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Sample records for monitoring toxicant exposure

  1. Indicator ability of biosubstances in monitoring the moderate occupational exposure to toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabeklis, Andrei R; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nechiporenko, Sergei P; Lakarova, Elena V

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the monitoring system, watching influence of toxic metals on human health in industrial plants, indicator properties of different biosubstances were compared. Four types of samples (whole blood, plasma, urine, and hair) from 263 workers of the "Khimprom" chemical plant (Novocheboksarsk, Russia) were subjected to multielement analysis by ICP-AES/ICP-MS. 19-25 chemical elements, including main toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb, etc.) were determined. The results were calculated with regard to workers' individual data on occupational exposure to chemical elements. Hair was found to be the most sensitive to toxic and conditionally toxic trace metals: Pb, Mn, Cr, Be, Ni, while occupational contact with macro elements (Na, P), trace metalloids (Si, B) and some other metals (Zn) was not reflected in hair. Whole blood relatively weakly indicated a moderate occupational level of metals except Pb and Mn, but effectively reflected deficiencies of essential elements: I, Cr, and shifts in K/Na ratio, which are likely to be secondary effects of harmful occupational factors. Blood plasma reflected only contact with Be, P; urine--only with Ni. In both whole blood and plasma the changes for the absolute majority of elements were similar. Thus, hair analysis is useful for monitoring the occupational exposure to toxic and conditionally toxic chemical elements, while a general estimation of occupational harmful influence on mineral metabolism requires simultaneous investigation of two biosubstances: hair and whole blood, or hair and blood plasma, with whole blood being more preferable. Analysis of urine is appropriate for monitoring particular chemical elements, e.g. nickel. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Linking high resolution mass spectrometry data with exposure and toxicity forecasts to advance high-throughput environmental monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — There is a growing need in the field of exposure science for monitoring methods that rapidly screen environmental media for suspect contaminants. Measurement and...

  3. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  4. Monitoring of radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-02-01

    The guide specifies the requirements for the monitoring of radiation exposure in instances where radiation is used. In addition to workers, the guide covers students, apprentices and visitors. The guide shall also apply to exposure from natural radiation. However, the monitoring of radiation exposure in nuclear power plants is dealt with in YVL Guide 7.10 and 7.11. The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently arranging such in different operations. In addition, the guide specifies the criteria for the approval and regulatory control of the dosimetric service.

  5. Linking high resolution mass spectrometry data with exposure and toxicity forecasts to advance high-throughput environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is a growing need in the field of exposure science for monitoring methods that rapidly screen environmental media for suspect contaminants. Measurement and analysis platforms, based on high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), now exist to meet this need. Here we describe r...

  6. Environmental and human exposure assessment monitoring of communities near an abandoned mercury mine in the Philippines: a toxic legacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maramba, Nelia P C; Reyes, Jose Paciano; Francisco-Rivera, Ana Trinidad; Panganiban, Lynn Crisanta R; Dioquino, Carissa; Dando, Nerissa; Timbang, Rene; Akagi, Hirokatsu; Castillo, Ma Teresa; Quitoriano, Carmela; Afuang, Maredith; Matsuyama, Akito; Eguchi, Tomomi; Fuchigami, Youko

    2006-10-01

    elevation of blood mercury levels exceeding the then recommended exposure level of 20ppb in 12 out of the 43 (27.9%) residents examined. The majority of the volunteers were former mine workers. In this study the abnormal findings included gingivitis, mercury lines, gum bleeding and pterydium. The most common neurologic complaints were numbness, weakness, tremors and incoordination. Anemia and elevated liver function tests were also seen in a majority of those examined. The assessment also revealed a probable association between blood mercury level and eosinophilia. The same association was also seen between high mercury levels and the presence of tremors and working in the mercury mine. To date, there are very limited environmental and health studies on the impact of both total and methylmercury that have been undertaken in the Philippines. Thus, this area of study was selected primarily because of its importance as an emerging issue in the country, especially regarding the combined effects of total and methylmercury low-dose and continuous uptake from environmental sources. At present the effects of total mercury exposure combined with MeHg consumption remain an important issue, especially those of low-dose and continuous uptake. Results of the study showed that four (4) species of fish, namely ibis, tabas, lapu-lapu and torsillo, had exceeded the recommended total mercury and methylmercury levels in fish (NV>0.5 microg/gf.w., NV>0.3 microg/gf.w., respectively). Saging and kanuping also exceeded the permissible levels for methylmercury. Total and methylmercury in canned fish, and total mercury in rice, ambient air and drinking water were within the recommended levels, however, additional mercury load from these sources may contribute to the over-all body burden of mercury among residents in the area. Surface water quality at the mining area, Honda Bay and during some monitoring periods at Palawan Bay exceeded total mercury standards (NV>0.002 ng/mL). Soil samples in two

  7. Acute exposure to fenthion in juveniles of white cachama (Piaractus brachypomus: toxic effects, changes in cholinesterase activity and potential use in environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borbón Javier F.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Fenthion is an organophosphate insecticide used worldwide that may pollute waters after itsapplication causing potential problems in public health and poisoning in domestic and wildlifeanimals. Objective: to evaluate toxic effects, butyrylcholinesterase activity (BChE and use inenvironmental monitoring, 34 juveniles of white cachama (Piaractus brachypomus were distributedin 3 groups (control, 0,13 ppm and 2 ppm fenthion for 96 h. Materials and methods: fishwere exposed in 10-gallon tanks; symptoms, gross lesions post-mortem, viscerosomatic index(VSI and plasma BChE activity were evaluated. Mean comparisons for each variable amongtreatments were performed (ANOVA, α=0,05. Results: severe signs were seen in 3 specimens(3/11 of 2 ppm fenthion between 11 and 34 h of exposure. These signs were frantic swimming,muscle tremors and loss of swimming axis. In 0,13 ppm, mild to moderate signs (tremors andcaudal fin flapping were observed in some of the fish. The VSI (control = 5,3 ± 0,5; 0,13 ppm= 6,9 ± 0,3 and 2 ppm = 7,3 ± 0,6 was significantly different between exposed to fenthion andcontrols. BChE activity (control = 185,0 ± 20,4; 0,13 ppm = 12,5 ± 2,3 and 2 ppm = 9,8 ± 1,8nmoles / ml plasma / min showed significant inhibition in exposed to fenthion as compared tocontrols. Conclusions: the present work confirmed the toxic effects of fenthion in white cachamajuveniles. Results found in BChE activity suggest its use in environmental monitoring as a goodbiomarker of organophosphates waterborne exposure.

  8. Exposure Space: Integrating Exposure Data and Modeling with Toxicity Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances have been made in high-throughput (HTP) toxicity testing, e.g. from ToxCast, which will ultimately be combined with HTP predictions of exposure potential to support next-generation chemical safety assessment. Rapid exposure methods are essential in selecting chemi...

  9. 2011 NATA - Air Toxics Monitors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset includes annual (2005 - 2013) statistics of measured ambient air toxics concentrations (in micrograms per cubic meter) and associated risk estimates for...

  10. Toxic hepatitis in occupational exposure to solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulia Malaguarnera; Emanuela Cataudella; Maria Giordano; Giuseppe Nunnari; Giuseppe Chisari; Mariano Malaguarnera

    2012-01-01

    The liver is the main organ responsible for the metabolism of drugs and toxic chemicals,and so is the primary target organ for many organic solvents.Work activities with hepatotoxins exposures are numerous and,moreover,organic solvents are used in various industrial processes.Organic solvents used in different industrial processes may be associated with hepatotoxicity.Several factors contribute to liver toxicity; among these are:species differences,nutritional condition,genetic factors,interaction with medications in use,alcohol abuse and interaction,and age.This review addresses the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity.The main pathogenic mechanisms responsible for functional and organic damage caused by solvents are:inflammation,dysfunction of cytochrome P450,mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.The health impact of exposure to solvents in the workplace remains an interesting and worrying question for professional health work.

  11. Biological monitoring of acrylonitrile exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houthuijs, D.; Remijn, B.; Willems, H.; Boleij, J.; Biersteker, K.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made of the excretion pattern of acrylonitrile (AN) in urine of 15 AN-exposed workers. During a 7-day working period with the following 2 days off, the workers delivered all their urines separately. Exposure data, collected by personal monitoring, showed a mean 8-hour TWA value of 0.13 ppm. The excretion of AN in urine (AN(U) ) showed a typical pattern; concentrations peaked at the end or shortly after the end of the workday and decreased rapidly until the beginning of the next workday. A control group of 41 nonexposed workers of the same company showed a significant increase of AN(U) with increasing number of cigarettes smoked. The AN(U) concentrations of the exposed workers however were, despite the low exposure, much higher than those of the controls, both during the workdays and during the days off. Biological monitoring of AN-exposed workers by assessing AN(U) therefore seems a very sensitive exposure evaluation method, especially because it accounts for inhalation as well as skin penetration as routes for entering the body.

  12. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  13. Human Health Effects Associated with Exposure to Toxic Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide. Warming and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. We examine the evidence for adverse human health effects associated with exposure to toxic blooms in drinking water, recreational water a...

  14. Exposure Monitoring and Risk Assessment of Biphenyl in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeon-Yeong Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to assess exposure to and the risk caused by biphenyl in the workplace. Biphenyl is widely used as a heat transfer medium and as an emulsifier and polish in industry. Vapor or high levels of dust inhalation and dermal exposure to biphenyl can cause eye inflammation, irritation of respiratory organs, and permanent lesions in the liver and nervous system. In this study, the workplace environment concentrations were assessed as central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure and were shown to be 0.03 and 0.12 mg/m3, respectively. In addition, the carcinogenic risk of biphenyl as determined by risk assessment was 0.14 × 10−4 (central tendency exposure and 0.56 × 10−4 (reasonable maximum exposure, which is below the acceptable risk value of 1.0 × 10−4. Furthermore, the central tendency exposure and reasonable maximum exposure hazard quotients were 0.01 and 0.06 for oral toxicity, 0.05 and 0.23 for inhalation toxicity, and 0.08 and 0.39 for reproduction toxicity, respectively, which are all lower than the acceptable hazard quotient of 1.0. Therefore, exposure to biphenyl was found to be safe in current workplace environments. Because occupational exposure limits are based on socioeconomic assessment, they are generally higher than true values seen in toxicity experiments. Based on the results of exposure monitoring of biphenyl, the current occupational exposure limits in Korea could be reviewed.

  15. TRACKING PYRETHROID TOXICITY IN SURFACE WATER SAMPLES: EXPOSURE DYNAMICS AND TOXICITY IDENTIFICATION TOOLS FOR LABORATORY TESTS WITH HYALELLA AZTECA (AMPHIPODA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deanovic, Linda A; Stillway, Marie; Hammock, Bruce G; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2017-09-09

    Pyrethroid insecticides are commonly used in pest control and are present at toxic concentrations in surface waters of agricultural and urban areas worldwide. Monitoring is challenging due to their high hydrophobicity and low toxicity thresholds, which often fall below the detection limits of analytical methods. Standard daphnid bioassays used in surface water monitoring are not sensitive enough to protect more susceptible invertebrate species such as the amphipod, Hyalella azteca, and chemical loss during toxicity testing is of concern. In this study, we quantified toxicity loss during storage and testing, using both natural and synthetic water, and present a tool to enhance toxic signal strength for improved sensitivity of H. azteca toxicity tests. The average half-life during storage in LDPE cubitainers at 4°C of five pyrethroids (permethrin, bifenthrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, cyfluthrin, esfenvalerate) and one organophosphate (chlorpyrifos; used as reference) was 1.4 d, and piperonyl butoxide (PBO) proved an effective tool to potentiate toxicity. We conclude that toxicity tests on ambient water samples containing these hydrophobic insecticides are likely to underestimate toxicity present in the field, and mimic short pulse rather than continuous exposures. Where these chemicals are of concern, the addition of PBO during testing can yield valuable information on their presence or absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Human biological monitoring of occupational genotoxic exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Sorsa, M

    1993-01-01

    ) occupational exposure limit value of styrene in ambient air. The consideration of ethical issues in human genetic monitoring is an important but often overlooked aspect. This includes the scientific and preventional relevance of performing a test on individuals, pre- and post study information of donors......Human biological monitoring is a valuable tool for exposure assessment in groups of persons occupationally exposed to genotoxic agents. If the monitoring activity covers genetic material the term genetic monitoring is used. The methods used for genetic monitoring are either substance specific, e...... for and the biomonitoring results should preferentially be linked with accurate ambient air monitoring. In persons occupationally exposed to styrene the endpoints of DNA-damage and DNA-repair in genetic monitoring are methods of choice in exposure situations above the current Danish (25 ppm) or Finnish (20 ppm...

  17. Monitoring of occupational exposure to diesel exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheepers, P.

    1994-12-01

    In Chapter 1 the origin and toxicity of incomplete combustion products of diesel fuel are discussed. Chapter 2 deals with methods that can be used for the identification and quantitation of airborne diesel exhaust-derived contaminants in the working place (environmental monitoring). Chemical substances may be used as indicators for source apportionment or markers for toxicity. A short-term in vitro bioassay may be used for (semi)quantitative determination of the mutagenic potency of diesel exhaust-derived airborne contaminants. Results are presented that support the use of 1-nitropyrene as a marker for the mutagenic activity of diesel exhaust particulate extracts. In Chapter 3 the development of methods for the determination of diesel exhaust-derived metabolites in biological samples is described. The application of new Salmonella typhimurium strains for the detection of urinary metabolites of nitroarenes is investigated. An immunoassay is presented as a method that may be used to track down persons with high occupational exposure to diesel exhaust. The possibilities for measurement of early biological effects are explored in Chapter 4. A method for the determination of hemoglobin adducts was used to investigate the role of the intestinal micro flora in the formation of such adducts derived from diesel exhaust constituents in rats equipped with a human micro flora. The formation of hemoglobin adducts is compared to the formation of DNA adducts in rats treated with two model compounds, in the presence or absence of a micro flora. The applicability of the described methods is discussed in Chapter 5. Prospects and recommendations for future research are given. 23 figs., 41 tabs., 660 refs., 4 appendices

  18. Monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Button, J.B.C. [Radiation Safety Consultancy, Engadine, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    A brief overview is presented of methods of monitoring occupational exposure to ionizing radiation together with reasons for such monitoring and maintaining dose histories of radiation occupationally exposed persons. The various Australian providers of external radiation monitoring services and the types of dosemeters they supply are briefly described together with some monitoring results. Biological monitoring methods, are used to determine internal radiation dose. Whole body monitors, used for this purpose are available at Australian Radiation Lab., ANSTO and a few hospitals. Brief mention is made of the Australian National Radiation Dose Register and its objectives. 8 refs., 9 tabs.

  19. Recovery of anaerobic digestion after exposure to toxicants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Parkin, G.F.; Speece, R.E.

    1979-12-01

    The concept that methane fermentation cannot tolerate chronic or slug doses of toxicants has almost totally precluded methane fermentation as a viable contender for the treatment of industrial wastewaters. This study assayed a wide variety of toxicants, heavy metals, inorganic salts, organic chemicals, solvents, and antibiotics which are used in industrial processes and, therefore, appear in the industrial wastewaters therefrom. Toxicity was related to the reduction in methane production of a control containing no toxicant. The response of methane fermentation after exposure to a toxicant was assayed with unacclimated cultures as well as cultures which had been acclimated to increasing concentrations of the toxicant over long periods of time. The reversible nature of the toxicants was assayed by adding slug doses to plug flow anaerobic filters and recording gas production prior to, during, and after toxicant addition.

  20. Exposure-based validation list for developmental toxicity screening assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daston, George P.; Beyer, Bruce K.; Carney, Edward W.; Chapin, Robert E.; Friedman, Jan M.; Piersma, Aldert H.; Rogers, John M.; Scialli, Anthony R.

    2014-01-01

    Validation of alternative assays requires comparison of the responses to toxicants in the alternative assay with in vivo responses. Chemicals have been classified as "positive" or "negative" in vivo, despite the fact that developmental toxicity is conditional on magnitude of exposure. We developed a

  1. Formal recycling of e-waste leads to increased exposure to toxic metals: an occupational exposure study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julander, Anneli; Lundgren, Lennart; Skare, Lizbet; Grandér, Margaretha; Palm, Brita; Vahter, Marie; Lidén, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Electrical and electronic waste (e-waste) contains multiple toxic metals. However, there is currently a lack of exposure data for metals on workers in formal recycling plants. The objective of this study was to evaluate workers' exposure to metals, using biomarkers of exposure in combination with monitoring of personal air exposure. We assessed exposure to 20 potentially toxic metals among 55 recycling workers and 10 office workers at three formal e-waste recycling plants in Sweden. Workers at two of the plants were followed-up after 6 months. We collected the inhalable fraction and OFC (37-mm) fraction of particles, using personal samplers, as well as spot samples of blood and urine. We measured metal concentrations in whole blood, plasma, urine, and air filters using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry following acid digestion. The air sampling indicated greater airborne exposure, 10 to 30 times higher, to most metals among the recycling workers handling e-waste than among the office workers. The exposure biomarkers showed significantly higher concentrations of chromium, cobalt, indium, lead, and mercury in blood, urine, and/or plasma of the recycling workers, compared with the office workers. Concentrations of antimony, indium, lead, mercury, and vanadium showed close to linear associations between the inhalable particle fraction and blood, plasma, or urine. In conclusion, our study of formal e-waste recycling shows that workers performing recycling tasks are exposed to multiple toxic metals.

  2. The chemical exposure toxicity space (CETS) model: Displaying exposure time, aqueous and organic concentration, activity, and onset of toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Donald; Parnis, J. Mark; McCarty, Lynn S.; Arnot, Jon A.; Powell, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 1‐compartment toxicokinetic model is used to characterize the chemical exposure toxicity space (CETS), providing a novel graphic tool that can aid in the design of aquatic toxicity tests for fish and for interpreting their results. The graph depicts the solution to the differential equation describing the uptake kinetics of a chemical by a modeled fish under conventional bioassay conditions. The model relates the exposure concentration in the water to a dimensionless time and the onset of toxicity as determined by an estimated or assumed critical body residue or incipient lethal aqueous concentration. These concentration graphs are specific to each chemical and exposure and organism parameters and clearly demonstrate differences in toxicity between chemicals and how factors such as hydrophobicity influence the toxic endpoint. The CETS plots can also be used to assess bioconcentration test conditions to ensure that concentrations are well below toxic levels. Illustrative applications are presented using a recent set of high‐quality toxicity data. Conversion of concentrations to chemical activities in the plots enables results for different baseline toxicants to be superimposed. For chemicals that have different modes of toxic action, the increased toxicity then becomes apparent. Implications for design and interpretation of aquatic toxicity tests are discussed. The model, and pictorial visualization of the time‐course of aquatic toxicity tests, may contribute to improvements in test design, implementation, and interpretation, and to reduced animal usage. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1389–1396. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC. PMID:27801500

  3. Air and biological monitoring of solvent exposure during graffiti removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anundi, H; Langworth, S; Johanson, G; Lind, M L; Akesson, B; Friis, L; Itkes, N; Söderman, E; Jönsson, B A; Edling, C

    2000-11-01

    The principal aim of the study was to estimate the level of exposure to organic solvents of graffiti removers, and to identify the chemicals used in different cleaning agents. A secondary objective was to inform about the toxicity of various products and to optimise working procedures. Exposure to organic solvents was determined by active air sampling and biological monitoring among 38 graffiti removers during an 8-h work shift in the Stockholm underground system. The air samples and biological samples were analysed by gas chromatography. Exposure to organic solvents was also assessed by a questionnaire and interviews. Solvents identified were N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), dipropylene glycol monomethyl ether (DPGME), propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME), diethylene glycol monoethyl ether (DEGEE), toluene, xylene, pseudocumene, hemimellitine, mesitylene, ethylbenzene, limonene, nonane, decane, undecane, hexandecane and gamma-butyrolactone. The 8-h average exposures [time-weighted average (TWA)] were below 20% of the Swedish permissible exposure limit value (PEL) for all solvents identified. In poorly ventilated spaces, e.g. in elevators etc., the short-term exposures exceeded occasionally the Swedish short-term exposure limit values (STEL). The blood and urine concentrations of NMP and its metabolites were low. Glycol ethers and their metabolites (2-methoxypropionic acid (MPA), ethoxy acetic acid (EAA), butoxy acetic acid (BAA), and 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) acetic acid (MEAA)) were found in low concentrations in urine. There were significant correlation between the concentrations of NMP in air and levels of NMP and its metabolites in blood and urine. The use of personal protective equipment, i.e. gloves and respirators, was generally high. Many different cleaning agents were used. The average exposure to solvents was low, but some working tasks included relatively high short-term exposure. To prevent adverse health effects, it is important to inform workers about the

  4. Nectophotometer: an infrared motility monitor used to rapidly identify toxicity in effluents and receiving waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Pinto, Richard W.; Santelli, John

    2007-04-01

    A change in the motility pattern of fish and aquatic invertebrates when initially exposed to a toxin has long been used in tests designed to signal the presence of toxins in effluents and receiving waters. We have discovered that the level of motility change occurring within 2.5 hours of exposure to all concentrations of a test toxicant correlates well with mortality observed after three days exposure to the toxin, but that the first 30 minutes of exposure is a poor predictor of mortality. Defining this 'best to use exposure time' can increase the sensitivity of toxicity monitoring systems to a weak toxin, one that causes a motility change so minor that it may otherwise go unnoticed. Motility is monitored and automatically recorded using a Nectophotometer, an automated bio-monitor with computer interface that senses interruptions of infrared beams when organisms separately exposed to multiple concentrations of a toxin move through the beams. In our tests changes in the motility of Artemia salina within the first 2.5 hours of exposure predict 3 day mortality with an average accuracy of 89%. The Nectophotometer has promise for allowing rapid assessment of the toxicity to invertebrates and fish, and may also be used to assess airborne toxicity if motile insects respond in a similar manner.

  5. 30 CFR 57.5071 - Exposure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Diesel Particulate Matter-Underground Only § 57.5071... miner's exposure to diesel particulate matter exceeds the DPM limit specified in § 57.5060, the operator... monitoring for diesel particulate matter, including any results received by a mine operator from sampling...

  6. Chronic Exposure to Diquat Causes Reproductive Toxicity in Female Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Jia-Qing Zhang; Bin-Wen Gao; Jing Wang; Xian-Wei Wang; Qiao-Ling Ren; Jun-Feng Chen; Qiang Ma; Bao-Song Xing

    2016-01-01

    Diquat is a bipyridyl herbicide that has been widely used as a model chemical for in vivo studies of oxidative stress due to its generation of superoxide anions, and cytotoxic effects. There is little information regarding the toxic effects of diquat on the female reproductive system, particularly ovarian function. Thus, we investigated the reproductive toxic effects of diquat on female mice. Chronic exposure to diquat reduced ovary weights, induced ovarian oxidative stress, resulted in granu...

  7. Towards bio monitoring of toxic (lead) and essential elements in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards bio monitoring of toxic (lead) and essential elements in whole blood from 1- to72-month old children: a cross-sectional study. ... African Health Sciences. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives.

  8. OCCUPATIONAL SOLVENT EXPOSURE ASSOCIATED WITH DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina-Costina LUCA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic solvent is a broad term that applies to many classes of chemicals. The solvent (benzene, toluene etc. aspects of occupational exposure are reviewed via the examination of the use, occurrence, and disposition as well as population’s potential of risk. The general public can be exposed to solvent in ambient air as a result of its occurrence in paint process. Solvents are primarily irritants to the skin and mucous membranes and have narcotic properties at high concentrations. Published epidemiological data identified various types of birth defects in certain occupations.

  9. Pesticides: an update of human exposure and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafalou, Sara; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Pesticides are a family of compounds which have brought many benefits to mankind in the agricultural, industrial, and health areas, but their toxicities in both humans and animals have always been a concern. Regardless of acute poisonings which are common for some classes of pesticides like organophosphoruses, the association of chronic and sub-lethal exposure to pesticides with a prevalence of some persistent diseases is going to be a phenomenon to which global attention has been attracted. In this review, incidence of various malignant, neurodegenerative, respiratory, reproductive, developmental, and metabolic diseases in relation to different routes of human exposure to pesticides such as occupational, environmental, residential, parental, maternal, and paternal has been systematically criticized in different categories of pesticide toxicities like carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, pulmonotoxicity, reproductive toxicity, developmental toxicity, and metabolic toxicity. A huge body of evidence exists on the possible role of pesticide exposures in the elevated incidence of human diseases such as cancers, Alzheimer, Parkinson, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, asthma, bronchitis, infertility, birth defects, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, autism, diabetes, and obesity. Most of the disorders are induced by insecticides and herbicides most notably organophosphorus, organochlorines, phenoxyacetic acids, and triazine compounds.

  10. Beryllium contamination and exposure monitoring in an inhalation laboratory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Caroline; Audusseau, Séverine; Salehi, Fariba; Truchon, Ginette; Chevalier, Gaston; Mazer, Bruce; Kennedy, Greg; Zayed, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Beryllium (Be) is used in several forms: pure metal, beryllium oxide, and as an alloy with copper, aluminum, or nickel. Beryllium oxide, beryllium metal, and beryllium alloys are the main forms present in the workplace, with inhalation being the primary route of exposure. Cases of workers with sensitization or chronic beryllium disease challenge the scientific community for a better understanding of Be toxicity. Therefore, a toxicological inhalation study using a murine model was performed in our laboratory in order to identify the toxic effects related to different particle sizes and chemical forms of Be. This article attempts to provide information regarding the relative effectiveness of the environmental monitoring and exposure protection program that was enacted to protect staff (students and researchers) in this controlled animal beryllium inhalation exposure experiment. This includes specific attention to particle migration control through intensive housekeeping and systematic airborne and surface monitoring. Results show that the protective measures applied during this research have been effective. The highest airborne Be concentration in the laboratory was less than one-tenth of the Quebec OEL (occupational exposure limit) of 0.15 microg/m(3). Considering the protection factor of 10(3) of the powered air-purifying respirator used in this research, the average exposure level would be 0.03 x 10(- 4) microg/m(3), which is extremely low. Moreover, with the exception of one value, all average Be concentrations on surfaces were below the Quebec Standard guideline level of 3 microg/100 cm(2) for Be contamination. Finally, all beryllium lymphocyte proliferation tests for the staff were not higher than controls.

  11. Nickel Nanoparticles Exposure and Reproductive Toxicity in Healthy Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Kong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nickel is associated with reproductive toxicity. However, the reproductive toxicity of nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs is unclear. Our goal was to determine the association between nickel nanoparticle exposure and reproductive toxicity. According to the one-generation reproductive toxicity standard, rats were exposed to nickel nanoparticles by gavage and we selected indicators including sex hormone levels, sperm motility, histopathology, and reproductive outcome etc. Experimental results showed nickel nanoparticles increased follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH, and lowered etradiol (E2 serum levels at a dose of 15 and 45 mg/kg in female rats. Ovarian lymphocytosis, vascular dilatation and congestion, inflammatory cell infiltration, and increase in apoptotic cells were found in ovary tissues in exposure groups. For male rats, the weights decreased gradually, the ratio of epididymis weight over body weight increased, the motility of rat sperm changed, and the levels of FSH and testosterone (T diminished. Pathological results showed the shedding of epithelial cells of raw seminiferous tubule, disordered arrangement of cells in the tube, and the appearance of cell apoptosis and death in the exposure group. At the same time, Ni NPs resulted in a change of the reproductive index and the offspring development of rats. Further research is needed to elucidate exposure to human populations and mechanism of actions.

  12. Immunological and physiological responses of the periwinkle Littorina littorea during and after exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium minutum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Raquel A F; Figueiredo, Gisela M; Valentin, Jean Louis; da Silva Scardua, Patricia Mirella; Hégaret, Hélène

    2015-03-01

    Species of the dinoflagellate genus Alexandrium produce phycotoxins responsible for paralytic shellfish poisoning. Blooms of Alexandrium minutum reach very high concentrations of vegetative cells in the water column; and when these blooms occur, large numbers of toxic cysts can be produced and deposited on sediments becoming available to benthic species. The present study investigated the potential effect of exposure to toxic cysts of A. minutum on the periwinkle Littorinalittorea. Snails were exposed for nine days to pellicle cysts of toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates, A. minutum and Heterocapsa triquetra, respectively, followed by six days of depuration while they were fed only H. triquetra. Toxin accumulation, condition index, immune and histopathological responses were analyzed. Histological alterations were also monitored in snails exposed to a harmful A. minutum bloom, which naturally occurred in the Bay of Brest. Snails exposed to toxic cysts showed abnormal behavior that seems to be toxin-induced and possibly related to muscle paralysis. Periwinkles accumulated toxins by preying on toxic cysts and accumulation appeared dependent on the time of exposure, increasing during intoxication period but tending to stabilize during depuration period. Toxic exposure also seemed to negatively affect hemocyte viability and functions, as ROS production and phagocytosis. Histological analyses revealed that toxic exposure induced damages on digestive organs of snails, both in laboratory and natural systems. This study demonstrates that an exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate A. minutum leads to sublethal effects on L. littorea, which may alter individual fitness and increase the susceptibility of snails to pathogens and diseases.

  13. Thermoregulatory responses to environmental toxicants: the interaction of thermal stress and toxicant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Lisa R

    2008-11-15

    Thermal stress can have a profound impact on the physiological responses that are elicited following environmental toxicant exposure. The efficacy by which toxicants enter the body is directly influenced by thermoregulatory effector responses that are evoked in response to high ambient temperatures. In mammals, the thermoregulatory response to heat stress consists of an increase in skin blood flow and moistening of the skin surface to dissipate core heat to the environment. These physiological responses may exacerbate chemical toxicity due to increased permeability of the skin, which facilitates the cutaneous absorption of many environmental toxicants. The core temperature responses that are elicited in response to high ambient temperatures, toxicant exposure or both can also have a profound impact on the ability of an organism to survive the insult. In small rodents, the thermoregulatory response to thermal stress and many environmental toxicants (such as organophosphate compounds) is often biphasic in nature, consisting initially of a regulated reduction in core temperature (i.e., hypothermia) followed by fever. Hypothermia is an important thermoregulatory survival strategy that is used by small rodents to diminish the effect of severe environmental insults on tissue homeostasis. The protective effect of hypothermia is realized by its effects on chemical toxicity as molecular and cellular processes, such as lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species, are minimized at reduced core temperatures. The beneficial effects of fever are unknown under these conditions. Perspective is provided on the applicability of data obtained in rodent models to the human condition.

  14. POPULATION EXPOSURE AND DOSE MODEL FOR AIR TOXICS: A BENZENE CASE STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA's National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) is developing a human exposure and dose model called the Stochastic Human Exposure and Dose Simulation model for Air Toxics (SHEDS-AirToxics) to characterize population exposure to air toxics in support of the National Air ...

  15. Audience, consequence, and journal selection in toxic-exposure epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rier, David A

    2004-10-01

    Even preliminary toxic-exposure epidemiology papers can spark "media scares" and questionable reactions amongst the public. Concerns for the social consequences of publication can lead epidemiologists--despite the advantages of visible publication--to choose a more obscure outlet for potentially sensitive studies. Interviews with 61 US toxic-exposure epidemiologists indicate that investigators generally sought visible journals to transmit their work to the widest relevant audience. Yet up to 36-46% of this sample sometimes have sought or would seek to keep their research from a public who, they feared, might misuse their results. Implications for the boundaries between science and society (including evidence of hidden scientific activism and "inert" public activism) are discussed, and six hypotheses for further research are proposed.

  16. Molecular targets that link dioxin exposure to toxicity phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Wataru; Peterson, Richard E; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2011-10-01

    Many toxicology studies have elucidated health effects associated with exposure to various chemicals, but few have identified the molecular targets that cause specific endpoints of toxicity. Our understanding of the toxicity of dioxins, a group of chemicals capable of causing toxicity at environmentally relevant levels of exposure, is no exception. Dioxins are unique compared to most chemicals that we are exposed to in the environment because they activate a high affinity receptor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), that was identified more than three decades ago. In recent years, several lines of experimental evidence have provided clues for opening the "black box" that contains the molecular mechanisms of dioxin action. These clues have emerged by toxicologists beginning to identify the molecular targets that link AhR signaling to tissue-specific toxicity phenotypes. Endpoints of dioxin toxicity for which downstream molecular targets have begun to be elucidated are observed in developmental or tissue regeneration processes, and include impaired prostate development and hydronephrosis in mouse fetuses and pups, reduced midbrain blood flow and jaw malformation in zebrafish embryos, and impaired fin regeneration in larval and adult zebrafish. Significant progress in identifying molecular targets for dioxin-induced hepatotoxicity in adult mice also has occurred. Misregulation of AhR downstream pathways, such as conversion of arachidonic acid to prostanoids via cyclooxygenase-2, and altered Wnt/β-catenin signaling downregulating Sox9, and signaling by receptors for inflammatory cytokines have been implicated in tissue-specific endpoints of dioxin toxicity. These findings may not only begin to clarify the molecular targets of dioxin action but shed light on new molecular events associated with development and disease.

  17. Chronic Exposure to Diquat Causes Reproductive Toxicity in Female Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Qing Zhang

    Full Text Available Diquat is a bipyridyl herbicide that has been widely used as a model chemical for in vivo studies of oxidative stress due to its generation of superoxide anions, and cytotoxic effects. There is little information regarding the toxic effects of diquat on the female reproductive system, particularly ovarian function. Thus, we investigated the reproductive toxic effects of diquat on female mice. Chronic exposure to diquat reduced ovary weights, induced ovarian oxidative stress, resulted in granulosa cell apoptosis, and disrupted oocyte developmental competence, as shown by reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation, decreased polar body extrusion rates and increased apoptosis-related genes expression. Additionally, after diquat treatment, the numbers of fetal mice and litter sizes were significantly reduced compared to those of control mice. Thus, our results indicated that chronic exposure to diquat induced reproductive toxicity in female mice by promoting the ROS production of gruanousa cells and ooctyes, impairing follicle development, inducing apoptosis, and reducing oocyte quality. In conclusion, our findings indicate that diquat can be used as a potent and efficient chemical for in vivo studies of female reproductive toxicity induced by oxidative stress. Moreover, the findings from this study will further enlarge imitative research investigating the effect of ovarian damage induced by oxidative stress on reproductive performance and possible mechanisms of action in large domestic animals.

  18. Medical Toxicology and Public Health-Update on Research and Activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry : Environmental Exposures among Arctic Populations: The Maternal Organics Monitoring Study in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mehruba; Ridpath, Alison; Berner, James; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that in-utero exposure to environmental chemicals, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), heavy metals, and radionuclides, that might bioaccumulate in the mother may increase a newborn's risk of adverse developmental, neurological, and immunologic effects. Chemical contamination of bodies of water and strong ocean currents worldwide can drive these chemicals from lower latitudes to Arctic waters where they accumulate in common traditional subsistence foods. In response to concerns of the people from Alaska of the effects of bio-accumulated chemicals on their children, the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study(MOMS) was developed. The objective of the study was to assess the risks and benefits associated with the population's subsistence diet. Data analysis of biological samples at the CDC's NCEH laboratory and maternal questionnaires is ongoing. Results will be provided to Alaska Native communities to help support public health actions and inform future interventions and research.

  19. Toxicity profiles and solvent-toxicant interference in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea after dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, An-Sofie; Pirotte, Nicky; Plusquin, Michelle; Willems, Maxime; Neyens, Thomas; Artois, Tom; Smeets, Karen

    2015-03-01

    To investigate hydrophobic test compounds in toxicological studies, solvents like dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) are inevitable. However, using these solvents, the interpretation of test compound-induced responses can be biased. DMSO concentration guidelines are available, but are mostly based on acute exposures involving one specific toxicity endpoint. Hence, to avoid solvent-toxicant interference, we use multiple chronic test endpoints for additional interpretation of DMSO concentrations and propose a statistical model to assess possible synergistic, antagonistic or additive effects of test compounds and their solvents. In this study, the effects of both short- (1 day) and long-term (2 weeks) exposures to low DMSO concentrations (up to 1000 µl l(-1) ) were studied in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We measured different biological levels in both fully developed and developing animals. In a long-term exposure set-up, a concentration of 500 µl l(-1) DMSO interfered with processes on different biological levels, e.g. behaviour, stem cell proliferation and gene expression profiles. After short exposure times, 500 µl l(-1) DMSO only affected motility, whereas the most significant changes on different parameters were observed at a concentration of 1000 µl l(-1) DMSO. As small sensitivity differences exist between biological levels and developmental stages, we advise the use of this solvent in concentrations below 500 µl l(-1) in this organism. In the second part of our study, we propose a statistical approach to account for solvent-toxicant interactions and discuss full-scale solvent toxicity studies. In conclusion, we reassessed DMSO concentration limits for different experimental endpoints in the planarian S. mediterranea.

  20. Assessing physiological .response to toxic industrial chemical exposure in megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-05

    Rai, A. (2011). DNA damage and cholinesterase activity in occupational workers exposed to pesticides . Environmental Toxicology and Pharmacology, 31(2...chemicals and environmental hazards unique to the megacity operational environment . Properly validated biomarkers of exposure and effect can integrate...Center for Environmental Health Research REPORT NUMBER 568 Doughten Drive Fort Detrick, MD 2 1702-50 l 0 16-047 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME

  1. SNRB{trademark} air toxics monitoring. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is currently conducting a project under the DOE`s Clean Coal Technology (CCT II) Program to demonstrate its SO{sub x}NO{sub x}-Rox Box{trademark} (SNRB{trademark}) process in a 5 MWe Field Demonstration Unit at Ohio Edison`s R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The objective of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project was to provide data on SNRB{trademark} air toxics emissions control performance to B&W and to add to the DOE/EPRI/EPA data base by quantifying the flow rates of selected hazardous substances (or air toxics) in all of the major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} process as well as the power plant. Work under the project included the collection and analysis of representative samples of all major input and output streams of the SNRB{trademark} demonstration unit and the power plant, and the subsequent laboratory analysis of these samples to determine the partitioning of the hazardous substances between the various process streams. Material balances for selected air toxics were subsequently calculated around the SNRB{trademark} and host boiler systems, including the removal efficiencies across each of the major air pollution control devices. This report presents results of the SNRB{trademark} Air Toxics Monitoring Project. In addition to the Introduction, a brief description of the test site, including the Boiler No. 8 and the SNRB{trademark} process, is included in Section H. The concentrations of air toxic emissions are presented in Section II according to compound class. Material balances are included in Section IV for three major systems: boiler, electrostatic precipitator, and SNRB{trademark}. Emission factors and removal efficiencies are also presented according to compound class in Sections V and VI, respectively. A data evaluation is provided in Section VII.

  2. Comparability of portable nanoparticle exposure monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbach, Christof; Kaminski, Heinz; von Barany, Daniel; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Monz, Christian; Dziurowitz, Nico; Pelzer, Johannes; Vossen, Katja; Berlin, Knut; Dietrich, Silvio; Götz, Uwe; Kiesling, Heinz-Jürgen; Schierl, Rudolf; Dahmann, Dirk

    2012-07-01

    Five different portable instrument types to monitor exposure to nanoparticles were subject to an intensive intercomparison measurement campaign. Four of them were based on electrical diffusion charging to determine the number concentration or lung deposited surface area (LDSA) concentration of airborne particles. Three out of these four also determined the mean particle size. The fifth instrument type was a handheld condensation particle counter (CPC). The instruments were challenged with three different log-normally distributed test aerosols with modal diameters between 30 and 180 nm, varying in particle concentration and morphology. The CPCs showed the highest comparability with deviations on the order of only ±5%, independent of the particle sizes, but with a strictly limited upper number concentration. The diffusion charger-based instruments showed comparability on the order of ±30% for number concentration, LDSA concentration, and mean particle size, when the specified particle size range of the instruments matched the size range of the aerosol particles, whereas significant deviations were found when a large amount of particles exceeded the upper or lower detection limit. In one case the reported number concentration was even increased by a factor of 6.9 when the modal diameter of the test aerosol exceeded the specified upper limit of the instrument. A general dependence of the measurement accuracy of all devices on particle morphology was not detected.

  3. NAIL KERATIN AS MONITOR-TISSUE FOR SELENIUM EXPOSURE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANNOORD, PAH; MAAS, MJ; DEBRUIN, M

    1992-01-01

    Nail clippings might provide a way to monitor exposure to selenium in the recent past of an individual, since a clipping collected from a toe would reflect exposures months before actual clipping date. The relation between levels of exogenous selenium exposure and selenium levels in nail keratin was

  4. Waterpipe tobacco and cigarette smoking: direct comparison of toxicant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissenberg, Thomas; Shihadeh, Alan

    2009-12-01

    Waterpipe (hookah, shisha) tobacco smoking has spread worldwide. Many waterpipe smokers believe that, relative to cigarettes, waterpipes are associated with lower smoke toxicant levels and fewer health risks. For physicians to address these beliefs credibly, waterpipe use and cigarette smoking must be compared directly. The purpose of this study is to provide the first controlled, direct laboratory comparison of the toxicant exposure associated with waterpipe tobacco and cigarette smoking. Participants (N=31; M=21.4 years, SD=2.3) reporting monthly waterpipe use (M=5.2 uses/month, SD=4.0) and weekly cigarette smoking (M=9.9 cigarettes/day, SD=6.4) completed a crossover study in which they each smoked a waterpipe for a maximum of 45 minutes, or a single cigarette. Outcome measures included expired-air carbon monoxide (CO) 5 minutes after session's end, and blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), plasma nicotine, heart rate, and puff topography. Data were collected in 2008-2009 and analyzed in 2009. On average, CO increased by 23.9 ppm for waterpipe use (SD=19.8) and 2.7 ppm for cigarette smoking (SD=1.8), while peak waterpipe COHb levels (M=3.9%, SD=2.5) were three times those observed for cigarette smoking (M=1.3%, SD=0.5; p'swaterpipe M=10.2 ng/mL, SD=7.0; cigarette M=10.6 ng/mL, SD=7.7). Significant heart rate increases relative to pre-smoking were observed at 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 35 minutes during the cigarette session and at 5-minute intervals during the waterpipe session (p'swaterpipe use as compared to 1.0 L for cigarette smoking (pwaterpipe use is associated with greater CO, similar nicotine, and dramatically more smoke exposure. Physicians should consider advising their patients that waterpipe tobacco smoking exposes them to some of the same toxicants as cigarette smoking and therefore the two tobacco-smoking methods likely share some of the same health risks.

  5. A perspective on the epidemiology of acetaminophen exposure and toxicity in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blieden, Marissa; Paramore, L Clark; Shah, Dhvani; Ben-Joseph, Rami

    2014-05-01

    Acetaminophen is a commonly-used analgesic in the US and, at doses of more than 4 g/day, can lead to serious hepatotoxicity. Recent FDA and CMS decisions serve to limit and monitor exposure to high-dose acetaminophen. This literature review aims to describe the exposure to and consequences of high-dose acetaminophen among chronic pain patients in the US. Each year in the US, approximately 6% of adults are prescribed acetaminophen doses of more than 4 g/day and 30,000 patients are hospitalized for acetaminophen toxicity. Up to half of acetaminophen overdoses are unintentional, largely related to opioid-acetaminophen combinations and attempts to achieve better symptom relief. Liver injury occurs in 17% of adults with unintentional acetaminophen overdose.

  6. Validation of the dynamic direct exposure method for toxicity testing of diesel exhaust in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joeng, Lucky; Hayes, Amanda; Bakand, Shahnaz

    2013-01-01

    Diesel exhaust emission is a major health concern because of the complex nature of its gaseous content (e.g., NO2, NO, CO, and CO2) and high concentration of particulate matter (PM) less than 2.5  μ m which allows for deeper penetration into the human pulmonary system upon inhalation. The aim of this research was to elucidate the potential toxic effects of diesel exhaust on a human pulmonary-based cellular system. Validation of a dynamic direct exposure method for both laboratory (230 hp Volvo truck engine) and field (Volkswagen Passat passenger car) diesel engines, at idle mode, was implemented. Human pulmonary type II epithelial cells (A549) grown on porous membranes were exposed to unmodified diesel exhaust at a low flow rate (37.5 mL/min). In parallel, diesel emission sampling was also conducted using real-time air monitoring techniques. Induced cellular effects were assessed using a range of in vitro cytotoxicity assays (MTS, ATP, and NRU). Reduction of cell viability was observed in a time-dependent manner following 30-60 mins of exposure with NRU as the most sensitive assay. The results suggest that the dynamic direct exposure method has the potential to be implemented for both laboratory- and field-based in vitro toxicity studies of diesel exhaust emissions.

  7. Automated swimming activity monitor for examining temporal patterns of toxicant effects on individual Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing; Jensen, Anne; Marcussen, Laurits Faarup; Nielsen, Majken Elley; Roslev, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic pollutants are often biologically active at low concentrations and impact on biota in combination with other abiotic stressors. Traditional toxicity tests may not detect these effects, and there is a need for sensitive high-throughput methods for detecting sublethal effects. We have evaluated an automated infra-red (IR) light-based monitor for recording the swimming activity of Daphnia magna to establish temporal patterns of toxicant effects on an individual level. Activity was recorded for 48 h and the sensitivity of the monitor was evaluated by exposing D. magna to the reference chemicals K2 Cr2 O7 at 15, 20 and 25 °C and 2,4-dichlorophenol at 20 °C. Significant effects (P swimming activity remained unchanged for 48 h at sublethal concentrations of K2 Cr2 O7 whereas activity at 20 and 25 °C was more biphasic with decreases in activity occurring after 12-18 h. A similar biphasic pattern was observed after 2,4-dichlorophenol exposure at 20 °C. EC50 values for 2,4-dichlorophenol and K2 Cr2 O7 determined from automated recording of swimming activity showed increasing toxicity with time corresponding to decreases in EC50 of 0.03-0.07 mg l(-1) h(-1) . EC50 values determined after 48 h were comparable or lower than EC50 values based on visual inspection according to ISO 6341. The results demonstrated that the swimming activity monitor is capable of detecting sublethal behavioural effects that are toxicant and temperature dependent. The method allows EC values to be established at different time points and can serve as a high-throughput screening tool in toxicity testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Estimating occupational beryllium exposure from compliance monitoring data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michele P; Burstyn, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to beryllium is widespread and is a health risk. The objectives of this study were to develop plausible models to estimate occupational airborne beryllium exposure. Compliance monitoring data were obtained from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration for 12,148 personal measurements of beryllium exposure from 1979 to 2005. Industry codes were maintained as reported or collapsed based on the number of measurements per cell of a job-exposure matrix (JEM). Probability of exposure was predicted based on year, industry, job, and sampling duration. In these models, probability of exposure decreased over time, was highest in full-shift personal samples, and varied with industry and job. The probability of exposure was calculated using 6 JEMs, each providing similar rankings of the likelihood of non-negligible exposure to beryllium. These statistical models, with expert appraisal, are suitable for the assessment of the probability of elevated occupational exposure to beryllium.

  9. Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Haruo; Yamada, Kenichi; Hori, Hajime; Kumagai, Shinji; Murata, Masaru; Nagoya, Toshio; Nakahara, Hirohiko; Mochida, Nobuyuki

    2017-08-31

    This Document, "Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals" ("this Guideline"), has been prepared by "The Committee for Personal Exposure Monitoring" ("the Committee") of the Expert Division of Occupational Hygiene & Ergonomics, Japan Society for Occupational Health.Considering the background of the growing importance of personal exposure monitoring in risk assessment and the need to prepare for the introduction of monitoring using personal samplers from an administrative perspective in recent years, the Committee was organized in November 2012. The Committee has prepared this Guideline as a "practical guideline" for personal exposure monitoring, so as to offer proposals and recommendations to the members of the Japan Society for Occupational Health and to society in general.The scope of this Guideline covers all chemical substances and all related workplaces regarded as targets for general assessment and the management of risk. It thus is not to be considered to comment on legal regulations and methodology. The main text provides the basic methods and concepts of personal exposure monitoring, while 31 "Appendices" are provided later in this Guideline throughout the series; technical descriptions, statistical bases, and actual workplace examples are provided in these appendices, to assist better understanding.The personal exposure monitoring described as per this Guideline is equivalent to an "expert-centered basic method to reasonably proceed with the assessment and management of risk at workplaces." It is considered that practicing and expanding on this method will significantly contribute in reforming the overall framework of occupational hygiene management in Japan.

  10. Evaluation of toxicity: Whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures with amphipod Hyalella azteca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Hardesty, D.K.; Kemble, N.E.

    2000-01-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the toxicity of whole-sediment versus overlying-water exposures to the amphipod Hyalella azteca using field-collected sediments. Severe toxic effects (5-63% survival) were observed with amphipods exposed for 10 d in direct contact with sediment. In contrast, amphipods exposed only to overlying water in these sediment exposures did not exhibit any toxic effects.

  11. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  12. Estimation of exposure to toxic releases using spatial interaction modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conley Jamison F

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI data are frequently used to estimate a community's exposure to pollution. However, this estimation process often uses underdeveloped geographic theory. Spatial interaction modeling provides a more realistic approach to this estimation process. This paper uses four sets of data: lung cancer age-adjusted mortality rates from the years 1990 through 2006 inclusive from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER database, TRI releases of carcinogens from 1987 to 1996, covariates associated with lung cancer, and the EPA's Risk-Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI model. Results The impact of the volume of carcinogenic TRI releases on each county's lung cancer mortality rates was calculated using six spatial interaction functions (containment, buffer, power decay, exponential decay, quadratic decay, and RSEI estimates and evaluated with four multivariate regression methods (linear, generalized linear, spatial lag, and spatial error. Akaike Information Criterion values and P values of spatial interaction terms were computed. The impacts calculated from the interaction models were also mapped. Buffer and quadratic interaction functions had the lowest AIC values (22298 and 22525 respectively, although the gains from including the spatial interaction terms were diminished with spatial error and spatial lag regression. Conclusions The use of different methods for estimating the spatial risk posed by pollution from TRI sites can give different results about the impact of those sites on health outcomes. The most reliable estimates did not always come from the most complex methods.

  13. Developmental toxicity of UV filters and environmental exposure: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumpf, Margret; Durrer, Stefan; Faass, Oliver; Ehnes, Colin; Fuetsch, Michaela; Gaille, Catherine; Henseler, Manuel; Hofkamp, Luke; Maerkel, Kirsten; Reolon, Sasha; Timms, Barry; Tresguerres, Jesus A F; Lichtensteiger, Walter

    2008-04-01

    Several ultraviolet (UV) filters exhibit estrogenic, some also anti-androgenic activity. They are present in waste water treatment plants, surface waters and biosphere including human milk, suggesting potential exposure during development. Developmental toxicity was studied in rats for the UV filters 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC, 0.7, 7, 24, 47 mg/kg/day) and 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC, 0.07, 0.24, 0.7, 2.4, 7 mg/kg/day) administered in chow to the parent generation before mating, during pregnancy and lactation, and to the offspring until adulthood. Neonates exhibited enhanced prostate growth after 4-MBC and altered uterine gene expression after both chemicals. 4-MBC and 3-BC delayed male puberty and affected reproductive organ weights of adult offspring. Effects on the thyroid axis were also noted. Expression and oestrogen sensitivity of oestrogen-regulated genes and nuclear receptor coregulator levels were altered at mRNA and protein levels in adult uterus, prostate and brain regions involved in gonadal control and sexual behaviour. Female sexual behaviour was impaired by both filters; 3-benzylidene camphor caused irregular cycles. Classical endpoints exhibited lowest observed adverse effect levels (LOAELs) and no observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) of 7/0.7 mg/kg for 4-MBC and 0.24/0.07 mg/kg for 3-BC. Molecular endpoints were affected by the lowest doses studied. Our data indicate that the potential risk posed by endocrine active UV filters warrants further investigations.

