marcus; App, Christine; Münster, Tino; Kessler, Hermann; Maas, Stefanie; Gebhardt, Bernd; Heimke-Brinck, Ralph; Reuter, Eva; Dörje, Frank; Rau, Tilman T; Uter, Wolfgang; Wang, Thomas D; Kiesslich, Ralf; Vieth, Michael; Hannappel, Ewald; Neurath, Markus F

    2014-03-01

    As antibodies to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) suppress immune responses in Crohn's disease by binding to membrane-bound TNF (mTNF), we created a fluorescent antibody for molecular mTNF imaging in this disease. Topical antibody administration in 25 patients with Crohn's disease led to detection of intestinal mTNF(+) immune cells during confocal laser endomicroscopy. Patients with high numbers of mTNF(+) cells showed significantly higher short-term response rates (92%) at week 12 upon subsequent anti-TNF therapy as compared to patients with low amounts of mTNF(+) cells (15%). This clinical response in the former patients was sustained over a follow-up period of 1 year and was associated with mucosal healing observed in follow-up endoscopy. These data indicate that molecular imaging with fluorescent antibodies has the potential to predict therapeutic responses to biological treatment and can be used for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease and autoimmune or inflammatory disorders.

  13. Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced chemosensitivity for hypoxia-responsive tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Zhang, Haijun; Wu, Xue; Guo, Liting; Wang, Fei; Xia, Guohua; Chen, Baoan; Yin, HaiXiang; Wang, Yonglu; Li, Xueming

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an inseparable component of the solid tumor as well as the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the effect of the novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-poly L-lysine (PLL)-poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) based nanoparticles (NPs) modified by transferrin (Tf) loaded with daunorubicin (DNR) (DNR-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA-NPs, abbreviated as DNR-Tf-NPs) on leukemia cells (K562) under hypoxia. In vitro and in vivo tests to determine the effect of the enhanced chemosensitivity were evaluated using the immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, 3,-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazoliumbromide assay, Western blot analysis, histopathological examination, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Under hypoxia, K562 cells were hypoxia-responsive with the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50) of DNR increased, resulting in chemotherapy insensitivity. By targeting the transferrin receptor (TfR) on the surface of K562 cells, DNR-Tf-NPs led to an increased intracellular DNR level, enhancing drug sensitivity of K562 cells to DNR with a decreased IC50, even under hypoxia. We further detected the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in K562 cells. The results indicated that DNR-Tf-NPs downregulated HIF-1α and induced apoptosis to overcome hypoxia. In the xenograft model, injection of DNR-Tf-NPs significantly suppressed tumor growth, and the immunosignals of Ki67 in DNR-Tf-NPs group was significantly lower than the other groups. It was therefore concluded that DNR-Tf-NPs could be a promising candidate for enhancing drug sensitivity under hypoxia in tumor treatment.

  14. Comparison of Vaccine-Induced Effector CD8 T Cell Responses Directed against Self- and Non-Self-Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara R; Sørensen, Maria R; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play a major role in tumor control, yet vaccination aimed at eliciting potent CD8 T cell responses are rarely efficient in clinical trials. To try and understand why this is so, we have generated potent adenoviral vectors encoding the endogenous tumor Ags...... that low avidity of the self-TA-specific CD8 T cells may represent a major obstacle for efficient immunotherapy of cancer....

  15. Therapy of chronic hepatitis C: Virologic response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljić-Kapulica Nada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Virological testing is considered to be essential in the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in order to diagnose infection, and, most importantly, as a quide for treatment decisions and assess the virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of a sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with pegiinterferon alpha (PEGINF and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy. Methods. A total of 34 patients, treated with PEG-IFN and RBV were studied. Serum HCV-RNA was measured before the treatment, 12 weeks following the start of the therapy and 6 weeks after the treatment cessation. SVR was defined as undetectable serum HCV-RNA 6 months of post-treatment follow-up, virologic relapse (VR as relapse of HCV-RNA during the post-treatment follow-up. Serum HCV-RNA was measured with the Cobas Amplicor test. Results. At the end of post-treatment follow-up 19 (55.8% patients demonstrated a SVR. The majority of the patients were genotype 1 (27, and the other were genotype 3 (5 patients and genotype 4 (2 patients. There was VR in 6 patients 6 months after the therapy. In 9 patients HCV-RNA was positive after 12 weeks. Conclusion. We demonstrated that patients with chronic HCV infection can be successfully treated with combination of PEG-INF and RBV. This result emphasizes also that post-treatment follow-up to identify patients with SVR or VR could be important.

  16. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    dyes that indicate changes of pH due to release of halogen from halogenated substrates, have limited shelf life and must be protected from extreme environmental conditions. Some also show a marked rate dependence of response. Readings of color reflection optical densities on labels or long paper strips......Many kinds of coated or impregnated reflecting papers change color or become colored by large radiation doses. Such papers or “labels” do not generally supply dosimetry information, but may give useful inventory information, namely a visual indication of whether or not an industrial product...

  17. Expression analysis of genes associated with human osteosarcoma tumors shows correlation of RUNX2 overexpression with poor response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cervigne Nilva K

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric bone tumor. There is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying osteosarcoma oncogenesis, and a lack of good diagnostic as well as prognostic clinical markers for this disease. Recent discoveries have highlighted a potential role of a number of genes including: RECQL4, DOCK5, SPP1, RUNX2, RB1, CDKN1A, P53, IBSP, LSAMP, MYC, TNFRSF1B, BMP2, HISTH2BE, FOS, CCNB1, and CDC5L. Methods Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of these 16 genes as potential biomarkers of osteosarcoma oncogenesis and chemotherapy response in human tumors. We performed quantitative expression analysis in a panel of 22 human osteosarcoma tumors with differential response to chemotherapy, and 5 normal human osteoblasts. Results RECQL4, SPP1, RUNX2, and IBSP were significantly overexpressed, and DOCK5, CDKN1A, RB1, P53, and LSAMP showed significant loss of expression relative to normal osteoblasts. In addition to being overexpressed in osteosarcoma tumor samples relative to normal osteoblasts, RUNX2 was the only gene of the 16 to show significant overexpression in tumors that had a poor response to chemotherapy relative to good responders. Conclusion These data underscore the loss of tumor suppressive pathways and activation of specific oncogenic mechanisms associated with osteosarcoma oncogenesis, while drawing attention to the role of RUNX2 expression as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy failure in osteosarcoma.

  18. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  19. Enzyme responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor therapy in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Ding, Xingwei; Li, Jinghua; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Liu, Junjie; Dai, Liangliang; Zhou, Jun; Hou, Changjun; Cai, Kaiyong

    2015-04-01

    To reduce the toxic side effects of traditional chemotherapeutics in vivo, we designed and constructed a biocompatible, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) responsive drug delivery system based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs). MMPs substrate peptide containing PLGLAR (sensitive to MMPs) was immobilized onto the surfaces of amino-functionalized MSNs via an amidation reaction, serving as MMPs sensitive intermediate linker. Bovine serum albumin was then covalently coupled to linker as end-cap for sealing the mesopores of MSNs. Lactobionic acid was further conjugated to the system as targeting motif. Doxorubicin hydrochloride was used as the model anticancer drug in this study. A series of characterizations revealed that the system was successfully constructed. The peptide-functionalized MSNs system demonstrated relatively high sensitivity to MMPs for triggering drug delivery, which was potentially important for tumor therapy since the tumor’s microenvironment overexpressed MMPs in nature. The in vivo experiments proved that the system could efficiently inhibit the tumor growth with minimal side effects. This study provides an approach for the development of the next generation of nanotherapeutics toward efficient cancer treatment.

  20. Thermal responsive micelles for dual tumor-targeting imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiyan; Li, Bowen; Qiu, Jiadan; Li, Jiangyu; Jin, Jing; Dai, Shuhang; Ma, Yuxiang; Gu, Yueqing

    2013-11-01

    Two kinds of thermally responsive polymers P(FAA-NIPA-co-AAm-co-ODA) and P(FPA-NIPA-co-AAm-co-ODA) containing folate, isopropyl acrylamide and octadecyl acrylate were fabricated through free radical random copolymerization for targeted drug delivery. Then the micelles formed in aqueous solution by self-assembly and were characterized in terms of particle size, lower critical solution temperature (LCST) and a variety of optical spectra. MTT assays demonstrated the low cytotoxicity of the control micelle and drug-loaded micelle on A549 cells and Bel 7402 cells. Then fluorescein and cypate were used as model drugs to optimize the constituents of micelles for drug entrapment efficiency and investigate the release kinetics of micelles in vitro. The FA and thermal co-mediated tumor-targeting efficiency of the two kinds of micelles were verified and compared in detail at cell level and animal level, respectively. These results indicated that the dual-targeting micelles are promising drug delivery systems for tumor-targeting therapy.

  1. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  2. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  3. Predictors of response to anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy in ulcerative colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Evanthia; Zampeli; Michalis; Gizis; Spyros; I; Siakavellas; Giorgos; Bamias

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis(UC) is an immune-mediated, chronic inflammatory disease of the large intestine. Its course is characterized by flares of acute inflammation and periods of low-grade chronic inflammatory activity or remission. Monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor(anti-TNF) are part of the therapeutic armamentarium and are used in cases of moderate to severe UC that is refractory to conventional treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants. Therapeutic response to these agents is not uniform and a large percentage of patients either fail to improve(primary non-response) or lose response after a period of improvement(secondary non-response/loss of response). In addition, the use of anti-TNF agents has been related to uncommon but potentially serious adverse effects that preclude their administration or lead to their discontinuation. Finally, use of these medications is associated with a considerable cost for the health system. The identification of parameters thatmay predict response to anti-TNF drugs in UC would help to better select for patients with a high probability to respond and minimize risk and costs for those who will not respond. Analysis of the major clinical trials and the accumulated experience with the use of anti-TNF drugs in UC has resulted to the report of such prognostic factors. Included are clinical and epidemiological characteristics, laboratory markers, endoscopic indicators and molecular(immunological/genetic) signatures. Such predictive parameters of long-term outcomes may either be present at the commencement of treatment or determined during the early period of therapy. Validation of these prognostic markers in large cohorts of patients with variable characteristics will facilitate their introduction into clinical practice and the best selection of UC patients who will benefit from anti-TNF therapy.

