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Sample records for monitoring tumor response

  1. Tumor response to ionizing radiation and combined 2-deoxy-D-glucose application in EATC tumor bearing mice: monitoring of tumor size and microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latz, D.; Thonke, A.; Jueling-Pohlit, L.; Pohlit, W.

    1993-01-01

    The present study deals with the changes induced by two fractionation schedules (5x9 Gy and 10x4.5 Gy; 30 MeV-electrons) of ionizing radiations and 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose (2-DG) application on EATC tumor bearing swiss albino mice. The monitoring of tumor response was carried out by means of calliper measurement on the macroscopic level and by histopathological examination of tumor preparations stained with hematoxiline and eosine on the microscopic level. The tumor material was assessed at suitable intervals after treatment by killing the animals. The tumor response was analysed in the histological preparations and the thickness of the tumor band was determined quantitatively by an ocularmicrometric technique. Tumor damage was most extensive in the combined treated animals (5x9 Gy + 2-DG). Only in this group local tumor control was achievable. The histological analysis of tumor preparations revealed additional data about treatment-induced changes in the tumor compared to the measurement of the tumor volume with mechanical callipers. We also found that the treatment outcome could be predicted from the histopathological analysis. It is concluded that studies involving histopathological examinations may give some insight into the way cancer is controlled by radiotherapy and may be of value in prognosis and selection of treatment in patients. (orig.) [de

  2. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  3. Fluorodeoxyglucose-based positron emission tomography imaging to monitor drug responses in hematological tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newbold, Andrea; Martin, Ben P.; Cullinane, Carleen; Bots, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be used to monitor the uptake of the labeled glucose analog fluorodeoxyglucose (¹⁸F-FDG), a process that is generally believed to reflect viable tumor cell mass. The use of ¹⁸F-FDG PET can be helpful in documenting over time the reduction in tumor mass volume

  4. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M. Th; Teixeira, Suzana C.; Pengel, Kenneth E.; Loo, Claudette E.; Vogel, Wouter V.; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J. Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A.; Sonke, Gabe S.; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T. F. D.; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G. A.

    2017-01-01

    To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and 18F-FDG-PET/CT were acquired

  5. Monitoring tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT in breast cancer subtypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmitz, Alexander M Th; Teixeira, Suzana C; Pengel, Kenneth E; Loo, Claudette E; Vogel, Wouter V; Wesseling, Jelle; Rutgers, Emiel J Th; Valdés Olmos, Renato A; Sonke, Gabe S; Rodenhuis, Sjoerd; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore guidelines on the use of MRI and PET/CT monitoring primary tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), taking breast cancer subtype into account. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective cohort study, 188 women were included with stages II and III breast cancer. MRI and

  6. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  7. Monitoring early tumor response to drug therapy with diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexman, Molly L.; Vlachos, Fotios; Kim, Hyun Keol; Sirsi, Shashank R.; Huang, Jianzhong; Hernandez, Sonia L.; Johung, Tessa B.; Gander, Jeffrey W.; Reichstein, Ari R.; Lampl, Brooke S.; Wang, Antai; Borden, Mark A.; Yamashiro, Darrell J.; Kandel, Jessica J.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2012-01-01

    Although anti-angiogenic agents have shown promise as cancer therapeutics, their efficacy varies between tumor types and individual patients. Providing patient-specific metrics through rapid noninvasive imaging can help tailor drug treatment by optimizing dosages, timing of drug cycles, and duration of therapy--thereby reducing toxicity and cost and improving patient outcome. Diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a noninvasive three-dimensional imaging modality that has been shown to capture physiologic changes in tumors through visualization of oxygenated, deoxygenated, and total hemoglobin concentrations, using non-ionizing radiation with near-infrared light. We employed a small animal model to ascertain if tumor response to bevacizumab (BV), an anti-angiogenic agent that targets vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), could be detected at early time points using DOT. We detected a significant decrease in total hemoglobin levels as soon as one day after BV treatment in responder xenograft tumors (SK-NEP-1), but not in SK-NEP-1 control tumors or in non-responder control or BV-treated NGP tumors. These results are confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging T2 relaxometry and lectin perfusion studies. Noninvasive DOT imaging may allow for earlier and more effective control of anti-angiogenic therapy.

  8. Functional imaging to monitor vascular and metabolic response in canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rødal, Jan; Rusten, Espen; Søvik, Åste; Skogmo, Hege Kippenes; Malinen, Eirik

    2013-10-01

    Radiotherapy causes alterations in tumor biology, and non-invasive early assessment of such alterations may become useful for identifying treatment resistant disease. The purpose of the current work is to assess changes in vascular and metabolic features derived from functional imaging of canine head and neck tumors during fractionated radiotherapy. Material and methods. Three dogs with spontaneous head and neck tumors received intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Contrast-enhanced cone beam computed tomography (CE-CBCT) at the treatment unit was performed at five treatment fractions. Dynamic (18)FDG-PET (D-PET) was performed prior to the start of radiotherapy, at mid-treatment and at 3-12 weeks after the completion of treatment. Tumor contrast enhancement in the CE-CBCT images was used as a surrogate for tumor vasculature. Vascular and metabolic tumor parameters were further obtained from the D-PET images. Changes in these tumor parameters were assessed, with emphasis on intra-tumoral distributions. Results. For all three patients, metabolic imaging parameters obtained from D-PET decreased from the pre- to the inter-therapy session. Correspondingly, for two of three patients, vascular imaging parameters obtained from both CE-CBCT and D-PET increased. Only one of the tumors showed a clear metabolic response after therapy. No systematic changes in the intra-tumor heterogeneity in the imaging parameters were found. Conclusion. Changes in vascular and metabolic parameters could be detected by the current functional imaging methods. Vascular tumor features from CE-CBCT and D-PET corresponded well. CE-CBCT is a potential method for easy response assessment when the patient is at the treatment unit.

  9. Multimodal OCT for complex assessment of tumors response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Matveev, Lev A.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Vitkin, Alex; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2017-07-01

    Multimodal OCT is a promising tool for monitoring of individual tumor response to antitumor therapies. The changes of tumor cells, connective tissue, microcirculation and stiffness can be estimated simultaneously in real time with high resolution.

  10. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E.

    2007-09-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present.

  11. A noninvasive multimodal technique to monitor brain tumor vascularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Vishal; Gonzalez-Gomez, Ignacio; Laug, Walter E

    2007-01-01

    Determination of tumor oxygenation at the microvascular level will provide important insight into tumor growth, angiogenesis, necrosis and therapeutic response and will facilitate to develop protocols for studying tumor behavior. The non-ionizing near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) technique has the potential to differentiate lesion and hemoglobin dynamics; however, it has a limited spatial resolution. On the other hand, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has achieved high spatial resolution with excellent tissue discrimination but is more susceptible to limited ability to monitor the hemoglobin dynamics. In the present work, the vascular status and the pathophysiological changes that occur during tumor vascularization are studied in an orthotopic brain tumor model. A noninvasive multimodal approach based on the NIRS technique, namely steady state diffuse optical spectroscopy (SSDOS) along with MRI, is applied for monitoring the concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor region. The concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin and water within tumor vasculature are extracted at 15 discrete wavelengths in a spectral window of 675-780 nm. We found a direct correlation between tumor size, intratumoral microvessel density and tumor oxygenation. The relative decrease in tumor oxygenation with growth indicates that though blood vessels infiltrate and proliferate the tumor region, a hypoxic trend is clearly present

  12. Value of PET and PET-CT for monitoring tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiang; Zhao Jinhua

    2007-01-01

    18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) PET or PET-CT is an accurate test for differentiating residual viable tumor tissue from therapy-induced changes in tumor. Furthermore, quantitative assessment of therapy-induced changes in tumor 18 F-FDG uptake may allow the prediction of tumor response. Treatment may be adjusted according to tumor response. So it is increasingly used to monitor tumor response in patients undergoing chemotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Here we focused on practical aspects of 18 F-FDG PET or PET-CT for treatment monitoring and on the existing advantages and challenges. (authors)

  13. Tumor radiation responses and tumor oxygenation in aging mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1989-01-01

    EMT6 mouse mammary tumors transplanted into aging mice are less sensitive to radiation than tumors growing in young adult animals. The experiments reported here compare the radiation dose-response curves defining the survivals of tumor cells in aging mice and in young adult mice. Cell survival curves were assessed in normal air-breathing mice and in mice asphyxiated with N 2 to produce uniform hypoxia throughout the tumors. Analyses of survival curves revealed that 41% of viable malignant cells were severely hypoxic in tumors in aging mice, while only 19% of the tumor cells in young adult animals were radiobiologically hypoxic. This did not appear to reflect anaemia in the old animals. Treatment of aging animals with a perfluorochemical emulsion plus carbogen (95% O 2 /5% CO 2 ) increased radiation response of the tumors, apparently by improving tumor oxygenation and decreasing the number of severely hypoxic, radiation resistant cells in the tumors. (author)

  14. Part of tumor markers in the evaluation of tumor response to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deckers, C.; Desmedt, M.

    1994-01-01

    When present, the tumor markers reflect the clinical evolution of the malignant lesions. We present here their variations in relation to the antitumor treatment and demonstrate that the marker reflects quite well the tumor response and constitutes an additional monitoring for the clinician. (authors). 11 refs., 2 figs

  15. Noninvasive monitoring of radiation-induced treatment response using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in a colorectal tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Roe, Kathrine; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) can monitor radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts in mice. Materials and methods: HT29 xenografts in mice received a dose of 15 Gy. In vivo 1 H MRS and DW-MRI were acquired pretreatment and 1, 3, 6 and 10 days post-irradiation. After imaging, tumors were excised for histological analysis. The amounts of necrosis, fibrosis and viable cells in the cross sections were scored and compared to changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and choline/water ratio. Results: Radiation-induced necrosis in the xenografts was observed as increased tumor ADC. In-growth of fibrosis three days post-irradiation restricting water mobility was accompanied by decreased tumor ADC. Choline/water ratio correlated with metabolic activity and tumor growth. Conclusions: ADC and choline/water ratio assessed by in vivo DW-MRI and 1 H MRS depicts radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts following irradiation

  16. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); El Bachiri, Sabrina [Université Catholique de Louvain, IMMAQ Technological Platform, Methodology and Statistical Support, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Grégoire, Vincent [Université Catholique de Louvain, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, Center for Molecular Imaging, Radiotherapy and Oncology, Brussels (Belgium); Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium); Jordan, Bénédicte F., E-mail: benedicte.jordan@uclouvain.be [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}*. R{sub 1} is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R{sub 2}* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R{sub 1}, water R{sub 1}, lipids R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}* with pO{sub 2} assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R{sub 1}, R{sub 2}*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O{sub 2}, 5% CO{sub 2}). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO{sub 2}. Global and lipids R{sub 1} were found to be correlated to pO{sub 2} in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R{sub 2}* was found to be inversely correlated to pO{sub 2} in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R{sub 2}* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. {sup 18}F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R{sub 1} and R{sub 2}* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R{sub 1

  17. Monitoring Tumor Response to Carbogen Breathing by Oxygen-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Parameters to Predict the Outcome of Radiation Therapy: A Preclinical Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao-Pham, Thanh-Trang; Tran, Ly-Binh-An; Colliez, Florence; Joudiou, Nicolas; El Bachiri, Sabrina; Grégoire, Vincent; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard; Jordan, Bénédicte F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In an effort to develop noninvasive in vivo methods for mapping tumor oxygenation, magnetic resonance (MR)-derived parameters are being considered, including global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2*. R_1 is sensitive to dissolved molecular oxygen, whereas R_2* is sensitive to blood oxygenation, detecting changes in dHb. This work compares global R_1, water R_1, lipids R_1, and R_2* with pO_2 assessed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry, as potential markers of the outcome of radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: R_1, R_2*, and EPR were performed on rhabdomyosarcoma and 9L-glioma tumor models, under air and carbogen breathing conditions (95% O_2, 5% CO_2). Because the models demonstrated different radiosensitivity properties toward carbogen, a growth delay (GD) assay was performed on the rhabdomyosarcoma model and a tumor control dose 50% (TCD50) was performed on the 9L-glioma model. Results: Magnetic resonance imaging oxygen-sensitive parameters detected the positive changes in oxygenation induced by carbogen within tumors. No consistent correlation was seen throughout the study between MR parameters and pO_2. Global and lipids R_1 were found to be correlated to pO_2 in the rhabdomyosarcoma model, whereas R_2* was found to be inversely correlated to pO_2 in the 9L-glioma model (P=.05 and .03). Carbogen increased the TCD50 of 9L-glioma but did not increase the GD of rhabdomyosarcoma. Only R_2* was predictive (P<.05) for the curability of 9L-glioma at 40 Gy, a dose that showed a difference in response to RT between carbogen and air-breathing groups. "1"8F-FAZA positron emission tomography imaging has been shown to be a predictive marker under the same conditions. Conclusion: This work illustrates the sensitivity of oxygen-sensitive R_1 and R_2* parameters to changes in tumor oxygenation. However, R_1 parameters showed limitations in terms of predicting the outcome of RT in the tumor models studied, whereas R_2* was found to be

  18. Growth of melanoma brain tumors monitored by photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staley, Jacob; Grogan, Patrick; Samadi, Abbas K.; Cui, Huizhong; Cohen, Mark S.; Yang, Xinmai

    2010-07-01

    Melanoma is a primary malignancy that is known to metastasize to the brain and often causes death. The ability to image the growth of brain melanoma in vivo can provide new insights into its evolution and response to therapies. In our study, we use a reflection mode photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system to detect the growth of melanoma brain tumor in a small animal model. The melanoma tumor cells are implanted in the brain of a mouse at the beginning of the test. Then, PAM is used to scan the region of implantation in the mouse brain, and the growth of the melanoma is monitored until the death of the animal. It is demonstrated that PAM is capable of detecting and monitoring the brain melanoma growth noninvasively in vivo.

  19. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  20. Monitoring therapy with MEK inhibitor U0126 in a novel Wilms tumor model in Wt1 knockout Igf2 transgenic mice using 18F-FDG PET with dual-contrast enhanced CT and MRI: early metabolic response without inhibition of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Leo G; Yeh, Hsin-Hsien; Soghomonyan, Suren; Young, Daniel; Bankson, James; Hu, Qianghua; Alauddin, Mian; Huff, Vicki; Gelovani, Juri G

    2013-04-01

    during early development and progression of renal tumors. Over the 8-month period, 46 Wt1-Igf2 mice and 8 littermate control mice were studied. Renal tumors were identified in 54.3 % of Wt1-Igf2 mice between post-natal 50-100 days. In 35.6 % of Wt1-Igf2 mice, tumors were localized in the right kidney; in 24 %, in the left kidney, while 40.4 % of Wt1-Igf2 mice had bilateral kidney tumors. Metastatic lesions were identified in 15.4 % of Wt1-Igf2 mice. Increased levels of Glut1 and IGF1R expression, high Ki67 labeling index, and a dense network of CD34+ microvessels in renal tumors was consistent with increased (18)F-FDG accumulation. Treatment with a MEK 1/2 inhibitor U0126 did not cause the inhibition of tumor growth as compared to untreated animals. However, after the first three to four doses (~2 weeks of treatment), a decrease in (18)F-FDG SUV was observed, as compared to pre-treatment levels (p endogenous mouse model of Wilms tumor and for monitoring their growth in response to targeted therapies. Therapy with MEK inhibitor U0126 produces only a transient inhibition of tumor glycolytic activity but does not inhibit tumor growth, which is due to continuing IGF2-induced signaling from IGF1R through the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway.

  1. Monitoring tumor proliferative response to radiotherapy using 18F-fluorothymidine in human head and neck cancer xenograft in comparison with Ki-67

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatema, Chowdhury Nusrat; Yu, Wenwen; Kitagawa, Yoshimasa; Zhao, Songji; Zhao, Yan; Murakami, Masahiro; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Tamaki, Nagara; Kuge, Yuji

    2013-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is an important treatment strategy for head and neck cancers, it induces tumor repopulation which adversely affects therapeutic outcome. In this regard, fractionated radiotherapy is widely applied to prevent tumor repopulation. Evaluation of tumor proliferative activity using 18 F-fluorothymidine (FLT), a noninvasive marker of tumor proliferation, may be useful for determining the optimal timing of and dose in the repetitive irradiation. Thus, to assess the potentials of FLT, we evaluated the sequential changes in intratumoral proliferative activity in head and neck cancer xenografts (FaDu) using FLT. FaDu tumor xenografts were established in nude mice and assigned to control and two radiation-treated groups (10 and 20 Gy). Tumor volume was measured daily. 3 H-FLT was injected intravenously 2 h before killing. Mice were killed 6, 24, 48 h, and 7 days after the radiation treatment. Intratumoral 3 H-FLT level was visually and quantitatively assessed by autoradiography. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry (IHC) was performed. In radiation-treated mice, the tumor growth was significantly suppressed compared with the control group, but the tumor volume in these mice gradually increased with time. In the visual assessment, intratumoral 3 H-FLT level diffusely decreased 6 h after the radiation treatment and then gradually increased with time, whereas no apparent changes were observed in Ki-67 IHC. Six hours after the radiation treatment at 10 and 20 Gy, the intratumoral 3 H-FLT level markedly decreased to 45 and 40% of the control, respectively (P 3 H-FLT levels at 48 h and on day 7 were significantly higher than that at 6 h. The intratumoral 3 H-FLT levels in both treated groups were 68 and 60% at 24 h (P<0.001), 71 and 77% at 48 h (P<0.001), and 83 and 81% on day 7 (P=NS) compared with the control group. Intratumoral FLT uptake level markedly decreased at 6 h and then gradually increased with time. Sequential evaluation of intratumoral proliferative

  2. Design of tumor biomarker-monitoring trials: a proposal by the European Group on Tumor Markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sölétormos, György; Duffy, Michael J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Sturgeon, Catharine M.; Barak, Vivian; Bossuyt, Patrick M.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.; Gion, Massimo; Hyltoft-Petersen, Per; Lamerz, Rolf M.; Nielsen, Dorte L.; Sibley, Paul; Tholander, Bengt; Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Bonfrer, Johannes M. G.

    2013-01-01

    A major application of tumor biomarkers is in serial monitoring of cancer patients, but there are no published guidelines on how to evaluate biomarkers for this purpose. The European Group on Tumor Markers has convened a multidisciplinary panel of scientists to develop guidance on the design of such

  3. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.D.; Hwang, T.; Hsieh, C.; Thames, H.

    1985-01-01

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  4. Monitoring the effect of belinostat in solid tumors by H4 acetylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquard, L.; Petersen, K.D.; Persson, M.

    2008-01-01

    after treatment with HDAC inhibitors, and could thus be used as a marker for monitoring cellular response to HDAC inhibitor treatment. Here we describe the utility of a newly described monoclonal antibody against acetylated H4 for immunohistochemistry on paraffin-embedded fine needle biopsies from nude...... acetylation in fine needle biopsies using the T25 antibody may prove useful in monitoring HDAC inhibitor efficacy in clinical trials involving humans with solid tumors Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  5. MR thermometry for monitoring tumor ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senneville, Baudouin D. de; Quesson, Bruno; Dragonu, Iulius; Moonen, Chrit T.W.; Mougenot, Charles; Grenier, Nicolas

    2007-01-01

    Local thermal therapies are increasingly used in the clinic for tissue ablation. During energy deposition, the actual tissue temperature is difficult to estimate since physiological processes may modify local heat conduction and energy absorption. Blood flow may increase during temperature increase and thus change heat conduction. In order to improve the therapeutic efficiency and the safety of the intervention, mapping of temperature and thermal dose appear to offer the best strategy to optimize such interventions and to provide therapy endpoints. MRI can be used to monitor local temperature changes during thermal therapies. On-line availability of dynamic temperature mapping allows prediction of tissue death during the intervention based on semi-empirical thermal dose calculations. Much progress has been made recently in MR thermometry research, and some applications are appearing in the clinic. In this paper, the principles of MRI temperature mapping are described with special emphasis on methods employing the temperature dependency of the water proton resonance frequency. Then, the prospects and requirements for widespread applications of MR thermometry in the clinic are evaluated. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MRI for tumor characterization, differentiation and monitoring in pediatric patients with neuroblastic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neubauer, Henning [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Li, Mengxia [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Mueller, Verena Rabea [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Paediatrics; Pabst, Thomas [Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Beer, Meinrad [Univ. Hospital Ulm (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2017-07-15

    We explored the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for tumor characterization, differentiation and therapy monitoring in pediatric patients with extracranial neuroblastic tumors. All 29 patients (14 girls, median age: 3 years) with neuroblastoma (NB, n = 19), ganglioneuroblastoma (GNB, n = 4) and ganglioneuroma (GN, n = 6) who had had at least one in-house DWI examination since 2005 were identified and retrospectively analyzed. Two independent blinded readers measured ADC values (unit: 10-3 mm{sup 2}/s) and signal intensity ratios (SIRs) of the primary tumor and, if applicable, of the tumor after chemotherapy, metastases and tumor relapse. The pre-treatment ADC was 0.90 ± 0.23 in NB/GNB and 1.70 ± 0.36 in GN without overlap between the two entities for both readers, 0.67 ± 0.14 in metastases and 0.72 ± 0.18 in tumor relapse. With chemotherapy, mean ADC increased to 1.54 ± 0.33 in NB/GNB and to 1.23 ± 0.27 in metastases (p < 0.05). The median SIRs of various tumor lesions vs. liver, vs. muscle tissue and vs. adjacent tissue were significantly higher on DWI (range: 2.4 -9.9) than on ce-T1w (range: 1.0 - 1.8, all p < 0.05). The coefficient of variation (CV) was ≤ 8.0% for ADC and ≤ 16.4% for signal intensity data. Based on mean ADC, DWI distinguishes between NB/GNB and GN with high certainty and provides plausible quantitative data on tumor response to therapy. Lesion conspicuity, as measured by SIR, is superior on DWI, compared to ce-T1w. DWI as a noninvasive, radiation-free and widely available imaging technique should be an integral part of MR imaging for neuroblastic tumors and should undergo prospective evaluation in multicenter studies.

  7. Radiological evaluation of tumor response in oncological studies (tumor response evaluation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, B.; Riess, H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiological-morphological response evaluation plays a major role in oncological therapy and studies for approval. Specific criteria have been developed for some tumor entities and chemotherapeutics. Application, limitations and definitions of the most frequently used criteria for tumor response evaluation will be presented. Materials and Methods: Review based on a selective literature research. Results: In clinical oncological therapy studies, WHO and RECIST are the most frequently used criteria to evaluate morphological therapy response. RECIST criteria have been modified recently, especially with respect to the evaluation of lymph nodes, and were published as RECIST 1.1 in 2009. All criteria were originally developed and defined to review clinical multicenter trials for approval. Using these criteria in a clinical situation, certain limitations have to be considered. To evaluate response, a baseline scan before therapy start is mandatory. Special tumor response criteria have been defined for some certain tumor entities. Oncologists and radiologists should define in advance which criteria are used before starting therapy. Conclusion: The use of defined criteria is very important in oncology response evaluation. In-depth knowledge of the criteria and their limits is required for correct usage. (orig.)

  8. Methylated DNA for monitoring tumor growth and regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Nielsen, Dorte; Söletormos, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A wide range of protein cancer biomarkers is currently recommended in international guidelines for monitoring the growth and regression of solid tumors. However, a number of these markers are also present in low concentrations in blood obtained from healthy individuals and from patients...... of gene promoters. Because tumor cells naturally secrete DNA and upon cell death leak DNA, modified methylated DNA can be detected in blood, urine, sputum and other body fluids. At present international guidelines do not include recommendations for monitoring modified methylated DNA. The low level...... of evidence can partly be explained by incomplete collection of serial blood samples, by analytical challenges, and by lack of knowledge of how monitoring studies should be designed and how serial marker data obtained from individual patients should be interpreted. Here, we review the clinical validity...

  9. Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma: tumor response to sunitinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacchiotti Silvia

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMCS is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of uncertain differentiation, characterized in most cases by a translocation that results in the fusion protein EWSR1-CHN (the latter even called NR4A3 or TEC. EMCS is marked by >40% incidence of metastases in spite of its indolent behaviour. It is generally resistant to conventional chemotherapy, and, to the best of our knowledge, no data have been reported to date about the activity of tirosin-kinase inhibitor (TKI in this tumor. We report on two consecutive patients carrying an advanced EMCS treated with sunitinib. Methods Since July 2011, 2 patients with progressive pretreated metastatic EMCS (Patient1: woman, 58 years, PS1; Patient2: man, 63 years, PS1 have been treated with continuous SM 37.5 mg/day, on an individual use basis. Both patients are evaluable for response. In both cases diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of the typical EWSR1-CHN translocation. Results Both patients are still on treatment (11 and 8 months. Patient 1 got a RECIST response after 4 months from starting sunitinib, together with a complete response by PET. An interval progression was observed after stopping sunitinib for toxicity (abscess around previous femoral fixation, but response was restored after restarting sunitinib. Patient 2 had an initial tumor disease stabilization detected by CT scan at 3 months. Sunitinib was increased to 50 mg/day, with evidence of a dimensional response 3 months later. Conclusions Sunitinib showed antitumor activity in 2 patients with advanced EMCS. Further studies are needed to confirm these preliminary results.

  10. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  11. Development of RIA kits for tumor-markers monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprarop, P.

    1997-01-01

    All reagents for tumor markers assays are imported from various manufacturers mainly CIS bio international. The average cost of these reagents is ranged from 80-150 bath/test (2-4 dollars test). The screening test for cancers could not be done especially in other regions of Thailand whose budgets and resources are so limited. If the reagents are made locally, many laboratories can perform the tests and use as primary diagnosis, screening or monitor the course of the disease following treatment. In addition, these reagents could help clinicians and give complementary information on the tumor status to improve quality of life in Thailand. Research objectives include: 1. Development of IRMA reagent kits suitable for diagnosing staging and monitoring prostrate and breast cancer. 2. Transfer of technology and reagent kits to relevant laboratories in Thailand. 3. Routine distribution of the reagents kits to the end users

  12. Periostin Limits Tumor Response to VEGFA Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keklikoglou, Ioanna; Kadioglu, Ece; Bissinger, Stefan; Langlois, Benoît; Bellotti, Axel; Orend, Gertraud; Ries, Carola H; De Palma, Michele

    2018-03-06

    Resistance to antiangiogenic drugs limits their applicability in cancer therapy. Here, we show that revascularization and progression of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) under extended vascular-endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) blockade are dependent on periostin (POSTN), a matricellular protein expressed by stromal cells. Genetic deletion of Postn in RIP1-Tag2 mice blunted tumor rebounds of M2-like macrophages and αSMA + stromal cells in response to prolonged VEGFA inhibition and suppressed PNET revascularization and progression on therapy. POSTN deficiency also impeded the upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2), an adaptive mechanism previously implicated in PNET evasion from antiangiogenic therapy. Higher POSTN expression correlated with markers of M2-like macrophages in human PNETs, and depleting macrophages with a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) antibody inhibited PNET revascularization and progression under VEGFA blockade despite continued POSTN production. These findings suggest a role for POSTN in orchestrating resistance to anti-VEGFA therapy in PNETs. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Periostin Limits Tumor Response to VEGFA Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Keklikoglou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to antiangiogenic drugs limits their applicability in cancer therapy. Here, we show that revascularization and progression of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs under extended vascular-endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA blockade are dependent on periostin (POSTN, a matricellular protein expressed by stromal cells. Genetic deletion of Postn in RIP1-Tag2 mice blunted tumor rebounds of M2-like macrophages and αSMA+ stromal cells in response to prolonged VEGFA inhibition and suppressed PNET revascularization and progression on therapy. POSTN deficiency also impeded the upregulation of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF2, an adaptive mechanism previously implicated in PNET evasion from antiangiogenic therapy. Higher POSTN expression correlated with markers of M2-like macrophages in human PNETs, and depleting macrophages with a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R antibody inhibited PNET revascularization and progression under VEGFA blockade despite continued POSTN production. These findings suggest a role for POSTN in orchestrating resistance to anti-VEGFA therapy in PNETs.

  14. Radiation effects on tumor-specific DTH response, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobusawa, Hiroshi; Hachisu, Reiko.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor-specific immunity was induced in C3H mice by immunizing with syngeneic MH134 hepatoma cells. Radiation sensitivity of anti-tumor activity of immunized spleen cells were examined and compared with the radiation sensitivity of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH)-response. The spleen cells were irradiated in vitro, then mixed with the tumor cells. DTH-response intensity was determined from the footpad increment twenty-four hours after inoculation of tumor cells with immunized spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of the spleen cells, based on growth inhibition of tumor cells, was measured by a cytostatic test in vivo with diffusion chambers. Tumor-specific DTH response was suppressed dose-dependently in the range of 12-24 Gy irradiation. No suppression was observed below 12 Gy. Without irradiation, growth of tumor cells was inhibited by immunized spleen cells more effectively than by normal spleen cells. Anti-tumor activity of immunized and normal spleen cells was diminished by irradiation doses of 20 Gy and 10 Gy, respectively. Comparing our report with others that analyzed the type of anti-tumor effector cells induced in this experimental system, we concluded that tumor-specific anti-tumor activity (tumor growth inhibition in vivo) that was radiosensitive at 10-20 Gy depended on a DTH-response. (author)

  15. Transcriptional response to hypoxia in human tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lal, A.; Peters, H.; Croix, B. St.; Haroon, Z.A.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Strausberg, R.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Kogel, A.J. van der; Riggins, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The presence of hypoxic regions within solid tumors is associated with a more malignant tumor phenotype and worse prognosis. To obtain a blood supply and protect against cellular damage and death, oxygen-deprived cells in tumors alter gene expression, resulting in resistance to therapy.

  16. Gallium 67 imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Front, D.; Lam, M.; Ben-Haim, S.; Kleinhaus, U.; Ben-Shachar, M.; Robinson, E.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of gallium 67 (Ga) imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment was assessed in 25 patients with Ga-avid tumors and compared to body computed tomography (CT), chest radiographs, and palpation of tumor infiltrated peripheral lymph nodes. Ga imaging was negative in 95% (20/21) of the patients who were clinically considered to be in remission and in whom treatment was stopped. The disease did not recur during a follow-up of 12 to 26 months in 15 patients. Six patients developed recurrence of the disease 3 to 12 months after treatment was stopped. In all six patients Ga imaging became positive again at the time of the appearance of active disease. In the group of patients in remission, CT was negative in 57% (11/19), chest x-rays in 55% (6/11) and peripheral lymph nodes were palpated in none of the patients (13/13). In four patients that did not achieve remission after treatment, Ga scans were positive. Ga imaging appears useful in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment. This is probably because Ga imaging monitors tumor cell viability, whereas body CT and chest radiographs show the tumor mass, which may consist of fibrotic or necrotic tissue

  17. Fluorescence diffuse tomography for tumor detection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balalaeva, Irina V.; Orlova, Anna G.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Kibraeva, Elena A.; Zagainova, Elena V.; Turchin, Ilya V.

    2007-05-01

    Strong light scattering and absorption limit visualization of the internal structure of biological tissue. Only special tools for turbid media imaging, such as optical diffuse tomography, enable noninvasive investigation of the internal biological tissues, including visualization and intravital monitoring of deep tumors. In this work the preliminary results of fluorescence diffuse tomography (FDT) of small animals are presented. Using of exogenous fluorophores, targeted specifically at tumor cells, and fluorescent proteins expressed endogenously can significantly increase the contrast of obtained images. Fluorescent compounds of different nature, such as sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (Photosens), red fluorescing proteins and CdTe/CdSe-core/shell nanocrystals (quantum dots) were applied. The animal was scanned in the transilluminative configuration by low-frequency modulated light (1 kHz) from Nd:YAG laser with second harmonic generation at the wavelength of 532 nm or semiconductor laser at the wavelength of 655 nm. Photosens was injected intravenously into linear mice with metastazing Lewis lung carcinoma in dose 4 mg/kg. Quantum dots (5x10 -11 M) or protein DsRed2 (1-5x10 -6 M) in glass capsules (inner diameter 2-3 mm) were placed inside the esophagus of 7-day-old hairless rats (18-20 g) to simulate marked tumors. Cells of HEK-293 Phoenix line, transitory transfected with Turbo-RFP protein gene, were injected hypodermically to immunodeficient mice. This work demonstrates potential capabilities of FDT method for detection and monitoring of deep fluorescent-labeled tumors in animal models. Strong advantages of fluorescent proteins and quantum dots over the traditional photosensitizer for FDT imaging are shown.

  18. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  19. Tumor Response to Radiotherapy Regulated by Endothelial Cell Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Barros, Monica; Paris, Francois; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Lyden, David; Rafii, Shahin; Haimovitz-Friedman, Adriana; Fuks, Zvi; Kolesnick, Richard

    2003-05-01

    About 50% of cancer patients receive radiation therapy. Here we investigated the hypothesis that tumor response to radiation is determined not only by tumor cell phenotype but also by microvascular sensitivity. MCA/129 fibrosarcomas and B16F1 melanomas grown in apoptosis-resistant acid sphingomyelinase (asmase)-deficient or Bax-deficient mice displayed markedly reduced baseline microvascular endothelial apoptosis and grew 200 to 400% faster than tumors on wild-type microvasculature. Thus, endothelial apoptosis is a homeostatic factor regulating angiogenesis-dependent tumor growth. Moreover, these tumors exhibited reduced endothelial apoptosis upon irradiation and, unlike tumors in wild-type mice, they were resistant to single-dose radiation up to 20 grays (Gy). These studies indicate that microvascular damage regulates tumor cell response to radiation at the clinically relevant dose range.

  20. Clinical implications of heterogeneity of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.; Skates, S.; Taghian, A.; Okunieff, P.; Efird, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneity of response of tumor tissue to radiation clearly exists. Major parameters include histopathologic type, size (number of tumor rescue units (TRUs)), hemoglobin concentration, cell proliferation kinetics and immune rejection reaction by host. Further, normal and presumably tumor tissue response is altered in certain genetic diseases, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. Any assessment of response of tumor tissue to a new treatment method or the testing of a new clinical response predictor is optimally based upon a narrow strata, viz., uniform with respect to known parameters of response, e.g. size, histological type. Even among tumors of such a clinical defined narrow strata, there will be residual heterogeneity with respect to inherent cellular radiation sensitivity, distributions of pO 2 , (SH), cell proliferation, etc. (author). 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Mutant KRAS Circulating Tumor DNA Is an Accurate Tool for Pancreatic Cancer Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perets, Ruth; Greenberg, Orli; Shentzer, Talia; Semenisty, Valeria; Epelbaum, Ron; Bick, Tova; Sarji, Shada; Ben-Izhak, Ofer; Sabo, Edmond; Hershkovitz, Dov

    2018-05-01

    Many new pancreatic cancer treatment combinations have been discovered in recent years, yet the prognosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains grim. The advent of new treatments highlights the need for better monitoring tools for treatment response, to allow a timely switch between different therapeutic regimens. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a tool for cancer detection and characterization with growing clinical use. However, currently, ctDNA is not used for monitoring treatment response. The high prevalence of KRAS hotspot mutations in PDAC suggests that mutant KRAS can be an efficient ctDNA marker for PDAC monitoring. Seventeen metastatic PDAC patients were recruited and serial plasma samples were collected. CtDNA was extracted from the plasma, and KRAS mutation analysis was performed using next-generation sequencing and correlated with serum CA19-9 levels, imaging, and survival. Plasma KRAS mutations were detected in 5/17 (29.4%) patients. KRAS ctDNA detection was associated with shorter survival (8 vs. 37.5 months). Our results show that, in ctDNA positive patients, ctDNA is at least comparable to CA19-9 as a marker for monitoring treatment response. Furthermore, the rate of ctDNA change was inversely correlated with survival. Our results confirm that mutant KRAS ctDNA detection in metastatic PDAC patients is a poor prognostic marker. Additionally, we were able to show that mutant KRAS ctDNA analysis can be used to monitor treatment response in PDAC patients and that ctDNA dynamics is associated with survival. We suggest that ctDNA analysis in metastatic PDAC patients is a readily available tool for disease monitoring. Avoiding futile chemotherapy in metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients by monitoring response to treatment is of utmost importance. A novel biomarker for monitoring treatment response in PDAC, using mutant KRAS circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), is proposed. Results, although limited by small sample numbers

  2. Preventing lower cranial nerve injuries during fourth ventricle tumor resection by utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Faisal R; Minhas, Mazhar; Jane, John

    2012-12-01

    We present two cases illustrating the benefit of utilizing intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring (IONM) for prevention of injuries to the lower cranial nerves during fourth ventricle tumor resection surgeries. Multiple cranial nerve nuclei are located on the floor of the fourth ventricle with a high risk of permanent damage. Two male patients (ages 8 and 10 years) presented to the emergency department and had brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans showing brainstem/fourth ventricle tumors. During surgery, bilateral posterior tibial and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs); four-limb and cranial nerves transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (TCeMEPs); brainstem auditory evoked responses (BAERs); and spontaneous electromyography (s-EMG) were recorded. Electromyography (EMG) was monitored bilaterally from cranial nerves V VII, IX, X, XI, and XII. Total intravenous anesthesia was used. Neuromuscular blockade was used only for initial intubation. Pre-incision baselines were obtained with good morphology of waveforms. After exposure the floor of the fourth ventricle was mapped by triggered-EMG (t-EMG) using 0.4 to 1.0 mA. In both patients the tumor was entangled with cranial nerves VII to XII on the floor of the fourth ventricle. The surgeon made the decision not to resect the tumor in one case and limited the resection to 70% of the tumor in the second case on the basis of neurophysiological monitoring. This decision was made to minimize any post-operative neurological deficits due to surgical manipulation of the tumor involving the lower cranial nerves. Intraoperative spontaneous and triggered EMG was effectively utilized in preventing injuries to cranial nerves during surgical procedures. All signals remained stable during the surgical procedure. Postoperatively both patients were well with no additional cranial nerve weakness. At three months follow-up, the patients continued to have no deficits.

  3. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, Vincent A.; Zhao Dawen; Gilio, Joseph; Chang, C.-H.; Jiang Lan; Hahn, Eric W.; Mason, Ralph P.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by 19 F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm 3 ) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) than their smaller counterparts ( 3 ). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO 2 , and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO 2 > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy

  4. Noninvasive diffuse optical monitoring of head and neck tumor blood flow and oxygenation during radiation delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lixin; Kudrimoti, Mahesh; Cheng, Ran; Shang, Yu; Johnson, Ellis L.; Stevens, Scott D.; Shelton, Brent J.; Yu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    This study explored using a novel diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) flow-oximeter to noninvasively monitor blood flow and oxygenation changes in head and neck tumors during radiation delivery. A fiber-optic probe connected to the DCS flow-oximeter was placed on the surface of the radiologically/clinically involved cervical lymph node. The DCS flow-oximeter in the treatment room was remotely operated by a computer in the control room. From the early measurements, abnormal signals were observed when the optical device was placed in close proximity to the radiation beams. Through phantom tests, the artifacts were shown to be caused by scattered x rays and consequentially avoided by moving the optical device away from the x-ray beams. Eleven patients with head and neck tumors were continually measured once a week over a treatment period of seven weeks, although there were some missing data due to the patient related events. Large inter-patient variations in tumor hemodynamic responses were observed during radiation delivery. A significant increase in tumor blood flow was observed at the first week of treatment, which may be a physiologic response to hypoxia created by radiation oxygen consumption. Only small and insignificant changes were found in tumor blood oxygenation, suggesting that oxygen utilizations in tumors during the short period of fractional radiation deliveries were either minimal or balanced by other effects such as blood flow regulation. Further investigations in a large patient population are needed to correlate the individual hemodynamic responses with the clinical outcomes for determining the prognostic value of optical measurements. PMID:22312579

  5. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciubuc, John

    Methods built on Raman spectroscopy have shown major potential in describing and discriminating between malignant and benign specimens. Accurate, real-time medical diagnosis benefits in substantial improvements through this vibrational optical method. Not only is acquisition of data possible in milliseconds and analysis in minutes, Raman allows concurrent detection and monitoring of all biological components. Besides validating a significant Raman signature distinction between non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, this study reveals a label-free method to assess overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) in tumor cells. EGFR overexpression sires Raman features associated with phosphorylated threonine and serine, and modifications of DNA/RNA characteristics. Investigations by gel electrophoresis reveal EGF induction of phosphorylated Akt, agreeing with the Raman results. The analysis presented is a vital step toward Raman-based evaluation of EGF receptors in breast cancer cells. With the goal of clinically applying Raman-guided methods for diagnosis of breast tumors, the current results lay the basis for proving label-free optical alternatives in making prognosis of the disease.

  6. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy

  8. Automatic duress alarms through physiological response monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrig, S.C.

    1977-07-01

    Physiological response monitoring under controlled conditions can provide an effective means for passively determining if the wearer is under moderate to severe stresses. By monitoring the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR) of an individual, it is possible to detect in real time the increase in heart rate and GSR levels due to physiological reactions to mental duress. With existing physiological monitoring equipment, however, the work load of the wearer must be well defined since it is impossible, without additional data, to distinguish mental duress responses from those resulting from moderate physical exertion. Similarly, environmental conditions should be constrained within set limits to avoid masking increases in GSR levels due to metntal stress from those associated with increased perspiration. These constraints should not prove overly restrictive and would allow an integrated security system utilizing physiological monitoring equipment to provide an effective real time, automated early warning system for detection of mental duress or death of the wearer

  9. Measuring Response to Therapy by Near-Infrared Imaging of Tumors Using a Phosphatidylserine-Targeting Antibody Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Gong

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Imaging tumors and their response to treatment could be a valuable biomarker toward early assessment of therapy in patients with cancer. Phosphatidylserine (PS is confined to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane in normal cells but is externalized on tumor vascular endothelial cells (ECs and tumor cells, and PS exposure is further enhanced in response to radiation and chemotherapy. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of a PS-targeting human F(ab'2 antibody fragment, PGN650, to detect exposure of PS in tumor-bearing mice. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was measured by near-infrared optical imaging in human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice. PGN650 specifically targeted tumors and was shown to target CD31-positive ECs and tumor cells. Tumor uptake of PGN650 was significantly higher in animals pretreated with docetaxel. The peak tumor to normal tissue (T/N ratio of probe was observed at 24 hours postinjection of probe, and tumor binding was detected for at least 120 hours. In repeat dose studies, PGN650 uptake in tumors was significantly higher following pretreatment with docetaxel compared to baseline uptake prior to treatment. PGN650 may be a useful probe to detect PS exposed in tumors and to monitor enhanced PS exposure to optimize therapeutic agents to treat tumors.

  10. Peripheral tumors alter neuroinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyter, Leah M; El Mouatassim Bih, Sarah; Sattar, Husain; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-03-13

    Cancer is associated with an increased prevalence of depression. Peripheral tumors induce inflammatory cytokine production in the brain and depressive-like behaviors. Mounting evidence indicates that cytokines are part of a pathway by which peripheral inflammation causes depression. Neuroinflammatory responses to immune challenges can be exacerbated (primed) by prior immunological activation associated with aging, early-life infection, and drug exposure. This experiment tested the hypothesis that peripheral tumors likewise induce neuroinflammatory sensitization or priming. Female rats with chemically-induced mammary carcinomas were injected with either saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 250μg/kg; i.p.), and expression of mRNAs involved in the pathway linking inflammation and depression (interleukin-1beta [Il-1β], CD11b, IκBα, indolamine 2,3-deoxygenase [Ido]) was quantified by qPCR in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and frontal cortex, 4 or 24h post-treatment. In the absence of LPS, hippocampal Il-1β and CD11b mRNA expression were elevated in tumor-bearing rats, whereas Ido expression was reduced. Moreover, in saline-treated rats basal hypothalamic Il-1β and CD11b expression were positively correlated with tumor weight; heavier tumors, in turn, were characterized by more inflammatory, necrotic, and granulation tissue. Tumors exacerbated CNS proinflammatory gene expression in response to LPS: CD11b was greater in hippocampus and frontal cortex of tumor-bearing relative to tumor-free rats, IκBα was greater in hippocampus, and Ido was greater in hypothalamus. Greater neuroinflammatory responses in tumor-bearing rats were accompanied by attenuated body weight gain post-LPS. The data indicate that neuroinflammatory pathways are potentiated, or primed, in tumor-bearing rats, which may exacerbate future negative behavioral consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Label-Free Raman Imaging to Monitor Breast Tumor Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Felicia S; Ciubuc, John D; Parra, Karla; Manciu, Marian; Bennet, Kevin E; Valenzuela, Paloma; Sundin, Emma M; Durrer, William G; Reza, Luis; Francia, Giulio

    2017-08-01

    Although not yet ready for clinical application, methods based on Raman spectroscopy have shown significant potential in identifying, characterizing, and discriminating between noncancerous and cancerous specimens. Real-time and accurate medical diagnosis achievable through this vibrational optical method largely benefits from improvements in current technological and software capabilities. Not only is the acquisition of spectral information now possible in milliseconds and analysis of hundreds of thousands of data points achieved in minutes, but Raman spectroscopy also allows simultaneous detection and monitoring of several biological components. Besides demonstrating a significant Raman signature distinction between nontumorigenic (MCF-10A) and tumorigenic (MCF-7) breast epithelial cells, our study demonstrates that Raman can be used as a label-free method to evaluate epidermal growth factor activity in tumor cells. Comparative Raman profiles and images of specimens in the presence or absence of epidermal growth factor show important differences in regions attributed to lipid, protein, and nucleic acid vibrations. The occurrence, which is dependent on the presence of epidermal growth factor, of new Raman features associated with the appearance of phosphothreonine and phosphoserine residues reflects a signal transduction from the membrane to the nucleus, with concomitant modification of DNA/RNA structural characteristics. Parallel Western blotting analysis reveals an epidermal growth factor induction of phosphorylated Akt protein, corroborating the Raman results. The analysis presented in this work is an important step toward Raman-based evaluation of biological activity of epidermal growth factor receptors on the surfaces of breast cancer cells. With the ultimate future goal of clinically implementing Raman-guided techniques for the diagnosis of breast tumors (e.g., with regard to specific receptor activity), the current results just lay the foundation for

  12. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  13. A novel method for monitoring high-risk breast cancer with tumor markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sölétormos, G; Nielsen, D; Schiøler, V

    1993-01-01

    cancer. METHODS: Ninety females with high-risk breast cancer were included in the study. Response evaluation was based upon clinical examination, x-rays or histology and elaborated marker criteria. RESULTS: During the marker monitoring period, metastases in four patients were confined to skin or lymph......BACKGROUND: An early and reliable diagnosis of metastatic spread has increased interest in serum tumor markers. This study investigated the ability of CA 15.3, CEA, and TPA to identify, predict, and exclude metastases in bone/viscera during adjuvant treatment and follow-up of high-risk breast...

  14. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra eDemaria

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T-cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy that are being tested in the clinic.

  15. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demaria, Sandra [Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: sandra.demaria@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine and NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-08-24

    Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has been demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy which are being tested in the clinic.

  16. Role of T lymphocytes in tumor response to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia C.

    2012-01-01

    Over thirty years ago, Helen Stone and colleagues compared the effects of local tumor irradiation in immunocompetent and T cell deficient mice, providing the first evidence that tumor response to radiotherapy is impaired in the absence of a normal T cell repertoire. In the following three decades there has been an exponential growth in understanding T cells and the complex molecular mechanisms that regulate their activation, migration to tumors and effector functions. We now also know that tumor progression is intrinsically linked to the development of multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms that allow cancer cells to escape immune control. Recent evidence about the role of T cells in determining the prognosis and outcome of patients at any clinical stages of cancer has been instrumental in re-directing the concept of immunosurveillance and immunoediting from the realm of preclinical models to the reality of clinical observations. Importantly, cell death induced by standard anti-cancer therapies like chemotherapy and radiation has been demonstrated to involve the immune system and, in certain specific settings, enable a specific immune response. It is, therefore, not surprising that the last few years have seen an increase in investigations exploring how to harness the ability of radiation to induce anti-tumor immune responses. We will review here the experimental evidence that anti-tumor T cells are key players in tumor control achieved by radiotherapy. The effects of radiation on the tumor that have been shown to enhance the priming and effector phases of anti-tumor immunity will be discussed. Finally, we will highlight promising combinations of immune response modifiers that enhance T cell function with radiotherapy which are being tested in the clinic.

  17. In vivo MR monitoring of pH and blood flow during hyperglycemia in a brain tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, S.L.; Ross, B.D.; Merkle, H.; Garwood, M.

    1988-01-01

    Previous investigations have shown that tumors exhibit an acidotic pH shift following hyperglycemia, which may aid in hyperthermic treatments. P-31 and H-1 magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to monitor hyperglycemia-induced pH and blood flow changes, respectively, in subcutaneous and intracerebral C6 gliomas in rats. Subcutaneous tumors had a 78.2% +- 8.03% (standard error of the mean) decrease in blood flow and a concomitant pH decrease of 0.76 units +- 0.08. However, intracerebral tumors displayed an average blood flow reduction of only 20.9% +- 6.1%, with no significant pH change following hyperglycemia. These results indicate that the tissue harboring the tumor may have an important role in the overall tumor response to hyperglycemia

  18. Correlation of radiation response with tumor oxygenation in the Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourke, Vincent A [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Dawen, Zhao [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Gilio, Joseph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Chang, C -H [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Lan, Jiang [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Hahn, Eric W [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States); Mason, Ralph P [Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the application of pretreatment oxygenation to the AT1 subline of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor, which is more hypoxic and faster growing than the H1 subline previously studied. Methods and Materials: Dunning prostate R3327-AT1 tumors growing on Copenhagen rats were administered 30 Gy of X-ray radiation either with or without oxygen inhalation. Tumor oxygenation was sampled by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance echo planar imaging relaxometry of the reporter molecule hexafluorobenzene, no more than 24 h before irradiation. Results: Large tumors (>3.0 cm{sup 3}) exhibited significantly greater hypoxic fractions and lower mean partial pressure of oxygen (pO{sub 2}) than their smaller counterparts (<1.5 cm{sup 3}). However, unlike the R3327-HI subline, large AT1 tumors generally did not respond to oxygen inhalation in terms of altered hypoxic fraction or response to irradiation. Although the tumors did not respond to oxygen inhalation, each tumor had a different pO{sub 2}, and there was a clear trend between level of oxygenation at time of irradiation and tumor growth delay, with considerably better outcome when mean pO{sub 2} > 10 mm Hg. The comparatively small baseline hypoxic fraction in the group of small tumors was virtually eliminated by breathing oxygen, and the growth rate was significantly reduced for tumors on rats breathing oxygen during irradiation. Conclusions: These results further validate the usefulness of nuclear magnetic resonance oximetry as a predictor of response to radiation therapy.

  19. Tumor PDT-associated immune response: relevance of sphingolipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Merchant, Soroush; Separovic, Duska M.

    2010-02-01

    Sphingolipids have become recognized as essential effector molecules in signal transduction with involvement in various aspects of cell function and death, immune response and cancer treatment response. Major representatives of sphingolipids family, ceramide, sphingosine and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), have attracted interest in their relevance to tumor response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) because of their roles as enhancers of apoptosis, mediators of cell growth and vasculogenesis, and regulators of immune response. Our recent in vivo studies with mouse tumor models have confirmed that PDT treatment has a pronounced impact on sphingolipid profile in the targeted tumor and that significant advances in therapeutic gain with PDT can be attained by combining this modality with adjuvant treatment with ceramide analog LCL29.

  20. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  1. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  2. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifies. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement required from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  3. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifiers. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  4. Longitudinal optical monitoring of blood flow in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, J. M.; Chung, S. H.; Leproux, A.; Baker, W. B.; Busch, D. R.; DeMichele, A. M.; Tchou, J.; Tromberg, B. J.; Yodh, A. G.