  14. Measurement and modeling of exposure to selected air toxics for health effects studies and verification by biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Roy M; Delgado-Saborit, Juana Maria; Baker, Stephen J; Aquilina, Noel; Meddings, Claire; Harrad, Stuart; Matthews, Ian; Vardoulakis, Sotiris; Anderson, H Ross

    2009-06-01

    The overall aim of our investigation was to quantify the magnitude and range of individual personal exposures to a variety of air toxics and to develop models for exposure prediction on the basis of time-activity diaries. The specific research goals were (1) to use personal monitoring of non-smokers at a range of residential locations and exposures to non-traffic sources to assess daily exposures to a range of air toxics, especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including 1,3-butadiene and particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); (2) to determine microenvironmental concentrations of the same air toxics, taking account of spatial and temporal variations and hot spots; (3) to optimize a model of personal exposure using microenvironmental concentration data and time-activity diaries and to compare modeled exposures with exposures independently estimated from personal monitoring data; (4) to determine the relationships of urinary biomarkers with the environmental exposures to the corresponding air toxic. Personal exposure measurements were made using an actively pumped personal sampler enclosed in a briefcase. Five 24-hour integrated personal samples were collected from 100 volunteers with a range of exposure patterns for analysis of VOCs and 1,3-butadiene concentrations of ambient air. One 24-hour integrated PAH personal exposure sample was collected by each subject concurrently with 24 hours of the personal sampling for VOCs. During the period when personal exposures were being measured, workplace and home concentrations of the same air toxics were being measured simultaneously, as were seasonal levels in other microenvironments that the subjects visit during their daily activities, including street microenvironments, transport microenvironments, indoor environments, and other home environments. Information about subjects' lifestyles and daily activities were recorded by means of questionnaires and activity diaries. VOCs were collected in tubes packed

  15. 18. Adduct detection in human monitoring for carcinogen exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Determination of the covalently bound products (adducts) of carcinogens with DNA or proteins may be used for the monitoring of exposure to these compounds. Protein adducts are generally stable and are not enzymatically repaired, and the use of these for cxposure monitoring is normally carried out with globin or albumin, because

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Toxic Gas Monitor (SUBTOX) for Disabled Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A HYPERBARIC TOXIC GAS MONITOR (SUBTOX) FOR DISABLED SUBMARINES... HYPERBARIC TOXIC GAS MONITOR (SUBTOX) FOR DISABLED SUBMARINES 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) R. S. Lillo...period (2004–2012), Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU) helped ENMET Corp. to develop the first hyperbaric toxic gas analyzer (SubTox) to monitor

  17. Toxicity assessment due to sub-chronic exposure to individual and mixtures of four toxic heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobbina, Samuel J.; Chen, Yao [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Zhao, Ting [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Zhen [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei [School of Food and Biological Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Li, Qian [School of Pharmacy, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Wu, Xiangyang, E-mail: wuxy@ujs.edu.cn [School of the Environment, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013, Jiangsu (China); Yang, Liuqing, E-mail: yangliuqing@ujs.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Rd. 301, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • Low dose single and mixtures of toxic metals had adverse effect on mice. • Metal mixtures exhibited higher toxicities compared to individual metals. • Mixtures of low dose Pb + Hg + Cd induced neuronal degeneration in brain of mice. • Exposure to Pb + Hg + As + Cd showed renal tubular necrosis in kidney. - Abstract: Humans are exposed to a cocktail of heavy metal toxicants in the environment. Though heavy metals are deleterious, there is a paucity of information on toxicity of low dose mixtures. In this study, lead (Pb) (0.01 mg/L), mercury (Hg) (0.001 mg/L), cadmium (Cd) (0.005 mg/L) and arsenic (As) (0.01 mg/L) were administered individually and as mixtures to 10 groups of 40 three-week old mice (20 males and 20 females), for 120 days. The study established that low dose exposures induced toxicity to the brain, liver, and kidney of mice. Metal mixtures showed higher toxicities compared to individual metals, as exposure to low dose Pb + Hg + Cd reduced brain weight and induced structural lesions, such as neuronal degeneration in 30-days. Pb + Hg + Cd and Pb + Hg + As + Cd exposure induced hepatocellular injury to mice evidenced by decreased antioxidant activities with marginal increases in MDA. These were accentuated by increases in ALT, AST and ALP. Interactions in metal mixtures were basically synergistic in nature and exposure to Pb + Hg + As + Cd induced renal tubular necrosis in kidneys of mice. This study underlines the importance of elucidating the toxicity of low dose metal mixtures so as to protect public health.

  18. Toxicant Exposure and Bioaccumulation: A Common and Potentially Reversible Cause of Cognitive Dysfunction and Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Genuis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juxtaposed alongside the ongoing rise in the incidence and prevalence of dementia, is the surge of recent research confirming widespread exposure and bioaccumulation of chemical toxicants. Evidence from sources such as the Centers for Disease Control reveals that most people have accrued varying degrees of assorted toxic pollutants including heavy metals, flame retardants, and pesticide residues within their bodies. It has been well established that many of these toxicants have neurodegenerative as well as neurodevelopmental impact as a result of various pathophysiologic mechanisms including neuronal mitochondrial toxicity and disruption of neurotransmitter regulation. Elimination of stockpiled toxicants from the body may diminish adverse toxicant impact on human biology and allow restoration of normal physiological function. Incorporating a review of medical literature on toxicant exposure and dementia with a case history of a lead-exposed individual diagnosed with dementia, this paper will discuss a much overlooked and potentially widespread cause of declining brain function and dementia.

  19. Evaluation of effects of long term exposure on lethal toxicity with mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vibha; Yu, Qiming J; Connell, Des W

    2014-02-01

    The relationship between exposure time (LT50) and lethal exposure concentration (LC50) has been evaluated over relatively long exposure times using a novel parameter, Normal Life Expectancy (NLT), as a long term toxicity point. The model equation, ln(LT50) = aLC50(ν) + b, where a, b and ν are constants, was evaluated by plotting lnLT50 against LC50 using available toxicity data based on inhalation exposure from 7 species of mammals. With each specific toxicant a single consistent relationship was observed for all mammals with ν always mammals and then be extended to estimate toxicity at any exposure time with other mammals. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hand-arm vibration exposure monitoring with wearable sensor module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austad, Hanne O; Røed, Morten H; Liverud, Anders E; Dalgard, Steffen; Seeberg, Trine M

    2013-01-01

    Vibration exposure is a serious risk within work physiology for several work groups. Combined with cold artic climate, the risk for permanent harm is even higher. Equipment that can monitor the vibration exposure and warn the user when at risk will provide a safer work environment for these work groups. This study evaluates whether data from a wearable wireless multi-parameter sensor module can be used to estimate vibration exposure and exposure time. This work has been focused on the characterization of the response from the accelerometer in the sensor module and the optimal location of the module in the hand-arm configuration.

  1. Developmental exposure to organophosphate flame retardants elicits overt toxicity and alters behavior in early life stage zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishaw, Laura V; Hunter, Deborah L; Padnos, Beth; Padilla, Stephanie; Stapleton, Heather M

    2014-12-01

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) are common replacements for the phased-out polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and have been detected at high concentrations in environmental samples. OPFRs are structurally similar to organophosphate pesticides and may adversely affect the developing nervous system. This study evaluated the overt toxicity, uptake, and neurobehavioral effects of tris (1,3-dichloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TDCPP), tris (2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris (1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate (TCPP), and tris (2,3-dibromopropyl) phosphate (TDBPP) in early life stage zebrafish. Chlorpyrifos was used as a positive control. For overt toxicity and neurobehavioral assessments, zebrafish were exposed from 0 to 5 days postfertilization (dpf). Hatching, death, or malformations were evaluated daily. Teratogenic effects were scored by visual examination on 6 dpf. To evaluate uptake and metabolism, zebrafish were exposed to 1 µM of each organophosphate (OP) flame retardant and collected on 1 and 5 dpf to monitor accumulation. Larval swimming activity was measured in 6 dpf larvae to evaluate neurobehavioral effects of exposures below the acute toxicity threshold. TDBPP elicited the greatest toxicity at >1 µM. TDCPP and chlorpyrifos were overtly toxic at concentrations ≥10 µM, TCEP, and TCPP were not overtly toxic at the doses tested. Tissue concentrations increased with increasing hydrophobicity of the parent chemical after 24 h exposures. TDCPP and TDBPP and their respective metabolites were detected in embryos on 5 dpf. For all chemicals tested, developmental exposures that were not overtly toxic significantly altered larval swimming activity. These data indicate that OPFRs adversely affect development of early life stage zebrafish.

  2. Acute toxicity resulting from human exposures to military smokes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, M. van; Langenberg, J.P.; Klerk, W.P.C. de; Alblas, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    The toxicity of smoke-generating ammunition can be established by looking at the complete hand grenade or only at the smoke composition. In this paper both approaches are described. The toxicity of a signalling smoke was assessed as a complete smoke hand grenade whereas for a 76 mm screening smoke

  3. Video exposure monitoring as part of a strategy to assess exposure to nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurskens-Comuth, P.A.W.V.; Verbist, K.; Brouwer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: There is a growing awareness of the potential risks for human health of exposure to ultrafine particles or nanoparticles. In that context, workplace air measurements become important, and various strategies have been developed to monitor exposure. In addition, observations and time/activ

  4. A cellular viability assay to monitor drug toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jakob; Bross, Peter

    2010-01-01

    A central part of the research in protein misfolding and its associated disorders is the development of treatment strategies based on ensuring cellular protein homeostasis. This often includes testing chemical substances or drugs for their ability to counteract protein misfolding processes and to promote correct folding. Such investigations also include assessment of how the tested chemical substances affect cellular viability, that is, their cytotoxic effect. Investigations of cytotoxicity often require testing several different concentrations and drug exposure times using cells in culture. It is therefore attractive to use a viability test that permits the analysis of many samples with little handling time. This protocol describes a simple and fast methodology to analyze viability of lymphoblastoid cells and to test putative cytotoxic effects associated with exposure to a chemical substance, here exemplified by celastrol. The natural substance celastrol has been used for many years in traditional Chinese medicine and has subsequently been shown to induce transcription of genes encoding molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins) that are involved in promoting folding of cellular proteins. The well-described colorimetric tetrazolium salt (MTT) assay, which monitors metabolic activity of cultured cells, was adapted to analyze the viability of cells exposed to celastrol. After having established a suitable cell seeding density, the dose-dependence and time-course of viability reduction of lymphoblastoid cells treated with celastrol were determined. It was found that 4- and 24-h exposure to 0.8 microM celastrol reduced the viability of lymphoblastoid cells, with the most severe effect observed at 24 h with MTT reductions approaching 30% of non-exposed cells. For a series of incubations for 24 h, it was found that concentrations as low as 0.2 microM were sufficient to affect the viability, and celastrol concentrations of 0.5 microM reduced the MTT reduction rate to

  5. Webinar Presentation: Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation, Epidemiologic Studies of the Effects of Toxic Exposures on Brain and Behavior: Neuropsychological Assessment, was given at the NIEHS/EPA Children's Centers 2015 Webinar Series: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Neurodevelopment.

  6. Chemical concentrations, exposures, health risks by census tract from National Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Chemical concentrations, exposures, health risks by census tract for the United States from National Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA). This dataset is associated...

  7. Electrochemical sensors for the detection of lead and other toxic heavy metals: the next generation of personal exposure biomonitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantasee, Wassana; Lin, Yuehe; Hongsirikarn, Kitiya; Fryxell, Glen E; Addleman, Raymond; Timchalk, Charles

    2007-12-01

    To support the development and implementation of biological monitoring programs, we need quantitative technologies for measuring xenobiotic exposure. Microanalytical based sensors that work with complex biomatrices such as blood, urine, or saliva are being developed and validated and will improve our ability to make definitive associations between chemical exposures and disease. Among toxic metals, lead continues to be one of the most problematic. Despite considerable efforts to identify and eliminate Pb exposure sources, this metal remains a significant health concern, particularly for young children. Ongoing research focuses on the development of portable metal analyzers that have many advantages over current available technologies, thus potentially representing the next generation of toxic metal analyzers. In this article, we highlight the development and validation of two classes of metal analyzers for the voltammetric detection of Pb, including: a) an analyzer based on flow injection analysis and anodic stripping voltammetry at a mercury-film electrode, and b) Hg-free metal analyzers employing adsorptive stripping voltammetry and novel nanostructure materials that include the self-assembled monolayers on mesoporous supports and carbon nanotubes. These sensors have been optimized to detect Pb in urine, blood, and saliva as accurately as the state-of-the-art inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with high reproducibility, and sensitivity allows. These improved and portable analytical sensor platforms will facilitate our ability to conduct biological monitoring programs to understand the relationship between chemical exposure assessment and disease outcomes.

  8. Toxicity of Trinitrotoluene to Sheepshead Minnows in Water Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-06

    more toxic than TNT to an amphipod Hyalella azteca (2 times) and the cladoceran Ceriodaphia dubia (30 times) (Griest et al., 1998). Substantial...the aquatic amphipod Hyalella Azteca . Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf. 70, 38–46. Smock, L.A., Stoneburner, D.L., Clark, J.R., 1976. The toxic effects of...tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine in sediments to Chironomus tentans and Hyalella azteca : low-dose hormesis and high-dose mortality. Environ. Toxicol. Chem. 21

  9. Vicia faba bioassay for environmental toxicity monitoring: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Munawar

    2016-02-01

    Higher plants are recognized as excellent genetic models to detect cytogenetic and mutagenic agents and are frequently used in environmental monitoring studies. Vicia faba (V. faba) bioassay have been used to study DNA damages i.e., chromosomal and nuclear aberrations induced by metallic compounds, pesticides, complex mixtures, petroleum derivates, toxins, nanoparticles and industrial effluents. The main advantages of using V. faba is its availability round the year, economical to use, easy to grow and handle; its use does not require sterile conditions, rate of cell division is fast, chromosomes are easy to score, less expensive and more sensitive as compared to other short-term tests that require pre-preparations. The V. faba test offers evaluation of different endpoints and tested agents can be classified as cytotoxic/genotoxic/mutagenic. This test also provides understanding about mechanism of action, whether the tested agent is clastogenic or aneugenic in nature. In view of advantages offered by V. faba test system, it is used extensively to assess toxic agents and has been emerged as an important bioassay for ecotoxicological studies. Based on the applications of V. faba test to assess the environmental quality, this article offers an overview of this test system and its efficiency in assessing the cytogenetic and mutagenic agents in different classes of the environmental concerns.

  10. Exposure information in environmental health research: Current opportunities and future directions for particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Ryan, P. Barry; Ozkaynak, Haluk

    2007-02-01

    Understanding and quantifying outdoor and indoor sources of human exposure are essential but often not adequately addressed in health-effects studies for air pollution. Air pollution epidemiology, risk assessment, health tracking and accountability assessments are examples of health-effects studies that require but often lack adequate exposure information. Recent advances in exposure modeling along with better information on time-activity and exposure factors data provide us with unique opportunities to improve the assignment of exposures for both future and ongoing studies linking air pollution to health impacts. In September 2006, scientists from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) along with scientists from the academic community and state health departments convened a symposium on air pollution exposure and health in order to identify, evaluate, and improve current approaches for linking air pollution exposures to disease. This manuscript presents the key issues, challenges and recommendations identified by the exposure working group, who used cases studies of particulate matter, ozone, and toxic air pollutant exposure to evaluate health-effects for air pollution. One of the over-arching lessons of this workshop is that obtaining better exposure information for these different health-effects studies requires both goal-setting for what is needed and mapping out the transition pathway from current capabilities to meeting these goals. Meeting our long-term goals requires definition of incremental steps that provide useful information for the interim and move us toward our long-term goals. Another over-arching theme among the three different pollutants and the different health study approaches is the need for integration among alternate exposure assessment approaches. For example, different groups may advocate exposure indicators, biomonitoring, mapping methods (GIS), modeling, environmental media

  11. 30 CFR 57.5037 - Radon daughter exposure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Radon daughter exposure monitoring. 57.5037 Section 57.5037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND..., entitled “American National Standard Radiation Protection in Uranium Mines,” approved July 18, 1973,...

  12. AGE-RELATED TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental exposures is poorly understood. To investigate-the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of an acute exposure to the volatile organic compound, toluene (0.0 or 1.0 g/kg), i...

  13. Molecular toxicity identification evaluation (mTIE) approach predicts chemical exposure in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antczak, Philipp; Jo, Hun Je; Woo, Seonock; Scanlan, Leona; Poynton, Helen; Loguinov, Alex; Chan, Sarah; Falciani, Francesco; Vulpe, Chris

    2013-10-15

    Daphnia magna is a bioindicator organism accepted by several international water quality regulatory agencies. Current approaches for assessment of water quality rely on acute and chronic toxicity that provide no insight into the cause of toxicity. Recently, molecular approaches, such as genome wide gene expression responses, are enabling an alternative mechanism based approach to toxicity assessment. While these genomic methods are providing important mechanistic insight into toxicity, statistically robust prediction systems that allow the identification of chemical contaminants from the molecular response to exposure are needed. Here we apply advanced machine learning approaches to develop predictive models of contaminant exposure using a D. magna gene expression data set for 36 chemical exposures. We demonstrate here that we can discriminate between chemicals belonging to different chemical classes including endocrine disruptors and inorganic and organic chemicals based on gene expression. We also show that predictive models based on indices of whole pathway transcriptional activity can achieve comparable results while facilitating biological interpretability.

  14. Subchronic toxicity and cardiovascular responses in spontaneously hypertensive rats after exposure to multiwalled carbon nanotubes by intratracheal instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhang, Lili; Ge, Cuicui; Tseng, Michael T; Bai, Ru; Qu, Ying; Beer, Christiane; Autrup, Herman; Chen, Chunying

    2015-03-16

    The tremendous demand of the market for carbon nanotubes has led to their massive production that presents an increasing risk through occupational exposure. Lung deposition of carbon nanotubes is known to cause acute localized pulmonary adverse effects. However, systemic cardiovascular damages associated with acute pulmonary lesion have not been thoroughly addressed. Four kinds of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with different lengths and/or iron contents were used to explore the potential subchronic toxicological effects in spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats and normotensive control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats after intratracheal instillation. MWCNTs penetrated the lung blood-gas barrier and accumulated in the liver, kidneys, and spleen but not in the heart and aorta of SH rats. The pulmonary toxicity and cardiovascular effects were assessed at 7 and 30 days postexposure. Compared to the WKY rats, transient influences on blood pressure and up to 30 days persistent decrease in the heart rate of SH rats were found by electrocardiogram monitoring. The subchronic toxicity, especially the sustained inflammation of the pulmonary and cardiovascular system, was revealed at days 7 and 30 in both SH and WKY rat models. Histopathological results showed obvious morphological lesions in abdominal arteries of SH rats 30 days after exposure. Our results suggest that more attention should be paid to the long-term toxic effects of MWCNTs, and particularly, occupationally exposed workers with preexisting cardiovascular diseases should be monitored more thoroughly.

  15. Human solvent exposure. Factors influencing the pharmacokinetics and acute toxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bælum, Jesper

    1991-01-01

    exposed to mixtures of solvents experience an increased frequency of work related irritative and neurological symptoms although the exposure has been far below the occupational exposure limits. A series of controlled human exposure studies was carried out. Different groups of persons were exposed...... to the most frequent solvent, toluene. Toluene in alveolar air and the urinary excretion of the metabolites were measured and the acute effects of toluene were assessed by the performance in a series of test of the perceptual and psychomotor functions as well as a standardized registration of annoyance...

  16. USEtox human exposure and toxicity factors for comparative assessment of toxic emissions in life cycle analysis: sensitivity to key chemical properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark; Henderson, Andrew D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to provide science-based consensus and guidance for health effects modelling in comparative assessments based on human exposure and toxicity. This aim is achieved by i) describing the USEtoxTM exposure and toxicity models representing consensus and recommended...... modelling practice, ii) identifying key mechanisms influencing human exposure and toxicity effects of chemical emissions, iii) extending substance coverage. Methods The methods section of this paper contains a detailed documentation of both the human exposure and toxic effects models of USEtox......TM, to determine impacts on human health per kg substance emitted in different compartments. These are considered as scientific consensus and therefore recommended practice for comparative toxic impact assessment. The framework of the exposure model is described in details including the modelling of each exposure...

  17. Farmers’ Exposure to Pesticides: Toxicity Types and Ways of Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Damalas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic pesticides are extensively used in agriculture to control harmful pests and prevent crop yield losses or product damage. Because of high biological activity and, in certain cases, long persistence in the environment, pesticides may cause undesirable effects to human health and to the environment. Farmers are routinely exposed to high levels of pesticides, usually much greater than those of consumers. Farmers’ exposure mainly occurs during the preparation and application of the pesticide spray solutions and during the cleaning-up of spraying equipment. Farmers who mix, load, and spray pesticides can be exposed to these chemicals due to spills and splashes, direct spray contact as a result of faulty or missing protective equipment, or even drift. However, farmers can be also exposed to pesticides even when performing activities not directly related to pesticide use. Farmers who perform manual labor in areas treated with pesticides can face major exposure from direct spray, drift from neighboring fields, or by contact with pesticide residues on the crop or soil. This kind of exposure is often underestimated. The dermal and inhalation routes of entry are typically the most common routes of farmers’ exposure to pesticides. Dermal exposure during usual pesticide handling takes place in body areas that remain uncovered by protective clothing, such as the face and the hands. Farmers’ exposure to pesticides can be reduced through less use of pesticides and through the correct use of the appropriate type of personal protective equipment in all stages of pesticide handling.

  18. Critical Duration of Exposure for Developmental Chlorpyrifos-Induced Neurobehavioral Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sledge, Damiyon; Yen, Jerry; Morton, Terrell; Dishaw, Laura; Petro, Ann; Donerly, Susan; Linney, Elwood; Levin, Edward D.

    2011-01-01

    Developmental exposure of rats to the pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) causes persistent neurobehavioral impairment. In a parallel series of studies with zebrafish, we have also found persisting behavioral dysfunction after developmental CPF exposure. We have developed a battery of measures of zebrafish behavior, which are reliable and sensitive to toxicant-induced damage. This study determined the critical duration of developmental CPF exposure for causing persisting neurobehavioral effects. Tes...

  19. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Pemberton, R.M. [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Fielden, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Hart, J.P., E-mail: john.hart@uwe.ac.uk [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-24

    continuous monitoring of glutamate released from HepG2 cells upon exposure to paracetamol over 8 h. The concentrations of glutamate released in the presence of 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol, increased in proportion to the drug concentration, ie: 16 μM, 28 μM and 62 μM respectively. This result demonstrates the feasibility of using this approach to monitor early metabolic changes after exposure to a model toxic compound. - Highlights: • A simple method of fabricating a new microband glutamate biosensor was developed. • The biocomponents, GLDH and NAD{sup +} were immobilised onto the electrode surface using chitosan. • The biosensors operated continuously over an 8 h period in culture medium. • The release of glutamate from HepG2 cells was monitored following toxic challenge.

  20. Risk of leukemia in relation to exposure to ambient air toxics in pregnancy and early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Julia E; Park, Andrew S; Qiu, Jiaheng; Cockburn, Myles; Ritz, Beate

    2014-07-01

    There are few established causes of leukemia, the most common type of cancer in children. Studies in adults suggest a role for specific environmental agents, but little is known about any effect from exposures in pregnancy to toxics in ambient air. In our case-control study, we ascertained 69 cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 46 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) from California Cancer Registry records of children leukemia associated with one interquartile range increase in air toxic exposure. Risk of ALL was elevated with 3(rd) trimester exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (OR=1.16, 95% CI 1.04, 1.29), arsenic (OR=1.33, 95% CI 1.02, 1.73), benzene (OR=1.50, 95% CI 1.08, 2.09), and three other toxics related to fuel combustion. Risk of AML was increased with 3rd trimester exposure to chloroform (OR=1.30, 95% CI 1.00, 1.69), benzene (1.75, 95% CI 1.04, 2.93), and two other traffic-related toxics. During the child's first year, exposure to butadiene, ortho-xylene, and toluene increased risk for AML and exposure to selenium increased risk for ALL. Benzene is an established cause of leukemia in adults; this study supports that ambient exposures to this and other chemicals in pregnancy and early life may also increase leukemia risk in children.

  1. Early dioxin exposure causes toxic effects in adult zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tracie R; Peterson, Richard E; Heideman, Warren

    2013-09-01

    The acute effects of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure have been well documented in many vertebrate species. However, less is known about the consequences in adulthood from sublethal exposure during development. To address this, we exposed zebrafish to sublethal levels of TCDD (1h; 50 pg/ml), either in early embryogenesis (day 0) or during sexual determination (3 and 7 weeks), and assessed the effects later in adulthood. We found that exposure during embryogenesis produced few effects on the adults themselves but did affect the offspring of these fish: Malformations and increased mortality were observed in the subsequent generation. Zebrafish exposed during sexual development showed defects in the cranial and axial skeleton as adults. This was most clearly manifested as scoliosis caused by malformation of individual vertebrae. These fish also showed defects in reproduction, producing fewer eggs with lower fertilization success. Both males and females were affected, with males contributing to the decrease in egg release from the females and exposed females contributing to fertilization failure. TCDD exposure at 3 and 7 weeks produced feminization of the population. Surprisingly, part of this was due to the appearance of fish with clearly female bodies, yet carrying testes in place of ovaries. Our results show that exposures that produce little if any impact during development can cause severe consequences during adulthood and present a model for studying this process.

  2. Integration of biological monitoring, environmental monitoring and computational modelling into the interpretation of pesticide exposure data: introduction to a proposed approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosio, Claudio; Rubino, Federico M; Alegakis, Athanasios; Ariano, Eugenio; Brambilla, Gabri; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Metruccio, Francesca; Minoia, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo; Somaruga, Chiara; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Turci, Roberta; Vellere, Francesca

    2012-08-13

    Open field, variability of climatic and working conditions, and the use of complex mixtures of pesticides makes biological and environmental monitoring in agriculture, and therefore risk assessment and management, very complicated. A need of pointing out alternative risk assessment approaches, not necessarily based on measures, but simple, user-friendly and reliable, feasible also in the less advanced situations and in particular in small size enterprises, arises. This aim can be reached through a combination of environmental monitoring, biological monitoring and computational modelling. We have used this combination of methods for the creation of "exposure and risk profiles" to be applied in specific exposure scenarios, and we have tested this approach on a sample of Italian rice and maize herbicide applicators. We have given specific "toxicity scores" to the different products used and we have identified, for each of the major working phases, that is mixing and loading, spraying, maintenance and cleaning of equipment, the main variables affecting exposure and inserted them into a simple algorithm, able to produce "exposure indices". Based on the combination of toxicity indices and exposure indices it is possible to obtain semiquantitative estimates of the risk levels experienced by the workers in the exposure scenarios considered. Results of operator exposure data collected under real-life conditions can be used to validate and refine the algorithms; moreover, the AOEL derived from pre-marketing studies can be combined to estimate tentative biological exposure limits for pesticides, useful to perform individual risk assessment based on technical surveys and on simple biological monitoring. A proof of principle example of this approach is the subject of this article.

  3. A SINGLE-EXPOSURE, MULTIDETECTOR NEUTRON SPECTROMETER FOR WORKPLACE MONITORING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, R; Bortot, D; Buonomo, B; Esposito, A; Gómez-Ros, J M; Introini, M V; Mazzitelli, G; Moraleda, M; Pola, A; Romero, A M

    2016-09-01

    This communication describes a recently developed single-exposure neutron spectrometer, based on multiple active thermal neutron detectors located within a moderating sphere, which have been developed jointly by CIEMAT (Spain), INFN (Italy) and Politecnico di Milano (Italy) in the framework of Italian and Spanish collaboration projects. The fabricated prototypes permit to achieve spectrometric resolution with nearly isotropic response for neutron with energies from thermal to 100-200 MeV, thus being able to characterise the complete neutron spectrum in only one exposure by unfolding the measured responses of the detectors. This makes it especially advantageous for characterising neutron fields and workplace monitoring purposes in neutron-producing facilities.

  4. Toxics Use Reduction in the Home: Lessons Learned from Household Exposure Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunagan, Sarah C; Dodson, Robin E; Rudel, Ruthann A; Brody, Julia G

    2011-03-01

    Workers and fence-line communities have been the first to benefit from the substantial reductions in toxic chemical use and byproducts in industrial production resulting from the Massachusetts Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA). As TURA motivates reformulation of products as well as retooling of production processes, benefits could extend more broadly to large-scale reductions in everyday exposures for the general population. Household exposure studies, including those conducted by Silent Spring Institute, show that people are exposed to complex mixtures of indoor toxics from building materials and a myriad of consumer products. Pollutants in homes are likely to have multiple health effects because many are classified as endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), with the ability to interfere with the body's hormone system. Product-related EDCs measured in homes include phthalates, halogenated flame retardants, and alkylphenols. Silent Spring Institute's chemical analysis of personal care and cleaning products confirms many are potential sources of EDCs, highlighting the need for a more comprehensive toxics use reduction (TUR) approach to reduce those exposures. Toxics use reduction targeted at EDCs in consumer products has the potential to substantially reduce occupational and residential exposures. The lessons that have emerged from household exposure research can inform improved chemicals management policies at the state and national levels, leading to safer products and widespread health and environmental benefits.

  5. Monitor for detecting and assessing exposure to airborne nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Johan; Voetz, Matthias; Kiesling, Heinz-Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    An important safety aspect of the workplace environment concerns the severity of its air pollution with nanoparticles (NP; workplace air pollution level and the personal exposure to airborne NPs. This article describes the design and operation of the Aerasense NP monitor that enables intelligence gathering in particular with respect to airborne particles in the 10-300 nm size range. The NP monitor provides real time information about their number concentration, average size, and surface areas per unit volume of inhaled air that deposit in the various compartments of the respiratory tract. The monitor's functionality relies on electrical charging of airborne particles and subsequent measurements of the total particle charge concentration under various conditions. Information obtained with the NP monitor in a typical workplace environment has been compared with simultaneously recorded data from a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) capable of measuring the particle size distribution in the 11-1086 nm size range. When the toxicological properties of the engineered and/or released particles in the workplace are known, personal exposure monitoring allows a risk assessment to be made for a worker during each workday, when the workplace-produced particles can be distinguished from other (ambient) particles.

  6. Extrapolation for exposure duration in oral toxicity: A quantitative analysis of historical toxicity data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneveld, C.N.; Hakkert, B.C.; Bos, P.M.J.; Heer, C.de

    2004-01-01

    For human risk assessment, experimental data often have to be extrapolated for exposure duration, which is generally done by means of default values. The purpose of the present study was twofold. First, to derive a statistical distribution for differences in exposure duration that can be used in a p

  7. Residential Exposure of Environment Toxic Substance Outcome during Menstrual Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alagendran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: It was intended to diagnose and treat the disorders of female reproductive system where they are exposed to environmentally toxic pesticides and estrogenic compounds like bisphenol A which are the main reason for the infertility problems. Approach: Human saliva contains arrays of proteins that have distinct biological functions. Results: Salivary hormones concentrations of luteinising hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, estrogen as well as estrone-1-glucuronide, were assayed in 20 normal menstruating women who were among the reproductive phases like preovulatory phase (6-12 days; Ovulatory phase (13-14 days and Postovulatory phase (15-26 days. It was intended to diagnose and treat the disorders of female reproductive system where they are exposed to environmentally toxic pesticides and estrogenic compounds like bisphenol A which are the main reason for the infertility problems. In this context, the detection of fertile period suggests that the mean value of luteinising hormone (56.58±12.96 mIU L-1 indicates the surge during the time of ovulation. Identifying the period of ovulation would be the easiest way to detect other constituents like follicle stimulating hormone, estrogen and its conjugate like estrone-1-glucuronide are extensively high (pConclusion: Our results indicated that the salivary hormones like estrogen and its conjugate indicates decrease in ovulatory and postovulatory phase. Further, the environmental toxic materials can also cause problems like infertility. The conclusion is that any physiological effects of estrogen from drinking water will be undetectable in people. The results from hormones suggested that they may be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of ovulation using saliva as the noninvasive specimen.

  8. Glyphosate and its formulations – Toxicity, occupational and environmental exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kwiatkowska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate (N-(phosphonomethylglycine is an active ingredient of the most widely used herbicide formulations in protecting agricultural and horticultural crops. Numerous results (mostly published in the years 2010-2013 concerning the action of glyphosate and its formulations in the recent decade were analyzed. Initial reports about alleged biodegradability of glyphosate in the environment turned out to be wrong. It has been shown that glyphosate remains in the soil and can reach people by spreading along with groundwater. Recent publications have shown that glyphosate is detected at low concentrations in the human blood. Publications cited in this article, which indicate a possible induction of neoplastic changes by glyphosate formulation, have raised great concern and controversy in the scientific world. Presenting adverse effects of glyphosate and its formulations we focused on the role of glyphosate formulations in hormonal disorders by impeding the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the inhibition of aromatase activity. The impact of glyphosate on oxygen reactive species formation, changes in redox system and the effect on necrosis and apoptosis in various types of cells was shown. We also revealed that glyphosate as a phosphonate herbicide does not inhibit directly the activity of acetylcholinesterase. Based on numerous studies it was noted that commercial formulations of glyphosate exhibit higher toxicity than that of the active substance itself. The discussed problems clearly show the need to evaluate the toxicity of glyphosate and its formulations and related potential threat to humans. Med Pr 2013;64(5:717–729

  9. Farmers’ Exposure to Pesticides: Toxicity Types and Ways of Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Damalas, Christos A.; KOUTROUBAS, Spyridon D.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic pesticides are extensively used in agriculture to control harmful pests and prevent crop yield losses or product damage. Because of high biological activity and, in certain cases, long persistence in the environment, pesticides may cause undesirable effects to human health and to the environment. Farmers are routinely exposed to high levels of pesticides, usually much greater than those of consumers. Farmers’ exposure mainly occurs during the preparation and application of the pesti...

  10. Farmers’ Exposure to Pesticides: Toxicity Types and Ways of Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Damalas, Christos A.; KOUTROUBAS, Spyridon D.

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic pesticides are extensively used in agriculture to control harmful pests and prevent crop yield losses or product damage. Because of high biological activity and, in certain cases, long persistence in the environment, pesticides may cause undesirable effects to human health and to the environment. Farmers are routinely exposed to high levels of pesticides, usually much greater than those of consumers. Farmers’ exposure mainly occurs during the preparation and application of the pesti...

  11. Childhood trauma exposure and toxic stress: what the PNP needs to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornor, Gail

    2015-01-01

    Trauma exposure in childhood is a major public health problem that can result in lifelong mental and physical health consequences. Pediatric nurse practitioners must improve their skills in the identification of trauma exposure in children and their interventions with these children. This continuing education article will describe childhood trauma exposure (adverse childhood experiences) and toxic stress and their effects on the developing brain and body. Adverse childhood experiences include a unique set of trauma exposures. The adverse childhood experiences or trauma discussed in this continuing education offering will include childhood exposure to emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, domestic violence, household substance abuse, household mental illness, parental separation or divorce, and a criminal household member. Thorough and efficient methods of screening for trauma exposure will be discussed. Appropriate intervention after identification of trauma exposure will be explored.

  12. Copper pellets simulating oral exposure to copper ammunition: Absence of toxicity in American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian; Lahner, Lesanna L.; Meteyer, Carol U.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the potential toxicity of copper (Cu) in raptors that may consume Cu bullets, shotgun pellets containing Cu, or Cu fragments as they feed on wildlife carcasses, we studied the effects of metallic Cu exposure in a surrogate, the American kestrel (Falco sparverius). Sixteen kestrels were orally administered 5 mg Cu/g body mass in the form of Cu pellets (1.18–2.00 mm in diameter) nine times during 38 days and 10 controls were sham gavaged on the same schedule. With one exception, all birds retained the pellets for at least 1 h, but most (69%) regurgitated pellets during a 12-h monitoring period. Hepatic Cu concentrations were greater in kestrels administered Cu than in controls, but there was no difference in Cu concentrations in the blood between treated and control birds. Concentration of the metal-binding protein metallothionein was greater in male birds that received Cu than in controls, whereas concentrations in female birds that received Cu were similar to control female birds. Hepatic Cu and metallothionein concentrations in kestrels were significantly correlated. Histopathologic alterations were noted in the pancreas of four treated kestrels and two controls, but these changes were not associated with hepatic or renal Cu concentrations, and no lesions were seen in other tissues. No clinical signs were observed, and there was no treatment effect on body mass; concentrations of Cu, hemoglobin, or methemoglobin in the blood; or Cu concentrations in kidney, plasma biochemistries, or hematocrit. Based on the parameters we measured, ingested Cu pellets pose little threat to American kestrels (and presumably phylogenetically related species), although the retention time of pellets in the stomach was of relatively short duration. Birds expected to regurgitate Cu fragments with a frequency similar to kestrels are not likely to be adversely affected by Cu ingestion, but the results of our study do not completely rule out the potential for toxicity in

  13. Interactions among contaminant exposure route, kinetics and toxicity in marine deposit-feeders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selck, Henriette

    as the organic model compound, and cadmium (Cd) as the inorganic compound. Worms were exposed either to dissolved (i.e. ... in this thesis, and earlier published literature, that exposure route does matter both for toxicokinetics and toxicity (i.e. critical body residue) of inorganic- and organic contaminants. Exposure to dissolved contaminants resulted in a lower body-burden, reduced elimination rate and increased toxicity (i......Many of the chemicals having the greatest likelihood of causing damage in ecological systems, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals are of persistent and/or hydrophobic character. Deposit-feeders may be important in facilitating the removal of organic contaminants from bulk...

  14. Acute toxic effects of nerve agent VX on respiratory dynamics and functions following microinsillation inhalation exposure in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Peter E; Graham, Jacob R; Moran, Theodore S; Gordon, Richard K; Sciuto, Alfred M; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2007-03-01

    Exposure to a chemical warfare nerve agent (CWNA) leads to severe respiratory distress, respiratory failure, or death if not treated. We investigated the toxic effects of nerve agent VX on the respiratory dynamics of guinea pigs following exposure to 90.4 mug/m3 of VX or saline by microinstillation inhalation technology for 10 min. Respiratory parameters were monitored by whole-body barometric plethysmography at 4, 24, and 48 h, 7 d, 18 d, and 4 wk after VX exposure. VX-exposed animals showed a significant decrease in the respiratory frequency (RF) at 24 and 48 h of recovery (p value .0329 and .0142, respectively) compared to the saline control. The tidal volume (TV) slightly increased in VX exposed animals at 24 and significantly at 48 h (p = .02) postexposure. Minute ventilation (MV) increased slightly at 4 h but was reduced at 24 h and remained unchanged at 48 h. Animals exposed to VX also showed an increase in expiratory (Te) and relaxation time (RT) at 24 and 48 h and a small reduction in inspiratory time (Ti) at 24 h. A significant increase in end expiratory pause (EEP) was observed at 48 h after VX exposure (p = .049). The pseudo lung resistance (Penh) was significantly increased at 4 h after VX exposure and remained slightly high even at 48 h. Time-course studies reveal that most of the altered respiratory dynamics returned to normal at 7 d after VX exposure except for EEP, which was high at 7 d and returned to normal at 18 d postexposure. After 1 mo, all the monitored respiratory parameters were within normal ranges. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 1 mo after exposure showed virtually no difference in protein levels, cholinesterase levels, cell number, and cell death in the exposed and control animals. These results indicate that sublethal concentrations of VX induce changes in respiratory dynamics and functions that over time return to normal levels.

  15. Toxic Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs in the Atmospheric Environment: Regulatory Aspects and Monitoring in Japan and Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Tien Tsai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, hazardous air pollutants (HAPs, so-called air toxics or toxic air pollutants, have been detected in the atmospheric air at low concentration levels, causing public concern about the adverse effect of long-term exposure to HAPs on human health. Most HAPs belong to volatile organic compounds (VOCs. More seriously, most of them are known carcinogens or probably carcinogenic to humans. The objectives of this paper were to report the regulatory aspects and environmental monitoring management of toxic VOCs designated by Japan and Korea under the Air Pollution Control Act, and the Clean Air Conservation Act, respectively. It can be found that the environmental quality standards and environmental monitoring of priority VOCs (i.e., benzene, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and dichloromethane have been set and taken by the state and local governments of Japan since the early 2000, but not completely established in Korea. On the other hand, the significant progress in reducing the emissions of some toxic VOCs, including acrylonitrile, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,2-dichloroethane, dichloromethane, chloroform, tetrachloroethylene, and trichloroethylene in Japan was also described as a case study in the brief report paper.

  16. Toxic metal accumulation, responses to exposure and mechanisms of tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, S

    2006-11-01

    Over the past 200 years emissions of toxic heavy metals have risen tremendously and significantly exceed those from natural sources for practically all metals. Uptake and accumulation by crop plants represents the main entry pathway for potentially health-threatening toxic metals into human and animal food. Of major concern are the metalloids arsenic (As) and selenium (Se), and the metals cadmium (Cd), mercury (Hg), and lead (Pb). This review discusses the molecular mechanisms of toxic metal accumulation in plants and algae, the responses to metal exposure, as well as our understanding of metal tolerance and its evolution. The main emphasis will be on cadmium, which is by far the most widely studied of the non-essential toxic metals/metalloids. Entry via Zn2+, Fe2+, and Ca2+ transporters is the molecular basis of Cd2+ uptake into plant cells. Much less is known about the partitioning of non-essential metals and about the genes underlying the enormous diversity among plants with respect to Cd accumulation in different tissues. Numerous studies have described symptoms and responses of plants upon toxic metal exposure. Mysterious are primary targets of toxicity, the degree of specificity of responses, the sensing and the signaling events that lead to transcriptional activation. All plants apparently possess a basal tolerance of toxic non-essential metals. For Cd and As, this is largely dependent on the phytochelatin pathway. Not understood is the molecular biology of Cd hypertolerance in certain plant species such as the metallophytes Arabidopsis halleri or Thlaspi caerulescens.

  17. Engineered Nanomaterials: Knowledge Gaps in Fate, Exposure, Toxicity, and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to identify current knowledge gaps in fate, exposure, and toxicity of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs, highlight research gaps, and suggest future research directions. Humans and other living organisms are exposed to ENMs during production or use of products containing them. To assess the hazards of ENMs, it is important to assess their physiochemical properties and try to relate them to any observed hazard. However, the full determination of these relationships is currently limited by the lack of empirical data. Moreover, most toxicity studies do not use realistic environmental exposure conditions for determining dose-response parameters, affecting the accurate estimation of health risks associated with the exposure to ENMs. Regulatory aspects of nanotechnology are still developing and are currently the subject of much debate. Synthesis of available studies suggests a number of open questions. These include (i developing a combination of different analytical methods for determining ENM concentration, size, shape, surface properties, and morphology in different environmental media, (ii conducting toxicity studies using environmentally relevant exposure conditions and obtaining data relevant to developing quantitative nanostructure-toxicity relationships (QNTR, and (iii developing guidelines for regulating exposure of ENMs in the environment.

  18. Toxicity of linear alkylbenzene sulfonate in anaerobic digestion: influence of exposure time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mösche, M; Meyer, U

    2002-07-01

    The inhibition of anaerobic digestion by the anionic surfactant linear alkylbenzene sulfonate was studied. The development of bacterial activity during several weeks was monitored by performing batch degradation tests with acetate and propionate. In the first phase the decay of activity without surfactant addition was studied. After the addition of the surfactant an immediate inhibition was detected. Subsequently, the degradation activity continued to decrease with increasing exposure time. Both, the immediate inhibition and the rate of the subsequent decrease of activity were dependent on the surfactant concentration. A kinetic model is presented that describes this behavior. A surfactant concentration of 14 mg L(-1) causes a 50% immediate inhibition of acetate degradation (27 mg L(-1) in the case of propionate degradation). Additionally, each 12 mg L(-1) of surfactant increases the decay rate of acetate degradation activity by a factor 10 (23 mg L(-1) for propionate degradation). A deviation from this model occurs at low surfactant concentrations (<3 mg L(-1)), where a slight stimulation of bacterial activity was observed. The above-mentioned concentrations refer to measured surfactant concentrations. These were substantially lower than the nominal concentrations (added surfactant per volume). This discrepancy is explained by adsorption of the surfactant to the biomass. Finally, the importance of the presented kinetic model and the significance of surfactant toxicity for anaerobic digestion are discussed.

  19. Real-time monitoring of oxygen uptake in hepatic bioreactor shows CYP450-independent mitochondrial toxicity of acetaminophen and amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prill, Sebastian; Bavli, Danny; Levy, Gahl; Ezra, Elishai; Schmälzlin, Elmar; Jaeger, Magnus S; Schwarz, Michael; Duschl, Claus; Cohen, Merav; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2016-05-01

    Prediction of drug-induced toxicity is complicated by the failure of animal models to extrapolate human response, especially during assessment of repeated dose toxicity for cosmetic or chronic drug treatments. In this work, we present a 3D microreactor capable of maintaining metabolically active HepG2/C3A spheroids for over 28 days in vitro under stable oxygen gradients mimicking the in vivo microenvironment. Mitochondrial respiration was monitored using two-frequency phase modulation of phosphorescent microprobes embedded in the tissue. Phase modulation is focus independent and unaffected by cell death or migration. This sensitive measurement of oxygen dynamics revealed important information on the drug mechanism of action and transient subthreshold effects. Specifically, exposure to antiarrhythmic agent, amiodarone, showed that both respiration and the time to onset of mitochondrial damage were dose dependent showing a TC50 of 425 μm. Analysis showed significant induction of both phospholipidosis and microvesicular steatosis during long-term exposure. Importantly, exposure to widely used analgesic, acetaminophen, caused an immediate, reversible, dose-dependent loss of oxygen uptake followed by a slow, irreversible, dose-independent death, with a TC50 of 12.3 mM. Transient loss of mitochondrial respiration was also detected below the threshold of acetaminophen toxicity. The phenomenon was repeated in HeLa cells that lack CYP2E1 and 3A4, and was blocked by preincubation with ascorbate and TMPD. These results mark the importance of tracing toxicity effects over time, suggesting a NAPQI-independent targeting of mitochondrial complex III might be responsible for acetaminophen toxicity in extrahepatic tissues.

  20. Development of pulmonary oxygen toxicity in rats after hyperoxic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siermontowski Piotr

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effects of hyperbaric oxygen on lung aeration on an animal experimental model and compare the obtained results with the anticipated scope of damage to pulmonary parenchyma in humans under the same exposure conditions. The research was carried out on Black Hood rats that were kept in a hyperbaric chamber designed for animals in an atmosphere of pure oxygen and at overpressures of 0.15, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 MPa for 1, 2 or 4 h. After sacrificing the animals, histopathological specimens were obtained encompassing cross-sections of entire lungs, which were subjected to qualitative and quantitative examination with the use of the 121-point Haug grid. A statistically significant decrease in pulmonary parenchyma was observed as a result of an increasing oxygen partial pressure as well as with prolonged exposure time. The intensification of changes observed was much higher than expected on the basis of calculations performed with the use of tables.

  1. Biological monitoring of exposure to tebuconazole in winegrowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, Silvia; Mercadante, Rosa; Polledri, Elisa; Rubino, Federico Maria; Mandic-Rajcevic, Stefan; Vianello, Giorgio; Colosio, Claudio; Moretto, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Tebuconazole (TEB) is a fungicide widely used in vineyards and is a suspected teratogen for humans. The aim of this research was to identify urinary biomarkers and the best sampling time for the biological monitoring of exposure to TEB in agricultural workers. Seven vineyard workers of the Monferrato region, Piedemont, Italy, were investigated for a total of 12 workdays. They treated the vineyards with TEB for 1-2 consecutive days, one of them for 3 days. During each application coveralls, underwears, hand washing liquids and head coverings were used to estimate dermal exposure. For biomonitoring, spot samples of urine from each individual were collected starting from 24 h before the first application, continuing during the application, and again after the application for about 48 h. TEB and its metabolites TEB-OH and TEB-COOH were measured by liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. TEB contamination of coveralls and total dermal exposure showed median levels of 6180 and 1020 μg. Urinary TEB-OH was the most abundant metabolite; its excretion rate peaked within 24 h after product application (post 24 h). In this time frame, median levels of TEB-OH and TEB-COOH ranged from 8.0 to 387.8 μg/l and from 5.7 to 102.9 μg/l, respectively, with a ratio between the two metabolites of about 3.5. The total amount of urinary metabolites (U-TEBeq) post 24 h was significantly correlated with both TEB on coveralls and total dermal exposure (Pearson's r=0.756 and 0.577). The amount of metabolites excreted in urine represented about 17% of total dermal TEB exposure. Our results suggest that TEB-OH and TEB-COOH in post-exposure urine samples are promising candidates for biomonitoring TEB exposure in agricultural workers.

  2. Comparison of sarin and cyclosarin toxicity by subcutaneous, intravenous and inhalation exposure in Gottingen minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Stanley W; Sommerville, Douglas R; Miller, Dennis B; Scotto, Jacqueline A; Muse, William T; Burnett, David C

    2014-02-01

    Sexually mature male and female Gottingen minipigs were exposed to various concentrations of GB and GF vapor via whole-body inhalation exposures or to liquid GB or GF via intravenous or subcutaneous injections. Vapor inhalation exposures were for 10, 60 or 180 min. Maximum likelihood estimation was used to calculate the median effect levels for severe effects (ECT50 and ED50) and lethality (LCT50 and LD50). Ordinal regression was used to model the concentration × time profile of the agent toxicity. Contrary to that predicted by Haber's rule, LCT50 values increased as the duration of the exposures increased for both nerve agents. The toxic load exponents (n) were calculated to be 1.38 and 1.28 for GB and GF vapor exposures, respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in male minipigs were 73, 106 and 182 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60 - and 180-min exposures to vapor GB in female minipigs were 87, 127 and 174 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures to vapor GF in male minipigs were 218, 287 and 403 mg min/m(3), respectively. LCT50 values for 10-, 60- and 180-min exposures in female minipigs were 183, 282 and 365 mg min/m(3), respectively. For GB vapor exposures, there was a tenuous gender difference which did not exist for vapor GF exposures. Surprisingly, GF was 2-3 times less potent than GB via the inhalation route of exposure regardless of exposure duration. Additionally GF was found to be less potent than GB by intravenous and subcutaneous routes.

  3. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  4. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  5. Physiologic assessment of fetal compromise: biomarkers of toxic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, L.D.

    1987-10-01

    Understanding the physiologic and endocrinologic basis of fetal development is a major goal of perinatal biology. During the past decade a number of technological developments have allowed more precise evaluation of the fetus in utero and diagnosis of abnormalities. Despite these methodological achievements, however, there are no specific biological markers currently available to indicate that exposure to a given xenobiotic is associated with a cellular, subcellular, or pharmacodynamic event. This paper evaluates the following issues: what are some of the unique physiologic and endocrinologic features of the fetal milieu interieur. What problems are peculiar to fetal assessment. What are some examples of validated biomarkers and their applicability. What promising biomarkers are on the horizon. How may molecular probes be of value as biological markers of fetal compromise. What are some of the major research gaps and needs, and how should research priorities be set. Some of these topics are addressed. Moreover, the more general role(s) that various diagnostic methods and biological markers can have in an understanding of the regulation of fetal growth and differentiation and the role of xenobiotics in affecting the normal course of events are discussed.

  6. Pulmonary toxicity following exposure to a tile coating product containing alkylsiloxanes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, P.; Nørgaard, A. W.; Hansen, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    . Thirty-nine persons, who reported respiratory and systemic symptoms following exposure to the tile-coating product, were clinically examined. The product was analysed chemically and furthermore, the exposure scenario was reconstructed using a climate chamber and the toxicological properties......-dependent changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol. Conclusion. Workers need to cautiously apply surface coating products because the contents can be highly toxic through inhalation, and the aerosols can disperse to locations remote from the worksite and affect bystanders.......Context. Coating products are widely used for making surfaces water and dirt repellent. However, on several occasions the use of these products has been associated with lung toxicity. Objective. In the present study, we evaluated the toxic effects of an aerosolized tile-coating product. Methods...