  4. Monitors display of radiological images: quality control and response of the observer; Monitores de visualizacion de imagenes radiologicas: control de calidad y respuesta del observador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesares Magaz, O.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, O. C.; Gonzalez Martin, A. E.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis is aimed to determine the possible change experienced by a human reader response to the qualification of a test image on a monitor diagnostic radiographic image when observed before and after calibration of the monitor following the provisions of the AAPM TG18 protocol. It also quantified the change experienced by the monitor as a result of the calibration, by measuring the luminance response as set out in the protocol.

  5. Type I pityriasis rubra pilaris: upregulation of tumor necrosis factor alpha and response to adalimumab therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao-Hua; Zhou, Youwen; Ball, Nigel; Su, Ming-Wan; Xu, Jin-Hua; Zheng, Zhi-Zhong

    2010-01-01

    pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) has unknown etiology and is often refractory to conventional therapies. to document a PRP patient's response to adalimumab therapy and to highlight the potential role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in the development of PRP skin lesions. a patient received adalimumab therapy at standard dosing intervals. In addition, the messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) of TNF in the lesional and perilesional normal skin was quantified in two patients with PRP. the patient responded to adalimumab therapy and achieved clinical remission by 4 months. There was a significant elevation of TNF mRNA in the lesional skin of PRP. TNF upregulation is detected in PRP lesional skin, consistent with the observed clinical efficacy of TNF blockade for the treatment of PRP.

  6. Tissue Platinum Concentration and Tumor Response in Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eric S.; Lee, J. Jack; He, Guangan; Chow, Chi-Wan; Fujimoto, Junya; Kalhor, Neda; Swisher, Stephen G.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Stewart, David J.; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Platinum resistance is a major limitation in the treatment of advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Reduced intracellular drug accumulation is one of the most consistently identified features of platinum-resistant cell lines, but clinical data are limited. We assessed the effects of tissue platinum concentrations on response and survival in NSCLC. Patients and Methods We measured total platinum concentrations by flameless atomic absorption spectrophotometry in 44 archived fresh-frozen NSCLC specimens from patients who underwent surgical resection after neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy. Tissue platinum concentration was correlated with percent reduction in tumor size on post- versus prechemotherapy computed tomography scans. The relationship between tissue platinum concentration and survival was assessed by univariate and multicovariate Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Tissue platinum concentration correlated significantly with percent reduction in tumor size (P < .001). The same correlations were seen with cisplatin, carboplatin, and all histology subgroups. Furthermore, there was no significant impact of potential variables such as number of cycles and time lapse from last chemotherapy on platinum concentration. Patients with higher platinum concentration had longer time to recurrence (P = .034), progression-free survival (P = .018), and overall survival (P = .005) in the multicovariate Cox model analysis after adjusting for number of cycles. Conclusion This clinical study established a relationship between tissue platinum concentration and response in NSCLC. It suggests that reduced platinum accumulation might be an important mechanism of platinum resistance in the clinical setting. Further studies investigating factors that modulate intracellular platinum concentration are warranted. PMID:22891266

  7. Breast DCE-MRI Kinetic Heterogeneity Tumor Markers: Preliminary Associations With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ahmed; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Mies, Carolyn; DeMichele, Angela; Rosen, Mark; Davatzikos, Christos; Kontos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    The ability to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women diagnosed with breast cancer, either before or early on in treatment, is critical to judicious patient selection and tailoring the treatment regimen. In this paper, we investigate the role of contrast agent kinetic heterogeneity features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for predicting treatment response. We propose a set of kinetic statistic descriptors and present preliminary results showing the discriminatory capacity of the proposed descriptors for predicting complete and non-complete responders as assessed from pre-treatment imaging exams. The study population consisted of 15 participants: 8 complete responders and 7 non-complete responders. Using the proposed kinetic features, we trained a leave-one-out logistic regression classifier that performs with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.84 under the ROC. We compare the predictive value of our features against commonly used MRI features including kinetics of the characteristic kinetic curve (CKC), maximum peak enhancement (MPE), hotspot signal enhancement ratio (SER), and longest tumor diameter that give lower AUCs of 0.71, 0.66, 0.64, and 0.54, respectively. Our proposed kinetic statistics thus outperform the conventional kinetic descriptors as well as the classifier using a combination of all the conventional descriptors (i.e., CKC, MPE, SER, and longest diameter), which gives an AUC of 0.74. These findings suggest that heterogeneity-based DCE-MRI kinetic statistics could serve as potential imaging biomarkers for tumor characterization and could be used to improve candidate patient selection even before the start of the neoadjuvant treatment. PMID:26055172

  8. Breast DCE-MRI Kinetic Heterogeneity Tumor Markers: Preliminary Associations With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ashraf

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women diagnosed with breast cancer, either before or early on in treatment, is critical to judicious patient selection and tailoring the treatment regimen. In this paper, we investigate the role of contrast agent kinetic heterogeneity features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI for predicting treatment response. We propose a set of kinetic statistic descriptors and present preliminary results showing the discriminatory capacity of the proposed descriptors for predicting complete and non-complete responders as assessed from pre-treatment imaging exams. The study population consisted of 15 participants: 8 complete responders and 7 non-complete responders. Using the proposed kinetic features, we trained a leave-one-out logistic regression classifier that performs with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC of 0.84 under the ROC. We compare the predictive value of our features against commonly used MRI features including kinetics of the characteristic kinetic curve (CKC, maximum peak enhancement (MPE, hotspot signal enhancement ratio (SER, and longest tumor diameter that give lower AUCs of 0.71, 0.66, 0.64, and 0.54, respectively. Our proposed kinetic statistics thus outperform the conventional kinetic descriptors as well as the classifier using a combination of all the conventional descriptors (i.e., CKC, MPE, SER, and longest diameter, which gives an AUC of 0.74. These findings suggest that heterogeneity-based DCE-MRI kinetic statistics could serve as potential imaging biomarkers for tumor characterization and could be used to improve candidate patient selection even before the start of the neoadjuvant treatment.

  9. Breast DCE-MRI Kinetic Heterogeneity Tumor Markers: Preliminary Associations With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Ahmed; Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Mies, Carolyn; DeMichele, Angela; Rosen, Mark; Davatzikos, Christos; Kontos, Despina

    2015-06-01

    The ability to predict response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for women diagnosed with breast cancer, either before or early on in treatment, is critical to judicious patient selection and tailoring the treatment regimen. In this paper, we investigate the role of contrast agent kinetic heterogeneity features derived from breast dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) for predicting treatment response. We propose a set of kinetic statistic descriptors and present preliminary results showing the discriminatory capacity of the proposed descriptors for predicting complete and non-complete responders as assessed from pre-treatment imaging exams. The study population consisted of 15 participants: 8 complete responders and 7 non-complete responders. Using the proposed kinetic features, we trained a leave-one-out logistic regression classifier that performs with an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) of 0.84 under the ROC. We compare the predictive value of our features against commonly used MRI features including kinetics of the characteristic kinetic curve (CKC), maximum peak enhancement (MPE), hotspot signal enhancement ratio (SER), and longest tumor diameter that give lower AUCs of 0.71, 0.66, 0.64, and 0.54, respectively. Our proposed kinetic statistics thus outperform the conventional kinetic descriptors as well as the classifier using a combination of all the conventional descriptors (i.e., CKC, MPE, SER, and longest diameter), which gives an AUC of 0.74. These findings suggest that heterogeneity-based DCE-MRI kinetic statistics could serve as potential imaging biomarkers for tumor characterization and could be used to improve candidate patient selection even before the start of the neoadjuvant treatment.

  10. Recent Advances in Stimuli-Responsive Release Function Drug Delivery Systems for Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chendi Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Benefiting from the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery systems (DDSs with stimuli-responsive controlled release function show great potential in clinical anti-tumor applications. By using a DDS, the harsh side effects of traditional anti-cancer drug treatments and damage to normal tissues and organs can be avoided to the greatest extent. An ideal DDS must firstly meet bio-safety standards and secondarily the efficiency-related demands of a large drug payload and controlled release function. This review highlights recent research progress on DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. The first section briefly reviews the nanoscale scaffolds of DDSs, including mesoporous nanoparticles, polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The second section presents the main types of stimuli-responsive mechanisms and classifies these into two categories: intrinsic (pH, redox state, biomolecules and extrinsic (temperature, light irradiation, magnetic field and ultrasound ones. Clinical applications of DDS, future challenges and perspectives are also mentioned.

  11. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  12. Histopathologic tumor response after induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuong, Michael D; Frakes, Jessica M; Figura, Nicholas; Hoffe, Sarah E; Shridhar, Ravi; Mellon, Eric A; Hodul, Pamela J; Malafa, Mokenge P; Springett, Gregory M; Centeno, Barbara A

    2016-04-01

    While clinical outcomes following induction chemotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have been reported for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer (BRPC) patients, pathologic response has not previously been described. This single-institution retrospective review evaluated BRPC patients who completed induction gemcitabine-based chemotherapy followed by SBRT and surgical resection. Each surgical specimen was assigned two tumor regression grades (TRG), one using the College of American Pathologists (CAP) criteria and one using the MD Anderson Cancer Center (MDACC) criteria. Overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS) were correlated to TRG score. We evaluated 36 patients with a median follow-up of 13.8 months (range, 6.1-24.8 months). The most common induction chemotherapy regimen (82%) was GTX (gemcitabine, docetaxel, capecitabine). A median SBRT dose of 35 Gy (range, 30-40 Gy) in 5 fractions was delivered to the region of vascular involvement. The margin-negative resection rate was 97.2%. Improved response according to MDACC grade trended towards superior PFS (P=061), but not OS. Any neoadjuvant treatment effect according to MDACC scoring (IIa-IV vs. I) was associated with improved OS and PFS (both P=0.019). We found no relationship between CAP score and OS or PFS. These data suggest that the increased pathologic response after induction chemotherapy and SBRT is correlated with improved survival for BRPC patients.

  13. Interactions of the p53 protein family in cellular stress response in gastrointestinal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Washington, Mary K; Wei, Jinxiong; Chen, Heidi; Prassolov, Vladimir S; Zaika, Alexander I

    2010-03-01

    p53, p63, and p73 are members of the p53 protein family involved in regulation of cell cycle, apoptosis, differentiation, and other critical cellular processes. Here, we investigated the contribution of the entire p53 family in chemotherapeutic drug response in gastrointestinal tumors. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry revealed complexity and variability of expression profiles of the p53 protein family. Using colon and esophageal cancer cells, we found that the integral transcription activity of the entire p53 family, as measured by the reporter analysis, associated with response to drug treatment in studied cells. We also found that p53 and p73, as well as p63 and p73, bind simultaneously to the promoters of p53 target genes. Taken together, our results support the view that the p53 protein family functions as an interacting network of proteins and show that cellular responses to chemotherapeutic drug treatment are determined by the total activity of the entire p53 family rather than p53 alone.