    2017-06-01

    We measure tissue blood flow markers in breast tumors during neoadjuvant chemotherapy and investigate their correlation to pathologic complete response in a pilot longitudinal patient study (n  =  4). Tumor blood flow is quantified optically by diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS), and tissue optical properties, blood oxygen saturation, and total hemoglobin concentration are derived from concurrent diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI). The study represents the first longitudinal DCS measurement of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in humans over the entire course of treatment; it therefore offers a first correlation between DCS flow indices and pathologic complete response. The use of absolute optical properties measured by DOSI facilitates significant improvement of DCS blood flow calculation, which typically assumes optical properties based on literature values. Additionally, the combination of the DCS blood flow index and the tissue oxygen saturation from DOSI permits investigation of tissue oxygen metabolism. Pilot results from four patients suggest that lower blood flow in the lesion-bearing breast is correlated with pathologic complete response. Both absolute lesion blood flow and lesion flow relative to the contralateral breast exhibit potential for characterization of pathological response. This initial demonstration of the combined optical approach for chemotherapy monitoring provides incentive for more comprehensive studies in the future and can help power those investigations.

  5. Assays for predicting and monitoring responses to lung cancer immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has become a key strategy for cancer treatment, and two immune checkpoints, namely, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), have recently emerged as important targets. The interaction blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 demonstrated promising activity and antitumor efficacy in early phase clinical trials for advanced solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many cell types in multiple tissues express PD-L1 as well as several tumor types, thereby suggesting that the ligand may play important roles in inhibiting immune responses throughout the body. Therefore, PD-L1 is a critical immunomodulating component within the lung microenvironment, but the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis is controversial. More evidence is required to support the use of PD-L1 as a potential predictive biomarker. Clinical trials have measured PD-L1 in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with different antibodies, but the assessment of PD-L1 is not yet standardized. Some commercial antibodies lack specificity and their reproducibility has not been fully evaluated. Further studies are required to clarify the optimal IHC assay as well as to predict and monitor the immune responses of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway

  6. Emerging Role of the Unfolded Protein Response in Tumor Immunosurveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, Hélène; Vetters, Jessica; Moudombi, Lyvia; Caux, Christophe; Janssens, Sophie; Michallet, Marie-Cécile

    2017-07-01

    Disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis results in ER stress and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). This response alleviates cell stress, and is activated in both tumor cells and tumor infiltrating immune cells. The UPR plays a dual function in cancer biology, acting as a barrier to tumorigenesis at the premalignant stage, while fostering cancer maintenance in established tumors. In infiltrating immune cells, the UPR has been involved in both immunosurveillance and immunosuppressive functions. This review aims to decipher the role of the UPR at different stages of tumorigenesis and how the UPR shapes the balance between immunosurveillance and immune escape. This knowledge may improve existing UPR-targeted therapies and the design of novel strategies for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Integrated genomics of ovarian xenograft tumor progression and chemotherapy response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Brodsky, Alexander S; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H; Hillenmeyer, Sara; Kim, Kyu K; Ritz, Anna; Singh, Rakesh K; Raphael, Benjamin J; Brard, Laurent

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most deadly gynecological cancer with a very poor prognosis. Xenograft mouse models have proven to be one very useful tool in testing candidate therapeutic agents and gene function in vivo. In this study we identify genes and gene networks important for the efficacy of a pre-clinical anti-tumor therapeutic, MT19c. In order to understand how ovarian xenograft tumors may be growing and responding to anti-tumor therapeutics, we used genome-wide mRNA expression and DNA copy number measurements to identify key genes and pathways that may be critical for SKOV-3 xenograft tumor progression. We compared SKOV-3 xenografts treated with the ergocalciferol derived, MT19c, to untreated tumors collected at multiple time points. Cell viability assays were used to test the function of the PPARγ agonist, Rosiglitazone, on SKOV-3 cell growth. These data indicate that a number of known survival and growth pathways including Notch signaling and general apoptosis factors are differentially expressed in treated vs. untreated xenografts. As tumors grow, cell cycle and DNA replication genes show increased expression, consistent with faster growth. The steroid nuclear receptor, PPARγ, was significantly up-regulated in MT19c treated xenografts. Surprisingly, stimulation of PPARγ with Rosiglitazone reduced the efficacy of MT19c and cisplatin suggesting that PPARγ is regulating a survival pathway in SKOV-3 cells. To identify which genes may be important for tumor growth and treatment response, we observed that MT19c down-regulates some high copy number genes and stimulates expression of some low copy number genes suggesting that these genes are particularly important for SKOV-3 xenograft growth and survival. We have characterized the time dependent responses of ovarian xenograft tumors to the vitamin D analog, MT19c. Our results suggest that PPARγ promotes survival for some ovarian tumor cells. We propose that a combination of regulated expression and copy number

  8. Fibrinolytic response to tumor necrosis factor in healthy subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Büller, H. R.; van Deventer, S. J.; de Boer, J. P.; Hack, C. E.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1991-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be involved in the disturbance of the procoagulant-fibrinolytic balance in septicemia, leading to microvascular thrombosis. To assess the dynamics of the fibrinolytic response to TNF in humans, we performed a crossover saline-controlled study in six healthy men,

  9. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator

  10. Canine tumor and normal tissue response to heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, E.L.; McChesney, S.L.

    1985-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinomas of dogs were treated with either irradiation alone or combined with hyperthermia. Tumor control was assessed as no evidence of disease one year following treatment. Dogs were randomized to variable radiation doses which were given in ten fractions three times a week for three weeks. Heat was given three hours after the first and third radiation dose each week for seven treatments. The attempt was made to achieve a minimum tumor temperature of 42 0 C for thirty minutes with a maximum normal tissue temperature of 40 0 C. It was usually possible to selectively heat tumors. The TCD 50 for irradiation alone was about 400 rads greater than for heat plus irradiation. The dose response curve for heat plus radiation was much steeper than for radiation alone indicating less heterogeneity of tumor response. That also implies a much greater effectiveness of radiation combined with heat at higher tumor control probabilities. Early necrosis caused by heating healed with conservative management. No increase in late radiation necrosis was observed

  11. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.-C. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Jeng-Jong [Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw; Ting, G. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Tseng, Y.-L. [Taiwan Liposome Company, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Wang, S.-J. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Whang-Peng, J. [Cancer Research Division, National Health Research Institute, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China)

    2007-02-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R {sup 2}=0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm{sup 3} (R {sup 2}=0.907). {gamma} Scintigraphy combined with [{sup 131}I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs.

  12. Monitoring and quantitative assessment of tumor burden using in vivo bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-C.; Hwang, Jeng-Jong; Ting, G.; Tseng, Y.-L.; Wang, S.-J.; Whang-Peng, J.

    2007-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating tumor growth. In this study, the kinetic of tumor growth has been assessed in C26 colon carcinoma bearing BALB/c mouse model. The ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth of subcutaneous tumors transplanted with C26 cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (C26/tk-luc). A good correlation (R 2 =0.998) of photon emission to the cell number was found in vitro. Tumor burden and tumor volume were monitored in vivo over time by quantitation of photon emission using Xenogen IVIS 50 and standard external caliper measurement, respectively. At various time intervals, tumor-bearing mice were imaged to determine the correlation of in vivo BLI to tumor volume. However, a correlation of BLI to tumor volume was observed when tumor volume was smaller than 1000 mm 3 (R 2 =0.907). γ Scintigraphy combined with [ 131 I]FIAU was another imaging modality used for verifying the previous results. In conclusion, this study showed that bioluminescence imaging is a powerful and quantitative tool for the direct assay to monitor tumor growth in vivo. The dual reporter genes transfected tumor-bearing animal model can be applied in the evaluation of the efficacy of new developed anti-cancer drugs

  13. Feasibility of a novel deformable image registration technique to facilitate classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, Kristy K.; Dawson, Laura A.; Sharpe, Michael B.; Moseley, Douglas J.; Jaffray, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of a biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique for the integration of multimodality imaging, image guided treatment, and response monitoring. Methods and Materials: A multiorgan deformable image registration technique based on finite element modeling (FEM) and surface projection alignment of selected regions of interest with biomechanical material and interface models has been developed. FEM also provides an inherent method for direct tracking specified regions through treatment and follow-up. Results: The technique was demonstrated on 5 liver cancer patients. Differences of up to 1 cm of motion were seen between the diaphragm and the tumor center of mass after deformable image registration of exhale and inhale CT scans. Spatial differences of 5 mm or more were observed for up to 86% of the surface of the defined tumor after deformable image registration of the computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images. Up to 6.8 mm of motion was observed for the tumor after deformable image registration of the CT and cone-beam CT scan after rigid registration of the liver. Deformable registration of the CT to the follow-up CT allowed a more accurate assessment of tumor response. Conclusions: This biomechanical-based deformable image registration technique incorporates classification, targeting, and monitoring of tumor and normal tissue using one methodology

  14. Non-Invasive Monitoring of Breast Tumor Oxygenation: A Key to Tumor Therapy Planning and Tumor Prognosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Hanli

    2004-01-01

    .... The aims have included (1) to evaluate a single-channel, dual wavelength, NIR, frequency-domain oximeter and the algorithms for obtaining tumor HbO2 against tumor PO2 measured by 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), (2...

  15. Quantitative Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J L Schreurs

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize response to photodynamic therapy (PDT in a mouse cancer model using a multi-parametric quantitative MRI protocol and to identify MR parameters as potential biomarkers for early assessment of treatment outcome.CT26.WT colon carcinoma tumors were grown subcutaneously in the hind limb of BALB/c mice. Therapy consisted of intravenous injection of the photosensitizer Bremachlorin, followed by 10 min laser illumination (200 mW/cm2 of the tumor 6 h post injection. MRI at 7 T was performed at baseline, directly after PDT, as well as at 24 h, and 72 h. Tumor relaxation time constants (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were quantified at each time point. Additionally, Gd-DOTA dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI was performed to estimate transfer constants (Ktrans and volume fractions of the extravascular extracellular space (ve using standard Tofts-Kermode tracer kinetic modeling. At the end of the experiment, tumor viability was characterized by histology using NADH-diaphorase staining.The therapy induced extensive cell death in the tumor and resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth, as compared to untreated controls. Tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times remained unchanged up to 24 h, but decreased at 72 h after treatment. Tumor ADC values significantly increased at 24 h and 72 h. DCE-MRI derived tracer kinetic parameters displayed an early response to the treatment. Directly after PDT complete vascular shutdown was observed in large parts of the tumors and reduced uptake (decreased Ktrans in remaining tumor tissue. At 24 h, contrast uptake in most tumors was essentially absent. Out of 5 animals that were monitored for 2 weeks after treatment, 3 had tumor recurrence, in locations that showed strong contrast uptake at 72 h.DCE-MRI is an effective tool for visualization of vascular effects directly after PDT. Endogenous contrast parameters T1, T2, and ADC, measured at 24 to 72 h after PDT, are

  16. Concurrent Longitudinal EPR Monitoring of Tissue Oxygenation, Acidosis, and Reducing Capacity in Mouse Xenograft Tumor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Andrey A; Evans, Jason; Denko, Nicholas C; Khramtsov, Valery V

    2017-06-01

    Tissue oxygenation, extracellular acidity, and tissue reducing capacity are among crucial parameters of tumor microenvironment (TME) of significant importance for tumor pathophysiology. In this paper, we demonstrate the complementary application of particulate lithium octa-n-butoxy-naphthalocyanine and soluble nitroxide paramagnetic probes for monitoring of these TME parameters using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique. Two different types of therapeutic interventions were studied: hypothermia and systemic administration of metabolically active drug. In summary, the results demonstrate the utility of EPR technique for non-invasive concurrent longitudinal monitoring of physiologically relevant chemical parameters of TME in mouse xenograft tumor models, including that under therapeutic intervention.

  17. Social media monitoring: Responsive governance in the shadow of surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.R. Edwards (Arthur); D. de Kool (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Social media monitoring is gradually becoming a common practice in public organizations in the Netherlands. The main purposes of social media monitoring are strategic control and responsiveness. Social media monitoring poses normative questions in terms of

  18. Immune response to uv-induced tumors: transplantation immunity and lymphocyte populations exhibiting anti-tumor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light-induced murine skin tumors were analyzed for their ability to induce tumor-specific and cross-protective transplantation immunity in immunocompetent syngeneic mice. These studies revealed that progressor UV-tumors, like regressor UV-tumors, possess tumor-specific transplantation antigens. Cross-protective transplantation immunity to UV-tumors, however, was associated with sensitization to the serum used to culture the tumor lines rather than to cross-reactive or common determinants on UV-tumors. An analysis of the cytolytic activity of lymphocytes from the spleens of mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors revealed a striking difference between the two immune splenocyte populations. From regressor tumor-immune animals, cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes with specificity for the immunizing tumor were found. However, the analysis of splenic lymphocytes from progressor tumor immune animals revealed no such effector cells. To more effectively examine those lymphocytes exhibiting cytolytic activity in vitro, T lymphocyte cloning technology was used as a means of isolating homogeneous lymphocyte populations with the effector activities described above. The mechanisms where NK cells and other nonspecific effector cells could be induced in tumor-immune animals are discussed in the context of class II restricted immune responses

  19. Mechanical disruption of tumors by iron particles and magnetic field application results in increased anti-tumor immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam N Bouchlaka

    Full Text Available The primary tumor represents a potential source of antigens for priming immune responses for disseminated disease. Current means of debulking tumors involves the use of cytoreductive conditioning that impairs immune cells or removal by surgery. We hypothesized that activation of the immune system could occur through the localized release of tumor antigens and induction of tumor death due to physical disruption of tumor architecture and destruction of the primary tumor in situ. This was accomplished by intratumor injection of magneto-rheological fluid (MRF consisting of iron microparticles, in Balb/c mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast cancer, followed by local application of a magnetic field resulting in immediate coalescence of the particles, tumor cell death, slower growth of primary tumors as well as decreased tumor progression in distant sites and metastatic spread. This treatment was associated with increased activation of DCs in the draining lymph nodes and recruitment of both DCs and CD8(+T cells to the tumor. The particles remained within the tumor and no toxicities were observed. The immune induction observed was significantly greater compared to cryoablation. Further anti-tumor effects were observed when MRF/magnet therapy was combined with systemic low dose immunotherapy. Thus, mechanical disruption of the primary tumor with MRF/magnetic field application represents a novel means to induce systemic immune activation in cancer.

  20. Differential response of idiopathic sporadic tumoral calcinosis to bisphosphonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Balachandran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Tumoral calcinosis is a disorder of phosphate metabolism characterized by ectopic calcification around major joints. Surgery is the current treatment of choice, but a suboptimal choice in recurrent and multicentric lesions. Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of bisphosphonates for the management of tumoral calcinosis on optimized medical treatment. Settings and Design: The study was done in the endocrine department of a tertiary care hospital in South India. We prospectively studied two patients with recurrent tumoral calcinosis who had failed therapy with phosphate lowering measures. Materials and Methods: After informed consent, we treated both patients with standard age adjusted doses of bisphosphonates for 18 months. The response was assessed by X ray and whole body 99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan at the beginning of therapy and at the end of 1 year. We also estimated serum phosphate levels and urinary phosphate to document serial changes. Results: Two patients (aged 19 and 5 years with recurrent idiopathic hyperphosphatemic tumoral calcinosis, following surgery were studied. Both patients had failed therapy with conventional medical management − low phosphate diet and phosphate binders. They had restriction of joint mobility. Both were given standard doses of oral alendronate and parenteral pamidronate respectively for more than a year, along with phosphate lowering measures. At the end of 1 year, one of the patients had more than 95% and 90% reduction in the size of the lesions in right and left shoulder joints respectively with total improvement in range of motion. In contrast, the other patient (5-year-old had shown no improvement, despite continuing to maintain normophosphatemia following treatment. Conclusions: Bisphosphonate therapy in tumoral calcinosis is associated with lesion resolution and may be used as a viable alternative to surgery, especially in cases with multicentric recurrence or treatment failure to other

  1. Dramatic response to nivolumab in xeroderma pigmentosum skin tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambon, Fanny; Osdoit, Sophie; Bagny, Kelly; Moro, Anne; Nguyen, Jacqueline; Réguerre, Yves

    2018-02-01

    We report the case of a 6-year-old female with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) who developed a nonoperable scalp tumor, treated with anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (anti-PD-1) therapy (nivolumab). She presented with a sarcomatoid carcinoma of the scalp with bone lysis as well as vascular and meningeal contact. Nivolumab was initiated because it has emerged as a promising immunotherapy. We observed a dramatic tumor response with excellent tolerance. However, while on nivolumab therapy she developed two large skin melanomas and several squamous cell carcinomas, which have been resected. These results demonstrate that cancer immunotherapy in patients with XP can be impressive but complex and warrants further investigation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The use of amino acid PET and conventional MRI for monitoring of brain tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Law, Ian; Pope, Whitney B

    2017-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring of brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced MRI. However, the capacity of conventional MRI to differentiate tumor tissue from posttherapeutic effects following neurosurgical resection, chemoradiation, alkylating chemotherapy, radiosurgery, and......),O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) and summarizes investigations regarding monitoring of brain tumor therapy......./or immunotherapy may be limited. Metabolic imaging using PET can provide relevant additional information on tumor metabolism, which allows for more accurate diagnostics especially in clinically equivocal situations. This review article focuses predominantly on the amino acid PET tracers11C-methyl-l-methionine (MET...

  3. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  4. Early inflammatory response in epithelial ovarian tumor cyst fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Björg; Partheen, Karolina; Fung, Eric T; Yip, Christine; Levan, Kristina; Sundfeldt, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Mortality rates for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) are high, mainly due to late-stage diagnosis. The identification of biomarkers for this cancer could contribute to earlier diagnosis and increased survival rates. Given that chronic inflammation plays a central role in cancer initiation and progression, we selected and tested 15 cancer-related cytokines and growth factors in 38 ovarian cyst fluid samples. We used ovarian cyst fluid since it is found in proximity to the pathology and mined it for inflammatory biomarkers suitable for early detection of EOC. Immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sample fractionation were obtained by using tandem antibody libraries bead and mass spectrometry. Two proteins, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) and interleucin-8 (IL-8/CXCL8), were significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the malignant (n = 16) versus benign (n = 22) tumor cysts. Validation of MCP-1, IL-8, and growth-regulated protein-α (GROα/CXCL1) was performed with ELISA in benign, borderline, and malignant cyst fluids (n = 256) and corresponding serum (n = 256). CA125 was measured in serum from all patients and used in the algorithms performed. MCP-1, IL-8, and GROα are proinflammatory cytokines and promoters of tumor growth. From 5- to 100-fold higher concentrations of MCP-1, IL-8 and GROα were detected in the cyst fluids compared to the serum. Significant (P < 0.001) cytokine response was already established in borderline cyst fluids and stage I EOC. In serum a significant (P < 0.01) increase of IL-8 and GROα was found, but not until stage I and stage III EOC, respectively. These findings confirm that early events in tumorigenesis can be analyzed and detected in the tumor environment and we conclude that ovarian cyst fluid is a promising source in the search for new biomarkers for early ovarian tumors

  5. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempp, Hansjoerg, E-mail: hansjoerg.rempp@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Clasen, Stephan [Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Pereira, Philippe L. [SLK-Kliniken, Clinic for Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, and Minimal Invasive Therapies (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  6. Image-Based Monitoring of Magnetic Resonance-Guided Thermoablative Therapies for Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempp, Hansjörg; Clasen, Stephan; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2012-01-01

    Minimally invasive treatment options for liver tumor therapy have been increasingly used during the last decade because their benefit has been proven for primary and inoperable secondary liver tumors. Among these, radiofrequency ablation has gained widespread consideration. Optimal image-guidance offers precise anatomical information, helps to position interventional devices, and allows for differentiation between already-treated and remaining tumor tissue. Patient safety and complete ablation of the entire tumor are the overriding objectives of tumor ablation. These may be achieved most elegantly with magnetic resonance (MR)-guided therapy, where monitoring can be performed based on precise soft-tissue imaging and additional components, such as diffusion-weighted imaging and temperature mapping. New MR scanner types and newly developed sequence techniques have enabled MR-guided intervention to move beyond the experimental phase. This article reviews the current role of MR imaging in guiding radiofrequency ablation. Signal characteristics of primary and secondary liver tumors are identified, and signal alteration during therapy is described. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and temperature mapping as special components of MR therapy monitoring are introduced. Practical information concerning coils, sequence selection, and parameters, as well as sequence gating, is given. In addition, sources of artifacts are identified and techniques to decrease them are introduced, and the characteristic signs of residual tumor in T1-, T2-, and DWI are described. We hope to enable the reader to choose MR sequences that allow optimal therapy monitoring depending on the initial signal characteristics of the tumor as well as its size and location in the liver.

  7. Assessment of biophysical tumor response to PDT in pancreatic cancer using localized reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, Martin; Klubben, William; He, Ting; Laughney, Ashley M.; Glaser, Adam; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Hoopes, P. Jack; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-02-01

    Biophysical changes such as inflammation and necrosis occur immediately following PDT and may be used to assess the treatment response to PDT treatment in-vivo. This study uses localized reflectance measurements to quantify the scatter changes in tumor tissue occurring in response to verteporfin-based PDT treatment in xenograft pancreas tumors. Nude mice were implanted with subcutaneous AsPC-1 pancreatic tumors cells in matrigel, and allowed to establish solid tumors near 100mm3 volume. The mice were sensitized with 1mg/kg of the active component of verteporfin (benzoporphryin derivative, BPD), one hour before light delivery. The optical irradiation was performed using a 1 cm cylindrical interstitial diffusing tip fiber with 20J of red light (690nm). Tumor tissue was excised progressively and imaged, from 1 day to 4 weeks, after PDT treatment. The tissue sections were stained and analyzed by an expert veterinary pathologist, who provided information on tissue regions of interest. This information was correlated with variations in scattering and absorption parameters elucidated from the spectral images and the degree of necrosis and inflammation involvement was identified. Areas of necrosis and dead cells exhibited the lowest average scatter irradiance signature (3.78 and 4.07 respectively) compared to areas of viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (5.81 and 7.19 respectively). Bilirubin absorbance parameters also showed a lower absorbance value in necrotic tissue and areas of dead cells (0.05 and 0.1 respectively) compared to tissue areas for viable pancreatic tumor cells and areas of inflammation (0.28 and 0.35). These results demonstrate that localized reflectance spectroscopy is an imaging modality that can be used to identify tissue features associated with PDT treatment (e.g. necrosis and inflammation) that can be correlated with histopathologically-reviewed H&E stained slides. Further study of this technique may provide means for automated

  8. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  9. Variation in tumor response to fluosol-DA (20%)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasai, K.; Ono, K.; Nishidai, T.; Tsutsui, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of Fluosol-DA 20% (FDA) and carbogen (95% O2/5% CO 2 ) on radiosensitivity of the three experimental tumors, SCC VII tumor, RIF-I tumor, and transplanted mammary tumor of C 3 H/He mouse, subcutaneously inoculated in the leg were examined. The effect of FDA plus carbogen, and carbogen alone on radiosensitivity of SCC VII and RIF-I tumors was tested using the in vivo-in vitro assay. The growth curves were obtained for both SCC VII tumor and transplanted mammary tumor. The effect of the combination of FDA and carbogen was only observed in the transplanted mammary tumor. In the other two tumors, only the effect of inspiring carbogen was observed. We concluded that the effect of FDA on the radiosensitivity of experimental tumors varies with the kind of tumor systems

  10. Assessment of therapeutic response and treatment planning for brain tumors using metabolic and physiological MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-07-01

    MRI is routinely used for diagnosis, treatment planning and assessment of response to therapy for patients with glioma. Gliomas are spatially heterogeneous and infiltrative lesions that are quite variable in terms of their response to therapy. Patients classified as having low-grade histology have a median overall survival of 7 years or more, but need to be monitored carefully to make sure that their tumor does not upgrade to a more malignant phenotype. Patients with the most aggressive grade IV histology have a median overall survival of 12-15 months and often undergo multiple surgeries and adjuvant therapies in an attempt to control their disease. Despite improvements in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of anatomic images, there remain considerable ambiguities in the interpretation of changes in the size of the gadolinium-enhancing lesion on T(1) -weighted images as a measure of treatment response, and in differentiating between treatment effects and infiltrating tumor within the larger T(2) lesion. The planning of focal therapies, such as surgery, radiation and targeted drug delivery, as well as a more reliable assessment of the response to therapy, would benefit considerably from the integration of metabolic and physiological imaging techniques into routine clinical MR examinations. Advanced methods that have been shown to provide valuable data for patients with glioma are diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric examinations that include the acquisition of such data are able to assess tumor cellularity, hypoxia, disruption of normal tissue architecture, changes in vascular density and vessel permeability, in addition to the standard measures of changes in the volume of enhancing and nonenhancing anatomic lesions. This is particularly critical for the interpretation of the results of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials of novel therapies, which are increasingly including agents that are designed to have anti-angiogenic and anti

  11. Development of a Novel Preclinical Pancreatic Cancer Research Model: Bioluminescence Image-Guided Focal Irradiation and Tumor Monitoring of Orthotopic Xenografts1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; DeWeese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. RESULTS: Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. CONCLUSIONS: We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response. PMID:22496923

  12. Development of a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model: bioluminescence image-guided focal irradiation and tumor monitoring of orthotopic xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuli, Richard; Surmak, Andrew; Reyes, Juvenal; Hacker-Prietz, Amy; Armour, Michael; Leubner, Ashley; Blackford, Amanda; Tryggestad, Erik; Jaffee, Elizabeth M; Wong, John; Deweese, Theodore L; Herman, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    We report on a novel preclinical pancreatic cancer research model that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI)-guided irradiation of orthotopic xenograft tumors, sparing of surrounding normal tissues, and quantitative, noninvasive longitudinal assessment of treatment response. Luciferase-expressing MiaPaCa-2 pancreatic carcinoma cells were orthotopically injected in nude mice. BLI was compared to pathologic tumor volume, and photon emission was assessed over time. BLI was correlated to positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) to estimate tumor dimensions. BLI and cone-beam CT (CBCT) were used to compare tumor centroid location and estimate setup error. BLI and CBCT fusion was performed to guide irradiation of tumors using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP). DNA damage was assessed by γ-H2Ax staining. BLI was used to longitudinally monitor treatment response. Bioluminescence predicted tumor volume (R = 0.8984) and increased linearly as a function of time up to a 10-fold increase in tumor burden. BLI correlated with PET/CT and necropsy specimen in size (P < .05). Two-dimensional BLI centroid accuracy was 3.5 mm relative to CBCT. BLI-guided irradiated pancreatic tumors stained positively for γ-H2Ax, whereas surrounding normal tissues were spared. Longitudinal assessment of irradiated tumors with BLI revealed significant tumor growth delay of 20 days relative to controls. We have successfully applied the SARRP to a bioluminescent, orthotopic preclinical pancreas cancer model to noninvasively: 1) allow the identification of tumor burden before therapy, 2) facilitate image-guided focal radiation therapy, and 3) allow normalization of tumor burden and longitudinal assessment of treatment response.

  13. Dual responsive promoters to target therapeutic gene expression to radiation-resistant hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, Naomi; Cowen, Rachel L.; Sheppard, Freda C.D.; Robinson, Suzanne; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon D.; Stratford, Ian J.; Patterson, Adam V.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is unequivocally linked to poor radiotherapy outcome. This study aimed to identify enhancer sequences that respond maximally to a combination of radiation and hypoxia for use in genetic radiotherapy approaches. Methods and materials: The influence of radiation (5 Gy) and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) on reporter-gene expression driven by hypoxia (HRE) and radiation (Egr-1) responsive elements was evaluated in tumor cells grown as monolayers or multicellular spheroids. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α protein expression was monitored in parallel. Results: Of the sequences tested, an HRE from the phosphoglycerate kinase-1 gene (PGK-18[5+]) was maximally induced in response to hypoxia plus radiation in all 5 cell lines tested. The additional radiation treatment afforded a significant increase in the induction of PGK-18[5+] compared with hypoxia alone in 3 cell lines. HIF-1α/2α were induced by radiation but combined hypoxia/radiation treatment did not yield a further increase. The dual responsive nature of HREs was maintained when spheroids were irradiated after delivery of HRE constructs in a replication-deficient adenovirus. Conclusions: Hypoxia-responsive enhancer element sequences are dually responsive to combined radiation and hypoxic treatment. Their use in genetic radiotherapy in vivo could maximize expression in the most radio-resistant population at the time of radiation and also exploit microenvironmental changes after radiotherapy to yield additional switch-on

  14. Electrophysiological Monitoring in Patients With Tumors of the Skull Base Treated by Carbon-12 Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carozzo, Simone [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Schardt, Dieter [Department of Biophysics, GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Narici, Livio [Department of Physics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Combs, Stephanie E.; Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Sannita, Walter G., E-mail: wgs@dism.unige.it [Department of Neuroscience, Ophthalmology, and Genetics, University of Genova, Genova (Italy); Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To report the results of short-term electrophysiologic monitoring of patients undergoing {sup 12}C therapy for the treatment of skull chordomas and chondrosarcomas unsuitable for radical surgery. Methods and Materials: Conventional electroencephalogram (EEG) and retinal and cortical electrophysiologic responses to contrast stimuli were recorded from 30 patients undergoing carbon ion radiation therapy, within a few hours before the first treatment and after completion of therapy. Methodologies and procedures were compliant with the guidelines of the International Federation for Clinical Neurophysiology and International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results: At baseline, clinical signs were reported in 56.6% of subjects. Electrophysiologic test results were abnormal in 76.7% (EEG), 78.6% (cortical evoked potentials), and 92.8% (electroretinogram) of cases, without correlation with neurologic signs, tumor location, or therapy plan. Results on EEG, but not electroretinograms and cortical responses, were more often abnormal in patients with reported clinical signs. Abnormal EEG results and retinal/cortical responses improved after therapy in 40% (EEG), 62.5% (cortical potentials), and 70% (electroretinogram) of cases. Results on EEG worsened after therapy in one-third of patients whose recordings were normal at baseline. Conclusions: The percentages of subjects whose EEG results improved or worsened after therapy and the improvement of retinal/cortical responses in the majority of patients are indicative of a limited or negligible (and possibly transient) acute central nervous system toxicity of carbon ion therapy, with a significant beneficial effect on the visual pathways. Research on large samples would validate electrophysiologic procedures as a possible independent test for central nervous system toxicity and allow investigation of the correlation with clinical signs; repeated testing over time after therapy would demonstrate, and may

  15. Response of the tumor and organs of the tumor-bearing animal to the action of an ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlakova, E.B.; Gaintseva, V.D.; Pal'mina, N.P.; Sezina, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in the antioxigenic activity (AOA) of the liver of the tumor-bearing animals and the tumor have been studied after a single whole-body exposure of animals to a dose of 600 R. AOA of the liver of animals having hepatoma 22-a and Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) was found to decrease immediately after irradiation while that of the tumor itself can both increase (hepatoma 22-a) and decrease (EAT). Proceeding from the assumption that AOA is connected with tissue radiosensitivity it is suggested that the observed variations in the response of tumor cells and normal tissue to the action of ionizing radiation should be taken into account when developing the schemes of radiation effect on the tumor

  16. The Impact of Induction Chemotherapy and the Associated Tumor Response on Subsequent Radiation-Related Changes in Lung Function and Tumor Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Jingfang; Kocak, Zafer; Zhou Sumin; Garst, Jennifer; Evans, Elizabeth S.; Zhang Junan; Larrier, Nicole A.; Hollis, Donna R.; Folz, Rodney J.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of induction chemotherapy, and associated tumor shrinkage, on the subsequent radiation-related changes in pulmonary function and tumor response. Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective institutional review board-approved study, 91 evaluable patients treated definitively with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) for unresectable lung cancer were analyzed. The rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without pre-RT chemotherapy. In the patients receiving induction chemotherapy, the rates of RT-associated pulmonary toxicity and tumor response were compared in the patients with and without a response (modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumor criteria) to the pre-RT chemotherapy. Comparisons of the rates of improvements in pulmonary function tests (PFTs) post-RT, dyspnea requiring steroids, and percent declines in PFTs post-RT were compared in patient subgroups using Fisher's exact test, analysis of variance, and linear or logistic regression. Results: The use of pre-RT chemotherapy appears to increase the rate of radiation-induced pneumonitis (p = 0.009-0.07), but has no consistent impact on changes in PFTs. The degree of induction chemotherapy-associated tumor shrinkage is not associated with the rate of subsequent RT-associated pulmonary toxicity. The degree of tumor response to chemotherapy is not related to the degree of tumor response to RT. Conclusions: Additional study is needed to better clarify the impact of chemotherapy on radiation-associated disfunction

  17. Multitriggered Tumor-Responsive Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Protein and Polypeptide Coassembly for Enhanced Photodynamic Tumor Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fenfang; Zou, Qianli; Li, Yongxin; Ma, Guanghui; Yan, Xuehai

    2016-11-01

    Tumor-responsive nanocarriers are highly valuable and demanded for smart drug delivery particularly in the field of photodynamic therapy (PDT), where a quick release of photosensitizers in tumors is preferred. Herein, it is demonstrated that protein-based nanospheres, prepared by the electrostatic assembly of proteins and polypeptides with intermolecular disulfide cross-linking and surface polyethylene glycol coupling, can be used as versatile tumor-responsive drug delivery vehicles for effective PDT. These nanospheres are capable of encapsulation of various photosensitizers including Chlorin e6 (Ce6), protoporphyrin IX, and verteporfin. The Chlorin e6-encapsulated nanospheres (Ce6-Ns) are responsive to changes in pH, redox potential, and proteinase concentration, resulting in multitriggered rapid release of Ce6 in an environment mimicking tumor tissues. In vivo fluorescence imaging results indicate that Ce6-Ns selectively accumulate near tumors and the quick release of Ce6 from Ce6-Ns can be triggered by tumors. In tumors the fluorescence of released Ce6 from Ce6-Ns is observed at 0.5 h postinjection, while in normal tissues the fluorescence appeared at 12 h postinjection. Tumor ablation is demonstrated by in vivo PDT using Ce6-Ns and the biocompatibility of Ce6-Ns is evident from the histopathology imaging, confirming the enhanced in vivo PDT efficacy and the biocompatibility of the assembled drug delivery vehicles. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer in Monitoring Glioblastoma (GBM) Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun; Stanisz, Greg J

    2018-02-06

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) was used as a biomarker to monitor glioblastoma (GBM) response to chemo-radiation and identify the earliest time-point qMT could differentiate progressors from non-progressors. Nineteen GBM patients were recruited and MRI-scanned before (Day 0 ), two weeks (Day 14 ), and four weeks (Day 28 ) into the treatment, and one month after the end of the treatment (Day 70 ). Comprehensive qMT data was acquired, and a two-pool MT model was fit to the data. Response was determined at 3-8 months following the end of chemo-radiation. The amount of magnetization transfer ([Formula: see text]) was significantly lower in GBM compared to normal appearing white matter (p GBM are more sensitive to treatment effects compared to clinically used metrics. qMT could assess tumor aggressiveness and identify early progressors even before the treatment. Changes in qMT parameters within the first 14 days of the treatment were capable of separating early progressors from non-progressors, making qMT a promising biomarker to guide adaptive radiotherapy for GBM.

  19. Hypoxic Response of Tumor Tissues in a Microfluidic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morshed, Adnan; Dutta, Prashanta

    2017-11-01

    Inside a tumor tissue, cells growing further away from the blood vessel often suffer from low oxygen levels known as hypoxia. Cancer cells have shown prolonged survival in hostile hypoxic conditions by sharply changing the cellular metabolism. In this work, different stages of growth of the tumor tissue and the oxygen transport across the tissue are investigated. The tissue was modeled as a contiguous block of cells inside a microfluidic environment with nutrient transport through advection and diffusion. While oxygen uptake inside the tissue is through diffusion, ascorbate transport from the extracellular medium is addressed by a concentration dependent uptake model. By varying the experimentally observed oxygen consumption rate, different types of cancer cells and their normoxic and hypoxic stages were studied. Even when the oxygen supply in the channel is maintained at normoxic levels, our results show the onset of hypoxia within minutes inside the cellblock. Interestingly, modeled cell blocks with and without a structured basal layer showed less than 5% variation in hypoxic response in chronic hypoxia. Results also indicate that the balance of cell survival and growth are affected by the flow rate of nutrients and the oxygen consumption rate. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMS 1317671.

  20. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Seoane

    Full Text Available Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS, crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12. Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  1. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes

  2. Are Breast Tumor Stem Cells Responsible for Metastasis and Angiogenesis?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pan, Quintin

    2005-01-01

    .... The current dogma of metastasis is that most primary tumor cells have low metastatic potential, but rare cells, less than one in ten million, within large primary tumors acquire metastatic capacity...

  3. Regulation of bitter taste responses by tumor necrosis factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Pu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Kim, Agnes; Chai, Jinghua; Simon, Nirvine; Zhou, Minliang; Bachmanov, Alexander A; Huang, Liquan; Wang, Hong

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory cytokines are important regulators of metabolism and food intake. Over production of inflammatory cytokines during bacterial and viral infections leads to anorexia and reduced food intake. However, it remains unclear whether any inflammatory cytokines are involved in the regulation of taste reception, the sensory mechanism governing food intake. Previously, we showed that tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent proinflammatory cytokine, is preferentially expressed in a subset of taste bud cells. The level of TNF in taste cells can be further induced by inflammatory stimuli. To investigate whether TNF plays a role in regulating taste responses, in this study, we performed taste behavioral tests and gustatory nerve recordings in TNF knockout mice. Behavioral tests showed that TNF-deficient mice are significantly less sensitive to the bitter compound quinine than wild-type mice, while their responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are comparable to those of wild-type controls. Furthermore, nerve recording experiments showed that the chorda tympani nerve in TNF knockout mice is much less responsive to bitter compounds than that in wild-type mice. Chorda tympani nerve responses to sweet, umami, salty, and sour compounds are similar between TNF knockout and wild-type mice, consistent with the results from behavioral tests. We further showed that taste bud cells express the two known TNF receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2 and, therefore, are potential targets of TNF. Together, our results suggest that TNF signaling preferentially modulates bitter taste responses. This mechanism may contribute to taste dysfunction, particularly taste distortion, associated with infections and some chronic inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Tumor-associated fibrosis as a regulator of tumor immunity and response to immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Hegde, Samarth; DeNardo, David G

    2017-08-01

    Tumor-associated fibrosis is characterized by unchecked pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory signaling. The components of fibrosis including significant numbers of cancer-associated fibroblasts, dense collagen deposition, and extracellular matrix stiffness, are well appreciated regulators of tumor progression but may also be critical regulators of immune surveillance. While this suggests that the efficacy of immunotherapy may be limited in highly fibrotic cancers like pancreas, it also suggests a therapeutic opportunity to target fibrosis in these tumor types to reawaken anti-tumor immunity. This review discusses the mechanisms by which fibrosis might subvert tumor immunity and how to overcome these mechanisms.

  5. Response of melanoma tumor phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea: a high resolution proton NMR spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morvan, Daniel; Demidem, Aïcha; Madelmont, Jean-Claude

    2003-07-01

    Phospholipid metabolism is tightly involved in tumor growth regulation and tumor cell survival. The response of phospholipid metabolism to chloroethyle nitrosourea treatment is investigated in a murine B16 melanoma model. Measurements of phospholipid derivatives are performed on intact tumor tissue samples using one- and two-dimensional proton NMR spectroscopy. During the tumor growth inhibition phase under treatment, tumors overexpress phosphocholine, phosphoethanolamine, glycerophosphocholine and glycerophosphoethanolamine, whereas phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine levels are maintained to control levels. During re-growth, which remained quantitatively much below control growth, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors overexpress phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine only. In treated melanoma, phosphatidylcholine levels show an inverse relationship with tumor growth rates. In conclusion, chloroethyle nitrosourea-treated melanoma tumors maintain their phosphatidylcholine levels and exhibit transformed phospholipid metabolism phenotype, by mechanisms that could participate in tumor cell survival.

  6. Response comparative study of Rn-222 alpha particles track monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Osvaldo Luiz dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    This work was a comparative study between the responses of three monitors, the NRPB, an acrylic monitor (in thin film geometry) and the aluminum monitor (also thin film geometry) in controlled and mixed environment. The experiments consisted on placing the monitors in a plastic tube, with a radio-226 source internal. Only internal CR-39 plastic detectors were analyzed in this work. It was found that the monitors in thin film geometry had activities response of approximately 15% less than the NRPB monitors. All monitors responded the same way when in controlled environment. Related to the type of material, conductive plastic or dielectric (insulator) plastic, the NRPB, in environments without ventilation, responded in the same way. (author)

  7. Reliability updating based on monitoring of structural response parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leira, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Short- and long-term aspects of measuring structural response parameters are addressed. Two specific examples of such measurements are considered for the purpose of illustration and in order to focus the discussion. These examples are taken from the petroleum industry (monitoring of riser response) and from the shipping industry (monitoring of ice-induced strains in a ship hull). Similarities and differences between the two cases are elaborated with respect to which are the most relevant mechanical limit states. Furthermore, main concerns related to reliability levels within a short-term versus long-term time horizon are highlighted. Quantifying the economic benefits of applying monitoring systems is also addressed. - Highlights: • Two examples of structural response monitoring are described. • Application of measurements is discussed in relation to updating of load and structural parameters. • Quantification of the value of response monitoring is made for both of the examples.

  8. Cells responsible for tumor surveillance in man: effects of radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and biologic response modifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reizenstein, P.; Ogier, C.; Blomgren, H.; Petrini, B.; Wasserman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Currently, the most probable theory of tumor surveillance is neither the existence of any tumor-specific, antigen-dependent, T-cell-mediated cytotoxic effect that could eliminate spontaneous tumors in man and that could be used for some kind of vaccination against tumors, nor the complete absence of any surveillance or defense systems against tumors. What is probable is the cooperation of a number of antigen-independent, relatively weakly cytotoxic or possibly only cytostatic humoral and cellular effects, including nutritional immunity, tumor necrosis factor, certain cytokines, and the cytotoxic effects mediated by macrophages, NK cells, NK-like cells, and certain stimulated T-cells. One question remaining to be solved is why these antigen-independent effects do not attack normal cells. A number of plausible hypotheses are discussed. The hypothetical surveillance system is modulated both by traditional cancer treatment and by attempts at immunomodulation. Radiotherapy reduced the T-helper cell function for almost a decade, but not those of macrophages or NK cells. T-cell changes have no prognostic implication, supporting, perhaps, the suggestion of a major role for macrophages and NK cells. Cyclic adjuvant chemotherapy reduces the peripheral lymphocyte population and several lymphocyte functions but not NK activity. Most of the parameters were normalized some years following treatment, but NK activity remained elevated and Th/Ts cell ratio was still decreased. This might possibly be taken to support the surveillance role of NK cells. Bestatin increases the frequency of lymphocytes forming rosettes with sheep red blood cells (but not their mitogenic responses), enhances NK activity, and augments the phagocytic capacity of granulocytes and monocytes (but not their cytotoxic activity). 154 references

  9. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal 1H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P; Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S; Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C; Gauduel, Y A; Dou, W; Ruan, S; Barre, L; Rioult, F; Derlon, J M; Chapon, F; Fong, V; Kauffmann, F

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  10. Effects of reactive oxygen species on metabolism monitored by longitudinal {sup 1}H single voxel MRS follow-up in patients with mitochondrial disease or cerebral tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constans, J M; Collet, S; Hossu, G; Courtheoux, P [MRI Unit, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Guillamo, J S; Lechapt-Zalcman, E; Valable, S [CERVOxy Group, CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen, Normandy (France); Lacombe, S; Houee Levin, C [Paris-Sud 11 University-CNRS, Orsay (France); Gauduel, Y A [LOA, Ecole Polytechnique - ENSTA ParisTech, Palaiseau (France); Dou, W [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Ruan, S [CReSTIC EA 3804, IUT Troyes, Troyes (France); Barre, L [GDMTEP, Group CI-NAPS, UMR 6232 CI-NAPS, Cyceron, Caen (France); Rioult, F [CNRS UMR 6072, GREYC, Caen, Normandy (France); Derlon, J M [Neurosurgery and Neurology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Chapon, F [Pathology, Caen University Hospital, Caen, Normandy (France); Fong, V [Caen University (France); Kauffmann, F, E-mail: constans-jm@chu-caen.fr [Mathematics LMNO CNRS UMR 6139, Caen University, Caen, Normandy (France)

    2011-01-01

    Free radicals, or Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), have an effect on energy and glycolytic metabolism, mitochondrial function, lipid metabolism, necrosis and apoptosis, cell proliferation, and infiltration. These changes could be monitored longitudinally (every 4 months over 6 years) in humans with glial brain tumors (low and high grade) after therapy, using conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) and MR perfusion. Some examples of early clinical data from longitudinal follow-up monitoring in humans of energy and glycolytic metabolism, lipid metabolism, necrosis, proliferation, and infiltration measured by conventional MRI, MRS and perfusion, and positron emission tomography (PET) are shown in glial brain tumors after therapy. Despite the difficulty, the variability and unknown factors, these repeated measurements give us a better insight into the nature of the different processes, tumor progression and therapeutic response.

  11. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging allows monitoring the effect of combretastatin A4 phosphate on rabbit implanted VX2 tumor model: 12-Day dynamic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shao Haibo; Ni Yicheng; Dai Xu; Zhang Jian; Chen Feng; Fan, Guoguang; Sun Ziping; Li Yaming; Zhou Hongxu; Xu Ke

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the 12-day dynamic characteristics of tumor response to intravenous administration of CA4P in rabbit VX2 tumor models. Methods: Study protocol was approved by local ethical committee for animal care and use. Sixteen rabbits with 32 tumors on bilateral legs were randomly divided into treated and control groups. Conventional and DWI images were acquired before and 24 h, 4 days, 8 days and 12 days after treatment. The dynamic changes of tumor on images were correlated with histological results. ADCs were compared among and between groups at different time points. Results: The tumors in treated group grew slower than those in control group. In treaded group, the mean ADC decreased slightly at 24 h point due to cell edema caused by ischemia. Then, it increased significantly at 4 days and 8 days because of progressive central necrosis. Finally, peripheral tumor proliferation caused a second decrease of ADC at 12 days. The significant difference of ΔADC% between the two groups at 24 h, 4 days and 8 days indicated that the change of ADC in treated group was really caused by CA4P. Conclusion: The dynamic histological changes of tumor caused by CA4P as reflected exactly by diffusion-weighted MR imaging indicate a noninvasive measure for monitoring tumor vascular targeting treatment.

  12. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Leten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683 in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1 outliers can be detected earlier, (2 GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3 a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents.

  13. Angiogenesis for tumor vascular normalization of Endostar on hepatoma 22 tumor-bearing mice is involved in the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingyu; Gu, Junfei; Lv, You; Yuan, Jiarui; Yang, Nan; Chen, Juan; Wang, Chunfei; Hou, Xuefeng; Jia, Xiaobin; Feng, Liang; Yin, Guowen

    2018-03-01

    Tumor vascular normalization involved in immune response is beneficial to the chemotherapy of tumors. Recombinant human endostatin (Endostar), an angiogenesis inhibitor, has been demonstrated to be effective in hepatocellular cancer (HCC). However, its vascular normalization in HCC and the role of the immune response in angiogenesis were unclear. In the present study, effects of Endostar on tumor vascular normalization were evaluated in hepatoma 22 (H22) tumor-bearing mice. Endostar was able to inhibit the proliferation and infiltration of tumor cells and improve α-fetoprotein, tumor necrosis factor-α and cyclic adenosine 5'-phosphate levels in the serum of H22-bearing mice, as well as the protein expression levels of the immune factors interferon-γ and cluster of differentiation (CD)86 in liver tissue. Endostar also exhibited more marked downregulation of the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor, CD31, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and interleukin-17 during day 3-9 treatment, resulting in short-term normalization of tumor blood vessels. The period of vascular normalization was 3-9 days. The results of the present study demonstrated that Endostar was able to induce the period of vascular normalization, contributing to a more efficacious means of HCC treatment combined with other chemotherapy, and this effect was associated with the immune response. It may be concluded that Endostar inhibited immunity-associated angiogenesis behaviors of vascular endothelial cells in response to HCC. The results of the present study provided more reasonable possibility for the combination therapy of Endostar for the treatment of HCC.

  14. WE-FG-202-02: Exploration of High-Resolution Quantitative Ultrasonic Micro-Vascular Imaging for Early Assessment of Radiotherapy Tumor Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasoji, S; Rivera, J; Dayton, P [University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Buse, J [UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); Chang, S [University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill/ North Carolina State University, Chapel Hill, NC (United States); UNC School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Currently, we cannot predict an individual patient’s response to a given radiotherapy which normally is not detected for weeks to months post-treatment. As a result, precious time is wasted for patients with unresponsive tumors who could have switched to an alternative treatment much earlier. Presently, no early treatment response detection method exists that is effective, low-cost, non-invasive, and safe. We hypothesize that changes in tumor microvasculature predict tumor response to radiotherapy earlier than tumor volume changes. Recent radiobiology research suggests tumors undergo vascular remodeling in response to radiation well before manifesting changes in tumor volume. We propose monitoring tumor microvasculature post-radiation using Acoustic Angiography (AA), a novel ultrasound imaging modality developed and patented in-house. In this study, we investigate whether changes in tumor microvasculature, measured using AA, can be an early indicator of high-dose radiotherapy success, compared to changes in tumor volume. Methods: Fibrosarcoma xenograft tumor tissue was subcutaneously implanted into rodent flanks (N=10). Animal tumors (N=8) were irradiated with a single treatment of 15Gy using a clinical LINAC at 100SSD and 2×2cm field size. Two untreated rats were left as tumor controls. AA imaging was performed immediately posttreatment and every third day thereafter for 30 days, or until tumors disappeared. Tumor volumes and vascular densities were measured from anatomical b-mode ultrasound and AA images, respectively. Results: Statistical differences in vascular density between treatment responders and non-responders were observed on Day 10 (p=0.005), whereas statistical differences in tumor volume were not observed until Day 19 (p=0.02). Conclusions: Tumor vascularity differences may be observed substantially earlier than differences in tumor size. In addition, significant early increases in vascular density were observed in non-responding tumors

  15. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plathow, Christian [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen [Eberhard-Karls University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Therapy, Clinic for Thoracic Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2{+-}0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5{+-}0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0{+-}0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5{+-}0.6 vs. 2.0{+-}0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7{+-}0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  16. Therapy monitoring using dynamic MRI: Analysis of lung motion and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plathow, Christian; Hof, Holger; Kuhn, Sabine; Puderbach, Michael; Ley, Sebastian; Biederer, Juergen; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D.; Schaefer, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.; Tuengerthal, Siegfried

    2006-01-01

    A frequent side effect after radiotherapy of lung tumors is a decrease of pulmonary function accompanied by dyspnea due to developing lung fibrosis. The aim of this study was to monitor lung motion as a correlate of pulmonary function and intrathoracic tumor mobility before and after radiotherapy (RT) using dynamic MRI (dMRI). Thirty-five patients with stage I non-small-cell lung carcinoma were examined using dMRI (trueFISP; three images/s). Tumors were divided into T1 and T2 tumors of the upper, middle and lower lung region (LR). Maximum craniocaudal (CC) lung dimensions and tumor mobility in three dimensions were monitored. Vital capacity (VC) was measured and correlated using spirometry. Before RT, the maximum CC motion of the tumor-bearing hemithorax was 5.2±0.9 cm if the tumor was located in the lower LR (middle LR: 5.5±0.8 cm; upper LR: 6.0±0.6 cm). After RT, lung motion was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.05). Before RT, the maximum CC tumor mobility was significantly higher in tumors of the lower LR 2.5±0.6 vs. 2.0±0.3 cm (middle LR; P<0.05) vs. 0.7±0.2 cm (upper LR; P<0.01). After RT, tumor mobility was significantly reduced in the lower LR (P<0.01) and in T2 tumor patients (P<0.05). VC showed no significant changes. dMRI is capable of monitoring changes in lung motion that were not suspected from spirometry. This might make the treatment of side effects possible at a very early stage. Changes of lung motion and tumor mobility are highly dependent on the tumor localization and tumor diameter. (orig.)