  7. TEARHS - Modelling toxic impacts on the airway system from exposure to fluctuating concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, N.J.; Markert, Frank; Ott, Søren

    2000-01-01

    information on toxic effects and the relevant time scale for exposure. Concentration-time-fatality relations areobtained from experiments with rats down to 5 minutes of exposure. If the information from these relations is extrapolated down to 5 to 10 seconds using different assumptions, the predicted...... to be small, in the order of a few seconds. Considering the aspiration pattern, it is concluded that relevant time scale for absorption in the airways is 5 to 10seconds. In real atmospheric, toxic gas clouds, fluctuations at this time scale are large. There is still a large gap between the empirical...... mortality is quite different. This study indicates thatatmospheric dispersion models for acutely toxic substances need to provide information about concentration fluctuations of time scales of 5 to 10 sec. Final conclusions can only be drawn when it becomes clear how the gap betweenconcentration...

  8. Quality assurance: using the exposure index and the deviation index to monitor radiation exposure for portable chest radiographs in neonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Mervyn D. [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Riley Hospital for Children, Department of Radiology, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Cooper, Matt L.; Piersall, Kelly [Indiana University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Riley Children' s Hospital, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Apgar, Bruce K. [Agfa HealthCare Corporation, Greenville, SC (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Many methods are used to track patient exposure during acquisition of plain film radiographs. A uniform international standard would aid this process. To evaluate and describe a new, simple quality-assurance method for monitoring patient exposure. This method uses the ''exposure index'' and the ''deviation index,'' recently developed by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The deviation index measures variation from an ideal target exposure index value. Our objective was to determine whether the exposure index and the deviation index can be used to monitor and control exposure drift over time. Our Agfa workstation automatically keeps a record of the exposure index for every patient. The exposure index and deviation index were calculated on 1,884 consecutive neonatal chest images. Exposure of a neonatal chest phantom was performed as a control. Acquisition of the exposure index and calculation of the deviation index was easily achieved. The weekly mean exposure index of the phantom and the patients was stable and showed <10% change during the study, indicating no exposure drift during the study period. The exposure index is an excellent tool to monitor the consistency of patient exposures. It does not indicate the exposure value used, but is an index to track compliance with a pre-determined target exposure. (orig.)

  9. Acute and chronic toxicity of sodium sulfate to four freshwater organisms in water-only exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Dorman, Rebecca A; Ingersoll, Christopher G; Hardesty, Doug K; Brumbaugh, William G; Hammer, Edward J; Bauer, Candice R; Mount, David R

    2016-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of sulfate (tested as sodium sulfate) was determined in diluted well water (hardness of 100 mg/L and pH 8.2) with a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 2-d and 7-d exposures), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 4-d and 41-d exposures), a unionid mussel (pink mucket, Lampsilis abrupta; 4-d and 28-d exposures), and a fish (fathead minnow, Pimephales promelas; 4-d and 34-d exposures). Among the 4 species, the cladoceran and mussel were acutely more sensitive to sulfate than the midge and fathead minnow, whereas the fathead minnow was chronically more sensitive than the other 3 species. Acute-to-chronic ratios ranged from 2.34 to 5.68 for the 3 invertebrates but were as high as 12.69 for the fish. The fathead minnow was highly sensitive to sulfate during the transitional period from embryo development to hatching in the diluted well water, and thus, additional short-term (7- to 14-d) sulfate toxicity tests were conducted starting with embryonic fathead minnow in test waters with different ionic compositions at a water hardness of 100 mg/L. Increasing chloride in test water from 10 mg Cl/L to 25 mg Cl/L did not influence sulfate toxicity to the fish, whereas increasing potassium in test water from 1 mg K/L to 3 mg K/L substantially reduced the toxicity of sulfate. The results indicate that both acute and chronic sulfate toxicity data, and the influence of potassium on sulfate toxicity to fish embryos, need to be considered when environmental guidance values for sulfate are developed or refined.

  10. Methodology and biological monitoring of exposure to chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, M.L.; Smith, J.R.; McMonagle, J.D. [Army Medical Research Inst. of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In the past few years, our institute has developed several GC/MS methods for the detection of the breakdown products of toxic organophosphonates (soman, sarin, GF) and vesicant sulfur mustard in biological samples. Recently we developed a modified GC/MS method for VX and are continually working on the methodology for lewisite and tabun. The purpose is to have an analytical tool to verify the exposure of chemical warfare agents in humans. Analytical procedures for quantitating the hydrolyzed phosphonic acids from nerve agents in environmental samples have been reported by many analysts. For more complex matrices such as biological samples, there is not yet a method reported. To make these polar acids amenable to gas chromatographic analysis a prior derivatization is needed. We found the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivatives of the phosphonates are suitable for verification and pharmacokinetic studies in biological samples. This method may also serve as an alternative method for confirmation purposes in environmental samples.

  11. Noncoding RNA response to xenobiotic exposure: an indicator of toxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrone, April K; Beland, Frederick A; Pogribny, Igor P

    2014-10-01

    Human exposure to certain environmental and occupational chemicals is one of the major risk factors for noncommunicable diseases, including cancer. Therefore, it is desirable to take advantage of subtle exposure-related adverse cellular events for early disease detection and to identify potential dangers caused by new and currently under-evaluated drugs and chemicals. Nongenotoxic events due to carcinogen/toxicant exposure are a general hallmark of sustained cellular stress leading to tumorigenesis. These processes are globally regulated via noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Tumorigenesis-associated genotoxic and nongenotoxic events lead to the altered expression of ncRNAs and may provide a mechanistic link between chemical exposure and tumorigenesis. Current advances in toxicogenomics are beginning to provide valuable insight into gene-chemical interactions at the transcriptome level. In this review, we summarize recent information about the impact of xenobiotics on ncRNAs. Evidence highlighted in this review suggests a critical role of ncRNAs in response to carcinogen/toxicant exposure. Benefits for the use of ncRNAs in carcinogenicity assessment include remarkable tissue specificity, early appearance, low baseline variability, and their presence and stability in biological fluids, which suggests that the incorporation of ncRNAs in the evaluation of cancer risk assessment may enhance substantially the efficiency of toxicity and carcinogenicity testing.

  12. Monitoring Toxic Ionic Liquids in Zebrafish (Danio rerio) with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI-MSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Consuelo J.; Tata, Alessandra; de Campos, Michel L.; Peng, Chun; Ifa, Demian R.

    2016-10-01

    Ambient mass spectrometry imaging has become an increasingly powerful technique for the direct analysis of biological tissues in the open environment with minimal sample preparation and fast analysis times. In this study, we introduce desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI-MSI) as a novel, rapid, and sensitive approach to localize the accumulation of a mildly toxic ionic liquid (IL), AMMOENG 130 in zebrafish (Danio rerio). The work demonstrates that DESI-MSI has the potential to rapidly monitor the accumulation of IL pollutants in aquatic organisms. AMMOENG 130 is a quaternary ammonium-based IL reported to be broadly used as a surfactant in commercialized detergents. It is known to exhibit acute toxicity to zebrafish causing extensive damage to gill secondary lamellae and increasing membrane permeability. Zebrafish were exposed to the IL in a static 96-h exposure study in concentrations near the LC50 of 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L. DESI-MS analysis of zebrafish gills demonstrated the appearance of a dealkylated AMMOENG 130 metabolite in the lowest concentration of exposure identified by a high resolution hybrid LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer as the trimethylstearylammonium ion, [C21H46N]+. With DESI-MSI, the accumulation of AMMOENG 130 and its dealkylated metabolite in zebrafish tissue was found in the nervous and respiratory systems. AMMOENG 130 and the metabolite were capable of penetrating the blood brain barrier of the fish with significant accumulation in the brain. Hence, we report for the first time the simultaneous characterization, distribution, and metabolism of a toxic IL in whole body zebrafish analyzed by DESI-MSI. This ambient mass spectrometry imaging technique shows great promise for the direct analysis of biological tissues to qualitatively monitor foreign, toxic, and persistent compounds in aquatic organisms from the environment.

  13. Host Response to Environmental Hazards: Using Literature, Bioinformatics, and Computation to Derive Candidate Biomarkers of Toxic Industrial Chemical Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Biomarkers of Toxic Industrial Chemical Exposure Major Jonathan D. Stallings *1 , Danielle L. Ippolito 1 , Anders Wallqvist 2 , B. Claire McDyre 3 , and...Department of Defense Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications Institute, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center, U.S...data to infer biomarkers of toxic industrial chemicals exposure. Using a computational and relational approach we prioritized militarily relevant

  14. Toxicity assessment in marine sediment for the Terra Nova environmental effects monitoring program (1997-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteway, Sandra A.; Paine, Michael D.; Wells, Trudy A.; DeBlois, Elisabeth M.; Kilgour, Bruce W.; Tracy, Ellen; Crowley, Roger D.; Williams, Urban P.; Janes, G. Gregory

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses toxicity test results on sediments from the Terra Nova offshore oil development. The Terra Nova Field is located on the Grand Banks approximately 350 km southeast of Newfoundland (Canada). The amphipod (Rhepoxynius abronius) survival and solid phase luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, or Microtox) assays were conducted on sediment samples collected from approximately 50 stations per program year around Terra Nova during baseline (1997), prior to drilling, and in 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2008 and 2010 after drilling began. The frequency of toxic responses in the amphipod toxicity test was low. Of the ten stations that were toxic in environmental effects monitoring (EEM) years, only one (station 30(FE)) was toxic in more than one year and could be directly attributed to Terra Nova project activities. In contrast, 65 (18%) of 364 EEM samples were toxic to Microtox. Microtox toxicity in EEM years was not related to distance from Terra Nova drill centres or concentrations of >C10-C21 hydrocarbons or barium, the primary constituents of the synthetic-based drill muds used at Terra Nova. Of the variables tested, fines and strontium levels showed the strongest (positive) correlations with toxicity. Neither fines nor strontium levels were affected by drill cuttings discharge at Terra Nova, except at station 30(FE) (and that station was not toxic to Microtox). Benthic macro-invertebrate abundance, richness and diversity were greater in toxic than in non-toxic sediments. Therefore, Microtox responses indicating toxicity were associated with positive biological responses in the field. This result may have been an indirect function of the increased abundance of most invertebrate taxa in less sandy sediments with higher gravel content, where fines and strontium levels and, consequently, toxicity to Microtox were high; or chemical substances released by biodegradation of organic matter, where invertebrates are abundant, may be toxic to Microtox. Given

  15. Comparison of waterborne and intraperitoneal exposure to fipronil in the Caspian white fish (Rutilus frisii) on acute toxicity and histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshir, Rashid Alijani; Zolgharnein, Hossein; Movahedinia, Abdolali; Salamat, Negin; Zabihi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Fipronil is an effective insecticide widely used in agriculture with potential ecotoxicological consequences. The median lethal dose (LD50) and concentration (LC50) of fipronil in 16.3 g Caspian white fish, Rutilus frisii kutum fingerlings were determined. To determine the LD50, a total of 133 fish were assigned to 19 tanks (7 fish/tank) including one control and 6 treatment groups (300, 450, 550, 650, 750, 850 mg/kg). Fish were injected intraperitoneally and monitored at 96 h. The LD50 of fipronil was 632 mg/kg suggesting it was slightly toxic to the Caspian white fish. To determine LC50, 114 fish were assigned to 19 tanks (6 fish/tank) including one control and 6 treatment groups (300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800 μg/L). The LC50 of fipronil was 572 μg/L, which was highly toxic to the fish. The degree of tissue change (DTC) in vital organs from moribund fish exposed via waterborne exposure showed severe damage (DTC: 71 ± 52 for 700 μg/L) in the gill, including aneurisms, extensive fusion and necrosis. The fish exposed through the intraperitoneal route seemed to have severe lesions (DTC: 66 ± 50 for 750 mg/kg) in the kidney, involving hemorrhage, tubular degeneration and necrosis. The liver had no significant differences in DTC values between the two routes and showed pyknosis and sinusoid dilation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining did not show any histological alterations in the brain but nissl staining showed some alterations in distribution of purkinje cells. Generally, this study showed that the route of exposure to fipronil not only affects its acute toxicity but also determines the main target organs of toxicity and histopathological alterations in Caspian white fish.

  16. Application of metallomic and metabolomic approaches in exposure experiments on laboratory mice for environmental metal toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sevillano, M A; García-Barrera, T; Gómez-Ariza, J L

    2014-02-01

    Metals have a central role in biological systems, regulating numerous cellular processes, and in other cases having toxic or deleterious effects on the metabolism. Hence, the study of metal-induced changes in cellular metabolic pathways is crucial to understanding the biological response associated with environmental issues. In this context, the finding of biomarkers has great interest, representing -omics techniques, such as metallomics and metabolomics, powerful tools for this purpose. The present work evaluates the exposure of mice Mus musculus to toxic metals (As, Cd and Hg), considering the changes induced in both the metallome and metabolome as a consequence of the high genetic homology between Mus musculus/Mus spretus mice, which allows the use of the database from M. musculus to identify the proteins and metabolites expressed by M. spretus. For this purpose a metallomic approach based on size exclusion chromatography (SEC) in combination with other complementary orthogonal separation techniques and heteroelement monitoring by ICP-ORS-qMS was performed, followed by identification of metallobiomolecules by organic mass spectrometry. In addition, simultaneous speciation of selenoproteins and selenometabolites in mouse plasma was accomplished by tandem (double) SEC-(dual) affinity chromatography (AF)-HPLC and online isotope dilution analysis (IDA)-ICP-ORS-qMS. Finally, the simultaneous changes in metabolic expression in mice caused by metal exposure (metabolome) were considered, using direct infusion mass spectrometry (DI-ESI-QqQ-TOF-MS) of extracts from mice plasma. Subsequently altered metabolites were identified using MS/MS experiments. The results obtained under controlled conditions were extrapolated to homologous free-living mice captured in Doñana National Park (DNP) and surroundings (southwest Spain) affected by As, Cd and Hg pollution. In summary, such studies are needed to understand the effect of heavy metal exposure and cope with heavy metal

  17. Personal and ambient exposures to air toxics in Camden, New Jersey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioy, Paul J; Fan, Zhihua; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos; Wang, Sheng-Wei; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Wu, Xiangmei; Zhu, Xianlei; Harrington, Jason; Tang, Xiaogang; Meng, Qingyu; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Kwon, Jaymin; Hernandez, Marta; Bonnano, Linda; Held, Joann; Neal, John

    2011-08-01

    Personal exposures and ambient concentrations of air toxics were characterized in a pollution "hot spot" and an urban reference site, both in Camden, New Jersey. The hot spot was the city's Waterfront South neighborhood; the reference site was a neighborhood, about 1 km to the east, around the intersection of Copewood and Davis streets. Using personal exposure measurements, residential ambient air measurements, statistical analyses, and exposure modeling, we examined the impact of local industrial and mobile pollution sources, particularly diesel trucks, on personal exposures and ambient concentrations in the two neighborhoods. Presented in the report are details of our study design, sample and data collection methods, data- and model-analysis approaches, and results and key findings of the study. In summary, 107 participants were recruited from nonsmoking households, including 54 from Waterfront South and 53 from the Copewood-Davis area. Personal air samples were collected for 24 hr and measured for 32 target compounds--11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs*), four aldehydes, 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and particulate matter (PM) with an aerodynamic diameter personal monitoring, ambient concentrations of the target compounds were measured at two fixed monitoring sites, one each in the Waterfront South and Copewood-Davis neighborhoods. To understand the potential impact of local sources of air toxics on personal exposures caused by temporal (weekdays versus weekend days) and seasonal (summer versus winter) variations in source intensities of the air toxics, four measurements were made of each subject, two in summer and two in winter. Within each season, one measurement was made on a weekday and the other on a weekend day. A baseline questionnaire and a time diary with an activity questionnaire were administered to each participant in order to obtain information that could be used to understand personal exposure to specific air toxics measured during

  18. Toxicity assessment of Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella protothecoides following exposure to Pb(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xiong, Bang; Chen, Lin; Lin, Kuangfei; Cui, Xinhong; Bi, Huasong; Guo, Meijin; Wang, Weiliang

    2013-07-01

    The short- and long-term toxic effects of Pb(II) exposure on Chlorella vulgaris (C. vulgaris) and Chlorella protothecoides (C. protothecoides) were not well understood. The lab study was performed to observe the Pb(II) exposure induced changes. Results of the observations show: (1) higher level of Pb(II) (50 or 80mgL(-1)) could significantly inhibit the growth and chlorophyll a synthesis of both algae in almost all the treatments and dose-response relationships could be clearly observed, (2) the range of EC50 values (24-120h, 67.73-172.45mgL(-1)) indicated that Pb(II) had a relatively limited short-term toxicity to the two algae, while long-term tests (7-28d, 50.41-63.91mgL(-1)) displayed higher toxicity and (3) SOD and CAT activities of both algae after exposed to medium level of Pb(II) were significantly promoted, and their response might be more susceptible in short-term exposure. This research provides a basic understanding of Pb(II) toxicity to aquatic organisms.

  19. Estimating children's exposure to toxic elements in contaminated toys and children's jewelry via saliva mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guney, Mert; Nguyen, Alain; Zagury, Gerald J

    2014-09-19

    Children's potential for exposure to potentially toxic elements in contaminated jewelry and toys via mouth contact has not yet been fully evaluated. Various toys and jewelry (metallic toys and jewelry [MJ], plastic toys, toys with paint or coating, and brittle/pliable toys; n = 32) were tested using the saliva extraction (mouthing) compartment of the DIN and RIVM bioaccessibility protocols to assess As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb, and Se mobilization via saliva. Total concentrations of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Sb were found elevated in analyzed samples. Four metals were mobilized to saliva from 16 MJ in significant quantities (>1 μg for highly toxic Cd and Pb, >10 μg for Cu and Ni). Bioaccessible concentrations and hazard index values for Cd exceeded limit values, for young children between 6 mo- and 3 yr-old and according to both protocols. Total and bioaccessible metal concentrations were different and not always correlated, encouraging the use of bioaccessibility for more accurate hazard assessments. Bioaccessibility increased with increasing extraction time. Overall, the risk from exposure to toxic elements via mouthing was high only for Cd and for MJ. Further research on children's exposure to toxic elements following ingestion of toy or jewelry material is recommended.

  20. Relationship between lethal toxicity in oral administration and injection to mice: effect of exposure routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Ning, Zhong H; Tai, Hong W; Long, Shuang; Qin, Wei C; Su, Li M; Zhao, Yuan H

    2015-03-01

    The lethal toxicity (LD₅₀) in oral administration, intravenous, intraperitoneal, intramuscular and subcutaneous injections were used to investigate relationships of log 1/LD₅₀ from different exposure routes. Regression analysis showed that log 1/LD₅₀ in oral route was related to the toxicity in injection route. This relationship in lethality between the two routes is apparently due to the same mechanisms of the compounds to the same species. However, the scatter in the correlation curve indicates that exposure route is an important factor that influences the relationship. Some compounds with low intestinal absorption exhibit much less toxicity in oral administration than that in the injection route. A systemic bias of log 1/LD₅₀ between oral and injection routes indicates that tissue distribution of compounds between blood and target site is a very rapid process, leading to log 1/LD₅₀ in injection greater than those in oral administration. Although compounds can be metabolized in the body both from oral and injection routes, first-pass metabolism occurs in oral route but not in injection route. This will result in decrease of toxicity in oral route for most compounds as compared with injection route. In addition, experimental uncertainty, differences in gender, and species can also affect relationships of log1/LD₅₀ between exposure routes.

  1. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedel, Erik Q., E-mail: Erik.Roedel@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Cafasso, Danielle E., E-mail: Danielle.Cafasso@amedd.army.mil [Department of General Surgery, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Lee, Karen W.M., E-mail: Karen.W.Lee@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States); Pierce, Lisa M., E-mail: Lisa.Pierce@amedd.army.mil [Department of Clinical Investigation, Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI 96859 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24 h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals. -- Highlights: ► Intratracheal instillation of W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe induces lung inflammation in rats. ► W–Ni–Co and W–Ni–Fe alter expression of oxidative stress and toxicity genes. ► W

  2. Chronic fluoride exposure-induced testicular toxicity is associated with inflammatory response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ruifen; Luo, Guangying; Sun, Zilong; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Jundong

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that fluoride (F) can affect testicular toxicity in humans and rodents. However, the mechanism underlying F-induced testicular toxicity is not well understood. This study was conducted to evaluate the sperm quality, testicular histomorphology and inflammatory response in mice followed F exposure. Healthy male mice were randomly divided into four groups with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 0, 25, 50, 100 mg/L in the drinking water for 180 days. At the end of the exposure, significantly increased percentage of spermatozoa abnormality was found in mice exposed to 50 and 100 mg/L NaF. Disorganized spermatogenic cells, vacuoles in seminiferous tubules and loss and shedding of sperm cells were also observed in the NaF treated group. In addition, chronic F exposure increased testicular interleukin-17(IL-17), interleukin-17 receptor C (IL-17RC), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in transcriptional levels, as well as IL-17 and TNF-α levels in translational levels. Interestingly, we observed that F treated group elevated testicular inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) mRNA level and nitric oxide (NO) concentration. Taken together, these results indicated that testicular inflammatory response could contribute to chronic F exposure induced testicular toxicity in mice.

  3. Salicylate Toxicity from Genital Exposure to a Methylsalicylate-Containing Rubefacient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevonne M. Thompson, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methylsalicylate-containing rubefacients have been reported to cause salicylate poisoning after ingestion, topical application to abnormal skin, and inappropriate topical application to normal skin. Many over-the-counter products contain methylsalicylate. Topical salicylates rarely produce systemic toxicity when used appropriately; however, methylsaliclyate can be absorbed through intact skin. Scrotal skin can have up to 40-fold greater absorption compared to other dermal regions. We report a unique case of salicylate poisoning resulting from the use of a methylsalicylate-containing rubefacient to facilitate masturbation in a male teenager. Saliclyate toxicity has not previously been reported from the genital exposure to methylsaliclyate.

  4. Developmental toxicity from exposure to various forms of mercury compounds in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wei, Lixin; Jingfeng, Yang; Chernick, Melissa; Hinton, David E.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined developmental toxicity of different mercury compounds, including some used in traditional medicines. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) embryos were exposed to 0.001–10 µM concentrations of MeHg, HgCl2, α-HgS (Zhu Sha), and β-HgS (Zuotai) from stage 10 (6–7 hpf) to 10 days post fertilization (dpf). Of the forms of mercury in this study, the organic form (MeHg) proved the most toxic followed by inorganic mercury (HgCl2), both producing embryo developmental toxicity. Altered phenotypes included pericardial edema with elongated or tube heart, reduction of eye pigmentation, and failure of swim bladder inflation. Both α-HgS and β-HgS were less toxic than MeHg and HgCl2. Total RNA was extracted from survivors three days after exposure to MeHg (0.1 µM), HgCl2 (1 µM), α-HgS (10 µM), or β-HgS (10 µM) to examine toxicity-related gene expression. MeHg and HgCl2 markedly induced metallothionein (MT) and heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1), while α-HgS and β-HgS failed to induce either gene. Chemical forms of mercury compounds proved to be a major determinant in their developmental toxicity. PMID:27635309

  5. Developmental toxicity from exposure to various forms of mercury compounds in medaka fish (Oryzias latipes embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Dong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examined developmental toxicity of different mercury compounds, including some used in traditional medicines. Medaka (Oryzias latipes embryos were exposed to 0.001–10 µM concentrations of MeHg, HgCl2, α-HgS (Zhu Sha, and β-HgS (Zuotai from stage 10 (6–7 hpf to 10 days post fertilization (dpf. Of the forms of mercury in this study, the organic form (MeHg proved the most toxic followed by inorganic mercury (HgCl2, both producing embryo developmental toxicity. Altered phenotypes included pericardial edema with elongated or tube heart, reduction of eye pigmentation, and failure of swim bladder inflation. Both α-HgS and β-HgS were less toxic than MeHg and HgCl2. Total RNA was extracted from survivors three days after exposure to MeHg (0.1 µM, HgCl2 (1 µM, α-HgS (10 µM, or β-HgS (10 µM to examine toxicity-related gene expression. MeHg and HgCl2 markedly induced metallothionein (MT and heme oxygenase-1 (Ho-1, while α-HgS and β-HgS failed to induce either gene. Chemical forms of mercury compounds proved to be a major determinant in their developmental toxicity.

  6. A simple control for sediment-toxicity exposures using the amphipod, Hyalella azteca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasier, Peter J; Urich, Matthew L

    2014-09-01

    Sediment-toxicity exposures comparing survival and growth of the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca, are often components of aquatic-habitat assessments. Standardized exposure methods have been established and require evaluations for quality assurance. Test acceptability using performance-based criteria can be determined from exposures to control sediments, which are collected from the environment or formulated from commercially available components. Amending sand with leached alfalfa solids provided a simple formulated sediment that elicited consistently acceptable survival and growth in 28-day exposures with and without a daily feeding regime. A procedure is described for preparing the sediment along with results from comparisons among sand, amended sand, and field-collected sediments that incorporated three feeding regimes.

  7. Feeding behavior of the invasive bivalve Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857 under exposure to toxic cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Gazulha

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test the effects of cyanobacteria toxicity on feeding behavior of the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei. First, it was tested the hypothesis that L. fortunei preferentially graze on non-toxic phytoplankton and reject toxic cyanobacteria. Second, it was tested the hypothesis that toxic cyanobacteria negatively affect feeding and survival of L. fortunei. The present study is the first to evaluate the effects of toxic cyanobacteria on L. fortunei feeding and survival. In the short-term grazing, golden mussel filtration rates were evaluated in the presence of toxic and non-toxic strains of cyanobacteria Microcystis aeruginosa, and non-toxic phytoplankton Nitzschia palea. Highest filtration rates were registered when mussels fed on Nitzschia. Despite that, golden mussel expelled Nitzschia cells in large quantities and preferentially ingested Microcystis cells, both toxic and non-toxic strains. In the long-term grazing, mussels were exposed to toxic and non-toxic strains of Microcystis during 5 days. Filtration rates were not significantly different for toxic and non-toxic Microcystis throughout exposure period. The results have demonstrated cyanobacteria toxicity is not the main factor influencing L. fortunei feeding behavior. Survival of L. fortunei feeding on toxic cyanobacteria shows the potential of this invasive bivalve as a vector to the transference of cyanotoxins to higher trophic levels.

  8. Toxicogenomic and phenotypic analyses of bisphenol-A early-life exposure toxicity in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Hong Lam

    Full Text Available Bisphenol-A is an important environmental contaminant due to the increased early-life exposure that may pose significant health-risks to various organisms including humans. This study aimed to use zebrafish as a toxicogenomic model to capture transcriptomic and phenotypic changes for inference of signaling pathways, biological processes, physiological systems and identify potential biomarker genes that are affected by early-life exposure to bisphenol-A. Phenotypic analysis using wild-type zebrafish larvae revealed BPA early-life exposure toxicity caused cardiac edema, cranio-facial abnormality, failure of swimbladder inflation and poor tactile response. Fluorescent imaging analysis using three transgenic lines revealed suppressed neuron branching from the spinal cord, abnormal development of neuromast cells, and suppressed vascularization in the abdominal region. Using knowledge-based data mining algorithms, transcriptome analysis suggests that several signaling pathways involving ephrin receptor, clathrin-mediated endocytosis, synaptic long-term potentiation, axonal guidance, vascular endothelial growth factor, integrin and tight junction were deregulated. Physiological systems with related disorders associated with the nervous, cardiovascular, skeletal-muscular, blood and reproductive systems were implicated, hence corroborated with the phenotypic analysis. Further analysis identified a common set of BPA-targeted genes and revealed a plausible mechanism involving disruption of endocrine-regulated genes and processes in known susceptible tissue-organs. The expression of 28 genes were validated in a separate experiment using quantitative real-time PCR and 6 genes, ncl1, apoeb, mdm1, mycl1b, sp4, U1SNRNPBP homolog, were found to be sensitive and robust biomarkers for BPA early-life exposure toxicity. The susceptibility of sp4 to BPA perturbation suggests its role in altering brain development, function and subsequently behavior observed in

  9. Toxic effects of maternal zearalenone exposure on uterine capacity and fetal development in gestation rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Jia, Zhiqiang; Yin, Shutong; Shan, Anshan; Gao, Rui; Qu, Zhe; Liu, Min; Nie, Shaoping

    2014-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of high-dose and early gestational exposure to zearalenone (ZEN) in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, to correlate the maternal uterus with the fetus, and to explore the development and malformation of fetuses. Pregnant female SD rats were fed diets containing 0.3, 48.5, 97.6, or 146.0 mg/kg ZEN on gestational days (GDs) 0 through 7. All the females survived until GD 20, at which point a cesarean section was performed to harvest the organs, blood, and fetuses. The results indicated that exposure to ZEN during early gestation can impact the maternal reproductive capability. Delayed fetal development was directly linked to maternal toxicity. The toxic effects of ZEN caused early deaths more frequently than late deaths, and the deleterious effects lasted through the end of pregnancy.

  10. New applications of biological monitoring for environmental exposure and susceptibility monitoring. Report of the 7th International Symposium on Biological Monitoring in Occupational and Environmental Health.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Heussen, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Validated biological monitoring methods are used in large-scale monitoring programmes involving determination of ubiquitous environmental pollutants such as metals and pesticides. Some programmes focus on children's exposure, and policies to prevent adverse health effects. Most of these initiatives

  11. New applications of biological monitoring for environmental exposure and susceptibility monitoring. Report of the 7th International Symposium on Biological Monitoring in Occupational and Environmental Health.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, P.T.J.; Heussen, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Validated biological monitoring methods are used in large-scale monitoring programmes involving determination of ubiquitous environmental pollutants such as metals and pesticides. Some programmes focus on children's exposure, and policies to prevent adverse health effects. Most of these initiatives

  12. Effects of reduced mitochondrial DNA content on secondary mitochondrial toxicant exposure in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Anthony L; Meyer, Joel N

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) is intimately linked to cellular and organismal health, as demonstrated by the fact that mutations in and depletion of mtDNA result in severe mitochondrial disease in humans. However, cells contain hundreds to thousands of copies of mtDNA, which provides genetic redundancy, and creates a threshold effect in which a large percentage of mtDNA must be lost prior to clinical pathogenesis. As certain pharmaceuticals and genetic mutations can result in depletion of mtDNA, and as many environmental toxicants target mitochondria, it is important to understand whether reduced mtDNA will sensitize an individual to toxicant exposure. Here, using ethidium bromide (EtBr), which preferentially inhibits mtDNA replication, we reduced mtDNA 35-55% in the in vivo model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. Chronic, lifelong, low-dose EtBr exposure did not disrupt nematode development or lifespan, and induced only mild alterations in mitochondrial respiration, while having no effect on steady-state ATP levels. Next, we exposed nematodes with reduced mtDNA to the known and suspected mitochondrial toxicants aflatoxin B1, arsenite, paraquat, rotenone or ultraviolet C radiation (UVC). EtBr pre-exposure resulted in mild sensitization of nematodes to UVC and arsenite, had no effect on AfB1 and paraquat, and provided some protection from rotenone toxicity. These mixed results provide a first line of evidence suggesting that reduced mtDNA content may sensitize an individual to certain environmental exposures.

  13. Atrazine exposure causes mitochondrial toxicity in liver and muscle cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagarkar, Sneha; Gandhi, Deepa; Devi, S Saravana; Sakharkar, Amul; Kapley, Atya

    2016-01-01

    Chronic exposure to atrazine and other pesticides is reported to cause metabolic disorders, yet information on effects of atrazine on expression of genes relevant to mitochondrial function is largely missing. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the expression of a battery of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in human liver (HepG2) and rat muscle (L6) cell lines due to short-term atrazine exposure. We have determined the EC50 values of atrazine for cytotoxicity and mitochondrial toxicity (mitotoxicity) in terms of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content in HepG2 and L6 cells. Further, the mRNA expression of nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded genes was analyzed using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The EC50 value of atrazine for mitotoxicity in HepG2 and L6 cells was found to be about 0.162 and 0.089 mM, respectively. Mitochondrial toxicity was indicated by reduction in ATP content following atrazine exposure. Atrazine exposure resulted in down-regulation of many OXPHOS subunits expression and affected biogenesis factors' expression. Most prominently, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) expressions were up-regulated in HepG2 cells, whereas SIRT3 expression was alleviated in L6 cells, without significant changes in SOD levels. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) and SIRT1 expression were significantly down-regulated in both cell lines. Results suggest that TFAM and SIRT1 could be involved in atrazine-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, and further studies can be taken up to understand the mechanism of mitochondrial toxicity. Further study can also be taken up to explore the possibility of target genes as biomarkers of pesticide toxicity.

  14. Pulmonary toxicity after exposure to military-relevant heavy metal tungsten alloy particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roedel, Erik Q; Cafasso, Danielle E; Lee, Karen W M; Pierce, Lisa M

    2012-02-15

    Significant controversy over the environmental and public health impact of depleted uranium use in the Gulf War and the war in the Balkans has prompted the investigation and use of other materials including heavy metal tungsten alloys (HMTAs) as nontoxic alternatives. Interest in the health effects of HMTAs has peaked since the recent discovery that rats intramuscularly implanted with pellets containing 91.1% tungsten/6% nickel/2.9% cobalt rapidly developed aggressive metastatic tumors at the implantation site. Very little is known, however, regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms associated with the effects of inhalation exposure to HMTAs despite the recognized risk of this route of exposure to military personnel. In the current study military-relevant metal powder mixtures consisting of 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% cobalt (WNiCo) and 92% tungsten/5% nickel/3% iron (WNiFe), pure metals, or vehicle (saline) were instilled intratracheally in rats. Pulmonary toxicity was assessed by cytologic analysis, lactate dehydrogenase activity, albumin content, and inflammatory cytokine levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 24h after instillation. The expression of 84 stress and toxicity-related genes was profiled in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage cells using real-time quantitative PCR arrays, and in vitro assays were performed to measure the oxidative burst response and phagocytosis by lung macrophages. Results from this study determined that exposure to WNiCo and WNiFe induces pulmonary inflammation and altered expression of genes associated with oxidative and metabolic stress and toxicity. Inhalation exposure to both HMTAs likely causes lung injury by inducing macrophage activation, neutrophilia, and the generation of toxic oxygen radicals.

  15. Relationship between toxic metals exposure via cigarette smoking and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Hassan Imran; Kazi, Tasneem Gul; Talpur, Farah Naz; Naher, Sumsun; Brabazon, Dermot

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) has increased among people who smoke tobacco. In the present study, the association between toxic metals exposure via cigarette smoking and rheumatoid arthritis incidence in the population living in Dublin, Ireland, is investigated. The different brands of cigarettes (filler tobacco, filter and ash) consumed by the population studied were analysed for Cd, Ni, and Pb. The concentrations of toxic elements in biological samples and different components of cigarettes were measured by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer after microwave-assisted acid digestion. The validity and accuracy of the methodology were checked using certified reference materials. The filler tobacco of different branded cigarettes contain Cd, Ni, and Pb concentrations in the ranges of 1.73-2.02, 0.715-1.52, and 0.378-1.16 μg/cigarette, respectively. The results of this study showed that the mean values of cadmium nickel, and lead were significantly higher in scalp hair and blood samples of rheumatoid arthritis patients when related to healthy controls, while the difference was significant in the case of smoker patients (p toxic metals were 2- to 3-fold higher in scalp hair and blood samples of non arthritis smoker subjects as compared to nonsmoker controls. The high exposure of toxic metals as a result of cigarette smoking may be synergistic with risk factors associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

  16. Controlling silver nanoparticle exposure in algal toxicity testing - A matter of timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Baun, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The aquatic ecotoxicity testing of nanoparticles is complicated by unstable exposure conditions resulting from various transformation processes of nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions. In this study, we investigated the influence of exposure timing on the algal test response to silver nanoparticles......) in a standard algal growth inhibition test (ISO 8692:2004) for 48 h and a short-term (2 h) 14C-assimilation test. For AgNO3, similar responses were obtained in the two tests, whereas freshly prepared suspensions of citrate stabilized AgNPs were less toxic in the 2-h tests compared to the 48-h tests. The 2-h...... and reproducibility increased. Prolonged aging to 48 h increased toxicity in the 2-h tests whereas aging beyond 48 h reduced toxicity. Our results demonstrate that the outcome of algal toxicity testing of AgNPs is highly influenced not only by the test duration, but also by the time passed from the moment Ag...

  17. Toxicants exposures as novel zoonoses: reflections on sustainable development, food safety and veterinary public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazzoli, C; Mantovani, A

    2010-12-01

    The modern concept of zoonosis considers any detriment to the health and/or quality of human life resulting from relationships with (other) vertebrate or edible or toxic invertebrate animals. Whereas exposure to toxicants through foods of animal origin (a.o.) is a well-established issue, hereby we discuss it as novel zoonoses, from the standpoints of health implications as well as similarities and differences with classical zoonoses caused by biological agents. Novel toxicant-related zoonoses are linked with new issues in food safety, such as the environment-feed-food chain. In fact, the potential effect of the combined and repeated exposure to dietary toxicants is generally long-term and not readily discernible. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in staple foods of a.o. are discussed as a telling example of a food safety issue summing up critical points covered by the definition of sustainable development, also implicating health risks for generations to come. We suggest some critical points to implement the veterinary public health action in sustainable food safety, such as enhancement of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points systems for toxicological risk management.

  18. Tobacco toxicant exposure in cigarette smokers who use or do not use other tobacco products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollen, Nicole L; Mayo, Matthew S; Clark, Lauren; Cox, Lisa Sanderson; Khariwala, Samir S; Pulvers, Kim; Benowitz, Neal L; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S

    2017-10-01

    Non-cigarette other tobacco products (OTP; e.g., cigarillos, little cigars) are typically used in combination with cigarettes, but limited data exists on the tobacco toxicant exposure profiles of dual cigarette-OTP (Cig-OTP) users. This study examined biomarkers of nicotine and carcinogen exposure in cigarette smokers who used or did not use OTP. 111 Cig-OTP and 111 cigarette only (Cig Only) users who smoked equivalent cigarettes per day were matched on age (=40), race (African American, White), and gender. Participants reported past 7-day daily use of cigarettes and OTP and provided urine for nicotine, cotinine, total nicotine equivalents (TNE) and total NNAL concentrations. Cig-OTP users reported greater past 7-day tobacco use (15.9 versus 13.0 products/day, pCig Only users (pCig-OTP users had lower levels of nicotine and metabolites of a lung carcinogen relative to Cig-Only users, but concentrations of toxicants among Cig-OTP users were still at levels that place smokers at great risk from the detrimental health effects of smoking. Our study finds that nicotine and carcinogen exposure in Cig-OTP users are lower compared to cigarette only users, but still likely to be associated with substantial harm. A better understanding of why toxicant levels may be lower in Cig-OTP is an important area for future study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Irresistible ants: exposure to novel toxic prey increases consumption over multiple temporal scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Mark W; Robbins, Travis R; Centi, Alan; Thawley, Christopher J; Langkilde, Tracy

    2016-07-01

    As species become increasingly exposed to novel challenges, it is critical to understand how evolutionary (i.e., generational) and plastic (i.e., within lifetime) responses work together to determine a species' fate or predict its distribution. The introduction of non-native species imposes novel pressures on the native species that they encounter. Understanding how native species exposed to toxic or distasteful invaders change their feeding behavior can provide insight into their ability to cope with these novel threats as well as broader questions about the evolution of this behavior. We demonstrated that native eastern fence lizards do not avoid consuming invasive fire ants following repeated exposure to this toxic prey. Rather fence lizards increased their consumption of these ants following exposure on three different temporal scales. Lizards ate more fire ants when they were exposed to this toxic prey over successive days. Lizards consumed more fire ants if they had been exposed to fire ants as juveniles 6 months earlier. Finally, lizards from populations exposed to fire ants over multiple generations consumed more fire ants than those from fire ant-free areas. These results suggest that the potentially lethal consumption of fire ants may carry benefits resulting in selection for this behavior, and learning that persists long after initial exposure. Future research on the response of native predators to venomous prey over multiple temporal scales will be valuable in determining the long-term effects of invasion by these novel threats.

  20. Solid Phase Extraction for Monitoring of Occupational Exposure to Cr (III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.J. Shahtaheri

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromium is an important constituent widely used in different industrial processes for production of various synthetic materials. For evaluation of workers’ exposure to trace toxic metal of Cr (III, environmental and biological monitoring are essential processes, in which, preparation of samples is one of the most time-consuming and error-prone aspects prior to analysis. The use of solid-phase extraction (SPE has grown and is a fertile technique of sample preparation as it provides better results than those produced by liquid-liquid extraction (LLE. SPE using mini columns filled with XAD-4 resin was optimized regarding to sample pH, ligand concentration, loading flow rate, elution solvent, sample volume, elution volume, amount of resins, and sample matrix interferences. Chromium was retained on solid sorbent and was eluted with 2 M HNO3 followed by simple determination of analytes by using flame atomic absorption spectrometery. Obtained recoveries of metal ion were more than 92%. The optimized procedure was also validated with three different pools of spiked urine samples and showed a good reproducibility over six consecutive days as well as six within-day experiments. Through this study, suitable results were obtained for relative standard deviation, therefore, it is concluded that, this optimized method can be considered to be successful in simplifying sample preparation for trace residue analysis of Cr in different matrices for evaluation of occupational and environmental exposures. To evaluate occupational exposure to chromium, 16 urine samples were taken, prepared, and analyzed based on optimized procedure.

  1. Autofluorescence microscopy: a non-destructive tool to monitor mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Robim M; Macko, Peter; Palosaari, Taina; Whelan, Maurice P

    2011-10-30

    Visualization of NADH by fluorescence microscopy makes it possible to distinguish mitochondria inside living cells, allowing structure analysis of these organelles in a non-invasive way. Mitochondrial morphology is determined by the occurrence of mitochondrial fission and fusion. During normal cell function mitochondria appear as elongated tubular structures. However, cellular malfunction induces mitochondria to fragment into punctiform, vesicular structures. This change in morphology is associated with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and early apoptosis. The aim of this study is to demonstrate that autofluorescence imaging of mitochondria in living eukaryotic cells provides structural and morphological information that can be used to assess mitochondrial health. We firstly established the illumination conditions that do not affect mitochondrial structure and calculated the maximum safe light dose to which the cells can be exposed. Subsequently, sequential recording of mitochondrial fluorescence was performed and changes in mitochondrial morphology were monitored in a continuous non-destructive way. This approach was then used to assess mitochondrial toxicity induced by potential toxicants exposed to mammalian cells. Both mouse and human cells were used to evaluate mitochondrial toxicity of different compounds with different toxicities. This technique constitutes a novel and promising approach to explore chemical induced toxicity because of its reliability to monitor mitochondrial morphology changes and corresponding toxicity in a non-invasive way.

  2. Evaluation of the toxicity of graphene oxide exposure to the eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Yan, Liang; Wu, Qian; Li, Yijian; Li, Qiyou; Chen, Siyu; Yang, Yuli; Gu, Zhanjun; Xu, Haiwei; Yin, Zheng Qin

    2016-11-01

    Graphene and its derivatives are the new carbon nanomaterials with the prospect for great applications in electronics, energy storage, biosensors and medicine. However, little is known about the toxicity of graphene or its derivatives in the case of occasional or repeated ocular exposure. We performed in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate the toxicity of graphene oxide (GO) exposure to the eye. Primary human corneal epithelium cells (hCorECs) and human conjunctiva epithelium cells (hConECs) were exposed to GO (12.5-100 μg/mL). Acute GO exposure (2 h) did not induce cytotoxicity to hCorECs. However, short-term GO exposure (24 h) exerted significant cytotoxicity to hCorECs and hConECs with increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutathione (GSH) reduced the GO-induced cytotoxicity. We further performed acute eye irritation tests in albino rabbits according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines, and the rabbits did not exhibit corneal opacity, conjunctival redness, abnormality of the iris, or chemosis at any time point after the instillation of 100 μg/mL of GO. However, 5-day repeated GO exposure (50 and 100 μg/mL) caused reversible mild corneal opacity, conjunctival redness and corneal epithelium damage to Sprague-Dawley rats, which was also alleviated by GSH. Therefore, our study suggests that GO-induced time- and dose-dependent cytotoxicity to hCorECs and hConECs via oxidative stress. Occasional GO exposure did not cause acute eye irritation; short-term repeated GO exposure generally resulted in reversible damage to the eye via oxidative stress, which may be alleviated by the antioxidant GSH.

  3. Acute pulmonary toxicity following inhalation exposure to aerosolized VX in anesthetized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xinqi; Perkins, Michael W; Simons, Jannitt; Witriol, Alicia M; Rodriguez, Ashley M; Benjamin, Brittany M; Devorak, Jennifer; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2014-06-01

    This study evaluated acute toxicity and pulmonary injury in rats at 3, 6 and 24 h after an inhalation exposure to aerosolized O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX). Anesthetized male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) were incubated with a glass endotracheal tube and exposed to saline or VX (171, 343 and 514 mg×min/m³ or 0.2, 0.5 and 0.8 LCt₅₀, respectively) for 10 min. VX was delivered by a small animal ventilator at a volume of 2.5 ml × 70 breaths/minute. All VX-exposed animals experienced a significant loss in percentage body weight at 3, 6, and 24 h post-exposure. In comparison to controls, animals exposed to 514 mg×min/m³ of VX had significant increases in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein concentrations at 6 and 24 h post-exposure. Blood acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was inhibited dose dependently at each of the times points for all VX-exposed groups. AChE activity in lung homogenates was significantly inhibited in all VX-exposed groups at each time point. All VX-exposed animals assessed at 20 min and 3, 6 and 24 h post-exposure showed increases in lung resistance, which was prominent at 20 min and 3 h post-exposure. Histopathologic evaluation of lung tissue of the 514 mg×min/m³ VX-exposed animals at 3, 6 and 24 h indicated morphological changes, including perivascular inflammation, alveolar exudate and histiocytosis, alveolar septal inflammation and edema, alveolar epithelial necrosis, and bronchiolar inflammatory infiltrates, in comparison to controls. These results suggest that aerosolization of the highly toxic, persistent chemical warfare nerve agent VX results in acute pulmonary toxicity and lung injury in rats.

  4. MATT: Monitoring, Analysis and Toxicity of Toxaphene: improvement of analytical methods

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, J.; Klungsøyr, J; Nesje, G.; Meier, S; McHugh, B.; Nixon, E.; Rimkus, G.G.

    1999-01-01

    The European Research Project MATT (Investigation into the Monitoring, Analysis and Toxicity of Toxaphene) started in 1997 and had the objective to provide information on toxicological risks to the consumer of toxaphene residues in fish from European waters. This report includes information on the analytical block of the project, which comprised three studies.

  5. Toxicity of tritium. [Chronic, low-dose exposure of mice and monkeys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, R.L.

    1979-03-02

    Among radionuclides of importance in atomic energy, /sup 3/H has relatively low toxicity. The main health and environmental worry is the possibility that significant biological effects may follow from protracted exposure to low concentrations in water. To examine this possible hazard and measure toxicity at low tritium concentrations, chronic exposure studies were done on mice and monkeys. During vulnerable developmental periods animals were exposed to /sup 3/HOH, and mice were exposed also to /sup 60/Co gamma irradiation and energy-related chemical agents. The biological endpoint measured was the irreversible loss of female germ cells. Effects from tritium were observed at surprisingly low concentrations where /sup 3/H was found more damaging than previously thought. Comparisons between tritium and gamma radiation showed the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) to be greater than 1 and to reach approximately 3 at very low exposures. For perspective, other comparisons were made: between radiation and chemical agents, which revealed parallels in action on germ cells, and between pre- and postnatal exposure, which warn of possible special hazard to the fetus from both classes of energy-related byproducts.

  6. Chronic toxicity of azoxystrobin to freshwater amphipods, midges, cladocerans, and mussels in water-only exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Smalling, Kelly; Elskus, Adria; Kuivila, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the effects of fungicides on nontarget organisms at realistic concentrations and exposure durations is vital for determining potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems. Environmental concentrations of the fungicide azoxystrobin have been reported up to 4.6 μg/L in the United States and 30 μg/L in Europe. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the chronic toxicity of azoxystrobin in water-only exposures with an amphipod (Hyalella azteca; 42-d exposure), a midge (Chironomus dilutus; 50-d exposure), a cladoceran (Ceriodaphnia dubia; 7-d exposure), and a unionid mussel (Lampsilis siliquoidea; 28-d exposure) at environmentally relevant concentrations. The potential photo-enhanced toxicity of azoxystrobin accumulated by C. dubiaand L. siliquoidea following chronic exposures to azoxystrobin was also evaluated. The 20% effect concentrations (EC20s) based on the most sensitive endpoint were 4.2 μg/L for H. aztecareproduction, 12 μg/L for C. dubia reproduction and C. dilutus emergence, and >28 μg/L for L. siliquoidea. Hyalella azteca was more sensitive to azoxystrobin compared with the other 3 species in the chronic exposures. No photo-enhanced toxicity was observed for either C. dubia or L. siliquoidea exposed to ultraviolet light in control water following azoxystrobin tests. The results of the present study indicate chronic effects of azoxystrobin on 3 of 4 invertebrates tested at environmentally relevant concentrations. The changes noted in biomass and reproduction have the potential to alter the rate of ecological processes driven by aquatic invertebrates. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1–8. Published 2017 Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of SETAC. This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

  7. Chromated copper arsenate–treated wood: a potential source of arsenic exposure and toxicity in dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Yuntzu-Yen Chen, MD

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic-contaminated drinking water presents a serious health hazard in certain geographic locations around the world. Chromated copper arsenate, a pesticide and preservative that was used to pressure treat residential lumber in the United States beginning in the 1940s and was banned by the Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, poses a potential source of arsenic exposure and toxicity. In this study, we review the clinical manifestations of arsenic intoxication with the focus on dermatologic manifestations. Dermatologists should be aware that although chromated copper arsenate-treated wood for residential use was banned in 2003, the exposure risk remains. Long-term follow up is necessary to detect arsenic induced cutaneous and visceral malignancy in patients with history of arsenic exposure.

  8. An integrated approach to the toxicity assessment of Irish marine sediments: validation of established marine bioassays for the monitoring of Irish marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, Ailbhe; Giltrap, Michelle; Foley, Barry; McGovern, Evin; McHugh, Brendan; Davoren, Maria

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes the ecotoxicological evaluation of marine sediments from three sites around Ireland representative of a range of contaminant burdens. A comprehensive assessment of potential sediment toxicity requires the consideration of multiple exposure phases. In addition to the evaluation of multi-exposure phases the use of a battery of multi-trophic test species has been advocated by a number of researchers as testing of single or few organisms may not detect toxicants with a specific mode of action. The Microtox solid phase test (SPT) and the 10-d acute amphipod test with Corophium volutator were used to assess whole sediment toxicity. Porewater and elutriates were assessed with the Microtox acute test, the marine prasinophyte Tetraselmis suecica, and the marine copepod Tisbe battagliai. Solvent extracts were assayed with the Microtox and T. battagliai acute tests. Alexandra Basin was identified as the most toxic site according to all tests, except the Microtox SPT which identified the Dunmore East site as being more toxic. However, it was not possible to correlate the observed ecotoxicological effects with a specific and/or class of contaminants based on sediment chemistry alone. Therefore porewaters found to elicit significant toxicity (Dunmore East and Alexandra Basin) with the test battery were selected for further TIE assessment with T. battalgiai and the Microtox system. The results of this study have important implications for risk assessment in estuarine and coastal waters in Ireland, where, at present the monitoring of sediment and water quality is predominantly reliant on chemical analysis alone.

  9. Investigation on modes of toxic action to rats based on aliphatic and aromatic compounds and comparison with fish toxicity based on exposure routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jia; Li, Jin J; Wen, Yang; Tai, Hong W; Yu, Yang; Qin, Wei C; Su, Li M; Zhao, Yuan H

    2015-06-01

    The modes of toxic action (MOAs) play an important role in the assessment of the ecotoxicity of organic pollutants. However, few studies have been reported on the MOAs in rat toxicity. In this paper, the toxic contributions of functional groups in 1255 aromatic compounds were calculated from regression and were then compared with the toxic contributions in aliphatic compounds. The results show that some functional groups have same toxic contributions both in aromatic and aliphatic compounds, but some have not. To investigate the MOAs in rat toxicity, the distribution of toxic ratio (TR) was examined for well-known baseline and less inert compounds and thresholds of log TR=0.3 and 0.5 were used to classify baseline, less inert and reactive compounds. The results showed that some compounds identified as baseline compounds in fish toxicity were also classified as baseline compounds in rat toxicity. Except for phenols and anilines which were identified as less inert compounds in fish toxicity, aromatic compounds with functional groups such as ether, nitrile, nitrophenol, isocyanatoe and chloro were identified as less inert chemicals in rat toxicity. Reactive compounds identified in fish toxicity exhibit greater toxicity to rats. These compounds can undergo nucleophilic substitution, acylation and Schiff base formation with biological macromolecules. The critical body residues (CBRs) calculated from absorption and bioconcentration show that log 1/CBRs in rat toxicity are not equal to that in fish for some compounds. It suggests that the exposure route can affect the identification of MOAs between these two species for these compounds.