  14. Twitter Seismology: Earthquake Monitoring and Response in a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Smoczyk, G.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The potential uses of Twitter for earthquake response include broadcasting earthquake alerts, rapidly detecting widely felt events, qualitatively assessing earthquake damage effects, communicating with the public, and participating in post-event collaboration. Several seismic networks and agencies are currently distributing Twitter earthquake alerts including the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (@LastQuake), Natural Resources Canada (@CANADAquakes), and the Indonesian meteorological agency (@infogempabmg); the USGS will soon distribute alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts. Beyond broadcasting alerts, the USGS is investigating how to use tweets that originate near the epicenter to detect and characterize shaking events. This is possible because people begin tweeting immediately after feeling an earthquake, and their short narratives and exclamations are available for analysis within 10's of seconds of the origin time. Using five months of tweets that contain the word "earthquake" and its equivalent in other languages, we generate a tweet-frequency time series. The time series clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a simple Short-Term-Average / Long-Term-Average algorithm similar to that commonly used to detect seismic phases. As with most auto-detection algorithms, the parameters can be tuned to catch more or less events at the cost of more or less false triggers. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector found 48 globally-distributed, confirmed seismic events with only 2 false triggers. A space-shuttle landing and "The Great California ShakeOut" caused the false triggers. This number of

  15. Porous Silicon Microparticle Potentiates Anti-Tumor Immunity by Enhancing Cross-Presentation and Inducing Type I Interferon Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Xia

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanometer-size particles have become popular candidates for cancer vaccine adjuvants. However, the mechanism by which such particles enhance immune responses remains unclear. Here, we report a porous silicon microparticle (PSM-based cancer vaccine that greatly enhances cross-presentation and activates type I interferon (IFN-I response in dendritic cells (DCs. PSM-loaded antigen exhibited prolonged early endosome localization and enhanced cross-presentation through both proteasome- and lysosome-dependent pathways. Phagocytosis of PSM by DCs induced IFN-I responses through a TRIF- and MAVS-dependent pathway. DCs primed with PSM-loaded HER2 antigen produced robust CD8 T cell-dependent anti-tumor immunity in mice bearing HER2+ mammary gland tumors. Importantly, this vaccination activated the tumor immune microenvironment with elevated levels of intra-tumor IFN-I and MHCII expression, abundant CD11c+ DC infiltration, and tumor-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. These findings highlight the potential of PSM as an immune adjuvant to potentiate DC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Early skin toxicity predicts better outcomes, and early tumor shrinkage predicts better response after cetuximab treatment in advanced colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogawa, T; Doi, A; Shimokawa, M; Fouad, T M; Osuga, T; Tamura, F; Mizushima, T; Kimura, T; Abe, S; Ihara, H; Kukitsu, T; Sumiyoshi, T; Yoshizaki, N; Hirayama, M; Sasaki, T; Kawarada, Y; Kitashiro, S; Okushiba, S; Kondo, H; Tsuji, Y

    2015-03-01

    Cetuximab-containing treatments for metastatic colorectal cancer have been shown to have higher overall response rates and longer progression-free and overall survival than other systemic therapies. Cetuximab-related manifestations, including severe skin toxicity and early tumor shrinkage, have been shown to be predictors of response to cetuximab. We hypothesized that early skin toxicity is a predictor of response and better outcomes in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated 62 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma who had unresectable tumors and were treated with cetuximab in our institution. Skin toxicity grade was evaluated on each treatment day. Tumor size was evaluated using computed tomography prior to treatment and 4-8 weeks after the start of treatment with cetuximab.Patients with early tumor shrinkage after starting treatment with cetuximab had a significantly higher overall response rate (P = 0.0001). Patients with early skin toxicity showed significantly longer overall survival (P = 0.0305), and patients with higher skin toxicity grades had longer progression-free survival (P = 0.0168).We have shown that early tumor shrinkage, early onset of skin toxicity, and high skin toxicity grade are predictors of treatment efficacy and/or outcome in patients with advanced colorectal carcinoma treated with cetuximab.

  17. HEXIM1 as a Robust Pharmacodynamic Marker for Monitoring Target Engagement of BET Family Bromodomain Inhibitors in Tumors and Surrogate Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaoyu; Huang, Xiaoli; Uziel, Tamar; Hessler, Paul; Albert, Daniel H; Roberts-Rapp, Lisa A; McDaniel, Keith F; Kati, Warren M; Shen, Yu

    2017-02-01

    An increasing number of BET family protein inhibitors have recently entered clinical trials. It has been reported that attempts of monitoring target engagement of the BET bromodomain inhibitor OTX015 using literature-described putative pharmacodynamic markers, such as c-Myc, BRD2, etc., failed to detect pharmacodynamic marker responses in AML patients treated at active dose and those with clinical responses. Here, we report the identification and characterization of HEXIM1 and other genes as robust pharmacodynamic markers for BET inhibitors. Global gene expression profiling studies were carried out using cancer cells and surrogate tissues, such as whole blood and skin, to identify genes that are modulated by BET family proteins. Candidate markers were further characterized for concentration- and time-dependent responses to the BET inhibitor ABBV-075 in vitro and in vivo HEXIM1 was found to be the only gene that exhibited robust and consistent modulation by BET inhibitors across multiple cancer indications and surrogate tissues. Markers such as SERPINI1, ZCCHC24, and ZMYND8 were modulated by ABBV-075 and other BET inhibitors across cancer cell lines and xenograft tumors but not in blood and skin. Significant downregulation of c-Myc, a well-publicized target of BET inhibitors, was largely restricted to hematologic cancer cell lines. Incorporating well-characterized pharmacodynamic markers, such as HEXIM1 and other genes described here, can provide a better understanding of potential efficacy and toxicity associated with inhibiting BET family proteins and informs early clinical decisions on BET inhibitor development programs. Mol Cancer Ther; 16(2); 388-96. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Sensorineural hearing loss among cerebellopontine-angle tumor patients examined with pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinindra, A. M.; Zizlavsky, S.; Bashiruddin, J.; Aman, R. A.; Wulani, V.; Bardosono, S.

    2017-08-01

    Tumor in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) accurs for approximately 5-10% of all intracranial tumors, where unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus are the most frequent symptoms. This study aimed to collect data on sensorineural hearing loss in CPA tumor patients in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH) using pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry (BERA). It also aimed to obtaine data on CPA-tumor imaging through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This was a descriptive, analytic, and cross-sectional study. The subjects of this study were gathered using a total sampling method from secondary data between July 2012 and November 2016. From 104 patients, 30 matched the inclusion criteria. The CPA-tumor patients in the ENT CMH outpatient clinic were mostly female, middle-aged patients (41-60 years) whose clinical presentation was mostly tinnitus and severe, asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss in 10 subjects. From 30 subjects, 29 showed ipsilaterally impaired BERA results, and 17 subjects showed contralaterally impaired BERA results. There were 24 subjects who with large-sized tumors and 19 subjects who had intracanal tumors that had spread until they were extracanal in 19 subjects.

  19. Feeding mice with Aloe vera gel diminishes L-1 sarcoma-induced early neovascular response and tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocik, Janusz; Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Zdanowski, Robert; Jung, Leszek; Skopińska-Różewska, Ewa; Skopiński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Aloe vera (Aloe arborescens, aloe barbadensis) is a medicinal plant belonging to the Liliaceae family. Aloe vera gel prepared from the inner part of Aloe leaves is increasingly consumed as a beverage dietary supplement. Some data suggest its tumor growth modulatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in Balb/c mice the in vivo influence of orally administered Aloe vera drinking gel on the syngeneic L-1 sarcoma tumor growth and its vascularization: early cutaneous neovascular response, tumor-induced angiogenesis (TIA test read after 3 days), and tumor hemoglobin content measured 14 days after L-1 sarcoma cell grafting. Feeding mice for 3 days after tumor cell grafting with 150 μl daily dose of Aloe vera gel significantly diminished the number of newly-formed blood vessels in comparison to the controls. The difference between the groups of control and Aloe-fed mice (150 μl daily dose for 14 days) with respect to the 14 days' tumor volume was on the border of statistical significance. No difference was observed in tumor hemoglobin content.

  20. IgE/FcεRI-Mediated Antigen Cross-Presentation by Dendritic Cells Enhances Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Platzer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic studies discovered an inverse association between immunoglobulin E (IgE-mediated allergies and cancer, implying tumor-protective properties of IgE. However, the underlying immunologic mechanisms remain poorly understood. Antigen cross-presentation by dendritic cells (DCs is of key importance for anti-tumor immunity because it induces the generation of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs with specificity for tumor antigens. We demonstrate that DCs use IgE and FcεRI, the high-affinity IgE receptor, for cross-presentation and priming of CTLs in response to free soluble antigen at low doses. Importantly, IgE/FcεRI-mediated cross-presentation is a distinct receptor-mediated pathway because it does not require MyD88 signals or IL-12 induction in DCs. Using passive immunization with tumor antigen-specific IgE and DC-based vaccination experiments, we demonstrate that IgE-mediated cross-presentation significantly improves anti-tumor immunity and induces memory responses in vivo. Our findings suggest a cellular mechanism for the tumor-protective features of IgE and expand the known physiological functions of this immunoglobulin.

  1. EMIR: a configurable hierarchical system for event monitoring and incident response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deich, William T. S.

    2014-07-01

    The Event Monitor and Incident Response system (emir) is a flexible, general-purpose system for monitoring and responding to all aspects of instrument, telescope, and general facility operations, and has been in use at the Automated Planet Finder telescope for two years. Responses to problems can include both passive actions (e.g. generating alerts) and active actions (e.g. modifying system settings). Emir includes a monitor-and-response daemon, plus graphical user interfaces and text-based clients that automatically configure themselves from data supplied at runtime by the daemon. The daemon is driven by a configuration file that describes each condition to be monitored, the actions to take when the condition is triggered, and how the conditions are aggregated into hierarchical groups of conditions. Emir has been implemented for the Keck Task Library (KTL) keyword-based systems used at Keck and Lick Observatories, but can be readily adapted to many event-driven architectures. This paper discusses the design and implementation of Emir , and the challenges in balancing the competing demands for simplicity, flexibility, power, and extensibility. Emir 's design lends itself well to multiple purposes, and in addition to its core monitor and response functions, it provides an effective framework for computing running statistics, aggregate values, and summary state values from the primitive state data generated by other subsystems, and even for creating quick-and-dirty control loops for simple systems.