  17. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kal, H.B. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Struikmans, H. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Medical Centre Haaglanden, Westeinde Hospital, The Hague (Netherlands); Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E. [Dept. of Medical Oncology, Univ. Medical Centre Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2004-12-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  18. Response of rat prostate and lung tumors to ionizing radiation combined with the angiogenesis inhibitor AMCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kal, H.B.; Struikmans, H.; Gebbink, M.F.B.G.; Voest, E.E.

    2004-01-01

    Aim: to determine whether radiation combined with Trans-4-AminoMethyl cyclohexane carboxylic acid (AMCA, or tranexamic acid, Cyklokapron registered) results in a better tumor response than radiation alone. Materials and methods: we evaluated the responses of the L44 lung tumor in BN rats and R3327-MATLyLu (MLL) prostate tumor in Copenhagen rats, to single and fractionated X-ray doses with and without AMCA (1.5 g/kg). Tumors were grown subcutaneously in the flank of the animal. AMCA was administered subcutaneously twice daily for at least 2 weeks. Response to treatment was evaluated according to excess growth delay and specific growth delay. Results: L44 and MLL tumors treated with AMCA only experienced a non-significant growth delay. L44 tumors treated with 4 daily dose fractions of 2.5 Gy had a significant excess and specific growth delay when treated with AMCA, the enhancement ratio was 1.6-1.7. The enhancement ratio based on the calculated excess biologically effective dose of the linear-quadratic concept was 1.4-1.5. MLL tumors treated with a single dose of 20 Gy and AMCA had no significant excess growth delay. Conclusion: the enhancement ratio of 1.4-1.7 for the L44 tumor, but not for the MLL tumor, due to AMCA treatment, indicates that AMCA may potentiate the anti-tumor effect of ionizing radiation in distinct tumor types. (orig.)

  19. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  20. Sensor response time monitoring using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Holbert, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Random noise techniques in nuclear power plants have been developed for system surveillance and for analysis of reactor core dynamics. The noise signals also contain information about sensor dynamics, and this can be extracted using frequency, amplitude and time domain analyses. Even though noise analysis has been used for sensor response time testing in some nuclear power plants, an adequate validation of this method has never been carried out. This paper presents the results of limited work recently performed to examine the validity of the noise analysis for sensor response time testing in nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that noise analysis has the potential for detecting gross changes in sensor response but it cannot be used for reliable measurement of response time until more laboratory and field experience is accumulated. The method is more advantageous for testing pressure sensors than it is for temperature sensors. This is because: 1) for temperature sensors, a method called Loop Current Step Response test is available which is quantitatively more exact than noise analysis, 2) no method currently exists for on-line testing of pressure transmitters other than the Power-Interrupt test which is applicable only to force balance pressure transmitters, and 3) pressure sensor response time is affected by sensing line degradation which is inherently taken into account by testing with noise analysis. (author)

  1. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  2. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET Imaging for Monitoring Everolimus Effect on Tumor-Growth in Neuroendocrine Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnbeck, Camilla Bardram; Munk Jensen, Mette; Nielsen, Carsten Haagen

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors...

  3. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the tumor temperature during hyperthermia (HT), and on the cytotoxic effect of HT, was studied in the BT 4 An tumor transplanted to the hind limb of BD IX rats. Experiments with two different anesthetics, pentobarbital and the midazolam/fentanyl/fluanisone combination (MFF), were performed to secure reliable conclusions. Methods and Materials: In the tumor response experiments local waterbath HT at 44.0 deg. C was given for 60 min. Sodium nitroprusside was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion to lower the MAP to 60 or 80 mmHg during HT. In two other experiments the temperature at the base of the tumor during HT was measured before and during SNP infusion. In animals without tumor the temperature was measured subcutaneously on the foot during HT with or without SNP-induced hypotension. Results: When SNP was given to lower the MAP to 60 mmHg during HT in MFF anesthetized animals, the median tumor growth time (TGT) was 70 days, compared to 14.5 days in the HT alone group. The corresponding figures were 127 and 12.1 days with pentobarbital anesthesia. In the HT + SNP group, more than 40% cure was observed in both experiments. No cures were seen in any of the other groups. Hyperthermia alone prolonged the TGT slightly, whereas SNP given alone had no effect, compared to controls. When the MAP was lowered to 80 mmHg by SNP infusion during HT (MFF anesthesia), the median TGT was 19.9 days, which was significantly longer than that in the HT alone group (10.9 days). In the MAP range from 60 to 120 mmHg, a nearly linear relationship between the MAP and the tumor temperature was found during HT in MFF anesthetized animals. With both anesthetics, the median temperature at the base of the tumor was about 0.8 deg. C higher during HT when the MAP was lowered to 60 mmHg by SNP. In animals without tumors, the temperature subcutaneously on the foot was 0

  4. Complete clinical response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in a 54-year-old male with Askin tumor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, J

    2012-02-01

    Askin tumor is a tumor of the thoracopulmonary region that most commonly affects children and adolescents. These rare tumors are a form of primitive neuroectodermal tumor and typically carry a poor prognosis. Treatment is multimodal and consists of a combination of neoadjuvant chemotherapy, radical resection, and adjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy or all of the above. Surgery is advocated in most cases. We report a case of Askin tumor in a 54-year-old male who showed rapid and complete response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. This allowed potentially radical surgery to be avoided. At one-year follow-up he remains disease-free.

  5. Circulating tumor DNA changes for early monitoring of anti-PD1 immunotherapy: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabel, L; Riva, F; Servois, V; Livartowski, A; Daniel, C; Rampanou, A; Lantz, O; Romano, E; Milder, M; Buecher, B; Piperno-Neumann, S; Bernard, V; Baulande, S; Bieche, I; Pierga, J Y; Proudhon, C; Bidard, F-C

    2017-08-01

    Recent clinical results support the use of new immune checkpoint blockers (ICB), such as anti-PD-1 (e.g. nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 antibodies. Radiological evaluation of ICB efficacy during therapy is challenging due to tumor immune infiltration. Changes of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) levels during therapy could be a promising tool for very accurate monitoring of treatment efficacy, but data are lacking with ICB. This prospective pilot study was conducted in patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer, uveal melanoma, or microsatellite-instable colorectal cancer treated by nivolumab or pembrolizumab monotherapy at Institut Curie. ctDNA levels were assessed at baseline and after 8 weeks (w8) by bidirectional pyrophosphorolysis-activated polymerization, droplet digital PCR or next-generation sequencing depending on the mutation type. Radiological evaluation of efficacy of treatment was carried out by using immune-related response criteria. ctDNA was detected at baseline in 10 out of 15 patients. At w8, a significant correlation (r = 0.86; P = 0.002) was observed between synchronous changes in ctDNA levels and tumor size. Patients in whom ctDNA levels became undetectable at w8 presented a marked and lasting response to therapy. ctDNA detection at w8 was also a significant prognostic factor in terms of progression-free survival (hazard ratio = 10.2; 95% confidence interval 2.5-41, P < 0.001) and overall survival (hazard ratio = 15; 95% confidence interval 2.5-94.9, P = 0.004). This proof-of-principle study is the first to demonstrate that quantitative ctDNA monitoring is a valuable tool to assess tumor response in patients treated with anti-PD-1 drugs. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Significance of serum tumor markers monitoring in carcinomas of unknown primary site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejčić Ivica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Unknown primary tumors represent a heterogeneous group of malignancies that are indicative of ominous prognosis. Cancer of unknown primary site (CUP is defined as the lack of any detectable primary site after full evaluation, and accounts for approximately 3-5% of all newly diagnosed patients with malignancies. The aim of this report was to present the prognostic and predictive value of 8 serum tumor markers in this group of patients. Methods. The study involved 63 patients. On histological examination, all the patients were presented with metastatic tumors whose primary site (origin could not be detected with noninvasive diagnostic techniques. Following the routine light microscopy, all histological findings were classified into one of the following three groups: plano-cellular carcinoma - 8 patients; adenocarcinoma - 33 patients; unclassifiable (undifferentiated carcinoma - 22 patients. In all the cases we evaluated 8 serum tumor markers: alpha-fetoproteins (AFP, chronic gonadotrophin beta submit, human (beta-HCG, neuron specific enolase (NSE, marker of malignant ovarian tumors (CA 125, prostate-specific antigene (PSA, marker of malignant brest tumor (CA 15-3, marker of malignant pancreas tumor and gastrointestinal tumor (Ca 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA at the time of diagnosis. The patients on chemotherapy had the markers determined after the third and sixth chemocycle, i.e. at the time of illness progression observation, if present. The patients responding to chemotherapy with complete response (CR, partial response (PR or stable disease (SD had the markers determined after three-month periods until the time of relapse or progression. Chemotherapy was applied in 32 patients (20 females and 12 males, aged 29-70 years, who met the inclusion criteria. The following chemotherapy regimen was used: doxorubicin 50mg/m2 (day 1, cisplatin 60mg/m2 (day 1, and etoposide 120 mg/m2 (days 1-3. The period between two chemotherapy

  7. Post decommissioning monitoring of uranium mines; a watershed monitoring program based on biological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, C.; Coggan, A.; Ludgate, I.

    2006-01-01

    Rio Algom Limited and Denison Mines own and operated uranium mines in the Elliot Lake area. The mines operated from the late 1950's to the mid 1960's and again for the early 1970's to the 1990's when the mines ceased operations. There are eleven decommissioned mines in the Serpent River watershed. At the time of decommissioning each mine had it's own monitoring program, which had evolved over the operating life of the mine and did not necessarily reflect the objectives associated with the monitoring of decommissioned sites. In order to assess the effectiveness of the decommissioning plans and monitoring the cumulative effects within the watershed, a single watershed monitoring program was developed in 1999: the Serpent River Watershed Monitoring Program which focused on water and sediment quality within the watershed and response of the biological community over time. In order to address other 'source area' monitoring, three complimentary objective-focused programs were developed 1) the In- Basin Monitoring Program, 2) the Source Area Monitoring Program and 3) the TMA Operational Monitoring Program. Through development this program framework and monitoring programs that were objective- focused, more meaningful data has been provided while providing a significant reduction in the cost of monitoring. These programs allow for the reduction in scope over time in response to improvement in the watershed. This talk will describe the development of these programs, their implementation and effectiveness. (author)

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  9. Measuring Emotional Responses to TV Commercials: The Warmth Monitor Modernized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Roy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a lot of interest in measuring emotional responses to advertising. This study focuses on the measurement of a specific emotional response to television advertising; warmth. Nearly thirty years ago, (Aaker, Stayman and Hagerty, 1986 developed a procedure they called the Warmth Monitor; “paper and pencil” self-report process recording method. The Warmth Monitor has been used in a large number of empirical studies in marketing since, but the most recent versions of the procedure are computerized. The two methods of administering the Warmth Monitor are compared in this research.

  10. Macrophage biology plays a central role during ionizing radiation-elicited tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuji Wu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the major therapeutic modalities for most solid tumors. The anti-tumor effect of radiation therapy consists of the direct tumor cell killing, as well as the modulation of tumor microenvironment and the activation of immune response against tumors. Radiation therapy has been shown to promote immunogenic cells death, activate dendritic cells and enhance tumor antigen presentation and anti-tumor T cell activation. Radiation therapy also programs innate immune cells such as macrophages that leads to either radiosensitization or radioresistance, according to different tumors and different radiation regimen studied. The mechanisms underlying radiation-induced macrophage activation remain largely elusive. Various molecular players such as NF-κB, MAPKs, p53, reactive oxygen species, inflammasomes have been involved in these processes. The skewing to a pro-inflammatory phenotype thus results in the activation of anti-tumor immune response and enhanced radiotherapy effect. Therefore, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of radiation-induced macrophage activation and its role in tumor response to radiation therapy is crucial for the development of new therapeutic strategies to enhance radiation therapy efficacy.

  11. Review of the clinical applications and technological advances of circulating tumor DNA in cancer monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi; Tolani, Bhairavi; Nie, Xiuhong; Zhi, Xiuyi; Hu, Mu; He, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) released by tumor cells, termed ctDNA, closely reflects the heterogeneity of primary cancers and their metastases. As a noninvasive, real-time monitoring biomarker, ctDNA is a promising tool for detecting driver gene mutations, assessing tumor burden and acquired resistance, and early diagnosis. However, isolation and enrichment of cfDNA is a big challenge due to the high degree of DNA fragmentation and its relatively low abundance in the bloodstream. This review aims to provide insights into the recent technological advances in acquisition of optimal quality cfDNA, the use of preservatives, isolation methods, processing timelines, and detection techniques. It also describes clinical applications of ctDNA in cancer patient management.

  12. Tumor suppressor maspin as a modulator of host immune response to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sijana H. Dzinic

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the promising clinical outcome, the primary challenge of the curative cancer immunotherapy is to overcome the dichotomy of the immune response: tumor-evoked immunostimulatory versus tumor-induced immunosuppressive. The goal needs to be two-fold, to re-establish sustainable antitumor-cancer immunity and to eliminate immunosuppression. The successful elimination of cancer cells by immunosurveillance requires the antigenic presentation of the tumor cells or tumor-associated antigens and the expression of immunostimulatory cytokines and chemokines by cancer and immune cells. Tumors are heterogeneous and as such, some of the tumor cells are thought to have stem cell characteristics that enable them to suppress or desensitize the host immunity due to acquired epigenetic changes. A central mechanism underlying tumor epigenetic instability is the increased histone deacetylase (HDAC-mediated repression of HDAC-target genes regulating homeostasis and differentiation. It was noted that pharmacological HDAC inhibitors are not effective in eliminating tumor cells partly because they may induce immunosuppression. We have shown that epithelial-specific tumor suppressor maspin, an ovalbumin-like non-inhibitory serine protease inhibitor, reprograms tumor cells toward better differentiated phenotypes by inhibiting HDAC1. Recently, we uncovered a novel function of maspin in directing host immunity towards tumor elimination. In this review, we discuss the maspin and maspin/HDAC1 interplay in tumor biology and immunology. We propose that maspin based therapies may eradicate cancer.

  13. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Monitoring Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanetz, Priscilla J; Moy, Linda; Baron, Paul; diFlorio, Roberta M; Green, Edward D; Heller, Samantha L; Holbrook, Anna I; Lee, Su-Ju; Lewin, Alana A; Lourenco, Ana P; Niell, Bethany; Stuckey, Ashley R; Trikha, Sunita; Vincoff, Nina S; Weinstein, Susan P; Yepes, Monica M; Newell, Mary S

    2017-11-01

    Patients with locally advanced invasive breast cancers are often treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgical intervention. The primary aims of this approach are to: 1) reduce tumor burden thereby permitting breast conservation rather than mastectomy; 2) promptly treat possible metastatic disease, whether or not it is detectable on preoperative staging; and 3) potentially tailor future chemotherapeutic decisions by monitoring in-vivo tumor response. Accurate radiological assessment permits optimal management and planning in this population. However, assessment of tumor size and response to treatment can vary depending on the modality used, the measurement technique (such as single longest diameter, 3-D measurements, or calculated tumor volume), and varied response of different tumor subtypes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (such as concentric shrinkage or tumor fragmentation). As discussed in further detail, digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, US and MRI represent the key modalities with potential to help guide patient management. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  15. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate Measured by Magnetic Resonance Volumetry Correlated With Pathologic Tumor Response of Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy for Rectal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Hong, Yong Sang; Chang, Hee Jin; Park, Ji Won; Lim, Seok-Byung; Choi, Hyo Seong; Jeong, Seung-Yong

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlates with the pathologic tumor response after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study included 405 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (cT3-T4) who had undergone preoperative CRT and radical proctectomy. The tumor volume was measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry before and after CRT but before surgery. We analyzed the correlation between the TVRR and the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and tumor regression grade (TRG). Downstaging was defined as ypStage 0-I (ypT0-T2N0M0), and the TRG proposed by Dworak et al. was used. Results: The mean TVRR was 65.0% ± 22.3%. Downstaging and complete regression occurred in 167 (41.2%) and 58 (14.3%) patients, respectively. The TVRRs according to ypT classification (ypT0-T2 vs. ypT3-T4), ypN classification (ypN0 vs. ypN1-N2), downstaging (ypStage 0-I vs. ypStage II-III), good regression (TRG 3-4 vs. TRG 1-2), and complete regression (TRG 4 vs. TRG 1-3) were all significantly different (p 80%), the rates of ypT0-T2, ypN0, downstaging, and good regression were all significantly greater for patients with a TVRR of ≥60%, as was the complete regression rate for patients with a TVRR >80% (p <.05). Conclusion: The TVRR measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest magnetic resonance volumetry correlated significantly with the pathologic tumor response in terms of downstaging and TRG after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer.

  16. Role of Interleukin-6 in the Radiation Response of Liver Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Miao-Fen; Hsieh, Ching-Chuan; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Lai, Chia-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of interleukin (IL)-6 in biological sequelae and tumor regrowth after irradiation for hepatic malignancy, which are critical for the clinical radiation response of liver tumors. Methods and Materials: The Hepa 1-6 murine hepatocellular cancer cell line was used to examine the radiation response by clonogenic assays and tumor growth delay in vivo. After irradiation in a single dose of 6 Gy in vitro or 15 Gy in vivo, biological changes including cell death and tumor regrowth were examined by experimental manipulation of IL-6 signaling. The effects of blocking IL-6 were assessed by cells preincubated in the presence of IL-6–neutralizing antibody for 24 hours or stably transfected with IL-6–silencing vectors. The correlations among tumor responses, IL-6 levels, and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) recruitment were examined using animal experiments. Results: Interleukin-6 expression was positively linked to irradiation and radiation resistance, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Interleukin-6–silencing vectors induced more tumor inhibition and DNA damage after irradiation. When subjects were irradiated with a sublethal dose, the regrowth of irradiated tumors significantly correlated with IL-6 levels and MDSC recruitment in vivo. Furthermore, blocking of IL-6 could overcome irradiation-induced MDSC recruitment and tumor regrowth after treatment. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that IL-6 is important in determining the radiation response of liver tumor cells. Irradiation-induced IL-6 and the subsequent recruitment of MDSC could be responsible for tumor regrowth. Therefore, treatment with concurrent IL-6 inhibition could be a potential therapeutic strategy for increasing the radiation response of tumors.

  17. Establishing a mobile automatic monitoring station for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A radiological/nuclear emergency event may cause environmental contamination. The emergency response works always need to plan an environmental survey programme incorporating the assessment results to see what is happening. The places where are assessed to have the highest radioactive contamination/radiation dose will catch more concern and need continuous monitoring. It will cause unnecessary dangers and dose to command that personnel conduct surveying in such places when the radiological/nuclear accident become more severe. A mobile automatic monitoring station has been established for emergency response by INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research) to solve the problem practically. The monitoring station involves a HPIC to monitor radiation dose, an anemometer to monitor wind speed and direction, a GPS to get position data, a GPRS/3G communication module to send monitoring and positioning data to the monitoring centre where can show the monitoring result directly on a map shown on the computer. These instruments are integrated in a trailer easy to be towed to the place need to be monitored. The electric power of the station is supplied by s a solar power energy system. It can supply the station working at least 10 days without extra electric power supply designed based on the expected time length of a nuclear power plant event. The HPIC is very sensitive and stable that can discriminate a 10 nSv/hr increasing of dose rate with the monitoring time period every ten seconds. Where the radiological dispersion device events happened is not predictable, it is difficult to get suitable wind monitoring data to assess the result of radiological dispersion device events. The anemometer added on the station can provide the real time wind monitoring data to help assessment works. (author)

  18. The combined status of ATM and p53 link tumor development with therapeutic response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Hai; Reinhardt, H Christian; Bartkova, Jirina

    2009-01-01

    commonly used by tumors to bypass early neoplastic checkpoints ultimately determine chemotherapeutic response and generate tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited with targeted therapies. Specifically, evaluation of the combined status of ATM and p53, two commonly mutated tumor suppressor...... genes, can help to predict the clinical response to genotoxic chemotherapies. We show that in p53-deficient settings, suppression of ATM dramatically sensitizes tumors to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, whereas, conversely, in the presence of functional p53, suppression of ATM or its downstream target Chk2...... actually protects tumors from being killed by genotoxic agents. Furthermore, ATM-deficient cancer cells display strong nononcogene addiction to DNA-PKcs for survival after DNA damage, such that suppression of DNA-PKcs in vivo resensitizes inherently chemoresistant ATM-deficient tumors to genotoxic...

  19. Optical fiber biocompatible sensors for monitoring selective treatment of tumors via thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Poeggel, Sven; Dinesh, Duraibabu B.; Macchi, Edoardo G.; Gallati, Mario; Braschi, Giovanni; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-09-01

    Thermal ablation (TA) is an interventional procedure for selective treatment of tumors, that results in low-invasive outpatient care. The lack of real-time control of TA is one of its main weaknesses. Miniature and biocompatible optical fiber sensors are applied to achieve a dense, multi-parameter monitoring, that can substantially improve the control of TA. Ex vivo measurements are reported performed on porcine liver tissue, to reproduce radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Our measurement campaign has a two-fold focus: (1) dual pressure-temperature measurement with a single probe; (2) distributed thermal measurement to estimate point-by-point cells mortality.

  20. Metabolic 19F MRI an dynamic 18F PET for chemotherapy monitoring in experimental tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Haberkorn, U.; Bellemann, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    The efficient clinical use of chemotherapeutic agents requires the assessment of the uptake and metabolism of the drugs in the tumor as well as in the various organs of the body by using noninvasive imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). In this overview, we present different metabolic 19 F MRI and dynamic 18 F PET techniques for noninvasive monitoring of fluorine-containing anticancer drugs and evaluate their potentials and limitations within the framework of experimental animal studies. (orig.) [de

  1. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  2. Effect of host age on the transplantation, growth, and radiation response of EMT6 tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of EMT6 tumors in young adult and aged BALB/c KaRw mice were compared. The number of tumor cells implanted s.c. necessary to cause tumors in 50% of the injection sites was lower in aging than in young adult mice. The latent period of intradermally implanted tumors was shorter in aging mice than in young animals; however, the growth curves of established tumors were similar. The number and appearance of lung colonies after injection of cells i.v. and the pattern of spontaneous metastases were similar in young and aged animals. Radiation dose-response curves for the cells of tumors in young and aging mice were different and suggested that the proportion of hypoxic cells was higher in tumors on aging animals. These findings suggest that both immunological and nonimmunological tumor-host interactions differ in young and aged animals and that such factors may influence the natural history of the tumor and the response of the tumor to treatment

  3. Model of avascular tumor growth and response to low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Aguirre, J M; Custidiano, E R

    2011-01-01

    A single level cellular automata model is described and used to simulate early tumor growth, and the response of the tumor cells under low dose radiation affects. In this model the cell cycle of the population of normal and cancer cells is followed. The invasion mechanism of the tumor is simulated by a local factor that takes into account the microenvironment hardness to cell development, in a picture similar to the AMTIH model. The response of normal and cancer cells to direct effects of radiation is tested for various models and a model of bystander response is implemented.

  4. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C P

    2015-01-01

    In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was

  5. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, I.; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the

  6. Can quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography predict cervical tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Chuan; Liu, Long-Zhong; Zheng, Wei [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Xie, Yan-Jun [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Zhongcun Town hospital, 140 Renmin Road, Zhongcun Town, Panyu District, Guangzhou, 511400 (China); Xiong, Yong-Hong; Li, An-Hua [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China); Pei, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: peixq@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Ultrasound, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center of Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, 651 Dongfeng Road East, Guangzhou, 510060 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • We assessed the clinical value of quantitative CEUS for prediction of cervical tumor perfusion response to NACT. • IMAX, RT, and TTP changed significantly after one NACT cycle. • Pre-treatment IMAX positively correlated with the absolute and percentage changes in all cervical tumor IMAX after NACT. • Pre-treatment IMAX may be predictive of NACT perfusion response in cervical tumor. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of quantitative contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) for predicting and assessing cervical tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). Methods: Thirty-eight cases with stage IB2 or IIA cervical cancer were studied using CEUS before and after one cycle of NACT. The quantitative CEUS parameters maximum intensity (IMAX), rise time (RT), time to peak (TTP), and mean transit time (MTT) were compared between cervical tumors and myometrium (reference zone) using Sonoliver software. Absolute and relative changes in quantitative CEUS parameters were also compared among complete response, partial response, and non-responsive groups. Correlations between pre-treatment IMAX and changes in quantitative parameters were assessed after one cycle of NACT. Results: There were significant changes in cervical tumor IMAX (P < 0.001), RT (P < 0.05), and TTP (P < 0.05) after one cycle of NACT. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors guidelines, the enrollments were divided into complete response, partial response, stable disease and progressive disease groups. There were no significant differences in quantitative CEUS parameters among complete response, partial response, and non-responsive groups (P > 0.05). In the stable disease group (n = 17), cervical tumor IMAX, RT, and TTP decreased significantly after NACT (P < 0.001). The absolute and percentage changes in IMAX were positively correlated with pre-treatment IMAX in all 38 patients (r = 0.576, P < 0.001 and r = 0.429, P < 0.001). Conclusion

  7. APOMAB, a La-specific monoclonal antibody, detects the apoptotic tumor response to life-prolonging and DNA-damaging chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fares Al-Ejeh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antineoplastic therapy may impair the survival of malignant cells to produce cell death. Consequently, direct measurement of tumor cell death in vivo is a highly desirable component of therapy response monitoring. We have previously shown that APOMAB representing the DAB4 clone of a La/SSB-specific murine monoclonal autoantibody is a malignant cell-death ligand, which accumulates preferentially in tumors in an antigen-specific and dose-dependent manner after DNA-damaging chemotherapy. Here, we aim to image tumor uptake of APOMAB (DAB4 and to define its biological correlates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Brisk tumor cell apoptosis is induced in the syngeneic EL4 lymphoma model after treatment of tumor-bearing mice with DNA-damaging cyclophosphamide/etoposide chemotherapy. Tumor and normal organ accumulation of Indium 111 ((111In-labeled La-specific DAB4 mAb as whole IgG or IgG fragments was quantified by whole-body static imaging and organ assay in tumor-bearing mice. Immunohistochemical measurements of tumor caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage, which are indicators of early and late apoptosis, respectively, were correlated with tumor accumulation of DAB4. Increased tumor accumulation of DAB4 was associated directly with both the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor cell death and DAB4 binding per dead tumor cell. Tumor DAB4 accumulation correlated with cumulative caspase-3 activation and PARP-1 cleavage as tumor biomarkers of apoptosis and was directly related to the extended median survival time of tumor-bearing mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Radiolabeled La-specific monoclonal antibody, DAB4, detected dead tumor cells after chemotherapy, rather than chemosensitive normal tissues of gut and bone marrow. DAB4 identified late apoptotic tumor cells in vivo. Hence, radiolabeled DAB4 may usefully image responses to human carcinoma therapy because DAB4 would capture the protracted cell death of carcinoma. We believe that the

  8. Splenomegaly and tumor marker response following selective internal radiation therapy for non-resectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shehata, M.; Yan, K.; Itoh, Seiji; King, J.; Glenn, D.; Quinn, R.; Morris, D.L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate changes in spleen size, the level of chromogranin A as a tumor marker, and the relationship between these two parameters before and 3 months after selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) for non-resectable liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumor (NET). Our first serious adverse event with this relatively new treatment is also discussed. A retrospective review of a prospective database identified patients with non-resectable liver metastases from NET who underwent SIRT between 2003 and 2007. Patients who underwent CT scans before and 3 months after treatment were included. The patients were divided into two groups: those with and without a 20% or more increase in splenic volume on the CT scans. The percentages of patients showing a tumor marker response in the two groups were then compared. Fourteen patients were included in the present analysis. A tumor marker response was seen in 6 of 7 patients (85.7%) who showed an increase in splenic volume of >20%, and in 3 of 7 patients (42.9%) without an increase in splenic volume (p=0.266). There was one death as a result of oesophageal variceal bleeding due to portal hypertension at 9 months after treatment. Splenic enlargement after SIRT may be associated with tumor marker response, although this could not be confirmed statistically in this study due to the small number of patients. Long-term splenomegaly and portal hypertension may be important complications of SIRT. This issue needs to be investigated further using a larger number of patients and longer follow-up. (author)

  9. The potential of tumor-derived exosomes for noninvasive cancer monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Theresa L

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TEX) are emerging as a new type of cancer biomarker. TEX are membrane-bound, virus-size vesicles of endocytic origin present in all body fluids of cancer patients. Based on the expanding albeit incomplete knowledge of their biogenesis, secretion by tumor cells and cancer cell-specific molecular and genetic contents, TEX are viewed as promising, clinically-relevant surrogates of cancer progression and response to therapy. Preliminary proteomic, genetic and functional profiling of tumor cell-derived or cancer plasma-derived exosomes confirms their unique characteristics. Alterations in protein or nucleic acid profiles of exosomes in plasma of cancer patients responding to therapies appear to correlate with clinical endpoints. However, methods for TEX isolation and separation from the bulk of human plasma-derived exosomes are not yet established and their role as biomarkers remains to be confirmed. Further development and validation of TEX as noninvasive, liquid equivalents of tumor biopsies are necessary to move this effort forward.

  10. Tumor localization and biochemical response to cure in tumor-induced osteomalacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, William H; Andreopoulou, Panagiota; Chen, Clara C; Reynolds, James; Guthrie, Lori; Kelly, Marilyn; Gafni, Rachel I; Bhattacharyya, Nisan; Boyce, Alison M; El-Maouche, Diala; Crespo, Diana Ovejero; Sherry, Richard; Chang, Richard; Wodajo, Felasfa M; Kletter, Gad B; Dwyer, Andrew; Collins, Michael T

    2013-06-01

    Tumor-induced osteomalacia (TIO) is a rare disorder of phosphate wasting due to fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23)-secreting tumors that are often difficult to locate. We present a systematic approach to tumor localization and postoperative biochemical changes in 31 subjects with TIO. All had failed either initial localization, or relocalization (in case of recurrence or metastases) at outside institutions. Functional imaging with ¹¹¹Indium-octreotide with single photon emission computed tomography (octreo-SPECT or SPECT/CT), and ¹⁸fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/CT (FDG-PET/CT) were performed, followed by anatomic imaging (CT, MRI). Selective venous sampling (VS) was performed when multiple suspicious lesions were identified or high surgical risk was a concern. Tumors were localized in 20 of 31 subjects (64.5%). Nineteen of 20 subjects underwent octreo-SPECT imaging, and 16 of 20 FDG-PET/CT imaging. Eighteen of 19 (95%) were positive on octreo-SPECT, and 14 of 16 (88%) on FDG-PET/CT. Twelve of 20 subjects underwent VS; 10 of 12 (83%) were positive. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were as follows: sensitivity = 0.95, specificity = 0.64, PPV = 0.82, and NPV = 0.88 for octreo-SPECT; sensitivity = 0.88, specificity = 0.36, PPV = 0.62, and NPV = 0.50 for FDG-PET/CT. Fifteen subjects had their tumor resected at our institution, and were disease-free at last follow-up. Serum phosphorus returned to normal in all subjects within 1 to 5 days. In 10 subjects who were followed for at least 7 days postoperatively, intact FGF23 (iFGF23) decreased to near undetectable within hours and returned to the normal range within 5 days. C-terminal FGF23 (cFGF23) decreased immediately but remained elevated, yielding a markedly elevated cFGF23/iFGF23 ratio. Serum 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ (1,25D) rose and exceeded the normal range. In this systematic approach to tumor

  11. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  12. A clinical trial comparing the responses of animal tumors receiving heat sensitizing drugs prior to whole body hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.K.; Forsyth, K.; Dewhirst, M.W.; Fuller, D.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Whole body hyperthermia (WBH) has rarely been found effective in inducing complete tumor responses. Recent in vitro studies showing that heat sensitizion is possible have renewed interest in this field. In this protocol, WBH is induced via a commercially available inductive device and maintained at 42 0 C for thirty minutes. The heat sensitizing drugs, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) methylglyoxal bis (guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) are administered 48 hours before, in accordance with in vitro studies. Goals of the study include evaluation of normal tissue toxicity and tumor response. Two normal dogs were treated to study acute toxicities before inception of the clinical trial. The gastrointestinal and hematopoietic systems were used to monitor toxicities using systems review and serial bloodwork. These studies and preliminary clinical results of observed tumor regression in dogs with lymphomas are discussed. Consistent changes in all patients included elevations in liver enzymes, creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and white blood cell counts, as well as, decreases in platelet counts. All changes were transient and clinical signs were not associated with them. Tumor volume reductions from 25% to 74% have been documented

  13. Validation of Heat Shock Protein 70 as a Tumor-Specific Biomarker for Monitoring the Outcome of Radiation Therapy in Tumor Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christine; Liebhardt, Michael E.; Schmid, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Hube, Kathrin; Specht, Hanno M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Schilling, Daniela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany); Gehrmann, Mathias; Stangl, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Siveke, Jens T. [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele, E-mail: Gabriele.multhoff@lrz.tum.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, frequently overexpress heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the cytosol, present it on their cell surface, and actively release it. Therefore, soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) was investigated as a potential tumor biomarker for monitoring the outcome of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plasma from mice bearing membrane Hsp70 (mHsp70)-positive FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and spontaneous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) was investigated. A cohort of mice with FaDu tumors (0.32 cm{sup 3}) was irradiated with 30 Gy, and plasma was collected 24 hours after irradiation, after the tumors had shrunk to 50% of their starting volume and after complete remission. sHsp70 levels in the plasma were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: sHsp70 levels were significantly higher in the blood of tumor-bearing mice than that of control animals. A correlation between increasing sHsp70 plasma levels and tumor volume in the range of 0.01 cm{sup 3} to 0.66 cm{sup 3} was observed. Radiation-induced regression of the tumors was associated with significantly decreased sHsp70 levels, which returned to the level of control animals after complete remission. Conclusion: We propose sHsp70 as an innovative biomarker for detecting tumors and for monitoring the clinical outcome of radiation therapy in cancer patients.

  14. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  15. Monitoring mammary tumor progression and effect of tamoxifen treatment in MMTV-PymT using MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar Butt, Sadia; Søgaard, Lise V.; Ardenkjær-Larsen, Jan Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To use dynamic magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of hyperpolarized 13C-pyruvate to follow the progress over time in vivo of breast cancer metabolism in the MMTV-PymT model, and to follow the response to the anti-estrogen drug tamoxifen. Methods: Tumor growth was monitored by anatomical...... significantly in the treated group. Conclusion: These hyperpolarized 13C MRS findings indicate that tumor metabolic changes affects kP. The measured kp did not relate to treatment response to the same extent as did tumor growth, histological evaluation, and in vitro determination of LDH activity. © 2014 Wiley...

  16. Enhanced responses to tumor immunization following total body irradiation are time-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Diab

    Full Text Available The development of successful cancer vaccines is contingent on the ability to induce effective and persistent anti-tumor immunity against self-antigens that do not typically elicit immune responses. In this study, we examine the effects of a non-myeloablative dose of total body irradiation on the ability of tumor-naïve mice to respond to DNA vaccines against melanoma. We demonstrate that irradiation followed by lymphocyte infusion results in a dramatic increase in responsiveness to tumor vaccination, with augmentation of T cell responses to tumor antigens and tumor eradication. In irradiated mice, infused CD8(+ T cells expand in an environment that is relatively depleted in regulatory T cells, and this correlates with improved CD8(+ T cell functionality. We also observe an increase in the frequency of dendritic cells displaying an activated phenotype within lymphoid organs in the first 24 hours after irradiation. Intriguingly, both the relative decrease in regulatory T cells and increase in activated dendritic cells correspond with a brief window of augmented responsiveness to immunization. After this 24 hour window, the numbers of dendritic cells decline, as does the ability of mice to respond to immunizations. When immunizations are initiated within the period of augmented dendritic cell activation, mice develop anti-tumor responses that show increased durability as well as magnitude, and this approach leads to improved survival in experiments with mice bearing established tumors as well as in a spontaneous melanoma model. We conclude that irradiation can produce potent immune adjuvant effects independent of its ability to induce tumor ablation, and that the timing of immunization and lymphocyte infusion in the irradiated host are crucial for generating optimal anti-tumor immunity. Clinical strategies using these approaches must therefore optimize such parameters, as the correct timing of infusion and vaccination may mean the difference

  17. Whole-genome sequencing of a malignant granular cell tumor with metabolic response to pazopanib

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Liu, Song; Conroy, Jeffrey; Wang, Jianmin; Papanicolau-Sengos, Antonios; Glenn, Sean T.; Murakami, Mitsuko; Liu, Lu; Hu, Qiang; Conroy, Jacob; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Nowak, David E.; Liu, Biao; Qin, Maochun; Bshara, Wiam; Omilian, Angela R.; Head, Karen; Bianchi, Michael; Burgher, Blake; Darlak, Christopher; Kane, John; Merzianu, Mihai; Cheney, Richard; Fabiano, Andrew; Salerno, Kilian; Talati, Chetasi; Khushalani, Nikhil I.; Trump, Donald L.; Johnson, Candace S.; Morrison, Carl D.

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumors are an uncommon soft tissue neoplasm. Malignant granular cell tumors comprise T transitions, particularly when immediately preceded by a 5′ G. A loss-of-function mutation was detected in a newly recognized tumor suppressor candidate, BRD7. No mutations were found in known targets of pazopanib. However, we identified a receptor tyrosine kinase pathway mutation in GFRA2 that warrants further evaluation. To the best of our knowledge, this is only the second reported case of a malignant granular cell tumor exhibiting a response to pazopanib, and the first whole-genome sequencing of this uncommon tumor type. The findings provide insight into the genetic basis of malignant granular cell tumors and identify potential targets for further investigation. PMID:27148567

  18. Targeting tumor antigens to secreted membrane vesicles in vivo induces efficient antitumor immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Ostrowski, Matias; Krumeich, Sophie; Bobrie, Angélique; Jancic, Carolina; Boissonnas, Alexandre; Delcayre, Alain; Le Pecq, Jean-Bernard; Combadière, Béhazine; Amigorena, Sebastian; Théry, Clotilde

    2008-02-15

    Expression of non-self antigens by tumors can induce activation of T cells in vivo, although this activation can lead to either immunity or tolerance. CD8+ T-cell activation can be direct (if the tumor expresses MHC class I molecules) or indirect (after the capture and cross-presentation of tumor antigens by dendritic cells). The modes of tumor antigen capture by dendritic cells in vivo remain unclear. Here we examine the immunogenicity of the same model antigen secreted by live tumors either in association with membrane vesicles (exosomes) or as a soluble protein. We have artificially addressed the antigen to secreted vesicles by coupling it to the factor VIII-like C1C2 domain of milk fat globule epidermal growth factor-factor VIII (MFG-E8)/lactadherin. We show that murine fibrosarcoma tumor cells that secrete vesicle-bound antigen grow slower than tumors that secrete soluble antigen in immunocompetent, but not in immunodeficient, host mice. This growth difference is due to the induction of a more potent antigen-specific antitumor immune response in vivo by the vesicle-bound than by the soluble antigen. Finally, in vivo secretion of the vesicle-bound antigen either by tumors or by vaccination with naked DNA protects against soluble antigen-secreting tumors. We conclude that the mode of secretion can determine the immunogenicity of tumor antigens and that manipulation of the mode of antigen secretion may be used to optimize antitumor vaccination protocols.

  19. 3D tumor tissue analogs and their orthotopic implants for understanding tumor-targeting of microenvironment-responsive nanosized chemotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Pallavi; Jyoti, Amar; Swindell, Elden P; Chan, Ryan; Langner, Ulrich W; Feddock, Jonathan M; Nagarajan, Radhakrishnan; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Upreti, Meenakshi

    2015-11-01

    An appropriate representation of the tumor microenvironment in tumor models can have a pronounced impact on directing combinatorial treatment strategies and cancer nanotherapeutics. The present study develops a novel 3D co-culture spheroid model (3D TNBC) incorporating tumor cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts as color-coded murine tumor tissue analogs (TTA) to better represent the tumor milieu of triple negative breast cancer in vitro. Implantation of TTA orthotopically in nude mice, resulted in enhanced growth and aggressive metastasis to ectopic sites. Subsequently, the utility of the model is demonstrated for preferential targeting of irradiated tumor endothelial cells via radiation-induced stromal enrichment of galectin-1 using anginex conjugated nanoparticles (nanobins) carrying arsenic trioxide and cisplatin. Demonstration of a multimodal nanotherapeutic system and inclusion of the biological response to radiation using an in vitro/in vivo tumor model incorporating characteristics of tumor microenvironment presents an advance in preclinical evaluation of existing and novel cancer nanotherapies. Existing in-vivo tumor models are established by implanting tumor cells into nude mice. Here, the authors described their approach 3D spheres containing tumor cells, enodothelial cells and fibroblasts. This would mimic tumor micro-environment more realistically. This interesting 3D model should reflect more accurately tumor response to various drugs and would enable the design of new treatment modalities. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC. The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3 following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  1. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Martinez, Gary V; Cornnell, Heather H; Hart, Charles P; Baker, Amanda F; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  2. Plasticity of gamma delta T cells: impact on the anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie eLafont

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The tumor immune microenvironment contributes to tumor initiation, progression and response to therapy. Among the immune cell subsets that play a role in the tumor microenvironment, innate-like T cells that express T cell receptors composed of gamma and delta chains (gamma delta T cells are of particular interest. gamma delta T cells can contribute to the immune response against many tumor types (lymphoma, myeloma, melanoma, breast, colon, lung, ovary and prostate cancer directly through their cytotoxic activity and indirectly by stimulating or regulating the biological functions of other cell types required for the initiation and establishment of the anti-tumor immune response, such as dendritic cells and cytotoxic CD8+ T cells. However, the notion that tumor-infiltrating gamma delta T cells are a good prognostic marker in cancer was recently challenged by studies showing that the presence of these cells in the tumor microenvironment was associated with poor prognosis in both breast and colon cancer. These findings suggest that gamma delta T cells may also display pro-tumor activities. Indeed, breast tumor-infiltrating gamma deltaT cells could exert an immunosuppressive activity by negatively regulating DC maturation. Furthermore, recent studies demonstrated that signals from the microenvironment, particularly cytokines, can confer some plasticity to gamma delta T cells and promote their differentiation into gamma delta T cells with regulatory functions. This review focuses on the current knowledge on the functional plasticity of gamma delta T cells and its effect on their anti-tumor activities. It also discusses the putative mechanisms underlying gamma delta T cell expansion, differentiation and recruitment in the tumor microenvironment.

  3. Tumor and normal tissue responses to fractioned non-uniform dose delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaellman, P; Aegren, A; Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    The volume dependence of the radiation response of a tumor is straight forward to quantify because it depends primarily on the eradication of all its clonogenic cells. A tumor therefore has a parallel organization as any surviving clonogen in principle can repopulate the tumor. The difficulty with the response of the tumor is instead to know the density and sensitivity distribution of the most resistant clonogenic cells. The increase in the 50% tumor control dose and the decrease in the maximum normalized slope of the dose response relation, {gamma}, in presence of small compartments of resistant tumor cells have therefore been quantified to describe their influence on the dose response relation. Injury to normal tissue is a much more complex and gradual process. It depends on earlier effects induced long before depletion of the differentiated and clonogenic cells that in addition may have a complex structural and functional organization. The volume dependence of the dose response relation of normal tissues is therefore described here by the relative seriality, s, of the infrastructure of the organ. The model can also be generalized to describe the response of heterogeneous tissues to non uniform dose distributions. The new model is compared with clinical and experimental data on normal tissue response, and shows good agreement both with regard to the shape of dose response relation and the volume dependence of the isoeffect dose. The response of tumors and normal tissues are quantified for arbitrary dose fractionations using the linear quadratic cell survival parameters {alpha} and {beta}. The parameters of the dose response relation are derived both for a constant dose per fraction and a constant number of dose fractions, thus in the latter case accounting also for non uniform dose delivery. (author). 26 refs, 4 figs.

  4. Response evaluation of giant-cell tumor of bone treated by denosumab: Histogram and texture analysis of CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Jisook; Lee, Young Han; Kim, Sang Kyum; Kim, Seung Hyun; Song, Ho-Taek; Shin, Kyoo-Ho; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to compare computed tomography (CT) features, including tumor size and textural and histogram measurements, of giant-cell tumors of bone (GCTBs) before and after denosumab treatment and determine their applicability in monitoring GCTB response to denosumab treatment. This retrospective study included eight patients (male, 3; female, 5; mean age, 33.4 years) diagnosed with GCTB, who had received treatment by denosumab and had undergone pre- and post-treatment non-contrast CT between January 2010 and December 2016. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Pre- and post-treatment size, histogram, and textural parameters of GCTBs were compared by the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Pathological findings of five patients who underwent surgery after denosumab treatment were evaluated for assessment of treatment response. Relative to the baseline values, the tumor size had decreased, while the mean attenuation, standard deviation, entropy (all, P = 0.017), and skewness (P = 0.036) of the GCTBs had significantly increased post-treatment. Although the difference was statistically insignificant, the tumors also exhibited increased kurtosis, contrast, and inverse difference moment (P = 0.123, 0.327, and 0.575, respectively) post-treatment. Histologic findings revealed new bone formation and complete depletion or decrease in the number of osteoclast-like giant cells. The histogram and textural parameters of GCTBs changed significantly after denosumab treatment. Knowledge of the tendency towards increased mean attenuation and heterogeneity but increased local homogeneity in post-treatment CT histogram and textural features of GCTBs might aid in treatment planning and tumor response evaluation during denosumab treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Temporal variation in the response of tumors to hyperoxia with breathing carbogen and oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Hua-gang; Khan, Nadeem; Du, Gai-xin; Hodge, Sassan; Swartz, Harold M.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hyperoxygenation with carbogen (95% O2 + 5% CO2) and 100% oxygen inhalation on partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) tumor was investigated. RIF-1 tumors were innoculated in C3H mice, and aggregates of oximetry probe, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc), was implanted in each tumor. A baseline tumor pO2 was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry for 20 minutes in anesthetized mice breathing 30% O2 and then the gas was switched to carbogen or 100 % oxygen for 60 minutes. These experiments were repeated for 10 days. RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a baseline tissue pO2 of 6.2–8.3 mmHg in mice breathing 30% O2. Carbogen and 100% oxygen significantly increased tumor pO2 on days 1 to 5, with a maximal increase at approximately 32–45 minutes on each day. However, the extent of increase in pO2 from the baseline declined significantly on day 5 and day 10. The results provide quantitative information on the effect of hyperoxic gas inhalation on tumor pO2 over the course of 10 days. EPR oximetry can be effectively used to repeatedly monitor tumor pO2 and test hyperoxic methods for potential clinical applications. PMID:27867481

  6. Temporal variation in the response of tumors to hyperoxia with breathing carbogen and oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-gang Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hyperoxygenation with carbogen (95% O 2 + 5% CO 2 and 100% oxygen inhalation on partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1 tumor was investigated. RIF-1 tumors were innoculated in C3H mice, and aggregates of oximetry probe, lithium phthalocyanine (LiPc, was implanted in each tumor. A baseline tumor pO 2 was measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR oximetry for 20 minutes in anesthetized mice breathing 30% O 2 and then the gas was switched to carbogen or 100 % oxygen for 60 minutes. These experiments were repeated for 10 days. RIF-1 tumors were hypoxic with a baseline tissue pO 2 of 6.2-8.3 mmHg in mice breathing 30% O 2 . Carbogen and 100% oxygen significantly increased tumor pO 2 on days 1 to 5, with a maximal increase at approximately 32-45 minutes on each day. However, the extent of increase in pO 2 from the baseline declined significantly on day 5 and day 10. The results provide quantitative information on the effect of hyperoxic gas inhalation on tumor pO 2 over the course of 10 days. EPR oximetry can be effectively used to repeatedly monitor tumor pO 2 and test hyperoxic methods for potential clinical applications.

  7. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 μg in 50 μl). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21 WAF1 / CIP1 and Bcl-X s in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X L , Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment

  8. Enhancement of tumor response by MEK inhibitor in murine HCa-I tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Hee; Seong, Jin Sil [College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-09-01

    Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which is part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, opposes initiation of the apoptotic cell death which is programmed by diverse cytotoxic stimuli. In this regard, the inhibition of ERK may be useful in improving the therapeutic efficacy of established anticancer agents. Murine hepatocarcinoma, HCa-l is known to be highly radioresistant with a TCD50 (radiation dose yield in 50% cure) of more than 80 Gy. Various anticancer drugs have been found to enhance the radioresponse of this particular tumor but none were successful. The objective of this study was to explore whether the selective inhibition of MEK could potentiate the antitumor efficacy of radiation in vivo, particularly in the case of radioresistant tumor. C3H/HeJ mice bearing 7.5-8 mm. HCa-l, were treated with PD98059 (intratumoral injection of 0.16 {mu}g in 50 {mu}l). Downregulation of ERK by PD98059 was most prominent 1h after the treatment. In the tumor growth delay assay, the drug was found to increase the effect of the tumor radioresponse with an enhancement factor (EF) of 1.6 and 1.87. Combined treatment of 25 Gy radiation with PD98059 significantly increased radiation induced apoptosis. The peak apoptotic index (number of apoptotic nuclei in 1000 nuclei X100) was 1.2% in the case of radiation treatment alone, 0.9% in the case of drug treatment alone and 4.9%, 5.3% in the combination treatment group. An analysis of apoptosis regulating molecules with Western blotting showed up regulation of p53, p21{sup WAF1}/{sup CIP1} and Bcl-X{sub s} in the combination treatment group as compared to their levels in either the radiation alone or drug alone treatment groups. The level of other molecules such as Bcl-X{sub L}, Bax and BCI-2 were changed to a lesser extent. The selective inhibition of MEK in combination with radiation therapy may have potential benefit in cancer treatment.

  9. Expression of EGFR Under Tumor Hypoxia: Identification of a Subpopulation of Tumor Cells Responsible for Aggressiveness and Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogsteen, Ilse J., E-mail: i.hoogsteen@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Marres, Henri A.M.; Hoogen, Franciscus J.A. van den [Department of Otorhinolaryngology/Head-Neck Surgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Rijken, Paul F.J.W.; Lok, Jasper; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and tumor hypoxia have been shown to correlate with worse outcome in several types of cancer including head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma. Little is known about the combination and possible interactions between the two phenomena. Methods and Materials: In this study, 45 cases of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were analyzed. All patients received intravenous infusions of the exogenous hypoxia marker pimonidazole prior to biopsy. Presence of EGFR, pimonidazole binding, and colocalization between EGFR and tumor hypoxia were examined using immunohistochemistry. Results: Of all biopsies examined, respectively, 91% and 60% demonstrated EGFR- and pimonidazole-positive areas. A weak but significant association was found between the hypoxic fractions of pimonidazole (HFpimo) and EGFR fractions (F-EGFR) and between F-EGFR and relative vascular area. Various degrees of colocalization between hypoxia and EGFR were found, increasing with distance from the vasculature. A high fraction of EGFR was correlated with better disease-free and metastasis-free survival, whereas a high degree of colocalization correlated with poor outcome. Conclusions: Colocalization of hypoxia and EGFR was demonstrated in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinomas, predominantly at longer distances from vessels. A large amount of colocalization was associated with poor outcome, which points to a survival advantage of hypoxic cells that are also able to express EGFR. This subpopulation of tumor cells might be indicative of tumor aggressiveness and be partly responsible for treatment resistance.