  10. Applications of carboxylesterase activity in environmental monitoring and toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, Craig E; Phillips, Bryn M; Anderson, Brian S; Miller, Jeff L; Miller, Mike J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2008-01-01

    increase for applications in sediment TIEs. Carboxylesterases are an interesting and useful enzyme family that deserves further study for applications in environmental monitoring as well as to increase our understanding of the fundamental biological role(s) of these enzymes. There are, of course, other enzymes that show high esterase activity on pyrethroids but are not technically carboxylesterases in the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold protein family. These enzymes should also be examined for use in TIE protocols and "esterase" arrays as well as for general applications in environmental monitoring. One can envision the creation of a standardized screen of enzymes with esterase activity to (1) identify environmental contaminants, (2) estimate the potential toxic effects of new compounds on a range of organisms, and (3) monitor organism exposure to agrochemicals (and potentially other contaminants). This approach would provide a multibiomarker integrative assessment of esterase-inhibiting potential of a compound or mixture. In conclusion, much is still unknown about this enzyme family, indicating that this area is still wide open to researchers interested in the applications of carboxylesterase activity as well as basic biological questions into the nature of enzyme activity and the endogenous role of the enzyme.

  11. Repeated exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles causes testicular toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundarraj, Kiruthika; Manickam, Vijayprakash; Raghunath, Azhwar; Periyasamy, Madhivadhani; Viswanathan, Mangala Priya; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether repeated exposure to iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe2 O3 -NPs) could be toxic to mice testis. Fe2 O3 -NPs (25 and 50 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally administered into mice once a week for 4 weeks. Our study showed that Fe2 O3 -NPs have the ability to cross the blood-testis barrier to get into the testis. The findings showed that exposure resulted in the accumulation of Fe2 O3 -NPs which was evidenced from the iron content and accumulation in the testis. Furthermore, 25 and 50 mg/kg Fe2 O3 -NPs administration increased the reactive oxygen species, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyl content, glutathione peroxidase activity, and nitric oxide levels with a concomitant decrease in the levels of antioxidants-superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione, and vitamin C. Increased expression of Bax, cleaved-caspase-3, and cleaved-PARP confirms apoptosis. Serum testosterone levels increased with increased concentration of Fe2 O3 -NPs exposure. In addition, the histopathological lesions like vacuolization, detachment, and sloughing of germ cells were also observed in response to Fe2 O3 -NPs treatment. The data from our study entailed that testicular toxicity caused by Fe2 O3 -NPs exposure may be associated with Fe2 O3 -NPs accumulation leading to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Therefore, precautions should be taken in the safe use of Fe2 O3 -NPs to avoid complications in the fertility of males. Further research will unravel the possible molecular mechanisms on testicular toxicity of Fe2 O3 -NPs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 594-608, 2017.

  12. Pulmonary Toxicity and Modifications in Iron Homeostasis Following Libby Amphibole Asbestos Exposure in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Individuals suffering from cardiovascular disease (CVD) develop iron dysregulation which may influence pulmonary toxicity and injury upon exposure to asbestos. We hypothesized spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) rats woul...

  13. Carcinogenic Air Toxics Exposure and Their Cancer-Related Health Impacts in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Chaoyang; Huijbregts, Mark A. J.; Mumtaz, M. Moiz

    2015-01-01

    Public health protection from air pollution can be achieved more effectively by shifting from a single-pollutant approach to a multi-pollutant approach. To develop such multi-pollutant approaches, identifying which air pollutants are present most frequently is essential. This study aims to determine the frequently found carcinogenic air toxics or hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) combinations across the United States as well as to analyze the health impacts of developing cancer due to exposure to these HAPs. To identify the most commonly found carcinogenic air toxics combinations, we first identified HAPs with cancer risk greater than one in a million in more than 5% of the census tracts across the United States, based on the National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) by the U.S. EPA for year 2005. We then calculated the frequencies of their two-component (binary), and three-component (ternary) combinations. To quantify the cancer-related health impacts, we focused on the 10 most frequently found HAPs with national average cancer risk greater than one in a million. Their cancer-related health impacts were calculated by converting lifetime cancer risk reported in NATA 2005 to years of healthy life lost or Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs). We found that the most frequently found air toxics with cancer risk greater than one in a million are formaldehyde, carbon tetrachloride, acetaldehyde, and benzene. The most frequently occurring binary pairs and ternary mixtures are the various combinations of these four air toxics. Analysis of urban and rural HAPs did not reveal significant differences in the top combinations of these chemicals. The cumulative annual cancer-related health impacts of inhaling the top 10 carcinogenic air toxics included was about 1,600 DALYs in the United States or 0.6 DALYs per 100,000 people. Formaldehyde and benzene together contribute nearly 60 percent of the total cancer-related health impacts. Our study shows that although there are many

  14. Dose-rate effects of ethylene oxide exposure on developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, E; Long, N; Smith, A; Williams, P; Ravi, S; Gill, J; Henessey, R; Skornik, W; Brain, J; Kimmel, C; Kimmel, G; Holmes, L; Ryan, L

    1999-08-01

    In risk assessment, evaluating a health effect at a duration of exposure that is untested involves assuming that equivalent multiples of concentration (C) and duration (T) of exposure have the same effect. The limitations of this approach (attributed to F. Haber, Zur Geschichte des Gaskrieges [On the history of gas warfare], in Funf Vortrage aus den Jahren 1920-1923 [Five lectures from the years 1920-1923], 1924, Springer, Berlin, pp. 76-92), have been noted in several studies. The study presented in this paper was designed to specifically look at dose-rate (C x T) effects, and it forms an ideal case study to implement statistical models and to examine the statistical issues in risk assessment. Pregnant female C57BL/6J mice were exposed, on gestational day 7, to ethylene oxide (EtO) via inhalation for 1.5, 3, or 6 h at exposures that result in C x T multiples of 2100 or 2700 ppm-h. EtO was selected because of its short half-life, documented developmental toxicity, and relevance to exposures that occur in occupational settings. Concurrent experiments were run with animals exposed to air for similar periods. Statistical analysis using models developed to assess dose-rate effects revealed significant effects with respect to fetal death and resorptions, malformations, crown-to-rump length, and fetal weight. Animals exposed to short, high exposures of EtO on day 7 of gestation were found to have more adverse effects than animals exposed to the same C x T multiple but at longer, lower exposures. The implication for risk assessment is that applying Haber's Law could potentially lead to an underestimation of risk at a shorter duration of exposure and an overestimation of risk at a longer duration of exposure. Further research, toxicological and statistical, are required to understand the mechanism of the dose-rate effects, and how to incorporate the mechanistic information into the risk assessment decision process.

  15. The biotic ligand model approach for addressing effects of exposure water chemistry on aquatic toxicity of metals: Genesis and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major uncertainty in many aquatic risk assessments for toxic chemicals is the aggregate effect of the physicochemical characteristics of exposure media on toxicity, and how this affects extrapolation of laboratory test results to natural systems. A notable example of this is h...

  16. The biotic ligand model approach for addressing effects of exposure water chemistry on aquatic toxicity of metals: Genesis and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major uncertainty in many aquatic risk assessments for toxic chemicals is the aggregate effect of the physicochemical characteristics of exposure media on toxicity, and how this affects extrapolation of laboratory test results to natural systems. A notable example of this is h...

  17. Propylthiouracyl-induced severe liver toxicity: An indication for alanine aminotransferase monitoring?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M Benyounes; C Sempoux; C Daumerie; J Rahier; AP Geubel

    2006-01-01

    Propylthiouracyl (PTU)-related liver toxicity is likely to occur in about 1% of treated patients. In case of acute or subacute hepatitis, liver failure may occur in about one third. We report two further cases of PTU-induced subacute hepatitis, in whom the delay between occurrence of liver damage after the initiation of treatment, the underestimation of its severity and the delayed withdrawal of the drug were all likely responsible for liver failure.The high incidence of liver toxicity related to PTU, its potential severity and delayed occurrence after initiation of treatment are in favor of monthly alanine aminotransferase monitoring, at least during the first six months of therapy.

  18. Electronic noses for monitoring benzene occupational exposure in biological samples of Egyptian workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab I. Mohamed

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Benzene is commonly emitted in several industries, leading to widespread environmental and occupational exposure hazards. While less toxic solvents have been substituted for benzene, it is still a component of petroleum products and is a trace impurity in industrial products resulting in continued higher occupational exposures in industrial settings in developing countries. Materials and Methods: We investigated the potential use of an electronic nose (e-nose to monitor the headspace volatiles in biological samples from benzene-exposed Egyptian workers and non-exposed controls. The study population comprised 150 non-smoking male workers exposed to benzene and an equal number of matching non-exposed controls. We determined biomarkers of benzene used to estimate exposure and risk including: benzene in exhaled air and blood; and its urinary metabolites such as phenol and muconic acid using gas chromatography technique and a portable e-nose. Results: The average benzene concentration measured in the ambient air of the workplace of all studied industrial settings in Alexandria, Egypt; was 97.56±88.12 μg/m3 (range: 4.69–260.86 μg/m3. Levels of phenol and muconic acid were signifi cantly (p < 0.001 higher in both blood and urine of benzene-exposed workers as compared to non-exposed controls. Conclusions: The e-nose technology has successfully classifi ed and distinguished benzene-exposed workers from non-exposed controls for all measured samples of blood, urine and the exhaled air with a very high degree of precision. Thus, it will be a very useful tool for the low-cost mass screening and early detection of health hazards associated with the exposure to benzene in the industry.

  19. Chronic uranium exposure and growth toxicity for phytoplankton. Dose-effect relationship: first comparison of chemical and radiological toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbin, R.; Pradines, C.; Garnier-Laplace, J. [CEA Cadarache (DEI/SECRE/LRE), Laboratory of Radioecology and Ecotoxicology, Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    The bioavailability of uranium for freshwater organisms, as for other dissolved metals, is closely linked to chemical speciation in solution (U aqueous speciation undergoes tremendous changes in the presence of ligands commonly found in natural waters e.g. carbonate, phosphate, hydroxide and natural organic matter). For the studied chemical domain, short-term uranium uptake experiments have already shown that the free uranyl ion concentration [UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}] is a good predictor of uranium uptake by the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, as predicted by the Free Ion Activity Model. In agreement with these results, acidic pH and low ligands concentrations in water enhance uranium bioavailability and consequently its potential chronic effects on phytoplankton. Moreover, uranium is known to be both radio-toxic and chemo-toxic. The use of different isotopes of uranium allows to expose organisms to different radiological doses for the same molar concentration: e.g. for a given element concentration (chemical dose), replacing depleted U by U-233 obviously leads to an enhanced radiological delivered dose to organisms (x10{sup 4}). In this work we established relationships between uranium doses (depleted uranium and 233-U ) and effect on the growth rate of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Uranium bioaccumulation was also monitored. Growth rate was measured both in classical batch (0-72 hrs) and continuous (turbidostat) cultures, the latter protocol allowing medium renewal to diminish exudates accumulation and speciation changes in the medium. The differences in effects will be, if possible, related to the development of defence mechanisms against the formation of reactive oxygen species (forms of glutathione) and the production of phyto-chelatins (small peptides rich in cystein that play an important role in the homeostasis and the detoxication of metals in cells). (author)

  20. Dermal Exposure to Cumene Hydroperoxide: Assessing Its Toxic Relevance and Oxidant Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rider, Cynthia V; Chan, Po; Herbert, Ron A; Kissling, Grace E; Fomby, Laurene M; Hejtmancik, Milton R; Witt, Kristine L; Waidyanatha, Suramya; Travlos, Greg S; Kadiiska, Maria B

    2016-07-01

    Cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) is a high production volume chemical that is used to generate phenol and acetone. Dermal exposure to CHP was hypothesized to result in systemic tissue toxicity, production of free radicals, and consequent decrease in plasma antioxidant levels. To evaluate the hypothesis and characterize the toxicity of CHP, male and female B6C3F1/N mice and F344/N rats were exposed to varying doses of CHP applied topically for 14 or 90 days. No significant changes in survival or body weight of mice and rats were observed following 14 days of exposure. However, 90 days of CHP exposure at the high dose (12 mg/kg) triggered a significant decrease (-15%) in the body weight of the male rat group only. Irritation of the skin was observed at the site of application and was characterized by inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. In treated animals, histology of liver tissue, free radical generation, and antioxidant levels in blood plasma were not significantly changed as compared to the corresponding controls. Consistent with the lack of systemic damage, no increase in micronucleated erythrocytes was seen in peripheral blood. In conclusion, topical CHP application caused skin damage only at the application site and did not cause systemic tissue impairment.

  1. Parental exposure to microcystin-LR induced thyroid endocrine disruption in zebrafish offspring, a transgenerational toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Houcheng; Yan, Wei; Wu, Qin; Liu, Chunsheng; Gong, Xiuying; Hung, Tien-Chieh; Li, Guangyu

    2017-11-01

    Microcystin-LR is the most poisonous and commonly encountered hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria in an aquatic ecosystem, and it may cause thyroid dysfunction in fish. The present study aimed to reveal the effects of transgenerational toxicity of MCLR on the thyroid endocrine system under sub-chronic exposure conditions. Adult zebrafish (F0) were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations (1, 5 and 25 μg/L) of MCLR for 45 days. The produced F1 embryos were then tested without further MCLR treatment. In the F0 generation, exposure to 25 μg/L MCLR reduced thyroxine (T4) but not 3, 5, 3'-triiodothyronine (T3) levels in females, while the T4 and T3 levels were unchanged in males. After parental exposure to MCLR, we observed a decreased hatching and growth retardation correlated with reduced thyroid hormone levels in the F1 offspring. The gene transcription and protein expression along the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis were detected to further investigate the possible mechanisms of MCLR-induced thyroid disruption. Our results indicated MCLR could disturb the thyroid endocrine system under environmentally relevant concentrations and the disrupting effects could be remarkably transmitted to its F1 offspring. We regard these adverse effects as a parental transgenerational toxicity of MCLR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute toxicity effects of Prunus avium fruit extract and selection of optimum dose against radiation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisodia, Rashmi; Sharma, K; Singh, Smita

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of different doses of the methanolic extract of the fruit pulp of Prunus avium (family Rosaceae), which is used ethno-medicinally for the treatment of various diseases, and to find out the optimal dose of Prunus avium extract against 10 Gy gamma-radiation exposure. To test acute toxicity in mice, different doses of PAE (Prunus avium fruit extract) were given orally for 15 consecutive days, after which the animals were observed for another 15 days; the LD50/15 of the methanolic extract was calculated to be 4.947 gm/kg body weight (b.wt). In optimum dose selection against radiation exposure, oral administration of 450 mg/kg b.wt/d of PAE for 15 consecutive days before exposure to 10 Gy of gamma-radiation was found to afford maximum protection in terms of body weight and survivability of the mice in comparison to other doses.

  3. On the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor the work of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorić Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor influent and effluent wastewaters of wastewater treatment plants. The information obtained through these tests is used to prevent toxic pollutants from entering wastewater treatment plants and discharge of toxic pollutants into the recipient. Samples of wastewaters from the wastewater treatment plants of Kragujevac and Gornji Milanovac, as well as from the Lepenica and Despotovica Rivers immediately before and after the influx of wastewaters from the plants, were collected between October 2004 and June 2005. Used as the test organism in these tests was the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio Hamilton - Buchanon (Cyprinidae. The acute toxicity test of 96/h duration showed that the tested samples had a slight acutely toxic effect on B. rerio, except for the sample of influent wastewater into the Cvetojevac wastewater treatment plant, which had moderately acute toxicity, indicating that such water should be prevented from entering the system in order to eliminate its detrimental effect on the purification process.

  4. Online monitoring of cell metabolism to assess the toxicity of nanoparticles: the case of cobalt ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Valentina; Ponti, Jessica; Giudetti, Guido; Broggi, Francesca; Marmorato, Patrick; Gioria, Sabrina; Franchini, Fabio; Rauscher, Hubert; Rossi, François

    2012-05-01

    Different in vitro assays are successfully used to determine the relative cytotoxicity of a broad range of compounds. Nevertheless, different research groups have pointed out the difficulty in using the same tests to assess the toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs). In this study, we evaluated the possible use of a microphysiometer, Bionas 2500 analyzing system Bionas GmbH®, to detect in real time changes in cell metabolisms linked to NPs exposure. We focused our work on response changes of fibroblast cultures linked to exposure by cobalt ferrite NPs and compared the results to conventional in vitro assays. The measurements with the microphysiometer showed a cobalt ferrite cytotoxic effect, confirmed by the Colony Forming Efficiency assay. In conclusion, this work demonstrated that the measurement of metabolic parameters with a microphysiometer is a promising method to assess the toxicity of NPs and offers the advantage to follow on-line the cell metabolic changes.

  5. Postdeployment evaluation of health risk communication after exposure to a toxic industrial chemical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, James D; Ostafin, Margaret; Lovell, Mark

    2008-04-01

    Increasing emphasis is being placed on the appropriate communication of deployment-related risks among military service members. This report validates risk communication on the postdeployment health assessment (PDHA), in the context of a known, low-level exposure to a toxic industrial chemical. In late 2003, 245 soldiers were exposed to hexavalent chromium at an industrial site in Iraq; of those, 227 had completed PDHAs on file for review. Despite being directed to document this exposure upon redeployment, only 55 soldiers (24.2%) specifically reported chromium exposure. Increasing age and time at the industrial site were associated with increased reporting of exposure. Although providers documented deployment exposure concerns for only 65.4% of this population, this was much more often than for other redeploying service members. The PDHA is a risk assessment and risk communication tool that has sources of misclassification, and results must be interpreted with caution when individual or population occupational and environmental risks resulting from deployment are assessed.

  6. Lead exposure in American black ducks after implementation of non-toxic shot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, M.D.; Bowers, E. Frank

    2000-01-01

    Lead poisoning from the ingestion of spent shotgun pellets has been recognized as an important disease of North American waterfowl since Bellrose's (1959) research >40 years ago. Nation-wide regulations banning the use of lead shot for waterfowl hunting were established in 1991. We compared the prevalence of lead exposure in American black ducks (Anas rubripes) wintering on 2 areas in Tennessee before (1986-88) and after the ban (1997-99) to assess the effect of the ban on lead shot on this species. Prevalence of elevated blood lead in black ducks declined by 44% from before (11.7% prevalence) to after (6.5% prevalence) the implementation of non-toxic shot. The reduction in lead exposure was pronounced in adult black ducks (from 14.3% to 5.3%). However, prevalence in lead exposure remained similar in juvenile black ducks (from 8.2% to 8.3%). Additional evidence from lead ingestion and lead poisoning mortality events also indicates that lead exposure has declined in waterfowl in the Mississippi flyway. We believe that lead ingestion will continue to decline, despite the persistence of lead shot in some wetlands. The impact of reduced lead exposure on waterfowl populations needs to be assessed.

  7. Gene networks and toxicity pathways induced by acute cadmium exposure in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehinto, Alvine C., E-mail: alvinam@sccwrp.org [Southern California Coastal Water Research Project, Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (United States); Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Prucha, Melinda S. [Department of Human Genetics, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Colli-Dula, Reyna C.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Lavelle, Candice M.; Barber, David S. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Vulpe, Christopher D. [Department of Nutritional Sciences and Toxicology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Low-level acute cadmium exposure elicited tissue-specific gene expression changes. • Molecular initiating events included oxidative stress and disruption of DNA repair. • Metallothionein, a marker of metal exposure, was not significantly affected. • We report effects of cadmium on cholesterol metabolism and steroid synthesis. • Diabetic complications and impaired reproduction are potential adverse outcomes. - Abstract: Cadmium is a heavy metal that can accumulate to toxic levels in the environment leading to detrimental effects in animals and humans including kidney, liver and lung injuries. Using a transcriptomics approach, genes and cellular pathways affected by a low dose of cadmium were investigated. Adult largemouth bass were intraperitoneally injected with 20 μg/kg of cadmium chloride (mean exposure level – 2.6 μg of cadmium per fish) and microarray analyses were conducted in the liver and testis 48 h after injection. Transcriptomic profiles identified in response to cadmium exposure were tissue-specific with the most differential expression changes found in the liver tissues, which also contained much higher levels of cadmium than the testis. Acute exposure to a low dose of cadmium induced oxidative stress response and oxidative damage pathways in the liver. The mRNA levels of antioxidants such as catalase increased and numerous transcripts related to DNA damage and DNA repair were significantly altered. Hepatic mRNA levels of metallothionein, a molecular marker of metal exposure, did not increase significantly after 48 h exposure. Carbohydrate metabolic pathways were also disrupted with hepatic transcripts such as UDP-glucose, pyrophosphorylase 2, and sorbitol dehydrogenase highly induced. Both tissues exhibited a disruption of steroid signaling pathways. In the testis, estrogen receptor beta and transcripts linked to cholesterol metabolism were suppressed. On the contrary, genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were highly

  8. [Risk assessment and risk control for occupational exposure to chemical toxicants from an isophorone nitrile device].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dejun; Fu, Xiaokuan; Kong, Fanling; Sui, Shaofeng; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Du, Yinglin; Zhou, Jingyang

    2014-06-01

    Risk assessment and risk control for occupational exposure to chemical toxicants were performed on an isophorone nitrile device with an annual production of 5,000 tons, based on improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method, with consideration of actual situation in China and in the present project. With the use of engineering analysis and identification of occupational hazards in the improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method, hazard rating (HR) and risk assessment were performed on chemical toxicants from an isophorone nitrile device with an annual production of 5,000 tons. The chemical toxicants in the isophorone nitrile device were mainly isophorone, hydrocyanic acid, methanol, phosphoric acid, sodium hydroxide, and sodium cyanide; the HR values were mild hazard (2), extreme hazard (5), mild hazard (2), mild hazard (2), moderate hazard (3), and extreme hazard (5), respectively, and the corresponding exposure rating (ER) values were 2.09, 2.72, 2.76, 1.68, 2.0, and 1.59, respectively. The risk of chemical toxicants in this project was assessed according to the formula Risk = [HR×ER](1/2). Hydrocyanic acid was determined as high risk, sodium hydroxide and sodium cyanide as medium risk, and isophorone, methanol, and phosphoric acid as low risk. Priority in handling of risks was determined by risk rating. The table of risk control measure was established for pre-assessment of occupational hazards. With risk assessment in this study, we concluded that the isophorone nitrile device with 5,000 ton annual production was a high-occupational hazard device. This device is a project of extreme occupational hazard. The improved Singaporean semi-quantitative risk assessment method is a scientific and applicable method, and is especially suitable for pre-evaluation of on-site project with no analogy.

  9. Toxic metals in tissues of fishes from the Black Sea and associated human health risk exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavan, Gabriel; Jitar, Oana; Teodosiu, Carmen; Nicoara, Mircea; Micu, Dragos; Strungaru, Stefan-Adrian

    2017-03-01

    The anthropogenic activities in the Black Sea area are responsible for toxic metal contamination of sea food products. In this study, several toxic metals: cadmium, lead, nickel, chromium, and copper were quantified in different tissues (digestive tract, muscle, skeleton, skin) of nine fish species (Neogobius melanostomus, Belone belone, Solea solea, Trachurus mediterraneus ponticus, Sardina pilchardus, Engraulis encrasicolus, Pomatomus saltatrix, Sprattus sprattus, Scorpaena porcus) by using atomic absorption spectrometer with a high-resolution continuum source and graphite furnace technique (HR-CS GF-AAS), and the risk of fish meat consumption by the young human population was evaluated. These metals are used in high amounts in industries located near the coastline such as shipyard construction and industrial plants. Toxic metal accumulation depends on fish feeding behavior, abiotic conditions, metal chemistry, and animal physiology. For instance, cadmium was measured in the muscle of the investigated species and average values of 0.0008-0.0338 mg kg(-1) were obtained. The lowest average value of this metal was measured at benthic species N. melanostomus and the highest at the pelagic predator T. mediterraneus ponticus. Generally, the highest metal concentration was measured in the digestive tract that has the role of biofilter for these contaminants. The risk of contamination is significantly reduced by avoiding the consumption of certain fish tissues (digestive tract and skin for copper and skeleton for nickel). An estimation of the dietary metal intake to young consumers was realized for each of the studied species of fish from Romanian, Bulgarian, and Turkish waters, during the period 2001-2014 in order to evaluate the risks of chronic exposure in time due to metal toxicity. This estimation is important for the prevention of chronic exposure due to metal toxicity. Food exposure to studied metals showed a negative trend for Romania, Turkey, and Bulgaria

  10. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of selenium during a life-cycle exposure with desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besser, John M.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Ivey, Chris D.; Kunz, James L.; Annis, Mandy; Ingersoll, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    Populations of desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius; pupfish), a federally-listed endangered species, inhabit irrigation drains in the Imperial Valley agricultural area of southern California. These drains have varying degrees of selenium (Se) contamination of water, sediment, and aquatic biota. Published Se toxicity studies suggest that these levels of Se contamination may pose risk of chronic toxicity to Se-sensitive fish, but until recently there have been no studies of the chronic toxicity of Se to desert pupfish.A life-cycle Se exposure with pupfish was conducted to estimate dietary and tissue thresholds for toxic effects of Se on all life stages. The dietary exposure was based on live oligochaete worms (Lumbriculus variegatus) dosed with Se by a laboratory food chain based on selenized yeast. Oligochaetes readily accumulated Se from mixtures of selenized and control yeasts. The protocol for dosing oligochaetes for pupfish feeding studies included long-term (at least 28 days) feeding of a low-ration of yeast mixtures to large batches of oligochaetes. Oligochaetes were dosed at five Se levels in a 50-percent dilution series. Pupfish were simultaneously fed Se-dosed oligochaetes and exposed to a series of Se concentrations in water (consisting of 85 percent selenate and 15 percent selenite) to produce exposures that were consistent with Se concentrations and speciation in pupfish habitats. The nutritional characteristics of oligochaete diets were consistent across the range of oligochaete Se concentrations tested.The life-cycle exposure started with laboratory-cultured juvenile pupfish that were exposed to Se through sexual maturation and reproduction (150 days; F0 exposure). The Se exposure continued with eggs, larvae, and juveniles produced by Se-exposed parents (79 days; F1 exposure). Selenium exposure (water and diets), Se bioaccumulation (whole-body and eggs), and toxicity endpoints (juvenile and adult survival and growth; egg production and hatching

  11. Reduced cadmium accumulation and toxicity in Daphnia magna under carbon nanotube exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2015-12-01

    With increasing application and commercial production, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will inevitably be released into aquatic environments and affect the transport and toxicity of toxic metals in ecosystems. The present study examined how CNTs affected the biokinetics and toxicity of a toxic metal, cadmium (Cd), in the freshwater zooplankton Daphnia magna. The authors quantified the dissolved uptake and the 50% lethal concentration (LC50, 48 h and 72 h) of Cd in daphnids in the presence of functionalized multiwalled nanotubes (F-CNTs) with different lengths (10-30 µm vs 0.5-2 µm) and concentrations (4 mg/L and 8 mg/L). Compared with the control treatment without CNTs, both CNTs slowed down the accumulation rate of Cd in D. magna over 8 h of exposure and further reduced the accumulation thereafter. Mechanisms for the reduced Cd uptake were mainly related to the influences of CNTs on the physiological activity of daphnids. The LC50 of D. magna in the presence of Cd and shorter CNTs was almost the same as that of the control group without CNTs. However, the LC50 of the groups with normal CNTs was significantly higher than that of the control group (i.e., F-CNTs decreased Cd toxicity significantly). Meanwhile, CNTs also decreased the tolerance of D. magna to Cd. The present study suggests that different physical properties of CNTs, such as length, need to be considered in the environmental risk assessment of CNTs.

  12. Assessment of locomotion behavioral defects induced by acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dayong; XING Xiaojuan

    2008-01-01

    Locomotion behaviors are susceptible to disruption by a broad spectrum of chemicals and environmental stresses. However, no systematic testing of locomotion behavior defects induced by metal exposure has been conducted in the model organism of nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, the acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure on the locomotion behaviors was analyzed in nematodes. Endpoints of head thrash, body bend, forward turn, backward turn, and Omega/U turn were chosen to evaluate the locomotion behavioral defects. Our data suggest that the endpoints of head thrash, body bend, and forward turn will be useful for the evaluation of heavy metal toxicity in nematodes. The endpoint of head thrash could detect the toxicity from Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, and Pb exposures at a low concentration (2.5 μmol/L). The endpoint of body bend could be explored to evaluate the toxicity from all assayed heavy metal exposures at different concentrations, whereas the endpoint of forward turn will be more useful for the evaluation of heavy metal toxicity at high concentrations. Thus, endpoints of these locomotion behaviors establish a fast and economic way to assess the presence of acute toxicity from heavy metal exposure in nematode C. elegans.

  13. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation late in development increases the toxicity of oil to mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus) embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Lauren E; Magnuson, Jason; Garner, T Ross; Alloy, Matthew M; Stieglitz, John D; Benetti, Daniel; Grosell, Martin; Roberts, Aaron P

    2016-11-16

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2010 overlapped with the spawning of many pelagic fish species in the Gulf of Mexico, including mahi-mahi (Coryphaena hippurus). Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) released during the spill have been shown to cause photo-induced toxicity under ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In the present study, mahi-mahi embryos were exposed to high-energy water accommodated fractions of source and naturally weathered oils for up to 48 h. The timing of co-exposure with UV radiation varied between an early development exposure for 8 h or a late development exposure for 8 h. The UV co-exposure had a photo-induced toxic effect on hatching success for all oil types and exposure scenarios. A more sensitive developmental window to photo-induced toxicity was observed when UV exposure occurred late in development. Source Oil B was over 6-fold more toxic, and Massachusetts source oil was 1.6-fold more toxic when the embryos were co-exposed to UV light late in development. Furthermore, weathered oil from the surface co-exposure with UV late in development resulted in bradycardia in the mahi-mahi. The present study provides evidence that the developmental window when UV co-exposure occurs has a significant effect on the degree of photo-induced toxicity of oil and that UV co-exposure may exacerbate long-term cardiac effects in developing fish. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;9999:1-7. © 2016 SETAC.

  14. Testing a Microarray to Detect and Monitor Toxic Microalgae in Arcachon Bay in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Jessica U; Del Amo, Yolanda; Costes, Laurence; Medlin, Linda K

    2013-03-05

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur worldwide, causing health problems and economic damages to fisheries and tourism. Monitoring agencies are therefore essential, yet monitoring is based only on time-consuming light microscopy, a level at which a correct identification can be limited by insufficient morphological characters. The project MIDTAL (Microarray Detection of Toxic Algae)-an FP7-funded EU project-used rRNA genes (SSU and LSU) as a target on microarrays to identify toxic species. Furthermore, toxins were detected with a newly developed multiplex optical Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor (Multi SPR) and compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In this study, we demonstrate the latest generation of MIDTAL microarrays (version 3) and show the correlation between cell counts, detected toxin and microarray signals from field samples taken in Arcachon Bay in France in 2011. The MIDTAL microarray always detected more potentially toxic species than those detected by microscopic counts. The toxin detection was even more sensitive than both methods. Because of the universal nature of both toxin and species microarrays, they can be used to detect invasive species. Nevertheless, the MIDTAL microarray is not completely universal: first, because not all toxic species are on the chip, and second, because invasive species, such as Ostreopsis, already influence European coasts.

  15. Testing a Microarray to Detect and Monitor Toxic Microalgae in Arcachon Bay in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K. Medlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs occur worldwide, causing health problems and economic damages to fisheries and tourism. Monitoring agencies are therefore essential, yet monitoring is based only on time-consuming light microscopy, a level at which a correct identification can be limited by insufficient morphological characters. The project MIDTAL (Microarray Detection of Toxic Algae—an FP7-funded EU project—used rRNA genes (SSU and LSU as a target on microarrays to identify toxic species. Furthermore, toxins were detected with a newly developed multiplex optical Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor (Multi SPR and compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, we demonstrate the latest generation of MIDTAL microarrays (version 3 and show the correlation between cell counts, detected toxin and microarray signals from field samples taken in Arcachon Bay in France in 2011. The MIDTAL microarray always detected more potentially toxic species than those detected by microscopic counts. The toxin detection was even more sensitive than both methods. Because of the universal nature of both toxin and species microarrays, they can be used to detect invasive species. Nevertheless, the MIDTAL microarray is not completely universal: first, because not all toxic species are on the chip, and second, because invasive species, such as Ostreopsis, already influence European coasts.

  16. Development of an online sulfur-oxidizing bacteria biosensor for the monitoring of water toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Anup; Kang, Woo-Chang; Shin, Beom-Soo; Cho, Ju Sik; Oh, Sang-Eun

    2014-12-01

    A toxicity monitoring system based on the metabolic properties of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) in continuous and fed-batch modes has been applied for the detection of nitrite (NO2 (-)-N). In this study, the effects of different concentrations of NO2 (-)-N (0.1 to 5 mg/L) on the SOB bioreactors were tested. We found that 5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N was very toxic to the SOB bioreactors in both continuous (R1) and fed-batch (R2) modes, showing complete inhibition of SOB activity within 2 h of operation. R1 and R2 were operated in different ways; however, the EC inhibition and recovery patterns were very similar. The EC rate increased with an increasing NO2 (-)-N concentration in both continuous and fed-batch modes. The addition of 5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N in continuous mode decreased the average EC rate by 14.38 ± 2.1 μS/cm/min; while in fed-batch mode, the EC rate decreased by 23 μS/cm/min. Although the toxicity monitoring system could detect 0.5-5 mg/L NO2 (-)-N, it could not detect 0.1 mg/L NO2 (-)-N in either continuous or fed-batch operation. Thus, the SOB biosensor method presented is useful to detect toxic agents such as NO2 (-)-N within a few minutes or hours.

  17. Clinical expert panel on monitoring potential lung toxicity of inhaled oligonucleotides: consensus points and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Eric W; Boushey, Homer A; Garn, Holger; Green, Francis H; Hodges, Michael; Martin, Richard J; Murdoch, Robert D; Renz, Harald; Shrewsbury, Stephen B; Seguin, Rosanne; Johnson, Graham; Parry, Joel D; Tepper, Jeff; Renzi, Paolo; Cavagnaro, Joy; Ferrari, Nicolay

    2012-08-01

    Oligonucleotides (ONs) are an emerging class of drugs being developed for the treatment of a wide variety of diseases including the treatment of respiratory diseases by the inhalation route. As a class, their toxicity on human lungs has not been fully characterized, and predictive toxicity biomarkers have not been identified. To that end, identification of sensitive methods and biomarkers that can detect toxicity in humans before any long term and/or irreversible side effects occur would be helpful. In light of the public's greater interests, the Inhalation Subcommittee of the Oligonucleotide Safety Working Group (OSWG) held expert panel discussions focusing on the potential toxicity of inhaled ONs and assessing the strengths and weaknesses of different monitoring techniques for use during the clinical evaluation of inhaled ON candidates. This white paper summarizes the key discussions and captures the panelists' perspectives and recommendations which, we propose, could be used as a framework to guide both industry and regulatory scientists in future clinical research to characterize and monitor the short and long term lung response to inhaled ONs.

  18. Isotopically modified silver nanoparticles to assess nanosilver bioavailability and toxicity at environmentally relevant exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Marie-Noële; Dybowska, Agnieszka D.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Misra, Superb K.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in understanding the environmental implications of nanotechnology lies in studying nanoparticle uptake in organisms at environmentally realistic exposure concentrations. Typically, high exposure concentrations are needed to trigger measurable effects and to detect accumulation above background. But application of tracer techniques can overcome these limitations. Here we synthesised, for the first time, citrate-coated Ag nanoparticles using Ag that was 99.7 % 109Ag. In addition to conducting reactivity and dissolution studies, we assessed the bioavailability and toxicity of these isotopically modified Ag nanoparticles (109Ag NPs) to a freshwater snail under conditions typical of nature. We showed that accumulation of 109Ag from 109Ag NPs is detectable in the tissues of Lymnaea stagnalis after 24-h exposure to aqueous concentrations as low as 6 ng L–1 as well as after 3 h of dietary exposure to concentrations as low as 0.07 μg g–1. Silver uptake from unlabelled Ag NPs would not have been detected under similar exposure conditions. Uptake rates of 109Ag from 109Ag NPs mixed with food or dispersed in water were largely linear over a wide range of concentrations. Particle dissolution was most important at low waterborne concentrations. We estimated that 70 % of the bioaccumulated 109Ag concentration in L. stagnalis at exposures –1 originated from the newly solubilised Ag. Above this concentration, we predicted that 80 % of the bioaccumulated 109Ag concentration originated from the 109Ag NPs. It was not clear if agglomeration had a major influence on uptake rates.

  19. Evaluating Systemic Toxicity in Rabbits after Acute Ocular Exposure to Irritant Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma Sebastian Cherian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute systemic toxicity via ocular exposure route is not a well understood aspect. Any material/drug/chemical that comes in contact with the eye can evade the first pass metabolism and enter the systemic circulation through the conjunctival blood vessels or via the nasolacrimal route. In this study, the effect of ocular irritant chemicals on the systemic toxicity was assessed in rabbit. Eyes of rabbits were exposed to known ocular irritant (cetyl pyridinium chloride, sodium salicylate, imidazole, acetaminophen, and nicotinamide for 24 h and scored. After a period of 72 h, blood was collected from the animals for examining the hematological and biochemical parameters. The animals were then sacrificed and the eyes were collected for histopathology and cytokine analysis by ELISA. Splenocyte proliferation was assessed by tritiated thymidine incorporation assay. The liver and brain of the treated animals were retrieved for evaluating oxidative damage. The chemicals showed moderate to severe eye irritation. Inflammation was not evident in the histopathology but proinflammatory markers were significantly high. The splenocyte proliferation capacity was undeterred. And there was minimal oxidative stress in the brain and liver. In conclusion, acute exposure of ocular irritants was incapable of producing a prominent systemic side effect in the current scenario.

  20. Quantitative measurement of porphyrins in biological tissues and evaluation of tissue porphyrins during toxicant exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, J S; Miller, H D

    1993-10-01

    Porphyrins are formed in most eukaryotic tissues as intermediates in the biosynthesis of heme. Assessment of changes in tissue porphyrin levels occurring in response to the actions of various drugs or toxicants is potentially useful in the evaluation of chemical exposures and effects. The present paper describes a rapid and sensitive method for the extraction and quantitation of porphyrins in biological tissues which overcomes difficulties encountered in previously described methods, particularly the loss of porphyrins during extraction and interference of porphyrin quantitation by coeluting fluorescent tissue constituents. In this procedure 8- through 2-carboxyl porphyrins are quantitatively extracted from tissue homogenates using HCl and methanol and are subsequently separated from potentially interfering contaminants by sequential methanol/phosphate elution on a C-18 preparatory column. Porphyrins are then separated and measured by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and spectrofluorometric techniques. Recovery of tissue porphyrins using this method is close to 100% with an intraassay variability of less than 10%. We have employed this procedure to measure liver and kidney porphyrin concentrations in male Fischer rats and to define the distinctive changes in tissue porphyrin patterns associated with treatment with the hepatic and renal porphyrinogenic chemicals, allylisopropylacetamide, and methyl mercury hydroxide, respectively. This method is applicable to the measurement of tissue porphyrin changes resulting from drug or toxicant exposures in clinical, experimental or environmental assessments.

  1. Toxicity assessment of sodium fluoride in Drosophila melanogaster after chronic sub-lethal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Moumita; Rajak, Prem; Khatun, Salma; Roy, Sumedha

    2017-01-01

    Sodium fluoride (NaF), one of the most frequently used fluoride compound is composed of Na(+) and F(-). Apart from its use in water fluoridation, NaF also acts as a major component for different dental products like toothpastes, gels and mouth rinses etc. The present study was carried out to explore the toxic impact of chronic NaF exposure on a non-target organism, Drosophila melanogaster. The larvae exposed to different concentrations of NaF through food showed a significant increase in HSP70 expression both qualitatively and quantitatively. The altered tail length and tail intensity in Comet assay validate the increased DNA damage in treated larvae. The activity of AChE, oxidative stress marker enzymes, phase I and phase II detoxifying enzymes were found to be significantly inhibited in the treated larvae when compared to control though there was no evidence of dose dependent change in each case. The alterations in the mentioned parameters can be due to increased body Fluoride ion (F(-)) concentration since the analysis with ion electrode analyzer revealed that F(-) concentration increased significantly with NaF treatment. Hence, the results suggest that D. melanogaster manifest prominent toxic response when subjected to chronic exposure to sub-lethal NaF concentrations.

  2. Modeling physiological processes that relate toxicant exposure and bacterial population dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tin Klanjscek

    Full Text Available Quantifying effects of toxicant exposure on metabolic processes is crucial to predicting microbial growth patterns in different environments. Mechanistic models, such as those based on Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB theory, can link physiological processes to microbial growth.Here we expand the DEB framework to include explicit consideration of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Extensions considered are: (i additional terms in the equation for the "hazard rate" that quantifies mortality risk; (ii a variable representing environmental degradation; (iii a mechanistic description of toxic effects linked to increase in ROS production and aging acceleration, and to non-competitive inhibition of transport channels; (iv a new representation of the "lag time" based on energy required for acclimation. We estimate model parameters using calibrated Pseudomonas aeruginosa optical density growth data for seven levels of cadmium exposure. The model reproduces growth patterns for all treatments with a single common parameter set, and bacterial growth for treatments of up to 150 mg(Cd/L can be predicted reasonably well using parameters estimated from cadmium treatments of 20 mg(Cd/L and lower. Our approach is an important step towards connecting levels of biological organization in ecotoxicology. The presented model reveals possible connections between processes that are not obvious from purely empirical considerations, enables validation and hypothesis testing by creating testable predictions, and identifies research required to further develop the theory.

  3. Respiratory toxicity of repeated exposure to particles produced by traffic and sugar cane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli-Rocha, Flavia; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Lanzetti, Manuella; Valença, Samuel S; Silva, Luiz F F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Zin, Walter A; Faffe, Débora S

    2014-01-15

    We compared the toxicity of subchronic exposure to equivalent masses of particles from sugar cane burning and traffic. BALB/c mice received 3 intranasal instillations/week during 1, 2 or 4 weeks of either distilled water (C1, C2, C4) or particles (15μg) from traffic (UP1, UP2, UP4) or biomass burning (BP1, BP2, BP4). Lung mechanics, histology and oxidative stress were analyzed 24h after the last instillation. In all instances UP and BP groups presented worse pulmonary elastance, airway and tissue resistance, alveolar collapse, bronchoconstriction and macrophage influx into the lungs than controls. UP4, BP2 and BP4 presented more alveolar collapse than UP1 and BP1, respectively. UP and BP had worse bronchial and alveolar lesion scores than their controls; BP4 had greater bronchial lesion scores than UP4. Catalase was higher in UP4 and BP4 than in C4. In conclusion, biomass particles were more toxic than those from traffic after repeated exposures.

  4. A novel approach reveals that zinc oxide nanoparticles are bioavailable and toxic after dietary exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, M.-N.; Dybowska, A.D.; Luoma, S.N.; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2011-01-01

    If engineered nanomaterials are released into the environment, some are likely to end up associated with the food of animals due to aggregation and sorption processes. However, few studies have considered dietary exposure of nanomaterials. Here we show that zinc (Zn) from isotopically modified 67ZnO particles is efficiently assimilated by freshwater snails when ingested with food. The 67Zn from nano-sized 67ZnO appears as bioavailable as 67Zn internalized by diatoms. Apparent agglomeration of the zinc oxide (ZnO) particles did not reduce bioavailability, nor preclude toxicity. In the diet, ZnO nanoparticles damage digestion: snails ate less, defecated less and inefficiently processed the ingested food when exposed to high concentrations of ZnO. It was not clear whether the toxicity was due to the high Zn dose achieved with nanoparticles or to the ZnO nanoparticles themselves. Further study of exposure from nanoparticles in food would greatly benefit assessment of ecological and human health risks. ?? 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  5. Transcriptional signatures of regulatory and toxic responses to benzo-[a]-pyrene exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Kristin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecule ligands often have multiple effects on the transcriptional program of a cell: they trigger a receptor specific response and additional, indirect responses ("side effects". Distinguishing those responses is important for understanding side effects of drugs and for elucidating molecular mechanisms of toxic chemicals. Results We explored this problem by exposing cells to the environmental contaminant benzo-[a]-pyrene (B[a]P. B[a]P exposure activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr and causes toxic stress resulting in transcriptional changes that are not regulated through Ahr. We sought to distinguish these two types of responses based on a time course of expression changes measured after B[a]P exposure. Using Random Forest machine learning we classified 81 primary Ahr responders and 1,308 genes regulated as side effects. Subsequent weighted clustering gave further insight into the connection between expression pattern, mode of regulation, and biological function. Finally, the accuracy of the predictions was supported through extensive experimental validation. Conclusion Using a combination of machine learning followed by extensive experimental validation, we have further expanded the known catalog of genes regulated by the environmentally sensitive transcription factor Ahr. More broadly, this study presents a strategy for distinguishing receptor-dependent responses and side effects based on expression time courses.

  6. Monitoring of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a carbon-electrode manufacturing plant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delft, J.H.M. van; Steenwinkel, M-J.S.T.; Asten, J.G. van; Es, J. van; Kraak, A.; Baan, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    An investigation is presented of occupational exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in a carbon-electrode manufacturing plant, as assessed by three monitoring methods, viz, environmental monitoring of the external dose by analysis of personal air samples, biological monitoring of the

  7. Enhancement of parathion toxicity to quail by heat and cold exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, B.A.; Becker, J.M.; Nakatsugawa, T.

    1987-01-01

    Effects of ambient temperature on the acute oral toxicity of parathion were investigated in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) maintained at thermoneutral temperature (26.degree. C) or exposed to elevated (37.degree. C) or reduced (4.degree. C) temperatures commonly encountered by free-ranging wild birds. Based upon estimates of the median lethal dosage, there was up to a two-fold enhancement of parathion toxicity in birds chronically exposed to heat or cold. Twenty-four hours after administration of a low dosage (4 mg/kg body wt, po), there was markedly greater cholinesterase inhibition in surviving heat-exposed quail compared with those reared at 26.degree. C (e.g., brain acetylcholinesterase depression of 42% versus 12%). There were no differences in hepatic activities of parathion oxidase, paraoxonase, or paraoxon deethylase which could account for greater toxicity to chronically heat-exposed birds. In contrast, 4 mg parathion/kg wt elicited less plasma cholinesterase inhibition in cold-exposed quail compared to thermoneutral controls (e.g., depression after 24 hr). Increased liver weight and a doubling of paraoxonase activity may have been associated with greater tolerance to sublethal doses of parathion in chronically cold-exposed quail. These findings, together with limited field observations, indicate that the hazard associated with anticholinesterase exposure of wild birds is substantially influenced by environmental temperature.

  8. Toxic exposure of songbirds to lead in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W Nelson; Franson, J Christian; French, John B; May, Thomas; Rattner, Barnett A; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I; Warner, Sarah E; Weber, John; Mosby, David

    2013-10-01

    Mining and smelting in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District has caused widespread contamination of soils with lead (Pb) and other metals. Soils from three study sites sampled in the district contained from approximately 1,000-3,200 mg Pb/kg. Analyses of earthworms [33-4,600 mg Pb/kg dry weight (dw)] collected in the district showed likely high Pb exposure of songbirds preying on soil organisms. Mean tissue Pb concentrations in songbirds collected from the contaminated sites were greater (p toxic effects, and 4 (12%) with life-threatening toxic effects. Acid-fast renal intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are indicative of Pb poisoning, were detected in kidneys of two robins that had the greatest renal Pb concentrations (952 and 1,030 mg/kg dw). Mean activity of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in red blood cells, a well-established bioindicator of Pb poisoning in birds, was decreased by 58-82% in songbirds from the mining sites. We conclude that habitats within the mining district with soil Pb concentrations of ≥1,000 mg Pb/kg are contaminated to the extent that they are exposing ground-feeding songbirds to toxic concentrations of Pb.

  9. Uranium exposure to the tropical duckweed Lemna aequinoctialis and pulmonate snail Amerianna cumingi: fate and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Alicia C; van Dam, Rick A; Houston, Melanie A; Harford, Andrew J; Nou, Suthidha

    2010-08-01

    The discharge of catchment-management water from the Ranger uranium (U) mine into Magela Creek upstream of the Ramsar-listed Magela Floodplain in Kakadu National Park is an important part of the mine's water-management system. Because U is one of the primary toxicants associated with this water, a receiving-water trigger value (TV), based on chronic toxicity data from five local native species, was derived for U. To strengthen the data set underpinning the derivation of the TV, the chronic toxicity of U to two additional tropical freshwater species, duckweed Lemna aequinoctialis (96-hour growth rate), and pulmonate gastropod, Amerianna cumingi (96-hour reproduction), was determined. The fate of U within the test systems was an important component of the study because analysis of U concentrations during the snail tests indicated that a substantial proportion of U (approximately 25%) was being lost from the test solutions when integrated during the entire test duration. Analysis of the snails and their food for U indicated that only a small proportion that was lost from solution was being taken up by the snails. Therefore, the majority of U that was lost was considered unavailable to the snails, and thus the exposure concentrations used to calculate the toxicity estimates were adjusted downward. Integrating the loss of U from the L. aequinoctialis test solutions over time showed that only a small proportion (6% to 13%) was lost during the test: Of that, almost half (2-5%) was taken up by the plants (constituting exposure). Uranium was only moderately toxic to L. aequinoctialis, with no observed-effect concentrations, lowest observed-effect concentrations, and inhibition concentrations causing 10% and 50% effects (IC10 and IC50) values of 226, 404, 207, and 1435 microg/l, respectively. A. cumingi was found to be more sensitive to U than L. aequinoctialis, with NOEC, LOEC, IC10, and IC50 values of 60, 61, 15, and 278 microg/l, respectively. The data for these two

  10. Posaconazole exposure-response relationship: evaluating the utility of therapeutic drug monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolton, Michael J; Ray, John E; Marriott, Deborah; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2012-06-01

    Posaconazole has become an important part of the antifungal armamentarium in the prophylaxis and salvage treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs). Structurally related to itraconazole, posaconazole displays low oral bioavailability due to poor solubility, with significant drug interactions and gastrointestinal disease also contributing to the generally low posaconazole plasma concentrations observed in patients. While therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of plasma concentrations is widely accepted for other triazole antifungal agents such as voriconazole, the utility of TDM for posaconazole is controversial due to debate over the relationship between posaconazole exposure in plasma and clinical response to therapy. This review examines the available evidence for a relationship between plasma concentration and clinical efficacy for posaconazole, as well as evaluating the utility of TDM and providing provisional target concentrations for posaconazole therapy. Increasing evidence supports an exposure-response relationship for plasma posaconazole concentrations for prophylaxis and treatment of IFIs; a clear relationship has not been identified between posaconazole concentration and toxicity. Intracellular and intrapulmonary concentrations have been studied for posaconazole but have not been correlated to clinical outcomes. In view of the high mortality and cost associated with the treatment of IFIs, increasing evidence of an exposure-response relationship for posaconazole efficacy in the prevention and treatment of IFIs, and the common finding of low posaconazole concentrations in patients, TDM for posaconazole is likely to be of significant clinical utility. In patients with subtherapeutic posaconazole concentrations, increased dose frequency, administration with high-fat meals, and withdrawal of interacting medications from therapy are useful strategies to improve systemic absorption.