  2. MUC1-specific immune therapy generates a strong anti-tumor response in a MUC1-tolerant colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Pathangey, L B; Bradley, J B; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Akporiaye, E T; Gendler, S J

    2007-02-19

    A MUC1-based vaccine was used in a preclinical model of colon cancer. The trial was conducted in a MUC1-tolerant immune competent host injected with MC38 colon cancer cells expressing MUC1. The vaccine included: MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, MHC class II-restricted pan-helper-peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Immunization was successful in breaking MUC1 self-tolerance, and in eliciting a robust anti-tumor response. The vaccine stimulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) helper and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells against MUC1 and other undefined MC38 tumor antigens. In the prophylactic setting, immunization caused complete rejection of tumor cells, while in the therapeutic regimen, tumor burden was significantly reduced.

  3. Top-Down Multilevel Simulation of Tumor Response to Treatment in the Context of In Silico Oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatakos, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide a brief introduction into the basics of a top-down multilevel tumor dynamics modeling method primarily based on discrete entity consideration and manipulation. The method is clinically oriented, one of its major goals being to support patient individualized treatment optimization through experimentation in silico (=on the computer). Therefore, modeling of the treatment response of clinical tumors lies at the epicenter of the approach. Macroscopic data, including i.a. anatomic and metabolic tomographic images of the tumor, provide the framework for the integration of data and mechanisms pertaining to lower and lower biocomplexity levels such as clinically approved cellular and molecular biomarkers. The method also provides a powerful framework for the investigation of multilevel (multiscale) tumor biology in the generic investigational context. The Oncosimulator, a multiscale physics and biomedical engineering concept and construct tightly associated with the method and cu...

  4. Clinical Significance of AFP and PIVKA-II Responses for Monitoring Treatment Outcomes and Predicting Prognosis in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Recently, the utility of tumor markers in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC field has received a good deal of attention. Here, we review and summarize the results of studies on the roles played by the α-fetoprotein (AFP and prothrombin induced by the absence of vitamin K or antagonist-II (PIVKA-II responses in terms of the monitoring of outcomes and prediction of prognosis after various HCC treatments. Methods. Studies lodged in PUBMED and that satisfied our inclusion criteria were reviewed. Results. We reviewed 12 studies measuring both AFP and PIVKA-II responses in HCC patients treated in various ways. The results are presented by treatment modality. Conclusion. Measurement of AFP and PIVKA II marker levels before and after HCC treatment is clinically useful in monitoring of treatment outcomes and prognosis and in predicting recurrence and survival.

  5. Monitoring of VX2 tumor growth in rabbit liver using T2-weighted and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 1.5T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, Jo-Chi; Mac, Ka-Wai; Chang, Chiung-Yun; Wu, Yu-Chiuan; Hsiao, Chia-Chi; Chen, Po-Chou

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the VX2 tumor growth in rabbit liver using T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Five New Zealand white (NZW) rabbits were implanted with VX2 cell suspension in liver. Afterwards, MRI was performed 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after tumor implantation. A 1.5T clinical MRI scanner was used to perform scans. After 3-plane localizer, T1 weighted imaging (T1WI), T2WI, and DCE-MRI using a three-dimensional gradient echo pulse sequence was performed. After 4 pre-contrast images were acquired, each rabbit was injected i.v. with 0.1 mmol/kg Dotarem. The total scan time after Dotarem administration was 30 minutes. All acquired images were analyzed using ImageJ software. Several regions of interest were selected from the rims of tumor, liver, and muscle. The enhancement ratio (ER) was calculated by dividing the MR signal after Dotarem injection to the MR signal before Dotarem injection. The maximum ER (ER_max) value of tumor for each rabbit was observed right after the Dotarem injection. The T2W MR signal intensities (T2W_SI) and the ER_max values obtained 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after tumor implantation were analyzed with a linear regression algorithm. Both T2W_SI and ER_max of tumors increased with time. The changes for T2W_SI and ER_max of tumors between 7 and 28 days after tumor implantation were 32.66% and 18.14%, respectively. T2W_SI is more sensitive than ER_max for monitoring the growth of VX2 tumor in a rabbit liver model.

  6. Optimization of biguanide derivatives as selective antitumor agents blocking adaptive stress responses in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narise, Kosuke; Okuda, Kensuke; Enomoto, Yukihiro; Hirayama, Tasuku; Nagasawa, Hideko

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive cellular responses resulting from multiple microenvironmental stresses, such as hypoxia and nutrient deprivation, are potential novel drug targets for cancer treatment. Accordingly, we focused on developing anticancer agents targeting the tumor microenvironment (TME). In this study, to search for selective antitumor agents blocking adaptive responses in the TME, thirteen new compounds, designed and synthesized on the basis of the arylmethylbiguanide scaffold of phenformin, were used in structure activity relationship studies of inhibition of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1 and unfolded protein response (UPR) activation and of selective cytotoxicity under glucose-deprived stress conditions, using HT29 cells. We conducted luciferase reporter assays using stable cell lines expressing either an HIF-1-responsive reporter gene or a glucose-regulated protein 78 promoter-reporter gene, which were induced by hypoxia and glucose deprivation stress, respectively, to screen for TME-targeting antitumor drugs. The guanidine analog (compound 2), obtained by bioisosteric replacement of the biguanide group, had activities comparable with those of phenformin (compound 1). Introduction of various substituents on the phenyl ring significantly affected the activities. In particular, the o-methylphenyl analog compound 7 and the o-chlorophenyl analog compound 12 showed considerably more potent inhibitory effects on HIF-1 and UPR activation than did phenformin, and excellent selective cytotoxicity under glucose deprivation. These compounds, therefore, represent an improvement over phenformin. They also suppressed HIF-1- and UPR-related protein expression and secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor-A. Moreover, these compounds exhibited significant antiangiogenic effects in the chick chorioallantoic membrane assay. Our structural development studies of biguanide derivatives provided promising candidates for a novel anticancer agent targeting the TME for selective cancer

  7. Prognostic implications of tumor volume response and COX-2 expression change during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon La; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    The relationship between treatment outcomes, alteration of the expression of biological markers, and tumor volume response during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with uterine cervical cancer was analyzed. Twenty patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma received definitive RT with (n = 17) or without (n = 3) concurrent chemotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured by three serial magnetic resonance imaging scans at pre-, mid-, and post-RT. Two serial punch biopsies were performed at pre- and mid-RT, and immunohistochemical staining for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was performed. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. The median tumor volume response at mid-RT (V2R) was 0.396 (range, 0.136 to 0.983). At mid-RT, an interval increase in the distribution of immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 8 patients, and 6 of them showed poor mid-RT tumor volume response (V2R {>=} 0.4). Four (20%) patients experienced disease progression after 10 to 12 months (median, 11 months). All 4 patients had poor mid-RT tumor volume response (p = 0.0867) and 3 of them had an interval increase in COX-2 expression. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) decreased in patients with V2R {>=} 0.4 (p 0.0291 for both). An interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT was also associated with a decreased survival (p = 0.1878 and 0.1845 for OS and PFS, respectively). Poor tumor volume response and an interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT decreased survival outcomes in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

  8. Wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor having fast time response for the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, M., E-mail: isobe@nifs.ac.jp; Takeiri, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K.; Miyake, H.; Hayashi, H.; Kobuchi, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Nakano, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Uritani, A. [Department of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Misawa, T. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori 590-0494 (Japan); Nishitani, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho 039-3212 (Japan); Tomitaka, M.; Kumagai, T.; Mashiyama, Y.; Ito, D.; Kono, S. [Toshiba Corporation, Fuchu 183-8511 (Japan); Yamauchi, M. [Toshiba Nuclear Engineering Services Corporation, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    A fast time response, wide dynamic range neutron flux monitor has been developed toward the LHD deuterium operation by using leading-edge signal processing technologies providing maximum counting rate up to ∼5 × 10{sup 9} counts/s. Because a maximum total neutron emission rate over 1 × 10{sup 16} n/s is predicted in neutral beam-heated LHD plasmas, fast response and wide dynamic range capabilities of the system are essential. Preliminary tests have demonstrated successful performance as a wide dynamic range monitor along the design.

  9. Comparison of the Serum Tumor Markers S100 and Melanoma-inhibitory Activity (MIA) in the Monitoring of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Receiving Vaccination Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Ugur; Schliep, Stefan; Schliep, Klaus; Erdmann, Michael; Koch, Hans-Uwe; Parsch, Hans; Rosenheinrich, Stina; Anzengruber, Doris; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In patients with melanoma, early dissemination via lymphatic and hematogenous routes is frequently seen. Thus, besides clinical follow-up examination and imaging, reliable melanoma-specific serological tumor markers are needed. We retrospectively compared two serum markers for melanoma, S100 and melanoma-inhibitory activity (MIA), for monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma under either adjuvant or therapeutic vaccination immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC). Serum was obtained from a total of 100 patients (28 patients in stage III and 72 patients in stage IV, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) at regular intervals during therapy, accompanied by follow-up imaging. When relapse was detected, both markers often remained within normal range. In contrast, in patients with metastatic measurable disease receiving therapeutic and not adjuvant DC vaccination, an increase of both markers was a strong indicator for disease progression. When comparing both markers in the whole study population, MIA showed a superior sensitivity to detect disease progression. S100 and MIA are highly sensitive tumor markers for monitoring of patients with melanoma with current metastases, but less sensitive for monitoring of tumor-free patients. In the current study, MIA had a slightly superior sensitivity to detect progressive disease compared to S100 and seems to be more useful in monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma receiving immunotherapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Prostate cancer stem cells are targets of both innate and adaptive immunity and elicit tumor-specific immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachetti, Elena; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Grioni, Matteo; Ricupito, Alessia; Brambillasca, Chiara; Generoso, Luca; Calcinotto, Arianna; Freschi, Massimo; Mondino, Anna; Galli, Rossella; Bellone, Matteo

    2013-05-01

    According to the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, therapies that do not target the CSC compartment have limited, if any, chances to eradicate established tumors. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) have the potential to recognize and kill single neoplastic cells within a tissue, whether CSCs can be targeted by the immune system during spontaneous or vaccination-elicited responses is poorly defined. Here, we provide experimental evidence showing that CSC lines established from the prostate of transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice expressed prostate cancer-associated antigens, MHC Class I and II molecules as well as ligands for natural killer (NK) cell receptors. Indeed, CSC were targets for both NK cell- and CTL-mediated cytotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. The administration of dendritic cells pulsed with irradiated CSCs induced a tumor-specific immune response that was more robust than that induced by dendritic cells pulsed with differentiated tumor cells, delayed tumor growth in mice challenged with prostate CSCs and caused tumor regression in TRAMP mice. Thus, CSC are targeted by both innate and adaptive immune responses and might be exploited for the design of novel immunotherapeutic approaches against cancer.