  10. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos

    2001-01-01

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  11. Monitoring Immune Responses in Organ Recipients by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mukhalafi Zuha

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection remains a major barrier to successful organ transplan-tation. Cellular and humoral immune responses play a critical role in mediating graft rejection. During the last few years, monoclonal antibodies have been used as a new specific therapeutic approach in the prevention of allograft rejection. Recently, the technology of flow cytometry has become a useful tool for monitoring immunological responses in transplant recipients. The application of this valuable tool in clinical transplantation at the present time is aimed at, i determining the extent of immuno-suppressive therapy through T-cell receptor analysis of cellular components, ii monitoring levels of alloreactive antibodies to identify high-risk recipients (sensitized patients in the pre-operative period and iii to predict rejection by monitoring their development post-operatively. In future, further development of this technology may demonstrate greater benefit to the field of organ transplantation.

  12. The Pig as a Large Animal Model for Studying Anti-Tumor Immune Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr

    but also generates a selective pressure, which may lead to selection of tumor cell variants with reduced immunogenicity; thereby, increasing the risk of tumor escape. Cancer immunotherapy includes treatment strategies aimed at activating anti-tumor immune responses or inhibiting suppressive and tumor......-favorable immune mechanisms. One of the promising arms of cancer immunotherapy is peptide-based therapeutic vaccines; yet, no such vaccine has been approved for use in human oncology. For many years, mouse models have provided invaluable understanding of complex immunological pathways; however, the majority...... tolerance towards IDO and the establishment of an antigen-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) response. When comparing the different CAF09-formulated antigen doses, we demonstrate the induction of a CMI-dominant response upon exposure to a low endogenous peptide dose. In contrast, a mixed CMI and humoral...

  13. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.; Osipiyants, I.; Kiselev, V.; Ogar, K; Gavrilov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  14. Brca1/p53 deficient mouse breast tumor hemodynamics during hyperoxic respiratory challenge monitored by a novel wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Austin; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Eva Y. H. P.; Tromberg, Bruce; Cerussi, Albert; Choi, Bernard

    2009-02-01

    Current imaging modalities allow precise visualization of tumors but do not enable quantitative characterization of the tumor metabolic state. Such quantitative information would enhance our understanding of tumor progression and response to treatment, and to our overall understanding of tumor biology. To address this problem, we have developed a wide-field functional imaging (WiFI) instrument which combines two optical imaging modalities, spatially modulated imaging (MI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI). Our current WiFI imaging protocol consists of multispectral imaging in the near infrared (650-980 nm) spectrum, over a wide (7 cm × 5 cm) field of view. Using MI, the spatially-resolved reflectance of sinusoidal patterns projected onto the tissue is assessed, and optical properties of the tissue are estimated using a Monte Carlo model. From the spatial maps of local absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, tissue composition information is extracted in the form of oxy-, deoxy-, and total hemoglobin concentrations, and percentage of lipid and water. Using LSI, the reflectance of a 785 nm laser speckle pattern on the tissue is acquired and analyzed to compute maps of blood perfusion in the tissue. Tissue metabolism state is estimated from the values of blood perfusion, volume and oxygenation state. We currently are employing the WiFI instrument to study tumor development in a BRCA1/p53 deficient mice breast tumor model. The animals are monitored with WiFI during hyperoxic respiratory challenge. At present, four tumors have been measured with WiFI, and preliminary data suggest that tumor metabolic changes during hyperoxic respiratory challenge can be determined.

  15. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome

  16. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloshin, Tali [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel); Voest, Emile E. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Shaked, Yuval, E-mail: yshaked@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel)

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  17. Towards an integrative computational model for simulating tumor growth and response to radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Carlos Sosa; Aubert, Vivien; Ciferri, Nicolas; Hernández, Alfredo; de Crevoisier, Renaud; Acosta, Oscar

    2017-11-01

    Understanding the response to irradiation in cancer radiotherapy (RT) may help devising new strategies with improved tumor local control. Computational models may allow to unravel the underlying radiosensitive mechanisms intervening in the dose-response relationship. By using extensive simulations a wide range of parameters may be evaluated providing insights on tumor response thus generating useful data to plan modified treatments. We propose in this paper a computational model of tumor growth and radiation response which allows to simulate a whole RT protocol. Proliferation of tumor cells, cell life-cycle, oxygen diffusion, radiosensitivity, RT response and resorption of killed cells were implemented in a multiscale framework. The model was developed in C++, using the Multi-formalism Modeling and Simulation Library (M2SL). Radiosensitivity parameters extracted from literature enabled us to simulate in a regular grid (voxel-wise) a prostate cell tissue. Histopathological specimens with different aggressiveness levels extracted from patients after prostatectomy were used to initialize in silico simulations. Results on tumor growth exhibit a good agreement with data from in vitro studies. Moreover, standard fractionation of 2 Gy/fraction, with a total dose of 80 Gy as a real RT treatment was applied with varying radiosensitivity and oxygen diffusion parameters. As expected, the high influence of these parameters was observed by measuring the percentage of survival tumor cell after RT. This work paves the way to further models allowing to simulate increased doses in modified hypofractionated schemes and to develop new patient-specific combined therapies.

  18. 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography for predicting tumor response to radiochemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Meng; Wei, Hangping; Lin, Ruifang; Zhang, Xuebang; Zou, Changlin; Zhao, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in predicting tumor response to radiochemotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). From July 2012 to March 2014, 46 NPC patients who had undergone PET scanning before receiving definitive intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment in our hospital were enrolled. Factors potentially affecting tumor response to treatment were studied by multiple logistic regression analysis. After radiochemotherapy, 32 patients had a clinical complete response (CR), making the CR rate 69.6 %. Multiple logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the maximal standard uptake value (SUV max ) of the primary tumor was the only factor related to tumor response (p = 0.001), and that the logistic model had a high positive predictive value (90.6 %). The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.809, with a best cutoff threshold at 10.05. Patients with SUV max ≤ 10 had a higher CR rate than those with SUV max > 10 (p < 0.001). The SUV max of the primary tumor before treatment is an independent predictor of tumor response in NPC. (orig.) [de

  19. SU-F-J-59: Assessment of Dose Response Distribution in Individual Human Tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Chen, S; Krauss, D; Chen, P [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Wilson, G [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To fulfill precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number, voxel-by-voxel dose response or radio-sensitivity in individual human tumor needs to be determined in early treatment to guide treatment adaptation. In this study, multiple FDG PET images obtained pre- and weekly during the treatment course were utilized to determine the distribution/spectrum of dose response parameters in individual human tumors. Methods: FDG PET/CT images of 18 HN cancer patients were used in the study. Spatial parametric image of tumor metabolic ratio (dSUV) was created following voxel by voxel deformable image registration. Each voxel value in dSUV was a function of pre-treatment baseline SUV and treatment delivered dose, and used as a surrogate of tumor survival fraction (SF). Regression fitting with break points was performed using the LQ-model with tumor proliferation for the control and failure group of tumors separately. The distribution and spectrum of radiation sensitivity and growth in individual tumors were determined and evaluated. Results: Spectrum of tumor dose-sensitivity and proliferation in the controlled group was broad with α in tumor survival LQ-model from 0.17 to 0.8. It was proportional to the baseline SUV. Tlag was about 21∼25 days, and Tpot about 0.56∼1.67 days respectively. Commonly tumor voxels with high radio-sensitivity or larger α had small Tlag and Tpot. For the failure group, the radio-sensitivity α was low within 0.05 to 0.3, but did not show clear Tlag. In addition, tumor voxel radio-sensitivity could be estimated during the early treatment weeks. Conclusion: Dose response distribution with respect to radio-sensitivity and growth in individual human tumor can be determined using FDG PET imaging based tumor metabolic ratio measured in early treatment course. The discover is critical and provides a potential quantitative objective to implement tumor specific precision radiotherapy via adaptive dose painting by number.

  20. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  1. Individualized monitoring of drug bioavailability and immunogenicity in rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with the tumor necrosis factor alpha inhibitor infliximab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, Klaus; Geborek, Pierre; Svenson, Morten

    2006-01-01

    Infliximab, an anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNFalpha) antibody, is effective in the treatment of several immunoinflammatory diseases. However, many patients experience primary or secondary response failure, suggesting that individualization of treatment regimens may be beneficial...

  2. CADrx for GBM Brain Tumors: Predicting Treatment Response from Changes in Diffusion-Weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Brown

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to develop a computer-aided therapeutic response (CADrx system for early prediction of drug treatment response for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM brain tumors with diffusion weighted (DW MR images. In conventional Macdonald assessment, tumor response is assessed nine weeks or more post-treatment. However, we will investigate the ability of DW-MRI to assess response earlier, at five weeks post treatment. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC map, calculated from DW images, has been shown to reveal changes in the tumor’s microenvironment preceding morphologic tumor changes. ADC values in treated brain tumors could theoretically both increase due to the cell kill (and thus reduced cell density and decrease due to inhibition of edema. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of features that quantify changes from pre- and post-treatment tumor ADC histograms to detect treatment response. There are three parts to this study: first, tumor regions were segmented on T1w contrast enhanced images by Otsu’s thresholding method, and mapped from T1w images onto ADC images by a 3D region of interest (ROI mapping tool using DICOM header information; second, ADC histograms of the tumor region were extracted from both pre- and five weeks post-treatment scans, and fitted by a two-component Gaussian mixture model (GMM. The GMM features as well as standard histogram-based features were extracted. Finally, supervised machine learning techniques were applied for classification of responders or non-responders. The approach was evaluated with a dataset of 85 patients with GBM under chemotherapy, in which 39 responded and 46 did not, based on tumor volume reduction. We compared adaBoost, random forest and support vector machine classification algorithms, using ten-fold cross validation, resulting in the best accuracy of 69.41% and the corresponding area under the curve (Az of 0.70.

  3. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28–83) provided informed consent. T 2 - and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm 2 /s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6–8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs ( −3 mm 2 /s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p 23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2–4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  4. Activation of antitumor immune responses by Ganoderma formosanum polysaccharides in tumor-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Li; Lu, Chiu-Ying; Hsueh, Ying-Chao; Liu, Wen-Hsiung; Chen, Chun-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Fungi of the genus Ganoderma are basidiomycetes that have been used as traditional medicine in Asia and have been shown to exhibit various pharmacological activities. We recently found that PS-F2, a polysaccharide fraction purified from the submerged culture broth of Ganoderma formosanum, stimulates the maturation of dendritic cells and primes a T helper 1 (Th1)-polarized adaptive immune response in vivo. In this study, we investigated whether the immune adjuvant function of PS-F2 can stimulate antitumor immune responses in tumor-bearing mice. Continuous intraperitoneal or oral administration of PS-F2 effectively suppressed the growth of colon 26 (C26) adenocarcinoma, B16 melanoma, and sarcoma 180 (S180) tumor cells in mice without adverse effects on the animals' health. PS-F2 did not cause direct cytotoxicity on tumor cells, and it lost the antitumor effect in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, and serum from PS-F2-treated tumor-bearing mice all exhibited antitumor activities when adoptively transferred to naïve animals, indicating that PS-F2 treatment stimulates tumor-specific cellular and humoral immune responses. These data demonstrate that continuous administration of G. formosanum polysaccharide PS-F2 can activate host immune responses against ongoing tumor growth, suggesting that PS-F2 can potentially be developed into a preventive/therapeutic agent for cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  6. Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Han, X.; Zhou, Y.; Yue, P.; Wang, X.; Lu, J.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Tang, H.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Fan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service(DIMERS) project was kicked off in 2017 in China, with the purpose to improve timely responsive service of the institutions involved in the management of natural disasters and man-made emergency situations with the timely and high-quality products derived from Space-based, Air-based and the in-situ Earth observation. The project team brought together a group of top universities and research institutions in the field of Earth observations as well as the operational institute in typical disaster services at national level. The project will bridge the scientific research and the response services of massive catastrophe in order to improve the emergency response capability of China and provide scientific and technological support for the implementation of the national emergency response strategy. In response to the call for proposal of "Earth Observation and Navigation" of 2017 National Key R&D Program of China, Professor Wu Jianjun, the deputy chairman of Faculty of Geographical Science of Beijing Normal University, submitted the Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service (DIMERS) project, jointly with the experts and scholars from Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan University, China Institute of Earthquake Forecasting of China Earthquake Administration and China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Science. After two round evaluations, the proposal was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  7. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy elicits tumor specific T cell responses in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Estévez, David; Sánchez, Ramiro; Tejada, Rafael E.; Parra-López, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical studies in breast cancer suggest that some anti-tumor therapy regimens generate stimulation of the immune system that accounts for tumor clinical responses, however, demonstration of the immunostimulatory power of these therapies on cancer patients continues to be a formidable challenge. Here we present experimental evidence from a breast cancer patient with complete clinical response after 7 years, associated with responsiveness of tumor specific T cells. T cells were obtained before and after anti-tumor therapy from peripheral blood of a 63-years old woman diagnosed with ductal breast cancer (HER2/neu+++, ER-, PR-, HLA-A*02:01) treated with surgery, followed by paclitaxel, trastuzumab (suspended due to cardiac toxicity), and radiotherapy. We obtained a leukapheresis before surgery and after 8 months of treatment. Using in vitro cell cultures stimulated with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that produce high levels of IL-12, we characterize by flow cytometry the phenotype of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) HER2/neu and NY-ESO 1 specific T cells. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) were performed in order to correlate both repertoires prior and after therapy. We evidence a functional recovery of T cell responsiveness to polyclonal stimuli and expansion of TAAs specific CD8+ T cells using peptide pulsed DCs, with an increase of CTLA-4 and memory effector phenotype after anti-tumor therapy. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and TILs showed that whereas the TCR-Vβ04-02 clonotype is highly expressed in TILs the HER2/neu specific T cells are expressed mainly in blood after therapy, suggesting that this particular TCR was selectively enriched in blood after anti-tumor therapy. Our results show the benefits of anti-tumor therapy in a breast cancer patient with clinical complete response in

  8. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  9. Tumor Architecture and Notch Signaling Modulate Drug Response in Basal Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberl, Markus; Mangelberger, Doris; Swanson, Jacob B; Verhaegen, Monique E; Harms, Paul W; Frohm, Marcus L; Dlugosz, Andrzej A; Wong, Sunny Y

    2018-02-12

    Hedgehog (Hh) pathway inhibitors such as vismodegib are highly effective for treating basal cell carcinoma (BCC); however, residual tumor cells frequently persist and regenerate the primary tumor upon drug discontinuation. Here, we show that BCCs are organized into two molecularly and functionally distinct compartments. Whereas interior Hh + /Notch + suprabasal cells undergo apoptosis in response to vismodegib, peripheral Hh +++ /Notch - basal cells survive throughout treatment. Inhibiting Notch specifically promotes tumor persistence without causing drug resistance, while activating Notch is sufficient to regress already established lesions. Altogether, these findings suggest that the three-dimensional architecture of BCCs establishes a natural hierarchy of drug response in the tumor and that this hierarchy can be overcome, for better or worse, by modulating Notch. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A deterministic and stochastic model for the system dynamics of tumor-immune responses to chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Li, Qingze; Pan, Jianxin

    2018-06-01

    Modern medical studies show that chemotherapy can help most cancer patients, especially for those diagnosed early, to stabilize their disease conditions from months to years, which means the population of tumor cells remained nearly unchanged in quite a long time after fighting against immune system and drugs. In order to better understand the dynamics of tumor-immune responses under chemotherapy, deterministic and stochastic differential equation models are constructed to characterize the dynamical change of tumor cells and immune cells in this paper. The basic dynamical properties, such as boundedness, existence and stability of equilibrium points, are investigated in the deterministic model. Extended stochastic models include stochastic differential equations (SDEs) model and continuous-time Markov chain (CTMC) model, which accounts for the variability in cellular reproduction, growth and death, interspecific competitions, and immune response to chemotherapy. The CTMC model is harnessed to estimate the extinction probability of tumor cells. Numerical simulations are performed, which confirms the obtained theoretical results.

  11. Monitoring and Targeting Anti-VEGF Induced Hypoxia within the Viable Tumor by 19F–MRI and Multispectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Shi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anti-angiogenic agents on tumor oxygenation has been in question for a number of years, where both increases and decreases in tumor pO2 have been observed. This dichotomy in results may be explained by the role of vessel normalization in the response of tumors to anti-angiogenic therapy, where anti-angiogenic therapies may initially improve both the structure and the function of tumor vessels, but more sustained or potent anti-angiogenic treatments will produce an anti-vascular response, producing a more hypoxic environment. The first goal of this study was to employ multispectral (MS 19F–MRI to noninvasively quantify viable tumor pO2 and evaluate the ability of a high dose of an antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF to produce a strong and prolonged anti-vascular response that results in significant tumor hypoxia. The second goal of this study was to target the anti-VEGF induced hypoxic tumor micro-environment with an agent, tirapazamine (TPZ, which has been designed to target hypoxic regions of tumors. These goals have been successfully met, where an antibody that blocks both murine and human VEGF-A (B20.4.1.1 was found by MS 19F–MRI to produce a strong anti-vascular response and reduce viable tumor pO2 in an HM-7 xenograft model. TPZ was then employed to target the anti-VEGF-induced hypoxic region. The combination of anti-VEGF and TPZ strongly suppressed HM-7 tumor growth and was superior to control and both monotherapies. This study provides evidence that clinical trials combining anti-vascular agents with hypoxia-activated prodrugs should be considered to improved efficacy in cancer patients.

  12. Abscopal Effects With Hypofractionated Schedules Extending Into the Effector Phase of the Tumor-Specific T-Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuanwei; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2018-05-01

    Hypofractionated radiation therapy (hRT) combined with immune checkpoint blockade can induce T-cell-mediated local and abscopal antitumor effects. We had previously observed peak levels of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) between days 5 and 8 after hRT. Because TILs are regarded as radiosensitive, hRT schedules extending into this period might be less immunogenic, prompting us to compare clinically relevant, short and extended schedules with equivalent biologically effective doses combined with anti-programmed cell death 1 (PD1) antibody treatment. In mice bearing 2 B16-CD133 melanoma tumors, the primary tumor was irradiated with 3 × 9.18 Gy in 3 or 5 days or with 5 × 6.43 Gy in 10 days; an anti-PD1 antibody was given weekly. The mice were monitored for tumor growth and survival. T-cell responses were determined on days 8 and 15 of treatment. The role of regional lymph nodes was studied by administering FTY720, which blocks lymph node egress of activated T cells. Tumor growth measurements after combination treatment using short or extended hRT and control treatment were also performed in the wild-type B16 melanoma and 4T1 breast carcinoma models. In the B16-CD133 model, growth inhibition of irradiated primary and nonirradiated secondary tumors and overall survival were similar with all 3 hRT/anti-PD1 combinations, superior to hRT and anti-PD1 monotherapy, and was strongly dependent on CD8 + T cells. TIL infiltration and local and systemic tumor-specific CD8 + T-cell responses were also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used. Administration of FTY720 accelerated growth of both primary and secondary tumors, strongly reduced their TIL infiltration, and increased tumor-specific CD8 + T cells in the lymph nodes draining the irradiated tumor. In the 4T1 model, local and abscopal tumor control was also similar, regardless of whether short or extended hRT was used, although the synergy between hRT and anti-PD1 was weaker. No

  13. Proton magnetic spectroscopic imaging of the child's brain: the response of tumors to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, A.A.; Young Poussaint, T.; Astrakas, L.G.; Barnes, P.D.; Goumnerova, L.; Scott, R.M.; Black, P.McL.; Anthony, D.C.; Billett, A.L.; Tarbell, N.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to determine and/or predict response to treatment of brain tumors in children using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). We studied 24 patients aged 10 months to 24 years, using MRI and point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS; TR 2000 TE 65 ms) with volume preselection and phase-encoding in two dimensions on a 1.5 T imager. Multiple logistic regression was used to establish independent predictors of active tumor growth. Biologically vital cell metabolites, such as N-acetyl aspartate and choline-containing compounds (Cho), were significantly different between tumor and control tissues (P<0.001). The eight brain tumors which responded to radiation or chemotherapy, exhibited lower Cho (P=0.05), higher total creatine (tCr) (P=0.02) and lower lactate and lipid (L) (P=0.04) than16 tumors which were not treated (except by surgery) or did not respond to treatment. The only significant independent predictor of active tumor growth was tCr (P<0.01). We suggest that tCr is useful in assessing response of brain tumors to treatment. (orig.)

  14. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M.; Pritzker, Laura B.; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-01-01

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced “RNA disruption” is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3’-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues

  15. RNA disruption is associated with response to multiple classes of chemotherapy drugs in tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendrula, Rashmi; Mispel-Beyer, Kyle; Guo, Baoqing; Parissenti, Amadeo M; Pritzker, Laura B; Pritzker, Ken; Masilamani, Twinkle; Wang, Xiaohui; Lannér, Carita

    2016-02-24

    Cellular stressors and apoptosis-inducing agents have been shown to induce ribosomal RNA (rRNA) degradation in eukaryotic cells. Recently, RNA degradation in vivo was observed in patients with locally advanced breast cancer, where mid-treatment tumor RNA degradation was associated with complete tumor destruction and enhanced patient survival. However, it is not clear how widespread chemotherapy induced "RNA disruption" is, the extent to which it is associated with drug response or what the underlying mechanisms are. Ovarian (A2780, CaOV3) and breast (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, BT474, SKBR3) cancer cell lines were treated with several cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs and total RNA was isolated. RNA was also prepared from docetaxel resistant A2780DXL and carboplatin resistant A2780CBN cells following drug exposure. Disruption of RNA was analyzed by capillary electrophoresis. Northern blotting was performed using probes complementary to the 28S and 18S rRNA to determine the origins of degradation bands. Apoptosis activation was assessed by flow cytometric monitoring of annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) binding to cells and by measuring caspase-3 activation. The link between apoptosis and RNA degradation (disruption) was investigated using a caspase-3 inhibitor. All chemotherapy drugs tested were capable of inducing similar RNA disruption patterns. Docetaxel treatment of the resistant A2780DXL cells and carboplatin treatment of the A2780CBN cells did not result in RNA disruption. Northern blotting indicated that two RNA disruption bands were derived from the 3'-end of the 28S rRNA. Annexin-V and PI staining of docetaxel treated cells, along with assessment of caspase-3 activation, showed concurrent initiation of apoptosis and RNA disruption, while inhibition of caspase-3 activity significantly reduced RNA disruption. Supporting the in vivo evidence, our results demonstrate that RNA disruption is induced by multiple chemotherapy agents in cell lines from different tissues and is

  16. Survivin-specific T-cell reactivity correlates with tumor response and patient survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; Andersen, Mads H; Hofmeister-Müller, Valeska

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination directed to induce an anti-tumoral T-cell response is a field of extensive investigation in the treatment of melanoma. However, many vaccination trials in melanoma failed to demonstrate a correlation between the vaccine-specific immune response and therapy outcome. This has...

  17. Monitoring tumor motion by real time 2D/3D registration during radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendrin, Christelle; Furtado, Hugo; Weber, Christoph; Bloch, Christoph; Figl, Michael; Pawiro, Supriyanto Ardjo; Bergmann, Helmar; Stock, Markus; Fichtinger, Gabor; Georg, Dietmar; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the possibility to use X-ray based real time 2D/3D registration for non-invasive tumor motion monitoring during radiotherapy. The 2D/3D registration scheme is implemented using general purpose computation on graphics hardware (GPGPU) programming techniques and several algorithmic refinements in the registration process. Validation is conducted off-line using a phantom and five clinical patient data sets. The registration is performed on a region of interest (ROI) centered around the planned target volume (PTV). The phantom motion is measured with an rms error of 2.56 mm. For the patient data sets, a sinusoidal movement that clearly correlates to the breathing cycle is shown. Videos show a good match between X-ray and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRR) displacement. Mean registration time is 0.5 s. We have demonstrated that real-time organ motion monitoring using image based markerless registration is feasible. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Detecting early response to cyclophosphamide treatment of RIF-1 tumors using selective multiple quantum spectroscopy (SelMQC) and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poptani, Harish; Bansal, Navin; Graham, Robert A; Mancuso, Anthony; Nelson, David S; Glickson, Jerry D

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable, noninvasive method for early detection of tumor response to therapy that would facilitate optimization of treatment regimens to the needs of the individual patient. In the present study, the effects of cyclophosphamide (Cp, a widely used alkylating agent) were monitored in a murine radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) using in vivo (1)H NMR spectroscopy and imaging to evaluate the potential of these techniques towards early detection of treatment response. Steady-state lactate levels and Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics were measured using selective multiple quantum coherence (Sel-MQC) transfer spectroscopy and dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, respectively in RIF-1 tumors before, 24 and 72 h after 300 mg/kg of Cp administration. High-resolution (1)H NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts of the tumor were correlated with lactate and glucose concentrations determined enzymatically. In vivo NMR experiments showed a decrease in steady-state lactate to water ratios (5.4 +/- 1.6 to 0.6 +/- 0.5, p < 0.05) and an increase in Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics following treatment response. The data indicate that decreases in lactate result from decreased glycolytic metabolism and an increase in tumor perfusion/permeability. Perchloric acid extracts confirmed the lower lactate levels seen in vivo in treated tumors and also indicated a higher glycerophosphocholine/phosphocholine (GPC/PC) integrated intensity ratio (1.39 +/- 0.09 vs 0.97 +/- 0.04, p < 0.01), indicative of increased membrane degradation following Cp treatment. Steady-state lactate levels provide metabolic information that correlates with changes in tumor physiology measured by Gd-DTPA uptake kinetics with high spatial and temporal resolution. Both of these parameters may be useful for monitoring early tumor response to therapy. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals detects tumor responses to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Timothy J; Canuto, Holly C; Kettunen, Mikko I; Booth, Thomas C; Hu, De-En; Krishnan, Anant S; Bohndiek, Sarah E; Neves, André A; McLachlan, Charles; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2014-01-01

    The acquisition of ever increasing volumes of high resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data has created an urgent need to develop automated and objective image analysis algorithms that can assist in determining tumor margins, diagnosing tumor stage, and detecting treatment response. We have shown previously that Minkowski functionals, which are precise morphological and structural descriptors of image heterogeneity, can be used to enhance the detection, in T1 -weighted images, of a targeted Gd(3+) -chelate-based contrast agent for detecting tumor cell death. We have used Minkowski functionals here to characterize heterogeneity in T2 -weighted images acquired before and after drug treatment, and obtained without contrast agent administration. We show that Minkowski functionals can be used to characterize the changes in image heterogeneity that accompany treatment of tumors with a vascular disrupting agent, combretastatin A4-phosphate, and with a cytotoxic drug, etoposide. Parameterizing changes in the heterogeneity of T2 -weighted images can be used to detect early responses of tumors to drug treatment, even when there is no change in tumor size. The approach provides a quantitative and therefore objective assessment of treatment response that could be used with other types of MR image and also with other imaging modalities. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Dosimetric precision requirements and quantities for characterizing the response of tumors and normal tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahme, A [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics

    1996-08-01

    Based on simple radiobiological models the effect of the distribution of absorbed dose in therapy beams on the radiation response of tumor and normal tissue volumes are investigated. Under the assumption that the dose variation in the treated volume is small it is shown that the response of the tissue to radiation is determined mainly by the mean dose to the tumor or normal tissue volume in question. Quantitative expressions are also given for the increased probability of normal tissue complications and the decreased probability of tumor control as a function of increasing dose variations around the mean dose level to these tissues. When the dose variations are large the minimum tumor dose (to cm{sup 3} size volumes) will generally be better related to tumor control and the highest dose to significant portions of normal tissue correlates best to complications. In order not to lose more than one out of 20 curable patients (95% of highest possible treatment outcome) the required accuracy in the dose distribution delivered to the target volume should be 2.5% (1{sigma}) for a mean dose response gradient {gamma} in the range 2 - 3. For more steeply responding tumors and normal tissues even stricter requirements may be desirable. (author). 15 refs, 6 figs.

  2. Quantitative Evaluation of Tumor Early Response to a Vascular-Disrupting Agent with Dynamic PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ning; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Guo, Jinxia; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Niu, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the early response of tumors to a vascular-disrupting agent (VDA) VEGF121/recombinant toxin gelonin (rGel) using dynamic [(18)F]FPPRGD2 positron emission tomography (PET) and kinetic parameter estimation. Two tumor xenograft models: U87MG (highly vascularized) and A549 (moderately vascularized), were selected, and both were randomized into treatment and control groups. Sixty-minute dynamic PET scans with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 that targets to integrin αvβ3 were performed at days 0 (baseline), 1, and 3 since VEGF121/rGel treatment started. Dynamic PET-derived binding potential (BPND) and parametric maps were compared with tumor uptake (%ID/g) and the static PET image at 1 h after the tracer administration. The growth of U87MG tumor was obviously delayed upon VEGF121/rGel treatment. A549 tumor was not responsive to the same treatment. BPND of treated U87MG tumors decreased significantly at day 1 (p dynamic PET with [(18)F]FPPRGD2 shows advantages in distinguishing effective from ineffective treatment during the course of VEGF121/rGel therapy at early stage and is therefore more sensitive in assessing therapy response than static PET.

  3. Metabolic imaging of tumor for diagnosis and response for therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena; Shirmanova, Marina; Lukina, Maria; Dudenkova, Varvara; Ignatova, Nadezgda; Elagin, Vadim; Shlivko, Irena; Scheslavsky, Vladislav; Orlinskay, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Nonlinear optical microscopy combined with fluorescence lifetime imaging is a non-invasive imaging technique, based on the study of fluorescence decay times of naturally occurring fluorescent molecules, enabling a noninvasive investigation of the biological tissue with subcellular resolution. Cancer exhibits altered cellular metabolism, which affects the autofluorescence of metabolic cofactors NAD(P)H and FAD. In this study features of tumor metabolism in different systems of organization (from cell culture to patient lesion) was showed. The observed differences in the relative contributions of free NAD(P)H and FAD testify to an increased a glycolytic metabolism in cancer cells compare to fibroblasts. In 3D spheroids, the cells of the proliferating zone had greater a1 and lower tm values than the cells of the quiescent zone, which likely is a consequence of their higher glycolytic rate. During the growth of colorectal cancer in the experimental mouse model, the contribution of the free component of NAD(P)H was increased. Dysplastic nevus and melanoma is characterized by raised contribution of free NADH compare to healthy skin. Therefore, melanoma cells had very short value of τ1.

  4. Evaluation of In-111 DTPA-paclitaxel scintigraphy to predict response on murine tumors to paclitaxel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomio; Li, C.; Yang, D.J.

    1999-01-01

    Our goal was to determine whether scintigraphy with 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel could predict the response to chemotherapy with paclitaxel. Ovarian carcinoma (OCA 1), mammary carcinoma (MCA-4), fibrosarcoma (FSA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC VII) were inoculated into the thighs of female C3Hf/Kam mice. Mice bearing 8 mm tumors were treated with paclitaxel (40 mg/kg). The growth delay, which was defined as the time in days for tumors in the treated groups to grow from 8 to 12 mm in diameter minus the time in days for tumors in the untreated control group to reach the same size, was measured to determine the effect of paclitaxel on the tumors. Sequential scintigraphy in mice bearing 10 to 14 mm tumors was conducted at 5, 30, 60, 120, 240 min and 24 hrs postinjection of 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel (3.7 MBq) or 111 In-DTPA as a control tracer. The tumor uptakes (% injection dose/pixel) were determined. The growth delay of OCA 1, MCA-4, FSA and SCC VII tumors was 13.6, 4.0, -0.02 and -0.28 days, respectively. In other words, OCA 1 and MCA-4 were paclitaxel-sensitive tumors, whereas FSA and SCC VII were paclitaxel-resistant tumors. The tumor uptakes at 24 hrs postinjection of In-111 DTPA paclitaxel of OCA 1, MCA-4, FSA and SCC VII were 1.0 x 10 -3 , 1.6 x 10 -3 , 2.2 x 10 -3 and 9.0 x 10 -3 % injection dose/pixel, respectively. There was no correlation between the response to chemotherapy with paclitaxel and the tumor uptakes of 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel. Scintigraphy with 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel could not predict the response to paclitaxel chemotherapy. Although there was significant accumulation of the paclitaxel in the tumor cells, additional mechanisms must be operative for the agent to be effective against the neoplasm. 111 In-DTPA-paclitaxel activity is apparently different from that of paclitaxel with Cremophor. (author)

  5. Three-dimensional power doppler ultrasound is useful to monitor the response to treatment in a patient with primary papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jen-Min; Huang, Yu-Fang; Chen, Helen H W; Cheng, Ya-Min; Chou, Cheng-Yang

    2006-05-01

    To date, this is the first report to monitor changes of intratumor vascularization and the response to radiation and Cyberknife therapy in a patient with recurrent primary papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum by three dimensional (3D) power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). Transvaginal 3D PDUS detected a recurrent presacral tumor with abundant intratumor vascularity. Serial examinations of the tumor volume and serum CA-125 level were studied before, during, and 6 mo after therapy. Meanwhile, the intratumor blood flow was measured and expressed as vascularity indices. All of the tumor volume, intratumor vascularity indices and serum CA-125 level decreased progressively following therapy. A remaining lesion with nearly absent intratumor power Doppler signals suggested a scarring lesion posttreatment. Indeed, CT-guided tissue biopsy confirmed fibrotic change. 3D PDUS is useful to monitor the response to treatments and to differentiate residual tumors from lesions of scarring change posttreatment. It provides more accurate posttreatment information than pelvic computed tomography.

  6. Circulating tumor cells in patients with breast cancer: monitoring chemotherapy success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ušiaková, Zuzana; Mikulová, Veronika; Pintérová, Daniela; Brychta, Milan; Valchář, Josef; Kubecová, Martina; Tesařová, Petra; Bobek, Vladimír; Kološtová, Katarína

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are an independent prognostic factor for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). However, the role of CTCs in early breast cancer management is not yet clearly defined. The aim of this study was to assess the CTC-positivity rate in patients undergoing chemotherapy depending on breast cancer stage in the adjuvant and neoadjuvant setting. We evaluated the ability to confirm therapy response by CTC analysis. CTCs isolated from blood by means of immunomagnetic separation were further characterized by means of reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EPCAM), mucin 1 (MUC1) and v-erb-b2 avian erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 2 (HER2) transcripts with the AdnaTest™. This prospective study included 179 patients; altogether 419 blood samples were evaluated. Patients with primary tumors were divided into neoadjuvant (n=38), and adjuvant (n=100) groups. Forty-one patients with MBC were evaluated under palliative treatment. CTC positivity was described in 35% of patients with early breast cancer without detected metastases before neoadjuvant chemotherapy; similarly, a 26% positivity rate was found in the adjuvant group. In patients with MBC, we detected CTCs in 43% of them. After completing the therapy, the CTC positivity rate decreased to 5% in the neoadjuvant group, to 13% in the adjuvant group and to 12% in the MBC group. CTC positivity after the therapy may classify a subgroup of patients at high risk of developing metastatic disease. This was even true when a patient was evaluated as being CTC-negative before chemotherapy. The multivariate analysis evaluating the correlation of CTC positivity with clinicopathological characteristics such as tumor size, nodal involvement, hormone receptor status, HER2 expression and number of metastatic sites revealed no statistically significant relationships. CTC status may have a significant impact on early BC management

  7. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  9. Radiobiological predictors of tumor and acute normal tissue response in radiotherapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciejewski, B.; Skladowski, K.; Zajusz, A.

    1991-01-01

    The importance of measurements of the potential doubling time (T pot. ) and of the survival fraction at 2.0 Gy (SF 2 ), and a method modifying acute radiation response of normal oral mucosa are discussed. Tumor clonogen repopulation accelerates around day 28 of the treatment, and the rate of repopulation is not constant but continuously increases from about 0.3 Gy/day to 1.0-1.3 Gy/day between day 28 and 65 of the treatment. This may suggest that T pot. values decrease correspondingly. The relevance of prior-to-treatment T pot. measurements to clinical situations is discussed. The SF 2 value reflects the intrinsic radiosensitivity of human tumors. The SF 2 values are expected to be valuable as predictors for tumor response to irradiation. Variations in the SF 2 values depending on tumor characteristics and assay methods are discussed in relation to the dose response and tumor cure probability. The effect of modifying the repopulation rate in the oral mucosa by stimulation with a 2% silver nitrate solution is discussed. Although these prognosticators are different in their nature, they might provide a rational basis for selecting patients into optimal irradiation treatment and might allow to modify the radiation response of dose-limiting normal tissues. (author). 5 figs., 1 tab., 28 refs

  10. Semiautomated volumetric response evaluation as an imaging biomarker in superior sulcus tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vos, C.G.; Paul, M.A.; Dahele, M.; Soernsen de Koste, J.R. van; Senan, S.; Bahce, I.; Smit, E.F.; Thunnissen, E.; Hartemink, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric response to therapy has been suggested as a biomarker for patient-centered outcomes. The primary aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was associated with pathological complete response (pCR) or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. The secondary aim was to evaluate a semiautomated method for serial volume assessment. In this retrospective study, treatment outcomes were obtained from a departmental database. The tumor was delineated on the computed tomography (CT) scan used for radiotherapy planning, which was typically performed during the first cycle of chemotherapy. These contours were transferred to the post-chemoradiotherapy diagnostic CT scan using deformable image registration (DIR) with/without manual editing. CT scans from 30 eligible patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 51 months. Neither absolute nor relative reduction in tumor volume following chemoradiotherapy correlated with pCR or 2-year survival. The tumor volumes determined by DIR alone and DIR + manual editing correlated to a high degree (R 2 = 0.99, P < 0.01). Volumetric response to induction chemoradiotherapy was not correlated with pCR or survival in patients with superior sulcus tumors managed with trimodality therapy. DIR-based contour propagation merits further evaluation as a tool for serial volumetric assessment. (orig.)

  11. 99mTc-Labeled Cyclic RGD Peptides for Noninvasive Monitoring of Tumor Integrin αvβ3 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhou

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the biologic evaluations of [99mTc(HYNIC-3P-RGD2(tricine(TPPTS] (99mTc-3P-RGD2: 6-hydrazinonicotinyl; 3P-RGD2 = PEG4-E[PEG4-c(RGDfK]2; PEG4 = 15-amino-4,7,10,13-tetraoxapentadecanoic acid; and TPPTS = trisodium triphenylpho-sphine-3,3′,3“-trisulfonate, [99mTc(HYNIC-3G-RGD2(tricine(TPPTS] (99mTc-3G-RGD2: 3G-RGD2 = G3-E[G3-c(RGDfK]2 and G3 = Gly-Gly-Gly, and 99mTcO(MAG2−3G-RGD2 (MAG2 = mercaptoacetylglycylglycyl as radiotracers for noninvasive imaging of tumor integrin αvβ3 expression in five xenografted tumor-bearing models. Biodistribution and imaging studies were performed in athymic nude mice bearing U87MG, MDA-MB-435, A549, HT29, or PC-3 tumor xenografts. Immunochemistry was performed using the cultured primary tumor cells and xenografted tumor tissues. It was found that the radiotracer tumor uptake followed the trend U87MG > MDA-MB-435 ≈ HT29 ≈ A549 > PC-3. The total integrin β3 expression levels followed the general trend: U87MG > MDA-MB-435 ≈ A549~HT29 > PC-3. There is a linear relationship between the radiotracer injected dose per gram tumor uptake and the total integrin β3 expression levels. On the basis of these, it was concluded that radiotracer tumor uptake is contributed by integrin αVβ3 expressed on tumor cells and activated endothelial cells of the tumor neovasculature. 99mTc-3P-RGD2 has the capability to monitor integrin αvβ3 expression in a noninvasive fashion.

  12. Monitoring tumor motion with on-line mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography imaging in a cine mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, Bodo; Gayou, Olivier; Parda, David S; Miften, Moyed

    2008-01-01

    Accurate daily patient localization is becoming increasingly important in external-beam radiotherapy (RT). Mega-voltage cone-beam computed tomography (MV-CBCT) utilizing a therapy beam and an on-board electronic portal imager can be used to localize tumor volumes and verify the patient's position prior to treatment. MV-CBCT produces a static volumetric image and therefore can only account for inter-fractional changes. In this work, the feasibility of using the MV-CBCT raw data as a fluoroscopic series of portal images to monitor tumor changes due to e.g. respiratory motion was investigated. A method was developed to read and convert the CB raw data into a cine. To improve the contrast-to-noise ratio on the MV-CB projection data, image post-processing with filtering techniques was investigated. Volumes of interest from the planning CT were projected onto the MV-cine. Because of the small exposure and the varying thickness of the patient depending on the projection angle, soft-tissue contrast was limited. Tumor visibility as a function of tumor size and projection angle was studied. The method was well suited in the upper chest, where motion of the tumor as well as of the diaphragm could be clearly seen. In the cases of patients with non-small cell lung cancer with medium or large tumor masses, we verified that the tumor mass was always located within the PTV despite respiratory motion. However for small tumors the method is less applicable, because the visibility of those targets becomes marginal. Evaluation of motion in non-superior-inferior directions might also be limited for small tumor masses. Viewing MV-CBCT data in a cine mode adds to the utility of MV-CBCT for verification of tumor motion and for deriving individualized treatment margins

  13. Tumors associated with HIV / AIDS monitoring 45 patients between 1/1998 and 6/2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krygier, G.; Lombardo, K.; Sosa, A.; Ocampo; Suárez P, R.; Muse, I.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: This paper is intended to show 45 patients with cancer associated the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) / AIDS, diagnosed, treated and followed over a period of 6.5 years in our country. The medical records were retrospectively analyzed of cancer patients diagnosed HIV positive on 5 institutions public and private in our midst, in the period between 1/98 and 6/04 (Institute of Health, National Institute of Oncology, Hospital of Clinics, Service Comprehensive Medical, Spanish Mutual Aid Association). They took into account different variables (origin, medical record number, sex, age, sexual habits, addiction to injecting drugs, HIV diagnosis positive diagnosis of AIDS, infectious prophylaxis, antiretroviral therapy, lymphocyte start and in the evolution population viral load start and evolutionary, tumor type, stage, treatment received, date of last control and status the close of the work). We compared data collected by us AIDS Ministry report of Public Health. 24 cases were Kaposi sarcomas (one nodal exclusive), 11 were non-Hodgkin lymphomas (two of SNC and other gastric), 1 Hodgkin's Disease 1 rectal cancer, tongue cancer 1 1 laryngeal cancer, thyroid cancer 1 1 Melanoma 1 parotid cancer, cancer 1 Lung and breast cancer 1. No cervical tumors or recorded anal canal in the study population. Treatments received varied for each disease depending on the stage of the disease and viral load / Towns lymphocyte start. This is the first study with longer follow-up in our country HIV patients / AIDS-associated cancer, he reflected the difficulty in collecting data, various types of cancer in the study population and demand the need to create an accurate and accessible system of monitoring these patients

  14. Tumor necrosis factor blockers influence macrophage responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    HARRIS, JAMES; HARRIS, JAMES

    2008-01-01

    PUBLISHED umor necrosis factor (TNF)?? is a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates inflammation in response to various pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but is also a key factor in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune diseases. Three TNF???suppressing drugs have been approved to treat selected autoimmune diseases; 2 are monoclonal antibodies against TNF?? (adalimumab and infliximab), and the other is a soluble TNF receptor/Fc fusion protein (etanerce...

  15. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-F. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y.-Y. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Nuclear Medicine Department, Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Pang Fei [Department of Veterinary Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, 155, Sec. 2, Li-Nong Street, Pei-tou 112, Taipei, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2007-02-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both {sup 131}I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis.

  16. Monitoring of tumor growth and metastasis potential in MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.-F.; Lin, Y.-Y.; Wang, H.-E.; Liu, R.-S.; Pang Fei; Hwang, J.-J.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular imaging of reporter gene expression provides a rapid, sensitive and non-invasive monitoring of tumor behaviors. In this study, we reported the establishment of a novel animal model for longitudinal examination of tumor growth kinetics and metastatic spreading in vivo. The highly metastatic human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435s cell line was engineered to stably express herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk) and luciferase (luc). Both 131 I-FIAU and D-luciferin were used as reporter probes. For orthotopic tumor formation, MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc cells were implanted into the first nipple of 6-week-old female NOD/SCID mice. For metastatic study, cells were injected via the lateral tail vein. Mice-bearing MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc tumors were scanned for tumor growth and metastatsis using Xenogen IVIS50 system. Gamma scintigraphy and whole-body autoradiography were also applied to confirm the tumor localization. The results of bioluminescence imaging as well as histopathological finding showed that tumors could be detected in femur, spine, ovary, lungs, kidney, adrenal gland, lymph nodes and muscle at 16 weeks post i.v. injection, and correlated photons could be quantified. This MDA-MB-435s/tk-luc human breast carcinoma-bearing mouse model combined with multimodalities of molecular imaging may facilitate studies on the molecular mechanisms of cancer invasion and metastasis

  17. Functional response of tumor vasculature in rats' glioma to hypercarbia evaluated by MR perfusion weighted imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingbo; Feng Xiaoyuan; Liang Zonghui; Chen Shuan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility of MR PWI in judging maturity and variability of tumor vasculature in gliomas in rats. Methods: Twenty male SD rats were randomly assigned to tumor group and control group. Four weeks after implantation of C6 glioma cells in the brains of tumor group and injection of saline in the brains of control group, all rats were examined using MR PWI before and after inhalation of a mixture of 10% CO2 and 90% air. PaCO 2 and blood pH values of rats were monitored. Relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) and relative cerebral blood flow(rCBF) values of tumors and normal brain tissue were measured. Brain sample were examined histologically using HE and immunohistochemical staining for smooth muscle actin(SMA). The histological features of gliomas were observed and SMA positively stained vessels of each tumor were counted manually using a light microscope. Perfusion data and pathological findings were analyzed statistically with SPSS for Windows. Results: PaCO 2 increased significantly [from(4.69±0.62)kPa to (7.62±0.81) kPa in tumor group and from (4.67±0.51) kPa to (7.63±0.78) kPa in control group, P 0.05), while changing rate of rCBV, rCBF in normal brain tissue correlated well with number of positive SMA labeled vessels (r=0.721 and 0.525, P 2 increase in the normal brain and in the tumor. It may be a useful technique to measure maturity of tumor vessels. (authors)

  18. Effect of carbon monoxide breathing on hypoxia and radiation response in the SCCVII tumor in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, C.; Marianne, M.D.; Nordsmark, M.; Khalil, A.A.; Horsman, M.R.; Overgaard, J.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the influence of a clinically relevant concentration of carbon monoxide (CO) on tumor oxygenation and responses to irradiation. The murine tumor model was the SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma transplanted to the feet of C3H/Km mice. Sixty minutes of breathing CO at 200 ppm resulted in a carboxyhemoglobin level of 15%. This resulted in a reduction in p50 (the oxygen partial pressure at which hemoglobin is 50% saturated) to 78% of the control value, and a decrease in tumor blood perfusion to 73% of the control value. The combined effect of a decrease in effective hemoglobin and blood perfusion resulted in a reduction in tumor oxygen supply to 62% of the control value. In agreement with this, intratumoral pO 2 measurements showed a significant increase in tumor hypoxia, such that the percentage of measurements with low pO 2 (≤ 5 mmHg) increased from 33% to 62%. The fraction of clonogenic hypoxic cells, measured radiobiologically by paired cell survival curves, similarly increased from 0.2% to 3.8%. Radiation sensitivity, evaluated from in vivo-in vitro excision assay, was significantly decreased by CO in 1, 4, 8, and 12 fractions were 0.71, 0.77, 0.83, and 0.71, respectively. The present SCCVII tumor data confirm the general experimental observation that CO breathing significantly increases tumor hypoxia and reduces the effectiveness of ionizing irradiation. 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  19. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shrotriya, Shiva

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence.

  20. "The Lower Threshold" phenomenon in tumor cells toward endogenous digitalis-like compounds: Responsible for tumorigenesis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun Weidemann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since their first discovery as potential anti-cancer drugs decades ago, there is increasing evidence that digitalis-like compounds (DLC have anti-tumor effects. Less is known about endogenous DLC (EDLC metabolism and regulation. As stress hormones synthesized in and secreted from the adrenal gland, they likely take part in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. In a previous study, we revealed reduced EDLC concentrations in plasma and organs from immune-compromised animals and proposed that a similar situation of a deregulated HPA axis with "adrenal EDLF exhaustion" may contribute to tumorigenesis in chronic stress situations. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that a lowered EDLC response threshold of tumor cells as compared with normal cells increases the risk of tumorigenesis, especially in those individuals with reduced EDLC plasma concentrations after chronic stress exposure. We will evaluate this hypothesis by (a summarizing the effects of different DLC concentrations on tumor as compared with normal cells and (b reviewing some essential differences in the Na/K-ATPase of tumor as compared with normal cells (isoform pattern, pump activity, mutations of other signalosome receptors. We will conclude that (1 tumor cells, indeed, seem to have their individual "physiologic" EDLC response range that already starts at pmolar levels and (2 that individuals with markedly reduced (pmolar EDLC plasma levels are predisposed to cancer because these EDLC concentrations will predominantly stimulate the proliferation of tumor cells. Finally, we will summarize preliminary results from our department supporting this hypothesis.

  1. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Høgh Hansen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the ...

  2. Precision cancer immunotherapy: optimizing dendritic cell-based strategies to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses against individual patient tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takuya; Nagaoka, Koji; Takahara, Masashi; Yang, Xiao Yi; Liu, Cong-Xiao; Guo, Hongtao; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Hobeika, Amy; Hartman, Zachary; Morse, Michael A; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-05-01

    Most dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines have loaded the DC with defined antigens, but loading with autologos tumor-derived antigens would generate DCs that activate personalized tumor-specific T-cell responses. We hypothesized that DC matured with an optimized combination of reagents and loaded with tumor-derived antigens using a clinically feasible electroporation strategy would induce potent antitumor immunity. We first studied the effects on DC maturation and antigen presentation of the addition of picibanil (OK432) to a combination of zoledronic acid, tumor necrosis factor-α, and prostaglandin E2. Using DC matured with the optimized combination, we tested 2 clinically feasible sources of autologous antigen for electroloading, total tumor mRNA or total tumor lysate, to determine which stimulated more potent antigen-specific T cells in vitro and activated more potent antitumor immunity in vivo. The combination of tumor necrosis factor-α/prostaglandin E2/zoledronic acid/OK432 generated DC with high expression of maturation markers and antigen-specific T-cell stimulatory function in vitro. Mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA [mRNA electroporated dendritic cell (EPDC)] induced greater expansion of antigen-specific T cells in vitro than DC electroloaded with tumor lysate (lysate EPDC). In a therapeutic model of MC38-carcinoembryonic antigen colon cancer-bearing mice, vaccination with mRNA EPDC induced the most efficient anti-carcinoembryonic antigen cellular immune response, which significantly suppressed tumor growth. In conclusion, mature DC electroloaded with tumor-derived mRNA are a potent cancer vaccine, especially useful when specific tumor antigens for vaccination have not been identified, allowing autologous tumor, and if unavailable, allogeneic cell lines to be used as an unbiased source of antigen. Our data support clinical testing of this strategy.