  11. Toxicity of silicon carbide nanowires to sediment-dwelling invertebrates in water or sediment exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwangi, Joseph N.; Wang, Ning; Ritts, Andrew; Kunz, James L.; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Li, Hao; Deng, Baolin

    2011-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNW) are insoluble in water. When released into an aquatic environment, SiCNW would likely accumulate in sediment. The objective of this study was to assess the toxicity of SiCNW to four freshwater sediment-dwelling organisms: amphipods (Hyalella azteca), midges (Chironomus dilutus), oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus), and mussels (Lampsilis siliquoidea). Amphipods were exposed to either sonicated or nonsonicated SiCNW in water (1.0 g/L) for 48 h. Midges, mussels, and oligochaetes were exposed only to sonicated SiCNW in water for 96 h. In addition, amphipods were exposed to sonicated SiCNW in whole sediment for 10 d (44% SiCNW on dry wt basis). Mean 48-h survival of amphipods exposed to nonsonicated SiCNW in water was not significantly different from the control, whereas mean survival of amphipods exposed to sonicated SiCNW in two 48-h exposures (0 or 15% survival) was significantly different from the control (90 or 98% survival). In contrast, no effect of sonicated SiCNW was observed on survival of midges, mussels, or oligochaetes. Survival of amphipods was not significantly reduced in 10-d exposures to sonicated SiCNW either mixed in the sediment or layered on the sediment surface. However, significant reduction in amphipod biomass was observed with the SiCNW either mixed in sediment or layered on the sediment surface, and the reduction was more pronounced for SiCNW layered on the sediment. These results indicated that, under the experimental conditions, nonsonicated SiCNW in water were not acutely toxic to amphipods, sonicated SiCNW in water were acutely toxic to the amphipods, but not to other organisms tested, and sonicated SiCNW in sediment affected the growth but not the survival of amphipods.

  12. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W H; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E

    2016-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations not commonly reported in the existing Se literature. Adult males and females in treatment groups were exposed, separately and together, to a dry diet spiked with 0, 12.5, 25, or 50 μg/g (dry weight) seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) for 6 days, and their embryo progeny collected for 5 days, maintained under controlled conditions and observed daily for hatchability, mortality and/or developmental toxicity. Sites of alteration included: craniofacial, pericardium and abdomen (Pc/Ab), notochord, gall bladder, spleen, blood, and swim bladder. Next, adult tissue Se concentrations (liver, skeletal muscle, ovary and testis) were determined and compared in treatment groups of bred and unbred individuals. No significant difference was found across treatment groups at the various SeMet concentrations; and, subsequent analysis compared exposed vs. control in each of the treatment groups at 10 dpf. Increased embryo mortality was observed in all treatment groups, compared to controls, and embryos had a decreased hatching rate when both parents were exposed. Exposure resulted in significantly more total altered phenotypes than controls. When altered phenotypes following exposure of both parents were higher than maternal only exposure, a male role was suggested. The comparisons between treatment groups revealed that particular types of phenotypic change may be driven by the sex of the exposed parent. Additionally, breeding reduced Se concentrations in some adult tissues, specifically the liver of exposed females

  13. Human exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls at toxic waste sites: investigations in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stehr-Green, P.A.; Welty, E.; Burse, V.W.

    1988-11-01

    Beginning in 1982, environmental and population data were evaluated from waste sites contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Pilot exposure assessment studies were conducted at 12 sites where risks of human exposure were thought to be greatest. Serum PCB levels in persons at highest risk of nonoccupationally related exposures (because of their self-reported frequencies and types of activities in contaminated areas) at 10 sites were within background ranges, even though environmental contamination levels as high as 2.5 parts per billion (ppb) in monitoring well water samples and 330,000 ppb in soil samples were measured. At the 2 remaining sites, elevated serum levels were found in these high-risk persons, which require further evaluation by community surveys. These results illustrate that, despite elevated environmental contaminant levels, unless uptake of chemicals above background exposure levels can be demonstrated, adverse health effects cannot be attributed to waste site chemicals. However, health risks due to background exposure levels, as well as in populations with elevated PCB body burdens need further study.

  14. Clear and present danger? The use of a yeast biosensor to monitor changes in the toxicity of industrial effluents subjected to oxidative colour removal treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Patrick O; Knight, Andrew W; Billinton, Nicholas; Cahill, Paul A; Dalrymple, Ian M; Hawkyard, Christopher J; Stratton-Campbell, Duncan; Walmsley, Richard M

    2007-12-01

    Discharges of coloured effluents into surface waters provide conspicuous evidence of the impact of industry on the environment. The textile industry is an obvious candidate for sources of such discharges. Conventional treatment methods appear to alleviate this situation by removing colour, however the affect on toxicity is less obvious. The objective of this study was to examine the changes in effluent toxicity during the course of two alternative wastewater treatment methods, ozonation and electrochemical oxidation, using a novel toxicity biosensor, GreenScreen EM. The biosensor is capable of measuring both general acute toxicity (cytotoxicity), and more specifically genotoxicity, that is damage to a cell's DNA structure, replication or distribution, caused by substances that may be mutagenic and/or carcinogenic. The biosensor utilises a modified strain of the brewers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, incorporating a gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) linked to the inducible promoter of the DNA damage responsive RAD54 gene. Upon exposure to a genotoxin, the production of GFP is up-regulated in parallel with RAD54, and the resulting cellular fluorescence provides a measure of genotoxicity. Acute toxicity is simultaneously determined by monitoring relative total growth of the cell culture during incubation. The results presented in this paper show that a reduction in colouration does not necessarily correspond to a reduction in effluent toxicity.

  15. A study of toxicity and differential gene expression in murine liver following exposure to anti-malarial drugs: amodiaquine and sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rath Srikanta

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amodiaquine (AQ along with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP offers effective and cheaper treatment against chloroquine-resistant falciparum malaria in many parts of sub-Saharan Africa. Considering the previous history of hepatitis, agranulocytosis and neutrocytopenia associated with AQ monotherapy, it becomes imperative to study the toxicity of co-administration of AQ and SP. In this study, toxicity and resulting global differential gene expression was analyzed following exposure to these drugs in experimental Swiss mice. Methods The conventional markers of toxicity in serum, oxidative stress parameters in tissue homogenates, histology of liver and alterations in global transcriptomic expression were evaluated to study the toxic effects of AQ and SP in isolation and in combination. Results The combination therapy of AQ and SP results in more pronounced hepatotoxicity as revealed by elevated level of serum ALT, AST with respect to their individual drug exposure regimen. Furthermore, alterations in the activity of major antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, indicating the development of oxidative stress, was more significant in AQ+SP combination therapy. cDNA microarray results too showed considerably more perturbed gene expression following combination therapy of AQ and SP as compared to their individual drug treatment. Moreover, a set of genes were identified whose expression pattern can be further investigated for identifying a good biomarker for potential anti-malarial hepatotoxicity. Conclusion These observations clearly indicate AQ+SP combination therapy is hepatotoxic in experimental Swiss mice. Microarray results provide a considerable number of potential biomarkers of anti-malarial drug toxicity. These findings hence will be useful for future drug toxicity studies, albeit implications of this study in clinical conditions need to be monitored with cautions.

  16. Monitoring and toxicity evaluation of phytoplankton on lithium manganese oxide adsorbents at lithium recovery pilot plant field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, H. O.; Kim, J. A.; Kim, J. C.; Chung, K. S.; Ryu, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    For recovery of rare mineral resources such as lithium or boron from seawater, the lithium adsorbent material have been made by Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and pilot plant was conducted in Okgye Harbor, Gangneung, Korea. The application of lithium adsorbent in pilot plant, it is important to consider the impact on the marine environment. Especially phytoplankton communities are important marine microorganism to represent marine primary product. At the same time, phytoplankton is possible to induce the decrease of lithium recovery rate due to cause of biofouling to surfaces of lithium adsorbents. Therefore long-term and periodic monitoring of phytoplankton is necessary to understand the environmental impact and biofouling problems near the lithium pilot plant. The abundance and biomass of phytoplankton have been evaluated through monthly interval sampling from February 2013 to May 2015. Abundance and species diversity of phytoplankton went up to summer from winter. When lithium adsorbents were immersing to seawater, eco-toxicities of released substances were determined using Microtox with bioluminescence bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The adsorbents were soaked in sterilized seawater and aeration for 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 14 days intervals under controlled temperature. Maximum EC50 concentration was 61.4% and this toxicity was showed in more than 10 days exposure.

  17. An Overview of the Health Hazards Due to Toxic Exposure in the Indian Work Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ramaswamy

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available Since independence, there has been a phenomenal growth in the chemical industry, the number of units rising from 98 in 1947 to 964 in 1953 and 4364 in 1976. With the national demands ever growing, this trend of growth in chemical industry will continue in future also. The chemical units handle numerous toxic chemicals such as asbestos, benzene, carbon disulphide, carcinogenic dye intermediates, lead, manganese, organophosphorus pesticides, phosgene, vinyl chloride etc.Being aware of the potential health hazards arising out of exposure to these toxic chemicals necessary safeguards against health hazards have been incorporated in the Factories Act 1948.With nearly 100,000 tonnes of asbestos, over 100,000 tonnes of benzene, and considerably large quantities of other toxic chemicals being handled in the country, understandably, the random studies and surveys by research agencies have revealed the incidence of definite        asbestosis (7 per cent, benzene intoxication in alkaloid extraction units ( 44.8 per cent, lead poisoning in storage battery units (10.6 per cent, carbon disulphide poisoning in viscose rayon units (20 per cent, mercury poisoning and intoxication in chloroalkali units (22.7 per cent, manganese poisoning in ferromanganese units (24 per cent, silicosis among slate pencil workers (54.7 per cent etc.Albeit such a condition, the cases documented in official reports are very few. Even the scattered studies by research institution in occupational health cannot be pooled to evolve a national picture, since, quite often there is no standardised approach in the studies undertaken by different institutions.After discussing the findings of studies on various toxic chemicals and substances, the paper enumerates the present deficiencies in the current studies and suggest steps for obtaining comprehensive information on health hazards.

  18. Toxicity assessment of zebrafish following exposure to CdTe QDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei, E-mail: wzhang@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lin, Kuangfei, E-mail: kflin@ecust.edu.cn [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Miao, Youna [State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment and Control on Chemical Process, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Functional Materials Chemistry, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); School of Resource and Environmental Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Dong, Qiaoxiang; Huang, Changjiang; Wang, Huili [Zhejiang Provincial Key Lab for Technology and Application of Model Organisms, Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Guo, Meijin [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Cui, Xinhong [Shanghai Institute of Landscape Gardening, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The LC{sub 50} of TGA-CdTe for zebrafish at 120 hpf was 185.9 nM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zebrafish exposed to TGA-CdTe resulted in lower hatch rate and more malformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Body length and heart beat of zebrafish declined after exposure to TGA-CdTe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Larvae exposure to TGA-CdTe elicited a higher basal swimming rate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Abnormal vascular of FLI-1 transgenic zebrafish larvae exposed to TGA-CdTe occurred. - Abstract: CdTe quantum dots (QDs) are nanocrystals of unique composition and properties that have found many new commercial applications; therefore, their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms has become a hot research topic. The lab study was performed to determine the developmental and behavioral toxicities to zebrafish under continuous exposure to low concentrations of CdTe QDs (1-400 nM) coated with thioglycolic acid (TGA). The results show: (1) the 120 h LC{sub 50} of 185.9 nM, (2) the lower hatch rate and body length, more malformations, and less heart beat and swimming speed of the exposed zebrafish, (3) the brief burst and a higher basal swimming rate of the exposed zebrafish larvae during a rapid transition from light-to-dark, and (4) the vascular hyperplasia, vascular bifurcation, vascular crossing and turbulence of the exposed FLI-1 transgenic zebrafish larvae.

  19. Exposure to toxic chemicals in the diet: is the Brazilian population at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Eloisa Dutra; Jardim, Andreia Nunes Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, in the last 20 years, dietary risk assessments have been conducted on pesticides, mycotoxins, food additives, heavy metals (mainly mercury), environmental contaminants (mainly DDT) and acrylamide, a compound formed during food processing. The objectives of this paper were to review these studies, discuss their limitations and uncertainties and identify the most critical chemicals that may pose a health risk to Brazilian consumers. The studies have shown that the cumulative intake of organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides by high consumers of fruits and vegetables may represent a health concern (up to 169% of the ARfD), although the benefits of consuming large portions of those foods most probably overcome the risks. High consumers of maize products may also be at risk due to the presence of fumonisin (355% of the PMTDI), a mycotoxin present at high levels in Brazilian maize. The studies conducted in the Brazilian Amazon have shown that riparian fish consumers are exposed to unsafe levels of mercury. However, this is a more complex issue, as mercury levels in the region are naturally high and the health benefits of a fish-based diet are well known. Studies conducted both in Brazil and internationally on acrylamide have shown that the exposure to this genotoxic compound, mainly from the consumption of French fries and potato chips, is of health concern. Reducing the population dietary exposure to toxic chemicals is a challenge for government authorities and food producers in all countries. Management strategies aimed at decreasing exposure to the critical chemicals identified in this review involve limiting the use or eliminating highly toxic pesticides, implementing good agricultural practices to decrease maize contamination by fumonisins, educating local fish-eating communities toward a fish diet less contaminated by mercury, and changing dietary habits concerning the consumption of fried potatoes, the main processed food containing acrylamide.

  20. Reproductive toxicity in Xenopus tropicalis after developmental exposure to environmental concentrations of ethynylestradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyllenhammar, Irina; Holm, Lena; Eklund, Rosita; Berg, Cecilia

    2009-01-31

    Reproductive disorders in wildlife and humans have been linked to developmental exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals. In frog tadpoles, environmental concentrations of ethynylestradiol (EE(2)) disrupt gonadal differentiation which results in female-biased sex ratios at metamorphosis indicating sex-reversal of genotypic males. It is not known if developmental exposure to estrogens results in reduced reproductive success in amphibians. The objective of this work was to investigate if exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of EE(2) during sex differentiation impairs reproductive organ development, fertility, and sexual behavior in adult frogs. A specific aim was to evaluate if testicular structure and function was affected in males that were not sex-reversed. Xenopus tropicalis tadpoles were exposed until metamorphosis to 6, 60, and 600 pM EE(2). Eight months after metamorphosis, reproductive organ morphology and fertility were evaluated. Larval EE(2)-exposure caused an increased proportion of phenotypic females indicating that sex-reversal of genotypic males is persistent. Sex-reversal was implied at concentrations as low as 6 pM (1.8 ng/l), which is comparable to levels observed in the environment. EE(2)-exposed males that were not sex-reversed had a significantly reduced fertilization rate compared with control males. Histological evaluation revealed that EE(2)-exposed males had a reduced amount of spermatozoa in the testis. Among frogs with ovaries there was a significantly higher percentage that lacked oviducts in the group exposed to 600 pM EE(2) compared with control females. No effect of EE(2) on sexual behavior was noted. The results indicate that reproduction in wild frogs might be impaired by estrogenic environmental pollutants. Similarities between the present effects and those reported in fish, birds and mammals after developmental exposure to estrogens suggest that X. tropicalis is a promising animal model for research on developmental

  1. Monitoring and modelling of exposure to ethanol in hairdressing salons.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiswinkel, van W.J.; Kromhout, H.; Onos, T.; Kersemaekers, W.

    1997-01-01

    Personal exposure to solvents was studied among hairdressers in 28 salons in two regions during two seasons in The Netherlands. Ethanol was used as a marker for solvent exposure. Auxiliary data, such as salon and work characteristics, meteorological conditions and information on the presence of

  2. Passive samplers for chemical substance monitoring and associated toxicity assessment in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, N; Devier, M H; Soulier, C; Creusot, N; Le Menach, K; Aït-Aïssa, S; Vrana, B; Budzinski, H

    2011-01-01

    The European legislation, and in particular the Water Framework Directive requires the development of cost efficient monitoring tools that can provide the required information for the assessment of water contamination. Passive sampling methods represent one of the novel tools that have a potential to be used in various regulatory monitoring programmes aimed at assessing the levels of chemical pollutants. These methods are particularly interesting for sampling polar organic pollutants in water because they provide representative information of the water quality over extended time periods (days to weeks) in environments with fluctuating contaminant concentrations. This is achieved by integrative sampling of pollutants over the whole sampler deployment period. These tools can be coupled to toxicity testing using bioassays that give information on toxic and ecotoxic hazards associated to substances that are present, these substances being identified or not. In this study the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was used in surface water to evaluate the water contamination by polar organic compounds and their potential toxicity.

  3. NTP Toxicity Study Report on the atmospheric characterization, particle size, chemical composition, and workplace exposure assessment of cellulose insulation (CELLULOSEINS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Daniel L

    2006-08-01

    Cellulose insulation (CI) is a type of thermal insulation produced primarily from recycled newspapers. The newspapers are shredded, milled, and treated with fire-retardant chemicals. The blowing process for installing CI generates a significant quantity of airborne material that presents a potential inhalation hazard to workers. CI was selected for study based upon the high production volume, the potential for widespread human exposure, and a lack of toxicity data; insufficient information was available to determine whether inhalation studies in laboratory animals were technically feasible or necessary. Studies were conducted to characterize the chemical and physical properties of CI aerosols, to evaluate the potential acute pulmonary toxicity of CI, and to assess occupational exposure of CI installers. Workplace exposure assessments were conducted in collaboration with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH, 2001). Chemical analyses were performed on samples of bulk CI from four major United States manufacturers. All samples of the bulk CI were found to contain primarily amorphous cellulose (60% to 65%) with a smaller crystalline component (35% to 40%). The crystalline phase was primarily native cellulose (75% to 85%) with a minor amount of cellulose nitrate (15% to 25%). Elemental analyses of acid digests of CI materials indicated that the major components (>0.1% by weight) included aluminum, boron, calcium, sodium, and sulfur. An acid-insoluble residue present in all four materials (3% to 5% of original sample weight) was found to consist primarily of aluminum silicate hydroxide (kaolinite; approximately 85%) with minor amounts (talc), potassium aluminum silicate hydroxide (muscovite), and titanium oxide (rutile). Solvent extracts of the bulk materials were analyzed for organic components by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. Analyses revealed a mass of poorly resolved peaks. Because of the very low concentrations

  4. Toxicity assessment of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in zebrafish embryos under different exposure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Z., E-mail: zairaclemente@yahoo.com.br [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Funcional e Molecular, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Castro, V.L.S.S. [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Moura, M.A.M. [Laboratório da Ciência das Plantas Daninhas, Instituto Biológico, APTA/SAA, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Jonsson, C.M. [Laboratório de Ecotoxicologia e Biossegurança, Embrapa CNPMA, Jaguariúna, SP (Brazil); Fraceto, L.F. [Programa de Pós-graduação em Biologia Funcional e Molecular, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Engenharia Ambiental, UNESP, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: •Nano-TiO{sub 2} accelerated hatching of the larvae. •Exposure to anatase/rutile mixture under UV light altered the equilibrium and survival of the larvae. •Nano-TiO{sub 2} caused alterations in the activities of CAT and GST. -- Abstract: The popularity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) lies in their wide range of nanotechnological applications, together with low toxicity. Meanwhile, recent studies have shown that the photocatalytic properties of this material can result in alterations in their behavior in the environment, causing effects that have not yet been fully elucidated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the toxicity of two formulations of nano-TiO{sub 2} under different illumination conditions, using an experimental model coherent with the principle of the three Rs of alternative animal experimentation (reduction, refinement, and replacement). Embryos of the fish Danio rerio were exposed for 96 h to different concentrations of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the form of anatase (TA) or an anatase/rutile mixture (TM), under either visible light or a combination of visible and ultraviolet light (UV). The acute toxicity and sublethal parameters evaluated included survival rates, malformation, hatching, equilibrium, and overall length of the larvae, together with biochemical biomarkers (specific activities of catalase (CAT), glutathione S-transferase (GST), and acid phosphatase (AP)). Both TA and TM caused accelerated hatching of the larvae. Under UV irradiation, there was greater mortality of the larvae of the groups exposed to TM, compared to those exposed to TA. Exposure to TM under UV irradiation altered the equilibrium of the larvae. Alterations in the activities of CAT and GST were indicative of oxidative stress, although no clear dose-response relationship was observed. The effects of nano-TiO{sub 2} appeared to depend on both the type of formulation and the illumination condition. The findings contribute to elucidation of the

  5. Environmentally toxicant exposures induced intragenerational transmission of liver abnormalities in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Al-Griw

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Environmental toxicants such as chemicals, heavy metals, and pesticides have been shown to promote transgenerational inheritance of abnormal phenotypes and/or diseases to multiple subsequent generations following parental and/ or ancestral exposures. This study was designed to examine the potential transgenerational action of the environmental toxicant trichloroethane (TCE on transmission of liver abnormality, and to elucidate the molecular etiology of hepatocyte cell damage. A total of thirty two healthy immature female albino mice were randomly divided into three equal groups as follows: a sham group, which did not receive any treatment; a vehicle group, which received corn oil alone, and TCE treated group (3 weeks, 100 μg/kg i.p., every 4th day. The F0 and F1 generation control and TCE populations were sacrificed at the age of four months, and various abnormalities histpathologically investigated. Cell death and oxidative stress indices were also measured. The present study provides experimental evidence for the inheritance of environmentally induced liver abnormalities in mice. The results of this study show that exposure to the TCE promoted adult onset liver abnormalities in F0 female mice as well as unexposed F1 generation offspring. It is the first study to report a transgenerational liver abnormalities in the F1 generation mice through maternal line prior to gestation. This finding was based on careful evaluation of liver histopathological abnormalities, apoptosis of hepatocytes, and measurements of oxidative stress biomarkers (lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, and nitric oxide in control and TCE populations. There was an increase in liver histopathological abnormalities, cell death, and oxidative lipid damage in F0 and F1 hepatic tissues of TCE treated group. In conclusion, this study showed that the biological and health impacts of environmental toxicant TCE do not end in maternal adults, but are passed on to offspring

  6. The Toxic Effects of Chloroform Stress Exposure on the Mediterranean Green Crab (Carcinus aestuarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARSILDA QYLI MEMAJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of different chemical substances in the aquatic environment such as chloroform, present high concern for potential adverse effects on non-target species. Chloroform, is known more formally as trichloromethane (CHCl3. It is a volatile organic compounds (VOCs which can be founded most frequently in both surface and ground water. In Albania, studies which estimate the effect of chloroform in aquatic living organisms are not present. The current study evaluates the physiological response of Mediterranean green crab Carcinus aestuarii against to chloroform exposure by measuring the haemolymph glucose level enzimatically. 20 animals were used for this experiment. Ten green crabs were assigned as the eyestalk-ablated group and the remaining ten animals as an intact group. Animals were exposed to the diluted chloroform solution on the ratio 1:1000 for 15 min (concentration: 0.005g/L. During experiments, the time exposure was recorded. Before and after exposure, the haemolymph glucose level was measured and the results showed that haemolymph glucose level, which was measured into intact animals, was significantly increased (F= 8.93, df=1, 10, p=0.014 so p0.05. The results of chloroform stress exposure indicate an aquatic environmental risk of this chemical substance for living organisms even in low concentrations. Obtained data on the biological effect of chloroform on Mediterranean green crab, Carcinus aestuarii, showed that these species can be used as bio indicator for bio-monitoring pollution of the aquatic environment.

  7. [Biological monitoring of PAH exposure among asphalt workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Laura; Calisti, Roberto; Polledri, Elisa; Barretta, Francesco; Stopponi, Roberta; Massacesi, Stefania; Bertazzi, Pieralberto; Fustinoni, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    Aim of this work was the assessment of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by urinary 1-hydroxypyrene (1-OHPyr) in asphalt workers. Median levels of 1-OHPyr resulted higher in asphalt workers than in controls (184 vs. < 20 ng/L, p < 0.001). The determinants of exposure of 1-OHPyr resulted smoking habit, the number of consecutive days at work and the job task; 1-OHPyr was also associated to urinary creatinine. End of work week 1-OHPyr is suggested as an useful indicator of occupational exposure to PAHs in bitumen fumes.

  8. Real-Time Cell-Electronic Sensing of Coal Fly Ash Particulate Matter for Toxicity-Based Air Quality Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Birget; Yuan, Chungang; Li, Jinhua; Du, Haiying; Gabos, Stephan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2016-06-20

    The development of a unique bioassay for cytotoxicity analysis of coal fly ash (CFA) particulate matter (PM) and its potential application for air quality monitoring is described. Using human cell lines, A549 and SK-MES-1, as live probes on microelectrode-embedded 96-well sensors, impedance changes over time are measured as cells are treated with varying concentrations (1 μg/mL-20 mg/mL) of CFA samples. A dose-dependent impedance change is determined for each CFA sample, from which an IC50 histogram is obtained. The assay was successfully applied to examine CFA samples collected from three coal-fired power plants (CFPs) in China. The samples were separated into three size fractions: PM2.5 (10 μm). Dynamic cell-response profiles and temporal IC50 histograms of all samples show that CFA cytotoxicity depends on concentration, exposure time (0-60 h), and cell-type (SK-MES-1 > A549). The IC50 values differentiate the cytotoxicity of CFA samples based on size fraction (PM2.5 ≈ PM10-2.5 ≫ PM10) and the sampling location (CFP2 > CFP1 ≈ CFP3). Differential cytotoxicity measurements of particulates in human cell lines using cell-electronic sensing provide a useful tool for toxicity-based air quality monitoring and risk assessment.

  9. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  10. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  11. Chronic cadmium exposure: relation to male reproductive toxicity and subsequent fetal outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zenick, H. (Univ. of Cincinnati, OH); Hastings, L.; Goldsmith, M.; Niewenhuis, R.J.

    1982-03-01

    Acute injections of high doses of Cd induced marked testicular necrosis. However, the effects of low-dose, oral Cd exposure on a chronic basis are not well documented. The present investigation was designed to examine the effects of such exposure as reflected in parameters of spermatotoxicity and histology. Moreover, the impact on fetal outcome was measured by evaluating teratological and postnatal neurobehavior endpoints. Male Long-Evans hooded rats (100 d of age) were exposed to 0, 17.2, 34.4, or 68.8 ppm Cd for 70 d. During this period, the animals were maintained on a semipurified diet to control for the contribution of Zn and other trace elements. Near the end of exposure the males were mated to three female rats. One was sacrificed on d 21 of pregnancy for teratological assessment, including fetal weight, and determination of preimplantation and postimplantation loss. The other two dams were allowed to deliver, and their offspring were tested on tasks of exploratory behavior (d 21) and learning (d 90). Subsequently, the male parent was sacrified and a variety of measures recorded including weights of testes and caudae epididymides, sperm count and sperm morphology, and Cd content of liver and kidney. One of the testes was also evaluated histologically. No significant effects were observed on any of the parameters of reproductive toxicity or fetal outcome. These findings suggest that, at the doses employed in this study, Cd did not have signficant deleterious effects on the male reproductive system. Morever, the traditional view of Cd-related testicular insult, based on acute exposure, injection protocols, needs to be reevaluated in terms of environmental relevance.

  12. HISTORICAL MONITORING OF BIOMARKERS OF EXPOSURE OF BROWN BULLHEAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomarkers of exposure to chemical contamination, benzo(a)pyrene (BAP) and naphthalene (NAPH) type metabolites were measured in brown bullhead from a heavily polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated section of the Black River, Ohio during and immediately after remedial ...

  13. Isopropanol exposure : environmental and biological monitoring in a printing works

    OpenAIRE

    Brugnone, F; Perbellini, L; Apostoli, P.; Bellomi, M; Caretta, D.

    1983-01-01

    Occupational exposure to isopropanol was studied in 12 workers by testing environmental air, alveolar air, venous blood, and urine during their work shift. Isopropanol, which ranged in environmental air between 7 and 645 mg/m3, was detected in alveolar air, where it ranged between 4 and 437 mg/m3, but not in blood or in urine. Alveolar isopropanol concentration (Ca) was significantly correlated with environmental isopropanol concentration (Ci) at any time of exposure. The value of the arithme...

  14. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alaee, Mehran [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. > Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. > NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  15. Low-Level Toxic Metal Exposure in Healthy Weaning-Age Infants: Association with Growth, Dietary Intake, and Iron Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungil Choi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Even low levels of toxic metal exposure (As, Cd, Hg, and Pb in infancy might be harmful to children’s development. This study investigated toxic metal exposure on healthy weaning-age infants and its relationship with growth, diet, and iron/anemia status. The weight, height, head circumference, whole blood levels of four toxic metals, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin of healthy infants was measured. Among 210 infants with a median age of 11.4 months (interquartile range: 10.5–12.0, the median levels of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb were 1.2 μg/L, 0.05 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 0.83 μg/dL, respectively. In adjusted linear regression models, post-birth weight gain (Pb and current head circumference (As, Pb were negatively associated with toxic metal levels. In multiple linear regression or logistic regression analysis, the duration of breastfeeding (all four metals, perceived adequacy of rice-based food intake (As, regular fish intake (As, Hg, and iron deficiency with/without anemia (Cd, Pb were associated with increased toxic metal levels. Although levels of toxic metals may not usually be high in this population, individual exposure risk may need to be assessed after considering the type of feeding or intake of complementary foods and the iron/anemia status while evaluating growth status during late infancy.

  16. Low-Level Toxic Metal Exposure in Healthy Weaning-Age Infants: Association with Growth, Dietary Intake, and Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungil; Chang, Ju Young; Hong, Jeana; Shin, Sue; Park, Jeong Su; Oh, Sohee

    2017-04-06

    Even low levels of toxic metal exposure (As, Cd, Hg, and Pb) in infancy might be harmful to children's development. This study investigated toxic metal exposure on healthy weaning-age infants and its relationship with growth, diet, and iron/anemia status. The weight, height, head circumference, whole blood levels of four toxic metals, hemoglobin, and serum ferritin of healthy infants was measured. Among 210 infants with a median age of 11.4 months (interquartile range: 10.5-12.0), the median levels of As, Cd, Hg, and Pb were 1.2 μg/L, 0.05 μg/L, 0.8 μg/L, and 0.83 μg/dL, respectively. In adjusted linear regression models, post-birth weight gain (Pb) and current head circumference (As, Pb) were negatively associated with toxic metal levels. In multiple linear regression or logistic regression analysis, the duration of breastfeeding (all four metals), perceived adequacy of rice-based food intake (As), regular fish intake (As, Hg), and iron deficiency with/without anemia (Cd, Pb) were associated with increased toxic metal levels. Although levels of toxic metals may not usually be high in this population, individual exposure risk may need to be assessed after considering the type of feeding or intake of complementary foods and the iron/anemia status while evaluating growth status during late infancy.

  17. Toxicity of mercury in macrophages. Structure and function of macrophages after experimental mercury exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, M.M.

    1995-12-31

    Mercury is recognized as an environmental heavy metal pollutant with a toxic effect on living organisms. The toxicity of this heavy metal at cellular level is described for many types of cells. Macrophages are ubiquitous in the organism and play a central role in the non-specific defence barrier against intruding micro-organisms. As a first line of defence, macrophages are crucial for the course of generalized infection, for instance with herpes simplex virus. Functions such as phagocytosis, migration, activation during infection and cytokine production are important in this context. Mercury, detectable by auto metallography, is found in the lysosomes of macrophages and this accumulation is dependent upon dose and length of time of mercury exposure. But higher concentrations cause auto interference, which indicates that mercury accumulation is dependent on lysosome functional integrity and that mercury inhibits lysosome functions. In mice intraperitoneally exposed to mercury chloride, mercury is found localized in the lysosomes of macrophages in the spleen, thymus, lymph nodes and liver as well as in peritoneal macrophages. The effect of mercury on a virus infection was examined in studies of the course of infection in mice treated with mercury and infected with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) under further exposure to mercury. To further elucidate aspects of interactions between heavy metals and macrophages and their eventual significance for the antiviral effect of macrophages, the effect of mercury on cell respiratory burst capacity and the influence of mercury on cell production of and reaction to cytokines was examined. This thesis shows that mercury is immunotoxic in that it affects macrophages both with regard to the viability and function of the cells. This is also valid for mercury concentrations that do not result in apparent pathological changes. (EG) 98 refs.

  18. Toxic exposure of songbirds to lead in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Franson, J. Christian; French, John B.; May, Thomas; Rattner, Barnett A.; Shearn-Bochsler, Valerie I.; Warner, Sarah E.; Weber, John; Mosby, David

    2013-01-01

    Mining and smelting in the Southeast Missouri Lead Mining District has caused widespread contamination of soils with lead (Pb) and other metals. Soils from three study sites sampled in the district contained from approximately 1,000–3,200 mg Pb/kg. Analyses of earthworms [33–4,600 mg Pb/kg dry weight (dw)] collected in the district showed likely high Pb exposure of songbirds preying on soil organisms. Mean tissue Pb concentrations in songbirds collected from the contaminated sites were greater (p < 0.05) than those in songbirds from reference sites by factors of 8 in blood, 13 in liver, and 23 in kidney. Ranges of Pb concentrations in livers (mg Pb/kg dw) were as follows: northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) = 0.11–3.0 (reference) and 1.3–30 (contaminated) and American robin (Turdus migratorius) = 0.43–8.5 (reference) and 7.6–72 (contaminated). Of 34 adult and juvenile songbirds collected from contaminated sites, 11 (32 %) had hepatic Pb concentrations that were consistent with adverse physiological effects, 3 (9 %) with systemic toxic effects, and 4 (12 %) with life-threatening toxic effects. Acid-fast renal intranuclear inclusion bodies, which are indicative of Pb poisoning, were detected in kidneys of two robins that had the greatest renal Pb concentrations (952 and 1,030 mg/kg dw). Mean activity of the enzyme delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in red blood cells, a well-established bioindicator of Pb poisoning in birds, was decreased by 58–82 % in songbirds from the mining sites. We conclude that habitats within the mining district with soil Pb concentrations of ≥1,000 mg Pb/kg are contaminated to the extent that they are exposing ground-feeding songbirds to toxic concentrations of Pb.

  19. Wood dust exposure in the Danish furniture industry using conventional and passive monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlünssen, V; Vinzents, P S; Mikkelsen, A B; Schaumburg, I

    2001-03-01

    A study of wood dust exposure at furniture factories in one county in Denmark was performed as a cross sectional study. Dust exposure was measured with personal passive dust monitors and calibrated against active sampling on filters. Measurements of 1685 workers were included in the exposure assessment. The passive dust monitor conversion models for equivalent concentrations of inhalable dust and total dust based on data from the present study were not significantly different from the original models. Therefore models based on all available data were used. The parameters of the distribution of equivalent concentration of inhalable dust were 0.94 mg/m3 (geometric mean) and 2.10 (geometric standard deviation). Compared with a national cross sectional study from 1988 the exposure level (geometric mean) was reduced by a factor 2.0. Inhalable dust exposure was about 50% higher than exposure measured by the Danish 'total' dust method.

  20. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Wallace, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 m in diameter) was found to produce several problems with astronaut s suits and helmets, mechanical seals and equipment, and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent of the lunar module from the lunar surface to rendezvous with the command module, much of the major portions of the contaminating soil and dust began to float, irritating the astronaut s eyes and being inhaled into their lungs. Our goal has been to understand some of the properties of lunar dust that could lead to possible hazards for humans. Due to the lack of an atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. In order to understand the possible toxic effects of the reactive dust, it is necessary to reactivate the dust, as samples returned during the Apollo missions were exposed to the atmosphere of the Earth. We have used grinding and UV exposure to mimic some of the processes occurring on the Moon. The level of activation has been monitored using two methods: fluorescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). These techniques allow the monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in solution. We have found that grinding of lunar dust produces 2-3 times the concentration of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and 10 times that of quartz. Exposure

  1. [Occupational toxic exposure in the pregnant woman. 1: principles fo individual risk assessment ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Lambert-Chhum, R; Bellemin, B; Descotes, J

    2001-12-01

    Many women of childbearing age are occupationally exposed to chemicals and concerned with the ensuing risk when pregnant. To describe the principles of individual risk assessment to be applied in pregnant women or women wishing to become pregnant that are exposed to chemicals at the workplace. Each request for risk assessment is based on a comprehensive review of the hazards of the handled products together with a thorough evaluation of the actual exposure at the workplace. A toxicological advice is then written to the gynecologist or the general practitioner in charge of the patient. When the exposure is estimated to be hazardous for the pregnancy, either total withdrawal, avoidance of certain activities or improvements of individual protective devices are recommended. The outcome of the pregnancy is systematically followed-up. An objective assessment of toxic risks in pregnant women exposed to chemicals at the workplace can be done. Thus, patients who must be withdrawn or benefit from improvements of their workstation can be selected.

  2. Workers' exposures and potential health risks to air toxics in a petrochemical complex assessed by improved methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chang-Chuan; Shie, Ruei-Hao; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Tsai, Dai-Hua

    2006-02-01

    This study was designed to comprehensively evaluate workers' potential health risks of exposure to 39 air toxics in the Ta-sher Petrochemical Complex. Open-Path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) was used to measure concentrations of air toxics. We used the measured worksite concentrations between 1997 and 1999 at 11 companies in the petrochemical complex, employing 3,100 on-site workers. The 39 measured air toxics included 10 chemicals with acute reference exposure levels (RELa), 19 chemicals with chronic reference exposure levels (RELc), and 3 chemicals classified as Class 1 or 2A human carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). We then used RELa to calculate the hazard index of acute health effects (HI ( A )) for workers in individual plants. We also calculated the hazard index of chronic health effects (HIc) and cancer risks for all workers in the entire petrochemical complex. Workers in five companies had HI ( A ) greater than 1 because of toluene, benzene, methyl ethyl ketone, chloroform and isopropanol exposures. Workers in this petrochemical complex had HIc greater than 1 because of acrylonitrile, 1,3-butadiene, hydrogen cyanide, and n,n-dimethylformamide exposures. Risk of hematopoietic system cancer because of benzene and ethylene oxide exposure, and respiratory system cancer because of 1,3-butadiene exposure was estimated to be 3.1-6.1 x 10(-4) and 5.2-7.1 x 10(-4), respectively. Our findings indicated that workers in the petrochemical complex might have excess cancer and noncancer risks due to acute or chronic exposures to air toxics from multiple emission sources.

  3. Relative toxicity of bifenthrin to Hyalella azteca in 10 day versus 28 day exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Brian S; Phillips, Bryn M; Voorhees, Jennifer P; Petersen, Megan A; Jennings, Lydia L; Fojut, Tessa L; Vasquez, Martice E; Siegler, Catherine; Tjeerdema, Ronald S

    2015-04-01

    Many watersheds in the Central Valley region of California are listed as impaired due to pyrethroid-associated sediment toxicity. The Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board is developing numeric sediment quality criteria for pyrethroids, beginning with bifenthrin. Criteria are being developed using existing data, along with data from 10 d and 28 d toxicity tests with Hyalella azteca conducted as part of the current study. A single range-finder and 2 definitive tests were conducted for each test duration. Median lethal concentrations (LC50s), as well as LC20s and inhibition concentrations (IC20s) were calculated based on measured whole sediment bifenthrin concentrations and interstitial water concentrations. Sediment LC50s were also corrected for organic C content. Average LC50s were not significantly different in 10 d versus 28 d tests with H. azteca: 9.1 and 9.6 ng/g bifenthrin for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Average LC20 values were also similar with concentrations at 7.1 and 7.0 for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Bifenthrin inhibition concentrations (IC20s) based on amphipod growth were variable, particularly in the 28 d tests, where a clear dose-response relationship was observed in only 1 of the definitive experiments. Average amphipod growth IC20s were 3.9 and 9.0 ng/g for 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Amphipod growth calculated as biomass resulted in IC20s of 4.1 and 6.3 ng/g for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Lack of a clear growth effect in the longer term test may be related to the lack of food adjustment to account for amphipod mortality in whole sediment exposures. The average C-corrected LC50s were 1.03 and 1.09 μg/g OC for the 10 d and 28 d tests, respectively. Interstitial water LC50s were determined as the measured dissolved concentration of bifenthrin relative to interstitial water dissolved organic carbon. The average LC50s for dissolved interstitial water bifenthrin were

  4. Comparative toxicity and biodistribution assessments in rats following subchronic oral exposure to copper nanoparticles and microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, In-Chul; Ko, Je-Won; Park, Sung-Hyeuk; Shin, Na-Rae; Shin, In-Sik; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Je-Hein; Kim, Hyoung-Chin; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2016-10-28

    Copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs) have great potential in electronics and biomedical fields because of their efficient thermodynamic and anti-microbial properties. However, their potential toxic effects and kinetic data following repeated exposure are still unclear. We evaluated the physicochemical properties of Cu NPs (25 nm) and copper microparticles (Cu MPs, 14-25 μm). Comparative in vivo toxicity of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was evaluated by conducting a 28-day repeated oral dose study at equivalent dose levels of 0, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg/day (vehicle, 1 % hydroxypropyl methylcellulose). We determined Cu levels in the blood, tissues, urine, and feces by using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The solubility of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was 84.5 and 17.2 %, respectively, in an acidic milieu; however, they scarcely dissolved in vehicle or intestinal milieus. The specific surface area of Cu NPs and Cu MPs was determined to be 14.7 and 0.16 m(2)/g, respectively. Cu NPs exhibited a dose-dependent increase of Cu content in the blood and tested organs, with particularly high levels of Cu in the liver, kidney, and spleen. Only for liver and kidney increased Cu levels were found in Cu MPs-treated rats. Cu NPs caused a dose-related increase in Cu levels in urine, whereas Cu MPs did not affect the urine Cu levels. Extremely high levels of Cu were detected in the feces of Cu MPs-treated rats, whereas much lower levels were detected in the feces of Cu NPs-treated rats. A comparative in vivo toxicity study showed that Cu NPs caused damages to red blood cells, thymus, spleen, liver, and kidney at ≥200 mg/kg/days, but Cu MPs did not cause any adverse effects even at the highest dose. Overall, the in vivo repeated dose toxicity study of Cu NPs and Cu MPs demonstrated that large surface area and high solubility in physiological milieus could directly influence the toxicological responses and biodistribution of Cu particles when administered orally. Under these experimental

  5. Single-walled carbon nanotubes toxicity to the freshwater amphipod Hyalella azteca: influence of sediment and exposure duration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messika Revel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials are present in various industrial applications and therefore their release into the environment including freshwater ecosystem is expected to increase. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of several parameters on the toxicity of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT to the freshwater amphipod, Hyalella azteca. The effect of period of exposure, sediment presence and possible impurities released during SWCNT preparation on survival and/or growth of such organism was evaluated. We measured a reduction of survival at concentrations ranging from 10 to 40 mg/L after 96-h exposure, while no mortality was observed with the same concentrations and in the presence of artificial sediment after 14 days of exposure. It is possible that SWCNT are adsorbed on the organic matter from the artificial sediment leading to a decrease of SWCNT bioavailability. The survival and growth toxicity tests revealed a stronger effect at 28 days compared to the 14 days of exposure, and full mortality of organisms at 1000 mg/L for both exposure times. The presence of SWCNT in the gut of survived organisms was observed. The present study demonstrates that the interaction with sediment should be considered when carbon nanotubes toxicity through water exposure is investigated.

  6. [Pediatric exposures to laundry pods or capsules: more toxic than traditional laundry products?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudet, I; Honorat, R; Casasoprana, A; Grouteau, E; Franchitto, N

    2014-06-01

    New concentrated laundry pods, available on the European market for approximately 10 years, are associated with more severe intoxications compared to classic laundry detergents. To compare symptoms and severity after exposure to classic laundry detergents and new laundry pods in a pediatric population. Retrospective study conducted between 1st January 2002 and 30th June 2013 including all laundry detergent exposure patients admitted to our tertiary level pediatric emergency unit. Collected data were age, sex, date, time and location of exposure, type of product (powder, liquid, tablets, pods), estimated ingested quantity, time of admission, clinical symptoms, severity, complications, and progression. Descriptive analysis: eighty-nine children were included. The mean age was 2.1 ± 1.5 years (range, 36 days to 10 years), 65% of patients were aged less than 2 years. The male:female ratio was 1.5 (males, 60%). After exposure, 57% of children were symptomatic and most frequently developed digestive symptoms (75%). Comparative analysis: compared to classic laundry detergent, children exposed to laundry pods were more symptomatic (96% versus 51%, P<0.0001), had more digestive signs (P=0.003), more frequently had bronchospasm (P=0.02), had a higher risk of ocular lesions (P=0.04), and exposure was more severe (poisoning severity score grade 2, 92% versus 59%, P<0.0001). Laundry pod toxicity is more severe. The chemical composition of laundry pods has a higher concentration of surfactants and ethoxylated alcohols; they have a higher viscosity and hydrotropic power. The addition of water seems to modify the alkalinity, which explains the severity of ENT, gastric, and corneal lesions. The declaration to national poison centers of these intoxications should be pursued by emergency pediatricians, physicians, and pediatric intensivists. Family physicians can encourage parents to declare adverse effects to the National Consumer Product Safety Commission. Parents need to be

  7. Evaluation of the toxicity data for peracetic acid in deriving occupational exposure limits: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pechacek, Nathan; Osorio, Magdalena; Caudill, Jeff; Peterson, Bridget

    2015-02-17

    Peracetic acid (PAA) is a peroxide-based chemistry that is highly reactive and can produce strong local effects upon direct contact with the eyes, skin and respiratory tract. Given its increasing prominence in industry, attention has focused on health hazards and associated risks for PAA in the workplace. Occupational exposure limits (OEL) are one means to mitigate risks associated with chemical hazards in the workplace. A mini-review of the toxicity data for PAA was conducted in order to determine if the data were sufficient to derive health-based OELs. The available data for PAA frequently come from unpublished studies that lack sufficient study details, suffer from gaps in available information and often follow unconventional testing methodology. Despite these limitations, animal and human data suggest sensory irritation as the most sensitive endpoint associated with inhalation of PAA. Rodent RD50 data (the concentration estimated to cause a 50% depression in respiratory rate) were selected as the critical studies in deriving OELs. Based on these data, a range of 0.36-0.51mg/m(3) (0.1-0.2ppm) was calculated for a time-weighted average (TWA), and 1.2-1.7mg/m(3) (0.4-0.5ppm) as a range for a short-term exposure limit (STEL). These ranges compare favorably to other published OELs for PAA. Considering the applicable health hazards for this chemistry, a joint TWA/STEL OEL approach for PAA is deemed the most appropriate in assessing workplace exposures to PAA, and the selection of specific values within these proposed ranges represents a risk management decision.

  8. Toxic effect in the lungs of rats after inhalation exposure to benzalkonium chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Świercz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benzalkonium chloride (BAC is a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC toxic to microorganisms. Inhalation is one of the major possible routes of human exposure to BAC. Materials and Methods: Experiments were performed on female Wistar rats. The rats were exposed to aerosol of BAC water solution at the target concentration of 0 (control group and 35 mg/m3 for 5 days (6 h/day and, after a 2-week interval, the animals were challenged (day 21 with BAC aerosol at the target concentration of 0 (control group and 35 mg/m3 for 6 h. Results: Compared to the controls, the animals exposed to BAC aerosol were characterized by lower food intake and their body weight was significantly smaller. As regards BAC-exposed group, a significant increase was noted in relative lung mass, total protein concentration, and MIP-2 in BALF both directly after the termination of the exposure and 18 h afterwards. Significantly higher IL-6 and IgE concentrations in BALF and a decrease in the CC16 concentration in BALF were found in the exposed group immediately after the exposure. The leukocyte count in BALF was significantly higher in the animals exposed to BAC aerosol compared to the controls. In the lungs of rats exposed to BAC the following effects were observed: minimal perivascular, interstitial edema, focal aggregates of alveolar macrophages, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltrations, thickened alveolar septa and marginal lipoproteinosis. Conclusion: Inhalation of BAC induced a strong inflammatory response and a damage to the blood-air barrier. Reduced concentrations of CC16, which is an immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory protein, in combination with increased IgE concentrations in BALF may be indicative of the immuno-inflammatory response in the animals exposed to BAC aerosol by inhalation. Histopathological examinations of tissue samples from the BAC-exposed rats revealed a number of pathological changes found only in the lungs.

  9. DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

    2012-05-05

    This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

  10. Quantifying human exposure to air pollution - moving from static monitoring to spatio-temporally resolved personal exposure assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E

    2013-01-01

    results from multifaceted relationships and interactions between environmental and human systems, adding complexity to the assessment process. Traditionally, approaches to quantify human exposure have relied on pollutant concentrations from fixed air quality network sites and static population...... distributions. New developments in sensor technology now enable us to monitor personal exposure to air pollutants directly while people are moving through their activity spaces and varying concentration fields. The literature review on which this paper is based on reflects recent developments in the assessment...... for the integrated assessment of human exposure to air pollutants taking into account latest technological capabilities and contextual information. Highlights ? We review and discuss recent developments and advances of research into personal exposure to air pollution. ? We emphasise the importance of personal...

  11. Monitoring of potentially toxic cyanobacteria using an online multi-probe in drinking water sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyadi, A; McQuaid, N; Prévost, M; Dorner, S

    2012-02-01

    Toxic cyanobacteria threaten the water quality of drinking water sources across the globe. Two such water bodies in Canada (a reservoir on the Yamaska River and a bay of Lake Champlain in Québec) were monitored using a YSI 6600 V2-4 (YSI, Yellow Springs, Ohio, USA) submersible multi-probe measuring in vivo phycocyanin (PC) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) fluorescence, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, temperature, and turbidity in parallel. The linearity of the in vivo fluorescence PC and Chl-a probe measurements were validated in the laboratory with Microcystis aeruginosa (r(2) = 0.96 and r(2) = 0.82 respectively). Under environmental conditions, in vivo PC fluorescence was strongly correlated with extracted PC (r = 0.79) while in vivo Chl-a fluorescence had a weaker relationship with extracted Chl-a (r = 0.23). Multiple regression analysis revealed significant correlations between extracted Chl-a, extracted PC and cyanobacterial biovolume and in vivo fluorescence parameters measured by the sensors (i.e. turbidity and pH). This information will help water authorities select the in vivo parameters that are the most useful indicators for monitoring cyanobacteria. Despite highly toxic cyanobacterial bloom development 10 m from the drinking water treatment plant's (DWTP) intake on several sampling dates, low in vivo PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial biovolume, and microcystin concentrations were detected in the plant's untreated water. The reservoir's hydrodynamics appear to have prevented the transport of toxins and cells into the DWTP which would have deteriorated the water quality. The multi-probe readings and toxin analyses provided critical evidence that the DWTP's untreated water was unaffected by the toxic cyanobacterial blooms present in its source water.

  12. Role of biomarkers in monitoring exposures to chemicals: present position, future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William P; Mutti, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in toxicology and human health. Many research groups are carrying out studies to develop biomarkers of exposure to chemicals and apply these for human monitoring. There is considerable interest in the use and application of biomarkers to identify the nature and amounts of chemical exposures in occupational and environmental situations. Major research goals are to develop and validate biomarkers that reflect specific exposures and permit the prediction of the risk of disease in individuals and groups. One important objective is to prevent human cancer. This review presents a commentary and consensus views about the major developments on biomarkers for monitoring human exposure to chemicals. A particular emphasis is on monitoring exposures to carcinogens. Significant developments in the areas of new and existing biomarkers, analytical methodologies, validation studies and field trials together with auditing and quality assessment of data are discussed. New developments in the relatively young field of toxicogenomics possibly leading to the identification of individual susceptibility to both cancer and non-cancer endpoints are also considered. The construction and development of reliable databases that integrate information from genomic and proteomic research programmes should offer a promising future for the application of these technologies in the prediction of risks and prevention of diseases related to chemical exposures. Currently adducts of chemicals with macromolecules are important and useful biomarkers especially for certain individual chemicals where there are incidences of occupational exposure. For monitoring exposure to genotoxic compounds protein adducts, such as those formed with haemoglobin, are considered effective biomarkers for determining individual exposure doses of reactive chemicals. For other organic chemicals, the excreted urinary metabolites can also give a useful and complementary indication of

  13. The plausibility of maternal toxicant exposure and nutritional status as contributing factors to the risk of autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuttall, Johnathan R

    2015-11-27

    Recent research suggests the maternal environment may be especially important for the risk of developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In particular maternal infections, micronutrient deficiencies, obesity, and toxicant exposures are likely to interact with genetic risk factors to disrupt fetal brain development.