  11. SU-E-J-31: Monitor Interfractional Variation of Tumor Respiratory Motion Using 4D KV Conebeam Computed Tomography for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy of Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, A; Prior, P; Gore, E; Johnstone, C; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4DCT has been widely used to generate internal tumor volume (ITV) for a lung tumor for treatment planning. However, lung tumors may show different respiratory motion on the treatment day. The purpose of this study is to evaluate 4D KV conebeam computed tomography (CBCT) for monitoring tumor interfractional motion variation between simulation and each fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung cancer. Methods: 4D KV CBCT was acquired with the Elekta XVI system. The accuracy of 4D KV CBCT for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was tested with a dynamic thorax motion phantom (CIRS, Virginia) with a linear amplitude of 2 cm. In addition, an adult anthropomorphic phantom (Alderson, Rando) with optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters embedded at the center and periphery of a slab of solid water was used to measure the dose of 4D KV CBCT and to compare it with the dose with 3D KV CBCT. The image registration was performed by aligning\\ each phase images of 4D KV CBCT to the planning images and the final couch shifts were calculated as a mean of all these individual shifts along each direction.A workflow was established based on these quality assurance tests for lung cancer patients. Results: 4D KV CBCT does not increase imaging dose in comparison to 3D KV CBCT. Acquisition of 4D KV CBCT is 4 minutes as compared to 2 minutes for 3D KV CBCT. Most of patients showed a small daily variation of tumor respiratory motion about 2 mm. However, some patients may have more than 5 mm variations of tumor respiratory motion. Conclusion: The radiation dose does not increase with 4D KV CBCT. 4D KV CBCT is a useful tool for monitoring interfractional variations of tumor respiratory motion before SBRT of lung cancer patients.

  12. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  13. Anti-tumor Immune Response Mediated by Newcastle Disease Virus HN Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Li-ping; JIN Ning-yi; LI Xiao; SUN Li-li; WEN Zhong-mei; LIU Yan; GAO Peng; HUANG Hai-yan; PIAO Bing-guo; JIN Jing

    2011-01-01

    Hemagglutinin-neuramidinase(HN) is one of the most important surface structure proteins of the Newcastle disease virus(NDV). HN not only mediates receptor recognition but also possesses neuraminidase(NA) activity,which gives it the ability to cleave a component of those receptors, NAcneu. Previous studies have demonstrated that HN has interesting anti-neoplastic and immune-stimulating properties in mammalian species, including humans. To explore the application of the HN gene in cancer gene therapy, we constructed a Lewis lung carcinoma(LLC) solid tumor model using C57BL/6 mice. Mice were injected intratumorally with the recombinant adenovirus expressing HN gene(Ad-HN), and the effect of HN was explored by natural killer cell activity assay, cytotoxic lymphocyte activity assay, T cell subtype evaluation, and Thl/Th2 cytokines analysis. The results demonstrate that HN not only can elicit clonal expansion of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell populations and cytotoxic T lymphocyte(CTL) and killer cell response, but also skews the immune response toward Thl. Thus, vaccination with Ad-HN may be a potential strategy for cancer gene therapy.

  14. ANTI-TUMOR ACTIVITY AND IMMUNE RESPONSES INDUCED BY HUMAN CANCER-ASSOCIATED MUCIN CORE PEPTIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Yunguo; Yuan Mei; Fei Lihua; Li Li

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the immune responses induced by apomucin which is a mixture of mucin core peptide, in mice for elucidating the role of mucin core peptide in the modulation of cancers. Methods:Apomucin was isolated from human pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. The mice were immunized with this apomucin (10μg/time×6) plus DETOX. Results: When immunized, all mice developed delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) after challenged with apomucin or synthetic peptide MUC-2 or MUC-3, while the mice immunized with apomucin alone did not develop DTH.No antibodies were detected by ELISA after immunization. When the spleen cells of vaccinated mice were cocultured with this apomucin (10-50μg/ml) and rhIL-2(50U/ml) in vitro, the proliferated lymphocytes showed cytotoxicity against human cancer cells, including colon cancer, gastric cancer, pancreatic cancer and leukemia as measured by Cr-51 release assay. Antibodies against MUC-2 and MUC-3 could block the cytotoxicity. Conclusion: It was identified that a vaccine combined of apomucin and immune adjuvant DETOX can induce cellular immune response and anti-tumor cytotoxicity in mice.

  15. Concepts of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Pathogenesis: DNA Damage Response and Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Lukas P; Reinhardt, H Christian; Pallasch, Christian P

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by specific genetic aberrations and alterations of cellular signaling pathways. In particular, a disturbed DNA damage response (DDR) and an activated B-cell receptor signaling pathway play a major role in promoting CLL cell survival. External stimuli are similarly essential for CLL cell survival and lead to activation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFkB) influences the disturbed anti-apoptotic balance of CLL cells. Losses or disabling mutations in TP53 and ATM are frequent events in chemotherapy-naïve patients and are further enriched in chemotherapy-resistant patients. As these lesions define key regulatory elements of the DDR pathway, they also determine treatment response to genotoxic therapy. Novel therapeutic strategies therefore try to circumvent defective DDR signaling and to suppress the pro-survival stimuli received from the tumor microenvironment. With increasing knowledge on specific genetic alterations of CLL, we may be able to target CLL cells more efficiently even in the situation of mutated DDR pathways or protection by microenvironmental stimuli.

  16. Identification of androgen-responsive genes that are alternatively regulated in androgen-dependent and androgen-independent rat prostate tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pfundt, R.; Smit, F.P.; Jansen, Corine; Aalders, T.W.; Straatman, H.M.P.M.; Vliet, W. van der; Isaacs, J.; Geurts van Kessel, A.H.M.; Schalken, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of androgen-dependent prostate tumors progress toward incurable, androgen-independent tumors. The identification of androgen-responsive genes, which are still actively transcribed in the tumors of patients who have undergone androgen ablation, may shed light on the molecular mechan

  17. Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA nanoparticles enhanced chemosensitivity for hypoxia-responsive tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ping Liu,1 Haijun Zhang,1 Xue Wu,1 Liting Guo,1 Fei Wang,1 Guohua Xia,2 Baoan Chen,1 HaiXiang Yin,3 Yonglu Wang,3 Xueming Li3 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Key Department of Jiangsu Province, Zhongda Hospital, 2Department of Hematology and Oncology, Medical School of Southeast University, 3School of Pharmacy, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Hypoxia is an inseparable component of the solid tumor as well as the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigated the effect of the novel polyethylene glycol (PEG-poly L-lysine (PLL-poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA based nanoparticles (NPs modified by transferrin (Tf loaded with daunorubicin (DNR (DNR-Tf-PEG-PLL-PLGA-NPs, abbreviated as DNR-Tf-NPs on leukemia cells (K562 under hypoxia. In vitro and in vivo tests to determine the effect of the enhanced chemosensitivity were evaluated using the immunofluorescence, flow cytometry, 3,-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl-2,5-diphenyl-2-tetrazoliumbromide assay, Western blot analysis, histopathological examination, and immunohistochemistry analysis. Under hypoxia, K562 cells were hypoxia-responsive with the inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50 of DNR increased, resulting in chemotherapy insensitivity. By targeting the transferrin receptor (TfR on the surface of K562 cells, DNR-Tf-NPs led to an increased intracellular DNR level, enhancing drug sensitivity of K562 cells to DNR with a decreased IC50, even under hypoxia. We further detected the protein levels of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 in K562 cells. The results indicated that DNR-Tf-NPs downregulated HIF-1α and induced apoptosis to overcome hypoxia. In the xenograft model, injection of DNR-Tf-NPs significantly suppressed tumor growth, and the immunosignals of Ki67 in DNR-Tf-NPs group was significantly lower than the other groups. It was therefore concluded that DNR-Tf-NPs could be a promising candidate for

  18. Optimization of in-vivo monitoring program for radiation emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In case of radiation emergencies, internal exposure monitoring for the members of public will be required to confirm internal contamination of each individual. In-vivo monitoring technique using portable gamma spectrometer can be easily applied for internal exposure monitoring in the vicinity of the on-site area. In this study, minimum detectable doses (MDDs) for '1'3'4Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 131}I were calculated adjusting minimum detectable activities (MDAs) from 50 to 1,000 Bq to find out the optimal in-vivo counting condition. DCAL software was used to derive retention fraction of Cs and I isotopes in the whole body and thyroid, respectively. A minimum detectable level was determined to set committed effective dose of 0.1 mSv for emergency response. We found that MDDs at each MDA increased along with the elapsed time. 1,000 Bq for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 100 Bq for {sup 131}I were suggested as optimal MDAs to provide in-vivo monitoring service in case of radiation emergencies. In-vivo monitoring program for emergency response should be designed to achieve the optimal MDA suggested from the present work. We expect that a reduction of counting time compared with routine monitoring program can achieve the high throughput system in case of radiation emergencies.