  3. Factors predicting the feasibility of monitoring lower-limb muscle motor evoked potentials in patients undergoing excision of spinal cord tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajshekhar, Vedantam; Velayutham, Parthiban; Joseph, Mathew; Babu, K Srinivasa

    2011-06-01

    This prospective study on intraoperative muscle motor evoked potentials (MMEPs) from lower-limb muscles in patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors was performed to: 1) determine preoperative clinical features that could predict successful recording of lower-limb MMEPs; 2) determine the muscle in the lower limb from which MMEPs could be most consistently obtained; 3) assess the need to monitor more than 1 muscle per limb; and 4) determine the effect of a successful baseline MMEP recording on early postoperative motor outcome. Of 115 consecutive patients undergoing surgery for spinal cord tumors, 110 were included in this study (44 intramedullary and 66 intradural extramedullary tumors). Muscle MEPs were generated using transcranial electrical stimulation under controlled anesthesia and were recorded from the tibialis anterior, quadriceps, soleus, and external anal sphincter muscles bilaterally. The effect of age (≤ 20 or > 20 years old), location of the tumor (intramedullary or extramedullary), segmental location of the tumor (cervical, thoracic, or lumbar), duration of symptoms (≤ 12 or > 12 months), preoperative functional grade (Nurick Grades 0-3 or 4-5), and muscle power (Medical Research Council Grades 0/5-3/5 or 4/5-5/5) on the success rate of obtaining MMEPs was studied using multiple regression analysis. The effect of the ability to monitor MMEPs on motor outcome at discharge from the hospital was also analyzed. The overall success rate for obtaining baseline lower-limb MMEPs was 68.2% (75 of 110 patients). Eighty-nine percent of patients with Nurick Grades 0-3 had successful MMEP recordings. Muscle MEPs could not be obtained in any patient in whom muscle power was 2/5 or less, but were obtained from 91.4% of patients with muscle power of 4/5 or more. Analysis showed that only preoperative Nurick grade (p ≤ 0.0001) and muscle power (p < 0.0001) were significant predictors of the likelihood of obtaining MMEPs. Responses were most consistently

  4. Patterns of DNA damage response in intracranial germ cell tumors versus glioblastomas reflect cell of origin rather than brain environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Jirina; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Krizova, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) machinery becomes commonly activated in response to oncogenes and during early stages of development of solid malignancies, with an exception of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). The active DDR signaling evokes cell death or senescence but this anti-tumor barrier ...... checkpoints in intracranial tumorigenesis, with implications for the differential biological responses of diverse tumor types to endogenous stress as well as to genotoxic treatments such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy....

  5. Response Monitoring and Adjustment: Differential Relations with Psychopathic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Konrad; Finy, M. Sima; Sprague, Jenessa; Verona, Edelyn

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the relation between psychopathy and cognitive functioning often show mixed results, partially because different factors of psychopathy have not been considered fully. Based on previous research, we predicted divergent results based on a two-factor model of psychopathy (interpersonal-affective traits and impulsive-antisocial traits). Specifically, we predicted that the unique variance of interpersonal-affective traits would be related to increased monitoring (i.e., error-related negativity) and adjusting to errors (i.e., post-error slowing), whereas impulsive-antisocial traits would be related to reductions in these processes. Three studies using a diverse selection of assessment tools, samples, and methods are presented to identify response monitoring correlates of the two main factors of psychopathy. In Studies 1 (undergraduates), 2 (adolescents), and 3 (offenders), interpersonal-affective traits were related to increased adjustment following errors and, in Study 3, to enhanced monitoring of errors. Impulsive-antisocial traits were not consistently related to error adjustment across the studies, although these traits were related to a deficient monitoring of errors in Study 3. The results may help explain previous mixed findings and advance implications for etiological models of psychopathy. PMID:24933282

  6. The role of RCAS1 as a biomarker in diagnosing CRC and monitoring tumor recurrence and metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Su-xia; Wang, Jing; Wang, Li-juan; Jin, Gui-hua; Ying, Xia; He, Chen-chen; Guo, Xi-jing; Zhang, Jian-ying; Zhang, Ying; Zhu, Qing

    2014-06-01

    Receptor-binding cancer antigen expressed on SiSo cells (RCAS1) plays an important role in tumor progression by helping tumor cell to escape from host immunological surveillance or modifying the characteristics of connective tissue around. RCAS1 may appropriately reflect the development and prognosis of tumor. In the study, we sought to identify the clinical significance of RCAS1 in colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosis and tumor recurrence monitoring. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) with tissue array slides was preformed to analyze RCAS1 protein expression in CRC, colorectal polyps, and normal colon tissues. RCAS1 levels in colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in colorectal polyps and normal colon tissues (PCRC are significantly higher than in healthy controls and polyps (PCRC was 82.1 %, which was higher than carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Especially in CEA-negative cases, the sensitivity of RCAS1 was 88.2 %. Finally, CRC patients who were followed up showed a serum RCAS1 level which significantly decreased after surgery (PCRC diagnosis but also useful for monitoring tumor recurrence. RCAS1 might be a supplementary serological marker for CRC.

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiographic and metabolic response rates following image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohammed, Nasiruddin; Grills, Inga S.; Wong, Ching-Yee Oliver; Galerani, Ana Paula; Chao, Kenneth; Welsh, Robert; Chmielewski, Gary; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate radiographic and metabolic response after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for early lung tumors. Materials and methods: Thirty-nine tumors were treated prospectively with SBRT (dose = 48-60 Gy, 4-5 Fx). Thirty-six cases were primary NSCLC (T1N0 = 67%; T2N0 = 25%); three cases were solitary metastases. Patients were followed using CT and PET at 6, 16, and 52 weeks post-SBRT, with CT follow-up thereafter. RECIST and EORTC criteria were used to evaluate CT and PET responses. Results: At median follow-up of 9 months (0.4-26), RECIST complete response (CR), partial response (PR), and stable disease (SD) rates were 3%, 43%, 54% at 6 weeks; 15%, 38%, 46% at 16 weeks; 27%, 64%, 9% at 52 weeks. Mean baseline tumor volume was reduced by 46%, 70%, 87%, and 96%, respectively at 6, 16, 52, and 72 weeks. Mean baseline maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) was 8.3 (1.1-20.3) and reduced to 3.4, 3.0, and 3.7 at 6, 16, and 52 weeks after SBRT. EORTC metabolic CR/PR, SD, and progressive disease rates were 67%, 22%, 11% at 6 weeks; 86%, 10%, 3% at 16 weeks; 95%, 5%, 0% at 52 weeks. Conclusions: SBRT yields excellent RECIST and EORTC based response. Metabolic response is rapid however radiographic response occurs even after 1-year post treatment.

  9. Predicting Response to Chemotherapy based on Tumor Marker Trend in Patients with Testicular Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nekulová, M.; Pecen, Ladislav; Kocák, I.; Šimíčková, M.; Frgala, T.; Pilný, R.; Valík, D.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 8, - (2004), s. 70 ISSN 1211-8869. [CECHTUMA 2004. 01.10.2004-03.10.2004, Prague] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1030915 Keywords : evaluation of therapy response * model of tumor markers decrease * testicular cancer Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  10. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  11. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction-both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Can Regulate the Immune Response in the Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Poggi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is a good target for therapy in solid tumors and hematological malignancies. Indeed, solid tumor cells’ growth and expansion can influence neighboring cells’ behavior, leading to a modulation of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC activities and remodeling of extracellular matrix components. This leads to an altered microenvironment, where reparative mechanisms, in the presence of sub-acute inflammation, are not able to reconstitute healthy tissue. Carcinoma cells can undergo epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT, a key step to generate metastasis; these mesenchymal-like cells display the functional behavior of MSC. Furthermore, MSC can support the survival and growth of leukemic cells within bone marrow participating in the leukemic cell niche. Notably, MSC can inhibit the anti-tumor immune response through either carcinoma-associated fibroblasts or bone marrow stromal cells. Experimental data have indicated their relevance in regulating cytolytic effector lymphocytes of the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. Herein, we will discuss some of the evidence in hematological malignancies and solid tumors. In particular, we will focus our attention on the means by which it is conceivable to inhibit MSC-mediated immune suppression and trigger anti-tumor innate immunity.

  13. Variability in blood flow and pO2 in tumors in response to carbogen breathing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanzen, Jennifer L.; Braun, Rod D.; Ong, Aqui L.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: There is speculation that the CO 2 in carbogen (95% O 2 , 5% CO 2 ) can block the vasoconstrictive effects of oxygen. However, it has recently been shown that blood flow in human tumors is variable while patients breathe carbogen. Furthermore, we have shown a consistent decrease in tumor blood flow (TBF) with carbogen breathing in the rat window chamber model. Also, we have previously shown that there is no significant difference in tumor growth time after radiation with air vs. carbogen breathing. This study was designed to investigate the effects of carbogen breathing on blood flow and oxygen levels in a solid tumor. Methods: Measurements were made in Fischer-344 rats with 8-10 mm diameter R3230Ac tumors transplanted either within the quadriceps muscle (n = 16) or subcutis (n = 14). Nontumor-bearing quadriceps muscle was studied in six other rats. After a 20-minute air-breathing baseline, rats breathed carbogen for an additional 40 minutes. Partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) was continuously monitored at one position for 60 minutes using 9-12 μm diameter oxygen microelectrodes. Blood flow was simultaneously monitored in all animals using laser Doppler flowmetry (1-2 probes/tumor). Results: Blood flow changes during carbogen breathing were variable in all tissues and intratumoral heterogeneity was observed. Despite variability in blood flow, pO 2 consistently increased in normal muscle but varied in both tumor sites. During carbogen breathing, the percent pO 2 measurements greater than the baseline average were 99.5% ± 0.4% (mean ± SEM), 42.7% ± 13.8%, and 79.8% ± 11.0% in normal muscle, subcutaneous tumor, and muscle tumor, respectively. To show the magnitude of change, average pO 2 values during air and carbogen breathing were calculated for each site. Normal muscle increased from 14.9 ± 2.3 to 39.0 ± 6.4 mm Hg (paired t-test; p = 0.009). Muscle tumors showed a rise from 14.6 ± 3.2 to 34.5 ± 8.2 mm Hg (p = 0.019). However, pO 2 in subcutaneous

  14. Correlation between dose and tumor response in the radiotherapy of lung cancer of various histological types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Kenji; Kusuhara, Toshiyuki; Nishikawa, Kiyoshi; Asada, Keiko; Watanabe, Katsushi

    1984-01-01

    Correlation between dose and tumor response by cell types was determined in 50 patients with lung cancer in order to predict the possibility of further tumor regression. The TDF (time-dose-fractionation) concept was used as dose factor. The radiation source was a cobalt-60 γ-ray or linear accelerator 10 MV X-ray. As a routine regime a fraction dose of 2 Gy five times per week was given to 39 of the 50 patients, but a dose of 2 Gy three times per week or of 1.5 Gy five times per week was given to seven and four patients, respectively. Radiation response was the best in small cell carcinoma and better in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma, showing a tumor regression rate of 50% or more in 90%, 80% and 58% of the patients, respectively. The correlation between tumor regression rate and TDF values was good in squamous cell carcinoma (r = 0.73) and small cell carcinoma (r = - 0.72), but poor in adenocarcinoma (r = - 0.10). These results suggest that in squamous cell carcinoma improvement of tumor regression can be expected by increasing TDF values, and in adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma the optimal TDF values are about 100 and 60 to 80, respectively. (author)

  15. Ultrasonic RF time series for early assessment of the tumor response to chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingguang; Wang, Jianwei; Li, Qing; Lin, Chunyi; Guo, Zhixing; Zheng, Wei; Yan, Cuiju; Li, Anhua; Zhou, Jianhua

    2018-01-05

    Ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) time series have been shown to carry tissue typing information. To evaluate the potential of RF time series for early prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy, 50MCF-7 breast cancer-bearing nude mice were randomized to receive cisplatin and paclitaxel (treatment group; n = 26) or sterile saline (control group; n = 24). Sequential ultrasound imaging was performed on days 0, 3, 6, and 8 of treatment to simultaneously collect B-mode images and RF data. Six RF time series features, slope, intercept, S1, S2, S3 , and S4 , were extracted during RF data analysis and contrasted with microstructural tumor changes on histopathology. Chemotherapy administration reduced tumor growth relative to control on days 6 and 8. Compared with day 0, intercept, S1 , and S2 were increased while slope was decreased on days 3, 6, and 8 in the treatment group. Compared with the control group, intercept, S1, S2, S3 , and S4 were increased, and slope was decreased, on days 3, 6, and 8 in the treatment group. Tumor cell density decreased significantly in the latter on day 3. We conclude that ultrasonic RF time series analysis provides a simple way to noninvasively assess the early tumor response to chemotherapy.

  16. Misonidazole in patients receiving radical radiotherapy: pharmacokinetic effects of phenytoin tumor response and neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.L.; Biol, F.I.; Patterson, I.C.M.; Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Henk, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    In 1978, a pilot study began of 29 patients with advanced tumors of the head and neck. The study showed an initial peripheral neuropathy rate of 55%, despite a dose limitation of 12 g/m 2 of misonidazole. Tumor response at 9 months was most encouraging. We are now able to examine tumor response and persistence of neuropathy in these patients 2 1/2 years after radical radiotherapy. The results are comparable with those obtained with hyperbaric oxygen in a clinical trial at this center during the 1970's. Neuropathy was a serious side effect but the drug phenytoin has been shown to shorten the half-life of misonidazole. We have examined the effect of phenytoin on the pharmacokinetics of misonidazole in 13 patients who received radical radiotherapy for advanced head and neck tumors or oesophageal tumors. Misonidazole was given in multiple doses, i.e. daily or weekly as it would be used in conventional therapy. Phenytoin was given either daily throughout treatment, or it was withdrawn during treatment. There were dramatic changes in the half-life of misonidazole, but the concentration at the time of irradiation was little affected. The significant changes in the half-life of misonidazole and the increased concentration of the metabolite desmethylmisonidazole are discussed

  17. Poly (I:C) enhances the anti-tumor activity of canine parvovirus NS1 protein by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Yadav, Pavan Kumar; Tiwari, A K; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Sahoo, A P

    2016-09-01

    The canine parvovirus NS1 (CPV2.NS1) protein selectively induces apoptosis in the malignant cells. However, for an effective in vivo tumor treatment strategy, an oncolytic agent also needs to induce a potent anti-tumor immune response. In the present study, we used poly (I:C), a TLR3 ligand, as an adjuvant along with CPV2.NS1 to find out if the combination can enhance the oncolytic activity by inducing a potent anti-tumor immune response. The 4T1 mammary carcinoma cells were used to induce mammary tumor in Balb/c mice. The results suggested that poly (I:C), when given along with CPV2.NS1, not only significantly reduced the tumor growth but also augmented the immune response against tumor antigen(s) as indicated by the increase in blood CD4+ and CD8+ counts and infiltration of immune cells in the tumor tissue. Further, blood serum analysis of the cytokines revealed that Th1 cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) were significantly upregulated in the treatment group indicating activation of cell-mediated immune response. The present study reports the efficacy of CPV2.NS1 along with poly (I:C) not only in inhibiting the mammary tumor growth but also in generating an active anti-tumor immune response without any visible toxicity. The results of our study may help in developing CPV2.NS1 and poly (I: C) combination as a cancer therapeutic regime to treat various malignancies.

  18. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer

  19. Noninvasive optical monitoring multiple physiological parameters response to cytokine storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Cancer and other disease originated by immune or genetic problems have become a main cause of death. Gene/cell therapy is a highlighted potential method for the treatment of these diseases. However, during the treatment, it always causes cytokine storm, which probably trigger acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Here we developed a point-of-care device for noninvasive monitoring cytokine storm induced multiple physiological parameters simultaneously. Oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water concentration and deep-tissue/tumor temperature variations were simultaneously measured by extended near infrared spectroscopy. Detection algorithms of symptoms such as shock, edema, deep-tissue fever and tissue fibrosis were developed and included. Based on these measurements, modeling of patient tolerance and cytokine storm intensity were carried out. This custom device was tested on patients experiencing cytokine storm in intensive care unit. The preliminary data indicated the potential of our device in popular and milestone gene/cell therapy, especially, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell immunotherapy (CAR-T).

  20. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  1. SU-E-J-275: Review - Computerized PET/CT Image Analysis in the Evaluation of Tumor Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W; Wang, J; Zhang, H [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To review the literature in using computerized PET/CT image analysis for the evaluation of tumor response to therapy. Methods: We reviewed and summarized more than 100 papers that used computerized image analysis techniques for the evaluation of tumor response with PET/CT. This review mainly covered four aspects: image registration, tumor segmentation, image feature extraction, and response evaluation. Results: Although rigid image registration is straightforward, it has been shown to achieve good alignment between baseline and evaluation scans. Deformable image registration has been shown to improve the alignment when complex deformable distortions occur due to tumor shrinkage, weight loss or gain, and motion. Many semi-automatic tumor segmentation methods have been developed on PET. A comparative study revealed benefits of high levels of user interaction with simultaneous visualization of CT images and PET gradients. On CT, semi-automatic methods have been developed for only tumors that show marked difference in CT attenuation between the tumor and the surrounding normal tissues. Quite a few multi-modality segmentation methods have been shown to improve accuracy compared to single-modality algorithms. Advanced PET image features considering spatial information, such as tumor volume, tumor shape, total glycolytic volume, histogram distance, and texture features have been found more informative than the traditional SUVmax for the prediction of tumor response. Advanced CT features, including volumetric, attenuation, morphologic, structure, and texture descriptors, have also been found advantage over the traditional RECIST and WHO criteria in certain tumor types. Predictive models based on machine learning technique have been constructed for correlating selected image features to response. These models showed improved performance compared to current methods using cutoff value of a single measurement for tumor response. Conclusion: This review showed that

  2. A search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, K.

    1990-01-01

    The search for an impulsive increase corresponding to a solar neutron response on high-mountain neutron monitors requires control of the stability of the measurement and elimination of other sources of short-time increases of different kinds which are involved in fluctuations of cosmic-ray intensity. For the solar flare of June 3, 1982 the excess of counting rate on the Lomnicky stit neutron monitor is, within a factor or 1.8, equal to that expected from solar neutrons. Superposed epoch analysis of 17 flares with gamma-ray or hard X-ray production gives a slight tendency of an occurring signal in cases of high heliocentric angles, indicating anisotropic production of neutrons on the sun. The low statistical significance of the result indicates that higher temporal resolution, better evaluation of multiplicity, better knowledge of the power spectra of short-term intensity fluctuations on neutron monitors, as well as coordinated measurements of solar gamma-rays and neutrons on satellites, are required. 21 refs

  3. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph G Skeate

    Full Text Available Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  4. Nano-Pulse Stimulation induces immunogenic cell death in human papillomavirus-transformed tumors and initiates an adaptive immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeate, Joseph G; Da Silva, Diane M; Chavez-Juan, Elena; Anand, Snjezana; Nuccitelli, Richard; Kast, W Martin

    2018-01-01

    Nano-Pulse Stimulation (NPS) is a non-thermal pulsed electric field modality that has been shown to have cancer therapeutic effects. Here we applied NPS treatment to the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-transformed C3.43 mouse tumor cell model and showed that it is effective at eliminating primary tumors through the induction of immunogenic cell death while subsequently increasing the number of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within the tumor microenvironment. In vitro NPS treatment of C3.43 cells resulted in a doubling of activated caspase 3/7 along with the translocation of phosphatidylserine (PS) to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, indicating programmed cell death activity. Tumor-bearing mice receiving standard NPS treatment showed an initial decrease in tumor volume followed by clearing of tumors in most mice, and a significant increase in overall survival. Intra-tumor analysis of mice that were unable to clear tumors showed an inverse correlation between the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and the size of the tumor. Approximately half of the mice that cleared established tumors were protected against tumor re-challenge on the opposite flank. Selective depletion of CD8+ T cells eliminated this protection, suggesting that NPS treatment induces an adaptive immune response generating CD8+ T cells that recognize tumor antigen(s) associated with the C3.43 tumor model. This method may be utilized in the future to not only ablate primary tumors, but also to induce an anti-tumor response driven by effector CD8+ T cells capable of protecting individuals from disease recurrence.

  5. PET/MRI of Hepatic 90Y Microsphere Deposition Determines Individual Tumor Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, Kathryn J. [Washington University, Department of Radiology (United States); Maughan, Nichole M. [Washington University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Laforest, Richard [Washington University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Saad, Nael E. [Washington University, Department of Radiology (United States); Sharma, Akash [Washington University, Department of Nuclear Medicine (United States); Olsen, Jeffrey; Speirs, Christina K.; Parikh, Parag J., E-mail: parikh@wustl.edu [Washington University, Department of Radiation Oncology (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PurposeThe purpose of our study is to determine if there is a relationship between dose deposition measured by PET/MRI and individual lesion response to yttrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) microsphere radioembolization.Materials and Methods26 patients undergoing lobar treatment with {sup 90}Y microspheres underwent PET/MRI within 66 h of treatment and had follow-up imaging available. Adequate visualization of tumor was available in 24 patients, and contours were drawn on simultaneously acquired PET/MRI data. Dose volume histograms (DVHs) were extracted from dose maps, which were generated using a voxelized dose kernel. Similar contours to capture dimensional and volumetric change of tumors were drawn on follow-up imaging. Response was analyzed using both RECIST and volumetric RECIST (vRECIST) criteria.ResultsA total of 8 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 4 neuroendocrine tumor (NET), 9 colorectal metastases (CRC) patients, and 3 patients with other metastatic disease met inclusion criteria. Average dose was useful in predicting response between responders and non-responders for all lesion types and for CRC lesions alone using both response criteria (p < 0.05). D70 (minimum dose to 70 % of volume) was also useful in predicting response when using vRECIST. No significant trend was seen in the other tumor types. For CRC lesions, an average dose of 29.8 Gy offered 76.9 % sensitivity and 75.9 % specificity for response.ConclusionsPET/MRI of {sup 90}Y microsphere distribution showed significantly higher DVH values for responders than non-responders in patients with CRC. DVH analysis of {sup 90}Y microsphere distribution following treatment may be an important predictor of response and could be used to guide future adaptive therapy trials.

  6. Current diagnostic approach of bone tumors in childhood; Abordagem diagnostica atual dos tumores osseos na infancia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torre, Marcia Barbosa; Scatigno Neto, Andre [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas

    1995-09-01

    The authors analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients with bone tumors or soft tissue tumors. The advent of such a sensitive imaging modality is fortuitous and coincides with a recent change in the therapeutic approach to primary bone tumors. MRI is extremely valuable in monitoring the tumor response to the initial chemotherapy and is accurate defining the margins of tumor, facilitating planning of limb salvage surgical procedures. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  8. Nonlinearities in the response of beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Dehning, B.; Matheson, J.; Prochnow, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the LEP e + /e - collider at CERN, Geneva, a Spectrometer is used to determine the beam energy with a relative accuracy of 10 -4 .The Spectrometer measures the change in bending angle in a dipole magnet, the beam trajectory being obtained using beam position monitors (BPMs), which must have an accuracy close to 1 μm in order to achieve the desired precision. The BPMs used feature an aluminum block with an elliptical aperture and capacitive pickup electrodes. The response depends on the electrode geometry and also on the shape of the monitor aperture. In addition, the size of the beam itself contributes if the beam is off-center. The beam size varies according to the beta and dispersion functions at the Spectrometer, so that each BPM may exhibit a systematic shift of the measured beam position. We have investigated the implications of such shifts on the performance of the Spectrometer. We present analytical results, a computer model of the BPM response, and comparison with measurements. The model suggests strategies such as beam-based alignment to minimize the systematic effects arising from the BPMs

  9. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

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    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  10. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  11. The effect of hypofractionated radiation and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia on tumor immunogenicity and overall treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Wagner, Robert J.; Song, Ailin; Osterberg, Bjorn; Gladstone, David J.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Giustini, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    It is now known that many tumors develop molecular signals (immune checkpoint modulators) that inhibit an effective tumor immune response. New information also suggest that even well-known cancer treatment modalities such as radiation and hyperthermia generate potentially beneficial immune responses that have been blocked or mitigated by such immune checkpoints, or similar molecules. The cancer therapy challenge is to; a) identify these treatment-based immune signals (proteins, antigens, etc.); b) the treatment doses or regimens that produce them; and c) the mechanisms that block or have the potential to promote them. The goal of this preliminary study, using the B6 mouse - B16 tumor model, clinically relevant radiation doses and fractionation schemes (including those used clinically in hypofractionated radiation therapy), magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) and sophisticated protein, immune and tumor growth analysis techniques and modulators, is to determine the effect of specific radiation or hyperthermia alone and combined on overall treatment efficacy and immunologic response mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that radiation dose (10 Gy vs. 2 Gy) significantly alters the mechanism of cell death (apoptosis vs. mitosis vs. necrosis) and the resulting immunogenicity. Our hypothesis and data suggest this difference is protein/antigen and immune recognition-based. Similarly, our evidence suggest that radiation doses larger than the conventional 2 Gy dose and specific hyperthermia doses and techniques (including mNP hyperthermia treatment) can be immunologically different, and potentially superior to, the radiation and heat therapy regimens that are typically used in research and clinical practice.

  12. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Qian, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy

  13. Computer-aided breast MR image feature analysis for prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghaei, Faranak; Tan, Maxine; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin, E-mail: Bin.Zheng-1@ou.edu [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Hollingsworth, Alan B. [Mercy Women’s Center, Mercy Health Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73120 (United States); Qian, Wei [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To identify a new clinical marker based on quantitative kinetic image features analysis and assess its feasibility to predict tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Methods: The authors assembled a dataset involving breast MR images acquired from 68 cancer patients before undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Among them, 25 patients had complete response (CR) and 43 had partial and nonresponse (NR) to chemotherapy based on the response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. The authors developed a computer-aided detection scheme to segment breast areas and tumors depicted on the breast MR images and computed a total of 39 kinetic image features from both tumor and background parenchymal enhancement regions. The authors then applied and tested two approaches to classify between CR and NR cases. The first one analyzed each individual feature and applied a simple feature fusion method that combines classification results from multiple features. The second approach tested an attribute selected classifier that integrates an artificial neural network (ANN) with a wrapper subset evaluator, which was optimized using a leave-one-case-out validation method. Results: In the pool of 39 features, 10 yielded relatively higher classification performance with the areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) ranging from 0.61 to 0.78 to classify between CR and NR cases. Using a feature fusion method, the maximum AUC = 0.85 ± 0.05. Using the ANN-based classifier, AUC value significantly increased to 0.96 ± 0.03 (p < 0.01). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that quantitative analysis of kinetic image features computed from breast MR images acquired prechemotherapy has potential to generate a useful clinical marker in predicting tumor response to chemotherapy.

  14. Tumor lymphocyte immune response to preoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer: The LYMPHOREC study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirjolet, C; Charon-Barra, C; Ladoire, S; Arbez-Gindre, F; Bertaut, A; Ghiringhelli, F; Leroux, A; Peiffert, D; Borg, C; Bosset, J F; Créhange, G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction : Some studies have suggested that baseline tumor-infiltrating-lymphocytes (TILs), such as CD8+ and FoxP3+ T-cells, may be associated with a better prognosis in colorectal cancer. We sought to investigate modulation of the immune response by preoperative radiotherapy (preopRT) and its impact on survival in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Materials & Methods : We analyzed data for 237 patients with LARC who received RT. Density of TILS (CD8+ and FoxP3+) in intraepithelial (iTILs) and stromal compartments (sTILs) were evaluated from surgery pathological specimens and biopsies performed at baseline. The primary endpoint was to assess the impact of infiltration of the tumor or tumor site after preopRT on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints were the impact of dose fractionation scheme on TILs. Results : In univariate analysis, several factors significantly correlated (pguide physicians in adjuvant treatment decision-making.

  15. Cellular Pathways in Response to Ionizing Radiation and Their Targetability for Tumor Radiosensitization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Maier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, improvements in the planning and application of radiotherapy in combination with surgery and chemotherapy resulted in increased survival rates of tumor patients. However, the success of radiotherapy is impaired by two reasons: firstly, the radioresistance of tumor cells and, secondly, the radiation-induced damage of normal tissue cells located in the field of ionizing radiation. These limitations demand the development of drugs for either radiosensitization of tumor cells or radioprotection of normal tissue cells. In order to identify potential targets, a detailed understanding of the cellular pathways involved in radiation response is an absolute requirement. This review describes the most important pathways of radioresponse and several key target proteins for radiosensitization.

  16. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  17. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  18. A stressful microenvironment: opposing effects of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the suppression and enhancement of adaptive tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Matthew P; Sertil, Aparna Ranganathan

    2015-03-01

    The recent clinical success of immunotherapy in the treatment of certain types of cancer has demonstrated the powerful ability of the immune system to control tumor growth, leading to significantly improved patient survival. However, despite these promising results current immunotherapeutic strategies are still limited and have not yet achieved broad acceptance outside the context of metastatic melanoma. The limitations of current immunotherapeutic approaches can be attributed in part to suppressive mechanisms present in the tumor microenvironment that hamper the generation of robust antitumor immune responses thus allowing tumor cells to escape immune-mediated destruction. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response has recently emerged as a potent regulator of tumor immunity. The ER stress response is an adaptive mechanism that allows tumor cells to survive in the harsh growth conditions inherent to the tumor milieu such as low oxygen (hypoxia), low pH and low levels of glucose. Activation of ER stress can also alter the cancer cell response to therapies. In addition, the ER stress response promotes tumor immune evasion by inducing the production of protumorigenic inflammatory cytokines and impairing tumor antigen presentation. However, the ER stress response can boost antitumor immunity in some situations by enhancing the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and by inducing the release of immunogenic factors from stressed tumor cells. Here, we discuss the dualistic role of the ER stress response in the modulation of tumor immunity and highlight how strategies to either induce or block ER stress can be employed to improve the clinical efficacy of tumor immunotherapy.

  19. Re-examine tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses of BOLD fMRI. Implications in presurgical brain mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Liya; Ali, Shazia; Fa, Tianning; Mao, Hui; Dandan, Chen; Olson, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Background: Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI is used for presurgical functional mapping of brain tumor patients. Abnormal tumor blood supply may affect hemodynamic responses and BOLD fMRI signals. Purpose: To perform a multivariate and quantitative investigation of the effect of brain tumors on the hemodynamic responses and its impact on BOLD MRI signal time course, data analysis in order to better understand tumor-induced alterations in hemodynamic responses, and accurately mapping cortical regions in brain tumor patients. Material and Methods: BOLD fMRI data from 42 glioma patients who underwent presurgical mapping of the primary motor cortex (PMC) with a block designed finger tapping paradigm were analyzed, retrospectively. Cases were divided into high grade (n = 24) and low grade (n = 18) groups based on pathology. The tumor volume and distance to the activated PMCs were measured. BOLD signal time courses from selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the PMCs of tumor affected and contralateral unaffected hemispheres were obtained from each patient. Tumor-induced changes of BOLD signal intensity and time to peak (TTP) of BOLD signal time courses were analyzed statistically. Results: The BOLD signal intensity and TTP in the tumor-affected PMCs are altered when compared to that of the unaffected hemisphere. The average BOLD signal level is statistically significant lower in the affected PMCs. The average TTP in the affected PMCs is shorter in the high grade group, but longer in the low grade tumor group compared to the contralateral unaffected hemisphere. Degrees of alterations in BOLD signal time courses are related to both the distance to activated foci and tumor volume with the stronger effect in tumor distance to activated PMC. Conclusion: Alterations in BOLD signal time courses are strongly related to the tumor grade, the tumor volume, and the distance to the activated foci. Such alterations may impair accurate mapping of tumor-affected functional

  20. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  2. Monitoring therapeutic response of human ovarian cancer to 17-DMAG by noninvasive PET imaging with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Gang; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Zibo [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Keck School of Medicine, USC Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, has been intensively investigated for cancer therapy and is undergoing clinical trials. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is one of the client proteins of Hsp90 and its expression is decreased upon 17-DMAG treatment. In this study, we aimed to noninvasively monitor the HER-2 response to 17-DMAG treatment in xenografted mice. The sensitivity of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells to 17-DMAG in vitro was measured by MTT assay. HER-2 expression in SKOV-3 cells was determined by flow cytometry. Nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumors were treated with 17-DMAG and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by tumor size measurement. Both treated and control mice were imaged with microPET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab and {sup 18}F-FDG. Biodistribution studies and immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the microPET results. SKOV-3 cells are sensitive to 17-DMAG treatment, in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC{sub 50} value of 24.72 nM after 72 h incubation. The tumor growth curve supported the inhibition effect of 17-DMAG on SKOV-3 tumors. Quantitative microPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab had prominent tumor accumulation in untreated SKOV-3 tumors, which was significantly reduced in 17-DMAG-treated tumors. There was no uptake difference detected by FDG PET. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the significant reduction in tumor HER-2 level upon 17-DMAG treatment. The early response to anti-Hsp90 therapy was successfully monitored by quantitative PET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab. This approach may be valuable in monitoring the therapeutic response in HER-2-positive cancer patients under 17-DMAG treatment. (orig.)

  3. Change of tumor vascular reactivity during tumor growth and postchemotherapy observed by near-infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Songhyun; Jeong, Hyeryun; Seong, Myeongsu; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in females. To monitor chemotherapeutic efficacy for breast cancer, medical imaging systems such as x-ray mammography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound imaging have been used. Currently, it can take up to 3 to 6 weeks to see the tumor response from chemotherapy by monitoring tumor volume changes. We used near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict breast cancer treatment efficacy earlier than tumor volume changes by monitoring tumor vascular reactivity during inhalational gas interventions. The results show that the amplitude of oxy-hemoglobin changes (vascular reactivity) during hyperoxic gas inhalation is well correlated with tumor growth and responded one day earlier than tumor volume changes after chemotherapy. These results may imply that NIRS with respiratory challenges can be useful in early detection of tumor and in the prediction of tumor response to chemotherapy.

  4. Nanomedicine targeting the tumor microenvironment: Therapeutic strategies to inhibit angiogenesis, remodel matrix, and modulate immune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L. Siegler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention has been given to the tumor microenvironment (TME, which includes cellular and structural components such as fibroblasts, immune cells, vasculature, and extracellular matrix (ECM that surround tumor sites. These components contribute to tumor growth and metastasis and are one reason why traditional chemotherapy often is insufficient to eradicate the tumor completely. Newer treatments that target aspects of the TME, such as antiangiogenic and immunostimulatory therapies, have seen limited clinical success despite promising preclinical results. This can be attributed to a number of reasons, including a lack of drug penetration deeper into the necrotic tumor core, nonspecific delivery, rapid clearance from serum, or toxic side effects at high doses. Nanoparticles offer a potential solution to all of these obstacles, and many recent studies have shown encouraging results using nanomedicine to target TME vasculature, ECM, and immune response. While few of these platforms have made it to clinical trials to date, these strategies are relatively new and may offer a way to improve the effects of anticancer therapies.

  5. (18)F-alfatide II and (18)F-FDG dual-tracer dynamic PET for parametric, early prediction of tumor response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jinxia; Guo, Ning; Lang, Lixin; Kiesewetter, Dale O; Xie, Qingguo; Li, Quanzheng; Eden, Henry S; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2014-01-01

    A single dynamic PET acquisition using multiple tracers administered closely in time could provide valuable complementary information about a tumor's status under quasiconstant conditions. This study aimed to investigate the utility of dual-tracer dynamic PET imaging with (18)F-alfatide II ((18)F-AlF-NOTA-E[PEG4-c(RGDfk)]2) and (18)F-FDG for parametric monitoring of tumor responses to therapy. We administered doxorubicin to one group of athymic nude mice with U87MG tumors and paclitaxel protein-bound particles to another group of mice with MDA-MB-435 tumors. To monitor therapeutic responses, we performed dual-tracer dynamic imaging, in sessions that lasted 90 min, starting with injection via the tail vein catheters with (18)F-alfatide II, followed 40 min later by (18)F-FDG. To achieve signal separation of the 2 tracers, we fit a 3-compartment reversible model to the time-activity curve of (18)F-alfatide II for the 40 min before (18)F-FDG injection and then extrapolated to 90 min. The (18)F-FDG tumor time-activity curve was isolated from the 90-min dual-tracer tumor time-activity curve by subtracting the fitted (18)F-alfatide II tumor time-activity curve. With separated tumor time-activity curves, the (18)F-alfatide II binding potential (Bp = k3/k4) and volume of distribution (VD) and (18)F-FDG influx rate ((K1 × k3)/(k2 + k3)) based on the Patlak method were calculated to validate the signal recovery in a comparison with 60-min single-tracer imaging and to monitor therapeutic response. The transport and binding rate parameters K1-k3 of (18)F-alfatide II, calculated from the first 40 min of the dual-tracer dynamic scan, as well as Bp and VD correlated well with the parameters from the 60-min single-tracer scan (R(2) > 0.95). Compared with the results of single-tracer PET imaging, (18)F-FDG tumor uptake and influx were recovered well from dual-tracer imaging. On doxorubicin treatment, whereas no significant changes in static tracer uptake values of (18)F-alfatide II

  6. Composition and fundamental requirements of nuclear emergency response monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Huang Weiqi; Wang Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is concrete foundation for accomplishing radiation monitoring in nuclear or radiation accidents. Based on technical report: Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency published by IAEA in 1999, this paper presents the main task and composition of nuclear emergency monitoring briefly, and then the basic equipment and trends of nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is put forward in detail, which is useful to construction and reinforcement of our nuclear emergency monitoring. (authors)

  7. Neutrophils responsive to endogenous IFN-beta regulate tumor angiogenesis and growth in a mouse tumor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jadwiga; Leschner, Sara; Westphal, Kathrin; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried

    2010-04-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of malignant neoplasias, as the formation of new blood vessels is required for tumors to acquire oxygen and nutrients essential for their continued growth and metastasis. However, the signaling pathways leading to tumor vascularization are not fully understood. Here, using a transplantable mouse tumor model, we have demonstrated that endogenous IFN-beta inhibits tumor angiogenesis through repression of genes encoding proangiogenic and homing factors in tumor-infiltrating neutrophils. We determined that IFN-beta-deficient mice injected with B16F10 melanoma or MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells developed faster-growing tumors with better-developed blood vessels than did syngeneic control mice. These tumors displayed enhanced infiltration by CD11b+Gr1+ neutrophils expressing elevated levels of the genes encoding the proangiogenic factors VEGF and MMP9 and the homing receptor CXCR4. They also expressed higher levels of the transcription factors c-myc and STAT3, known regulators of VEGF, MMP9, and CXCR4. In vitro, treatment of these tumor-infiltrating neutrophils with low levels of IFN-beta restored expression of proangiogenic factors to control levels. Moreover, depletion of these neutrophils inhibited tumor growth in both control and IFN-beta-deficient mice. We therefore suggest that constitutively produced endogenous IFN-beta is an important mediator of innate tumor surveillance. Further, we believe our data help to explain the therapeutic effect of IFN treatment during the early stages of cancer development.

  8. Fractional laser exposure induces neutrophil infiltration (N1 phenotype into the tumor and stimulates systemic anti-tumor immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayoshi Kawakubo

    Full Text Available Ablative fractional photothermolysis (aFP using a CO2 laser generates multiple small diameter tissue lesions within the irradiation field. aFP is commonly used for a wide variety of dermatological indications, including treatment of photodamaged skin and dyschromia, drug delivery and modification of scars due to acne, surgical procedures and burns. In this study we explore the utility of aFP for treating oncological indications, including induction of local tumor regression and inducing anti-tumor immunity, which is in marked contrast to current indications of aFP.We used a fractional CO2 laser to treat a tumor established by BALB/c colon carcinoma cell line (CT26.CL25, which expressed a tumor antigen, beta-galactosidase (beta-gal. aFP treated tumors grew significantly slower as compared to untreated controls. Complete remission after a single aFP treatment was observed in 47% of the mice. All survival mice from the tumor inoculation rejected re-inoculation of the CT26.CL25 colon carcinoma cells and moreover 80% of the survival mice rejected CT26 wild type colon carcinoma cells, which are parental cells of CT26.CL25 cells. Histologic section of the FP-treated tumors showed infiltrating neutrophil in the tumor early after aFP treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes showed aFP treatment abrogated the increase in regulatory T lymphocyte (Treg, which suppresses anti-tumor immunity and elicited the expansion of epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes, which were required to mediate the tumor-suppressing effect of aFP.We have demonstrated that aFP is able to induce a systemic anti-tumor adaptive immunity preventing tumor recurrence in a murine colon carcinoma in a mouse model. This study demonstrates a potential role of aFP treatments in oncology and further studies should be performed.

  9. POLE proofreading mutations elicit an anti-tumor immune response in endometrial cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gool, Inge C; Eggink, Florine A; Freeman-Mills, Luke; Stelloo, Ellen; Marchi, Emanuele; de Bruyn, Marco; Palles, Claire; Nout, Remi A; de Kroon, Cor D; Osse, Elisabeth M; Klenerman, Paul; Creutzberg, Carien L; Tomlinson, Ian PM; Smit, Vincent THBM; Nijman, Hans W

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have shown that 7-12% of endometrial cancers (ECs) are ultramutated due to somatic mutation in the proofreading exonuclease domain of the DNA replicase POLE. Interestingly, these tumors have an excellent prognosis. In view of the emerging data linking mutation burden, immune response and clinical outcome in cancer, we investigated whether POLE-mutant ECs showed evidence of increased immunogenicity. Experimental design We examined immune infiltration and activation according to tumor POLE proofreading mutation in a molecularly defined EC cohort including 47 POLE-mutant tumors. We sought to confirm our results by analysis of RNAseq data from the TCGA EC series and used the same series to examine whether differences in immune infiltration could be explained by an enrichment of immunogenic neoepitopes in POLE-mutant ECs. Results Compared to other ECs, POLE-mutants displayed an enhanced cytotoxic T cell response, evidenced by increased numbers of CD8+ tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and CD8A expression, enrichment for a tumor-infiltrating T cell gene signature, and strong upregulation of the T cell cytotoxic differentiation and effector markers T-bet, Eomes, IFNG, PRF and granzyme B. This was accompanied by upregulation of T cell exhaustion markers, consistent with chronic antigen exposure. In-silico analysis confirmed that POLE-mutant cancers are predicted to display more antigenic neo-epitopes than other ECs, providing a potential explanation for our findings. Conclusions Ultramutated POLE proofreading-mutant ECs are characterized by a robust intratumoral T cell response, which correlates with, and may be caused by an enrichment of antigenic neo-peptides. Our study provides a plausible mechanism for the excellent prognosis of these cancers. PMID:25878334

  10. Solid tumor models for the assessment of different treatment modalities. XIV. The evaluation of host and tumor response to cyclophosphamide and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Looney, W.B.; Hopkins, H.A.; MacLeod, M.S.; Ritenour, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of increasing doses of cyclophosphamide (50 to 250 mg/kg) on the time of occurrence of maximal and minimal tumor growth rates, tumor volume reduction, and linear doubling times (LDT) on the solid tumor model H-4-II-E has been determined. Tumor response to cyclophosphamide was classified as class I, tumor regression; class II, pseudo-regression; and class III, slow-down. The overall treatment efficiency (OTE) has been used to assess the magnitude of tumor volume changes after treatment. The maximum OTE occurred after 150 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Increasing the dose to 200 and 250 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide resulted in a decrease in OTE. Similar parameters were utilized to measure the effectiveness of increasing doses of local tumor radiation (750, 1500, 2000, 2500, 3000 and 3500R). The major increase in OTE occurs when the radiation dose is increased from 750R to 2000R. Increasing the dose further to 3500R results in smaller incremental increases in the OTE. Results of the study indicate that increasing the cyclophosphamide dose beyond a certain level (i.e., 150 mg/kg) increases mortality and morbidity without concomitant therapeutic benefit. The effects of increasing the dose of local tumor radiation on life span have given results which suggest that increasing the total radiation dose beyond a certain limit is less effective in increasing life span

  11. Effectiveness of a simple and real-time baseline shift monitoring system during stereotactic body radiation therapy of lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Yukihiro; Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kamei, Yoshiyuki; Kashihara, Kenichi

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to clinically validate a simple real-time baseline shift monitoring system in a prospective study of consecutive patients undergoing stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) of lung tumors, and to investigate baseline shift due to intrafraction motion of the patient's body during lung SBRT. Ten consecutive patients with peripheral lung tumors were treated by SBRT consisting of four fractions of 12 Gy each, with a total dose of 48 Gy. During treatment, each patient's geometric displacement in the anterior-posterior and left-right directions (the baseline shift) was measured using a real-time monitoring webcam system. Displacement between the start and end of treatment was measured using an X-ray fluoroscopic imaging system. The displacement measurements of the two systems were compared, and the measurements of baseline shift acquired by the monitoring system during treatment were analyzed for all patients. There was no significant deviation between the monitoring system and the X-ray imaging system, with the accuracy of measurement being within 1 mm. Measurements using the monitoring system showed that 7 min of treatment generated displacements of more than 1 mm in 50% of the patients. Baseline shift of a patient's body may be measured accurately in real time, using a monitoring system without X-ray exposure. The manubrium of the sternum is a good location for measuring the baseline shift of a patient's body at all times. The real-time monitoring system may be useful for measuring the baseline shift of a patient's body independently of a gating system. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Macrophage and tumor cell responses to repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldakov, M. A.; Tretyakova, M. S.; Ryabov, V. B.; Klimov, I. A.; Kutenkov, O. P.; Kzhyshkowska, J.; Bol'shakov, M. A.; Rostov, V. V.; Cherdyntseva, N. V.

    2017-05-01

    To study a response of tumor cells and macrophages to the repetitive pulsed low-dose X-ray radiation. Methods. Tumor growth and lung metastasis of mice with an injected Lewis lung carcinoma were analysed, using C57Bl6. Monocytes were isolated from a human blood, using CD14+ magnetic beads. IL6, IL1-betta, and TNF-alpha were determined by ELISA. For macrophage phenotyping, a confocal microscopy was applied. “Sinus-150” was used for the generation of pulsed X-ray radiation (the absorbed dose was below 0.1 Gy, the pulse repetition frequency was 10 pulse/sec). The irradiation of mice by 0.1 Gy pulsed X-rays significantly inhibited the growth of primary tumor and reduced the number of metastatic colonies in the lung. Furthermore, the changes in macrophage phenotype and cytokine secretion were observed after repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation. Conclusion. Macrophages and tumor cells had a different response to a low-dose pulsed X-ray radiation. An activation of the immune system through changes of a macrophage phenotype can result in a significant antitumor effect of the low-dose repetitive pulsed X-ray radiation.

  13. Instrument Response Modeling and Simulation for the GLAST Burst Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, R. M.; Hoover, A. S.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; Kienlin, A. von; Steinle, H.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts and other fast transient sources in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV. The GBM is composed of several unshielded and uncollimated scintillation detectors (twelve NaI and two BGO) that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. As a result, reconstructing source locations, energy spectra, and temporal properties from GBM data requires detailed knowledge of the detectors' response to both direct radiation as well as that scattered from the spacecraft and Earth's atmosphere. This full GBM instrument response will be captured in the form of a response function database that is derived from computer modeling and simulation. The simulation system is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolset, and is being extensively validated against calibrated experimental GBM data. We discuss the architecture of the GBM simulation and modeling system and describe how its products will be used for analysis of observed GBM data. Companion papers describe the status of validating the system

  14. Monitoring of tumor microcirculation during fractionated radiotherapy in patients with rectal carcinomas: a clinical study using contrast enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, A. de; Judmaier, W.; Griebel, J.; Kremser, Ch.; Gneiting, T.; Peer, S.; Aichner, F.; Lukas, P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radio chemotherapy is a frequently used treatment scheme for malignant neoplasms. The purpose of using chemotherapeutics such as 5-FU during radiotherapy is to enhance the effectiveness of radiation. The effectiveness of this approach depends on the accumulation of the drugs within the tumor, which is governed by micro circulatory parameters. However, to date scheduling of chemotherapy application is based on empirical data. There is no clinical study available monitoring tumor microcirculation during fractionated radiotherapy. Contrast enhanced MR imaging in tumors provides not only a better understanding of tumor micro vascularity but is also a method to characterize the substance accumulation within the tumor matrix during radiotherapy. This could help to optimize the scheduling of chemotherapy application. Materials and Methods: Patients with clinical and histological proven rectal carcinoma underwent a preoperative combined radio chemotherapy up to a total dose of 39,4Gy, hyperfractionated with b.i.d., single dose 1,1Gy. The fields in box-technique included the rectal canal and adjacent lymph nodes. 5-FU (300mg/m 2 per treatment day) was given continuously parallel to irradiation. To evaluate the Gd-DTPA (Magnevist, Schering, Germany) concentration time curve after i.v. constant rate infusion (0,05 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA) we used an ultrafast T1-mapping sequence on a 1,5-T whole body imager (Magneton Vision, Siemens, Germany). The transaxial slice (thickness 5 mm) was chosen so that both tumor and arterial vessels could be clearly identified. Before, during and after the infusion 53 T1 maps were obtained within 40 min in intervals of 14s (35 scans) and 120s (15 scans). Assuming a linear relation between relaxation rate, R1=1/T1, and Gd-DTPA concentration, concentration time curves were evaluated for arterial blood and tumor. The patients underwent MR imaging before and in constant intervals during fractionated radiotherapy. As a first

  15. Ball-in-ball ZrO2 nanostructure for simultaneous CT imaging and highly efficient synergic microwave ablation and tri-stimuli-responsive chemotherapy of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Dan; Niu, Meng; Tan, Longfei; Fu, Changhui; Ren, Xiangling; Xu, Ke; Zhong, Hongshan; Wang, Jingzhuo; Li, Laifeng; Meng, Xianwei

    2017-06-29

    Combined thermo-chemotherapy displays outstanding synergically therapeutic efficiency when compared with standalone thermotherapy and chemotherapy. Herein, we developed a smart tri-stimuli-responsive drug delivery system involving X@BB-ZrO 2 NPs (X represents loaded IL, DOX, keratin and tetradecanol) based on novel ball-in-ball-structured ZrO 2 nanoparticles (BB-ZrO 2 NPs). The microwave energy conversion efficiency of BB-ZrO 2 NPs was 41.2% higher than that of traditional single-layer NPs due to the cooperative action of self-reflection and spatial confinement effect of the special two-layer hollow nanostructure. The tri-stimuli-responsive controlled release strategy indicate that integrated pH, redox and microwaves in single NPs based on keratin and tetradecanol could effectively enhance the specific controlled release of DOX. The release of DOX was only 8.1% in PBS with pH = 7.2 and GSH = 20 μM. However, the release could reach about 50% at the tumor site (pH = 5.5, GSH = 13 mM) under microwave ablation. The as-made X@BB-ZrO 2 NPs exhibited perfect synergic therapy effect of chemotherapy and microwave ablation both in subcutaneous tumors (H22 tumor-bearing mice) and deep tumors (liver transplantation VX2 tumor-bearing rabbit model). There was no recurrence and death in the X@BB-ZrO 2 + MW group during the therapy of subcutaneous tumors even on the 42 nd day. The growth rates in the deep tumor of the control, MW and X@BB-ZrO 2 + MW groups were 290.1%, 14.1% and -42% 6 days after ablation, respectively. Dual-source CT was used to monitor the metabolism behavior of the as-made BB-ZrO 2 NPs and traditional CT was utilized to monitor the tumor growth in rabbits. Frozen section examination and ICP results indicated the precise control of drug delivery and enhanced cytotoxicity by the tri-stimuli-responsive controlled release strategy. The ball-in-ball ZrO 2 NPs with high microwave energy conversion efficiency were first developed for synergic microwave ablation and

  16. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of breast tumor response to chemotherapy using a multi-parameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Gangeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Tran, William; Trudeau, Maureen E; Pritchard, Kathleen; Ghandi, Sonal; Verma, Sunil; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2016-07-19

    This study demonstrated the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in providing an early prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Using a 6-MHz array transducer, ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected from 58 LABC patients prior to NAC treatment and at weeks 1, 4, and 8 of their treatment, and prior to surgery. QUS parameters including midband fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS), spectral intercept (SI), spacing among scatterers (SAS), attenuation coefficient estimate (ACE), average scatterer diameter (ASD), and average acoustic concentration (AAC) were determined from the tumor region of interest. Ultrasound data were compared with the ultimate clinical and pathological response of the patient's tumor to treatment and patient recurrence-free survival. Multi-parameter discriminant analysis using the κ-nearest-neighbor classifier demonstrated that the best response classification could be achieved using the combination of MBF, SS, and SAS, with an accuracy of 60 ± 10% at week 1, 77 ± 8% at week 4 and 75 ± 6% at week 8. Furthermore, when the QUS measurements at each time (week) were combined with pre-treatment (week 0) QUS values, the classification accuracies improved (70 ± 9% at week 1, 80 ± 5% at week 4, and 81 ± 6% at week 8). Finally, the multi-parameter QUS model demonstrated a significant difference in survival rates of responding and non-responding patients at weeks 1 and 4 (p=0.035, and 0.027, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time, using new parameters tested on relatively large patient cohort and leave-one-out classifier evaluation, that a hybrid QUS biomarker including MBF, SS, and SAS could, with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, detect the response of LABC tumors to NAC as early as after 4 weeks of therapy. The findings of this study also suggested that incorporating pre-treatment QUS parameters of a tumor improved the

  17. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  18. SU-E-J-61: Monitoring Tumor Motion in Real-Time with EPID Imaging During Cervical Cancer Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, W; Hrycushko, B; Yan, Y; Foster, R; Albuquerque, K [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Traditional external beam radiotherapy for cervical cancer requires setup by external skin marks. In order to improve treatment accuracy and reduce planning margin for more conformal therapy, it is essential to monitor tumor positions interfractionally and intrafractionally. We demonstrate feasibility of monitoring cervical tumor motion online using EPID imaging from Beam’s Eye View. Methods: Prior to treatment, 1∼2 cylindrical radio opaque markers were implanted into inferior aspect of cervix tumor. During external beam treatments on a Varian 2100C by 4-field 3D plans, treatment beam images were acquired continuously by an EPID. A Matlab program was developed to locate internal markers on MV images. Based on 2D marker positions obtained from different treatment fields, their 3D positions were estimated for every treatment fraction. Results: There were 398 images acquired during different treatment fractions of three cervical cancer patients. Markers were successfully located on every frame of image at an analysis speed of about 1 second per frame. Intrafraction motions were evaluated by comparing marker positions relative to the position on the first frame of image. The maximum intrafraction motion of the markers was 1.6 mm. Interfraction motions were evaluated by comparing 3D marker positions at different treatment fractions. The maximum interfraction motion was up to 10 mm. Careful comparison found that this is due to patient positioning since the bony structures shifted with the markers. Conclusion: This method provides a cost-free and simple solution for online tumor tracking for cervical cancer treatment since it is feasible to acquire and export EPID images with fast analysis in real time. This method does not need any extra equipment or deliver extra dose to patients. The online tumor motion information will be very useful to reduce planning margins and improve treatment accuracy, which is particularly important for SBRT treatment with long

  19. Tumor necrosis is an important hallmark of aggressive endometrial cancer and associates with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredholt, Geir; Mannelqvist, Monica; Stefansson, Ingunn M; Birkeland, Even; Bø, Trond Hellem; Øyan, Anne M; Trovik, Jone; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Jonassen, Inge; Salvesen, Helga B; Wik, Elisabeth; Akslen, Lars A

    2015-11-24

    Tumor necrosis is associated with aggressive features of endometrial cancer and poor prognosis. Here, we investigated gene expression patterns and potential treatment targets related to presence of tumor necrosis in primary endometrial cancer lesions. By DNA microarray analysis, expression of genes related to tumor necrosis reflected multiple tumor-microenvironment interactions like tissue hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation pathways. A tumor necrosis signature of 38 genes and a related patient cluster (Cluster I, 67% of the cases) were associated with features of aggressive tumors such as type II cancers, estrogen receptor negative tumors and vascular invasion. Further, the tumor necrosis signature was increased in tumor cells grown in hypoxic conditions in vitro. Multiple genes with increased expression are known to be activated by HIF1A and NF-kB. Our findings indicate that the presence of tumor necrosis within primary tumors is associated with hypoxia, angiogenesis and inflammation responses. HIF1A, NF-kB and PI3K/mTOR might be potential treatment targets in aggressive endometrial cancers with presence of tumor necrosis.