  14. Toxic effects caused by a long-term exposure of Danio rerio to TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Pecoraro

    2015-11-01

    In conclusion, the current study confirmed only a slight cytotoxicity of TiO2 NPs on zebrafish adults after a long-term exposure, however, further and wider studies are required to establish their effects on other organs and to evaluate the severity of their toxicity.

  15. Global Proteome Profiling of a Marine Copepod and the Mitigating Effect of Ocean Acidification on Mercury Toxicity after Multigenerational Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minghua; Lee, Jae-Seong; Li, Yan

    2017-05-16

    Previously, we found that ocean acidification (OA) mitigates mercury (Hg) toxicity to marine copepod Tigriopus japonicus under multigenerational exposure (four generations, F0-F3). To determine the response mechanisms of T. japonicus against long-term exposure to OA and Hg pollution, we investigated the proteome of F3 copepods after multigenerational exposure to four conditions: pCO2 400 μatm + control; pCO2 1000 μatm + control; pCO2 400 μatm +1.0 μg/L Hg; and pCO2 1000 μatm +1.0 μg/L Hg. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that OA enhanced the copepod's energy production mainly by increasing protein assimilation and proteolysis as a compensatory strategy, which explained its physiological resilience to reduced pH. Conversely, Hg treatment decreased many critical processes, including ferric iron binding, antioxidant activity, cellular homeostasis, and glutathione metabolism, and these toxic events could translate into higher-level responses, i.e., restrained reproduction in copepods. Importantly, the mediation of Hg toxicity in T. japonicus by OA could be explained by the enhanced lysosome-autophagy pathway proteomes that are responsible for repairing and removing damaged proteins and enzymes under stress. Overall, this study provided molecular insights into the response of T. japonicus to long-term exposure of OA and Hg, with a particular emphasis on the mitigating impact of the CO2-driven acidification on Hg toxicity.

  16. Influence of acclimation and exposure temperature on the acute toxicity of cadmium to the freshwater snail Potamopyrgus antipodarum (Hydrobiidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, V.; Forbes, V.E.; Depledge, M.H. (Odense Univ. (Denmark). Ecotoxicology Group)

    1994-09-01

    Forty-eight-hour acute toxicity tests were performed to determine the influence of acclimation temperature (5, 15, and 20 C) and exposure temperature (5, 15, and 20 C) on the toxicity of cadmium to the freshwater gastropod Potamopyrgus antipodarum. Mortality varied with cadmium concentration and treatment conditions, but did not conform to conventional sigmoid concentration-response relationships. Because the shapes of the concentration-response curves were treatment dependent, a nontraditional approach for data analysis was employed. Regardless of acclimation temperature, mortality increased with increasing exposure temperature, and at all exposure temperatures snails acclimated at 15 C were most susceptible to cadmium toxicity. Estimated LC50 values were within 1 to 4 mg Cd/L. Although the shapes of the concentration-response curves were different for each treatment, the slopes were generally quite steep, indicating a uniform response for the whole population. At a given Cd concentration, acclimation temperature and exposure temperature accounted for 57 and 40%, respectively, of the variation in mortality, and LC50s changed by a factor of four. The results indicate that changes in environmental variables can alter both the degree of response and the response distribution of a population, and that past as well as prevailing environmental conditions can influence organismic responses to toxicants.

  17. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (ECMO) for Severe Toxicological Exposures: Review of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G S; Levitan, R; Wiegand, T J; Lowry, J; Schult, R F; Yin, S

    2016-03-01

    Although there have been many developments related to specific strategies for treating patients after poisoning exposures, the mainstay of therapy remains symptomatic and supportive care. One of the most aggressive supportive modalities is extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our goal was to describe the use of ECMO for toxicological exposures reported to the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). We performed a retrospective review of the ACMT ToxIC Registry from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2013. Inclusion criteria included patients aged 0 to 89 years, evaluated between January 2010 through December 2013, and received ECMO for toxicological exposure. There were 26,271 exposures (60 % female) reported to the ToxIC Registry, 10 (0.0004 %) received ECMO: 4 pediatric (18 years). Time of initiation of ECMO ranged from 4 h to 4 days, with duration from 15 h to 12 days. Exposures included carbon monoxide/smoke inhalation (2), bitter almonds, methanol, and several medications including antihistamines (2), antipsychotic/antidepressant (2), cardiovascular drugs (2), analgesics (2), sedative/hypnotics (2), and antidiabetics (2). Four ECMO patients received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) during their hospital course, and the overall survival rate was 80 %. ECMO was rarely used for poisoning exposures in the ACMT ToxIC Registry. ECMO was utilized for a variety of ages and for pharmaceutical and non-pharmaceutical exposures. In most cases, ECMO was administered prior to cardiovascular failure, and survival rate was high. If available, ECMO may be a valid treatment modality.

  18. Breath testing and personal exposure--SIFT-MS detection of breath acetonitrile for exposure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Malina; Curry, Kirsty; Squire, Marie; Kingham, Simon; Epton, Michael

    2015-05-26

    Breath testing has potential for the rapid assessment of the source and impact of exposure to air pollutants. During the development of a breath test for acetonitrile using selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) raised acetonitrile concentrations in the breath of volunteers were observed that could not be explained by known sources of exposure. Workplace/laboratory exposure to acetonitrile was proposed since this was common to the volunteers with increased breath concentrations. SIFT-MS measurements of acetonitrile in breath and air were used to confirm that an academic chemistry laboratory was the source of exposure to acetonitrile, and quantify the changes that occurred to exhaled acetonitrile after exposure. High concentrations of acetonitrile were detected in the air of the chemistry laboratory. However, concentrations in the offices were not significantly different across the campus. There was a significant difference in the exhaled acetonitrile concentrations of people who worked in the chemistry laboratories (exposed) and those who did not (non-exposed). SIFT-MS testing of air and breath made it possible to determine that occupational exposure to acetonitrile in the chemistry laboratory was the cause of increased exhaled acetonitrile. Additionally, the sensitivity was adequate to measure the changes to exhaled amounts and found that breath concentrations increased quickly with short exposure and remained increased even after periods of non-exposure. There is potential to add acetonitrile to a suite of VOCs to investigate source and impact of poor air quality.

  19. MONITORING OF EXPOSURE RADIATION DOSES LOADS FROM MEDICAL EXPOSURE TO POPULATION OF THE KIROV REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. N. Skolotnev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes medical exposure to population of the Kirov region during the period of 50 years (1961–2011 from the main types of X-ray procedures. Steady eduction trend of exposure levels to population with increase of X-ray surveys frequency has been found.

  20. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R; Wolfe, David M; Celejewski, Magda A; Alaee, Mehran; Simpson, André J; Simpson, Myrna J

    2011-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)--based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms.

  1. The problems of individual monitoring for internal exposure of monazite storage facility workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekidin, A.; Kirdin, I.; Yarmoshenko, I.; Zhukovsky, M. [Institute of Industrial Ecology of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Yekaterinburg, (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    traditionally two situations of internal inhalation exposure by alpha emitting nuclides are considered in radiological protection: occupational exposure due to inhalation of plutonium aerosols; inhalation exposure by {sup 222}Rn daughters in working places and in home. for these situations the problems of radioactive aerosols intake, nuclide dynamics in human body, internal dosimetry, nuclide excretion, monitoring of internal exposure have been investigated in details especially for plutonium inhalation exposure. The results of these studies are presented in details in ICRP Publications and UNSCEAR reports. However there is very specific case in which the special analysis of internal inhalation exposure is need. it is the working places with anomalous, extremely high concentration of thoron ({sup 220}Rn) daughters. The problems of internal radiation exposure of workers in such working place are the main topic of this publication. (authors)

  2. Genotoxicity biomarkers for monitoring occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda M. Rodríguez-Montero

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Institute of Oncology and Radiobiology (INOR is the leading institution for the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of cancer in Cuba. The main methods used in cancer treatment are surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The last one involves the handling of hazardous substances, such as cytostatics, which implies a health risk to persons occupationally exposed to it. There are two sites where a considerable among of cytostatic is handled (Ambulatory Chemotherapy Room (ACR and the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture Preparation (CUCM. Genotoxicity biomarkers of exposure and effects have been widely used to detect occupational environment hazards. Aims: To evaluate genotoxicity biomarkers indicative of exposure and effects to cytostatics. Methods: In this study were tested samples taken from the surfaces of biological safety cabinets located in the Central Unit of Cytostatic Mixture using SOS – Chromotest. We also evaluated samples of oral mucosa exfoliated cells from exposed and control subjects, by micronucleus test. Results: All subjects were exposed and subjects who administered the mixes in the institution had an increased of DNA damage in comparison with the pharmaceutical staff that prepared it and wear the primary protection barriers properly. Conclusions: These results underline the efficiency of genotoxicological biomarkers in detecting the exposure levels and the deleterious effect of cytostatics on occupationally exposed personal.

  3. Exposure to toxicants in soil and bottom ash deposits in Agbogbloshie, Ghana: human health risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obiri, S; Ansa-Asare, O D; Mohammed, S; Darko, H F; Dartey, A G

    2016-10-01

    Recycling of e-waste using informal or crude techniques poses serious health risk not only to the workers but also to the environment as whole. It is against this background that this paper sought to measure health risk faced by informal e-waste workers from exposure to toxicants such as lead, cadmium, chromium, copper, arsenic, tin, zinc and cobalt via oral and dermal contact with bottom ash and soil. Using random sampling techniques, 3 separate sites each (where burning and manual dismantling of e-wastes are usually carried) were identified, and a total of 402 samples were collected. The samples were analysed using standard methods for chemical analysis prescribed by the American Water Works Association (AWWA). Concentrations of Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, As, Sn, Zn and Co in bottom ash samples from location ASH1 are 5388 ± 0.02 mg/kg (Pb), 2.39 ± 0.01 mg/kg (Cd), 42 ± 0.05 mg/kg (Cr), 7940 ± 0.01 mg/kg (Cu), 20 ± 0.07 mg/kg (As), 225 ± 0.04 mg/kg (Sn), 276 ± 0.04 mg/kg (Zn) and 123 ± 0.04 mg/kg (Co), while concentrations of the aforementioned toxicants in soil samples at location ASG1 are as follows: 1685 ± 0.14 mg/kg (Pb), 26.89 ± 0.30 mg/kg (Cd), 36.86 ± 0.02 mg/kg (Cr), 1427 ± 0.08 mg/kg (Cu), 1622 ± 0.12 mg/kg (As), 234 ± 0.25 mg/kg (Sn), 783 ± 0.31 mg/kg (Zn) and 135 ± 0.01 mg/kg (Co); used as input parameters in assessing health risk faced by workers. The results of cancer health risk faced by e-waste workers due to accidental ingestion of As in bottom ash at ASH1 is 4.3 × 10(-3) (CTE) and 6.5 × 10(-2) (RME), i.e. approximately 4 out of 1000 e-waste workers are likely to suffer from cancer-related diseases via central tendency exposure (CTE parameters), and 7 out of every 100 e-waste worker is also likely to suffer from cancer cases by reasonable maximum exposure (RME) parameters, respectively. The cancer health risk results for the other sampling sites were found to have exceeded the acceptable

  4. Toxic volatile organic compounds in environmental tobacco smoke: Emission factors for modeling exposures of California populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air contaminants in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including, 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosamines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors ({mu}g/cigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were Generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  5. Bioaccumulation and toxicity of CuO nanoparticles by a freshwater invertebrate after waterborne and dietborne exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Marie-Noele; Misra, Superb K.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    The incidental ingestion of engineered nanoparticles (NPs) can be an important route of uptake for aquatic organisms. Yet, knowledge of dietary bioavailability and toxicity of NPs is scarce. Here we used isotopically modified copper oxide (65CuO) NPs to characterize the processes governing their bioaccumulation in a freshwater snail after waterborne and dietborne exposures. Lymnaea stagnalis efficiently accumulated 65Cu after aqueous and dietary exposures to 65CuO NPs. Cu assimilation efficiency and feeding rates averaged 83% and 0.61 g g–1 d–1 at low exposure concentrations (–1), and declined by nearly 50% above this concentration. We estimated that 80–90% of the bioaccumulated 65Cu concentration in L. stagnalis originated from the 65CuO NPs, suggesting that dissolution had a negligible influence on Cu uptake from the NPs under our experimental conditions. The physiological loss of 65Cu incorporated into tissues after exposures to 65CuO NPs was rapid over the first days of depuration and not detectable thereafter. As a result, large Cu body concentrations are expected in L. stagnalis after exposure to CuO NPs. To the degree that there is a link between bioaccumulation and toxicity, dietborne exposures to CuO NPs are likely to elicit adverse effects more readily than waterborne exposures.

  6. Exposure of marine mussels Mytilus spp. to polystyrene microplastics: Toxicity and influence on fluoranthene bioaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Pont, Ika; Lacroix, Camille; González Fernández, Carmen; Hégaret, Hélène; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Frère, Laura; Cassone, Anne-Laure; Sussarellu, Rossana; Fabioux, Caroline; Guyomarch, Julien; Albentosa, Marina; Huvet, Arnaud; Soudant, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The effects of polystyrene microbeads (micro-PS; mix of 2 and 6 μm; final concentration: 32 μg L(-1)) alone or in combination with fluoranthene (30 μg L(-1)) on marine mussels Mytilus spp. were investigated after 7 days of exposure and 7 days of depuration under controlled laboratory conditions. Overall, fluoranthene was mostly associated to algae Chaetoceros muelleri (partition coefficient Log Kp = 4.8) used as a food source for mussels during the experiment. When micro-PS were added in the system, a fraction of FLU transferred from the algae to the microbeads as suggested by the higher partition coefficient of micro-PS (Log Kp = 6.6), which confirmed a high affinity of fluoranthene for polystyrene microparticles. However, this did not lead to a modification of fluoranthene bioaccumulation in exposed individuals, suggesting that micro-PS had a minor role in transferring fluoranthene to mussels tissues in comparison with waterborne and foodborne exposures. After depuration, a higher fluoranthene concentration was detected in mussels exposed to micro-PS and fluoranthene, as compared to mussels exposed to fluoranthene alone. This may be related to direct effect of micro-PS on detoxification mechanisms, as suggested by a down regulation of a P-glycoprotein involved in pollutant excretion, but other factors such as an impairment of the filtration activity or presence of remaining beads in the gut cannot be excluded. Micro-PS alone led to an increase in hemocyte mortality and triggered substantial modulation of cellular oxidative balance: increase in reactive oxygen species production in hemocytes and enhancement of anti-oxidant and glutathione-related enzymes in mussel tissues. Highest histopathological damages and levels of anti-oxidant markers were observed in mussels exposed to micro-PS together with fluoranthene. Overall these results suggest that under the experimental conditions of our study micro-PS led to direct toxic effects at tissue, cellular and

  7. Evaluation of the use of human hair for biomonitoring the deficiency of essential and exposure to toxic elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jairo L.; Batista, Bruno L.; Nunes, Juliana A.; Passos, Carlos J.S. [Laboratorio de Toxicologia e Essencialidade de Metais, Depto. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto-USP, Avenida do Cafe s/n, Monte Alegre, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil); Barbosa, Fernando [Laboratorio de Toxicologia e Essencialidade de Metais, Depto. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto-USP, Avenida do Cafe s/n, Monte Alegre, 14040-903, Ribeirao Preto-SP (Brazil)], E-mail: fbarbosa@fcfrp.usp.br

    2008-11-01

    Monitoring the nutritional status of essential elements and assessing exposure of individuals to toxic elements is of great importance for human health. Thus, the appropriate selection and measurement of biomarkers of internal dose is of critical importance. Due to their many advantages, hair samples have been widely used to assess human exposure to different contaminants. However, the validity of this biomarker in evaluating the level of trace elements in the human body is debatable. In the present study, we evaluated the relationship between levels of trace elements in hair and whole blood or plasma in a Brazilian population. Hair, blood and plasma were collected from 280 adult volunteers for metal determination. An ICP-MS was used for sample analysis. Manganese, copper, lead and strontium levels in blood varied from 5.1 to 14.7, from 494.8 to 2383.8, from 5.9 to 330.1 and from 11.6 to 87.3 {mu}g/L, respectively. Corresponding levels in hair varied from 0.05 to 6.71, from 0.02 to 37.59, from 0.02 to 30.63 and from 0.9 to 12.6 {mu}g/g. Trace element levels in plasma varied from 0.07 to 8.62, from 118.2 to 1577.7 and from 2.31 to 34.2 {mu}g/L for Mn, Cu and Sr, respectively. There was a weak correlation (r = 0.22, p < 0.001) between lead levels in hair and blood. Moreover, copper and strontium levels in blood correlate with those levels in plasma (r = 0.64 , p < 0.001 for Cu) and (r = 0.22, p < 0.05 for Sr). However, for Cu, Mn and Sr there was no correlation between levels in hair and blood. Our findings suggest that while the idea of measuring trace elements in hair is attractive, hair is not an appropriate biomarker for evaluating Cu, Mn and Sr deficiency or Pb exposure.

  8. Medical countermeasure against respiratory toxicity and acute lung injury following inhalation exposure to chemical warfare nerve agent VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Gordon, Richard K; Rezk, Peter E; Katos, Alexander M; Wajda, Nikolai A; Moran, Theodore S; Steele, Keith E; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Sciuto, Alfred M

    2007-03-01

    To develop therapeutics against lung injury and respiratory toxicity following nerve agent VX exposure, we evaluated the protective efficacy of a number of potential pulmonary therapeutics. Guinea pigs were exposed to 27.03 mg/m(3) of VX or saline using a microinstillation inhalation exposure technique for 4 min and then the toxicity was assessed. Exposure to this dose of VX resulted in a 24-h survival rate of 52%. There was a significant increase in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein, total cell number, and cell death. Surprisingly, direct pulmonary treatment with surfactant, liquivent, N-acetylcysteine, dexamethasone, or anti-sense syk oligonucleotides 2 min post-exposure did not significantly increase the survival rate of VX-exposed guinea pigs. Further blocking the nostrils, airway, and bronchioles, VX-induced viscous mucous secretions were exacerbated by these aerosolized treatments. To overcome these events, we developed a strategy to protect the animals by treatment with atropine. Atropine inhibits muscarinic stimulation and markedly reduces the copious airway secretion following nerve agent exposure. Indeed, post-exposure treatment with atropine methyl bromide, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, resulted in 100% survival of VX-exposed animals. Bronchoalveolar lavage from VX-exposed and atropine-treated animals exhibited lower protein levels, cell number, and cell death compared to VX-exposed controls, indicating less lung injury. When pulmonary therapeutics were combined with atropine, significant protection to VX-exposure was observed. These results indicate that combinations of pulmonary therapeutics with atropine or drugs that inhibit mucous secretion are important for the treatment of respiratory toxicity and lung injury following VX exposure.

  9. Cigarette ignition propensity, smoking behavior, and toxicant exposure: A natural experiment in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Kristie M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study used a 'pre-post' research design to measure the impact of the Canadian reduced ignition propensity law on cigarette toxicity and smoking behavior among Canadian smokers. Method The study was conducted in Ontario, Canada over a ten-month period in 2005-2006, consisting of 4 laboratory visits (baseline N = 61, final N = 42. At Visit 1, questionnaire data and biospecimens were collected. During the following 24 hours, participants smoked 5 cigarettes ad libitum through a topography recording device and collected their cigarette butts. Visit 2 consisted of a questionnaire and smoking one cigarette to measure laboratory topography values. After ten months, these procedures were repeated. Results Generalized estimating equations, with law status (pre and post as a fixed within-subject factor, were used to determine changes in behavior and biomarker exposure. Overall, there were no significant differences in smoking topography, breath carbon monoxide, and saliva cotinine pre-post law (p>0.1. However, analyses revealed a significant increase in the summed concentrations of hydroxyfluorene metabolites (N = 3,, and 1-hydroxypyrene in urine, with at notable increase in hydroxyphenanthrene metabolites (N = 3 (pΣhydroxyfluorene = 0.013, 22% increase; p1-hydroxypyrene = 0.018, 24% increase; pΣhydroxyphenanthrene = 0.061, 17% increase. Conclusion While the results suggest no change in topography variables, data showed increases in exposure to three PAH biomarkers following reduced ignition propensity implementation in Canada. These findings suggest that human studies should be considered to evaluate policy impacts.

  10. Hair as a biological indicator of drug use, drug abuse or chronic exposure to environmental toxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boumba, Vassiliki A; Ziavrou, Kallirroe S; Vougiouklakis, Theodore

    2006-01-01

    In recent years hair has become a fundamental biological specimen, alternative to the usual samples blood and urine, for drug testing in the fields of forensic toxicology, clinical toxicology and clinical chemistry. Moreover, hair-testing is now extensively used in workplace testing, as well as, on legal cases, historical research etc. This article reviews methodological and practical issues related to the application of hair as a biological indicator of drug use/abuse or of chronic exposure to environmental toxicants. Hair structure and the mechanisms of drug incorporation into it are commented. The usual preparation and extraction methods as well as the analytical techniques of hair samples are presented and commented on. The outcomes of hair analysis have been reviewed for the following categories: drugs of abuse (opiates, cocaine and related, amphetamines, cannabinoids), benzodiazepines, prescribed drugs, pesticides and organic pollutants, doping agents and other drugs or substances. Finally, the specific purpose of the hair testing is discussed along with the interpretation of hair analysis results regarding the limitations of the applied procedures.

  11. St. John's wort significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of methotrexate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Ying; Juang, Shin-Hun; Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Hou, Yu-Chi

    2012-08-15

    St. John's wort (SJW, Hypericum perforatum) is one of the popular nutraceuticals for treating depression. Methotrexate (MTX) is an immunosuppressant with narrow therapeutic window. This study investigated the effect of SJW on MTX pharmacokinetics in rats. Rats were orally given MTX alone and coadministered with 300 and 150 mg/kg of SJW, and 25mg/kg of diclofenac, respectively. Blood was withdrawn at specific time points and serum MTX concentrations were assayed by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. The results showed that 300 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC(0-t) and C(max) of MTX by 163% and 60%, respectively, and 150 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC(0-t) of MTX by 55%. In addition, diclofenac enhanced the C(max) of MTX by 110%. The mortality of rats treated with SJW was higher than that of controls. In conclusion, coadministration of SJW significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of MTX. The combined use of MTX with SJW would need to be with caution.

  12. [Assessment of exposure to toxic metals released during soldering and grazing processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matczak, Wanda

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess toxic metal exposure in workers performing soldering and brazing operations. The study group included workers of three plants manufacturing electronic systems, household equipment and electric motors. Membrane filters were used to collect 50 air samples, including personal 8-h samples to assess average weighed concentration of soldering and brazing fumes and their elements, and to assay respirable dust and "background" or "area" samples. After testing by gravimetry, the filter with collected sample was mineralized with concentrated HCL/HNO3 and 10 ml sample solution in 32% HCL/4% HNO3 was prepared according to OSHA ID-206. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to assess the contents of lead (Pb), tin (Sn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), antimony (Sb), silver (Ag) and manganese (Mn) in the sample solution. The quantitative analysis revealed that time-weighed average (TWA) of fume concentrations were: soldering fume Cu brazing fume Cu < 0.003-0.038 mg/m3, Zn < 0.003-0.025 mg/m3, Pb < 0.014-0.023 mg/m3, Ag < 0.014 mg/m3, Sn < 0.15 mg/m3, Mn < 0.07-0.12 mg/m3. The results show that on the day of measurements, working conditions at solderer/brazer workplaces were safe, i.e. relevant MAC values were not exceeded.

  13. The effect of exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lestari

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Self etch dentin bonding created to make light easily activate the application of composite resin on tooth surface. The monomer content has acid effect that could irritate tooth pulp. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of light exposure duration of self etch dentin bonding on toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture by MTT assay. Self etch dentin bonding was used as on experimental unit and the sample was exposed by visible light curing in different duration: 10, 20, 30 seconds and immerged in artificial saliva in pH 7 for 24 hours. 100 µl artificial saliva was exposed to human gingival fibroblast of cell culture 20.000 cells/100 µl RPMI for 24 hours. Toxicity was evaluated by MTT assay, optical density was measured using 550 nm spectrophotometer. The data was analyzed using Kruskal Wallis in 5% degree of significance. The result showed that increasing exposure duration (10, 20, 30 seconds of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture. It is concluded that 30 seconds-exposure of self etch dentin bonding will reduce the toxicity of human gingival fibroblast of cell culture.

  14. Exposure medium: key in identifying free Ag+ as the exclusive species of silver nanoparticles with acute toxicity to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mo-Hai; Zhou, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Xiao-Ya; Chao, Jing-Bo; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-04-10

    It is still not very clear what roles the various Ag species play in the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In this study, we found that traditional exposure media result in uncontrollable but consistent physicochemical transformation of AgNPs, causing artifacts in determination of median lethal concentration (LC50) and hindering the identification of Ag species responsible for the acute toxicity of AgNPs to Daphnia magna. This obstacle was overcome by using 8 h exposure in 0.1 mmol L(-1) NaNO3 medium, in which we measured the 8-h LC50 of seven AgNPs with different sizes and coatings, and determined the concentrations of various Ag species. The LC50 as free Ag(+) of the seven AgNPs (0.37-0.44 μg L(-1)) agreed very well with that of AgNO3 (0.40 μg L(-1)), and showed the lowest value compared to that as total Ag, total Ag(+), and dissolved Ag, demonstrating free Ag(+) is exclusively responsible for the acute toxicity of AgNPs to D. magna, while other Ag species in AgNPs have no contribution to the acute toxicity. Our results demonstrated the great importance of developing appropriate exposure media for evaluating risk of nanomaterials.

  15. Exposure Medium: Key in Identifying Free Ag+ as the Exclusive Species of Silver Nanoparticles with Acute Toxicity to Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Mo-Hai; Zhou, Xiao-Xia; Yang, Xiao-Ya; Chao, Jing-Bo; Liu, Rui; Liu, Jing-Fu

    2015-04-01

    It is still not very clear what roles the various Ag species play in the toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). In this study, we found that traditional exposure media result in uncontrollable but consistent physicochemical transformation of AgNPs, causing artifacts in determination of median lethal concentration (LC50) and hindering the identification of Ag species responsible for the acute toxicity of AgNPs to Daphnia magna. This obstacle was overcome by using 8 h exposure in 0.1 mmol L-1 NaNO3 medium, in which we measured the 8-h LC50 of seven AgNPs with different sizes and coatings, and determined the concentrations of various Ag species. The LC50 as free Ag+ of the seven AgNPs (0.37-0.44 μg L-1) agreed very well with that of AgNO3 (0.40 μg L-1), and showed the lowest value compared to that as total Ag, total Ag+, and dissolved Ag, demonstrating free Ag+ is exclusively responsible for the acute toxicity of AgNPs to D. magna, while other Ag species in AgNPs have no contribution to the acute toxicity. Our results demonstrated the great importance of developing appropriate exposure media for evaluating risk of nanomaterials.

  16. Molecular toxicity of cerium oxide nanoparticles to the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is associated with supra-environmental exposure concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nadine S; Merrifield, Ruth; Williams, Tim D; Chipman, J Kevin; Lead, Jamie R; Viant, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Ceria nanoparticles (NPs) are widely used as fuel catalysts and consequently are likely to enter the environment. Their potential impacts on. biota at environmentally relevant concentrations, including uptake and toxicity, remain to be elucidated and quantitative data on which to assess risk are sparse. Therefore, a definitive assessment of the molecular and phenotypic effects of ceria NPs was undertaken, using well-characterised mono-dispersed NPs as their toxicity is likely to be higher, enabling a conservative hazard assessment. Unbiased transcriptomics and metabolomics approaches were used to investigate the potential toxicity of tightly constrained 4-5 nm ceria NPs to the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a sentinel freshwater species. A wide range of exposure concentrations were investigated from predicted environmental levels, to support hazard assessment, to supra-environmental levels to provide insight into molecular toxicity pathways. Ceria NPs were internalised into intracellular vesicles within C. reinhardtii, yet caused no significant effect on algal growth at any exposure concentration. Molecular perturbations were only detected at supra-environmental ceria NP-concentrations, primarily down-regulation of photosynthesis and carbon fixation with associated effects on energy metabolism. For acute exposures to small mono-dispersed particles, it can be concluded there should be little concern regarding their dispersal into the environment for this trophic level.

  17. Human health effects associated with exposure to toxic Cyanobacteria – what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacteria blooms are increasing worldwide, as warming water and eutrophic surface water systems support the development of blooms. As awareness of toxic cyanobacteria blooms increases, reports of associated human and animal illnesses have also increased, but ...

  18. Sub-toxic Ethanol Exposure Modulates Gene Expression and Enzyme Activity of Antioxidant Systems to Provide Neuroprotection in Hippocampal HT22 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Pérez, José A.; Quinto-Alemany, David; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol is known to cause severe systemic damage often explained as secondary to oxidative stress. Brain is particularly vulnerable to ethanol-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) because the high amounts of lipids, and because nerve cell membranes contain high amounts of peroxidable fatty acids. Usually these effects of ethanol are associated to high and/or chronic exposure to ethanol. However, as we show in this manuscript, a low and acute dose of ethanol trigger a completely different response in hippocampal cells. Thus, we have observed that 0.1% ethanol exposure to HT22 cells, a murine hippocampal-derived cell line, increases the transcriptional expression of different genes belonging to the classical, glutathione/glutaredoxin and thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin antioxidant systems, these including Sod1, Sod2, Gpx1, Gclc, and Txnrd1. Paralleling these changes, enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (tSOD), catalase, total glutathione peroxidase (tGPx), glutathione-S-reductase (GSR), and total thioredoxin reductase (tTXNRD), were all increased, while the generation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), as indicators of lipid peroxidation, and glutathione levels remained unaltered. Ethanol exposure did not affect cell viability or cell growing as assessed by real-time cell culture monitoring, indicating that low ethanol doses are not deleterious for hippocampal cells, but rather prevented glutamate-induced excitotoxicity. In summary, we conclude that sub-toxic exposure to ethanol may well be neuroprotective against oxidative insults in hippocampal cells. PMID:27512374

  19. Environmental levels, toxicity and human exposure to tributyltin (TBT)-contaminated marine environment. a review. b_antizar@hotmail.com.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca

    2008-02-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) is a toxic chemical used for various industrial purposes such as slime control in paper mills, disinfection of circulating industrial cooling waters, antifouling agents, and the preservation of wood. Due to its widespread use as an antifouling agent in boat paints, TBT is a common contaminant of marine and freshwater ecosystems exceeding acute and chronic toxicity levels. TBT is the most significant pesticide in marine and freshwaters in Europe and consequently its environmental level, fate, toxicity and human exposure are of current concern. Thus, the European Union has decided to specifically include TBT compounds in its list of priority compounds in water in order to control its fate in natural systems, due to their toxic, persistent, bioaccumulative and endocrine disruptive characteristics. Additionally, the International Maritime Organization has called for a global treaty that bans the application of TBT-based paints starting 1 of January 2003, and total prohibition by 1 of January 2008. This paper reviews the state of the science regarding TBT, with special attention paid to the environmental levels, toxicity, and human exposure. TBT compounds have been detected in a number of environmental samples. In humans, organotin compounds have been detected in blood and in the liver. As for other persistent organic pollutants, dietary intake is most probably the main route of exposure to TBT compounds for the general population. However, data concerning TBT levels in foodstuffs are scarce. It is concluded that investigations on experimental toxicity, dietary intake, potential human health effects and development of new sustainable technologies to remove TBT compounds are clearly necessary.

  20. An easy, rapid and inexpensive method to monitor tributyltin (TBT) toxicity in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Andreia; Moreira, Rafael; Mendo, Sónia

    2014-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) contamination remains a major problem worldwide. Many laboratories are committed to the development of remediation methodologies that could help reduce the negative impact of this compound in the environment. Furthermore, it is important to have at hand simple methodologies for evaluating TBT toxicity in the laboratory, besides the use of complex and costly analytical instrumentation. With that purpose, a method was adapted that is based on the inhibition of growth of an indicator strain, Micrococcus luteus ATCC 9341, under TBT. Different types of matrices, of TBT concentrations and sample treatments were tested. The results herein reported show that the bioassay method can be applied for both aqueous and soil samples and also for a high range of TBT concentrations (at least up to 500 μmol/L). Besides being cheap and easy to perform, it can be performed in any laboratory. Additionally, one possible application of the method to monitor TBT degradation is presented as an example.

  1. Controlling and monitoring exposure to radiation from medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Above a certain threshold dose, ionising radiation invariably provokes harmful effects such as burns, nausea and aplasia. Their severity increases with the dose received. There is no known threshold dose below which long-term harmful effects, such as cancer and genetic defects, do not occur. Ionising radiation comes from both natural and man-made sources. Worldwide, medical exposure accounts for 98% of the dose received from man-made sources. In France, the average dose per person received from diagnostic radiological examinations increased by more than 50% between 2002 and 2007. This increase was due to more frequent use of computed tomography (CT) and diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. The internationally defined individual dose limits for the general population do not apply to the medical uses of ionising radiation, but medical exposure must comply with the principles of radiation protection: the examination must be justified and the dose optimised. In France, shortcomings are observed in the application of these principles. In 2012, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) received 345 reports of "significant radiation protection incidents" affecting patients: 75% involving external beam radiotherapy, 15% involving nuclear medicine, 6% involving CT scans, and 4% involving radiology. In 2011, reference levels were established for the doses received by children during CT imaging and nuclear medicine procedures. When deciding whether to order a diagnostic procedure using ionising radiation, the harm-benefit balance of both the procedure and the chosen technique must be taken into account. When two procedures have the same performance, the technique that exposes the patient to the lowest dose of radiation should be chosen.

  2. Personal exposure monitoring of PM2.5 in indoor and outdoor microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinle, Susanne; Reis, Stefan; Sabel, Clive E; Semple, Sean; Twigg, Marsailidh M; Braban, Christine F; Leeson, Sarah R; Heal, Mathew R; Harrison, David; Lin, Chun; Wu, Hao

    2015-03-01

    Adverse health effects from exposure to air pollution are a global challenge and of widespread concern. Recent high ambient concentration episodes of air pollutants in European cities highlighted the dynamic nature of human exposure and the gaps in data and knowledge about exposure patterns. In order to support health impact assessment it is essential to develop a better understanding of individual exposure pathways in people's everyday lives by taking account of all environments in which people spend time. Here we describe the development, validation and results of an exposure method applied in a study conducted in Scotland. A low-cost particle counter based on light-scattering technology - the Dylos 1700 was used. Its performance was validated in comparison with equivalent instruments (TEOM-FDMS) at two national monitoring network sites (R(2)=0.9 at a rural background site, R(2)=0.7 at an urban background site). This validation also provided two functions to convert measured PNCs into calculated particle mass concentrations for direct comparison of concentrations with equivalent monitoring instruments and air quality limit values. This study also used contextual and time-based activity data to define six microenvironments (MEs) to assess everyday exposure of individuals to short-term PM2.5 concentrations. The Dylos was combined with a GPS receiver to track movement and exposure of individuals across the MEs. Seventeen volunteers collected 35 profiles. Profiles may have a different overall duration and structure with respect to times spent in different MEs and activities undertaken. Results indicate that due to the substantial variability across and between MEs, it is essential to measure near-complete exposure pathways to allow for a comprehensive assessment of the exposure risk a person encounters on a daily basis. Taking into account the information gained through personal exposure measurements, this work demonstrates the added value of data generated by the

  3. Genotype and toxicity relationships among Hyalella azteca: II. Acute exposure to fluoranthene-contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y.; Guttman, S.I.; Oris, J.T.; Huang, X.; Burton, G.A.

    2000-05-01

    This study examined the genotypic responses of Hyalella azteca to the toxicity of sediment contaminated by the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fluoranthene. The authors monitored the time to death for 696 H. azteca exposed to ultraviolet light and sediment spiked with fluoranthene. The survival distribution functions within the genotypes at each of these variable allozyme loci (acid phosphatase [ACP*], glucose-6-phosphate isomerase [GPI*], and phosphoglucomutase [PGM*]) were compared using a long-rank test. Results showed significant differences among SDFs at all three loci. No association of heterozygosity with time to death was observed. The homozygote ACP*-CC was associated with decreased survivorship compared with ACP*-AA, ACP*-BB, and ACP*-AB. However, GPI*-AA was associated with increased survivorship compared with GPI*-BB, GPI*-CC, and GPI*-BC. Significant differences in resistance also were observed for PGM*-BB versus either PGM*-AC or PGM*-BC. These results indicate that differential resistance to PAH phototoxicity was genetically related, producing significant alteration in the frequencies of several genotypes in the population.

  4. Monitoring of increased natural occuring radiation exposure; Arbeitsplatzueberwachung bei erhoehter natuerlicher Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guhr, Andreas [ALTRAC Radon-Messtechnik, Berlin (Germany); Leissring, Nick [Bergtechnisches Ingenieurbuero GEOPRAX, Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The radiation exposure due to natural occurring sources is a special challenge for the health and safety protection at workplaces. The monitoring of the radon exposure of employees in mines, radon-spa and in water works is regulated by prescription of radiation protection. The relevant compounds of the radiation exposure are the inhalation of radon and radon daughter products; terrestrial irradiation; ingestion of radioactive contaminated materials and the inhalation of contaminated dust. The monitoring of the radiation workers is realized essentially by measurements by radiation safety officer of the performing company, by an external engineering firm as well as by control measurements of experts of local authorities. The experiences in the practice have shown that in the field of operational radiation protection only a combination of personal- and operational dosimetry is suitable to avoid health hazards by work in fields with increased natural occurring radiation exposures.

  5. Qualitative toxicity assessment of silver nanoparticles on the fresh water bacterial isolates and consortium at low level of exposure concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Kumari, Jyoti; Pakrashi, Sunandan; Dalai, Swayamprava; Raichur, Ashok M; Sastry, T P; Mandal, A B; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2014-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) pose a high risk of exposure to the natural environment owing to their extensive usage in various consumer products. In the present study we attempted to understand the harmful effect of AgNPs at environmentally relevant low concentration levels (≤1ppm) towards two different freshwater bacterial isolates and their consortium. The standard plate count assay suggested that the AgNPs were toxic towards the fresh water bacterial isolates as well as the consortium, though toxicity was significantly reduced for the cells in the consortium. The oxidative stress assessment and membrane permeability studies corroborated with the toxicity data. The detailed electron microscopic studies suggested the cell degrading potential of the AgNPs, and the FT-IR studies confirmed the involvement of the surface groups in the toxic effects. No significant ion leaching from the AgNPs was observed at the applied concentration levels signifying the dominant role of the particle size, and size distribution in bacterial toxicity. The reduced toxicity for the cells in the consortium than the individual isolates has major significance in further studies on the ecotoxicity of the AgNPs.

  6. Exposure of cultured human proximal tubular cells to cadmium, mercury, zinc and bismuth: toxicity and metallothionein induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodilla, V; Miles, A T; Jenner, W; Hawksworth, G M

    1998-08-14

    The kidney, in particular the proximal convoluted tubule, is a major target site for the toxic effects of various metals. However, little is known about the early effects of these metals after acute exposure in man. In the present study we have evaluated the toxicity of several inorganic metal compounds (CdCl2, HgCl2, ZnCl2, and Bi(NO3)3) and the induction of metallothionein by these compounds in cultured human proximal tubular (HPT) cells for up to 4 days. The results showed that bismuth was not toxic even at the highest dose (100 microM) used, while zinc, cadmium and mercury exhibited varying degrees of toxicity, zinc being the least toxic and mercury the most potent. A significant degree of interindividual variation between the different isolates used in these experiments was also observed. All metals used in the present study induced MT, as revealed by immunocytochemistry. All metals showed maximal induction between 1 and 3 days after treatment. Although a certain amount of constitutive MT was present in the cultures, the intensity of the staining varied with time in culture and between the different isolates studied. No correlation could be made between the intensity of the staining in control cultures (indicating total amount of constitutive MT) and the susceptibility of a given isolate to metal toxicity. Furthermore, no correlation could be made between metal-induced MT and the susceptibility of a given isolate to that particular metal.

  7. In vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoke is a complex aerosol comprising particulate phase and gaseous vapour phase. The air-liquid interface exposure provides a possible technical means to implement whole smoke exposure for the assessment of tobacco products. In this review, the research progress in the in vitro toxicity testing of cigarette smoke based on the air-liquid interface exposure is summarized. The contents presented involve mainly cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, systems toxicology, 3D culture and cigarette smoke dosimetry related to cigarette smoke, as well as the assessment of electronic cigarette aerosol. Prospect of the application of the air-liquid interface exposure method in assessing the biological effects of tobacco smoke is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The "HAWK" tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H*(10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H*(10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  9. Comparative Measurements of Cosmic Radiation Monitors for Aircrew Exposure Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getley, I. L.; Bennett, L. G. I.; Boudreau, M. L.; Lewis, B. J.; Green, A. R.; Butler, A.; Takada, M.; Nakamura, T.

    Various commercially available electronic personal dosimeters (EPDs) have recently been flown on numerous scheduled airline flights in order to determine their viability as small, convenient monitors to measure cosmic radiation at altitude. Often, frequent flyers or airline crew will acquire such dosimeters and report the readings from their flights, without due regard for the mixed radiation field at altitude, which is different from the intended fields on land. A sampling of EPDs has been compared to two types of spectrometers, which measure the total radiation spectrum. The “HAWK” tissue equivalent proportional counter is considered a reference instrument and measures the total dose equivalent H * (10). The Liulin-4N and 4SN linear energy transfer spectrometers each have a silicon semiconductor-based PIN diode detector which provides an absorbed dose, D, but have been further developed to provide H * (10). A Thermo Electron FH41B and B-10, and EPD-N2, and several personal dosimeters (Fuji NRY-21 and NRF-20, and RADOS DIS-100) were also flown.

  10. Comparison of exposure estimation methods for air pollutants: ambient monitoring data and regional air quality simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Mercedes A; Fuentes, Montserrat; Zhang, Yang; Burr, Michael J; Bell, Michelle L

    2012-07-01

    Air quality modeling could potentially improve exposure estimates for use in epidemiological studies. We investigated this application of air quality modeling by estimating location-specific (point) and spatially-aggregated (county level) exposure concentrations of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 μm (PM(2.5)) and ozone (O(3)) for the eastern U.S. in 2002 using the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system and a traditional approach using ambient monitors. The monitoring approach produced estimates for 370 and 454 counties for PM(2.5) and O(3), respectively. Modeled estimates included 1861 counties, covering 50% more population. The population uncovered by monitors differed from those near monitors (e.g., urbanicity, race, education, age, unemployment, income, modeled pollutant levels). CMAQ overestimated O(3) (annual normalized mean bias=4.30%), while modeled PM(2.5) had an annual normalized mean bias of -2.09%, although bias varied seasonally, from 32% in November to -27% in July. Epidemiology may benefit from air quality modeling, with improved spatial and temporal resolution and the ability to study populations far from monitors that may differ from those near monitors. However, model performance varied by measure of performance, season, and location. Thus, the appropriateness of using such modeled exposures in health studies depends on the pollutant and metric of concern, acceptable level of uncertainty, population of interest, study design, and other factors.

  11. Gestational Zearalenone Exposure Causes Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity in Pregnant Rats and Female Offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zearalenone (ZEN is an oestrogenic mycotoxin commonly found in food and feed products and can affect reproduction and development in both humans and animals. This study aimed to determine the toxic effects of ZEN on maternal SD rats and the F1 female offspring. Sixty-four pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups and exposed to feed contaminated with ZEN (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg feed on gestational days (GDs 0–21. Compared with the controls, the groups exposed to 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN showed significantly decreased feed intake and body weight of pregnant rats and/or female offspring. Meanwhile, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly decreased the birth weight and viability of F1 newborn rats. Moreover, 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN diets increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations but decreased oestradiol in both maternal and F1 adult rats. In the F1 generation, ZEN caused no pathological changes in ovaries and uterus in weaned rats, but significant follicular atresia and a thinning uterine layer were found in F1 female adult rats in the 20 mg/kg ZEN group. These impairments concurred with the inhibited mRNA and protein levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1 and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD in the adult uterus and/or ovaries. Furthermore, 10 and/or 20 mg/kg ZEN exposure significantly reduced Esr1, gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr, and ATP binding cassette transporters b1 and c1 (ABCb1 and ABCc1 in the placenta and foetal and weaned F1 brains, and also produced a dose-dependent increase in 3β-HSD in the placenta. Additionally, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly upregulated ABCc5 expression in the placenta and ovaries of weaned rats. These results suggested that prenatal ZEN exposure in rats affected maternal and foetal development and may lead to long-term reproductive impairment in F1 adult females.

  12. Gestational Zearalenone Exposure Causes Reproductive and Developmental Toxicity in Pregnant Rats and Female Offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xin; Sun, Lvhui; Zhang, Niya; Li, Chong; Zhang, Jiacai; Xiao, Zhuohui; Qi, Desheng

    2017-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is an oestrogenic mycotoxin commonly found in food and feed products and can affect reproduction and development in both humans and animals. This study aimed to determine the toxic effects of ZEN on maternal SD rats and the F1 female offspring. Sixty-four pregnant rats were divided into 4 groups and exposed to feed contaminated with ZEN (0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg feed) on gestational days (GDs) 0–21. Compared with the controls, the groups exposed to 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN showed significantly decreased feed intake and body weight of pregnant rats and/or female offspring. Meanwhile, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly decreased the birth weight and viability of F1 newborn rats. Moreover, 10 and 20 mg/kg ZEN diets increased follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations but decreased oestradiol in both maternal and F1 adult rats. In the F1 generation, ZEN caused no pathological changes in ovaries and uterus in weaned rats, but significant follicular atresia and a thinning uterine layer were found in F1 female adult rats in the 20 mg/kg ZEN group. These impairments concurred with the inhibited mRNA and protein levels of oestrogen receptor-alpha (Esr1) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) in the adult uterus and/or ovaries. Furthermore, 10 and/or 20 mg/kg ZEN exposure significantly reduced Esr1, gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHr), and ATP binding cassette transporters b1 and c1 (ABCb1 and ABCc1) in the placenta and foetal and weaned F1 brains, and also produced a dose-dependent increase in 3β-HSD in the placenta. Additionally, 20 mg/kg ZEN significantly upregulated ABCc5 expression in the placenta and ovaries of weaned rats. These results suggested that prenatal ZEN exposure in rats affected maternal and foetal development and may lead to long-term reproductive impairment in F1 adult females. PMID:28067781

  13. The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS): risk assessment and real-time toxicovigilance across United States poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William A; Litovitz, Toby L; Belson, Martin G; Wolkin, Amy B Funk; Patel, Manish; Schier, Joshua G; Reid, Nicole E; Kilbourne, Edwin; Rubin, Carol

    2005-09-01

    The Toxic Exposure Surveillance System (TESS) is a uniform data set of US poison centers cases. Categories of information include the patient, the caller, the exposure, the substance(s), clinical toxicity, treatment, and medical outcome. The TESS database was initiated in 1985, and provides a baseline of more than 36.2 million cases through 2003. The database has been utilized for a number of safety evaluations. Consideration of the strengths and limitations of TESS data must be incorporated into data interpretation. Real-time toxicovigilance was initiated in 2003 with continuous uploading of new cases from all poison centers to a central database. Real-time toxicovigilance utilizing general and specific approaches is systematically run against TESS, further increasing the potential utility of poison center experiences as a means of early identification of potential public health threats.

  14. Methylene blue toxicity in zebrafish cell line is dependent on light exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Simone Rutz da; Monteiro, Mauricio da Costa; da Silva Júnior, Flavio Manoel Rodrigues; Sandrini, Juliana Zomer

    2016-08-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been widely applied in the clinical area and is currently being used in aquaculture as biocide. Some recent studies have emphasized the importance of understanding the action mechanism and the MB cellular targets. In this sense, zebrafish is considered a relevant model to study the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis as well as the cellular responses involving DNA damage and repair. So, the aim of the present study was to compare MB action mechanisms in a zebrafish cell line, both in the absence (MB alone; dark toxicity) and in the presence of photosynthetically active radiation (MB+PAR; phototoxicity). There was a significant increase of the levels of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species 3 h after MB treatment, whereas this increase was only observed 12 h after treatment with MB+PAR. All treatments with MB resulted in an increase in DNA damage after 3 and 6 h. However, cell death by apoptosis was observed from 6 h after treatment with MB+PAR and 12 h after treatment with MB alone. The expression of genes related to apoptosis was altered after MB and MB+PAR treatment. Therefore, this zebrafish cell line is sensitive to the photodynamic action of MB; MB is able to generate DNA damage and induce apoptosis in this cell line both alone and in the presence of PAR. However, the pathways leading to apoptosis in this model appear to be dependent on the type of MB exposure (in the presence or absence of PAR).

  15. In Vivo acrylamide exposure may cause severe toxicity to mouse oocytes through its metabolite glycidamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Duru; Cakar, Zeynep; Ozkavukcu, Sinan; Can, Alp; Cinar, Ozgur

    2017-01-01

    High acrylamide (ACR) content in heat-processed carbohydrate-rich foods, as well as roasted products such as coffee, almonds etc., has been found to be as a risk factor for carcinogenicity and genotoxicity by The World Health Organization. Glycidamide (GLY), the epoxide metabolite of ACR, is processed by the cytochrome P-450 enzyme system and has also been found to be a genotoxic agent. The aim of this study was to determine whether ACR and/or GLY have any detrimental effect on the meiotic cell division of oocytes. For this purpose, germinal vesicle-stage mouse oocytes were treated with 0, 100, 500, or 1000 μM ACR or 0, 25, or 250 μM GLY in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed after an intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg/day ACR of female BALB/c mice for 7 days. The majority of in vitro ACR-treated oocytes reached the metaphase-II stage following 18 hours of incubation, which was not significantly different from the control group. Maturation of the oocytes derived from in vivo ACR-treated mice was impaired significantly. Oocytes, reaching the M-II stage in the in vivo ACR-treated group, were characterized by a decrease in meiotic spindle mass and an increase in chromosomal disruption. In vitro GLY treatment resulted in the degeneration of all oocytes, indicating that ACR toxicity on female germ cells may occur through its metabolite, GLY. Thus, ACR exposure must be considered, together with its metabolite GLY, when female fertility is concerned. PMID:28182799

  16. Pulmonary toxicity of inhaled nanoscale and fine zinc oxide particles: mass and surface area as an exposure metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Meng; Wu, Kuen-Yuh; Chein, Hung-Min; Chen, Lung-Chi; Cheng, Tsun-Jen

    2011-12-01

    The total surface area is known to be an effective exposure metric for predicting the lung toxicity of low solubility nanoparticles (NPs). However, if NPs are dissolved quickly enough in the lungs, the mass may be correlated with the toxicity. Recent studies have found that the toxicity of zinc oxide (ZnO) NPs was caused by the release of zinc ions. Thus, we hypothesized that mass could be used as an exposure metric for the toxicity of ZnO NPs. Healthy Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to a low, moderate, or high dose of 35 and 250 nm ZnO particles or filtered air. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was collected to determine lung inflammation, injury and oxidative stress. The lung inflammation induced by ZnO particles according to different concentration metrics, including number, mass and surface area, was compared. The mass concentration was significantly correlated with the percentage of neutrophils (R(2) = 0.84), number of neutrophils (R(2) = 0.84) and total cells (R(2) = 0.73). Similarly, surface area concentration was significantly correlated with the percentage of neutrophils (R(2) = 0.94), number of neutrophils (R(2) = 0.81) and total cells (R(2) = 0.76). There was no correlation between the number and lung inflammation. We found that both mass and surface area were effective as metrics for the toxicity of ZnO NPs, although only surface area was previously indicated to be an effective metric. Our results are also consistent with recent study results that ZnO NPs and released zinc ions may play a role mediating the toxicity of NPs.