  19. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  20. Monitoring of Breast Tumor Response to Local Chemotherapeutic Agent Delivered by Biodegradable Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    human and animal hemoglobin: determination and application,” (The Netherlands : VSP publisher) 57-64, (2000). 37 . S. Wray, M. Cope, D. T. Delpy, J. S...of Groningen The Netherlands (1970). 42. R. Cubeddu, A. Pifferi, P. Taroni, A. Torricelli, and G. Valentini, “Compact tissue oximeter based on... euthanasia . In theory, we have developed a simple mathematical model based on Fick’s Law of diffusion to describe haemokinetics of tumour vascular

  1. SU-E-J-148: Evaluating Tumor Response with a Commercially Available Deformable Registration System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowling, J; Ramsey, C [Thompson Cancer Survival Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to present a method for evaluating the response to treatment using a commercially available deformable image registration software package (Velocity Medical Systems) and repeat PET/CT imaging. This technique can be used to identify volumes that are risk for tumor recurrence. Methods: Response to treatment was evaluated using PET/CT images acquired prior-to and post-treatment for radiation therapy patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy. Velocity (Version 3.0.1) was used to deform the initial PET/CT to the post treatment PET/CT. The post-treatment PET images were then subtracted from the pre-treatment PET images. The resulting re-sampled image is a three-dimensional SUV difference map that shows pixels with increasing SUV values. SUV values increases greater than 2.5 in the post treatment images were identified for additional follow-up. Results: A total of 5 Lung patients were analyzed as part of this study. One lung patient in the cohort had an SUV increase of +3.28 that was identified using the SUV difference map. This volume of increased uptake was located outside the treatment field and adjacent to the 35 Gy isodose line. The remaining four patients all had SUV decreases inside the planning target volume, and no unexpected areas of increase outside the irradiated volumes. All five patients were analyzed using standard tools inside the Velocity application. Conclusion: The response to treatment can easily be measured using serial PET/CT images and a commercially available deformable image registration. This provides both the radiation oncologists and medical oncologists with a quantitative assessment of their treatment to use in patient follow-up.

  2. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R.; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  3. Co-delivery of antigen and IL-12 by Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles enhances antigen-specific immune responses and anti-tumor effects

    OpenAIRE

    Osada, Takuya; Berglund, Peter; Morse, Michael A.; Hubby, Bolyn; Lewis, Whitney; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hobeika, Amy; Burnett, Bruce; Devi, Gayathri R; Clay, Timothy M.; Smith, Jonathan; Lyerly, H. Kim

    2012-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) virus-based replicon particles (VRP) encoding tumor antigens could break tolerance in the immunomodulatory environment of advanced cancer. We hypothesized that local injection of VRP expressing Interleukin-12 (IL-12) at the site of injections of VRP-based cancer vaccines would enhance the tumor-antigen-specific T cell and antibody responses and anti-tumor efficacy. Mice were immunized with VRP encoding the human tumor-associat...

  4. Association between tumor tissue TIMP-1 levels and objective response to first-line chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klintman, Marie; Würtz, Sidse Ørnbjerg; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    In a previous study from our laboratory, high tumor levels of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) have been associated with an adverse response to chemotherapy in metastatic breast cancer suggesting that TIMP-1, which is known to inhibit apoptosis, may be a new predictive marker...... in this disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between TIMP-1 and objective response to chemotherapy in an independent patient population consisting of patients with metastatic breast cancer from Sweden and Denmark. TIMP-1 was measured using ELISA in 162 primary tumor extracts from...... patients who later developed metastatic breast cancer and these levels were related to the objective response to first-line chemotherapy. Increasing levels of TIMP-1 were associated with a decreasing probability of response to treatment, reaching borderline significance (OR = 1.59, 95% CI: 0.97-2.62, P = 0...

  5. Use of Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) to predict the treatment response to eribulin chemotherapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwagi, Shinichiro; Asano, Yuka; Goto, Wataru; Takada, Koji; Takahashi, Katsuyuki; Noda, Satoru; Takashima, Tsutomu; Onoda, Naoyoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Ohsawa, Masahiko; Hirakawa, Kosei; Ohira, Masaichi

    2017-01-01

    Eribulin mesylate (eribulin) is currently indicated for treatment of locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC). It is a cytotoxic agent with unique mechanisms that suppress epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells. On the other hand, Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), which are considered indicators of immune response monitoring, have been reported as prognostic factors and predictors of therapeutic efficacy. We thought that eribulin, which has an EMT-inhibiting mechanism, may produce an antitumor effect by improving the immune microenvironment, and in this study investigated the effects of breast cancer eribulin chemotherapy on the immune microenvironment with TILs as a marker. TILs was evaluated in 52 patients with MBC who underwent chemotherapy with eribulin. The correlation between TILs evaluated according to the standard method, and prognosis, including the efficacy of eribulin chemotherapy, was investigated retrospectively. Of the 52 MBC patients, 29 (55.8%) were in the high TILs group and 23 (44.2%) were in the low TILs group. The high TILs group included significantly more triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) (p = 0.008) than the low TILs group. In an analysis of outcomes, TNBC patients in the high TILs group had significantly longer disease-free survival than TNBC patients in the low TILs group (p = 0.033, log-rank), but no significant differences were seen in all breast cancer patients (p = 0.489, log-rank) or in non-TNBC patients (p = 0.878, log-rank). In a multivariate analysis of recurrence in TNBC patients, being in the high TILs group was again an independent factor for a good outcome (p = 0.031, HR = 0.063). The results of this study suggest that TILs may be useful as a predictive marker of the therapeutic effect of eribulin chemotherapy in TNBC.

  6. Correlation of in vivo tumor response and singlet oxygen luminescence detection in mTHPC-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian C. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excited-state singlet oxygen (1O2, generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT, is believed to be the primary cytotoxic agent with a number of clinically approved photosensitizers. Its relative concentration in cells or tissues can be measured directly through its near-infrared (NIR luminescence emission, which has correlated well with in vitro cell and in vivo normal skin treatment responses. Here, its correlation with the response of tumor tissue in vivo is examined, using the photosensitizer meso-tetrahydroxyphenylchlorin (mTHPC in an animal model comprising luciferase- and green fluorescent protein (GFP-transduced gliosarcoma grown in a dorsal window chamber. The change in the bioluminescence signal, imaged pretreatment and at 2, 5 and 9 d post treatment, was used as a quantitative measure of the tumor response, which was classified in individual tumors as "non", "moderate" and "strong" in order to reduce the variance in the data. Plotting the bioluminescence-based response vs the 1O2 counts demonstrated clear correlation, indicating that 1O2 luminescence provides a valid dosimetric technique for PDT in tumor tissue.

  7. Response Rate as a Regulatory End Point in Single-Arm Studies of Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Wilcox, Katharine H.; Gonen, Mithat; Polotsky, Mikhael; Hirsch, Bradford R.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Objective response rate (ORR) is an increasingly important end point for accelerated development of highly active anticancer therapies, yet its relationship to regulatory approval is not well characterized. OBJECTIVE To identify circumstances in which a high ORR is associated with regulatory approval, and therefore might be an appropriate end point for definitive single-arm studies of anticancer therapies. DATA SOURCE A database of all oncology clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov between October 1, 2007, and September 30, 2010. STUDY SELECTION Trials of palliative systemic therapies for 4 measurable solid tumor types, limited to those with trial arms of at least 20 patients reporting ORR per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS A systematic search was used to identify the reported ORR for each eligible treatment arm that had been presented publicly. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES For each treatment regimen, defined as a single-agent or unique combination of agents for 1 cancer type, the mean ORR and the maximum ORR statistically exceeded were calculated, and their association with regulatory approval was studied. A regimen was considered approved for a specific cancer type if it had received regulatory approval in any country for treatment of advanced cancer of that type. RESULTS From 1800 trials, 874 eligible trial arms in 578 eligible trials were identified; 542 arms had ORR data available for 294 regimens. Maximum ORR and mean ORR were significantly associated with regulatory approval (τ = 0.27, P < .001; τ = 0.12, P = .01); this relationship was stronger for single-agent therapies (τ = 0.49; τ = 0.41) than for combination regimens (τ = 0.28; τ = 0.17). Evaluation of ORR thresholds between 20% and 60% as potential trial end points demonstrated that ORR statistically exceeding 30% with a single agent had 98% specificity and 89% positive predictive value for identifying regimens achieving

  8. Differential responses of tumors and normal brain to the combined treatment of 2-DG and radiation in glioablastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Venkatesh K; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Dwarakanath, B S; Santhosh, Vani

    2009-09-01

    2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG), an inhibitor of glucose transport and glycolysis, enhances radiation damage selectively in tumor cells by modulating damage response pathways resulting in cell death in vitro and local tumor control. Phase I and II clinical trials in patients with malignant glioma have shown excellent tolerance to a combined treatment of orally administered 2-DG and hypofractionated radiotherapy without any acute toxicity and late radiation damage. Phase III efficacy trials are currently at an advanced stage. Re-exploratory surgery performed in 13 patients due to persistent symptoms of elevated ICP and mass effect at different follow-up periods revealed extensive tumor necrosis with well-preserved normal brain tissue adjoining the tumor included in the treatment volume as revealed by a histological examination. These observations are perhaps the first clinical evidences for differential effects of 2-DG on tumors and normal tissues in conformity with earlier in vitro and in vivo studies in normal and tumor-bearing mice.

  9. Gr-1+CD11b+ cells are responsible for tumor promoting effect of TGF-β in breast cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaoyang; Pang, Yanli; Gara, Sudheer Kumar; Achyut, B R; Heger, Christopher; Goldsmith, Paul K; Lonning, Scott; Yang, Li

    2012-12-01

    One great challenge in our understanding of TGF-β cancer biology and the successful application of TGF-β-targeted therapy is that TGF-β works as both a tumor suppressor and a tumor promoter. The underlying mechanisms for its functional change remain to be elucidated. Using 4T1 mammary tumor model that shares many characteristics with human breast cancer, particularly its ability to spontaneously metastasize to the lungs, we demonstrate that Gr-1+CD11b+ cells or myeloid derived suppressor cells are important mediators in TGF-β regulation of mammary tumor progression. Depletion of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells diminished the antitumor effect of TGF-β neutralization. Two mechanisms were involved: first, treatment with TGF-β neutralization antibody (1D11) significantly decreased the number of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in tumor tissues and premetastatic lung. This is mediated through increased Gr-1+CD11b+ cell apoptosis. In addition, 1D11 treatment significantly decreased the expression of Th2 cytokines and Arginase 1. Interestingly, the number and property of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells in peripheral blood/draining lymph nodes correlated with tumor size and metastases in response to 1D11 treatment. Our data suggest that the efficacy of TGF-β neutralization depends on the presence of Gr-1+CD11b+ cells, and these cells could be good biomarkers for TGF-β-targeted therapy.

  10. In vivo metabolic imaging of mouse tumor models in response to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukina, Maria M.; Dudenkova, Varvara; Shumilova, Anastasia V.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Shirmanova, Marina V.