  20. Activation of Anti-tumor Immune Response by Ablation of HCC with Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobo; Chen, Yiling; Zhang, Ruiqing; Miao, Xudong; Chen, Xinhua

    2018-03-28

    Locoregional therapy is playing an increasingly important role in the non-surgical management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The novel technique of non-thermal electric ablation by nanosecond pulsed electric field has been recognized as a potential locoregional methodology for indicated HCC. This manuscript explores the most recent studies to indicate its unique anti-tumor immune response. The possible immune mechanism, termed as nano-pulse stimulation, was also analyzed.

  1. An MRI Method To Map Tumor Hypoxia Using Red Blood Cells Loaded with a pO2-Responsive Gd-Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Gregorio, Enza; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Gianolio, Eliana; Lanzardo, Stefania; Carrera, Carla; Fedeli, Franco; Aime, Silvio

    2015-08-25

    Hypoxia is a typical hallmark of many solid tumors and often leads to therapy resistance and the development of a more aggressive cancer phenotype. Oxygen content in tissues has been evaluated using numerous different methods for several imaging modalities, but none has yet reached the required standard of spatial and temporal resolution. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) appears to be the technique of choice and several pO2-responsive probes have been designed for it over the years. In vivo translation is often hampered in Gd-relaxation agents as it is not possible to separate effects that arise from changes in local concentration from those associated with responsive properties. A novel procedure for the MRI based assessment of hypoxia is reported herein. The method relies on the combined use of Gd-DOTP- and Gd-HPDO3A-labeled red blood cells (RBCs) where the first probe acts as a vascular oxygenation-responsive agent, while the second reports the local labeled RBC concentration in a transplanted breast tumor mouse model. The MRI assessment of oxygenation state has been validated by photoacoustic imaging and ex vivo immunofluorescence. The method refines tumor staging in preclinical models and makes possible an accurate monitoring of the relationship between oxygenation and tumor growth.

  2. Tumor response parameters for head and neck cancer derived from tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chvetsov, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The main goal of this paper is to reconstruct a distribution of cell survival fractions from tumor-volume variation for a heterogeneous group of head and neck cancer patients and compare this distribution to the data from predictive assays. Methods: To characterize the tumor-volume variation during radiation therapy treatment, the authors use a two-level tumor-volume model of cell population that separates the entire tumor cell population into two subpopulations of viable cells and lethally damaged cells. This parameterized radiobiological model is integrated with a least squares objective function and a simulated annealing optimization algorithm to describe time-dependent tumor-volume variation rates in individual patients. Several constraints have been used in the optimization problem because tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy is described by a sum of exponentials; therefore, the problem of accurately fitting a model to measured data is ill-posed. The model was applied to measured tumor-volume variation curves from a clinical study on tumor-volume variation during radiotherapy for 14 head and neck cancer patients in which an integrated CT/linear particle accelerator (LINAC) system was used for tumor-volume measurements. Results: The two-level cell population tumor-volume modeling is capable of describing tumor-volume variation throughout the entire treatment for 11 of the 14 patients. For three patients, the tumor-volume variation was described only during the initial part of treatment, a fact that may be related to the neglected hypoxia in the two-level approximation. The predicted probability density distribution for the survival fractions agrees with the data obtained using in vitro studies with predictive assays. The mean value 0.35 of survival fraction obtained in this study is larger than the value 0.32 from in vitro studies, which could be expected because of greater repair in vivo. The mean half-life obtained in this study for the head

  3. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  4. TH-E-202-03: PET for Tumor Response Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, W. [University of Maryland School of Medicine (United States)

    2016-06-15

    PET/CT is a very important imaging tool in the management of oncology patients. PET/CT has been applied for treatment planning and response evaluation in radiation therapy. This educational session will discuss: Pitfalls and remedies in PET/CT imaging for RT planning The use of hypoxia PET imaging for radiotherapy PET for tumor response evaluation The first presentation will address the issue of mis-registration between the CT and PET images in the thorax and the abdomen. We will discuss the challenges of respiratory gating and introduce an average CT technique to improve the registration for dose calculation and image-guidance in radiation therapy. The second presentation will discuss the use of hypoxia PET Imaging for radiation therapy. We will discuss various hypoxia radiotracers, the choice of clinical acquisition protocol (in particular a single late static acquisition versus a dynamic acquisition), and the compartmental modeling with different transfer rate constants explained. We will demonstrate applications of hypoxia imaging for dose escalation/de-escalation in clinical trials. The last presentation will discuss the use of PET/CT for tumor response evaluation. We will discuss anatomic response assessment vs. metabolic response assessment, visual evaluation and semi-quantitative evaluation, and limitations of current PET/CT assessment. We will summarize clinical trials using PET response in guiding adaptive radiotherapy. Finally, we will summarize recent advancements in PET/CT radiomics and non-FDG PET tracers for response assessment. Learning Objectives: Identify the causes of mis-registration of CT and PET images in PET/CT, and review the strategies to remedy the issue. Understand the basics of PET imaging of tumor hypoxia (radiotracers, how PET measures the hypoxia selective uptake, imaging protocols, applications in chemo-radiation therapy). Understand the basics of dynamic PET imaging, compartmental modeling and parametric images. Understand the

  5. Strategies to Genetically Modulate Dendritic Cells to Potentiate Anti-Tumor Responses in Hematologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelisa M. Cornel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cell (DC vaccination has been investigated as a potential strategy to target hematologic malignancies, while generating sustained immunological responses to control potential future relapse. Nonetheless, few clinical trials have shown robust long-term efficacy. It has been suggested that a combination of surmountable shortcomings, such as selection of utilized DC subsets, DC loading and maturation strategies, as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression may be targeted to maximize anti-tumor responses of DC vaccines. Generation of DC from CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs may provide potential in patients undergoing allogeneic HSPC transplantations for hematologic malignancies. CD34+ HSPC from the graft can be genetically modified to optimize antigen presentation and to provide sufficient T cell stimulatory signals. We here describe beneficial (gene-modifications that can be implemented in various processes in T cell activation by DC, among which major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I and MHC class II presentation, DC maturation and migration, cross-presentation, co-stimulation, and immunosuppression to improve anti-tumor responses.

  6. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xia, Mengna

    2005-01-01

    The goals of the study in the first stage are 1) to develop a mathematic model by which we can derive tumor blood flow and metabolic rate of oxygen from hemoglobin concentration during interventions, 2...

  7. 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT-PET imaging for monitoring everolimus effect on tumor-growth in neuroendocrine tumors: studies in human tumor xenografts in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Bardram Johnbeck

    Full Text Available The mTOR inhibitor everolimus has shown promising results in some but not all neuroendocrine tumors. Therefore, early assessment of treatment response would be beneficial. In this study, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro treatment effect of everolimus in neuroendocrine tumors and evaluated the performance of 18F-FDG and the proliferation tracer 18F-FLT for treatment response assessment by PET imaging.The effect of everolimus on the human carcinoid cell line H727 was examined in vitro with the MTT assay and in vivo on H727 xenograft tumors. The mice were scanned at baseline with 18F-FDG or 18F-FLT and then treated with either placebo or everolimus (5 mg/kg daily for 10 days. PET/CT scans were repeated at day 1,3 and 10.Everolimus showed significant inhibition of H727 cell proliferation in vitro at concentrations above 1 nM. In vivo tumor volumes measured relative to baseline were significantly lower in the everolimus group compared to the control group at day 3 (126±6% vs. 152±6%; p = 0.016, day 7 (164±7% vs. 226±13%; p<0.001 and at day 10 (194±10% vs. 281±18%; p<0.001. Uptake of 18F-FDG and 18F-FLT showed little differences between control and treatment groups, but individual mean uptake of 18F-FDG at day 3 correlated with tumor growth day 10 (r2 = 0.45; P = 0.034, 18F-FLT mean uptake at day 1 correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.63; P = 0.019 and at day 3 18F-FLT correlated with tumor growth day 7 (r2 = 0.87; P<0.001 and day 10 (r2 = 0.58; P = 0.027.Everolimus was effective in vitro and in vivo in human xenografts lung carcinoid NETs and especially early 18F-FLT uptake predicted subsequent tumor growth. We suggest that 18F-FLT PET can be used for tailoring therapy for neuroendocrine tumor patients through early identification of responders and non-responders.

  8. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Monitoring multiple myeloma by idiotype-specific peptide binders of tumor-derived exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaccino, Enrico; Mimmi, Selena; Dattilo, Vincenzo; Marino, Fabiola; Candeloro, Patrizio; Di Loria, Antonio; Marimpietri, Danilo; Pisano, Antonio; Albano, Francesco; Vecchio, Eleonora; Ceglia, Simona; Golino, Gaetanina; Lupia, Antonio; Fiume, Giuseppe; Quinto, Ileana; Scala, Giuseppe

    2017-10-13

    Tumor-derived exosomes (TDEs) play a pivotal role in tumor establishment and progression, and are emerging biomarkers for tumor diagnosis in personalized medicine. To date, there is a lack of efficient technology platforms for exosome isolation and characterization. Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable B-cell malignancy due to the rapid development of drug-resistance. MM-released exosomes express the immunoglobulin B-cell receptor (Ig-BCR) of the tumor B-cells, which can be targeted by Idiotype-binding peptides (Id-peptides). In this study, we analyzed the production of MM-released exosomes in the murine 5T33MM multiple myeloma model as biomarkers of tumor growth. To this end, we selected Id-peptides by screening a phage display library using as bait the Ig-BCR expressed by 5T33MM cells. By FACS, the FITC-conjugated Id-peptides detected the MM-released exosomes in the serum of 5T33MM-engrafted mice, levels of which are correlated with tumor progression at an earlier time point compared to serum paraprotein. These results indicate that Id-peptide-based recognition of MM-released exosomes may represent a very sensitive diagnostic approach for clinical evaluation of disease progression.

  10. Treatment of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma with use of 90Y microspheres (TheraSphere): safety, tumor response, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Riad; Lewandowski, Robert J; Atassi, Bassel; Gordon, Stuart C; Gates, Vanessa L; Barakat, Omar; Sergie, Ziad; Wong, Ching-Yee O; Thurston, Kenneth G

    2005-12-01

    To present safety and efficacy results obtained in treatment of a cohort of patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with use of 90Y microspheres (TheraSphere). Forty-three consecutive patients with HCC were treated with 90Y microspheres over a 4-year period. Patients were treated by liver segment or lobe on one or more occasions based on tumor distribution, liver function, and vascular flow dynamics. Patients were followed for adverse events, objective tumor response, and survival. Patients were stratified into three risk groups according to method of treatment and risk stratification (group 0, segmental; group 1, lobar low-risk; group 2, lobar high-risk) and Okuda and Child-Pugh scoring systems. Based on follow-up data from 43 treated patients, 20 patients (47%) had an objective tumor response based on percent reduction in tumor size and 34 patients (79%) had a tumor response when percent reduction and/or tumor necrosis were used as a composite measure of tumor response. There was no statistical difference among the three risk groups with respect to tumor response. Survival times from date of diagnosis were different among the risk groups (P TheraSpheres) provides a safe and effective method of treatment for a broad spectrum of patients presenting with unresectable HCC. Further investigation is warranted.

  11. The use of PET in assessing tumor response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, Daisy; Joon, Daryl Lim; Chao, Michael; Wada, Morikatsu; Joon, Michael Lim; See, Andrew; Feigen, Malcolm; Jenkins, Patricia; Mercuri, Angelina; McNamara, Joanne; Poon, Aurora; Khoo, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the correlation of 18F-FDG-PET (PET) response to pathological response after neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with locally advanced rectal cancer were identified between 2001 and 2005. The median age was 57 years (range 37-72) with 14 males and 6 females. All patients were staged with endorectal ultrasound and/or MRI, CT, and PET. The clinical staging was T3N0M0 (16), T3N1M0 (2), and T3N0M1 (2). Restaging PET was performed after CRT, and prior to definitive surgery. The response on PET and pathology was assessed and correlated. Patient outcome according to PET response was also assessed. Results: Following CRT, a complete PET response occurred in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10, and no response in 3 patients. At surgery, complete pathological response was recorded in 7 patients, incomplete response in 10 and no response in 3. There was a good correlation of PET and pathological responses in complete responders (5/7 cases) and non-responders (3/3 cases). After a median follow-up of 62 months (range 7-73), twelve patients were alive with no evidence of disease. All patients achieving complete metabolic response were alive with no evidence of disease, while as those who had no metabolic response, all died as a result of metastatic disease. Conclusions: PET is a promising complementary assessment tool for assessing tumor response after CRT if there is a complete or no response. PET response may also predict for outcome.

  12. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  13. Rapid in vivo Taxotere quantitative chemosensitivity response by 4.23 Tesla sodium MRI and histo-immunostaining features in N-Methyl-N-Nitrosourea induced breast tumors in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ed X

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium weighted images can indicate sodium signal intensities from different features in the tumor before and 24 hours following administration of Taxotere. Aim To evaluate the association of in vivo intracellular sodium magnetic resonance image intensities with immuno-biomarkers and histopathological features to monitor the early tumor response to Taxotere chemotherapy in Methyl-Nitroso-Urea induced rat xenograft breast tumors. Methods and Materials Methyl-Nitroso-Urea (MNU induced rat xenograft breast tumors were imaged for sodium MRI and compared with tumor histology, immunostaining after 24 hours chemotherapy. Results Sodium MRI signal intensities represented sodium concentrations. Excised tumor histological sections showed different in vitro histological end points i.e. single strand DNA content of cell nuclei during cell cycle (G1/S-G2/M, distinct S or M histograms (Feulgen labeling to nuclear DNA content by CAS 200, mitotic figures and apoptosis at different locations of breast tumors. Necrosis and cystic fluid appeared gray on intracellular (IC sodium images while apoptosis rich regions appeared brighter on IC sodium images. After 24 hours Taxotere-treated tumors showed lower 'IC/EC ratio' of viable cells (65–76% with higher mitotic index; apoptotic tumor cells at high risk due to cytotoxicity (>70% with high apoptotic index; reduced proliferation index (270 vs 120 per high power field associated with enhanced IC sodium in vivo MR image intensities and decreased tumor size (3%; p in vivo associated with apoptosis and different pre-malignant features within 24 hours of exposure of cancer cells to anti-neoplastic Taxotere drug. Conclusion Sodium MRI imaging may be used as in vivo rapid drug monitoring method to evaluate Taxotere chemosensitivity response associated with neoplasia, apoptosis and tumor histology features.

  14. Two photon microscopy intravital study of DC-mediated anti-tumor response of NK cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caccia, Michele; Gorletta, Tatiana; Sironi, Laura; Zanoni, Ivan; Salvetti, Cristina; Collini, Maddalena; Granucci, Francesca; Chirico, Giuseppe

    2010-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) play a crucial role in the activation of Natural Killer cells (NKs) that are responsible for anti-tumor innate immune responses. The focus of this report is on the role of pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP) activated-DCs in inducing NK cell-mediated anti-tumor responses. Mice transplanted sub-cute (s.c.) with AK7 cells, a mesothelioma cell line sensitive to NK cell responses, are injected with fluorescent NK cells and DC activation is then induced by s.c. injection of Lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using 4 dimensional tracking we follow the kinetic behavior of NK cells at the Draining Lymph-Node (DLN). As control, noninflammatory conditions are also evaluated. Our data suggest that NK cells are recruited to the DLN where they can interact with activated-DCs with a peculiar kinetic behavior: short lived interactions interleaved by rarer longer ones. We also found that the changes in the NK dynamic behavior in inflammatory conditions clearly affect relevant motility parameters such as the instantaneous and average velocity and the effective diffusion coefficient. This observation suggests that NK cells and activated-DCs might efficiently interact in the DLN, where cells could be activated. Therefore the interaction between activated-DCs and NK cells in DLN is not only a reality but it may be also crucial for the start of the immune response of the NKs.

  15. Use of Wilms Tumor 1 Gene Expression as a Reliable Marker for Prognosis and Minimal Residual Disease Monitoring in Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Normal Karyotype Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Irena; Karan-Djurasevic, Teodora; Ugrin, Milena; Virijevic, Marijana; Vidovic, Ana; Tomin, Dragica; Suvajdzic Vukovic, Nada; Pavlovic, Sonja; Tosic, Natasa

    2017-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype (AML-NK) represents the largest group of AML patients classified with an intermediate prognosis. A constant need exists to introduce new molecular markers for more precise risk stratification and for minimal residual disease (MRD) monitoring. Quantitative assessment of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) gene transcripts was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The bone marrow samples were collected at the diagnosis from 104 AML-NK patients and from 34 of these patients during follow-up or disease relapse. We found that overexpression of the WT1 gene (WT1 high status), present in 25.5% of patients, was an independent unfavorable factor for achieving complete remission. WT1 high status was also associated with resistance to therapy and shorter disease-free survival and overall survival. Assessment of the log reduction value of WT1 expression, measured in paired diagnosis/complete remission samples, revealed that patients with a log reduction of < 2 had a tendency toward shorter disease-free survival and overall survival and a greater incidence of disease relapse. Combining WT1 gene expression status with NPM1 and FLT3-ITD mutational status, we found that the tumor behavior of intermediate patients (FLT3-ITD - /NPM1 - double negative) with WT1 high status is almost the same as the tumor behavior of the adverse risk group. WT1 expression status represents a good molecular marker of prognosis, response to treatment, and MRD monitoring. Above all, the usage of the WT1 expression level as an additional marker for more precise risk stratification of AML-NK patients could lead to more adapted, personalized treatment protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Nilotinib Enhances Tumor Angiogenesis and Counteracts VEGFR2 Blockade in an Orthotopic Breast Cancer Xenograft Model with Desmoplastic Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zafarnia

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF/VEGF receptor (VEGFR-targeted therapies predominantly affect nascent, immature tumor vessels. Since platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR blockade inhibits vessel maturation and thus increases the amount of immature tumor vessels, we evaluated whether the combined PDGFR inhibition by nilotinib and VEGFR2 blockade by DC101 has synergistic therapy effects in a desmoplastic breast cancer xenograft model. In this context, besides immunohistological evaluation, molecular ultrasound imaging with BR55, the clinically used VEGFR2-targeted microbubbles, was applied to monitor VEGFR2-positive vessels noninvasively and to assess the therapy effects on tumor angiogenesis. DC101 treatment alone inhibited tumor angiogenesis, resulting in lower tumor growth and in significantly lower vessel density than in the control group after 14 days of therapy. In contrast, nilotinib inhibited vessel maturation but enhanced VEGFR2 expression, leading to markedly increased tumor volumes and a significantly higher vessel density. The combination of both drugs led to an almost similar tumor growth as in the DC101 treatment group, but VEGFR2 expression and microvessel density were higher and comparable to the controls. Further analyses revealed significantly higher levels of tumor cell–derived VEGF in nilotinib-treated tumors. In line with this, nilotinib, especially in low doses, induced an upregulation of VEGF and IL-6 mRNA in the tumor cells in vitro, thus providing an explanation for the enhanced angiogenesis observed in nilotinib-treated tumors in vivo. These findings suggest that nilotinib inhibits vessel maturation but counteracts the effects of antiangiogenic co-therapy by enhancing VEGF expression by the tumor cells and stimulating tumor angiogenesis.

  17. Expression of most matrix metalloproteinase family members in breast cancer represents a tumor-induced host response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, K. J.; Matrisian, L. M.; Jensen, R. A.; Rodgers, W. H.

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family members have been associated with advanced-stage cancer and contribute to tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis as determined by inhibitor studies. In situ hybridization was performed to analyze the expression and localization of all known MMPs in a series of human breast cancer biopsy specimens. Most MMPs were localized to tumor stroma, and all MMPs had very distinct expression patterns. Matrilysin was expressed by morphologically normal epithelial ducts within tumors and in tissue from reduction mammoplasties, and by epithelial-derived tumor cells. Many family members, including stromelysin-3, gelatinase A, MT-MMP, interstitial collagenase, and stromelysin-1 were localized to fibroblasts of tumor stroma of invasive cancers but in quite distinct, and generally widespread, patterns. Gelatinase B, collagenase-3, and metalloelastase expression were more focal; gelatinase B was primarily localized to endothelial cells, collagenase-3 to isolated tumor cells, and metalloelastase to cytokeratin-negative, macrophage-like cells. The MMP inhibitor, TIMP-1, was expressed in both stromal and tumor components in most tumors, and neither stromelysin-2 nor neutrophil collagenase were detected in any of the tumors. These results indicate that there is very tight and complex regulation in the expression of MMP family members in breast cancer that generally represents a host response to the tumor and emphasize the need to further evaluate differential functions for MMP family members in breast tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8686751

  18. Onconase-induced changes in radiation response and physiological parameters in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, I.; Shui, C.; Shogen, K.; Mikulski, S.M.; Nunno, M.; Wallner, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Onconase (ONC), previously known as P-30 protein, is a novel basic amphibian protein isolated from eggs of the leopard frog. The original study conducted by Darzynkiewicz et al. (Cell Tissue Kinetics, 1988) demonstrated that ONC shows anti-proliferative and cytotoxic activities against several tumor cell lines in vitro. Since then, to our knowledge, no studies regarding the inhibitory effect of ONC in solid tumor models were performed. ONC is also known to inhibit cell-cycle progression from the radiation-sensitive G 1 phase to the radiation-resistant S phase. Thus, we examined the effect of ONC as a potential radiation sensitizer. The radiation response and physiological parameters were evaluated in C3H mice and/or nude mice bearing various (murine and/or human) tumor models. Materials and Method: First, we examined the effect of ONC on the cellular proliferative, as well as the clonogenic, response of various cell lines (i.e., H4IIE rat hepatoma, AsPC-1 human pancreas adenocarcinoma, DU145 human prostate carcinoma, LS174T human colon adenocarcinoma, A549 human lung carcinoma, MCaIV murine adenocarcinoma, FSaII murine fibrosarcoma, and CCL-209 bovine artery pulmonary endothelial cells) by using the MTT and clonogenic cell survival assays. Second, we determined the enhancement of radiation response before, during, and after treatment with ONC in several cell lines. Third, we determined whether ONC can inhibit the growth of solid tumors in vivo (i.e., FSaII and MCaIV in C3H mice, LS174T in nude mice). Fourth, we examined whether minocycline, an antiangiogenic agent, could amplify the tumoricidal efficacy of ONC in solid tumors. To test our hypothesis: if ONC could eradicate the outgrowth of tumor cells in confined spaces, it could lower the elevated pressure in solid tumors, we measured tumor interstitial fluid pressure (TIFP) using the wick-in-needle method, and systemic pressure using the right carotid artery cannulation method after treatment with ONC

  19. A clinical and radiological objective tumor response with somatostatin analogs (SSA in well-differentiated neuroendocrine metastatic tumor of the ileum: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Divitiis C

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chiara De Divitiis,1 Claudia von Arx,2 Roberto Carbone,3 Fabiana Tatangelo,4 Elena di Girolamo,5 Giovanni Maria Romano,1 Alessandro Ottaiano,1 Elisabetta de Lutio di Castelguidone,3 Rosario Vincenzo Iaffaioli,1 Salvatore Tafuto1 On behalf of the European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS Center of Excellence Multidisciplinary Group for Neuroendocrine Tumors in Naples (Italy 1Department of Abdominal Oncology, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G. Pascale”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, “Federico II” University, Naples, Italy; 3Department of Radiology, 4Department of Pathology, 5Department of Endoscopy, National Cancer Institute “Fondazione G Pascale”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Somatostatin analogs (SSAs are typically used to treat the symptoms caused by neuroendocrine tumors (NETs, but they are not used as the primary treatment to induce tumor shrinkage. We report a case of a 63-year-old woman with a symptomatic metastatic NET of the ileum. Complete symptomatic response was achieved after 1 month of treatment with SSAs. In addition, there was an objective response in the liver, with the disappearance of secondary lesions noted on computed tomography scan after 3 months of octreotide treatment. Our experience suggests that SSAs could be useful for downstaging and/or downsizing well-differentiated NETs, and they could allow surgery to be performed. Such presurgery therapy could be a promising tool in the management of patients with initially inoperable NETs. Keywords: neuroendocrine tumor, somatostatin analogs, octreotide, metastatic tumor of the ileum, radiological tumor response

  20. An off-on fluorescence probe targeting mitochondria based on oxidation-reduction response for tumor cell and tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hanchun; Cao, Li; Zhao, Weiwei; Zhang, Suge; Zeng, Man; Du, Bin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, a tumor-targeting poly( d, l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) loaded "off-on" fluorescent probe nanoparticle (PFN) delivery system was developed to evaluate the region of tumor by off-on fluorescence. The biodegradability of the nanosize PFN delivery system readily released the probe under tumor acidic conditions. The probe with good biocompatibility was used to monitor the intracellular glutathione (GSH) of cancer cells and selectively localize to mitochondria for tumor imaging. The incorporated tumor-targeting probe was based on the molecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism preventing fluorescence ("off" state) and could be easily released under tumor acidic conditions. However, the released tumor-targeting fluorescence probe molecule was selective towards GSH with high selectivity and an ultra-sensitivity for the mitochondria of cancer cells and tissues significantly increasing the probe molecule fluorescence signal ("on" state). The tumor-targeting fluorescence probe showed sensitivity to GSH avoiding interference from cysteine and homocysteine. The PFNs could enable fluorescence-guided cancer imaging during cancer therapy. This work may expand the biological applications of PFNs as a diagnostic reagent, which will be beneficial for fundamental research in tumor imaging. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Implanting Glioblastoma Spheroids into Rat Brains and Monitoring Tumor Growth by MRI Volumetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, Mario; Linsenmann, Thomas; Jawork, Anna; Kessler, Almuth F; Timmermann, Nils; Homola, György A; Ernestus, Ralf-Ingo; Hagemann, Carsten

    2017-01-01

    The outcome of patients suffering from glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor with a median survival of less than 15 months. To establish innovative therapeutical approaches or to analyze the effect of protein overexpression or protein knockdown by RNA interference in vivo, animal models are mandatory. Here, we describe the implantation of C6 glioma spheroids into the rats' brain and how to follow tumor growth by MRI scans. We show that C6 cells grown in Sprague-Dawley rats share several morphologic features of human glioblastoma like pleomorphic cells, areas of necrosis, vascular proliferation, and tumor cell invasion into the surrounding brain tissue. In addition, we describe a method for tumor volumetry utilizing the CISS 3D- or contrast-enhanced T1-weighted 3D sequence and freely available post-processing software.

  2. Is a comparative clinical trial for breast cancer tumor markers to monitor disease recurrence warranted? A value of information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariani, Rahber; Henry, Norah Lynn; Ramsey, Scott D; Blough, David K; Barlow, Bill; Gralow, Julie R; Veenstra, David L

    2013-05-01

    Breast cancer tumor markers are used by some clinicians to screen for disease recurrence risk. Since there is limited evidence of benefit, additional research may be warranted. To assess the potential value of a randomized clinical trial of breast tumor marker testing in routine follow-up of high-risk, stage II-III breast cancer survivors. We developed a decision-analytic model of tumor marker testing plus standard surveillance every 3-6 months for 5 years. The expected value of sample information was calculated using probabilistic simulations and was a function of: the probability of selecting the optimal monitoring strategy with current versus future information; the impact of choosing the nonoptimal strategy; and the size of the population affected. The value of information for a randomized clinical trial involving 9000 women was US$214 million compared with a cost of US$30-60 million to conduct such a trial. The probability of making an alternate, nonoptimal decision and choosing testing versus no testing was 32% with current versus future information from the trial. The impact of a nonoptimal decision was US$2150 and size of population impacted over 10 years was 308,000. The value of improved information on overall survival was US$105 million, quality of life US$37 million and test performance US$71 million. Conducting a randomized clinical trial of breast cancer tumor markers appears to offer a good societal return on investment. Retrospective analyses to assess test performance and evaluation of patient quality of life using tumor markers may also offer valuable areas of research. However, alternative investments may offer even better returns in investments and, as such, the trial concept deserves further study as part of an overall research-portfolio evaluation.

  3. Anti-tumor response with immunologically modified carbon nanotubes and phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Zhou, Feifan; Boarman, Ellen; Chen, Wei R.

    2013-02-01

    While successes of different cancer therapies have been achieved in various degrees a systemic immune response is needed to effectively treat late-stage, metastatic cancers, and to establish long-term tumor resistance in the patients. A novel method for combating metastatic cancers has been developed using immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy. Glycated chitosan (GC) is a potent immunological adjuvant capable of increasing host immune responses, including antigen presentation by activation of dendritic cells (DCs) and causing T cell proliferation. GC is also an effective surfactant for nanomaterials. By combining single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and GC, immunologically modified carbon nanotubes (SWNT-GC) were constructed. The SWNT-GC suspension retains the enhanced light absorption properties in the near infrared (NIR) region and the ability to enter cells, which are characteristic of SWNTs. The SWNT-GC also retains the immunological properties of GC. Cellular SWNT-GC treatments increased macrophage activity, DC activation and T cell proliferation. When cellular SWNT-GC was irradiated with a laser of an appropriate wavelength, these immune activities could be enhanced. The combination of laser irradiation and SWNT-GC induced cellular toxicity in targeted tumor cells, leading to a systemic antitumor response. Immunologically modified carbon nanotubes in conjunction with phototherapy is a novel and promising method to produce a systemic immune response for the treatment of metastatic cancers.

  4. Predicting and monitoring response to chemotherapy by 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea in subcutaneously implanted 9L glioma using the apparent diffusion coefficient of water and 23Na MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babsky, Andriy M; Hekmatyar, S K; Zhang, Hong; Solomon, James L; Bansal, Navin

    2006-07-01

    To examine the effects of the alkylating anticancer drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) on (23)Na MRI and the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) in subcutaneously- (sc-) implanted 9L glioma in rats. (23)Na MRI and (1)H water ADC measurements were performed on sham-treated control (N = 6) and BCNU-treated (N = 15) Fisher rats one day before BCNU injection and then one, three, and five days after BCNU injection. The BCNU-treated tumors were divided into BCNU-responsive (R(BCNU)) and BCNU-nonresponsive (NR(BCNU)) groups depending on the tumor volume changes that occurred after therapy. The pretreatment (23)Na MRI signal intensity (SI) and water ADC values were higher in R(BCNU) tumors compared to NR(BCNU) tumors. (23)Na MRI SI and water ADC increased with tumor growth in control and NR(BCNU) groups, but these changes were interrupted by BCNU therapy in R(BCNU) group. (23)Na MRI and water ADC measurements may be useful for predicting and monitoring response to chemotherapy in some tumors. However, the changes that occurred in (23)Na MRI SI and water ADC in sc-implanted 9L tumors are in contrast to previously published results for BCNU therapy of orthotopic 9L tumors. This may have important implications for monitoring therapy response in tumors. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Integrin-Targeted Hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography/X-ray Computed Tomography for Imaging Tumor Progression and Early Response in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Ma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins play an important role in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis. Therefore we aimed to evaluate a preclinical imaging approach applying ανβ3 integrin targeted hybrid Fluorescence Molecular Tomography/X-ray Computed Tomography (FMT-XCT for monitoring tumor progression as well as early therapy response in a syngeneic murine Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC model. Lewis Lung Carcinomas were grown orthotopically in C57BL/6 J mice and imaged in-vivo using a ανβ3 targeted near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF probe. ανβ3-targeted FMT-XCT was able to track tumor progression. Cilengitide was able to substantially block the binding of the NIRF probe and suppress the imaging signal. Additionally mice were treated with an established chemotherapy regimen of Cisplatin and Bevacizumab or with a novel MEK inhibitor (Refametinib for 2 weeks. While μCT revealed only a moderate slowdown of tumor growth, ανβ3 dependent signal decreased significantly compared to non-treated mice already at one week post treatment. ανβ3 targeted imaging might therefore become a promising tool for assessment of early therapy response in the future.

  6. Tumor Cell-Free DNA Copy Number Instability Predicts Therapeutic Response to Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Glen J; Beck, Julia; Braun, Donald P; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kristen; Barilla, Heather; Cubello, Rhiannon; Quan, Walter; Sangal, Ashish; Khemka, Vivek; Waypa, Jordan; Mitchell, William M; Urnovitz, Howard; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: Chromosomal instability is a fundamental property of cancer, which can be quantified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) from plasma/serum-derived cell-free DNA (cfDNA). We hypothesized that cfDNA could be used as a real-time surrogate for imaging analysis of disease status as a function of response to immunotherapy and as a more reliable tool than tumor biomarkers. Experimental Design: Plasma cfDNA sequences from 56 patients with diverse advanced cancers were prospectively collected and analyzed in a single-blind study for copy number variations, expressed as a quantitative chromosomal number instability (CNI) score versus 126 noncancer controls in a training set of 23 and a blinded validation set of 33. Tumor biomarker concentrations and a surrogate marker for T regulatory cells (Tregs) were comparatively analyzed. Results: Elevated CNI scores were observed in 51 of 56 patients prior to therapy. The blinded validation cohort provided an overall prediction accuracy of 83% (25/30) and a positive predictive value of CNI score for progression of 92% (11/12). The combination of CNI score before cycle (Cy) 2 and 3 yielded a correct prediction for progression in all 13 patients. The CNI score also correctly identified cases of pseudo-tumor progression from hyperprogression. Before Cy2 and Cy3, there was no significant correlation for protein tumor markers, total cfDNA, or surrogate Tregs. Conclusions: Chromosomal instability quantification in plasma cfDNA can serve as an early indicator of response to immunotherapy. The method has the potential to reduce health care costs and disease burden for cancer patients following further validation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(17); 5074-81. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. In Silico Analysis of Microarray-Based Gene Expression Profiles Predicts Tumor Cell Response to Withanolides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Withania somnifera (L. Dunal (Indian ginseng, winter cherry, Solanaceae is widely used in traditional medicine. Roots are either chewed or used to prepare beverages (aqueous decocts. The major secondary metabolites of Withania somnifera are the withanolides, which are C-28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids. Withania somnifera extracts exert chemopreventive and anticancer activities in vitro and in vivo. The aims of the present in silico study were, firstly, to investigate whether tumor cells develop cross-resistance between standard anticancer drugs and withanolides and, secondly, to elucidate the molecular determinants of sensitivity and resistance of tumor cells towards withanolides. Using IC50 concentrations of eight different withanolides (withaferin A, withaferin A diacetate, 3-azerininylwithaferin A, withafastuosin D diacetate, 4-B-hydroxy-withanolide E, isowithanololide E, withafastuosin E, and withaperuvin and 19 established anticancer drugs, we analyzed the cross-resistance profile of 60 tumor cell lines. The cell lines revealed cross-resistance between the eight withanolides. Consistent cross-resistance between withanolides and nitrosoureas (carmustin, lomustin, and semimustin was also observed. Then, we performed transcriptomic microarray-based COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of mRNA expression to identify mRNA expression profiles predicting sensitivity or resistance towards withanolides. Genes from diverse functional groups were significantly associated with response of tumor cells to withaferin A diacetate, e.g. genes functioning in DNA damage and repair, stress response, cell growth regulation, extracellular matrix components, cell adhesion and cell migration, constituents of the ribosome, cytoskeletal organization and regulation, signal transduction, transcription factors, and others.

  8. Biophysical Monitoring and dose response characteristics of irradiated hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshemey, W.M; Selim, N.S.; Desouky, O.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims to move a step forward towards a deeper understanding of the scattering of x-ray, from lyophilized biological samples. Comparative study has been performed using LAXS and UV-visible spectrophotometry for monitoring the dose response characteristics of the hemoglobin molecule of irradiated blood. Blood samples were irradiated at doses ranging from 5 up to 100 Gy. Diluted hemoglobin solution was scanned in the UV- visible range (200-700 nm), and lyophilized hemoglobin was prepared for LAXS measurement. The radiation-induced changes in the hemoglobin structure have been evaluated. The LAXS profile of hemoglobin molecule is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks were found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The obtained results suggest that the 1 s t peak, recorded at 4.65 o , is sensitive to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the globin part, while the major peak, recorded at 10.5 o , appeared to be related to its primary and secondary structure

  9. Correlations of noninvasive BOLD and TOLD MRI with pO2 and relevance to tumor radiation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallac, Rami R; Zhou, Heling; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Song, Kwang; Stojadinovic, Strahinja; Zhao, Dawen; Solberg, Timothy; Peschke, Peter; Mason, Ralph P

    2014-05-01

    To examine the potential use of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) and tissue oxygenation level dependent (TOLD) contrast MRI to assess tumor oxygenation and predict radiation response. BOLD and TOLD MRI were performed on Dunning R3327-AT1 rat prostate tumors during hyperoxic gas breathing challenge at 4.7 T. Animals were divided into two groups. In Group 1 (n = 9), subsequent (19) F MRI based on spin lattice relaxation of hexafluorobenzene reporter molecule provided quantitative oximetry for comparison. For Group 2 rats (n = 13) growth delay following a single dose of 30 Gy was compared with preirradiation BOLD and TOLD assessments. Oxygen (100%O2 ) and carbogen (95%O2 /5%CO2 ) challenge elicited similar BOLD, TOLD and pO2 responses. Strong correlations were observed between BOLD or R2* response and quantitative (19) F pO2 measurements. TOLD response showed a general trend with weaker correlation. Irradiation caused a significant tumor growth delay and tumors with larger changes in TOLD and R1 values upon oxygen breathing exhibited significantly increased tumor growth delay. These results provide further insight into the relationships between oxygen sensitive (BOLD/TOLD) MRI and tumor pO2 . Moreover, a larger increase in R1 response to hyperoxic gas challenge coincided with greater tumor growth delay following irradiation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Characterizing spatiotemporal information loss in sparse-sampling-based dynamic MRI for monitoring respiration-induced tumor motion in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arai, Tatsuya J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Nofiele, Joris; Yuan, Qing [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Madhuranthakam, Ananth J.; Pedrosa, Ivan; Chopra, Rajiv [Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Advanced Imaging Research Center, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Sawant, Amit, E-mail: amit.sawant@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Sparse-sampling and reconstruction techniques represent an attractive strategy to achieve faster image acquisition speeds, while maintaining adequate spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio in rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The authors investigate the use of one such sequence, broad-use linear acquisition speed-up technique (k-t BLAST) in monitoring tumor motion for thoracic and abdominal radiotherapy and examine the potential trade-off between increased sparsification (to increase imaging speed) and the potential loss of “true” information due to greater reliance on a priori information. Methods: Lung tumor motion trajectories in the superior–inferior direction, previously recorded from ten lung cancer patients, were replayed using a motion phantom module driven by an MRI-compatible motion platform. Eppendorf test tubes filled with water which serve as fiducial markers were placed in the phantom. The modeled rigid and deformable motions were collected in a coronal image slice using balanced fast field echo in conjunction with k-t BLAST. Root mean square (RMS) error was used as a metric of spatial accuracy as measured trajectories were compared to input data. The loss of spatial information was characterized for progressively increasing acceleration factor from 1 to 16; the resultant sampling frequency was increased approximately from 2.5 to 19 Hz when the principal direction of the motion was set along frequency encoding direction. In addition to the phantom study, respiration-induced tumor motions were captured from two patients (kidney tumor and lung tumor) at 13 Hz over 49 s to demonstrate the impact of high speed motion monitoring over multiple breathing cycles. For each subject, the authors compared the tumor centroid trajectory as well as the deformable motion during free breathing. Results: In the rigid and deformable phantom studies, the RMS error of target tracking at the acquisition speed of 19 Hz was approximately 0.3–0

  11. Monitoring of wind load and response for cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai-yuen; Chan, Wai-Yee K.; Man, King-Leung

    2001-08-01

    Structural health monitoring for the three cable-supported bridges located in the West of Hong Kong or the Tsing Ma Control Area has been carried out since the opening of these bridges to public traffic. The three cable-supported bridges are referred to as the Tsing Ma (suspension) Bridge, the Kap Shui Mun (cable-stayed) Bridge and the Ting Kau (cable-stayed) Bridge. The structural health monitoring works involved are classified as six monitoring categories, namely, wind load and response, temperature load and response, traffic load and response, geometrical configuration monitoring, strains and stresses/forces monitoring and global dynamic characteristics monitoring. As wind loads and responses had been a major concern in the design and construction stages, this paper therefore outlines the work of wind load and response monitoring on Tsing Ma, Kap Shui Mun and Ting Kau Bridges. The paper starts with a brief description of the sensory systems. The description includes the layout and performance requirements of sensory systems for wind load and responses monitoring. Typical results of wind load and response monitoring in graphical forms are then presented. These graphical forms include the plots of wind rose diagrams, wind incidences vs wind speeds, wind turbulence intensities, wind power spectra, gust wind factors, coefficient of terrain roughness, extreme wind analyses, deck deflections/rotations vs wind speeds, acceleration spectra, acceleration/displacement contours, and stress demand ratios. Finally conclusions on wind load and response monitoring on the three cable-supported bridges are drawn.

  12. Molecular analysis of urothelial cancer cell lines for modeling tumor biology and drug response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, M L; Witte, N; Im, K M; Turan, S; Owens, C; Misner, K; Tsang, S X; Cai, Z; Wu, S; Dean, M; Costello, J C; Theodorescu, D

    2017-01-05

    The utility of tumor-derived cell lines is dependent on their ability to recapitulate underlying genomic aberrations and primary tumor biology. Here, we sequenced the exomes of 25 bladder cancer (BCa) cell lines and compared mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression and drug response to BCa patient profiles in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). We observed a mutation pattern associated with altered CpGs and APOBEC-family cytosine deaminases similar to mutation signatures derived from somatic alterations in muscle-invasive (MI) primary tumors, highlighting a major mechanism(s) contributing to cancer-associated alterations in the BCa cell line exomes. Non-silent sequence alterations were confirmed in 76 cancer-associated genes, including mutations that likely activate oncogenes TERT and PIK3CA, and alter chromatin-associated proteins (MLL3, ARID1A, CHD6 and KDM6A) and established BCa genes (TP53, RB1, CDKN2A and TSC1). We identified alterations in signaling pathways and proteins with related functions, including the PI3K/mTOR pathway, altered in 60% of lines; BRCA DNA repair, 44%; and SYNE1-SYNE2, 60%. Homozygous deletions of chromosome 9p21 are known to target the cell cycle regulators CDKN2A and CDKN2B. This loci was commonly lost in BCa cell lines and we show the deletions extended to the polyamine enzyme methylthioadenosine (MTA) phosphorylase (MTAP) in 36% of lines, transcription factor DMRTA1 (27%) and antiviral interferon epsilon (IFNE, 19%). Overall, the BCa cell line genomic aberrations were concordant with those found in BCa patient tumors. We used gene expression and copy number data to infer pathway activities for cell lines, then used the inferred pathway activities to build a predictive model of cisplatin response. When applied to platinum-treated patients gathered from TCGA, the model predicted treatment-specific response. Together, these data and analysis represent a valuable community resource to model basic tumor biology and to study

  13. Targeting Tumor-Associated Macrophages as a Potential Strategy to Enhance the Response to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassetta, Luca; Kitamura, Takanori

    2018-01-01

    Inhibition of immune checkpoint pathways in CD8 + T cell is a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of solid tumors that has shown significant anti-tumor effects and is now approved by the FDA to treat patients with melanoma and lung cancer. However the response to this therapy is limited to a certain fraction of patients and tumor types, for reasons still unknown. To ensure success of this treatment, CD8 + T cells, the main target of the checkpoint inhibitors, should exert full cytotoxicity against tumor cells. However recent studies show that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) can impede this process by different mechanisms. In this mini-review we will summarize recent studies showing the effect of TAM targeting on immune checkpoint inhibitors efficacy. We will also discuss on the limitations of the current strategies as well on the future scientific challenges for the progress of the tumor immunology field.

  14. Fiber-optic combined FPI/FBG sensors for monitoring of radiofrequency thermal ablation of liver tumors: ex vivo experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Macchi, Edoardo Gino; Braschi, Giovanni; Cigada, Alfredo; Gallati, Mario; Rossi, Sandro; Poeggel, Sven; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2014-04-01

    We present a biocompatible, all-glass, 0.2 mm diameter, fiber-optic probe that combines an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometry and a proximal fiber Bragg grating sensor; the probe enables dual pressure and temperature measurement on an active 4 mm length, with 40 Pa and 0.2°C nominal accuracy. The sensing system has been applied to monitor online the radiofrequency thermal ablation of tumors in liver tissue. Preliminary experiments have been performed in a reference chamber with uniform heating; further experiments have been carried out on ex vivo porcine liver, which allowed the measurement of a steep temperature gradient and monitoring of the local pressure increase during the ablation procedure.

  15. Simultaneous Monitoring of Vascular Oxygenation and Tissue Oxygen Tension of Breast Tumors Under Hyperbaric Oxygen Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    28. Alagoz, T., R. Buller, B. Anderson, K. Terrell , R...and oxygenation Ann . New Acad. Sci. 838 29–45 Chapman J D, Stobbe C C, Arnfield M R, Santus R, Lee J and McPhee M S 1991 Oxygen dependency of tumor

  16. Serum tumor marker CA 125 for monitoring ovarian cancer during follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuxen, Malgorzata K.; Sölétormos, G; Dombernowsky, P

    2002-01-01

    CA 125 is currently widely applied in the management of patients with ovarian cancer. However, a change in results of CA 125, which should be considered significant, has not been defined. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of CA 125 to signal progressive ovarian cancer during fo...... utility of serological tumor markers in patients with ovarian cancer....

  17. Clinical implications of monitoring circulating tumor DNA in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Lone V; Reinert, Thomas; Ørntoft, Mai-Britt W

    2017-01-01

    .007). Changes in ctDNA levels induced by relapse intervention (n = 19) showed good agreement with changes in tumor volume (κ = 0.41; Spearman ρ = 0.4).Conclusions: Postoperative ctDNA detection provides evidence of residual disease and identifies patients at very high risk of relapse. Longitudinal surveillance...

  18. Current diagnostic approach of bone tumors in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torre, Marcia Barbosa; Scatigno Neto, Andre

    1995-01-01

    The authors analyze the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as the imaging modality of choice for evaluation of patients with bone tumors or soft tissue tumors. The advent of such a sensitive imaging modality is fortuitous and coincides with a recent change in the therapeutic approach to primary bone tumors. MRI is extremely valuable in monitoring the tumor response to the initial chemotherapy and is accurate defining the margins of tumor, facilitating planning of limb salvage surgical procedures. (author). 5 refs., 8 figs

  19. C-Reactive Protein Is an Important Biomarker for Prognosis Tumor Recurrence and Treatment Response in Adult Solid Tumors: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrotriya, Shiva; Walsh, Declan; Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thomas, Shirley; Lorton, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    A systematic literature review was done to determine the relationship between elevated CRP and prognosis in people with solid tumors. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a serum acute phase reactant and a well-established inflammatory marker. We also examined the role of CRP to predict treatment response and tumor recurrence. MeSH (Medical Subject Heading) terms were used to search multiple electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, EBM-Cochrane). Two independent reviewers selected research papers. We also included a quality Assessment (QA) score. Reports with QA scores <50% were excluded. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) methodology was utilized for this review (S1 PRISMA Checklist). 271 articles were identified for final review. There were 45% prospective studies and 52% retrospective. 264 had intermediate QA score (≥50% but <80%); Seven were adequate (80% -100%); A high CRP was predictive of prognosis in 90% (245/271) of studies-80% of the 245 studies by multivariate analysis, 20% by univariate analysis. Many (52%) of the articles were about gastrointestinal malignancies (GI) or kidney malignancies. A high CRP was prognostic in 90% (127 of 141) of the reports in those groups of tumors. CRP was also prognostic in most reports in other solid tumors primary sites. A high CRP was associated with higher mortality in 90% of reports in people with solid tumors primary sites. This was particularly notable in GI malignancies and kidney malignancies. In other solid tumors (lung, pancreas, hepatocellular cancer, and bladder) an elevated CRP also predicted prognosis. In addition there is also evidence to support the use of CRP to help decide treatment response and identify tumor recurrence. Better designed large scale studies should be conducted to examine these issues more comprehensively.