  17. Reproductive toxicity parameters and biological monitoring in occupationally and environmentally boron-exposed persons in Bandirma, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duydu, Yalçın; Başaran, Nurşen; Üstündağ, Aylin; Aydin, Sevtap; Ündeğer, Ülkü; Ataman, Osman Yavuz; Aydos, Kaan; Düker, Yalçın; Ickstadt, Katja; Waltrup, Britta Schulze; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2011-06-01

    Boric acid and sodium borates have been considered as being "toxic to reproduction and development", following results of animal studies with high doses. Experimentally, a NOAEL (no observed adverse effect level) of 17.5 mg B/kg-bw/day has been identified for the (male) reproductive effects of boron in a multigeneration study of rats, and a NOAEL for the developmental effects in rats was identified at 9.6 mg B/kg-bw/day. These values are being taken as the basis of current EU safety assessments. The present study was conducted to investigate the reproductive effects of boron exposure in workers employed in boric acid production plant in Bandirma, Turkey. In order to characterize the external and internal boron exposures, boron was determined in biological samples (blood, urine, semen), in workplace air, in food, and in water sources. Unfavorable effects of boron exposure on the reproductive toxicity indicators (concentration, motility, morphology of the sperm cells and blood levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and total testosterone) were not observed. The mean calculated daily boron exposure (DBE) of the highly exposed group was 14.45 ± 6.57 (3.32-35.62) mg/day. These human exposures represent worst-case exposure conditions to boric acid/borates in Turkey. These exposure levels are considerably lower than exposures, which have previously led to reproductive effects in experimental animals. In conclusion, this means that dose levels of boron associated with developmental and reproductive toxic effects in animals are by far not reachable for humans under conditions of normal handling and use.

  18. Studies on the prenatal toxicity of toluene in rabbits following inhalation exposure and proposal of a pregnancy guidance value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimisch, H.J.; Hellwig, J. (BASF AG, Ludwigshafen am Rhein (Germany). Abt. fuer Toxikologie); Hofmann, A. (Merck (E.), Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie)

    1992-07-01

    Prenatal toxicity of toluene was determined in two separate studies by inhalation exposure of Himalayan rabbits. In the first study 15 artificially inseminated females per group were exposed to 30, 100, or 300 ppm and in the second study 20 artificially inseminated females per group inhaled 100 or 500 ppm. In each case the rabbits were exposed for 6 hours per day from day 6 post-insemination (p.i.) to day 18 p.i. The respective controls inhaled conditioned clean air under the same exposure conditions. No signs of maternal toxicity were observed. All data obtained on gestational parameters were found to be within the variation range reported for this rabbit strain. The fetal external, soft tissue and skeletal findings, were seen in toluene exposed fetuses in a frequency similar to the corresponding and/or historical controls. Differences observed between the groups were not concentration dependent and were considered incidental rather than compound related. Therefore, toluene was not embryotoxic, fetotoxic, or teratogenic for rabbits exposed during the period of organogenesis. The highest concentration tested under these conditions (500 ppm) was found to be a no-observable-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) for both the adult and the fetal Himalayan rabbit. Based on these and previous results of animal studies of prenatal toxicity, a safety or uncertainty factor approach is considered for setting limits of exposure for women at workplaces. A pregnancy guidance value of 20 ppm is proposed. (orig.).

  19. Human monitoring of exposure to organic solvents. I Benzene, phenol, toluene, cresols and xylenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen EHJM; de Fluiter P; TOX

    1994-01-01

    In this report the conclusions of a literature study has been summarized concerning the monitoring of the general population to exposure to benzene-like solvents. Since the Dutch population is exposed to concentrations far below the ppm level, the conclusions on the suitability of biomarkers are

  20. Air nicotine monitoring for second hand smoke exposure in public places in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish Kaur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Air nicotine monitoring is an established method of measuring exposure to second hand smoke (SHS. Not much research has been done in India to measure air nicotine for the purpose of studying exposure to SHS. It is a risk factor and many diseases are known to occur among non smokers if they are exposed to second hand smoke. Objective: To conduct monitoring of air nicotine for second hand smoke exposure in public places across major cities in India. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional survey was conducted across four cities across the country, using passive air monitoring. The buildings included hospitals, secondary schools, Governmental offices, bars and restaurants. The buildings were selected through convenience sampling method keeping in view specific sentinel locations of interest. Result: The presence of air nicotine was recorded in most of the buildings under the study, which included government buildings, hospitals, schools, restaurants and entertainment venues (bars in all four cities under the study. The highest median levels of air nicotine were found in entertainment venues and restaurants in cities. Conclusion: The presence of air nicotine in indoor public places indicates weak implementation of existing smoke free law in India. The findings of this study provide a baseline characterization of exposure to SHS in public places in India, which could be used to promote clean indoor air policies and programs and monitor and evaluate the progress and future smoke-free initiatives in India.

  1. Multicenter Study of Posaconazole Therapeutic Drug Monitoring: Exposure-Response Relationship and Factors Affecting Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Dolton, Michael J; Ray, John E.; Chen, Sharon C.-A.; Ng, Kingsley; Pont, Lisa; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    Posaconazole has an important role in the prophylaxis and salvage treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs), although poor and variable bioavailability remains an important clinical concern. Therapeutic drug monitoring of posaconazole concentrations has remained contentious, with the use of relatively small patient cohorts in previous studies hindering the assessment of exposure-response relationships. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to investigate relationships between posaco...

  2. Human monitoring of exposure to organic solvents. I Benzene, phenol, toluene, cresols and xylenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen EHJM; de Fluiter P; TOX

    1994-01-01

    In this report the conclusions of a literature study has been summarized concerning the monitoring of the general population to exposure to benzene-like solvents. Since the Dutch population is exposed to concentrations far below the ppm level, the conclusions on the suitability of biomarkers are ba

  3. Exposure to Violence, Parental Monitoring, and Television Viewing as Contributors to Children's Psychological Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Mark I.; Flannery, Daniel J.; Guo, Shenyang; Miller, David; Leibbrandt, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relative contributions of exposure to violence, parental monitoring, and television viewing habits to children's self-reported symptoms of psychological trauma. Children in grades 3-8 in 11 public schools completed an anonymous self-report questionnaire administered during usual school hours. The final sample was comprised…

  4. Transition in occupational radiation exposure monitoring methods in diagnostic and interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lönnroth, Nadja; Hirvonen-Kari, Mirja; Timonen, Marjut; Savolainen, Sauli; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2012-08-01

    Radiation exposure monitoring is a traditional keystone of occupational radiation safety measures in medical imaging. The aim of this study was to review the data on occupational exposures in a large central university hospital radiology organisation and propose changes in the radiation worker categories and methods of exposure monitoring. An additional objective was to evaluate the development of electronic personal dosimeters and their potential in the digitised radiology environment. The personal equivalent dose of 267 radiation workers (116 radiologists and 151 radiographers) was monitored using personal dosimeters during the years 2006-2010. Accumulated exposure monitoring results exceeding the registration threshold were observed in the personal dosimeters of 73 workers (59 radiologists' doses ranged from 0.1 to 45.1 mSv; 14 radiographers' doses ranged from 0.1 to 1.3 mSv). The accumulated personal equivalent doses are generally very small, only a few angiography radiologists have doses >10 mSv per 5 y. The typical effective doses are dosimeters. An active real-time dosimetry system is warranted to support radiation protection strategy where optimisation aspects, including improving working methods, are essential.

  5. Exposure to Violence, Parental Monitoring, and Television Viewing as Contributors to Children's Psychological Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Mark I.; Flannery, Daniel J.; Guo, Shenyang; Miller, David; Leibbrandt, Sylvia

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relative contributions of exposure to violence, parental monitoring, and television viewing habits to children's self-reported symptoms of psychological trauma. Children in grades 3-8 in 11 public schools completed an anonymous self-report questionnaire administered during usual school hours. The final sample was comprised…

  6. Exposure to the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium catenella modulates juvenile oyster Crassostrea gigas hemocyte variables subjected to different biotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassudrie, Malwenn; Soudant, Philippe; Nicolas, Jean-Louis; Miner, Philippe; Le Grand, Jacqueline; Lambert, Christophe; Le Goïc, Nelly; Hégaret, Hélène; Fabioux, Caroline

    2016-04-01

    The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas is an important commercial species cultured throughout the world. Oyster production practices often include transfers of animals into new environments that can be stressful, especially at young ages. This study was undertaken to determine if a toxic Alexandrium bloom, occurring repeatedly in French oyster beds, could modulate juvenile oyster cellular immune responses (i.e. hemocyte variables). We simulated planting on commercial beds by conducting a cohabitation exposure of juvenile, "specific pathogen-free" (SPF) oysters (naïve from the environment) with previously field-exposed oysters to induce interactions with new microorganisms. Indeed, toxic Alexandrium spp. exposures have been reported to modulate bivalve interaction with specific pathogens, as well as physiological and immunological variables in bivalves. In summary, SPF oysters were subjected to an artificial bloom of Alexandrium catenella, simultaneously with a cohabitation challenge. Exposure to A. catenella, and thus to the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) and extracellular bioactive compounds produced by this alga, induced higher concentration, size, complexity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production of circulating hemocytes. Challenge by cohabitation with field-exposed oysters also activated these hemocyte responses, suggesting a defense response to new microorganism exposure. These hemocyte responses to cohabitation challenge, however, were partially inhibited by A. catenella exposure, which enhanced hemocyte mortality, suggesting either detrimental effects of the interaction of both stressors on immune capacity, or the implementation of an alternative immune strategy through apoptosis. Indeed, no infection with specific pathogens (herpesvirus OsHV-1 or Vibrio aesturianus) was detected. Additionally, lower PST accumulation in challenged oysters suggests a physiological impairment through alteration of feeding-related processes. Overall, results of this

  7. Real-time measurement of dust in the workplace using video exposure monitoring: Farming to pharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, P. T.; Forth, A. R.; Clark, R. D. R.; Dowker, K. P.; Thorpe, A.

    2009-02-01

    Real-time, photometric, portable dust monitors have been employed for video exposure monitoring (VEM) to measure and highlight dust levels generated by work activities, illustrate dust control techniques, and demonstrate good practice. Two workplaces, presenting different challenges for measurement, were used to illustrate the capabilities of VEM: (a) poultry farming activities and (b) powder transfer operations in a pharmaceutical company. For the poultry farm work, the real-time monitors were calibrated with respect to the respirable and inhalable dust concentrations using cyclone and IOM reference samplers respectively. Different rankings of exposure for typical activities were found on the small farm studied here compared to previous exposure measurements at larger poultry farms: these were mainly attributed to the different scales of operation. Large variations in the ratios of respirable, inhalable and real-time monitor TWA concentrations of poultry farm dust for various activities were found. This has implications for the calibration of light-scattering dust monitors with respect to inhalable dust concentration. In the pharmaceutical application, the effectiveness of a curtain barrier for dust control when dispensing powder in a downflow booth was rapidly demonstrated.

  8. Aircrew exposure onboard a Czech airlines aircraft, individual monitoring of aircrew

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploc, O.; Spurny, F.; Turek, K. [Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Dept. of Radiation Dosimetry, Prague (Czech Republic); Ploc, O. [Czech Technical Univ., Dept. of Dosimetry and Application of Ionizing Radiation, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    The contribution presents new results related to the aircraft crew exposure onboard aircraft of Czech air companies. First the results of long term monitoring onboard of an aircraft of Czech Airlines are presented. The monitoring has been performed in the period May - December 2005, more than 500 individual flights have been followed. M.D.U.-Liulin Si-diode based spectrometer was used, together with thermoluminescent and track detectors. Total effective dose was about 12 mSv, the results obtained with dosimeters mentioned are analyzed and compared with the results of calculation performed with C.A.R.I. and E.P.C.A.R.D. codes. Individual monitoring of air crew members has been started in the Czech Republic since 1998 year. The results obtained during few last years are presented, general tendencies of aircraft crew onboard exposure of Czech air companies are outlined. (authors)

  9. Strategies for monitoring and managing mass populations of toxic cyanobacteria in recreational waters: a multi-interdisciplinary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Andrew N; Hunter, Peter D; Carvalho, Laurence; Codd, Geoffrey A; Elliott, J Alex; Ferguson, Claire A; Hanley, Nick D; Hopkins, David W; Maberly, Stephen C; Mearns, Kathryn J; Scott, E Marion

    2009-12-21

    Mass populations of toxin-producing cyanobacteria commonly develop in fresh-, brackish- and marine waters and effective strategies for monitoring and managing cyanobacterial health risks are required to safeguard animal and human health. A multi-interdisciplinary study, including two UK freshwaters with a history of toxic cyanobacterial blooms, was undertaken to explore different approaches for the identification, monitoring and management of potentially-toxic cyanobacteria and their associated risks. The results demonstrate that (i) cyanobacterial bloom occurrence can be predicted at a local- and national-scale using process-based and statistical models; (ii) cyanobacterial concentration and distribution in waterbodies can be monitored using remote sensing, but minimum detection limits need to be evaluated; (iii) cyanotoxins may be transferred to spray-irrigated root crops; and (iv) attitudes and perceptions towards risks influence the public's preferences and willingness-to-pay for cyanobacterial health risk reductions in recreational waters.

  10. An assessment of the toxicity of phthalate esters to freshwater benthos. 2. Sediment exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, D J; Cox, D A; Geiger, D L; Genisot, K I; Markee, T P; Brooke, L T; Polkinghorne, C N; VandeVenter, F A; Gorsuch, J W; Robillard, K A; Parkerton, T F; Reiley, M C; Ankley, G T; Mount, D R

    2001-08-01

    Seven phthalate esters were evaluated for their 10-d toxicity to the freshwater invertebrates Hyalella azteca and Chironomus tentans in sediment. The esters were diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), di-n-hexyl phthalate (DHP), di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), diisononyl phthalate (DINP), diisodecyl phthalate (DIDP), and a commercial mixture of C7, C9, and C11 isophthalate esters (711P). All seven esters were tested in a sediment containing 4.80% total organic carbon (TOC), and DBP alone was tested in two additional sediments with 2.45 and 14.1% TOC. Sediment spiking concentrations for DEP and DBP were based on LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% of the population) values from water-only toxicity tests, sediment organic carbon concentration, and equilibrium partitioning (EqP) theory. The five higher molecular weight phthalate esters (DHP, DEHP, DINP, DIDP, 711P), two of which were tested and found to be nontoxic in water-only tests (i.e., DHP and DEHP), were tested at single concentrations between 2,100 and 3,200 mg/kg dry weight. Preliminary spiking studies were performed to assess phthalate ester stability under test conditions. The five higher molecular weight phthalate esters in sediment had no effect on survival or growth of either C. tentans or H. azteca, consistent with predictions based on water-only tests and EqP theory. The 10-d LC50 values for DBP and H. azteca were >17,400, >29,500, and >71,900 mg/kg dry weight for the low, medium, and high TOC sediments, respectively. These values are more than 30x greater than predicted by EqP theory and may reflect the fact that H. azteca is an epibenthic species and not an obligative burrower. The 10-d LC50 values for DBP and C. tentans were 826, 1,664, and 4.730 mg/kg dry weight for the low, medium, and high TOC sediments, respectively. These values are within a factor of two of the values predicted by EqP theory. Pore-water 10-d LC50 values for DBP (dissolved fraction) and C. tentans in the three

  11. Identifying inequitable exposure to toxic air pollution in racialized and low-income neighbourhoods to support pollution prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Kershaw

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Numerous environmental justice studies have confirmed a relationship between population characteristics such as low-income or minority status and the location of environmental health hazards. However, studies of the health risks from exposure to harmful substances often do not consider their toxicological characteristics. We used two different methods, the unit-hazard and the distance-based approach, to evaluate demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the population residing near industrial facilities in the City of Toronto, Canada. In addition to the mass of air emissions obtained from the national pollutant release inventory (NPRI, we also considered their toxicity using toxic equivalency potential (TEP scores. Results from the unit-hazard approach indicate no significant difference in the proportion of low-income individuals living in host versus non-host census tracts (t(107 = 0.3, P = 0.735. However, using the distance-based approach, the proportion of low-income individuals was significantly higher (+5.1%, t(522 = 6.0, P <0.001 in host tracts, while the indicator for “racialized” communities (“visible minority” was 16.1% greater (t(521 = 7.2, P <0.001 within 2 km of a NPRI facility. When the most toxic facilities by non-carcinogenic TEP score were selected, the rate of visible minorities living near the most toxic NPRI facilities was significantly higher (+12.9%, t(352 = 3.5, P = 0.001 than near all other NPRI facilities. TEP scores were also used to identify areas in Toronto that face a double burden of poverty and air toxics exposure in order to prioritise pollution prevention.

  12. Air pollution effects field research facility: 3. UV-B exposure and monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEvers, J.A.; Hileman, M.S.; Edwards, N.T.

    1993-03-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory Outdoor UltraViolet-B (UV-B) Exposure and Monitoring Facility was developed in 1980 to provide well-controlled and -monitored exposure of specific terrestrial plant. species to elevated levels of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The introduction of various anthropogenic agents into the earth`s stratosphere has resulted in a decrease in the volume of ozone (O{sub 3}) present here. The decrease in O{sub 3} has resulted in an increase in the level of UV radiation reaching thee earth`s surface. Of particular interest is the level of UV-B, because it has the most detrimental effect on living tissue. A thorough understanding of the effects of elevated levels of UV-B on living tissue is critical to the formulation of economic policy regarding production of such agents and alternative strategies. The UV region of interest is referred to as UV-B and corresponds to radiation with a wavelength of 290 to 320 nm. Design, operation, and performance of the automated generation, exposure, and monitoring system are described. The system has proved to be reliable and easy to maintain and operate, and it provides significant flexibility in exposure programs. The system software is described, and detailed listings are provided. The ability to expose plants to controlled set point percentages of UV-B above the ambient level was developed.

  13. Monitoring agricultural rodenticide use and secondary exposure of raptors in Scotland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J; Sharp, E; Taylor, M J; Melton, L; Hartley, G

    2013-08-01

    Despite the documented risk of secondary poisoning to non-target species by anticoagulant rodenticides there is no statutory post-approval monitoring of their use in the UK. This paper presents results from two Scottish monitoring schemes for the period 2000-2010; recording rodenticide use on arable farms and the presence of residues in raptor carcasses. More than three quarters of arable farms used anticoagulant rodenticides; predominately the second generation compounds difenacoum and bromadiolone. There was widespread exposure to anticoagulant rodenticides in liver tissues of the raptor species tested and the residues encountered generally reflected agricultural use patterns. As found in other studies, Red Kites (Milvus milvus) appeared to be particularly vulnerable to rodenticide exposure, 70 % of those sampled (n = 114) contained residues and 10 % died as a result of rodenticide ingestion. More unexpectedly, sparrowhawks (Accipiter nisus), which prey almost exclusively on birds, had similar exposure rates to species which prey on rodents. Although, with the exception of kites, confirmed mortality from rodenticides was low, the widespread exposure recorded is concerning. Particularly when coupled with a lack of data about the sub-lethal effects of these compounds. This raises questions regarding whether statutory monitoring of use is needed; both to address whether there are deficiencies in compliance with approval conditions or whether the recommended risk management procedures are themselves adequate to protect non-target wildlife.

  14. Identifying inequitable exposure to toxic air pollution in racialized and low-income neighbourhoods to support pollution prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kershaw, Suzanne; Gower, Stephanie; Rinner, Claus; Campbell, Monica

    2013-05-01

    Numerous environmental justice studies have confirmed a relationship between population characteristics such as low-income or minority status and the location of environmental health hazards. However, studies of the health risks from exposure to harmful substances often do not consider their toxicological characteristics. We used two different methods, the unit-hazard and the distance-based approach, to evaluate demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the population residing near industrial facilities in the City of Toronto, Canada. In addition to the mass of air emissions obtained from the national pollutant release inventory (NPRI), we also considered their toxicity using toxic equivalency potential (TEP) scores. Results from the unit-hazard approach indicate no significant difference in the proportion of low-income individuals living in host versus non-host census tracts (t(107) = 0.3, P = 0.735). However, using the distance-based approach, the proportion of low-income individuals was significantly higher (+5.1%, t(522) = 6.0, P air toxics exposure in order to prioritise pollution prevention.

  15. Differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated with MeHg exposure: deepening into the molecular mechanisms of toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuello, Susana; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L.; Camara, Carmen [Complutense University of Madrid, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Madrid (Spain); Ramos, Sonia [Institute of Food Science, Technology and Nutrition, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Madrid (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MeHg toxicity and the way in which this molecule interacts with living organisms is a critical point since MeHg represents a well-known risk to ecosystems and human health. We used a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture in combination with SDS-PAGE and nanoflow LC-ESI-LTQ for analyzing the differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated to MeHg exposure. Seventy-eight proteins were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold. We identified a number of proteins involved in different essential biological processes including apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular trafficking and energy production. Among these proteins, we found several molecules whose de-regulation has been already related to MeHg exposure, thus confirming the usefulness of our discovery approach, and new ones that helped to gain a deeper insight into the biomolecular mechanisms related to MeHg-induced toxicity. Overexpression of several HSPs and the proteasome 26S subunit itself showed the proteasome system as a molecular target of toxic MeHg. As for the interaction networks, the top ranked was the nucleic acid metabolism, where many of the identified de-regulated proteins are involved. (orig.)

  16. Differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated with MeHg exposure: deepening into the molecular mechanisms of toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuello, Susana; Ramos, Sonia; Madrid, Yolanda; Luque-Garcia, Jose L; Cámara, Carmen

    2012-08-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying MeHg toxicity and the way in which this molecule interacts with living organisms is a critical point since MeHg represents a well-known risk to ecosystems and human health. We used a quantitative proteomic approach based on stable isotopic labeling by amino acids in cell culture in combination with SDS-PAGE and nanoflow LC-ESI-LTQ for analyzing the differential protein expression of hepatic cells associated to MeHg exposure. Seventy-eight proteins were found de-regulated by more than 1.5-fold. We identified a number of proteins involved in different essential biological processes including apoptosis, mitochondrial dysfunction, cellular trafficking and energy production. Among these proteins, we found several molecules whose de-regulation has been already related to MeHg exposure, thus confirming the usefulness of our discovery approach, and new ones that helped to gain a deeper insight into the biomolecular mechanisms related to MeHg-induced toxicity. Overexpression of several HSPs and the proteasome 26S subunit itself showed the proteasome system as a molecular target of toxic MeHg. As for the interaction networks, the top ranked was the nucleic acid metabolism, where many of the identified de-regulated proteins are involved.

  17. Human exposure monitoring and evaluation in the Arctic: the importance of understanding exposures to the development of public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, William A; Avakian, Maureen D; Carpenter, David; Groopman, John D; Scammell, Madeleine; Wild, Christopher P

    2004-02-01

    Arctic indigenous peoples face significant challenges resulting from the contamination of Arctic air, water, and soil by persistent organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides. International cooperative efforts among governments and research institutions are under way to collect the information needed by environmental health scientists and public health officials to address environmental contamination in the Arctic. However, the climatic, political, and cultural conditions of the land and its native populations combine to present a unique set of scientific and logistic challenges to addressing this important public health issue. Public health officials have the responsibility to respect the cultural traditions of indigenous communities, while simultaneously designing strategies that will reduce their exposure to environmental contaminants and rates of disease and dysfunction. Researchers can better understand the link between environmental exposures and disease through monitoring programs for both the subsistence diets and health status of the indigenous populations. We suggest that the incorporation of community-based participatory research methods into programs designed to assess biomarkers of contaminant exposure in children and adults may be a valuable addition to ongoing and newly developed research programs. This approach could serve as a model for international environmental health initiatives, because it involves the participation of the local communities and seeks to builds trust between all stakeholders.

  18. Parental dietary seleno-L-methionine exposure and resultant offspring developmental toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Chernick, Melissa; Ware, Megan; Albright, Elizabeth; Kwok, Kevin W.H.; Dong, Wu; Zheng, Na; Hinton, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Selenium (Se) leaches into water from agricultural soils and from storage sites for coal fly ash. Se toxicity causes population and community level effects in fishes and birds. We used the laboratory aquarium model fish, Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes), an asynchronous breeder, to determine aspects of uptake in adults and resultant developmental toxicity in their offspring. The superior imaging properties of the model enabled detailed descriptions of phenotypic alterations...

  19. Evaluation of the developmental and reproductive toxicity of methoxychlor using an anuran (Xenopus tropicalis) chronic exposure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Douglas J; Thomas, John H; Rogers, Robert L; Noll, Andra; Spaulding, Clinton D; Guiney, Patrick D; Weeks, John A

    2004-10-01

    The chronic toxicity of methoxychlor to the South African clawed frog, Xenopus (Silurana) tropicalis, was evaluated using a life cycle approach. The chronic exposure period ranged from mid-cell blastula stage [NF (Nieuwkoop and Faber, 1994) stage 8] to 90 days of exposure, during which time the organisms generally completed metamorphosis and emerged as juvenile frogs. Methoxychlor concentrations ranged from 1 to 100 micrograms/l. Methoxychlor concentrations >10 micrograms/l caused delayed development. Organisms exposed to 10 micrograms/l methoxychlor for 30 days showed enlarged thyroid glands with follicular hyperplasia. No increase in mortality or external malformation was observed at any of the test concentrations during early embryo-larval development (NF stage 8 to NF stage 46; ca. 2 days exposure). A concentration-dependent increase in external malformations and internal abnormalities of the liver and gonads were noted after 90 days of exposure, however. Skewing of the sex ratio toward the female gender decreased ovary weight and number of oocytes, and increased oocyte immaturity and necrosis were noted at methoxychlor concentrations of 100 micrograms/l. Reductions in testis weight and sperm cell count were also detected at 100 micrograms/l methoxychlor. Results from these studies suggested that methoxychlor was capable of altering the rate of larval development, but did not adversely affect early embryo-larval development (2 days of exposure) as manifested in external malformations. Internal malformations, increases in the ratio of phenotypic females, were induced by chronic methoxychlor exposure. In addition, reproductive endpoints, most notably in the female specimens, were adversely affected by methoxychlor exposure. These studies add to the standardization and validation of a useful amphibian test methods capable of evaluating both reproductive and developmental effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals over a life cycle exposure.

  20. Gene Expression Regulation and Pathway Analysis After Valproic Acid and Carbamazepine Exposure in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Neurodevelopmental Toxicity Assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, Sjors H. W.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    2015-01-01

    Differentiating pluripotent stem cells in vitro have proven useful for the study of developmental toxicity. Here, we studied the effects of anticonvulsant drug exposure in a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based neurodevelopmental toxicity test (hESTn). During neural differentiation the cells were

  1. Gene Expression Regulation and Pathway Analysis After Valproic Acid and Carbamazepine Exposure in a Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Based Neurodevelopmental Toxicity Assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulpen, Sjors H. W.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; Piersma, Aldert H.

    Differentiating pluripotent stem cells in vitro have proven useful for the study of developmental toxicity. Here, we studied the effects of anticonvulsant drug exposure in a human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-based neurodevelopmental toxicity test (hESTn). During neural differentiation the cells were

  2. Embryonic exposure to butachlor in zebrafish (Danio rerio): endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wenqing; Niu, Lili; Liu, Weiping; Xu, Chao

    2013-03-01

    Butachlor is a chloroacetanilide herbicide widely employed in weeding important crops. Recently, the study of the possible toxic effects of butachlor in non-target organisms has increased substantially. However, the endocrine disruption, developmental toxicity and immunotoxicity effects of butachlor in fish have not been fully investigated in previous studies. In the present study, zebrafish embryos were exposed to a range of butachlor concentrations from 4 to 20 μM to evaluate the embryonic toxicity of butachlor until 84 hours postfertilization (hpf). The results demonstrated that butachlor was highly toxic to zebrafish embryos, hindering the hatching process, resulting in a series of malformations and followed by mortality. The malformations observed included pericardial edema (PE) and yolk sac edema (YSE), which showed concentration-dependent responses. The analysis of endocrine gene transcription indicated that butachlor significantly induced the expression of the estrogen-responsive gene Vtg1 but had no effect on the expression of the ERα gene. The innate immune system appeared to be another possible target of butachlor. At 72 hpf, butachlor significantly up-regulated the innate immune system-related genes, including IL-1β, CC-chem, CXCL-C1c and IL-8. These data suggest that butachlor causes developmental toxicity, endocrine disruption and immune toxicity in the zebrafish embryo. Bidirectional interactions between the endocrine system and the immune system might be present, and further studies are needed to determine these possible pathways.

  3. Evaluation of Occupational Exposure and Biological Monitoring of Sand Washing Workers Exposed to Silica Dusts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Parsaseresht

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives:The health of sand washing workers could be threatened by the crystalline silica dust exposure. The aim of this study was the evaluation of occupational and biological monitoring with crystalline silica dusts in the sand washing workers. Materials and Methods: This was an analytical and cross-sectional study of 44 sand washing workers exposed to crystalline silica and also 63 municipality gardeners as a control group in the city of Dorood. Occupational exposure monitoring to respirable total dust and silica dust was performed according to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH methods 0600 and 7602-respectively. Biological monitoring of workers' was carried out according to the Karatas method for the analysis of Malondialdehyde in the blood serum of exposed and control subjects. The informed consents were taken for obtaining blood samples of workers, according to the Helsinki Declaration. Statistical analysis of data was done using SPSS version 16. The statistical test of Pearson, t-tests and linear regression was applied. Results: The occupational exposure of 54.55% was exceeded the occupational exposure limit of Iran at the level of 3 mg/m3. The mean exposure of sand miners and control group to respirable silica dust was evaluated at 0.219 ± 0.177 and 0.010 ± 0.002 as mg/m3respectively. Occupational exposure of all sand washing workers was higher than the occupational exposure limit of Iran at the level of 0.025 mg/m3.The concentration of serum Malondialdehyde (MDA exposed group and the control group were 36.64 ± 10.75 and 19.40 ± 4.68 as µM respectively. Conclusion: Due to the positive correlation between exposure of sand washing workers to silica dust sand serum MDA among exposed group(P-value<0.0001, r=0.881, periodical biological monitoring along with effective control measures of workers are recommended for the health promotion of these workers.

  4. Chronic toxicity of arsenic, cobalt, chromium and manganese to Hyalella azteca in relation to exposure and bioaccumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norwood, W.P. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada) and Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division, Environment Canada, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada)]. E-mail: warren.norwood@ec.gc.ca; Borgmann, U. [Aquatic Ecosystems Protection Research Division, Environment Canada, P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Dixon, D.G. [Department of Biology, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2007-05-15

    Chronic toxicity of As, Co, Cr and Mn to Hyalella azteca can be described using a saturation-based mortality model relative to total-body or water metal concentration. LBC25s (total-body metal concentrations resulting in 25% mortality in 4 weeks) were 125, 103, 152 and 57,900 nmol g{sup -1} dry weight for As, Co, Cr and Mn respectively. LC50s (metal concentrations in water resulting in 25% mortality in 4 weeks) were 5600, 183, 731, and 197,000 nmol L{sup -1}, respectively. A hormesis growth response to As exposure was observed. Growth was a more variable endpoint than mortality for all four toxicants; however, confidence limits based on growth and mortality all overlapped, except Cr which had no effect on growth. Mn toxicity was greater in glass test containers compared to plastic. Bioaccumulation of As, Co, Cr, and Mn was strongly correlated with, and is useful for predicting, chronic mortality. - Chronic toxicity of As, Co, Cr and Mn to Hyalella azteca can be described using a saturation-based mortality model in relationship to total-body or water metal concentration.

  5. Influence of the exposure time in the area monitors at radiodiagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyton, Fernando, E-mail: leyton.fernando@gmail.com [Faculty of Health and Odontology, Diego Portales University, Santiago, Chile and Study Center in Radiological Sciences (CECRAD), Tarapaca University, Arica (Chile); Navarro, Marcus; Macedo, Eric; Navarro, Valeria; Garcia, Igor; Pereira, Lara [Instituto Federal da Bahia (LABPROSAUD/IFBA), Salvador, BA (Brazil). Laboratorio de Produtos para a Saude; Ferreira, Mario [Universidade do Estado da Bahia (UNEB), Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Area monitoring ensures radiation exposure at an acceptable level, which must be lower than the legal limit. Experimental measurements were taken in a ionizing radiation calibration laboratory. The specified reference radiation to radiation protection N80 was used. Five area monitors were used. The ranges of dose rate inaccuracy measured in rate mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3 s were from 10 to 48 % and from 1 to 15 %, respectively. The inaccuracy ranges measured in integrated mode for times ≤ 2 and ≥ 3 s were from 4 to 8 % and from 0 to 22 %, respectively. (author)

  6. Metabonomic analysis of quercetin against the toxicity of chronic exposure to a mixture of four organophosphate pesticides in rat plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Can; Zeng, Yan; Shi, Haidan; Yang, Shuang; Bao, Wei; Qi, Lei; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiujun

    2016-09-01

    1. A metabonomics approach was performed to investigate the effect of quercetin on the toxicity of chronic exposure to a mixture of four organophosphate pesticides (OPs) at their corresponding no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL). The rats were divided into six groups (n = 10/group): control, two different doses of quercetin, OPs mixture and different doses of quercetin plus OPs mixture-treated groups. 2. Nine metabolites, including two quercetin metabolites and seven endogenous metabolites were identified in plasma. The intensities of metabolites significantly changed in the OP mixture-treated group compared with the control group (p quercetin-treated group compared with the OP mixture-treated group (p quercetin elicited partial protective effects against the toxicity induced by a mixture of OPs, which include regulation of lipid metabolism, improvement of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle disorders, enhancement of antioxidant defence system to protect the liver.

  7. Safety Evaluation of Potential Toxic Metals Exposure from Street Foods Consumed in Mid-West Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekhator, O C; Udowelle, N A; Igbiri, S; Asomugha, R N; Igweze, Z N; Orisakwe, O E

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Street-vended foods offer numerous advantages to food security; nevertheless, the safety of street food should be considered. This study has investigated the level of potential toxic metal (Pb, Cd, Hg, Sb, Mn, and Al) contamination among street-vended foods in Benin City and Umunede. Methods. Twenty street food samples were purchased from vendors at bus stops. Metals were analyzed with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The methods developed by the US EPA were employed to evaluate the potential health risk of toxic metals. Results. The concentrations of the toxic metals in mg/kg were in the range of Pb (0.014-1.37), Cd (0.00-0.00017), Hg (0.00-0.00014), Sb (0.00-0.021), Mn (0.00-0.012), and Al (0.00-0.22). All the toxic metals except Pb were below permissible limit set by WHO, EU, and USEPA. The daily intake, hazard quotient, and hazard index of all toxic metals except for Pb in some street foods were below the tolerable daily intake and threshold value of 1, indicating an insignificant health risk. Total cancer risk was within the priority risk level of 1.0E - 04 but higher than the acceptable risk level of 1E - 06. Conclusion. Consumption of some of these street foods is of public health concern.

  8. Safety Evaluation of Potential Toxic Metals Exposure from Street Foods Consumed in Mid-West Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. C. Ekhator

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Street-vended foods offer numerous advantages to food security; nevertheless, the safety of street food should be considered. This study has investigated the level of potential toxic metal (Pb, Cd, Hg, Sb, Mn, and Al contamination among street-vended foods in Benin City and Umunede. Methods. Twenty street food samples were purchased from vendors at bus stops. Metals were analyzed with atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The methods developed by the US EPA were employed to evaluate the potential health risk of toxic metals. Results. The concentrations of the toxic metals in mg/kg were in the range of Pb (0.014–1.37, Cd (0.00–0.00017, Hg (0.00–0.00014, Sb (0.00–0.021, Mn (0.00–0.012, and Al (0.00–0.22. All the toxic metals except Pb were below permissible limit set by WHO, EU, and USEPA. The daily intake, hazard quotient, and hazard index of all toxic metals except for Pb in some street foods were below the tolerable daily intake and threshold value of 1, indicating an insignificant health risk. Total cancer risk was within the priority risk level of 1.0E-04 but higher than the acceptable risk level of 1E-06. Conclusion. Consumption of some of these street foods is of public health concern.

  9. Safeguarding Our Children at Home: Reducing Exposures to Toxic Chemicals and Heavy Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elise; Snow, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Emerging research suggests that exposure to environmental pollutants, prenatally and in early childhood, may contribute significantly to diseases and disabilities. For example, exposures to mercury or lead early in life can impact the nervous system and brain, potentially contributing to learning, behavioral, and developmental disabilities. The…

  10. Multiple imputation for assessment of exposures to drinking water contaminants: evaluation with the Atrazine Monitoring Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachael M; Stayner, Leslie T; Demirtas, Hakan

    2014-10-01

    Drinking water may contain pollutants that harm human health. The frequency of pollutant monitoring may occur quarterly, annually, or less frequently, depending upon the pollutant, the pollutant concentration, and community water system. However, birth and other health outcomes are associated with narrow time-windows of exposure. Infrequent monitoring impedes linkage between water quality and health outcomes for epidemiological analyses. To evaluate the performance of multiple imputation to fill in water quality values between measurements in community water systems (CWSs). The multiple imputation method was implemented in a simulated setting using data from the Atrazine Monitoring Program (AMP, 2006-2009 in five Midwestern states). Values were deleted from the AMP data to leave one measurement per month. Four patterns reflecting drinking water monitoring regulations were used to delete months of data in each CWS: three patterns were missing at random and one pattern was missing not at random. Synthetic health outcome data were created using a linear and a Poisson exposure-response relationship with five levels of hypothesized association, respectively. The multiple imputation method was evaluated by comparing the exposure-response relationships estimated based on multiply imputed data with the hypothesized association. The four patterns deleted 65-92% months of atrazine observations in AMP data. Even with these high rates of missing information, our procedure was able to recover most of the missing information when the synthetic health outcome was included for missing at random patterns and for missing not at random patterns with low-to-moderate exposure-response relationships. Multiple imputation appears to be an effective method for filling in water quality values between measurements. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Risk of human exposure to arsenic and other toxic elements from geophagy: trace element analysis of baked clay using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watts Michael J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geophagy or earth-eating is common amongst some Bangladeshi women, especially those who are pregnant, both in Bangladesh and in the United Kingdom. A large proportion of the population in Bangladesh is already exposed to high concentrations of arsenic (As and other toxic elements from drinking contaminated groundwater. Additional exposure to As and other toxic elements from non-food sources has not been adequately addressed and here we present the first study to monitor As levels in baked clay (known as sikor. Methods Sikor samples originating from Bangladesh were digested using a microwave digester and analysed for their As, Pb, Cd, Mn, Fe and Zn levels using ICP-MS. Detailed As speciation analysis was performed using HPLC-ICP-MS. Results Of particular concern were the levels of As (3.8-13.1 mg kg-1, Cd (0.09-0.4 mg kg-1 and Pb (21-26.7 mg kg-1 present in the sikor samples and their possible impact on human health. Speciation analysis revealed that sikor samples contained mainly inorganic As. Modest consumption of 50 g of sikor is equivalent to ingesting 370 μg of As and 1235 μg of Pb per day, based on median concentration values. This level of sikor consumption exceeds the permitted maximum tolerable daily intake (PMTDI of inorganic As by almost 2-fold. Conclusion We conclude that sikor can be a significant source of As, Cd and Pb exposure for the Bangladeshi population consuming large quantities of this material. Of particular concern in this regard is geophagy practiced by pregnant women concurrently exposed to As contaminated drinking water. Future studies needs to evaluate the bioavailability of As and other elements from sikor and their impact on human health.

  12. Toxic responses of medaka, d-rR strain, to polychlorinated naphthalene mixtures after embryonic exposure by in ovo nanoinjection: A partial life- cycle assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalobos, Sergio A.; Papoulias, D.M.; Meadows, J.; Blankenship, Alan L.; Pastva, Stephanie D.; Kannan, K.; Hinton, D.E.; Tillitt, D.E.; Giesy, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    Polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) are organic compounds with some chemical properties and uses similar to polychlorinated biphenyls. Polychlorinated naphthalenes have been detected in biota from certain aquatic environments. The toxicities of several PCN technical mixtures (Halowax) to medaka (Oryzias latipes) were determined by use of an embryo nanoinjection method. Medaka eggs (early gastrula) were injected with 0.5 nl of triolein (vehicle control) or 0.5 nl of four to five graded doses (0.3-30 ng/egg) of Halowax 1014, Halowax 1013, or Halowax 1051 in triolein. Following exposure, embryos developed, and fry were reared to sexual maturity (4 months), at which time they were euthanized. Responses were evaluated as early life stage (ELS) and early adult life stage (EALS) assessments. For ELS, lethality and sublethal alterations in embryos and larvae (<16 d old), such as craniofacial, cardiovascular, and myoskeletal deformities and abnormal or delayed hatch, were monitored for the first 9 d, and a dose severity index was computed. The EALS assessment examined the survival of 16-d-old larvae until early adulthood (123 ?? 3 d old), including gonadosomatic index (GSI) and morphometry. Halowax 1014 was found to be the most toxic mixture (LD50 4.2 ng/egg), whereas Halowax 1013 and 1051 were significantly less toxic (LD50s could not be determined). The gonadosomatic index of females was significantly less in fish dosed with Halowax 1014 or 1051. The LD50 for medaka embryos nanoinjected with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) is about 0.75 pg/egg. Thus, Halowax 1014 was 5,585-fold less potent than TCDD. For Halowax 1014, ELS assessments accurately predicted the results of EALS assessments.

  13. Multicenter study of posaconazole therapeutic drug monitoring: exposure-response relationship and factors affecting concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolton, Michael J; Ray, John E; Chen, Sharon C-A; Ng, Kingsley; Pont, Lisa; McLachlan, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Posaconazole has an important role in the prophylaxis and salvage treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFIs), although poor and variable bioavailability remains an important clinical concern. Therapeutic drug monitoring of posaconazole concentrations has remained contentious, with the use of relatively small patient cohorts in previous studies hindering the assessment of exposure-response relationships. This multicenter retrospective study aimed to investigate relationships between posaconazole concentration and clinical outcomes and adverse events and to assess clinical factors and drug interactions that may affect posaconazole concentrations. Medical records were reviewed for patients who received posaconazole and had ≥1 concentration measured at six hospitals in Australia. Data from 86 patients with 541 posaconazole concentrations were included in the study. Among 72 patients taking posaconazole for prophylaxis against IFIs, 12 patients (17%) developed a breakthrough fungal infection; median posaconazole concentrations were significantly lower than in those who did not develop fungal infection (median [range], 289 [50 to 471] ng/ml versus 485 [0 to 2,035] ng/ml; P posaconazole concentration was a significant predictor of breakthrough fungal infection via binary logistic regression (P posaconazole exposure, including coadministration with proton pump inhibitors, metoclopramide, phenytoin or rifampin, and the H(2) antagonist ranitidine (P posaconazole exposure (P posaconazole concentrations are common and are associated with breakthrough fungal infection, supporting the utility of monitoring posaconazole concentrations to ensure optimal systemic exposure.

  14. Acute and subacute toxicity of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-methylnaphthalene to the shallow-water coral Porites divaricata: Application of a novel exposure protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renegar, D Abigail; Turner, Nicholas R; Riegl, Bernhard M; Dodge, Richard E; Knap, Anthony H; Schuler, Paul A

    2017-01-01

    Previous research evaluating hydrocarbon toxicity to corals and coral reefs has generally focused on community-level effects, and results often are not comparable between studies because of variability in hydrocarbon exposure characterization and evaluation of coral health and mortality during exposure. Toxicity of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 1-methylnaphthalene to the coral Porites divaricata was assessed in a constant exposure toxicity test utilizing a novel toxicity testing protocol uniquely applicable to shallow-water corals, which considered multiple assessment metrics and evaluated the potential for post-exposure mortality and/or recovery. Acute and subacute effects (gross morphological changes, photosynthetic efficiency, mortality, and histologic cellular changes) were evaluated during pre-exposure (4 wk), exposure (48 h), and post-exposure recovery (4 wk) periods. Coral condition scores were used to determine a 48-h median effective concentration of 7442 μg/L. Significant physical and histological changes resulted from exposure to 640 μg/L and 5427 μg/L 1-methylnaphthalene, with a 1-d to 3-d delay in photosynthetic efficiency effects (ΔF/Fm). Pigmented granular amoebocyte area was found to be a potentially useful sublethal endpoint for this species. Coral mortality was used to estimate a 48-h median lethal concentration of 12 123 μg/L. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:212-219. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  15. Biological monitoring of embrio-fetal exposure to methamidophos or chlorothalonil on rat development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, V L; Chiorato, S H; Pinto, N F

    2000-12-01

    Maternal exposure to pesticides during the pre-implantation and very early post-implantation periods of pregnancy is correlated with numerous adverse effects on the offspring and in reproductive parameters like an increase in resorption, a decrease in fetal survival and weight, and teratogenic effects. Although the epidemiological evidence is inconclusive as regards the risk of the adverse outcome of pregnancy and developmental toxicity events, the use of biomarkers in exposure assessment may contribute to recognizing a potential health impairment. The present study evaluated the influence of prenatal oral exposure to an insecticide (1.0 mg methamidophos/kg) or a fungicide (200.0 mg chlorothalonil/kg) during gestation days 1 to 6 on maturational and behavioral aspects of offspring development of rats. The pesticides did not affect the body weight gain of dams and offspring, nor did the exposure affect the weight of gravid uterus, fetus, placenta and ovary. There were no observed alterations in the swimming behavior tested at postnatal days 7, 14 and 21, but the pesticides interfered with physical and maturational development landmarks of offspring according to age, showing subtle effects on behavioral and physical development. These findings show the importance of categorizing developmental effects, establishing the relationship between age and important performances, to recognize potential impacts on human populations.

  16. Chronic ZnO-NPs exposure at environmentally relevant concentrations results in metabolic and locomotive toxicities in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Wei; Li, Shang-Wei; Hsiu-Chuan Liao, Vivian

    2017-01-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are emerging contaminants that raise the concerns of potential risk in the aquatic environment. It has been estimated that the environmental ZnO-NPs concentration is 76 μg/l in the aquatic environment. Our aim was to determine the aquatic toxicity of ZnO-NPs with chronic exposure at environmentally relevant concentrations using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Two simulated environmentally relevant mediums-moderately hard reconstituted water (EPA water) and simulated soil pore water (SSPW)-were used to represent surface water and pore water in sediment, respectively. The results showed that the ZnO-NPs in EPA water has a much smaller hydrodynamic diameter than that in SSPW. Although the ionic release of Zn ions increased time-dependently in both mediums, the Zn ions concentrations in EPA water increased two-fold more than that in SSPW at 48 h and 72 h. The ZnO-NPs did not induce growth defects or decrease head thrashes in C. elegans in either media. However, chronic exposure to ZnO-NPs caused a significant reduction in C. elegans body bends in EPA water even with a relatively low concentration (0.05 μg/l); similar results were not observed in SSPW. Moreover, at the same concentrations (50 and 500 μg/l), body bends in C. elegans were reduced more severely in ZnO-NPs than in ZnCl2 in EPA water. The ATP levels were consistently and significantly decreased, and ROS was induced after ZnO-NPs exposure (50 and 500 μg/l) in EPA water. Our results provide evidences that chronic exposure to ZnO-NPs under environmentally relevant concentrations causes metabolic and locomotive toxicities implicating the potential ecotoxicity of ZnO-NPs at low concentrations in aquatic environments.

  17. Bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to the cladoceran Daphnia magna in relation to cadmium exposure history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Rui

    The cladoceran Daphnia magna is widely used in freshwater bioassessments and ecological risk assessments. This study designed a series of experiments employing radiotracer methodology to quantify the trace metals (mainly Cd and Zn) biokinetics in D. magna under different environmental and biological conditions and to investigate the influences of different Cd exposure histories on the bioavailability and toxicity of trace metals to D. magna. A bioenergetic-based kinetic model was finally applied in predicting the Cd accumulation dynamics in D. magna and the model validity under non-steady state was assessed. Cd assimilation was found in this study to be influenced by the food characteristics (e.g., metal concentration in food particles), the metal exposure history of the animals, and the genetic characteristics. Some of these influences could be interpreted by the capacity and/or competition of those metal binding sites within the digestive tract and/or the detoxifying proteins metallothionein (MT). My study demonstrated a significant induction of MT in response to Cd exposure and it was the dominant fraction in sequestering the internal nonessential trace metals in D. magna. The ratio of Cd body burden to MT might better predict the Cd toxicity on the digestion systems of D. magna than the Cd tissue burden alone within one-generational exposure to Cd. It was found that metal elimination (rate constant and contribution of different release routes) was independent of the food concentration and the dietary metal concentration, implying that the elimination may not be metabolically controlled. The incorporation of the bioenergetic-based kinetic model, especially under non-steady state, is invaluable in helping to understand the fate of trace metals in aquatic systems and potential environmental risks. The dependence of biokinetic parameters on environmental factors rather than on genotypes implies a great potential of using biokinetics in inter-laboratory comparisons.

  18. Ricin Toxicity in BALB/C 3T3 Cells: Peptide Biomarkers of Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    fibroblasts LC-MS Cell toxicity Ricin Liquid chromatography Ricinus communis Mass spectrometry Proteomics 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a...Preparation. Ricin communis agglutinin II (ricin, Vector Laboratories, Burlingame, CA) was dialyzed into 10 mM sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.0, PB

  19. Biomarker of Exposure and Mechanism of Action of Toxic Industrial Chemicals (TICs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    primary chemicals used, 10 employee 37 samples with a rank of 1 and 10 with a rank of 6. In addition, since AN is a constituent of tobacco smoke and...is/are at least partly responsible for the toxicity and perhaps carcinogenicity of acrylonitrile. Using proteomic approaches we identified 385

  20. Low concentration toxic metal mixture interactions: Effects on essential and non-essential metals in brain, liver, and kidneys of mice on sub-chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbina, Samuel J; Chen, Yao; Zhou, Zhaoxiang; Wu, Xueshan; Feng, Weiwei; Wang, Wei; Mao, Guanghua; Xu, Hai; Zhang, Zhen; Wu, Xiangyang; Yang, Liuqing

    2015-08-01

    The deleterious effects of long term exposure to individual toxic metals in low doses are well documented. There is however, a paucity of information on interaction of low dose toxic metal mixtures with toxic and essential metals. This study reports on interactions between low dose mixtures of lead (Pb), mercury (Hg), arsenic (As) and cadmium (Cd) and toxic and essential metals. For 120d, six groups of forty mice each were exposed to metal mixtures, however, the control group was given distilled water. Exposure to Pb+Cd increased brain Pb by 479% in 30d, whiles Pb+Hg+As+Cd reduced liver Hg by 46.5%, but increased kidney As by 130% in 30d. Brain Cu, increased by 221% on Pb+Hg+As+Cd exposure, however, liver Ca reduced by 36.1% on Pb+Hg exposure in 60-d. Interactions within metal mixtures were largely synergistic. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that low dose metal exposures influenced greatly levels of Hg (in brain and liver) and As (brain). The influence exerted on essential metals was highest in liver (PC1) followed by kidney (PC2) and brain (PC3). Exposure to low dose metal mixtures affected homeostasis of toxic and essential metals in tissues of mice.

  1. Toxic Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajeb, Parvaneh; Shakibazadeh, Shahram; Sloth, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Food is considered the main source of toxic element (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) exposure to humans, and they can cause major public health effects. In this chapter, we discuss the most important sources for toxic element in food and the foodstuffs which are significant contributors...... to human exposure. The occurrence of each element in food classes from different regions is presented. Some of the current toxicological risk assessments on toxic elements, the human health effect of each toxic element, and their contents in the food legislations are presented. An overview of analytical...... techniques and challenges for determination of toxic elements in food is also given....