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate energy metabolism in human cervical cancer cells HeLa Kyoto after chemotherapy in vitro and in vivo using two-photon fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM). Cellular metabolism was examined by monitoring of the fluorescence intensities and lifetimes of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. Cancer metabolism was analyzed in dynamics after treatment with cisplatin. Two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopies as well as standard histopathology with hematoxylin and eosin were used to characterize cancer tissue structure. We showed an increase of the optical redox ratio FAD/NAD(P)H in cancer cells in vitro and decrease of the relative contribution of free NAD(P)H (ɑ1) in vitro and in vivo, which presumably indicate a shift to more oxidative metabolism after chemotherapy. These data demonstrate the possibility to detect response of cancer cells to chemotherapy using optical metabolic imaging.

  11. Validation of assays to monitor immune responses in the Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivcec, Marko; Safronetz, David; Haddock, Elaine; Feldmann, Heinz; Ebihara, Hideki

    2011-05-31

    The Syrian golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) is a valuable but under-utilized animal model for studies of human viral pathogens such as bunyaviruses, arenaviruses, flaviviruses, henipaviruses, and SARS-coronavirus. A lack of suitable reagents and specific assays for monitoring host responses has limited the use of this animal model to clinical observations, pathology and humoral immune responses. The objective of this study was to establish and validate assays to monitor host immune responses in the hamster including important pro-inflammatory, anti-inflammatory and innate immune responses, as well as markers of apoptosis, cell proliferation, cell junction integrity and coagulation. Commercially available mouse and rat ELISA and luminex panels were screened for potential cross-reactivity, but were found to be of limited value for studying host responses in hamsters. Subsequently, quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays for the detection of 51 immune-related and four internal reference genes were developed. To validate the immune-related assays, hamsters were infected with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), Indiana species, or treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and host immune responses were monitored in selected organs. Ribosomal protein L18 was identified as the most stable internal reference gene. In conclusion, these new assays will greatly improve the use of the hamster as an important small animal model in infectious disease research.

  12. Impact of obesity on the response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors in axial spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheroli, Raphael; Hebeisen, Monika; Wildi, Lukas M; Exer, Pascale; Tamborrini, Giorgio; Bernhard, Jürg; Möller, Burkhard; Zufferey, Pascal; Nissen, Michael J; Scherer, Almut; Ciurea, Adrian

    2017-07-19

    Few studies have investigated the impact of obesity on the response to tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) in patients with axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA). The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of different body mass index (BMI) categories on TNFi response in a large cohort of patients with axSpA. Patients with axSpA within the Swiss Clinical Quality Management (SCQM) program were included in the current study if they fulfilled the Assessment in Spondyloarthritis International Society (ASAS) criteria for axSpA, started a first TNFi after recruitment, and had available BMI data as well as a baseline and follow-up visit at 1 year (±6 months). Patients were categorized according to BMI: normal (BMI 18.5 to 30). We evaluated the proportion of patients achieving the 40% improvement in ASAS criteria (ASAS40), as well as Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) improvement and status scores at 1 year. Patients having discontinued the TNFi were considered nonresponders. We controlled for age, sex, HLA-B27, axSpA type, BASDAI, BASMI, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), current smoking, enthesitis, physical exercise, and co-medication with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, as well as with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in multiple adjusted logistic regression analyses. A total of 624 axSpA patients starting a first TNFi were considered in the current study (332 patients of normal weight, 204 patients with overweight, and 88 obese patients). Obese individuals were older, had higher BASDAI levels, and had a more important impairment of physical function in comparison to patients of normal weight, while ASDAS and CRP levels were comparable between the three BMI groups. An ASAS40 response was reached by 44%, 34%, and 29% of patients of normal weight, overweight, and obesity, respectively (overall p = 0.02). Significantly lower odds ratios (ORs) for achieving ASAS40 response were found in adjusted analyses in obese patients versus

  13. Multicenter Study of Posaconazole Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: Exposure-Response Relationship and Factors Affecting Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Dolton, Michael J; Ray, John E.; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Ng, Kingsley; Pont, Lisa; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Posaconazole has an important role in the prophylaxis and salvage treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs), although poor and variable bioavailability remains an important clinical concern. Therapeutic drug monitoring of posaconazole concentrations has remained contentious, with the use of relatively small patient cohorts in previous studies hindering the assessment of exposure-response relationships. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to investigate relationships between posaco...

  14. Therapeutic drug monitoring: an aid to optimising response to antiretroviral drugs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarnoutse, R.E.; Schapiro, J.M.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Hekster, Y.A.; Burger, D.M.

    2003-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) has been proposed as a means to optimise response to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV infection. Protease inhibitors (PIs) and the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) efavirenz and nevirapine satisfy many criteria for TDM. Nuc

  15. Monitoring of the cardiac and vascular response to LBNP during the 14 day spaceflight "Cassiopee".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbeille, P h; Fomina, G; Sigaudo, D; Alferova, I; Porcher, M; Boulay, J; Gharib, C

    1997-07-01

    The objective of the present experiment was to monitor in real time the cardiac and the peripheral response to inflight LBNP. The second objective was to detect and quantify hemodynamic signs of orthostatic tolerance inflight by measuring the heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac and regional hemodynamics during LBNP.

  16. Monitoring cancer treatment response using photoacoustic and ultrasound spectral analysis in combination with oxygenation measurements (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysi, Eno; May, Jonathan P.; Wirtzfeld, Lauren; Undzys, Elijus; Li, Shyh-Dar; Kolios, Michael C.

    2016-03-01

    At clinically-relevant depths, the frequency content of photoacoustic signals encodes information about the size, concentration and spatial distribution of non-resolvable blood vessels. This study evaluates whether photoacoustics can detect cancer therapy-induced vascular perturbations. Photoacoustic/ultrasound (PA/US) spectral analysis was combined with functional, PA-based oxygenation and power Doppler (PD) perfusion estimates to assess treatment response. Co-registered, in-vivo US/PA/PD imaging of mice bearing breast cancer tumors was performed pre-treatment and 30m/2h/5h/24h/7d post-treatment (VevoLAZR, Fujifilm VisualSonics). Hyperthermia treatment (1h, 43C) was performed after systemic injections of doxorubicin-loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSL, n=13) or free doxorubicin (DOX, n=11). Response was classified according to 2h, PA-based oxygenation drop and endpoint (>9d), caliper-based volume reduction. At all time-points/wavelengths (750/850nm), the spectral-slope (SS) was computed from the normalized US/PA power spectra using depth-matched reference phantoms. The percent-vascularity (PV) was estimated for the animal with the largest oxygenation-drop at 2h. TLS-treated responders decreased their PA-SS by 1.9x @750nm and 5.8x @850nm 30m post-treatment and remained constant for 24h; tumor oxygenation followed the same trend. Non-responding SS remained unchanged for 24h. The 750nm SS was 18.7x lower than 850nm suggesting the TSL is sensitive vessel oxygenation. Responder PV decreased 100% when the 30m oxygenation dropped 15% and increased 7x when the 7d oxygenation increased 20%. DOX-responders exhibited similar trends to TSL-responders although the 750nm PA-SS was 1.6x smaller and post-treatment PV was 50% higher. The US-SS remained unchanged until 7d post-treatment suggesting its sensitivity to tumor cell-death. These findings suggest that PA spectral analysis has potential in monitoring cancer treatment response.

  17. Positron Emission Tomography as a Surrogate Marker for Evaluation of Treatment Response in Patients with Desmoid Tumors under Therapy with Imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Kasper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We used 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG positron emission tomography (PET to evaluate patients with desmoid tumors undergoing therapy with imatinib. The study included 22 patients with progressive disease (PD of a biopsy proven desmoid tumor treated orally with imatinib 800 mg daily. Patients were examined using PET prior to onset of therapy and during treatment. Restaging was performed in parallel using computed tomography (CT and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Outcome of 22 evaluable patients was as follows: five patients with partial response (PR; twelve patients with stable disease (SD accounting for 77% with non-progressive disease; five patients showed PD. A 30% decrease of the mean average standardized uptake value (SUV of sequential PET examinations could be demonstrated; no patient demonstrated a substantial increase in SUV. Patients with PR/SD were matched to a group of nonprogressive disease and tested versus PD. The initial average SUV and seem to be candidates for a response prediction with an approximate -value of 0.06553 and 0.07785, respectively. This is the first larger series of desmoid patients monitored using PET showing that early SUV changes may help to discriminate responders from nonresponders and, thus, to decide whether imatinib therapy should be continued.

  18. CD40 ligand and tdTomato-armed vaccinia virus for induction of antitumor immune response and tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, S; Ahonen, M; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Karttunen, Å; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A; Cerullo, V

    2014-02-01

    Oncolytic vaccinia virus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy. Oncolysis releases tumor antigens and provides co-stimulatory danger signals. However, arming the virus can improve efficacy further. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) can induce apoptosis of tumor cells and it also triggers several immune mechanisms. One of these is a T-helper type 1 (Th1) response that leads to activation of cytotoxic T-cells and reduction of immune suppression. Therefore, we constructed an oncolytic vaccinia virus expressing hCD40L (vvdd-hCD40L-tdTomato), which in addition features a cDNA expressing the tdTomato fluorochrome for detection of virus, potentially important for biosafety evaluation. We show effective expression of functional CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. In a xenograft model of bladder carcinoma sensitive to CD40L treatment, we show that growth of tumors was significantly inhibited by the oncolysis and apoptosis following both intravenous and intratumoral administration. In a CD40-negative model, CD40L expression did not add potency to vaccinia oncolysis. Tumors treated with vvdd-mCD40L-tdtomato showed enhanced efficacy in a syngenic mouse model and induced recruitment of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes at the tumor site. In summary, oncolytic vaccinia virus coding for CD40L mediates multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis and induction of Th1 type T-cell responses.