  20. Systematic Analysis of Time-Series Gene Expression Data on Tumor Cell-Selective Apoptotic Responses to HDAC Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-feng Qi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available SAHA (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid or vorinostat is the first nonselective histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. SAHA affects histone acetylation in chromatin and a variety of nonhistone substrates, thus influencing many cellular processes. In particularly, SAHA induces selective apoptosis of tumor cells, although the mechanism is not well understood. A series of microarray experiments was recently conducted to investigate tumor cell-selective proapoptotic transcriptional responses induced by SAHA. Based on that gene expression time series, we propose a novel framework for detailed analysis of the mechanism of tumor cell apoptosis selectively induced by SAHA. Our analyses indicated that SAHA selectively disrupted the DNA damage response, cell cycle, p53 expression, and mitochondrial integrity of tumor samples to induce selective tumor cell apoptosis. Our results suggest a possible regulation network. Our research extends the existing research.

  1. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with "1"8F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E.; Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of "1"8F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k_3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K_1) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k_3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K_1. The k_3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k_3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k_3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed characterization of the

  2. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with {sup 18}F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k{sub 3} and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K{sub 1}) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k{sub 3} and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K{sub 1}. The k{sub 3} -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k{sub 3} and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k{sub 3} indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET

  3. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with 18F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovski, Milan; Lee, Nancy Y; Schöder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D; Beattie, Bradley J; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E; O'Donoghue, Joseph A; Humm, John L

    2017-09-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∼95 min and ∼160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k 3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K 1 ) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k 3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K 1 . The k 3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k 3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k 3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed

  4. SU-E-J-273: Simulation of the Radiation Response of Hypoxic Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinoza, I; Peschke, P; Karger, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumour to irradiation prior to the treatment. Mathematical modelling of tumour control probability (TCP) based on the dose distribution, medical imaging and other biological information may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to develop an image based 3D multiscale radiobiological model, which describes the growth and the response to radiotherapy of hypoxic tumors. Methods: The computer model is based on voxels, containing tumour, normal (including capillary) and dead cells. Killing of tumour cells due to irradiation is calculated by the Linear Quadratic Model (extended for hypoxia), and the proliferation and resorption of cells are modelled by exponential laws. The initial shape of the tumours is taken from CT images and the initial vascular and cell density information from PET and/or MR images. Including the fractionation regime and the physical dose distribution of the radiation treatment, the model simulates the spatial-temporal evolution of the tumor. Additionally, the dose distribution may be biologically optimized. Results: The model describes the appearance of hypoxia during tumour growth and the reoxygenation processes during radiotherapy. Among other parameters, the TCP is calculated for different dose distributions. The results are in accordance with published results. Conclusion: The simulation model may contribute to the understanding of the influence of biological parameters on tumor response during treatment, and specifically on TCP. It may be used to implement dose-painting approaches. Experimental and clinical validation is needed. This study is supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education of Chile, Programa Mece Educacion Superior (2)

  5. SU-E-J-273: Simulation of the Radiation Response of Hypoxic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza, I [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Peschke, P; Karger, C [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumour to irradiation prior to the treatment. Mathematical modelling of tumour control probability (TCP) based on the dose distribution, medical imaging and other biological information may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. The aim of this work is to develop an image based 3D multiscale radiobiological model, which describes the growth and the response to radiotherapy of hypoxic tumors. Methods: The computer model is based on voxels, containing tumour, normal (including capillary) and dead cells. Killing of tumour cells due to irradiation is calculated by the Linear Quadratic Model (extended for hypoxia), and the proliferation and resorption of cells are modelled by exponential laws. The initial shape of the tumours is taken from CT images and the initial vascular and cell density information from PET and/or MR images. Including the fractionation regime and the physical dose distribution of the radiation treatment, the model simulates the spatial-temporal evolution of the tumor. Additionally, the dose distribution may be biologically optimized. Results: The model describes the appearance of hypoxia during tumour growth and the reoxygenation processes during radiotherapy. Among other parameters, the TCP is calculated for different dose distributions. The results are in accordance with published results. Conclusion: The simulation model may contribute to the understanding of the influence of biological parameters on tumor response during treatment, and specifically on TCP. It may be used to implement dose-painting approaches. Experimental and clinical validation is needed. This study is supported by a grant from the Ministry of Education of Chile, Programa Mece Educacion Superior (2)

  6. Cellular radiation response as a function of tumor size, host hematocrit, and erythrokinetics in CA755 tumor-bearing mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirtle, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments were performed which both characterized the kinetics of host anemia when CA755 mammary adenocarcinomas were grown in either preirradiated or unirradiated host tissue of C57B1/2J (BDF 1 ) mice, and determined whether a correlation exists between the extent of host anemia and the cellular radiosensitivity of the grossly viable tumor tissue. The red cell destruction rate and the total red cell volume (TRCV) were simultaneously measured throughout tumor growth, and from this information the erythrocyte production per day could be estimated. Increased erythrocyte production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in circulating reticulocytes. The application of these methods to a tumor-bearing mouse system demonstrated that the erythrocyte production rates increased to a maximum of 6 to 10 times normal in mice bearing tumors growing in either preirradiated or unirradiated graft sites. It was concluded that tumor host anemia was due to accelerated random loss of erythrocytes and the nearly simultaneous decrease in erythrocyte potential life span rather than to a decrease in the erythrocyte production

  7. Natural Killer Cell Response to Chemotherapy-Stressed Cancer Cells: Role in Tumor Immunosurveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Zingoni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are innate cytotoxic lymphoid cells that actively prevent neoplastic development, growth, and metastatic dissemination in a process called cancer immunosurveillance. An equilibrium between immune control and tumor growth is maintained as long as cancer cells evade immunosurveillance. Therapies designed to kill cancer cells and to simultaneously sustain host antitumor immunity are an appealing strategy to control tumor growth. Several chemotherapeutic agents, depending on which drugs and doses are used, give rise to DNA damage and cancer cell death by means of apoptosis, immunogenic cell death, or other forms of non-apoptotic death (i.e., mitotic catastrophe, senescence, and autophagy. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that they can trigger additional stress responses. Indeed, relevant immunostimulating effects of different therapeutic programs include also the activation of pathways able to promote their recognition by immune effector cells. Among stress-inducible immunostimulating proteins, changes in the expression levels of NK cell-activating and inhibitory ligands, as well as of death receptors on tumor cells, play a critical role in their detection and elimination by innate immune effectors, including NK cells. Here, we will review recent advances in chemotherapy-mediated cellular stress pathways able to stimulate NK cell effector functions. In particular, we will address how these cytotoxic lymphocytes sense and respond to different types of drug-induced stresses contributing to anticancer activity.

  8. Radiotherapy in desmoid tumors. Treatment response, local control, and analysis of local failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santti, Kirsi; Beule, Annette; Tuomikoski, Laura; Jaeaeskelaeinen, Anna-Stina; Saarilahti, Kauko; Tarkkanen, Maija; Blomqvist, Carl [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki (Finland); Roenty, Mikko [HUSLAB and University of Helsinki, Department of Pathology, Helsinki (Finland); Ihalainen, Hanna [Helsinki University Hospital and University of Helsinki, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2017-04-15

    Desmoid tumors (aggressive fibromatosis) are rare soft tissue tumors which frequently recur after surgery. Desmoid tumors arise from musculoaponeurotic tissue in the extremities, head and neck, abdominal wall, or intra-abdominally. Our aim was to examine the outcome of radiotherapy of desmoid tumors in a single institution series. We evaluated 41 patients with desmoid tumors treated with 49 radiotherapies between 1987 and 2012. Radiologic images for response evaluation were reassessed and responses to treatment registered according to RECIST criteria 1.1. For patients with local failures radiation dose distribution was determined in each local failure volume using image co-registration. Recurrences were classified as in-target, marginal, or out-of-target. Prognostic factors for radiotherapy treatment failure were evaluated. Radiotherapy doses varied from 20-63 Gy (median 50 Gy) with a median fraction size of 2 Gy. The objective response rate to definitive radiotherapy was 55% (12/22 patients). Median time to response was 14 months. A statistically significant dose-response relation for definitive and postoperative radiotherapy was observed both in univariate (p-value 0.002) and in multivariate analysis (p-value 0.02) adjusted for potential confounding factors. Surgery before radiotherapy or surgical margin had no significant effect on time to progression. Nine of 11 (82%) local failures were classified as marginal and two of 11 (18%) in-target. None of the recurrences occurred totally out-of-target. Radiotherapy is a valuable option for treating desmoid tumors. Radiotherapy dose appears to be significantly associated to local control. (orig.) [German] Desmoide (aggressive Fibromatosen) sind seltene Weichteiltumore der muskulaeren Membranen von Kopf, Hals, Extremitaeten und Bauchwand. Ziel war es, die Wirksamkeit der Strahlentherapie bei aggressiver Fibromatose an einer einzelnen Klinik zu untersuchen. Ausgewertet wurden 41 Patienten mit aggressiver Fibromatose, die

  9. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient for monitoring early response in patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jie; Zhu, Lijing; Zhu, Li; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-11-01

    Background Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram analysis has been widely used in determining tumor prognosis. Purpose To investigate the dynamic changes of ADC histogram parameters during concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with advanced cervical cancers. Material and Methods This prospective study enrolled 32 patients with advanced cervical cancers undergoing CCRT who received diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before CCRT, at the end of the second and fourth week during CCRT and one month after CCRT completion. The ADC histogram for the entire tumor volume was generated, and a series of histogram parameters was obtained. Dynamic changes of those parameters in cervical cancers were investigated as early biomarkers for treatment response. Results All histogram parameters except AUC low showed significant changes during CCRT (all P histogram parameters of cervical cancers changed significantly at the early stage of CCRT, indicating their potential in monitoring early tumor response to therapy.

  10. Glycolysis-related gene induction and ATP reduction during fractionated irradiation. Markers for radiation responsiveness of human tumor xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, K.; Meyer, S.S.; Mueller-Klieser, W. [University Medical Center Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Physiology and Pathophysiology; Yaromina, A. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; Zips, D. [University Hospital Tuebingen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Baumann, M. [Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology; University Hospital Dresden Technical Univ. Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2013-09-15

    Background and purpose: Lactate was previously shown to be a prognostic but not a predictive pre-therapeutic marker for radiation response of tumor xenografts. We hypothesize that metabolic changes during fractionated irradiation may restrict the predictiveness of lactate regarding tumor radiosensitivity. Materials and methods: Tumor xenografts were generated in nude mice by implanting 4 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma lines with different sensitivities to fractionated irradiation. Tumors were irradiated with up to 15 fractions of 2 Gy over a period of 3 weeks, and ATP and lactate levels were measured in vital tumor areas with induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging. Corresponding changes in mRNA expression of glycolysis-related genes were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Results: Lactate content decreased significantly in 3 out of 4 cell lines in the course of irradiation showing no correlation with cell line-specific radiosensitivity. Radiation-induced changes in ATP levels and glycolysis-related mRNA expression, however, only occurred in radiosensitive or intermediately radioresistant xenografts, whereas these parameters remained unchanged in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: Sensitivity-related differences in the transcriptional response of tumors to radiotherapy may be exploited in the clinic for better individualization of tumor treatment. (orig.)

  11. Extracellular matrix composition and rigidity regulate invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D pancreatic tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Gwendolyn; El-Hamidi, Hamid; Jafari, Seyedehrojin; Jones, Dustin P.; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2016-03-01

    The composition and mechanical compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to serve as regulators of tumor growth and invasive behavior. These effects may be particularly relevant in tumors of the pancreas, noted for a profound desmoplastic reaction and an abundance of stroma rich in ECM. In view of recent progress in the clinical implementation of photodynamic therapy (PDT) for pancreatic tumors, in this report we examine how ECM composition and rheological properties impact upon invasive behavior and response to PDT in 3D multicellular pancreatic tumor spheroids in ECM environments with characterized rheological properties. Tumor spheroids were cultured initially in attachment-free conditions to form millimeter-sized spheroids that were transplanted into reconstituted ECM microenvironments (Matrigel and Type I Collagen) that were characterized using bulk oscillatory shear rheology. Analysis of growth behavior shows that the soft collagen ECM promoted growth and extensive invasion and this microenvironment was used in subsequent assessment of PDT and chemotherapy response. Evaluation of treatment response revealed that primary tumor nodule growth is inhibited more effectively with PDT, while verteporfin PDT response is significantly enhanced in the ECM-infiltrating populations that are non-responsive to oxaliplatin chemotherapy. This finding is potentially significant, suggesting the potential for PDT to target these clinically problematic invasive populations that are associated with aggressive metastatic progression and chemoresistance. Experiments to further validate and identify the mechanistic basis of this observation are ongoing.

  12. TIP-1 translocation onto the cell plasma membrane is a molecular biomarker of tumor response to ionizing radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailun Wang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor response to treatment has been generally assessed with anatomic and functional imaging. Recent development of in vivo molecular and cellular imaging showed promise in time-efficient assessment of the therapeutic efficacy of a prescribed regimen. Currently, the in vivo molecular imaging is limited with shortage of biomarkers and probes with sound biological relevance. We have previously shown in tumor-bearing mice that a hexapeptide (HVGGSSV demonstrated potentials as a molecular imaging probe to distinguish the tumors responding to ionizing radiation (IR and/or tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment from those of non-responding tumors.In this study we have studied biological basis of the HVGGSSV peptide binding within the irradiated tumors by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells. The results indicated that Tax interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1BP3 is a molecular target that enables the selective binding of the HVGGSSV peptide within irradiated xenograft tumors. Optical imaging and immunohistochemical staining indicated that a TIP-1 specific antibody demonstrated similar biodistribution as the peptide in tumor-bearing mice. The TIP-1 antibody blocked the peptide from binding within irradiated tumors. Studies on both of human and mouse lung cancer cells showed that the intracellular TIP-1 relocated to the plasma membrane surface within the first few hours after exposure to IR and before the onset of treatment associated apoptosis and cell death. TIP-1 relocation onto the cell surface is associated with the reduced proliferation and the enhanced susceptibility to the subsequent IR treatment.This study by use of tumor-bearing mice and cultured cancer cells suggested that imaging of the radiation-inducible TIP-1 translocation onto the cancer cell surface may predict the tumor responsiveness to radiation in a time-efficient manner and thus tailor radiotherapy of cancer.

  13. Assessment of serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer after DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei-Fan Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy on serum tumor markers, tumor cell apoptosis and immune response in patients with advanced colon cancer. Methods: A total of 79 patients with advanced colon cancer conservatively treated in our hospital between May 2012 and October 2015 were retrospectively studied and divided into DC-CIK group and intravenous chemotherapy group according to different therapeutic regimens, DC-CIK group received DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy and intravenous chemotherapy group received conventional intravenous chemotherapy. After three cycles of chemotherapy, the content of tumor markers in serum, expression levels of apoptotic molecules in tumor lesions as well as immune function indexes were determined. Results: After 3 cycles of chemotherapy, CEA, CA199, CA242, HIF-1α, IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; p53, FAM96B, PTEN, PHLPP, ASPP2 and RASSF10 mRNA content in tumor lesions of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; the fluorescence intensity of CD3, CD4 and CD56 on peripheral blood mononuclear cell surface of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while the fluorescence intensity of CD8 and CD25 were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group; IL-2 and IFN-γ content in serum of DC-CIK group were significantly higher than those of intravenous chemotherapy group while IL-4, IL-5 and IL-10 content were significantly lower than those of intravenous chemotherapy group. Conclusions: DC-CIK combined with intravenous chemotherapy has better effect on killing colon cancer cells and inducing colon cancer cell apoptosis than conventional intravenous chemotherapy, and can also improve the body's anti-tumor immune response.

  14. Assessing tumor treatment response and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer with perfusion CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jianwei; Wu Ning; Song Ying

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To prospectively investigate whether any of the perfusion parameters would predict early tumor response to chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: In a prospective series, Perfusion CT were performed in 152 patients suspected lung cancer with 16-slice or 8-slice multislice CT. Contrast medium (50 ml) was injected at a rate of 4 ml/s with a power injector. The scanning delay was 10 seconds and the scanning time was 50 seconds. Among 152 patients, 123 patients were proved lung cancer by pathology. With the perfusion 3.0 software, the parameters including blood flow (BF), blood volume (BV), mean transit time (MTT) and capillary permeability surface area product (PS) were calculated. The perfusion image quality was evaluated on a 4-1eveal scale. The treatment response after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was assessed with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), and then the relationship between perfusion parameters with early tumor response to chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy was evaluated. Student t test and Kaplan-Meier estimates were used for data analysis. Results: In 84 patients (68.3%), the perfusion image quality was staged level 2 (moderate) and level 3 (good). Among them, 35 patients with NSCLC were assessed with RECIST after chemotherapy and (or) radiotherapy. In these 35 patients, The BF of responders and nonresponders was (81.0 ± 33.6)and (56.3 ± 23.1) ml · min -1 ·100 g -1 , respectively, which was significantly different(t=2.393, P=0.023). The median PFS of low-BF group (BF ≤ 80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) and high-BF group (BF>80 ml · min -1 · 100 g -1 ) was 11.8 and 8.0 months respectively (P>0.05), and the median PFS of low-BV group (BF ≤ 6 ml/100 g -1 ) and high-BV group (BF>6 ml/100 g -1 ) was 9.2 and 8.0 months respectively(P>0.05), both of them were not significantly different. Conclusion: NSCLC in high perfusion are relatively sensitive to chemotherapy

  15. In vivo therapeutic responses contingent on Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 status of the tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Michiel S; Brody, Jonathan R; Dezentje, David A; Gallmeier, Eike; Cunningham, Steven C; Swartz, Michael J; DeMarzo, Angelo M; Offerhaus, G Johan A; Isacoff, William H; Hruban, Ralph H; Kern, Scott E

    2005-10-15

    BRCA2, FANCC, and FANCG gene mutations are present in a subset of pancreatic cancer. Defects in these genes could lead to hypersensitivity to interstrand cross-linkers in vivo and a more optimal treatment of pancreatic cancer patients based on the genetic profile of the tumor. Two retrovirally complemented pancreatic cancer cell lines having defects in the Fanconi anemia pathway, PL11 (FANCC-mutated) and Hs766T (FANCG-mutated), as well as several parental pancreatic cancer cell lines with or without mutations in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway, were assayed for in vitro and in vivo sensitivities to various chemotherapeutic agents. A distinct dichotomy of drug responses was observed. Fanconi anemia-defective cancer cells were hypersensitive to the cross-linking agents mitomycin C (MMC), cisplatin, chlorambucil, and melphalan but not to 5-fluorouracil, gemcitabine, doxorubicin, etoposide, vinblastine, or paclitaxel. Hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents was confirmed in vivo; FANCC-deficient xenografts of PL11 and BRCA2-deficient xenografts of CAPAN1 regressed on treatment with two different regimens of MMC whereas Fanconi anemia-proficient xenografts did not. The MMC response comprised cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and necrosis. Xenografts of PL11 also regressed after a single dose of cyclophosphamide whereas xenografts of genetically complemented PL11(FANCC) did not. MMC or other cross-linking agents as a clinical therapy for pancreatic cancer patients with tumors harboring defects in the Fanconi anemia/BRCA2 pathway should be specifically investigated.

  16. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Xin Wang

    Full Text Available Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC, a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS, acute myeloid leukemia (AML and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+, but not CD4(+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  17. Low Dose Decitabine Treatment Induces CD80 Expression in Cancer Cells and Stimulates Tumor Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+ T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23671644

  18. Low dose decitabine treatment induces CD80 expression in cancer cells and stimulates tumor specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Xin; Mei, Zhen-Yang; Zhou, Ji-Hao; Yao, Yu-Shi; Li, Yong-Hui; Xu, Yi-Han; Li, Jing-Xin; Gao, Xiao-Ning; Zhou, Min-Hang; Jiang, Meng-Meng; Gao, Li; Ding, Yi; Lu, Xue-Chun; Shi, Jin-Long; Luo, Xu-Feng; Wang, Jia; Wang, Li-Li; Qu, Chunfeng; Bai, Xue-Feng; Yu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lack of immunogenicity of cancer cells has been considered a major reason for their failure in induction of a tumor specific T cell response. In this paper, we present evidence that decitabine (DAC), a DNA methylation inhibitor that is currently used for the treatment of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and other malignant neoplasms, is capable of eliciting an anti-tumor cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in mouse EL4 tumor model. C57BL/6 mice with established EL4 tumors were treated with DAC (1.0 mg/kg body weight) once daily for 5 days. We found that DAC treatment resulted in infiltration of IFN-γ producing T lymphocytes into tumors and caused tumor rejection. Depletion of CD8(+), but not CD4(+) T cells resumed tumor growth. DAC-induced CTL response appeared to be elicited by the induction of CD80 expression on tumor cells. Epigenetic evidence suggests that DAC induces CD80 expression in EL4 cells via demethylation of CpG dinucleotide sites in the promoter of CD80 gene. In addition, we also showed that a transient, low-dose DAC treatment can induce CD80 gene expression in a variety of human cancer cells. This study provides the first evidence that epigenetic modulation can induce the expression of a major T cell co-stimulatory molecule on cancer cells, which can overcome immune tolerance, and induce an efficient anti-tumor CTL response. The results have important implications in designing DAC-based cancer immunotherapy.

  19. High dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (gadodiamide) for diagnostic imaging and therapy monitoring of malignant bone tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeussler, M.D.; Rummeny, E.J.; Raufhake, C.; Blasius, S.; Lindner, N.; Daldrup, H.E.; Reimer, P.; Peters, P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of high-dose Gd-DTPA-BMA (gadodiamide, Omniscan) as a contrast for magnetic resonance imaging of malignant bone tumors and the use of high-dose dynamic studies for predicting the response to preoperative chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Examinations were performed in 22 patients with suspected malignant bone tumor on a 1.5 T system. In 8 cases a follow-up examination was done after preoperative chemotherapy. Static studies included Pd- and T2-weighted spin-echo sequences as well as T1-weighted spin-echo sequences, obtained pre- and post-contrast. Dynamic studies were performed using a FLASH 2D-gradient-echo sequence (TR 40 ms/TE 10 ms, 90 flip angle) every 20 s after intravenous bolus injection of Gd-DTPA-BMA (0.3 mmol/kg body weight). MR images were evaluated qualitatively by visual assessment of conspicuity size, extraosseous delineation and structure of the lesion and quantitatively by measurement of the signal intensities and calculation of the relative increase in signal intensity. Results: Qualitative image analysis showed best demonstration of the lesions on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. Comparison of T1-weighted pre- and postcontrast spin-echo sequences revealed significantly better assessment of tumor structure after administration of contrast media. After preoperative chemotherapy, all responders showed a markedly stronger reduction in relative increase in signal intensity in dynamic studies compared to nonresponders. Conclusion: Gd-DTPA-BMA is effective for magnetic resonance imaging of musculoskeletal lesions and improves assessment of the tumor structure. Dynamic studies may help to predict the response to preoperative chemotherapy. (orig.) [de

  20. HeLa cell tumor response to 60Co, Cs-137, Cf-252 radiations and cisplatin chemotherapy in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.; Feola, J.M.; Beach, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    HeLa cells were implanted into athymic nude mice from tissue culture and solid tumors established (HeLa cell tumor or HCT). Large cell numbers of 1 X 10 7 were required to obtain consistent and progressive growth, and tumor growth followed a Gompertzian mode. Irradiation studies were carried out using acute Cobalt-60 (60Co), low-dose-rate (LDR) Cs-137 and LDR Cf-252. Cf-252, a neutron-emitting radioisotope, produced an immediate tumor shrinkage and regression response after a dose of 279 cGy. Acute 60Co or LDR Cs-137 irradiation with 1000 cGy had little effect on the HCT. After a dose of 2000 cGy of 60Co radiation tumor shrinkage followed a latent period of approximately 5 days. Cisplatin had no effect on the HCT in nude mice in stationary or late exponential growth

  1. δ-Tocotrienol Oxazine Derivative Antagonizes Mammary Tumor Cell Compensatory Response to CoCl2-Induced Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryatheja Ananthula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to low oxygen supply, cancer cells elevate production of HIF-1α, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor that subsequently acts to stimulate blood vessel formation and promote survival. Studies were conducted to determine the role of δ-tocotrienol and a semisynthetic δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, on +SA mammary tumor cell hypoxic response. Treatment with 150 µM CoCl2 induced a hypoxic response in +SA mammary tumor cells as evidenced by a large increase in HIF-1α levels, and combined treatment with compound 44 attenuated this response. CoCl2-induced hypoxia was also associated with a large increase in Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of downstream targets p70S6K and eIF-4E1, and a significant increase in VEGF production, and combined treatment with compound 44 blocked this response. Additional in vivo studies showed that intralesional treatment with compound 44 in BALB/c mice bearing +SA mammary tumors significantly decreased the levels of HIF-1α, and this effect was associated with a corresponding decrease in Akt/mTOR signaling and activation of downstream targets p70S6kinase and eIF-4E1. These findings demonstrate that treatment with the δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, significantly attenuates +SA mammary tumor cell compensatory responses to hypoxia and suggests that this compound may provide benefit in the treatment of rapidly growing solid breast tumors.

  2. Comparison of FDG-PET/CT and contrast-enhanced CT for monitoring therapy response in patients with metastatic breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedl, Christopher C.; Ulaner, Gary A.; Jochelson, Maxine S.; Weber, Wolfgang A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Weill Cornell Medical College, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Pinker, Katja [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Ong, Leonard T. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Baltzer, Pascal [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); McArthur, Heather L. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Department of Medicine, Breast Oncology, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Dickler, Maura [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The aim of this study was to compare fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) for the prediction of progression-free survival (PFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) in patients with stage IV breast cancer undergoing systemic therapy. Sixty-five patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with first- or second-line systemic therapy in prospective clinical trials were included. Response to treatment was evaluated by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 for CE-CT and by PET Response Criteria in Solid Tumors (PERCIST), respectively. All responders by RECIST (n = 22) were also responders by PERCIST, but 40% (17/43) of non-responders by RECIST were responders by PERCIST. Responses according to RECIST and PERCIST both correlated with PFS, but PERCIST showed a significantly higher predictive accuracy (concordance index for PFS: 0.70 vs. 0.60). One-year PFS for responders vs. non-responders by RECIST was 59% vs. 27%, compared to 63% vs. 0% by PERCIST. Four-year DSS of responders and non-responders by RECIST was 50% and 38%, respectively (p = 0.2, concordance index: 0.55) as compared to 58% vs. 18% for PERCIST (p < 0.001, concordance index: 0.65). Response on PET/CT was also a significantly better predictor for DSS than disease control on CE-CT. In patients with metastatic breast cancer, tumor response on PET/CT appears to be a superior predictor of PFS and DSS than response on CE-CT. Monitoring tumor response by PET/CT may increase the power of clinical trials using tumor response as an endpoint, and may improve patient management in clinical routine. (orig.)

  3. The vascular disrupting agent ZD6126 shows increased antitumor efficacy and enhanced radiation response in large, advanced tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, Dietmar W.; Rojiani, Amyn M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: ZD6126 is a vascular-targeting agent that induces selective effects on the morphology of proliferating and immature endothelial cells by disrupting the tubulin cytoskeleton. The efficacy of ZD6126 was investigated in large vs. small tumors in a variety of animal models. Methods and Materials: Three rodent tumor models (KHT, SCCVII, RIF-1) and three human tumor xenografts (Caki-1, KSY-1, SKBR3) were used. Mice bearing leg tumors ranging in size from 0.1-2.0 g were injected intraperitoneally with a single 150 mg/kg dose of ZD6126. The response was assessed by morphologic and morphometric means as well as an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. To examine the impact of tumor size on the extent of enhancement of radiation efficacy by ZD6126, KHT sarcomas of three different sizes were irradiated locally with a range of radiation doses, and cell survival was determined. Results: All rodent tumors and human tumor xenografts evaluated showed a strong correlation between increasing tumor size and treatment effect as determined by clonogenic cell survival. Detailed evaluation of KHT sarcomas treated with ZD6126 showed a reduction in patent tumor blood vessels that was ∼20% in small ( 90% in large (>1.0 g) tumors. Histologic assessment revealed that the extent of tumor necrosis after ZD6126 treatment, although minimal in small KHT sarcomas, became more extensive with increasing tumor size. Clonogenic cell survival after ZD6126 exposure showed a decrease in tumor surviving fraction from approximately 3 x 10 -1 to 1 x 10 -4 with increasing tumor size. When combined with radiotherapy, ZD6126 treatment resulted in little enhancement of the antitumor effect of radiation in small (<0.3 g) tumors but marked increases in cell kill in tumors larger than 1.0 g. Conclusions: Because bulky neoplastic disease is typically the most difficult to manage, the present findings provide further support for the continued development of vascular disrupting agents such as

  4. Preclinical FLT-PET and FDG-PET imaging of tumor response to the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullinane, Carleen; Waldeck, Kelly L.; Binns, David; Bogatyreva, Ekaterina; Bradley, Daniel P.; Jong, Ron de; McArthur, Grant A.; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The Aurora kinases play a key role in mitosis and have recently been identified as attractive targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the utility of 3′-[ 18 F]fluoro-3′-deoxythymidine (FLT) and 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) for assessment of tumor response to the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901. Methods: Balb/c nude mice bearing HCT116 colorectal xenografts were treated with up to 30 mg/kg TAK 901 or vehicle intravenously twice daily for two days on a weekly cycle. Tumor growth was monitored by calliper measurements and PET imaging was performed at baseline, day 4, 8, 11 and 15. Tumors were harvested at time points corresponding to days of PET imaging for analysis of ex vivo markers of cell proliferation and metabolism together with markers of Aurora B kinase inhibition including phospho-histone H3 (pHH3) and senescence associated β-galactosidase. Results: Tumor growth was inhibited by 60% on day 12 of 30 mg/kg TAK-901 therapy. FLT uptake was significantly reduced by day 4 of treatment and this corresponded with reduction in bromodeoxyuridine and pHH3 staining by immunohistochemistry. All biomarkers rebounded towards baseline levels by the commencement of the next treatment cycle, consistent with release of Aurora B kinase suppression. TAK-901 therapy had no impact on glucose metabolism as assessed by FDG uptake and GLUT1 staining by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: FLT-PET, but not FDG-PET, is a robust non-invasive imaging biomarker of early HCT116 tumor response to the on-target effects of the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901. Advances in knowledge and implications for patient care: This is the first report to demonstrate the impact of the multi-targeted Aurora B kinase inhibitor, TAK-901 on tumor FLT uptake. The findings provide a strong rationale for the evaluation of FLT-PET as an early biomarker of tumor response in the early phase

  5. Early prediction of the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative MRI and machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Subramani; Chen, Yukun; Arlinghaus, Lori R; Li, Xia; Chakravarthy, A Bapsi; Bhave, Sandeep R; Welch, E Brian; Levy, Mia A; Yankeelov, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    The ability to predict early in the course of treatment the response of breast tumors to neoadjuvant chemotherapy can stratify patients based on response for patient-specific treatment strategies. Currently response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy is evaluated based on physical exam or breast imaging (mammogram, ultrasound or conventional breast MRI). There is a poor correlation among these measurements and with the actual tumor size when measured by the pathologist during definitive surgery. We tested the feasibility of using quantitative MRI as a tool for early prediction of tumor response. Between 2007 and 2010 twenty consecutive patients diagnosed with Stage II/III breast cancer and receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled on a prospective imaging study. Our study showed that quantitative MRI parameters along with routine clinical measures can predict responders from non-responders to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The best predictive model had an accuracy of 0.9, a positive predictive value of 0.91 and an AUC of 0.96.

  6. The national response plan and radioactive incident monitoring network (RIMNET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of the Environment is responsible through Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution for co-ordination of the Government's response to overseas nuclear incidents. This paper describes the contingency arrangements that have been set up for this purpose. (author)

  7. Hyperpolarized 13C MR imaging detects no lactate production in mutant IDH1 gliomas: Implications for diagnosis and response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam M. Chaumeil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic imaging of brain tumors using 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate is a promising neuroimaging strategy which, after a decade of preclinical success in glioblastoma (GBM models, is now entering clinical trials in multiple centers. Typically, the presence of GBM has been associated with elevated hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate produced from [1-13C] pyruvate, and response to therapy has been associated with a drop in hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate. However, to date, lower grade gliomas had not been investigated using this approach. The most prevalent mutation in lower grade gliomas is the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1 mutation, which, in addition to initiating tumor development, also induces metabolic reprogramming. In particular, mutant IDH1 gliomas are associated with low levels of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA and monocarboxylate transporters 1 and 4 (MCT1, MCT4, three proteins involved in pyruvate metabolism to lactate. We therefore investigated the potential of 13C MRS of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate for detection of mutant IDH1 gliomas and for monitoring of their therapeutic response. We studied patient-derived mutant IDH1 glioma cells that underexpress LDHA, MCT1 and MCT4, and wild-type IDH1 GBM cells that express high levels of these proteins. Mutant IDH1 cells and tumors produced significantly less hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate compared to GBM, consistent with their metabolic reprogramming. Furthermore, hyperpolarized [1-13C] lactate production was not affected by chemotherapeutic treatment with temozolomide (TMZ in mutant IDH1 tumors, in contrast to previous reports in GBM. Our results demonstrate the unusual metabolic imaging profile of mutant IDH1 gliomas, which, when combined with other clinically available imaging methods, could be used to detect the presence of the IDH1 mutation in vivo.

  8. Suitability of semi-automated tumor response assessment of liver metastases using a dedicated software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkmann, Janine; Ladd, S.C.; Greiff, A. de; Forsting, M.; Stattaus, J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the suitability of semi-automated compared to manual tumor response assessment (TRA) of liver metastases. Materials and methods: in total, 32 patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases were followed by an average of 2.8 contrast-enhanced CT scans. Two observers (O1, O2) measured the longest diameter (LD) of 269 liver metastases manually and semi-automatically using software installed as thin-client on a PACS workstation (LMS-Liver, MEDIAN Technologies). LD and TRA (''progressive'', ''stable'', ''partial remission'') were performed according to RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors) and analyzed for between-method, interobserver and intraobserver variability. The time needed for evaluation was compared for both methods. Results: all measurements correlated excellently (r ≥ 0.96). Intraobserver (semi-automated), interobserver (manual) and between-method differences (by O1) in LD of 1.4 ± 2.6 mm, 1.9 ± 1.9 mm and 2.1 ± 2.0 mm, respectively, were not significant. Interobserver (semi-automated) and between-method (by O2) differences in LD of 3.0 ± 3.0 mm and 2.6 ± 2.0 mm, respectively, reflected a significant variability (p < 0.01). The interobserver agreement in manual and semi-automated TRA was 91.4%. The intraobserver agreement in semi-automated TRA was 84.5%. Between both methods a TRA agreement of 86.2% was obtained. Semi-automated evaluation (2.7 min) took slightly more time than manual evaluation (2.3 min). Conclusion: semi-automated and manual evaluation of liver metastases yield comparable results in response assessments and require comparable effort. (orig.)

  9. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced breast cancer according to tumor subtypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabassum, S.; Zahid, N.

    2017-01-01

    To compare the pathological response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in different molecular subtypes of breast cancer Study Design: Prospective cohort study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Oncology Liaquat National Hospital Karachi from Jan 2013 to Dec 2014. Material and Methods: A total of 119 patients received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer followed by definitive surgery. Demographic, clinical and pathological data of 101 patients were available for analysis. Tumors were divided into different molecular subtypes, luminal A, luminal B human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER 2) was negative, luminal B (HER 2 positive), HER 2 over expressed and triple negative. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was given for total of eight cycles. Primary end point was pathological response [pathological complete response (PCR) versus no PCR] after surgery. Results: A total of 101 patients data were analyzed. Seventeen (16.8%) were luminal A, thirty eight (37.6%) were luminal B, out of 38 luminal B patients, twenty one (55.2%) were HER 2 + and seventeen (44.7%) were HER 2 -ve. Sixteen (15.8%) patients were HER 2 over expressed and thirty (29.7%) were triple negative. Out of 101 patients, twenty eight (27.72%) achieved PCR. A total of 5.9% achieved PCR in luminal A, 4.8% had PCR in luminal B (HER 2 -ve type), 23.5% had in luminal B (HER 2 +ve type), 50% achieved PCR in HER-2 over expressed type and 46.7% had PCR in triple negative subtype, (p=0.001). There was no significant association of PCR with age, tumor size, lymph node status, histology or grade. Conclusion: Molecular subtypes of breat cancer were found to be statistically significant predictor of PCR after neoadjuvant chemotherapy. (author)

  10. Pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue tumors: Assessment of response by static post-contrast MR imaging compared to histopathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einarsdottir, H.; Wejde, J.; Bauer, H.C.F.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate if static post-contrast MR imaging was adequate to assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. Post-contrast MR imaging of 36 soft tissue sarcomas performed 0 - 54 days (median 13 days) after pre-operative radiotherapy, were retrospectively reviewed and compared to post-operative histopathology reports. The contrast enhancement of the tumor was visually graded as minor, moderate or extensive. From the post-operative histopathology reports, three types of tumor response to radiotherapy were defined: Poor, intermediate or good. The size of the tumors before and after radiation was compared. Even if most viable tumors enhanced more than non-viable tumors, there was major overlapping and significant contrast enhancement could be seen in tumors where histopathological examination revealed no viable tumor tissue. Based on histopathology, there were 12 good responders; 8 of these showed minor, 3 moderate and 1 extensive contrast enhancement on MR imaging. Sixteen tumors had an intermediate response; 3 showed minor, 8 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Eight tumors had poor response; none showed minor enhancement, 3 moderate and 5 extensive enhancement. Both increase and Decrease in tumor size was seen in lesions with a good therapy response. Static post-contrast MR imaging cannot reliably assess tumor viability after pre-operative radiotherapy in soft tissue sarcoma. In tumors with no viable tumor tissue, moderate and extensive contrast enhancement can be seen

  11. Germline polymorphisms may act as predictors of response to preoperative chemoradiation in locally advanced T3 rectal tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise G; Nielsen, Jens N; Lindebjerg, Jan

    2007-01-01

    ) followed by total mesorectal excision eight weeks after treatment. Pathologic response was evaluated according to the tumor regression grade system. RESULTS: Thirty percent (18/60) of patients presented with complete pathologic response. Patients with thymidylate synthase genotype 2/2 had a significantly...

  12. The distribution of BRAF gene fusions in solid tumors and response to targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Jeffrey S; Wang, Kai; Chmielecki, Juliann; Gay, Laurie; Johnson, Adrienne; Chudnovsky, Jacob; Yelensky, Roman; Lipson, Doron; Ali, Siraj M; Elvin, Julia A; Vergilio, Jo-Anne; Roels, Steven; Miller, Vincent A; Nakamura, Brooke N; Gray, Adam; Wong, Michael K; Stephens, Philip J

    2016-02-15

    Although the BRAF V600E base substitution is an approved target for the BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, BRAF gene fusions have not been investigated as anticancer drug targets. In our study, a wide variety of tumors underwent comprehensive genomic profiling for hundreds of known cancer genes using the FoundationOne™ or FoundationOne Heme™ comprehensive genomic profiling assays. BRAF fusions involving the intact in-frame BRAF kinase domain were observed in 55 (0.3%) of 20,573 tumors, across 12 distinct tumor types, including 20 novel BRAF fusions. These comprised 29 unique 5' fusion partners, of which 31% (9) were known and 69% (20) were novel. BRAF fusions included 3% (14/531) of melanomas; 2% (15/701) of gliomas; 1.0% (3/294) of thyroid cancers; 0.3% (3/1,062) pancreatic carcinomas; 0.2% (8/4,013) nonsmall-cell lung cancers and 0.2% (4/2,154) of colorectal cancers, and were enriched in pilocytic (30%) vs. nonpilocytic gliomas (1%; p < 0.0001), Spitzoid (75%) vs. nonSpitzoid melanomas (1%; p = 0.0001), acinar (67%) vs. nonacinar pancreatic cancers (<1%; p < 0.0001) and papillary (3%) vs. nonpapillary thyroid cancers (0%; p < 0.03). Clinical responses to trametinib and sorafenib are presented. In conclusion, BRAF fusions are rare driver alterations in a wide variety of malignant neoplasms, but enriched in Spitzoid melanoma, pilocytic astrocytomas, pancreatic acinar and papillary thyroid cancers. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  13. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Chen, Gang S; Hulsey, J Leroy

    2017-10-20

    In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  14. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  15. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    or location has been irradiated to high doses. Among labels available worldwide, a few are suitable for indicating absorbed dose regions of slightly less than 104 Gy (monitoring high dose ranges (i.e., sterilization dose levels of > 104 Gy or > 1 Mrad), and in some cases......, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...... permit somewhat more precise discrimination of dose levels, and may sometimes be useful for monitoring differences in local dose distributions or area monitoring of radiation damage probabilities around particle accelerators or large radionuclide sources....

  16. Time-dependent transcriptional response of GOT1 human small intestine neuroendocrine tumor after 177Lu[Lu]-octreotate therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetz, Johan; Rudqvist, Nils; Langen, Britta; Parris, Toshima Z; Dalmo, Johanna; Schüler, Emil; Wängberg, Bo; Nilsson, Ola; Helou, Khalil; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2018-05-01

    Patients with neuroendocrine tumors expressing somatostatin receptors are often treated with 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate. Despite being highly effective in animal models, 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate-based therapies in the clinical setting can be optimized further. The aims of the study were to identify and elucidate possible optimization venues for 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate tumor therapy by characterizing transcriptional responses in the GOT1 small intestine neuroendocrine tumor model in nude mice. GOT1-bearing female BALB/c nude mice were intravenously injected with 15 MBq 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate (non-curative amount) or mock-treated with saline solution. Animals were killed 1, 3, 7 or 41 d after injection. Total RNA was extracted from the tumor samples and profiled using Illumina microarray expression analysis. Differentially expressed genes were identified (treated vs. control) and pathway analysis was performed. Distribution of differentially expressed transcripts indicated a time-dependent treatment response in GOT1 tumors after 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate administration. Regulation of CDKN1A, BCAT1 and PAM at 1 d after injection was compatible with growth arrest as the initial response to treatment. Upregulation of APOE and BAX at 3 d, and ADORA2A, BNIP3, BNIP3L and HSPB1 at 41 d after injection suggests first activation and then inhibition of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during tumor regression and regrowth, respectively. Transcriptional analysis showed radiation-induced apoptosis as an early response after 177 Lu[Lu]-octreotate administration, followed by pro-survival transcriptional changes in the tumor during the regrowth phase. Time-dependent changes in cell cycle and apoptosis-related processes suggest different time points after radionuclide therapy when tumor cells may be more susceptible to additional treatment, highlighting the importance of timing when administering multiple therapeutic agents. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  17. Comparison of Vaccine-Induced Effector CD8 T Cell Responses Directed against Self- and Non-Self-Tumor Antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sara R; Sørensen, Maria R; Buus, Søren

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that CD8 T cells play a major role in tumor control, yet vaccination aimed at eliciting potent CD8 T cell responses are rarely efficient in clinical trials. To try and understand why this is so, we have generated potent adenoviral vectors encoding the endogenous tumor Ags...... that low avidity of the self-TA-specific CD8 T cells may represent a major obstacle for efficient immunotherapy of cancer....

  18. Regulation of radiation-induced apoptosis by early growth response-1 gene in solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.

    2003-01-01

    Ionizing radiation exposure is associated with activation of certain immediate-early genes that function as transcription factors. These include members of jun or fos and early growth response (EGR) gene families. In particular, the functional role of EGR-1 in radiation-induced signaling is pivotal since the promoter of EGR-1 contains radiation-inducible CArG DNA sequences. The Egr-1 gene belongs to a family of Egr genes that includes EGR-2, EGR-3, EGR-4, EGR-α and the tumor suppressor, Wilms' tumor gene product, WT1. The Egr-1 gene product, EGR-1, is a nuclear protein that contains three zinc fingers of the C 2 H 2 subtype. The EGR-1 GC-rich consensus target sequence, 5'-GCGT/GGGGCG-3' or 5'-TCCT/ACCTCCTCC-3', has been identified in the promoter regions of transcription factors, growth factors, receptors, cell cycle regulators and pro-apoptotic genes. The gene targets mediated by Egr-1 in response to ionizing radiation include TNF-α , p53, Rb and Bax, all these are effectors of apoptosis. Based on these targets, Egr-1 is a pivotal gene that initiates early signal transduction events in response to ionizing radiation leading to either growth arrest or cell death in tumor cells. There are two potential application of Egr-1 gene in therapy of cancer. First, the Egr-1 promoter contains information for appropriate spatial and temporal expression in-vivo that can be regulated by ionizing radiation to control transcription of genes that have pro-apoptotic and suicidal function. Secondly, EGR-1 protein can eliminate 'induced-radiation resistance' by inhibiting the functions of radiation-induced pro-survival genes (NFκB activity and bcl-2 expression) and activate pro-apoptotic genes (such as bax) to confer a significant radio-sensitizing effect. Together, the reported findings from my laboratory demonstrate clearly that EGR-1 is an early central gene that confers radiation sensitivity and its pro-apoptotic functions are synergized by abrogation of induced radiation

  19. Expression analysis of genes associated with human osteosarcoma tumors shows correlation of RUNX2 overexpression with poor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadikovic, Bekim; Thorner, Paul; Chilton-MacNeill, Susan; Martin, Jeff W; Cervigne, Nilva K; Squire, Jeremy; Zielenska, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Human osteosarcoma is the most common pediatric bone tumor. There is limited understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying osteosarcoma oncogenesis, and a lack of good diagnostic as well as prognostic clinical markers for this disease. Recent discoveries have highlighted a potential role of a number of genes including: RECQL4, DOCK5, SPP1, RUNX2, RB1, CDKN1A, P53, IBSP, LSAMP, MYC, TNFRSF1B, BMP2, HISTH2BE, FOS, CCNB1, and CDC5L. Our objective was to assess relative expression levels of these 16 genes as potential biomarkers of osteosarcoma oncogenesis and chemotherapy response in human tumors. We performed quantitative expression analysis in a panel of 22 human osteosarcoma tumors with differential response to chemotherapy, and 5 normal human osteoblasts. RECQL4, SPP1, RUNX2, and IBSP were significantly overexpressed, and DOCK5, CDKN1A, RB1, P53, and LSAMP showed significant loss of expression relative to normal osteoblasts. In addition to being overexpressed in osteosarcoma tumor samples relative to normal osteoblasts, RUNX2 was the only gene of the 16 to show significant overexpression in tumors that had a poor response to chemotherapy relative to good responders. These data underscore the loss of tumor suppressive pathways and activation of specific oncogenic mechanisms associated with osteosarcoma oncogenesis, while drawing attention to the role of RUNX2 expression as a potential biomarker of chemotherapy failure in osteosarcoma

  20. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Chiaho; Wu Shengjie; Chemaitilly, Wassim; Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test ≥7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  1. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Hazan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of common fragile sites (CFSs in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  2. Genetic constraints in the induction of the immune response to Ehrlich ascites tumor in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marusic, M.; Perkins, E.H.

    1981-01-01

    A single injection of irradiated Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells induces immunity in normal mice but fails to do so in T-cell-deficient-thymectomized, lethally irradiated, bone marrow-reconstituted (TIR) mice. TIR mice injected with normal syngeneic T cells develop an immune response to EAT when injected with irradiated EAT cells and reject a subsequent tumor cell challenge. In the present studies allogeneic T cells were unable to protect against EAT in TIR recipients even if harvested from donors tolerant to the recipient's transplantation antigens and injected into the TIR mice tolerant to the transplantation antigens of the injected T cells. Tolerance was produced by establishing long-term radiation chimeras of the P → F 1 type. Semiallogeneic T cells also failed to afford protection against EAT in TIR recipients. Whereas tolerance to other parental-strain transplantation antigens did not reverse the inability of parental T cells (cells from P → F 1 chimeric donors) to protect against EAT in F 1 TIR mice, it did enable F 1 T cells to afford protection in P → F 1 TIR mice

  3. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via intracell......Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... intracellular signaling. This cytokine exerts its functions via interaction with two receptors: type-1 receptor (TNFR1) and type-2 receptor (TNFR2). In this work, the inflammatory response after a freeze injury (cryolesion) in the cortex was studied in wild-type (WT) animals and in mice lacking TNFR1 (TNFR1 KO...... signaling also affected the expression of apoptosis/cell death-related genes (Fas, Rip, p53), matrix metalloproteinases (MMP3, MMP9, MMP12), and their inhibitors (TIMP1), suggesting a role of TNFR1 in extracellular matrix remodeling after injury. However, GDNF, NGF, and BDNF expression were not affected...

  4. Predicting the Probability of Abnormal Stimulated Growth Hormone Response in Children After Radiotherapy for Brain Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua Chiaho, E-mail: Chia-Ho.Hua@stjude.org [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu Shengjie [Department of Biostatistics, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Chemaitilly, Wassim [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Pediatric Medicine, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Lukose, Renin C.; Merchant, Thomas E. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To develop a mathematical model utilizing more readily available measures than stimulation tests that identifies brain tumor survivors with high likelihood of abnormal growth hormone secretion after radiotherapy (RT), to avoid late recognition and a consequent delay in growth hormone replacement therapy. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 191 prospectively collected post-RT evaluations of peak growth hormone level (arginine tolerance/levodopa stimulation test), serum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein 3, height, weight, growth velocity, and body mass index in 106 children and adolescents treated for ependymoma (n = 72), low-grade glioma (n = 28) or craniopharyngioma (n = 6), who had normal growth hormone levels before RT. Normal level in this study was defined as the peak growth hormone response to the stimulation test {>=}7 ng/mL. Results: Independent predictor variables identified by multivariate logistic regression with high statistical significance (p < 0.0001) included IGF-1 z score, weight z score, and hypothalamic dose. The developed predictive model demonstrated a strong discriminatory power with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.883. At a potential cutoff point of probability of 0.3 the sensitivity was 80% and specificity 78%. Conclusions: Without unpleasant and expensive frequent stimulation tests, our model provides a quantitative approach to closely follow the growth hormone secretory capacity of brain tumor survivors. It allows identification of high-risk children for subsequent confirmatory tests and in-depth workup for diagnosis of growth hormone deficiency.

  5. Monitoring the systemic human memory B cell compartment of melanoma patients for anti-tumor IgG antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy E Gilbert

    Full Text Available Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10 to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10 (P<0.0001. Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21 (P<0.0001. Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800 compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600 produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer.

  6. Monitoring the Systemic Human Memory B Cell Compartment of Melanoma Patients for Anti-Tumor IgG Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Amy E.; Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Dodev, Tihomir; Koers, Alexander; Lacy, Katie; Josephs, Debra H.; Takhar, Pooja; Geh, Jenny L. C.; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M.; Rudman, Sarah M.; Beavil, Rebecca L.; Blower, Philip J.; Beavil, Andrew J.; Gould, Hannah J.; Spicer, James; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma, a potentially lethal skin cancer, is widely thought to be immunogenic in nature. While there has been much focus on T cell-mediated immune responses, limited knowledge exists on the role of mature B cells. We describe an approach, including a cell-based ELISA, to evaluate mature IgG antibody responses to melanoma from human peripheral blood B cells. We observed a significant increase in antibody responses from melanoma patients (n = 10) to primary and metastatic melanoma cells compared to healthy volunteers (n = 10) (P<0.0001). Interestingly, we detected a significant reduction in antibody responses to melanoma with advancing disease stage in our patient cohort (n = 21) (P<0.0001). Overall, 28% of melanoma patient-derived B cell cultures (n = 1,800) compared to 2% of cultures from healthy controls (n = 600) produced antibodies that recognized melanoma cells. Lastly, a patient-derived melanoma-specific monoclonal antibody was selected for further study. This antibody effectively killed melanoma cells in vitro via antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. These data demonstrate the presence of a mature systemic B cell response in melanoma patients, which is reduced with disease progression, adding to previous reports of tumor-reactive antibodies in patient sera, and suggesting the merit of future work to elucidate the clinical relevance of activating humoral immune responses to cancer. PMID:21559411

  7. Phonetic Accounts of Timed Responses in Syllable Monitoring Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, A.C.M.; Schiller, N.O.; Caspers, J.; Chen, Y.; Heeren, W.; Pacilly, J.; Schiller, N.O.; Zanten, E. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a syllable monitoring experiment that examines the role of segmental phonetic information in Dutch. Participants were presented with lists of spoken words and were required to detect auditorily specified targets that matched or did not match the initial syllable of the spoken

  8. Early prediction of therapy response and disease free survival after induction chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer by FDG-PET: Correlation between tumor FDG-metabolism and morphometric tumor response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R.P.; Schmuecking, M.; Niesen, A.; Przetak, C.; Griesinger, F.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Chemotherapy with Docetaxel and Carboplatin (DC) has shown high response rates in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Histologic tumor response after chemotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy is strongly associated with systemic tumor control and potentially cure. Metabolic tumor response assessed by FDG-PET after induction VIP-chemotherapy has been shown to be predictive of outcome in NSCLC. The aim of the present study was to correlate the tumor FDG metabolism as measured by F-18 FDG-PET with morphometric findings after DC induction chemotherapy plus Erythropoietin (10,000 IU Epo s.c. three times a week). Material and Methods: In this prospective multicenter study, 54 patients with NSCLC stage IIIA (9 patients) or IIIB (45 patients) were enrolled and received neoadjuvant treatment with D 100 mg/m 2 d1 and C AUC 7.5 d2 q21 days for 4 cycles prior to surgery. Postoperatively, all patients received adjuvant radiotherapy. WB-PET-studies (ECAT Exact 47) were obtained p.i. of 400 MBq F-18 FDG. Standardized uptake values (SUV), metabolic tumor diameter (MTD) and metabolic tumor index (MTI SUV x MTD) were assessed. Image fusion of PET and CT data was applied on a HERMES computer. Results: Of 54 enrolled patients, 46 were evaluable for response by CT. 30/46 patients (65%) achieved complete remission (CR, 1 patient) or partial remission (PR 29 patients.). Of the 46 patients, 37 patients completed neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Chx) and were studied before and after Chx by FDG-PET. 14 (30% of the 46 evaluable patients) had SUV < 2.5, corresponding to metabolic complete remission (mCR), 23 had PR or stable disease (non-mCR); in 9 patients, PET was not performed because of progressive disease demonstrated by CT. The R0-resection rate was 56% (27/48 evaluable patients). Of the 14 patients with metabolic CR, 9 were evaluated by morphometry. All had regression grades III (no vital tumor cells) or grade IIB (< 10% vital tumor cells and induced apoptosis). With a median

  9. Levels of active tyrosine kinase receptor determine the tumor response to Zalypsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moneo, Victoria; Serelde, Beatriz G; Blanco-Aparicio, Carmen; Diaz-Uriarte, Ramon; Avilés, Pablo; Santamaría, Gemma; Tercero, Juan C; Cuevas, Carmen; Carnero, Amancio

    2014-01-01

    Zalypsis® is a marine compound in phase II clinical trials for multiple myeloma, cervical and endometrial cancer, and Ewing’s sarcoma. However, the determinants of the response to Zalypsis are not well known. The identification of biomarkers for Zalypsis activity would also contribute to broaden the spectrum of tumors by selecting those patients more likely to respond to this therapy. Using in vitro drug sensitivity data coupled with a set of molecular data from a panel of sarcoma cell lines, we developed molecular signatures that predict sensitivity to Zalypsis. We verified these results in culture and in vivo xenograft studies. Zalypsis resistance was dependent on the expression levels of PDGFRα or constitutive phosphorylation of c-Kit, indicating that the activation of tyrosine kinase receptors (TKRs) may determine resistance to Zalypsis. To validate our observation, we measured the levels of total and active (phosphorylated) forms of the RTKs PDGFRα/β, c-Kit, and EGFR in a new panel of diverse solid tumor cell lines and found that the IC50 to the drug correlated with RTK activation in this new panel. We further tested our predictions about Zalypsis determinants for response in vivo in xenograft models. All cells lines expressing low levels of RTK signaling were sensitive to Zalypsis in vivo, whereas all cell lines except two with high levels of RTK signaling were resistant to the drug. RTK activation might provide important signals to overcome the cytotoxicity of Zalypsis and should be taken into consideration in current and future clinical trials

  10. Use of sequential endorectal US to predict the tumor response of preoperative chemoradiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Dou, Lizhou; Zhang, Yueming; Jin, Jing; Wang, Guiqi; Xiao, Qin; Li, Yexiong; Wang, Xin; Ren, Hua; Fang, Hui; Wang, Weihu; Wang, Shulian; Liu, Yueping; Song, Yongwen

    2017-03-01

    Accurate prediction of the response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) potentially assists in the individualized selection of treatment. Endorectal US (ERUS) is widely used for the pretreatment staging of rectal cancer, but its use for preoperatively predicting the effects of CRT is not well evaluated because of the inflammation, necrosis, and fibrosis induced by CRT. This study assessed the value of sequential ERUS in predicting the efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. Forty-one patients with clinical stage II/III rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled prospectively. Radiotherapy was delivered to the pelvis with concurrent chemotherapy of capecitabine and oxaliplatin. Total mesorectal excision was performed 6 to 8 weeks later. EUS measurements of primary tumor maximum diameter were performed before (ERUS1), during (ERUS2), and 6 to 8 weeks after (ERUS3) CRT, and the ratios of these were calculated. Correlations between ERUS values, tumor regression grade (TRG), T down-staging rate, and pathologic complete response (pCR) rate were assessed, and survival was analyzed. There was no significant correlation between ERUS2/ERUS1 and TRG. The value of ERUS3/ERUS1 correlated with pCR rate and TRG but not T down-staging rate. An ERUS3 value of 6.3 mm and ERUS3/ERUS1 of 52% were used as the cut-off for predicting pCR, and patients were divided into good and poor prognosis groups. Although not statistically significant, 3-year recurrence and survival rates of the good prognosis group were better than those of the poor prognosis group. Sequential ERUS may predict therapeutic efficacy of preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer. (Clinical trial registration number: NCT01582750.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Tumor markers for diagnosis, monitoring of recurrence and prognosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal tract cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Jie-Xian; Wang, Yan; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Ting; Tian, Bao-Guo; Du, Li-Li; Zhao, Xian-Wen; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the value of combined detection of serum CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS for the clinical diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) cancer and to analyze the efficacy of these tumor markers (TMs) in evaluating curative effects and prognosis. A total of 573 patients with upper GIT cancer between January 2004 and December 2007 were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were examined preoperatively and every 3 months postoperatively by ELISA. The sensitivity of CEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, AFP, CA72-4, SCC, TPA and TPS were 26.8%, 36.2%, 42.9%, 2.84%, 25.4%, 34.6%, 34.2% and 30.9%, respectively. The combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 had higher sensitivity and specificity in gastric cancer (GC) and cardiac cancer, while CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC was the best combination of diagnosis for esophageal cancer (EC). Elevation of preoperative CEA, CA19-9 and CA24-2, SCC and CA72-4 was significantly associated with pathological types (pCEA, CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC decreased obviously 3 months after operations. When metastasis and recurrence occurred, the levels of TMs significantly increased. On multivariate analysis, high preoperative CA72-4, CA24-2 and SCC served as prognostic factors for cardiac carcinoma, GC and EC, respectively. combined detection of CEA+CA199+CA242+SCC proved to be the most economic and practical strategy in diagnosis of EC; CEA+CA199+CA242+CA724 proved to be a better evaluation indicator for cardiac cancer and GC. CEA and CA19-9, CA24-2, CA72-4 and SCC, examined postoperatively during follow-up, were useful to find early tumor recurrence and metastasis, and evaluate prognosis. AFP, TPA and TPS have no significant value in diagnosis of patients with upper GIT cancer.

  12. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  13. Recent Advances in Stimuli-Responsive Release Function Drug Delivery Systems for Tumor Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chendi Ding

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Benefiting from the development of nanotechnology, drug delivery systems (DDSs with stimuli-responsive controlled release function show great potential in clinical anti-tumor applications. By using a DDS, the harsh side effects of traditional anti-cancer drug treatments and damage to normal tissues and organs can be avoided to the greatest extent. An ideal DDS must firstly meet bio-safety standards and secondarily the efficiency-related demands of a large drug payload and controlled release function. This review highlights recent research progress on DDSs with stimuli-responsive characteristics. The first section briefly reviews the nanoscale scaffolds of DDSs, including mesoporous nanoparticles, polymers, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, quantum dots (QDs and carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The second section presents the main types of stimuli-responsive mechanisms and classifies these into two categories: intrinsic (pH, redox state, biomolecules and extrinsic (temperature, light irradiation, magnetic field and ultrasound ones. Clinical applications of DDS, future challenges and perspectives are also mentioned.

  14. Stimuli-Responsive Nanodiamond-Based Biosensor for Enhanced Metastatic Tumor Site Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Gu, Mengjie; Toh, Tan Boon; Abdullah, Nurrul Lissa Binti; Chow, Edward Kai-Hua

    2018-02-01

    Metastasis is often critical to cancer progression and linked to poor survival and drug resistance. Early detection of metastasis, as well as identification of metastatic tumor sites, can improve cancer patient survival. Thus, developing technology to improve the detection of cancer metastasis biomarkers can improve both diagnosis and treatment. In this study, we investigated the use of nanodiamonds to develop a stimuli-responsive metastasis detection complex that utilizes matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) as a metastasis biomarker, as MMP9 increased expression has been shown to be indicative of metastasis. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor complex consists of nanodiamonds functionalized with MMP9-specific fluorescent-labeled substrate peptides. Using this design, protease activity of MMP9 can be accurately measured and correlated to MMP9 expression. The nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor also demonstrated an enhanced ability to protect the base sensor peptide from nonspecific serum protease cleavage. This enhanced peptide stability, combined with a quantitative stimuli-responsive output function, provides strong evidence for the further development of a nanodiamond-MMP9 biosensor for metastasis site detection. More importantly, this work provides the foundation for use of nanodiamonds as a platform for stimuli-responsive biosensors and theranostic complexes that can be implemented across a wide range of biomedical applications.

  15. Enhancing the radiation response of tumors but not early or late responding normal tissues using a vascular disrupting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael R

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Vascular disrupting agents (VDAs) damage tumor vasculature and enhance tumor radiation response. In this pre-clinical study, we combined radiation with the leading VDA in clinical development, combretastatin A-4 phosphate (CA4P), and compared the effects seen in tumors and relevant...... normal tissues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Radiation was applied locally to tissues in CDF1 mice to produce full radiation dose-response curves. CA4P (250 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally (i.p.) injected within 30 minutes after irradiating. Response of 200 mm3 foot implanted C3H mammary carcinomas was assessed......% increase in ventilation rate measured by plethysmography within 9 months). A Chi-squared test was used for statistical comparisons (significance level of p 4P. The radiation...

  16. PROFILE: Integrating Stressor and Response Monitoring into a Resource-Based Water-Quality Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROUX; KEMPSTER; KLEYNHANS; VAN; DU

    1999-01-01

    / South African water law as well as the country's water resource management policies are currently under review. The Water Law Principles, which were established as part of this review process, indicate a commitment to sustainable development of water resources and the protection of an ecological "reserve." Such policy goals highlight the limitations of traditional and current water-quality management strategies, which rely on stressor monitoring and associated regulation of pollution. The concept of an assimilative capacity is central to the implementation of the current water-quality management approach. Weaknesses inherent in basing water management on the concept of assimilative capacity are discussed. Response monitoring is proposed as a way of addressing some of the weaknesses. Following a global trend, the new policy goals emphasize the need to protect rather than to use the ability of ecosystems to recover from disturbances. This necessitates the adoption of response measurements to quantify ecological condition and monitor ecological change. Response monitoring focuses on properties that are essential to the sustainability of the ecosystem. These monitoring tools can be used to establish natural ranges of ecological change within ecosystems, as well as to quantify conceptually acceptable and unacceptable ranges of change. Through a framework of biological criteria and biological impairment standards, the results of response monitoring can become an integral part of future water resource management strategies in South Africa. KEY WORDS: Stressor monitoring; Response monitoring; Assimilative capacity; Ecosystem stability; Resilience; Biocriteria

  17. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu

    2004-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  18. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    Tumor-associated macrophages may comprise up to 50% of the tumor mass in breast cancer and are capable of producing estrogen and angiogenic cytokines that regulate the growth and angiogenesis of breast cancer...

  19. PET/CT evaluation of response to chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) versus response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiyong; Cheng, Xu; Yang, Lu; Zhang, Qingbo; Chen, Jianwei; Li, Tiannv; Shi, Haibin

    2014-06-01

    (18)F-FDG PET/CT is increasingly used in evaluation of treatment response for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). There is a need for an accurate criterion to evaluate the effect and predict the prognosis. The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic response in NSCLC with comparing PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST) to response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST) criteria on PET/CT. Forty-four NSCLC patients who received chemotherapy but no surgery were studied. Chemotherapeutic responses were evaluated using (18)F-FDG PET and CT according to the RECIST and PERCIST methodologies. PET/CT scans were obtained before chemotherapy and after 2 or 4-6 cycles' chemotherapy. The percentage changes of tumor longest diameters and standardized uptake value (SUV) (corrected for lean body mass, SUL) before and after treatment were compared using paired t-test. The response was categorized into 4 levels according to RECIST and PERCIST: CR (CMR) =1, PR (PMR) =2, SD (SMD) =3, PD (PMD) =4. Pearson chi-square test was used to compare the proportion of four levels in RECIST and PERCIST. Finally the relationship between progression-free survival (PFS) and clinicopathologic parameters (such as TNM staging, percentage changes in diameters and SUL, RECIST and PERCIST results etc.) were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression method. The difference of percentage changes between diameters and SUL was not significant using paired t-test (t=-1.69, P=0.098). However the difference was statistically significant in the 40 cases without increasing SUL (t=-3.31, P=0.002). The difference of evaluation results between RECIST and PERCIST was not significant by chi-square test (χ(2)=5.008, P=0.171). If RECIST evaluation excluded the new lesions which could not be found or identified on CT images the difference between RECIST and PERCIST was significant (χ(2)=11.759, P=0.007). Reduction rate of SULpeak (%), RECIST and

  20. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin cytotoxicity on three-dimensional spheroid tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baek NH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available NamHuk Baek,1,* Ok Won Seo,1,* Jaehwa Lee,1 John Hulme,2 Seong Soo A An2 1Department of Research and Development, NanoEntek Inc., Seoul, 2Department of BioNano Technology, Gachon University, Gyeonggi-do, Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Three-dimensional (3D cell cultivation is a powerful technique for monitoring and understanding diverse cellular mechanisms in developmental cancer and neuronal biology, tissue engineering, and drug development. 3D systems could relate better to in vivo models than two-dimensional (2D cultures. Several factors, such as cell type, survival rate, proliferation rate, and gene and protein expression patterns, determine whether a particular cell line can be adapted to a 3D system. The 3D system may overcome some of the limitations of 2D cultures in terms of cell–cell communication and cell networks, which are essential for understanding differentiation, structural organization, shape, and extended connections with other cells or organs. Here, the effect of the anticancer drug cisplatin, also known as cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II or CDDP, on adenosine triphosphate (ATP generation was investigated using 3D spheroid-forming cells and real-time monitoring for 7 days. First, 12 cell lines were screened for their ability to form 3D spheroids: prostate (DU145, testis (F9, embryonic fibroblast (NIH-3T3, muscle (C2C12, embryonic kidney (293T, neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y, adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cell (A549, cervical cancer (HeLa, HeLa contaminant (HEp2, pituitary epithelial-like cell (GH3, embryonic cell (PA317, and osteosarcoma (U-2OS cells. Of these, eight cell lines were selected: NIH-3T3, C2C12, 293T, SH-SY5Y, A549, HeLa, PA317, and U-2OS; and five underwent real-time monitoring of CDDP cytotoxicity: HeLa, A549, 293T, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS. ATP generation was blocked 1 day after addition of 50 µM CDDP, but cytotoxicity in HeLa, A549, SH-SY5Y, and U-2OS cells could be

  1. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  2. Antigen specific T-cell responses against tumor antigens are controlled by regulatory T cells in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadaschik, Boris; Su, Yun; Huter, Eva; Ge, Yingzi; Hohenfellner, Markus; Beckhove, Philipp

    2012-04-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising approach in an effort to control castration resistant prostate cancer. We characterized tumor antigen reactive T cells in patients with prostate cancer and analyzed the suppression of antitumor responses by regulatory T cells. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 57 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer, 8 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 16 healthy donors. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and antigen specific interferon-γ secretion of isolated T cells was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunospot assay. T cells were functionally characterized and T-cell responses before and after regulatory T-cell depletion were compared. As test tumor antigens, a panel of 11 long synthetic peptides derived from a total of 8 tumor antigens was used, including prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. In patients with prostate cancer we noted a 74.5% effector T-cell response rate compared with only 25% in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and 31% in healthy donors. In most patients 2 or 3 tumor antigens were recognized. Comparing various disease stages there was a clear increase in the immune response against prostate specific antigens from intermediate to high risk tumors and castration resistant disease. Regulatory T-cell depletion led to a significant boost in effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase. Tumor specific effector T cells were detected in most patients with prostate cancer, especially those with castration resistant prostate cancer. Since effector T-cell responses against prostate specific antigens strongly increased after regulatory T-cell depletion, our results indicate that immunotherapy efficacy could be enhanced by decreasing regulatory T cells. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Tumor response evaluation after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma: a prospective, multi-center cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martini, Paolo; Ceresoli, Marco; Mari, Giulio M.; Costanzi, Andrea; Maggioni, Dario; Pugliese, Raffaele; Ferrari, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    Background To verify the prognostic value of the pathologic and radiological tumor response after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Methods A total of 67 patients with locally advanced gastric cancer (clinical ≥ T2 or nodal disease and without evidence of distant metastases) underwent perioperative chemotherapy (ECF or ECX regimen) from December 2009 through June 2015 in two surgical units. Histopathological and radiological response to chemotherapy were evaluated by using tumor regression grade (TRG) (Becker’s criteria) and volume change assessed by CT. Results Fifty-one (86%) patients completed all chemotherapy scheduled cycles successfully and surgery was curative (R0) in 64 (97%) subjects. The histopathological analysis showed 19 (29%) specimens with TRG1 (less than 10% of vital tumor left) and 25 (37%) patients had partial or complete response (CR) assessed by CT scan. Median disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were 25.70 months (range, 14.52–36.80 months) and 36.60 months (range, 24.3–52.9 months), respectively. The median follow up was 27 months (range, 5.00–68.00 months). Radiological response and TRG were found to be a prognostic factor for OS and DFS, while tumor histology was not significantly related to survival. Conclusions Both radiological response and TRG have been shown as promising survival markers in patients treated with perioperative chemotherapy for locally advanced gastric cancer. Other predictive markers of response to chemotherapy are strongly required. PMID:29299362

  4. In Vivo Tumor Gene Delivery Using Novel Peptideticles: pH-Responsive and Ligand Targeted Core-Shell Nanoassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipour, Mohsen; Majidi, Asia; Molaabasi, Fatemeh; Sheikhnejad, Reza; Hosseinkhani, Saman

    2018-04-30

    Modulating cancer causing genes with nucleic acid based-molecules as cutting-edge approaches need efficient delivery systems to succeed in clinic. Herein, we report design and fabrication of a novel tissue penetrating Peptideticle with charge-structure switching in tumor microenvironment for an effective gene delivery. The comparative in vitro studies indicate that peptideticles identify and bind to tumor endothelial cells and efficiently penetrate into multicellular tumor spheroid. In addition, negatively charged peptideticle at pH 7.4, prevent unwanted interaction while it's sharp charge-structure switching at pH 6.2-6.9 (e.g.in tumor tissue) facilitates malignant cells penetration. More importantly, upon systemic administration into tumor bearing mice, peptideticles effectively localized in tumor tissue and delivered luciferase gene with a 200-fold higher efficiency compared to their non-pH-responsive counterparts. In conclusion, this study presents a robust nanoassembly of safe materials for high efficient tumor gene delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 UICC.

  5. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Shao

    Full Text Available On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  6. Mathematical modeling of the implications of dominant tolerance for tumor biology and the response to combination therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Kalet; Garcia, Karina; Lage, Agustin

    2008-01-01

    The existence of regulatory T lymphocytes (Tregs) that can control effector lymphocytes within the context of autoimmune, infectious and tumoral diseases is definitely accepted in current immunological research. Tregs confirm the theory of dominant tolerance, which holds that the choice of antigen rejection or tolerance in the immune system is the result of a dynamic equilibrium between populations of effector and regulatory T lymphocytes. The present paper summarizes the result of a recent theoretical study using mathematical modeling to analyze the dynamic interplay between T lymphocyte populations in the absence or presence of tumors and in response to different therapeutic treatments. The resulting model, developed at the Center of Molecular Immunology, which received an award from the Cuban Academy of Sciences in 2002, includes tumor cells and can simulate the effect of antitumoral mono- or combination therapies, by taking into account the way in which certain dynamic properties of tumors can, under specific circumstances, lead to the spontaneous expansion of Tregs populations. One of the advantages of the model is the prediction of several new strategies for the differential treatment of tumors, depending upon their ability of inducing the expansion of regulatory T cells. This is the first model available for the study of the impact of Tregs on the growth of malignant tumors, with results supported by international publications. Additionally, the model predicts the practical effects of several combination therapies, including vaccines, the excision of the tumor and depletion of lymphocyte populations. (Author)

  7. Sensorineural hearing loss among cerebellopontine-angle tumor patients examined with pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinindra, A. M.; Zizlavsky, S.; Bashiruddin, J.; Aman, R. A.; Wulani, V.; Bardosono, S.

    2017-08-01

    Tumor in the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) accurs for approximately 5-10% of all intracranial tumors, where unilateral hearing loss and tinnitus are the most frequent symptoms. This study aimed to collect data on sensorineural hearing loss in CPA tumor patients in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital (CMH) using pure tone audiometry and brainstem-evoked response audiometry (BERA). It also aimed to obtaine data on CPA-tumor imaging through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This was a descriptive, analytic, and cross-sectional study. The subjects of this study were gathered using a total sampling method from secondary data between July 2012 and November 2016. From 104 patients, 30 matched the inclusion criteria. The CPA-tumor patients in the ENT CMH outpatient clinic were mostly female, middle-aged patients (41-60 years) whose clinical presentation was mostly tinnitus and severe, asymmetric sensorineural hearing loss in 10 subjects. From 30 subjects, 29 showed ipsilaterally impaired BERA results, and 17 subjects showed contralaterally impaired BERA results. There were 24 subjects who with large-sized tumors and 19 subjects who had intracanal tumors that had spread until they were extracanal in 19 subjects.

  8. In Vivo Monitoring of pH, Redox Status, and Glutathione Using L-Band EPR for Assessment of Therapeutic Effectiveness in Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobko, Andrey A.; Eubank, Timothy D.; Voorhees, Jeffrey L.; Efimova, Olga V.; Kirilyuk, Igor A.; Petryakov, Sergey; Trofimiov, Dmitrii G.; Marsh, Clay B.; Zweier, Jay L.; Grigor’ev, Igor A.; Samouilov, Alexandre; Khramtsov, Valery V.

    2011-01-01

    Approach for in vivo real-time assessment of tumor tissue extracellular pH (pHe), redox, and intracellular glutathione based on L-band EPR spectroscopy using dual function pH and redox nitroxide probe and disulfide nitroxide biradical, is described. These parameters were monitored in PyMT mice bearing breast cancer tumors during treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor. It was observed that tumor pHe is about 0.4 pH units lower than that in normal mammary gland tissue. Treatment with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor decreased the value of pHe by 0.3 units compared with PBS control treatment. Tumor tissue reducing capacity and intracellular glutathione were elevated compared with normal mammary gland tissue. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor treatment resulted in a decrease of the tumor tissue reducing capacity and intracellular glutathione content. In addition to spectroscopic studies, pHe mapping was performed using recently proposed variable frequency proton–electron double-resonance imaging. The pH mapping superimposed with MRI image supports probe localization in mammary gland/tumor tissue, shows high heterogeneity of tumor tissue pHe and a difference of about 0.4 pH units between average pHe values in tumor and normal mammary gland. In summary, the developed multifunctional approach allows for in vivo, noninvasive pHe, extracellular redox, and intracellular glutathione content monitoring during investigation of various therapeutic strategies for solid tumors. Magn Reson Med 000:000–000, 2011. PMID:22113626

  9. Endothelial Dll4 overexpression reduces vascular response and inhibits tumor growth and metastasization in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Alexandre; Djokovic, Dusan; Gigante, Joana; Mendonça, Liliana; Duarte, António

    2017-03-14

    The inhibition of Delta-like 4 (Dll4)/Notch signaling has been shown to result in excessive, nonfunctional vessel proliferation and significant tumor growth suppression. However, safety concerns emerged with the identification of side effects resulting from chronic Dll4/Notch blockade. Alternatively, we explored the endothelial Dll4 overexpression using different mouse tumor models. We used a transgenic mouse model of endothelial-specific Dll4 overexpression, previously produced. Growth kinetics and vascular histopathology of several types of solid tumors was evaluated, namely Lewis Lung Carcinoma xenografts, chemically-induced skin papillomas and RIP1-Tag2 insulinomas. We found that increased Dll4/Notch signaling reduces tumor growth by reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial proliferation, tumor vessel density and overall tumor blood supply. In addition, Dll4 overexpression consistently improved tumor vascular maturation and functionality, as indicated by increased vessel calibers, enhanced mural cell recruitment and increased network perfusion. Importantly, the tumor vessel normalization is not more effective than restricted vessel proliferation, but was found to prevent metastasis formation and allow for increased delivery to the tumor of concomitant chemotherapy, improving its efficacy. By reducing endothelial sensitivity to VEGF, these results imply that Dll4/Notch stimulation in tumor microenvironment could be beneficial to solid cancer patient treatment by reducing primary tumor size, improving tumor drug delivery and reducing metastization. Endothelial specific Dll4 overexpression thus appears as a promising anti-angiogenic modality that might improve cancer control.

  10. Effect of Depleting Tumor-Associated Macrophages on Breast Cancer Growth and Response to Chemotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsan, Min-Fu; Gao, Baochong

    2005-01-01

    .... and whether depletion of tumor-associated macrophages has any effect on the tumor growth. The breast cancer model was established in BALB/c mice by subcutaneous injection of estrogen receptor-positive murine mammary tumor cells (4T1...

  11. Expression of complement and pentraxin proteins in acute phase response elicited by tumor photodynamic therapy: the engagement of adrenal hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchant, Soroush; Huang, Naiyan; Korbelik, Mladen

    2010-12-01

    Treatment of solid tumors by photodynamic therapy (PDT) was recently shown to trigger a strong acute phase response. Using the mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) model, the present study examined complement and pentraxin proteins as PDT-induced acute phase reactants. The results show a distinct pattern of changes in the expression of genes encoding these proteins in the tumor, as well as host liver and spleen, following PDT mediated by photosensitizer Photofrin™. These changes were influenced by glucocorticoid hormones, as evidenced by transcriptional activation of glucocorticoid receptor and the upregulation of gene encoding this receptor. The expression of gene for glucocorticoid-induced zipper (GILZ) protein, whose activity is particularly susceptible to glucocorticoid regulation, was also changed in PDT-treated tumors. A direct demonstration that tumor PDT induces glucocorticoid hormone upregulation is provided by documenting elevated levels of serum corticosterone in mice bearing PDT-treated LLC tumors. Tumor response to PDT was negatively affected by blocking glucocorticoid receptor activity, which suggests that glucocorticoid hormones have a positive impact on the therapeutic outcome with this therapy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. MUC1-specific immune therapy generates a strong anti-tumor response in a MUC1-tolerant colon cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P; Pathangey, L B; Bradley, J B; Tinder, T L; Basu, G D; Akporiaye, E T; Gendler, S J

    2007-02-19

    A MUC1-based vaccine was used in a preclinical model of colon cancer. The trial was conducted in a MUC1-tolerant immune competent host injected with MC38 colon cancer cells expressing MUC1. The vaccine included: MHC class I-restricted MUC1 peptides, MHC class II-restricted pan-helper-peptide, unmethylated CpG oligodeoxynucleotide, and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor. Immunization was successful in breaking MUC1 self-tolerance, and in eliciting a robust anti-tumor response. The vaccine stimulated IFN-gamma-producing CD4(+) helper and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells against MUC1 and other undefined MC38 tumor antigens. In the prophylactic setting, immunization caused complete rejection of tumor cells, while in the therapeutic regimen, tumor burden was significantly reduced.

  13. Optical Aptamer Probes of Fluorescent Imaging to Rapid Monitoring of Circulating Tumor Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yeon Hwang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence detecting of exogenous EpCAM (epithelial cell adhesion molecule or muc1 (mucin1 expression correlated to cancer metastasis using nanoparticles provides pivotal information on CTC (circulating tumor cell occurrence in a noninvasive tool. In this study, we study a new skill to detect extracellular EpCAM/muc1 using quantum dot-based aptamer beacon (QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB (aptamer linker beacon. The QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB was designed using QDs (quantum dots and probe. The EpCAM/muc1-targeting aptamer contains a Ep-CAM/muc1 binding sequence and BHQ1 (black hole quencher 1 or BHQ2 (black hole quencher2. In the absence of target EpCAM/muc1, the QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB forms a partial duplex loop-like aptamer beacon and remained in quenched state because the BHQ1/2 quenches the fluorescence signal-on of the QD-EpCAM/muc1 ALB. The binding of EpCAM/muc1 of CTC to the EpCAM/muc1 binding aptamer sequence of the EpCAM/muc1-targeting oligonucleotide triggered the dissociation of the BHQ1/2 quencher and subsequent signal-on of a green/red fluorescence signal. Furthermore, acute inflammation was stimulated by trigger such as caerulein in vivo, which resulted in increased fluorescent signal of the cy5.5-EpCAM/muc1 ALB during cancer metastasis due to exogenous expression of EpCAM/muc1 in Panc02-implanted mouse model.

  14. 24 CFR 108.20 - Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... documenting the implementation of the AFHM plan, including sales or rental reports, as required by the.... When sales or rental reports show that 20% of the units covered by the AFHM plan have been sold or... for monitoring plans and reports. 108.20 Section 108.20 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  15. Allocation of responsibilities for monitoring and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic disposal is considered by many to offer a way to achieve the long term isolation required for radioactive wastes. The extremely long timescales, however, have drawn attention to the need for society to plan far ahead into the future. Perhaps for the first time, much thought and debate is being explicitly devoted to the burdens and the benefits which a technology will bring to many generations in the future. The questions to be answered concern not only what the benefits and burdens are, but also who bears the responsibility for defining courses of action affecting future generations and for implementing any measures required to protect society beyond the lifetimes of those initiating activities with far future impacts. In the present paper, the intention is to review the actions which may have to be taken during and after the operation of a disposal facility, to consider who shares responsibility for such actions and to look rationally at how responsibilities can best be allocated to ensure that they will be fulfilled in a way which protects future generations from harm, be it physical or financial. The paper defines the phases in the lifetime of a geologic repository, and postulates that responsibilities are to be shared between governments, regulators, repository implementers, waste producers and potentially also supra-national bodies. The specific responsibilities ranging from conceptual planning through to financial provisions for actions are then listed. The allocation of these responsibilities is then discussed. The broad conclusions are that waste producers are responsible for all financing and for most of the specific actions to be taken. In very far future times, however, responsibility for a closed and sealed national repository must revert to the government of a State. (author)

  16. Changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the changes of serum endocrine hormone levels in patients with cancerrelated fatigue (CRF and their correlation with anti-tumor immune response and tumor load. Methods: A total of 137 patients who were diagnosed with primary lung cancer in West China Hospital, Sichuan University between June 2014 and November 2016 were selected and then divided into CRF group and control group according to their self-reported symptoms, serum was collected to determine the levels of endocrine hormones and tumor markers, and peripheral blood was collected to detect the levels of immune cells. Results: Serum ACTH and TSH levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group while Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels were significantly lower than those of control group; peripheral blood CD11b+ CD15 - CD33+ CD14+ M-MDSC, CD11b+ CD15-CD33+ CD14- G-MDSC, CD4+ CD25+ CD127lowTreg and CD19+ CD5+ CD1d+ Breg levels as well as serum CEA, Cyfra21-1, SCC-Ag, HE4, GDF- 15 and PCNA levels of CRF group were significantly higher than those of control group, positively correlated with serum ACTH and TSH levels, and negatively correlated with Cor, FT3 and FT4 levels. Conclusion: The changes of thyroid hormone and adrenal cortical hormone levels in patients with cancer-related fatigue are closely related to the inhibited antitumor immune response and increased tumor load.

  17. Sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression and humoral response in benign and malignant salivary gland tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sumit; Parashar, Deepak; Gupta, Namita; Jagadish, Nirmala; Thakar, Alok; Suri, Vaishali; Kumar, Rajive; Gupta, Anju; Ansari, Abdul S; Lohiya, Nirmal Kumar; Suri, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Salivary gland cancers are highly aggressive epithelial tumor associated with metastatic potential and high mortality. The tumors are biologically diverse and are of various histotypes. Besides, the detection and diagnosis is a major problem of salivary gland cancer for available treatment modalities. In the present study, we have investigated the association of sperm associated antigen 9 (SPAG9) expression with salivary gland tumor (SGT). Clinical specimens of benign (n = 16) and malignant tumors (n = 86) were examined for the SPAG9 expression. In addition, the sera and adjacent non-cancerous tissues (n = 72) from available patients were obtained. Our in situ RNA hybridization and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis revealed significant difference (p = 0.0001) in SPAG9 gene and protein expression in benign (63%) and malignant tumor (84%) specimens. Further, significant association was also observed between SPAG9 expression and malignant tumors (P = 0.05). A cut-off value of >10% cells expressing SPAG9 protein designated as positive in IHC, predicted presence of malignant SGT with 83.72% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 83.72% NPV. Humoral response against SPAG9 protein was generated in 68% of SGT patients. A cut-off value of 0.212 OD for anti-SPAG9 antibodies in ELISA predicted presence of malignant SGT with 69.23% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% PPV and 78.94% NPV. Collectively, our data suggests that the majority of SGT show significant difference and association among benign and malignant tumors for SPAG9 gene and protein expression and also exhibit humoral response against SPAG9 protein. Hence, SPAG9 may be developed as a biomarker for detection and diagnosis of salivary gland tumors. PMID:25941602

  18. Prognostic implications of tumor volume response and COX-2 expression change during radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Jae Myoung; Park, Won; Huh, Seung Jae; Cho, Eun Yoon; Choi, Yoon La; Bae, Duk Soo; Kim, Byoung Gie

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between treatment outcomes, alteration of the expression of biological markers, and tumor volume response during radiotherapy (RT) in patients with uterine cervical cancer was analyzed. Twenty patients with cervical squamous cell carcinoma received definitive RT with (n = 17) or without (n = 3) concurrent chemotherapy. Tumor volumes were measured by three serial magnetic resonance imaging scans at pre-, mid-, and post-RT. Two serial punch biopsies were performed at pre- and mid-RT, and immunohistochemical staining for cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor was performed. The median follow-up duration was 60 months. The median tumor volume response at mid-RT (V2R) was 0.396 (range, 0.136 to 0.983). At mid-RT, an interval increase in the distribution of immunoreactivity for COX-2 was observed in 8 patients, and 6 of them showed poor mid-RT tumor volume response (V2R ≥ 0.4). Four (20%) patients experienced disease progression after 10 to 12 months (median, 11 months). All 4 patients had poor mid-RT tumor volume response (p = 0.0867) and 3 of them had an interval increase in COX-2 expression. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) decreased in patients with V2R ≥ 0.4 (p 0.0291 for both). An interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT was also associated with a decreased survival (p = 0.1878 and 0.1845 for OS and PFS, respectively). Poor tumor volume response and an interval increase in COX-2 expression at mid-RT decreased survival outcomes in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

  19. Type I interferons as stimulators of DC-mediated cross-priming: impact on anti-tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna eSchiavoni

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Induction of potent tumor-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses is a fundamental objective in anticancer therapeutic strategies. This event requires that antigen-presenting cells (APC present tumor-associated antigens (Ag on their MHC class-I molecule, in a process termed cross-presentation. Dendritic cells (DC are particularly keen on this task and can induce the cross-priming of CD8+ T cells, when exposed to danger or inflammatory signals that stimulate their activation. Type I interferons (IFN-I, a family of long-known immunostimulatory cytokines, have been proven to produce optimal activation signal for DC-induced cross-priming. Recent in vitro and in vivo evidences have suggested that IFN-I -stimulated cross-priming by DC against tumor-associated Ag is a key mechanism for cancer immunosurveillance and may be usefully exploited to boost anti-tumor CD8+ T-cell responses. Here, we will review the cross-presentation properties of different DC subsets, with special focus on cell-associated and tumor Ag, and discuss how IFN-I can modify this function, with the aim of identifying more specific and effective strategies for improving anticancer responses.

  20. Theranostic 2D ultrathin MnO2 nanosheets with fast responsibility to endogenous tumor microenvironment and exogenous NIR irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuang; Zhang, Shengjian; Lin, Han; Zhao, Menglong; Yao, Heliang; Zhang, Linlin; Peng, Weijun; Chen, Yu

    2018-02-01

    The fabrication of functional nanoparticles with unique ultra-sensitivity to endogenous tumor microenvironment (TME) is of great significance for their improved theranostic performance and easy excretion out of the body, which has not been realized among diverse nano-sized photothermal agents for photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumor. In this work, we report on the synthesis of 2D ultrathin MnO 2 nanosheets for highly efficient PTT against tumor with ultra-sensitivity to endogenous TME. These ultrathin 2D MnO 2 nanosheets show the intriguing characteristic of disintegration and releasing of Mn 2+ in response to the mild acidic condition and elevated reducing microenvironment of TME, which has successfully realized the pH- and reducing-responsive T 1 -weighted magnetic resonance imaging of tumor. Importantly, the high PTT efficiency of 2D MnO 2 nanosheets responsive to exogenous NIR irradiation has been systematically demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo for suppressing the tumor growth. This first report on the exploring of TME-sensitive photothermal agents with concurrent diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) functions significantly broadens the biomedical application of 2D functional biomaterials, which also promotes the further potential clinical translations of nano-sized photothermal agents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. SU-E-T-751: Three-Component Kinetic Model of Tumor Growth and Radiation Response for Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Dahlman, E; Leder, K; Hui, S [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and study a kinetic model of tumor growth and its response to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) by assuming that the cells in irradiated tumor volume were made of three types. Methods: A set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) were derived for three types of cells and a tumor growth rate. It is assumed that the cells were composed of actively proliferating cells, lethally damaged-dividing cells, and non-dividing cells. We modeled the tumor volume growth with a time-dependent growth rate to simulate the saturation of growth. After SRS, the proliferating cells were permanently damaged and converted to the lethally damaged cells. The amount of damaged cells were estimated by the LQ-model. The damaged cells gradually stopped dividing/proliferating and died with a constant rate. The dead cells were cleared from their original location with a constant rate. The total tumor volume was the sum of the three components. The ODEs were numerically solved with appropriate initial conditions for a given dosage. The proposed model was used to model an animal experiment, for which the temporal change of a rhabdomyosarcoma tumor volume grown in a rat was measured with time resolution sufficient to test the model. Results: To fit the model to the experimental data, the following characteristics were needed with the model parameters. The α-value in the LQ-model was smaller than the commonly used value; furthermore, it decreased with increasing dose. At the same time, the tumor growth rate after SRS had to increase. Conclusions: The new 3-component model of tumor could simulate the experimental data very well. The current study suggested that the radiation sensitivity and the growth rate of the proliferating tumor cells may change after irradiation and it depended on the dosage used for SRS. These preliminary observations must be confirmed by future animal experiments.

  2. Targeting EGFR with photodynamic therapy in combination with Erbitux enhances in vivo bladder tumor response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Khee

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a promising cancer treatment modality that involves the interaction of the photosensitizer, molecular oxygen and light of specific wavelength to destroy tumor cells. Treatment induced hypoxia is one of the main side effects of PDT and efforts are underway to optimize PDT protocols for improved efficacy. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-tumor effects of PDT plus Erbitux, an angiogenesis inhibitor that targets epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, on human bladder cancer model. Tumor-bearing nude mice were assigned to four groups that included control, PDT, Erbitux and PDT plus Erbitux and tumor volume was charted over 90-day period. Results Our results demonstrate that combination of Erbitux with PDT strongly inhibits tumor growth in the bladder tumor xenograft model when compared to the other groups. Downregulation of EGFR was detected using immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and western blotting. Increased apoptosis was associated with tumor inhibition in the combination therapy group. In addition, we identified the dephosphorylation of ErbB4 at tyrosine 1284 site to play a major role in tumor inhibition. Also, at the RNA level downregulation of EGFR target genes cyclin D1 and c-myc was observed in tumors treated with PDT plus Erbitux. Conclusion The combination therapy of PDT and Erbitux effectively inhibits tumor growth and is a promising therapeutic approach in the treatment of bladder tumors.

  3. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Hansen, Morten Høgh; Nielsen, Dorte; Sölétormos, György

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring.

  4. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Kristiansen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the interrelationship between protein tumor markers, the global DNA hypomethylation, and hypermethylated genes in serum from patients with advanced disease. Twenty-nine patients with histologically proven advanced breast cancer received first-line chemotherapy with epirubicin. Samples were collected prior to each treatment and prospectively analyzed for CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA. The same samples were retrospectively analyzed for the concentration of hypermethylated RASSF1A and for global DNA hypomethylation using LINE-1. Among patients with elevated concentrations of the protein markers, concordance could be observed between serial changes of the hypermethylated RASSF1A gene and the protein markers. Among patients with lower concentrations, RASSF1A could only be detected periodically. There was discordance between changes of the hypomethylated LINE-1 as compared to the protein markers. Circulating hypermethylated RASSF1A and protein markers may have similar kinetics during monitoring of tumor burden. Further investigations are needed to determine whether any of the hypermethylated DNA genes may provide predictive information during monitoring.

  5. Nodal tumor response according to the count of peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations during preoperative chemoradiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Jae Sung; Oh, Young Tae; Noh, O Kyu; Chun, Mi Son; Park, Jun Eun; Cho, Sung Ran [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The objective of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between the circulating lymphocyte subpopulation counts during preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and tumor response in locally advanced rectal cancer. From August 2015 to June 2016, 10 patients treated with preoperative CRT followed by surgery were enrolled. Patients received conventional fractionated radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) with fluorouracil-based chemotherapy. Surgical resection was performed at 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of preoperative CRT. The absolute blood lymphocyte subpopulation was obtained prior to and after 4 weeks of CRT. We analyzed the association between a tumor response and change in the lymphocyte subpopulation during CRT. Among 10 patients, 2 (20%) had evidence of pathologic complete response. In 8 patients with clinically node positive, 4 (50%) had nodal tumor response. All lymphocyte subpopulation counts at 4 weeks after CRT were significantly lower than those observed during pretreatment (p < 0.01). A high decrease in natural killer (NK) cell, count during CRT (baseline cell count - cell count at 4 weeks) was associated with node down staging (p = 0.034). Our results suggest that the change of lymphocyte subset to preoperative CRT may be a predictive factor for tumor response in rectal cancer.

  6. DNA damage and the bystander response in tumor and normal cells exposed to X-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashree, M; Venkateswarlu, R; Karthik, K; Shangamithra, V; Venkatachalam, P

    2017-09-01

    Monolayer and suspension cultures of tumor (BMG-1, CCRF-CEM), normal (AG1522, HADF, lymphocytes) and ATM-mutant (GM4405) human cells were exposed to X-rays at doses used in radiotherapy (high dose and high dose-rate) or radiological imaging (low dose and low dose-rate). Radiation-induced DNA damage, its persistence, and possible bystander effects were evaluated, based on DNA damage markers (γ-H2AX, p53 ser15 ) and cell-cycle-specific cyclins (cyclin B1 and cyclin D1). Dose-dependent DNA damage and a dose-independent bystander response were seen after exposure to high dose and high dose-rate radiation. The level of induced damage (expression of p53 ser15 , γ-H2AX) depended on ATM status. However, low dose and dose-rate exposures neither increased expression of marker proteins nor induced a bystander response, except in the CCRF-CEM cells. Bystander effects after high-dose irradiation may contribute to stochastic and deterministic effects. Precautions to protect unexposed regions or to inhibit transmission of DNA damage signaling might reduce radiation risks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical and clinicopathologic response of canine bone tumor patients to treatment with samarium-153-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattimer, J.C.; Corwin, L.A. Jr.; Stapleton, J.; Volkert, W.A.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.; Anderson, S.K.; Simon, J.; Goeckeler, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Forty dogs with spontaneous skeletal neoplasia were treated with 153Sm-EDTMP (ethylenediaminetetramethylene phosphonic acid). Both primary and metastatic lesions were treated. Two treatment regimes, a single (37 MBq (1.0 mCi)/kg dose or two 37 MBq (1.0 mCi)/kg doses separated by 1 wk) were tested. Response to treatment was varied. Large lesions with minimal tumor bone formation responded poorly, while primary lesions with substantial ossification usually exhibited a transient response. Small lesions with minimal lysis, metastatic lesions, and axial skeleton lesions generally responded well. The major adverse side effects of treatment were platelet and white blood cell count depression below baseline values for up to 4 wk (p less than 0.05). Minor depression of packed cell volume and transient elevation of serum alkaline phosphatase were also noted (p less than 0.05). No significant differences (p greater than 0.05) between the two treatment groups, either in treatment effect or undesirable side effects, were detected

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  9. An evaluation of the 'criteria for tumor response after radiotherapy in esophageal cancer' of the Japanese Society for Esophageal Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Kozo; Yamada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Iwao

    1991-01-01

    The criteria covering tumor response after radiotherapy for an esophageal cancer proposed by the Japanese Society for Esophageal Diseases in March, 1989, has been evaluated in a study of 300 patients who were irradiated preoperatively or radically for an esophageal cancer. Results have revealed that the appearance that of EF-3, meaning no or few residual tumor cells in the esophageal specimen after resection, in the CR, PR, and NC Groups were 88.9%, 58.5%, and 30.3%, respectively, these differences among the groups considered highly significant (p<0.001). Thus, it has been concluded that this criteria can be clinically applied to evaluate the tumor response after radiotherapy. (author)

  10. Cell-mediated immune response to syngeneic uv induced tumors. I. The presence of tumor associated macrophages and their possible role in the in vitro generation of cytotoxic lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodward, J.G.; Daynes, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    A primary in vitro sensitization system employing a chromium release assay was utilized to investigate reactivity of murine spleen cells toward syngeneic ultraviolet (uv) light induced fibrosarcomas. These tumors are immunologically rejected in vivo when implanted into normal syngeneic mice but grow progressively when implanted into syngeneic mice that had previously been irradiated with subcarcinogenic levels of uv light. Following appropriate sensitization, spleen cells from both normal and uv irradiated mice are capable of developing cytotoxic lymphocytes in vitro against the uv induced tumors. It was subsequently discovered that in situ uv induced tumors all contained macrophages of host origin that became demonstrable only after enzymatic dissociation of the tumor tissue. These macrophages were immunologically active in vitro as their presence in the stimulator cell population was necessary to achieve an optimum anti-tumor cytotoxic response following in vitro sensitization. Anti-tumor reactivity generated by mixing spleen cells and tumor cells in the absence of tumor derived macrophages could be greatly enhanced by the addition of normal syngeneic peritoneal macrophages. When in vitro anti-tumor reactivity of spleen cells from normal and uv treated mice was compared under these conditions we again found no significant difference in the magnitude of the responses. In addition, the cytotoxic cells generated in response to uv induced tumors appeared to be highly cross reactive with respect to their killing potential

  11. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  12. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, N.; Englhart, E.; Schlemmer, M.; Hittinger, M.; Übleis, C.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Berger, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated

  13. Monitoring water supply systems for anomaly detection and response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Lapikas, T.; Tangena, B.H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Water supply systems are vulnerable to damage caused by unintended or intended human actions, or due to aging of the system. In order to minimize the damages and the inconvenience for the customers, a software tool was developed to detect anomalies at an early stage, and to support the responsible

  14. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    biochemical methods, detecting one or more proteins exclusively involved in the specific stress response pathways. The results indicate that the ageing phenotype is a result of an ineffective probability for cells to respond to stress. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2013.08.023...

  15. Response of the RIF-1 tumor in vitro and in C3H/Km mice to x-radiation (cell survival, regrowth delay, and tumor control), chemotherapeutic agents, and activated macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.; Twentyman, P.R.; Zamvil, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    The radiation response of logarithmic growth phase and fed plateau phase RIF-1 cells in vitro was found to be characterized by D 0 values of 110 and 133 rads and extrapolation numbs of 36 and 28, respectively. The response of the tumor in vivo to X-irradiation in nonanesthetized mice showed a dependence on the tumor implantation site. In the leg muscle, the response indicated that most cells were at an intermediate level of oxygenation, whereas in the subcutaneous tissue of the flank, the response of the tumor indicated that it had a small fraction of hypoxic cells of maximum radioresistance. Misonidazole radiosensitized the leg-implanted tumor as measured both by cell survival and regrowth delay. The tumor was relatively insensitive to a single dose of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea, sensitive to a single dose of cis-platinum, and highly sensitive to a single dose of cyclophosphamide

  16. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  17. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  18. Rheumatoid arthritis risk allele PTPRC is also associated with response to anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cui, Jing; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Thomson, Brian; Padyukov, Leonid; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; Nititham, Joanne; Hughes, Laura B.; de Vries, Niek; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Alfredsson, Lars; Askling, Johan; Wedrén, Sara; Ding, Bo; Guiducci, Candace; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Crusius, J. Bart A.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; Herenius, Marieke; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Worthington, Jane; Batliwalla, Franak; Kern, Marlena; Morgan, Ann W.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Isaacs, John D.; Hyrich, Kimme; Seldin, Michael F.; Moreland, Larry W.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Tak, Paul P.; Bridges, S. Louis; Toes, Rene E. M.; Barton, Anne; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K.; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (anti-TNF) therapy is a mainstay of treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to test established RA genetic risk factors to determine whether the same alleles also influence the response to anti-TNF therapy. METHODS: A total

  19. Predictive value of PET response combined with baseline metabolic tumor volume in peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cottereau, Anne-Segolene; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Becker, Stéphanie

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor outcomes with current therapy. We investigated if response assessed with Positron Emission Tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with baseline total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV) co...

  20. Evaluation of response to hormone therapy in patients with measurable adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.; van Driel, Willemien J.; Kenter, Gemma G.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively determine the objective response rate to hormone therapy (HT) for patients with a measurable adult granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary in a consecutive series of patients. All patients with an adult GCT who were treated with HT [steroidal progestins,