  19. Early Growth Response1and Fatty Acid Synthase Expression is Altered in Tumor Adjacent Prostate Tissue and Indicates Field Cancerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Anna C.; Trujillo, Kristina A.; Phillips, Genevieve K.; Fleet, Trisha M.; Murton, Jaclyn K.; Severns, Virginia; Shah, Satyan K.; Davis, Michael S.; Smith, Anthony Y.; Griffith, Jeffrey K.; Fischer, Edgar G.; Bisoffi, Marco

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Field cancerization denotes the occurrence of molecular alterations in histologically normal tissues adjacent to tumors. In prostate cancer, identification of field cancerization has several potential clinical applications. However, prostate field cancerization remains ill defined. Our previous work has shown up-regulated mRNA of the transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR-1) and the lipogenic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FAS) in tissues adjacent to prostate cancer. METHODS Immunofluorescence data were analyzed quantitatively by spectral imaging and linear unmixing to determine the protein expression levels of EGR-1 and FAS in human cancerous, histologically normal adjacent, and disease-free prostate tissues. RESULTS EGR-1 expression was elevated in both structurally intact tumor adjacent (1.6× on average) and in tumor (3.0× on average) tissues compared to disease-free tissues. In addition, the ratio of cytoplasmic versus nuclear EGR-1 expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent and tumor tissues. Similarly, FAS expression was elevated in both tumor adjacent (2.7× on average) and in tumor (2.5× on average) compared to disease-free tissues. CONCLUSIONS EGR-1 and FAS expression is similarly deregulated in tumor and structurally intact adjacent prostate tissues and defines field cancerization. In cases with high suspicion of prostate cancer but negative biopsy, identification of field cancerization could help clinicians target areas for repeat biopsy. Field cancerization at surgical margins on prostatectomy specimen should also be looked at as a predictor of cancer recurrence. EGR-1 and FAS could also serve as molecular targets for chemoprevention. PMID:22127986

  20. Noninvasive Personalization of Lung Cancer Therapy Using a New, Clinical-Grade Assay for Plasma-Based Measurement and Monitoring of Tumor Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0128 TITLE:Noninvasive Personalization of Lung Cancer Therapy Using a New, Clinical-Grade Assay for Plasma-Based...Measurement and Monitoring of Tumor Genotype PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Geoffrey Oxnard, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute...2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Noninvasive Personalization of Lung Cancer Therapy Using a

  1. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Luboldt; Holger Hartmann; Bärbel Wiedemann; Klaus Zöphel; Hans-Joachim Luboldt

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT). In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA) and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax) of normal liver and hepatic metastases we...

  2. Evaluation of alternate categorical tumor metrics and cut points for response categorization using the RECIST 1.1 data warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandrekar, Sumithra J; An, Ming-Wen; Meyers, Jeffrey; Grothey, Axel; Bogaerts, Jan; Sargent, Daniel J

    2014-03-10

    We sought to test and validate the predictive utility of trichotomous tumor response (TriTR; complete response [CR] or partial response [PR] v stable disease [SD] v progressive disease [PD]), disease control rate (DCR; CR/PR/SD v PD), and dichotomous tumor response (DiTR; CR/PR v others) metrics using alternate cut points for PR and PD. The data warehouse assembled to guide the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1 was used. Data from 13 trials (5,480 patients with metastatic breast cancer, non-small-cell lung cancer, or colorectal cancer) were randomly split (60:40) into training and validation data sets. In all, 27 pairs of cut points for PR and PD were considered: PR (10% to 50% decrease by 5% increments) and PD (10% to 20% increase by 5% increments), for which 30% and 20% correspond to the RECIST categorization. Cox proportional hazards models with landmark analyses at 12 and 24 weeks stratified by study and number of lesions (fewer than three v three or more) and adjusted for average baseline tumor size were used to assess the impact of each metric on overall survival (OS). Model discrimination was assessed by using the concordance index (c-index). Standard RECIST cut points demonstrated predictive ability similar to the alternate PR and PD cut points. Regardless of tumor type, the TriTR, DiTR, and DCR metrics had similar predictive performance. The 24-week metrics (albeit with higher c-index point estimate) were not meaningfully better than the 12-week metrics. None of the metrics did particularly well for breast cancer. Alternative cut points to RECIST standards provided no meaningful improvement in OS prediction. Metrics assessed at 12 weeks have good predictive performance.

  3. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  4. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT to monitor early response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in stage II and III breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Bin; Chen, Bin; Wang, Ting; Chen, Minglong; Ji, Tiefeng; Gao, Shi; Ma, Qingjie [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Changchun (China); Song, Yan [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Breast Surgery, Changchun (China); Wang, Xueju [China-Japan Union Hospital of Jilin University, Department of Pathology, Changchun (China)

    2015-08-15

    Monitoring of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) is important for optimal management of patients with breast cancer. {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT is a newly developed imaging modality for evaluating tumor vascular status. In this study, we investigated the application of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT in evaluating therapy response to NCT in patients with stage II or III breast cancer. Thirty-three patients were scheduled to undergo {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT at baseline, after the first and second cycle of NCT. Four patients had extremely low {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, and were not included in the subsequent studies. Changes in tumor to nontumor (T/N) ratio were compared with pathological tumor responses classified using the residual cancer burden system. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was used to compare the power to identify responders between the end of the first and the end of the second cycle of NCT. The impact of breast cancer subtype on {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake was evaluated. The correlation between {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake and pathological tumor response was also evaluated in each breast cancer subtype. Surgery was performed after four cycles of NCT and pathological analysis revealed 18 responders and 15 nonresponders. In patients with clearly visible {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} uptake at baseline, the sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive value of {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT were 86.7 %, 85.7 % and 86.7 % after the first cycle of NCT, and 92.9 %, 93.3 % and 93.3 % after the second cycle, respectively. Among these patients, the HER-2-positive group demonstrated both higher T/N ratios and a greater change in T/N ratio than patients with other breast cancer subtypes (P < 0.05). A strong correlation was found between changes in T/N ratio and pathological tumor response in the HER-2-positive group (P < 0.03). {sup 99m}Tc-3PRGD{sub 2} SPECT seems to be useful for determining the pathological

  5. Self-Assembly of an Optically-Responsive Polydiacetylene-Coating on Iron Ferrite Magnetic Nanoparticles for Tumor Detection and Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Vivian

    Nanoparticles are a promising diagnostic agent with applications in tumor imaging and targeted cancer treatment. They can offer multifunctional properties by combining imaging methods to improve cancer diagnosis, treatment, and disease monitoring. Two such complementary tools are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging. In this thesis, a dual solvent exchange approach was chosen to facilitate the self-assembly of amphiphilic diacetylene monomers onto hydrophobic iron ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Various concentrations of the diacetylene monomers, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) and 10,12-heptacosadiynoic acid (HCDA), were coated onto ˜14 nm iron ferrite MNPs. The diacetylene monomer coating were cross-linked to a stable blue colored polydiacetylene (PDA) coating after applying UV light. The resulting PDA-MNP hybrid displayed characteristic chromogenic and fluorogenic in response to thermal stress. This novel multifunctional nanoparticle system holds exciting potential for dual-modality diagnostics applications.

  6. Tumor responsive targeted multifunctional nanosystems for cancer imaging, chemo- and siRNA therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savla, Ronak

    Cancer is one of the most insidious diseases. Compromising of over 100 different types and sharing the unifying factors of uncontrolled growth and metastasis, unmet clinical needs in terms of cancer diagnosis and treatment continue to exist. It is widely accepted that most forms of cancer are treatable or even curable if detected before widespread metastasis occurs. Nearly a quarter of deaths in the United States is the result of cancer and it only trails heart disease in terms of annual mortality. Surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy are the primary treatment modalities for cancer. Research in these procedures has resulted in substantial benefits for cancer patients, but there is still room for an improvement. However, a time has been reached at which it appears that the benefits from these modalities have been reached the maximum. Therefore, it is vital to develop new strategies for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. The field of nanotechnology is concerned with structures in the nanometer size range and holds the potential to drastically impact and improve the lives of patients suffering from cancer. Not only can nanotechnology improve current methods of diagnosis and treatment, it has a possibility of introducing newer and better modalities. The overall purpose of this work is to develop novel nanotechnology-based methodologies for the diagnosis and treatment of various forms of cancers. The first aim of the project is the development of a multifunctional targeted nanosystem for the delivery of siRNA to overcome drug resistance. The second aspect is the synthesis of a quantum dot-based delivery system that releases drug in response to pH changes. The third aim is the development of a targeted, tumor environment responsive magnetic resonance nanoparticle contrast agent coupled with a nanoparticle-based treatment.

  7. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-12-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  8. Establishing Chinese medicine characteristic tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of Chinese medicine oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Li, Lei; Liu, Rui; Lin, Hong-sheng

    2012-10-01

    The features and advantages of Chinese medicine (CM) in cancer comprehensive treatment have been in the spotlight of experts both at home and abroad. However, how to evaluate the effect of CM more objectively, scientifically and systematically is still the key problem of clinical trial, and also a limitation to the development and internationalization of CM oncology. The change of tumor response evaluation system in conventional medicine is gradually consistent with the features of CM clinical effect, such as they both focus on a combination of soft endpoints (i.e. quality of life, clinical benefit, etc.) and hard endpoints (i.e. tumor remission rate, time to progress, etc.). Although experts have proposed protocols of CM tumor response evaluation criteria and come to an agreement in general, divergences still exist in the importance, quantification and CM feature of the potential endpoints. Thus, establishing a CM characteristic and wildly accepted tumor response evaluation system is the key to promote internationalization of CM oncology, and also provides a more convenient and scientific platform for CM international cooperation and communication.

  9. Nonblocking Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Soluble MIC Revamps Endogenous Innate and Adaptive Antitumor Responses and Eliminates Primary and Metastatic Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shengjun; Zhang, Jinyu; Liu, Dai; Li, Guangfu; Staveley-O'Carroll, Kevin F; Li, Zihai; Wu, Jennifer D

    2015-11-01

    The human tumor-derived soluble MHC I-chain-related molecule (sMIC) is highly immune suppressive in cancer patients and correlates with poor prognosis. However, the therapeutic effect of targeting sMIC has not been determined, due to the limitation that mice do not express homologs of human MIC. This study is to evaluate the therapeutic effect of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting sMIC in a clinically relevant transgenic animal model. We treated the engineered MIC-expressing "humanized" TRAMP/MIC bitransgenic mice at advanced disease stages with a sMIC-neutralizing nonblocking anti-MIC mAb and assessed the therapeutic efficacy and associated mechanisms. A sMIC-neutralizing nonblocking anti-MIC mAb effectively induced regression of primary tumors and eliminated metastasis without inducing systemic toxicity. The therapeutic effect is conferred by revamping endogenous antitumor immune responses, exemplified by restoring natural killer (NK) cell homeostasis and function, enhancing susceptibility of MIC(+)-tumor cells to NK cell killing, reviving and sustaining antigen-specific CD8 T-cell responses, augmenting CD4 T cells to Th1 responses, priming dendritic cells for antigen presentation, and remodeling tumor