  2. Optimization of an air–liquid interface exposure system for assessing toxicity of airborne nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latvala, Siiri; Hedberg, Jonas; Möller, Lennart; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Karlsson, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The use of refined toxicological methods is currently needed for characterizing the risks of airborne nanoparticles (NPs) to human health. To mimic pulmonary exposure, we have developed an air–liquid interface (ALI) exposure system for direct deposition of airborne NPs on to lung cell cultures. Compared to traditional submerged systems, this allows more realistic exposure conditions for characterizing toxicological effects induced by airborne NPs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how the deposition of silver NPs (AgNPs) is affected by different conditions of the ALI system. Additionally, the viability and metabolic activity of A549 cells was studied following AgNP exposure. Particle deposition increased markedly with increasing aerosol flow rate and electrostatic field strength. The highest amount of deposited particles (2.2 μg cm–2) at cell‐free conditions following 2 h exposure was observed for the highest flow rate (390 ml min–1) and the strongest electrostatic field (±2 kV). This was estimated corresponding to deposition efficiency of 94%. Cell viability was not affected after 2 h exposure to clean air in the ALI system. Cells exposed to AgNPs (0.45 and 0.74 μg cm–2) showed significantly (P < 0.05) reduced metabolic activities (64 and 46%, respectively). Our study shows that the ALI exposure system can be used for generating conditions that were more realistic for in vitro exposures, which enables improved mechanistic and toxicological studies of NPs in contact with human lung cells.Copyright © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Toxicology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26935862

  3. Increased Suicide Risk among Workers following Toxic Metal Exposure at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant From 1952 to 2003: A Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a problem worldwide and occupation is an important risk factor. In the last decade, 55 200 deaths in the US were attributed to occupational risk factors. Objective: To determine if toxic metal exposure was associated with suicide risk among Paducah gaseous diffusion plant (PGDP) workers. Methods: We assembled a cohort of 6820 nuclear industry workers employed from 1952 to 2003. A job-specific exposure matrix (JEM) was used to determine metal exposure likelihood. Uranium...

  4. Changes of lead speciation and microbial toxicity in soil treated with repeated Pb exposure in the presence of BDE209.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Gao; Lin, Kuangfei; Fu, Rongbing

    2016-03-01

    Lead (Pb) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) are main pollutants at electric waste (e-waste) recycling sites (EWRSs), and their joint toxicological effects have received extensive attention. Frequently, soil pollution at EWRSs usually results from the occurrence of repeated single or multiple pollution events, with continuous impacts on soil microorganisms. Therefore, a laboratory incubation study was conducted to determine Pb bioavailability and microbial toxicity in repeated Pb-polluted soil in the presence of BDE209 for the first time. We evaluated the impacts of repetitive exposure trials on chemical fractions of Pb, and the results showed that repeated single Pb pollution event resulted in an increase of carbonates fraction of Pb, which was different from one-off single Pb exposure. Moreover, one-off Pb-treated groups exhibited higher I R (reduced partition index) values on day 30 and all treatments remained the same I R level at the end of incubation period. The parameters of microbial toxicity were well reflected by soil enzymes. During the entire incubation, the dehydrogenase and urease activities were significantly inhibited by Pb (P soil enzymes were clearly observed (P < 0.05 or 0.01). Such observations would provide useful information for ecological effects of Pb and BDE209 at EWRSs.

  5. Proteomics in aquatic amphipods: can it be used to determine mechanisms of toxicity and interspecies responses after exposure to atrazine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralston-Hooper, Kimberly J; Sanchez, Brian C; Adamec, Jiri; Sepúlveda, María S

    2011-05-01

    Proteomics has gained popularity in the field of ecotoxicology as a holistic tool for unraveling novel mechanisms of toxicity and elucidating subtle effects of contaminant exposure. The holoarctic amphipod Diporeia spp. is declining at precipitous rates in the Great Lakes, and we are evaluating the use of the well-studied amphipod model Hyalella azteca as a surrogate for Diporeia spp. This article presents proteomics data from both amphipod species exposed to atrazine (ATZ) and one of its metabolites, desethylatrazine (DEA; 3 and 30 µg/L for 21 and 42 d). We used a proteomics approach to determine whether these two species of amphipods responded similarly to the same chemicals and to understand better the mechanisms of toxicity of ATZ and DEA in aquatic invertebrates. We observed disruption in energy production and mitochondrial function as well as hormesis in exposed organisms. In addition, we identified a two proteins (GAPDH and HSP 90 kDa) that have been linked to hormonal disruptions, suggesting potential endocrine disruption. Finally, we found that H. azteca and Diporeia spp. responded with similar proteomic profiles after ATZ and DEA exposure, suggesting that H. azteca may be used as a surrogate model organism for Diporeia spp.

  6. Toxicity of short-term copper exposure to early life stages of red sea bream, Pagrus major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Jinhu; Ye, Zhenjiang; Dou, Shuozeng

    2010-09-01

    Acute (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.8, 1.6 mg Cu/L) and chronic (0, 0.02, 0.04, 0.06, 0.08, 0.10, 0.12 mg Cu/L) toxicity tests of Cu with embryonic and larval red sea bream, Pagrus major, were carried out to investigate their biological responses to Cu exposure in static water at 18 +/- 1 degrees C (dissolved organic carbon, 1.8 +/- 0.65 mg C/L; hardness, 6,183 +/- 360 mg CaCO3/L; salinity, 33 +/- 1 per thousand). The 24- and 48-h LC50 (median lethal concentration) values of Cu for embryos were 0.23 and 0.15 mg/L, whereas the 48-, 72-, and 96-h LC50 values for larvae were 0.52, 0.19, and 0.13 mg/L, respectively, suggesting that embryos were more sensitive to Cu toxicity than larvae. Copper exposures at > or =0.06 mg concentrations caused low hatching success, a delay in the time to hatching of embryos, and reductions in the growth and yolk absorption of the larvae, whereas high mortality and morphological malformations occurred in the embryos and larvae at > or =0.08 mg/L concentrations. Copper concentration did not significantly affect the heart rate of the embryos, but it significantly decreased the heart rate of the newly hatched larvae when the Cu concentration was > or =0.08 mg/L, suggesting that Cu at high concentrations could induce heartbeat disturbances in red sea bream more easily at the larval stage than at the embryonic stage. Hatching success, time to hatching, growth rate, morphological abnormality, yolk absorption, and heart rate were Cu concentration-dependent and could be effective endpoints for evaluating Cu toxicity to the early life stages of red sea bream in nature.

  7. Early-life exposure to dimethoate-induced reproductive toxicity: evaluation of effects on pituitary-testicular axis of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ruchna; Mohanty, Banalata

    2009-12-01

    In utero and lactational exposure to organophosphate dimethoate exerted toxic impact on the reproductive system of male mice. Pregnant mice were exposed to 4, 8, and 16 mg/kg of the pesticide, the sublethal doses (2.5, 5, and 10% of Lethal Dose(50) [LD(50)]), via gavaging from gestation day (GD) 6 to postnatal day (PND) 21. The effects on the male reproductive system were evaluated at two stages: at prepubertal age (PND 22) and at the postpubertal age of PND 63. Gonadal inhibition was reflected in the significant reduction of weight and distinct histopathological alteration of testis and epididymis as well as in decreased sperm counts, which could be linked to hormonal imbalance caused by dimethoate interference of reproductive axis. Disruption of pituitary-testicular axis was shown in the weak immunointensity of luteinizing hormone (LH) cells, reduction in their size and number, and lowered plasma LH and testosterone levels as observed in the neonates exposed to two higher tested doses. In addition, the direct toxic impact of the pesticide on the testicular Leydig cells and inhibition of steroidogenesis could be suggested. Drastic reduction in the testosterone level (approximately 70%) was suggestive of this effect. The adverse effects were persisted in the young adult mice. Developmental toxicity was evident in the highest dose-exposed (10% LD(50)) group where GD length and stillbirths were significantly increased along with a decrease of body weight and anogenital distance of the fetus. Maternal exposure of pesticide during gestation and lactation periods thus adversely affected the pituitary-testicular axis of mice neonates, which further caused reproductive dysfunctioning of young adult mice.

  8. Potential citric acid exposure and toxicity to Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) associated with Eleutherodactylus frog control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, William C; Witmer, Gary W; Jojola, Susan M; Sin, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We examined potential exposure of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) to citric acid, a minimum risk pesticide registered for control of invasive Eleutherodactylus frog populations. Hoary bats are nocturnal insectivores that roost solitarily in foliage, federally listed as endangered, and are endemic to Hawaii. Oral ingestion during grooming of contaminated fur appears to be the principal route by which these bats might be exposed to citric acid. We made assessments of oral toxicity, citric acid consumption, retention of material on fur, and grooming using big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) as a surrogate species. We evaluated both ground application and aerial application of 16 % solutions of citric acid during frog control operations. Absorbent bat effigies exposed to ground and aerial operational spray applications retained means of 1.54 and 0.02 g, respectively, of dry citric acid, although retention by the effigies was much higher than bat carcasses drenched in citric acid solutions. A high dose delivered orally (2,811 mg/kg) was toxic to the big brown bats and emesis occurred in 1 bat dosed as low as the 759 mg/kg level. No effect was observed with the lower doses examined (≤ 542 mg/kg). Bats sprayed with 5 ml of 16 % (w/w) citric acid solution showed no evidence of intoxication. In field situations, it is unlikely that bats would be sprayed directly or ingest much citric acid retained by fur. Based on our observations, we believe Hawaiian hoary bats to be at very low risk from harmful exposure to a toxic dose of citric acid during frog control operations.

  9. Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1-Mediated Toxicity Inhibited by Neutralizing Antibodies Late in the Course of Continual in Vivo and in Vitro Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norbert Stich

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic shock syndrome (TSS results from the host’s overwhelming inflammatory response and cytokine storm mainly due to superantigens (SAgs. There is no effective specific therapy. Application of immunoglobulins has been shown to improve the outcome of the disease and to neutralize SAgs both in vivo and in vitro. However, in most experiments that have been performed, antiserum was either pre-incubated with SAg, or both were applied simultaneously. To mirror more closely the clinical situation, we applied a multiple dose (over five days lethal challenge in a rabbit model. Treatment with toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1 neutralizing antibody was fully protective, even when administered late in the course of the challenge. Kinetic studies on the effect of superantigen toxins are scarce. We performed in vitro kinetic studies by neutralizing the toxin with antibodies at well-defined time points. T-cell activation was determined by assessing T-cell proliferation (3H-thymidine incorporation, determination of IL-2 release in the cell supernatant (ELISA, and IL-2 gene activation (real-time PCR (RT-PCR. Here we show that T-cell activation occurs continuously. The application of TSST-1 neutralizing antiserum reduced IL-2 and TNFα release into the cell supernatant, even if added at later time points. Interference with the prolonged stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines is likely to be in vivo relevant, as postexposure treatment protected rabbits against the multiple dose lethal SAg challenge. Our results shed new light on the treatment of TSS by specific antibodies even at late stages of exposure.

  10. Cell-based Metabolomics for Assessing Chemical Exposure and Toxicity of Environmental Surface Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waste water treatment plants (WWTPs), concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs), mining activities, and agricultural operations release contaminants that negatively affect surface water quality. Traditional methods using live animals/fish to monitor/assess contaminant exposu...

  11. [The assessment of risk for xylene exposure in a laboratory of anatomy: comparison between computational models and environmental and biological monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Pasini, R; De Comite, A; Missineo, P; Riboldi, L; Bertazzi, P A

    2012-01-01

    Exposure to xylene in a pathology laboratory was evaluated using two algorithms: Stoffenmanager and Archi.me.de. The results were compared with those obtained by applying the environmental and biological monitoring of the exposure. The use of models required a period of self-learning and, for Stoffenmanager, knowledge of the English language. Information on the toxicity and safety of xylene, available from the medial and safety data sheets, and the conditions and amount of use, obtained through a survey and interviews with operators, have been imputed. Stoffenmanager estimated low the inhalation exposure and medium the dermal exposure, with a value of personal exposure during the work shift of 1.4 mg/m3. A.r.chi.me.d.e. estimated negligible the risk to health. These ratings are consistent with those obtained using the experimental approach. This result, combined with the simplicity and low cost, makes the algorithms very interesting tools for the assessment of chemical risk in the workplace.

  12. Dietary exposure to essential and potentially toxic elements for the population of Hanoi, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, H.; Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the dietary intake of essential and toxic elements in fast-developing Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam is limited. Iron and Zn deficiency in Asia is a well-known problem and is partly due to rice constituting a major part of the diet. Dietary habits are changing and there is......Knowledge of the dietary intake of essential and toxic elements in fast-developing Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam is limited. Iron and Zn deficiency in Asia is a well-known problem and is partly due to rice constituting a major part of the diet. Dietary habits are changing...... were identified and 14 samples of each food group were collected from markets and/or supermarkets in the period 2007-2009. Water spinach, water dropwort, watercress, water mimosa and pond fish are typically produced in wastewater-fed systems. Therefore, these samples were collected both at markets...

  13. Dietary exposure to essential and potentially toxic elements for the population of Hanoi, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcussen, H.; Jensen, Bodil Hamborg; Petersen, Annette;

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of the dietary intake of essential and toxic elements in fast-developing Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam is limited. Iron and Zn deficiency in Asia is a well-known problem and is partly due to rice constituting a major part of the diet. Dietary habits are changing and there is......Knowledge of the dietary intake of essential and toxic elements in fast-developing Southeast Asian countries such as Vietnam is limited. Iron and Zn deficiency in Asia is a well-known problem and is partly due to rice constituting a major part of the diet. Dietary habits are changing...... were identified and 14 samples of each food group were collected from markets and/or supermarkets in the period 2007-2009. Water spinach, water dropwort, watercress, water mimosa and pond fish are typically produced in wastewater-fed systems. Therefore, these samples were collected both at markets...

  14. Toxicity of quantum dots and cadmium salt to Caenorhabditis elegans after multigenerational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Elizabeth Q; Cho, Minjung; Zhu, Huiguang; Puppala, Hema L; Escalera, Gabriela; Zhong, Weiwei; Colvin, Vicki L

    2013-01-15

    To fully understand the biological and environmental impacts of nanomaterials requires studies that address both sublethal end points and multigenerational effects. Here, we use a nematode to examine these issues as they relate to exposure to two different types of quantum dots, core (CdSe) and core-shell (CdSe/ZnS), and to compare the effect to those observed after cadmium salt exposures. The strong fluorescence of the core-shell QDs allowed for the direct visualization of the materials in the digestive track within a few hours of exposure. Multiple end points, including both developmental and locomotive, were examined at QD exposures of low (10 mg/L Cd), medium (50 mg/L Cd), and high concentrations (100 mg/L Cd). While the core-shell QDs showed no effect on fitness (lifespan, fertility, growth, and three parameters of motility behavior), the core QDs caused acute effects similar to those found for cadmium salts, suggesting that biological effects may be attributed to cadmium leaching from the more soluble QDs. Over multiple generations, we commonly found that for lower life-cycle exposures to core QDs the parents response was generally a poor predictor of the effects on progeny. At the highest concentrations, however, biological effects found for the first generation were commonly similar in magnitude to those found in future generations.

  15. An Internal Reaction Chamber in Dimethylglycine Oxidase Provides Efficient Protection from Exposure to Toxic Formaldehyde*

    OpenAIRE

    Tralau, Tewes; Lafite, Pierre; Levy, Colin; Combe, John P.; Scrutton, Nigel S.; Leys, David

    2009-01-01

    We report a synthetic biology approach to demonstrate substrate channeling in an unusual bifunctional flavoprotein dimethylglycine oxidase. The catabolism of dimethylglycine through methyl group oxidation can potentially liberate toxic formaldehyde, a problem common to many amine oxidases and dehydrogenases. Using a novel synthetic in vivo reporter system for cellular formaldehyde, we found that the oxidation of dimethylglycine is coupled to the synthesis of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate thr...

  16. Exposure to Chlorinated Biphenyls Causes Polymorphonucleocytes to Induce Progenitor Cell Toxicity in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanika V. Martin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Progenitor cells (PC are the precursors for many developmental structures and are sensitive to a variety of toxic agents including the environmental contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs. The mechanism(s that contributes to the development of PCB-induced progenitor cell-related fetotoxicities are not completely understood. However, several studies have demonstrated an important role for neutrophils (polymorphonucleocytes in the development of PCB induced toxicities. Our recent findings have indicated that conditioned medium collected from PC (CMPC exposed to a single dose of the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1248, can activate isolated neutrophil populations. Because of our recent findings, this study was conducted to determine if conditioned medium from PC treated with a PCB mixture causes neutrophils to injure PC in culture. Isolated PC were cultured and treated with different concentrations of Aroclor 1248 for 24 hours. The resulting PC-derived conditioned media was collected and its affect on neutrophil activity was analyzed. Conditioned medium from PC treated with Aroclor 1248 was chemotactic for neutrophils. The conditioned medium from Aroclor 1248 treated-PC also stimulated neutrophils to release super oxide anion, cathepsin G and elastase into culture medium. Furthermore, the conditioned medium from Aroclor 1248 treated- PC was able to stimulate neutrophils to cause progenitor cell toxicity in co-cultures. The conditioned medium from Aroclor 1248 treated-PC was not toxic to individual neutrophil cultures or PC cultures. Moreover, the addition of a protease inhibitor to the co-cultures containing neutrophils and PC, afforded protection against neutrophil-induced cytotoxicity of PC. These data suggest that a PCB mixture can cause progenitor cells to produce a factor(s that activates neutrophils and stimulates them to damage PC populations in culture.

  17. External Quality Assessment Scheme for Biological Monitoring of Occupational Exposure to Toxic Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Lee

    2011-09-01

    Conclusion: The EQAS has taken a primary role in improving the reliability of analytical data. A total quality assurance scheme is suggested, including the validation of technical documentation for the whole analytical procedure.

  18. Neurobehavioral deficits at age 7years associated with prenatal exposure to toxicants from maternal seafood diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, Philippe; Weihe, Pal; Nielsen, Flemming;

    2012-01-01

    To determine the possible neurotoxic impact of prenatal exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), we analyzed banked cord blood from a Faroese birth cohort for PCBs. The subjects were born in 1986-1987, and 917 cohort members had completed a series of neuropsychological tests at age 7years....... Major PCB congeners (118, 138, 153, and 180), the calculated total PCB concentration, and the PCB exposure estimated in a structural equation model showed weak associations with test deficits, with statistically significant negative associations only with the Boston Naming test. Likewise, neither...... hexachlorobenzene nor p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene showed clear links to neurobehavioral deficits. Thus, these associations were much weaker than those associated with the cord-blood mercury concentration, and adjustment for mercury substantially attenuated the regression coefficients for PCB exposure...

  19. Neurodevelopmental toxicity risks due to occupational exposure to industrial chemicals during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julvez, Jordi; Grandjean, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    demonstrates the vulnerability of the developing brain to substances like lead and methylmercury. Despite the evident hazards involved, the number of occupational cohort studies carried out in this field is very low. However, the lack of evidence for assumed neurotoxicants should not divert the attention......Exposure to neurotoxic chemicals is of particular concern when it occurs during early development. The immature brain is highly vulnerable prenatally and is therefore at risk due to occupational exposures incurred by pregnant women. A systematic search of the literature has been performed...... with emphasis on epidemiological studies on female workers and the neurodevelopment of their children. The majority of recent occupational studies focused on organic solvents and pesticides, which were associated with neurobehavioral impairments in the progeny. Additional evidence on environmental exposures...

  20. Exposure Science for Terrorist Attacks and Theaters of Military Conflict: Minimizing Contact with Toxicants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioy, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    The strategies for protecting our deployed U.S. Forces are outlined in National Research Council documents published in 1999–2000. This article summarizes experiences and information gathered and interpreted regarding population and rescue workers’ exposures in the aftermath of the 2001 World Trade Center attacks, with the aim to provide insights on issues related to military deployment to locations with hazardous agents. Issues coveted include phases of exposure, materials of concern, detection equipment, and personal protection equipment. The focus is on human exposure issues, which are primarily associated with strategies 1 through 3 of the National Research Council’s report entitled “Protecting Those Who Serve: Strategies to Protect the Health of Deployed U.S. Forces”. Contact and duration of contact with hazardous substances are critical areas of concern, which require prevention and intervention procedures and protocols to reduce the incidence of acute and long-term health outcomes. PMID:21916334

  1. Estimating mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using prey fish monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T.; Hartman, C. Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Herzog, Mark P.; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark’s grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled.

  2. Estimating Mercury Exposure of Piscivorous Birds and Sport Fish Using Prey Fish Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Joshua T; Hartman, C Alex; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Herzog, Mark P; Davis, Jay; Ichikawa, Gary; Bonnema, Autumn

    2015-11-17

    Methylmercury is a global pollutant of aquatic ecosystems, and monitoring programs need tools to predict mercury exposure of wildlife. We developed equations to estimate methylmercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish using mercury concentrations in prey fish. We collected original data on western grebes (Aechmophorus occidentalis) and Clark's grebes (Aechmophorus clarkii) and summarized the published literature to generate predictive equations specific to grebes and a general equation for piscivorous birds. We measured mercury concentrations in 354 grebes (blood averaged 1.06 ± 0.08 μg/g ww), 101 grebe eggs, 230 sport fish (predominantly largemouth bass and rainbow trout), and 505 prey fish (14 species) at 25 lakes throughout California. Mercury concentrations in grebe blood, grebe eggs, and sport fish were strongly related to mercury concentrations in prey fish among lakes. Each 1.0 μg/g dw (∼0.24 μg/g ww) increase in prey fish resulted in an increase in mercury concentrations of 103% in grebe blood, 92% in grebe eggs, and 116% in sport fish. We also found strong correlations between mercury concentrations in grebes and sport fish among lakes. Our results indicate that prey fish monitoring can be used to estimate mercury exposure of piscivorous birds and sport fish when wildlife cannot be directly sampled.

  3. Experimentally Switching from Factory Made to Self-Made Cigarettes: A Preliminary Study of Perceptions, Toxicant Exposure and Smoking Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koszowski, Bartosz; Rosenberry, Zachary R; Strasser, Andrew A; Pickworth, Wallace B

    2014-04-01

    There is currently the potential for a great deal of transition and product switching among cigarette smokers. Studies on the transition when cigarette smokers switch from one type of nicotine delivery product to another are needed to understand subsequent toxicant exposure. A preliminary study was performed to determine the feasibility of experimentally replicating the transition from factory made (FM) to personal machine made (PMM) cigarette smoking. The adaptability and perceptions of the consumer and the consequent exposure to cigarette-delivered toxins were assessed. Six adults (4 men) were recruited for four laboratory visits (V1-V4) on study days 1, 5, 10 and 15, respectively. All of the participants agreed to switch from exclusive FM smoking to exclusive PMM cigarette smoking for the duration of the study. Compliance was very high among these participants. Participants progressively accepted the PMM cigarettes and became efficient producers of PMMs as evidenced in the reduced time to make 5 PMMs in the laboratory. Participants reported a preference for FM at visit 2 (V2), but had stated no preference by the fourth visit. Compared to the FMs, the PMMs at V3 (psmoking (for both FM and PMM) and 34.0±5.3 ng/mL after smoking; there were no significant differences in the plasma nicotine boost (average 17.7 and 15.4ng/ml after FM and PMM smoking, respectively). Although there were differences between individual subjects' filter butt levels of deposited solanesol the within-subject levels were remarkably similar. Puff topography measures did not vary across visits or cigarette type. Although interpretation of study results must be conservative because of the small sample size, this study demonstrates that experimentally-induced transition from FM to PMM smoking is feasible for laboratory study and the subsequent toxicant exposure is comparable for FM and PMM cigarettes.

  4. Soil Invertebrates As Bio-Monitors of Toxic Metals Pollution in Impacted Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Imaobong I. Udousoro; I. U. Umoren; J. M. Izuagie; C. U. Ikpo; S. F. Ngeri; E. S. Shaibu

    2015-01-01

    The bio-indicator potentials of two invertebrate species, Eudrilus eugeniae (earthworm) and Pachybolus ligulatus (millipede) in toxic metals impacted soils in Akwa Ibom State, in the Niger Delta region of Nigeria were assessed. The study involved collection of Eudrilus eugeniae and Pachybolus ligulatus, and their site soil samples from different impacted and non-impacted soils in ten locations spread over four Local Government Areas. Toxic metals (Pb, Fe, Zn, Ni and Cd) in soils and in the bi...

  5. Neurobehavioral toxicity of a repeated exposure (14 days to the airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon fluorene in adult Wistar male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Peiffer

    Full Text Available Fluorene is one of the most abundant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in air and may contribute to the neurobehavioral alterations induced by the environmental exposure of humans to PAHs. Since no data are available on fluorene neurotoxicity, this study was conducted in adult rats to assess the behavioral toxicity of repeated fluorene inhalation exposure. Male rats (n = 18/group were exposed nose-only to 1.5 or 150 ppb of fluorene 6 hours/day for 14 consecutive days, whereas the control animals were exposed to non-contaminated air. At the end of the exposure, animals were tested for activity and anxiety in an open-field and in an elevated-plus maze, for short-term memory in a Y-maze, and for spatial learning in an eight-arm maze. The results showed that the locomotor activity and the learning performances of the animals were unaffected by fluorene. In parallel, the fluorene-exposed rats showed a lower level of anxiety than controls in the open-field, but not in the elevated-plus maze, which is probably due to a possible difference in the aversive feature of the two mazes. In the same animals, increasing blood and brain levels of fluorene monohydroxylated metabolites (especially the 2-OH fluorene were detected at both concentrations (1.5 and 150 ppb, demonstrating the exposure of the animals to the pollutant and showing the ability of this compound to be metabolized and to reach the cerebral compartment. The present study highlights the possibility for a 14-day fluorene exposure to induce some specific anxiety-related behavioral disturbances, and argues in favor of the susceptibility of the adult brain when exposed to volatile fluorene.

  6. Personal Air Pollution Exposure Monitoring using Low Cost Sensors in Chennai City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy Yasa, Pavan; Shiva, Nagendra S. N.

    2016-04-01

    Air quality in many cities is deteriorating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. In the past, most of the health impacts studies in the urban areas have considered stationary air quality monitoring station data for health impact assessment. Since, there exist a spatial and temporal variation of air quality because of rapid change in land use pattern and complex interaction between emission sources and meteorological conditions, the human exposure assessment using stationary data may not provide realistic information. In such cases low cost sensors monitoring is viable in providing both spatial and temporal variations of air pollutant concentrations. In the present study an attempt has been made to use low cost sensor for monitoring the personal exposure to the two criteria pollutants CO and PM2.5 at 3 different locations of Chennai city. Maximum and minimum concentrations of CO and PM2.5 were found to be 5.4ppm, 0.8ppm and 534.8μg/m3, 1.9μg/m3 respectively. Results showed high concentrations near the intersection and low concentrations in the straight road.

  7. Monitoring and assessment of toxic metals in Gulf War oil spill contaminated soil using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, T; Gondal, M A

    2008-01-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the detection of toxic metals in oil spill contaminated soil (OSCS). The OSCS samples were collected from Khursania Saudi Arabia along the coast of Persian Gulf exposed to oil spills in 1991 Gulf war. Environmentally important elements like Aluminum Magnesium, Calcium, Chromium, Titanium, Strontium, Iron, Barium, Sodium, potassium, Zirconium and Vanadium from the contaminated soil have been detected. Optimal experimental conditions for analysis were investigated. The LIBS system was calibrated using standard samples containing these trace elements. The results obtained using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) were compared with the results obtained using Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICP). The concentrations of some elements (Ba and Cr) were found higher than permissible safe limits. Health risks associated with exposure to such toxic elements are also discussed.

  8. Contribution of various microenvironments to the daily personal exposure to ultrafine particles: Personal monitoring coupled with GPS tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Kjeldsen, Birthe Uldahl; Olsen, Yulia; Schipperijn, Jasper; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Karottki, Dorina Gabriela; Toftum, Jørn; Loft, Steffen; Clausen, Geo

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) may have adverse health effects. Central monitoring stations do not represent the personal exposure to UFP accurately. Few studies have previously focused on personal exposure to UFP. Sixty non-smoking residents living in Copenhagen, Denmark were asked to carry a backpack equipped with a portable monitor, continuously recording particle number concentrations (PN), in order to measure the real-time individual exposure over a period of ˜48 h. A GPS logger was carried along with the particle monitor and allowed us to estimate the contribution of UFP exposure occurring in various microenvironments (residence, during active and passive transport, other indoor and outdoor environments) to the total daily exposure. On average, the fractional contribution of each microenvironment to the daily integrated personal exposure roughly corresponded to the fractions of the day the subjects spent in each microenvironment. The home environment accounted for 50% of the daily personal exposure. Indoor environments other than home or vehicles contributed with ˜40%. The highest median UFP concentration was obtained during passive transport (vehicles). However, being in transit or outdoors contributed 5% or less to the daily exposure. Additionally, the subjects recorded in a diary the periods when they were at home. With this approach, 66% of the total daily exposure was attributable to the home environment. The subjects spent 28% more time at home according to the diary, compared to the GPS. These results may indicate limitations of using diaries, but also possible inaccuracy and miss-classification in the GPS data.

  9. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Futra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II, Cd(II, Pb(II, Zn(II, Cr(VI, Co(II, Ni(II, Ag(I and Fe(II were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8. The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD for Cu(II (6.40 μg/L, Cd(II (1.56 μg/L, Pb(II (47 μg/L, Ag(I (18 μg/L than Zn(II (320 μg/L, Cr(VI (1,000 μg/L, Co(II (1700 μg/L, Ni(II (2800 μg/L, and Fe(III (3100 μg/L. Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  10. [Occupational toxic exposure and the pregnant woman. 2: results of a prospective study of 100 pregnancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testud, F; Lambert-Chhum, R; Bellemin, B; Descotes, J

    2001-12-01

    Many women of childbearing age are occupationally exposed to chemicals and concerned with the ensuing risk when pregnant. To present the results of a prospective follow-up study of 100 pregnant women and to discuss them after a brief overview of the published data on this topic. Since January 1996 the Lyon Poison Center has been conducting a prospective follow-up of all request concerning pregnant women occupationally exposed to chemicals. A thorough evaluation of the hazards of the handled products and of the actual exposure at the workplace is done for each patient. A toxicological advice is given and the outcome of the pregnancy is followed-up. One hundred pregnant women were included between January 1996 and December 2000. Based on the nature of the handled products, two groups have been identified: the first included 73 women exposed to organic solvents and the second 27 women exposed to miscellaneous. When the exposure was considered potentially hazardous for the pregnancy, either withdrawal from the workstation (19 cases), avoidance of certain activities (9 cases) or improvement of individual protective measures (29 cases) was recommended. In 43% of the cases, the occupational exposure was not considered hazardous to the outcome of the pregnancy. No increase of adverse outcome was identified: 4 miscarriages and 96 living births were observed, with 2 major malformations and 1 minor malformation. Occupational exposure to chemicals was not found to affect adversely the outcome of these 100 pregnancies.

  11. Exposure to pesticides with dermal toxicity in farmers of Community of Valencia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Brandon Garcia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dermal route has a toxicological importance, as well as substances such as entry, but by frequent local effects. In applications of pesticides by farmers is common and important the dermal exposure to pesticides, so the dermal route in this sector of activity could be of particular relevance. Objective: To determine the hazard of dermal exposure in farmers using pesticides and to propose specific preventive measures. Material and methods: A transversal descriptive study based on a questionnaire designed by the researchers, replying to the 238 attendees at the courses for pesticide handler card basic level Department of Health Xativa-Ontinyent (Valencia in 2009. Pesticides used were collected over the past 12 months and reviewed their R phrases (risk phrases looking for dermal effects. Results: 55 % of pesticides had some phrase R on skin problems. The phrase R38 "Irritating to skin" was found in 16 products, used by 59.05 % of respondents and the R43 "Possibility of sensitization by skin contact" at 7, used by 23.91 %. Conclusions: The skin irritation effect was related to more dermal exposure to these pesticides. It is necessary to emphasize the skin protection in the courses for workers who apply these products. Skin problems should be included damages for workplace exposure to pesticides.

  12. Biological monitoring and questionnaire for assessing exposure to ethylenebisdithiocarbamates in a multicenter European field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fustinoni, S; Campo, L; Liesivuori, J; Pennanen, S; Vergieva, T; van Amelsvoort, Lgpm; Bosetti, C; Van Loveren, H; Colosio, C

    2008-09-01

    This study deals with pesticide exposure profile in some European countries with a specific focus on ethylenebisdithiocarbamates (EBDC). In all, 55 Bulgarian greenhouse workers, 51 Finnish potato farmers, 48 Italian vineyard workers, 42 Dutch floriculture farmers, and 52 Bulgarian zineb producers entered the study. Each group was matched with a group of not occupationally exposed subjects. Exposure data were gained through self-administered questionnaires and measuring ethylenethiourea (ETU) in two spot urine samples collected, respectively, before the beginning of seasonal exposure (T0), and after 30 days, at the end of the exposure period (T30). Controls underwent a similar protocol. Study agriculture workers were involved in mixing and loading pesticides, application of pesticide mixture with mechanical or manual equipments, re-entry activities, and cleaning equipments. Chemical workers were involved in synthesis, quality controls, and packing activities. The number of pesticides to whom these subjects were exposed varied from one (zineb production) to eight (potato farmers). The use of personal protective devices was variegate and regarded both aerial and dermal penetration routes. EBDC exposure, assessed by T30 urinary ETU, was found to follow the order: greenhouse workers, zineb producers, vineyard workers, potato farmers, floriculture farmers with median levels of 49.6, 23.0, 11.8, 7.5, and 0.9 microg/g creatinine; the last group having ETU at the same level of controls (approximately 0.5 microg/g creatinine). Among agriculture workers, pesticide application, especially using manual equipment, seems to be the major determinant in explaining internal dose. Although the analysis of self-administered questionnaires evidenced difficulties especially related to lack and/or poor quality of reported data, biological monitoring confirms to be a powerful tool in assessing pesticide exposure.

  13. Bio-monitoring of mycotoxin exposure in Cameroon using a urinary multi-biomarker approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Wilfred A; Warth, Benedikt; Sulyok, Michael; Krska, Rudolf; Tchana, Angele; Njobeh, Patrick B; Turner, Paul C; Kouanfack, Charles; Eyongetah, Mbu; Dutton, Mike; Moundipa, Paul F

    2013-12-01

    Bio-monitoring of human exposure to mycotoxin has mostly been limited to a few individually measured mycotoxin biomarkers. This study aimed to determine the frequency and level of exposure to multiple mycotoxins in human urine from Cameroonian adults. 175 Urine samples (83% from HIV-positive individuals) and food frequency questionnaire responses were collected from consenting Cameroonians, and analyzed for 15 mycotoxins and relevant metabolites using LC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, eleven analytes were detected individually or in combinations in 110/175 (63%) samples including the biomarkers aflatoxin M1, fumonisin B1, ochratoxin A and total deoxynivalenol. Additionally, important mycotoxins and metabolites thereof, such as fumonisin B2, nivalenol and zearalenone, were determined, some for the first time in urine following dietary exposures. Multi-mycotoxin contamination was common with one HIV-positive individual exposed to five mycotoxins, a severe case of co-exposure that has never been reported in adults before. For the first time in Africa or elsewhere, this study quantified eleven mycotoxin biomarkers and bio-measures in urine from adults. For several mycotoxins estimates indicate that the tolerable daily intake is being exceeded in this study population. Given that many mycotoxins adversely affect the immune system, future studies will examine whether combinations of mycotoxins negatively impact Cameroonian population particularly immune-suppressed individuals.

  14. Risk Exposure and Net Flow in Investment Funds: Do Shareholders Monitor Asset Allocation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Felipe Schiozer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the impact of asset allocation on the net flow of fixed income funds in the Brazilian market, by exploiting the exogenous variation in the risk perception of bank liabilities (CDs caused by the financial turmoil that followed Lehman Brothers’ demise in September 2008. The central hypothesis is that the exposure to assets negatively affected by the crisis impacts negatively the fund’s net flow. We find that, for mutual funds, the larger proportion of assets negatively affected by the crisis the larger the net outflow of resources, indicating that shareholders monitor asset allocation and exert disciplining power on fund managers by withdrawing their resources. In exclusive (fundos exclusivos, i.e., funds with a single shareholder, for which the shareholder is presumed to exert more influence on asset reallocation, we find no significant relationship between the exposure to assets negatively affected by the crisis and net flows.

  15. Occupational exposure to ultrafine particles among airport employees--combining personal monitoring and global positioning system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Karina Lauenborg; Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Schipperijn, Jasper

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exposure to ultrafine particles (UFP) has been linked to cardiovascular and lung diseases. Combustion of jet fuel and diesel powered handling equipment emit UFP resulting in potentially high exposure levels among employees working at airports. High levels of UFP have been reported......). METHOD: 30 employees from five different occupational groups (baggage handlers, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside and landside security) at CPH were instructed to wear a personal monitor of particle number concentration in real time and a GPS device. The measurements were carried out on 8 days...... handlers were exposed to 7 times higher average concentrations (geometric mean, GM: 37×103 UFP/cm(3), 95% CI: 25-55 × 10(3) UFP/cm(3)) than employees mainly working indoors (GM: 5 × 10(3) UFP/cm(3), 95% CI: 2-11 × 103 UFP/cm(3)). Furthermore, catering drivers, cleaning staff and airside security were...

  16. Evaluating toxic endpoints of exposure to a commercial PCB mixture: an in vivo laboratory study

    OpenAIRE

    Herve Aloysius; Daniel Desaulniers; Bandiera, Stelvio M.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous environmental contaminants that produce a wide range of toxic effects. To determine sensitive endpoints in various organ systems, the effects of Aroclor 1260 on immune, endocrine, and hepatic systems were evaluated in a dose-response study. Nine-week old male rats were treated with Aroclor 1260 by oral gavage at dosages ranging from 0.025 to 156 mg/kg/day for 10 consecutive days and killed two days after the last treatment. Eight days prior to s...

  17. Quantitative ultrasound imaging for monitoring in situ high-intensity focused ultrasound exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Kemmerer, Jeremy P; Karunakaran, Chandra; Abuhabsah, Rami; Miller, Rita J; Sarwate, Sandhya; Oelze, Michael L

    2014-10-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging is hypothesized to map temperature elevations induced in tissue with high spatial and temporal resolution. To test this hypothesis, QUS techniques were examined to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure of tissue. In situ experiments were conducted on mammary adenocarcinoma tumors grown in rats and lesions were formed using a HIFU system. A thermocouple was inserted into the tumor to provide estimates of temperature at one location. Backscattered time-domain waveforms from the tissue during exposure were recorded using a clinical ultrasonic imaging system. Backscatter coefficients were estimated using a reference phantom technique. Two parameters were estimated from the backscatter coefficient (effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC). The changes in the average parameters in the regions corresponding to the HIFU focus over time were correlated to the temperature readings from the thermocouple. The changes in the EAC parameter were consistently correlated to temperature during both heating and cooling of the tumors. The changes in the ESD did not have a consistent trend with temperature. The mean ESD and EAC before exposure were 120 ± 16 μm and 32 ± 3 dB/cm3, respectively, and changed to 144 ± 9 μm and 51 ± 7 dB/cm3, respectively, just before the last HIFU pulse was delivered to the tissue. After the tissue cooled down to 37 °C, the mean ESD and EAC were 126 ± 8 μm and 35 ± 4 dB/cm3, respectively. Peak temperature in the range of 50-60 °C was recorded by a thermocouple placed just behind the tumor. These results suggest that QUS techniques have the potential to be used for non-invasive monitoring of HIFU exposure.

  18. Are luminescent bacteria suitable for online detection and monitoring of toxic compounds in drinking water and its sources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woutersen, Marjolijn; Belkin, Shimshon; Brouwer, Bram; van Wezel, Annemarie P; Heringa, Minne B

    2011-05-01

    Biosensors based on luminescent bacteria may be valuable tools to monitor the chemical quality and safety of surface and drinking water. In this review, an overview is presented of the recombinant strains available that harbour the bacterial luciferase genes luxCDABE, and which may be used in an online biosensor for water quality monitoring. Many bacterial strains have been described for the detection of a broad range of toxicity parameters, including DNA damage, protein damage, membrane damage, oxidative stress, organic pollutants, and heavy metals. Most lux strains have sensitivities with detection limits ranging from milligrams per litre to micrograms per litre, usually with higher sensitivities in compound-specific strains. Although the sensitivity of lux strains can be enhanced by various molecular manipulations, most reported detection thresholds are still too high to detect levels of individual contaminants as they occur nowadays in European drinking waters. However, lux strains sensing specific toxic effects have the advantage of being able to respond to mixtures of contaminants inducing the same effect, and thus could be used as a sensor for the sum effect, including the effect of compounds that are as yet not identified by chemical analysis. An evaluation of the suitability of lux strains for monitoring surface and drinking water is therefore provided.

  19. Surveillance methods for identifying, characterizing, and monitoring tobacco products: potential reduced exposure products as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Richard J.; Cummings, K. Michael; Rees, Vaughan W.; Connolly, Gregory N.; Norton, Kaila J.; Sweanor, David; Parascandola, Mark; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.; Shields, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco products are widely sold and marketed, yet integrated data systems for identifying, tracking, and characterizing products are lacking. Tobacco manufacturers recently have developed potential reduction exposure products (PREPs) with implied or explicit health claims. Currently, a systematic approach for identifying, defining, and evaluating PREPs sold at the local, state or national levels in the US has not been developed. Identifying, characterizing, and monitoring new tobacco products could be greatly enhanced with a responsive surveillance system. This paper critically reviews available surveillance data sources for identifying and tracking tobacco products, including PREPs, evaluating strengths and weaknesses of potential data sources in light of their reliability and validity. Absent regulations mandating disclosure of product-specific information, it is likely that public health officials will need to rely on a variety of imperfect data sources to help identify, characterize, and monitor tobacco products, including PREPs. PMID:19959680

  20. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  1. An assessment of the toxicity of phthalate esters to freshwater benthos. 1. Aqueous exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, D J; Markee, T P; Geiger, D L; Brooke, L T; VandeVenter, F A; Cox, D A; Genisot, K I; Robillard, K A; Gorsuch, J W; Parkerton, T F; Reiley, M C; Ankley, G T; Mount, D R

    2001-08-01

    Tests were performed with the freshwater invertebrates Hyalella azteca, Chironomus tentans, and Lumbriculus variegatus to determine the acute toxicity of six phthalate esters, including dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), butylbenzyl phthalate (BBP), di-n-hexyl phthalate (DHP), and di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP). It was possible to derive 10-d LC50 (lethal concentration for 50% of the population) values only for the four lower molecular weight esters (DMP, DEP, DBP, and BBP), for which toxicity increased with increasing octanol-water partition coefficient (Kow) and decreasing water solubility. The LC50 values for DMP, DEP, DBP, and BBP were 28.1, 4.21, 0.63, and 0.46 mg/L for H. azteca; 68.2, 31.0, 2.64, and > 1.76 mg/L for C. tentans; and 246, 102, 2.48, and 1.23 mg/L for L. variegatus, respectively. No significant survival reductions were observed when the three species were exposed to either DHP or DEHP at concentrations approximating their water solubilities.

  2. Genotype and toxicity relationships among Hyalella azteca: I. Acute exposure to metals or low pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Y.; Guttman, S.I.; Oris, J.T.; Bailer, A.J.

    2000-05-01

    Comparative genotype and toxin interactions at three polymorphic enzyme loci were examined in a laboratory population of amphipods (Hyalella azteca) during acute exposure to cadmium, zinc, copper, lead, or low pH. Significant toxin-genotype interactions were observed using logistic regression to model mortality in ten of 15 analyses. Both stressor-specific and nonspecific modes of selection were observed. In general, low pH selected for different genotypes than those selected by metals, especially zinc. Different modes of selection were also observed when amphipods were exposed to different metals. These results suggest that exposure to low pH would significantly reduce the ability of H. azteca to survive subsequent contamination by metals; exposure to stressors in the reverse order would also compromise a population's chance of survival. A genetic distance analysis showed that the magnitude of genetic differentiation consistently increased among survivors compared with that of the initial populations. These increases in genetic divergence estimates suggest that acute exposure to metals or low pH may have an evolutionarily significant impact on the species. They also suggest that both genotype frequency and genetic distance measures (based on allozyme data) may be used as bioindicators for environmental monitoring programs. Validation of such bioindicators requires an understanding of the population's genetic background, genetic structure, and history.

  3. Assessment of two portable real-time particle monitors used in nanomaterial workplace exposure evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuewei; Beaucham, Catherine C; Pearce, Terri A; Zhuang, Ziqing

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticle emission assessment technique was developed to semi-quantitatively evaluate nanomaterial exposures and employs a combination of filter based samples and portable real-time particle monitors, including a condensation particle counter (CPC) and an optical particle counter (OPC), to detect nanomaterial releases. This laboratory study evaluated the results from CPC and OPC simultaneously measuring a polydisperse aerosol to assess their variability and accuracy. Two CPCs and two OPCs were used to evaluate a polydisperse sodium chloride aerosol within an enclosed chamber. The measurement results for number concentration versus time were compared between paired particle monitors of the same type, and to results from the Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS) which was widely used to measure concentration of size-specific particles. According to analyses by using the Bland-Altman method, the CPCs displayed a constant mean percent difference of -3.8% (95% agreement limits: -9.1 to 1.6%; range of 95% agreement limit: 10.7%) with the chamber particle concentration below its dynamic upper limit (100,000 particles per cubic centimeter). The mean percent difference increased from -3.4% to -12.0% (range of 95% agreement limits: 7.1%) with increasing particle concentrations that were above the dynamic upper limit. The OPC results showed the percent difference within 15% for measurements in particles with size ranges of 300 to 500 and 500 to 1000 regardless of the particle concentration. Compared with SMPS measurements, the CPC gave a mean percent difference of 22.9% (95% agreement limits: 10.5% to 35.2%); whereas the measurements from OPC were not comparable. This study demonstrated that CPC and OPC are useful for measuring nanoparticle exposures but the results from an individual monitor should be interpreted based upon the instrument's technical parameters. Future research should challenge these monitors with particles of different sizes, shapes, or

  4. Assessment of two portable real-time particle monitors used in nanomaterial workplace exposure evaluations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuewei Liu

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle emission assessment technique was developed to semi-quantitatively evaluate nanomaterial exposures and employs a combination of filter based samples and portable real-time particle monitors, including a condensation particle counter (CPC and an optical particle counter (OPC, to detect nanomaterial releases. This laboratory study evaluated the results from CPC and OPC simultaneously measuring a polydisperse aerosol to assess their variability and accuracy.Two CPCs and two OPCs were used to evaluate a polydisperse sodium chloride aerosol within an enclosed chamber. The measurement results for number concentration versus time were compared between paired particle monitors of the same type, and to results from the Scanning Mobility Particle Spectrometer (SMPS which was widely used to measure concentration of size-specific particles. According to analyses by using the Bland-Altman method, the CPCs displayed a constant mean percent difference of -3.8% (95% agreement limits: -9.1 to 1.6%; range of 95% agreement limit: 10.7% with the chamber particle concentration below its dynamic upper limit (100,000 particles per cubic centimeter. The mean percent difference increased from -3.4% to -12.0% (range of 95% agreement limits: 7.1% with increasing particle concentrations that were above the dynamic upper limit. The OPC results showed the percent difference within 15% for measurements in particles with size ranges of 300 to 500 and 500 to 1000 regardless of the particle concentration. Compared with SMPS measurements, the CPC gave a mean percent difference of 22.9% (95% agreement limits: 10.5% to 35.2%; whereas the measurements from OPC were not comparable.This study demonstrated that CPC and OPC are useful for measuring nanoparticle exposures but the results from an individual monitor should be interpreted based upon the instrument's technical parameters. Future research should challenge these monitors with particles of different sizes, shapes

  5. Grizzly bear hair reveals toxic exposure to mercury through salmon consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, Marie; Spence, Jody; Harris, Kate A; Robbins, Charles T; Fortin, Jennifer K; Ross, Peter S; Christensen, Jennie R

    2014-07-01

    Mercury obtained from the diet accumulates in mammalian hair as it grows thus preserving a record of mercury intake over the growth period of a given hair segment. We adapted a microanalysis approach, using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, to characterize temporal changes in mercury exposure and uptake in wild and captive grizzly bears. Captive grizzlies fed diets containing known and varied amounts of mercury provided data to allow prediction of Hg ingestion rates in wild bears. Here, we show, for the first time, that 70% of the coastal grizzly bears sampled had Hg levels exceeding the neurochemical effect level proposed for polar bears. In a context where the international community is taking global actions to reduce Hg emissions through the "Minamata Convention on Mercury", our study provides valuable information on the exposure to mercury of these grizzly bears already under many threats.

  6. Exposure and toxic effects of elemental mercury in gold-mining activities in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harari, Raúl; Harari, Florencia; Gerhardsson, Lars; Lundh, Thomas; Skerfving, Staffan; Strömberg, Ulf; Broberg, Karin

    2012-08-13

    Traditional gold mining, using metallic mercury (Hg(0)) to form gold amalgam, followed by burning to remove the Hg(0), is widely used in South America, Africa and Asia. The gold is sold to merchants who burn it again to eliminate remaining Hg(0). In Ecuador, 200 gold miners, 37 gold merchants and 72 referents were studied. The median Hg concentrations in urine (U-Hg) were 3.3 (range 0.23-170), 37 (3.2-420), and 1.6 (0.2-13)μg/g creatinine, respectively, and in whole blood (B-Hg) were 5.2, 30, and 5.0 μg/L, respectively. Biomarker concentrations among merchants were statistically significantly higher than among miners and referents; also the miners differed from the referents. Burning of gold amalgam among miners was intermittent; U-Hg decreased in the burning-free period. In computerized neuromotor examinations, B-Hg and U-Hg concentrations were associated with increases in the centre frequency of the tremor, as well as in reaction time and postural stability.Retention of Hg (B-Hg), and the elimination rate (U-Hg) appears to be modified by polymorphism in a gene of an enzyme in the glutathione synthesis (GCLM), but there were no significant genetic modifications for the associations between exposure and neurotoxicity.Thus, the gold merchants have a much higher exposure and risk than the miners, in whom the exposure varies over time. The metabolism of Hg is modified by genetic traits. The present exposure to Hg had limited neurotoxic effects.

  7. Use of human milk in the assessment of toxic metal exposure and essential element status in breastfeeding women and their infants in coastal Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzunov Letinić, Judita; Matek Sarić, Marijana; Piasek, Martina; Jurasović, Jasna; Varnai, Veda Marija; Sulimanec Grgec, Antonija; Orct, Tatjana

    2016-12-01

    Pregnant and lactating women and infants are vulnerable population groups for adverse effects of toxic metals due to their high nutritional needs and the resultant increased gastrointestinal absorption of both, essential and toxic elements. Although breastfeeding is recommended for infants worldwide, as human milk is the best source of nutrients and other required bioactive factors, it is also a pathway of maternal excretion of toxic substances including toxic metals and thus a source of infant exposure. The aim of this research was to assess health risks in breastfeeding women in the coastal area of the Republic of Croatia and their infants (N=107) due to maternal exposure to Cd and Pb via cigarette smoking, and Hg via seafood and dental amalgam fillings, and their interaction with essential elements. Biological markers of exposure were the concentrations of main toxic metals Pb, Cd and Hg in maternal blood and three types of breast milk throughout lactation stages. Biological markers of effects were the levels of essential elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in maternal serum and breast milk. With regard to cigarette smoking as a source of exposure to Cd and Pb, there were effects of smoking on Cd concentration in blood and correlations between the smoking index and Cd concentrations in maternal blood (ρ=0.593; Pelement status, only Se levels in maternal serum decreased by 10% in persons who continued smoking during pregnancy compared to non-smokers. In conclusion, the levels of main toxic metals Cd, Pb and Hg and essential elements Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Se in maternal blood and three types of breast milk samples in the studied area of coastal Croatia showed no risk of disrupted essential element levels with regard of toxic metal exposure in both breastfeeding women and their infants.

  8. Lung toxicity and biodistribution of Cd/Se-ZnS quantum dots with different surface functional groups after pulmonary exposure in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Jenny R; Antonini, James M.; Porter, Dale W.; Chapman, Rebecca S.; Scabilloni, James F.; Young, Shih-Houng; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; CASTRANOVA, VINCENT; Mercer, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Background The potential use of quantum dots (QD) in biomedical applications, as well as in other systems that take advantage of their unique physiochemical properties, has led to concern regarding their toxicity, potential systemic distribution, and biopersistence. In addition, little is known about workplace exposure to QD in research, manufacturing, or medical settings. The goal of the present study was to assess pulmonary toxicity, clearance, and biodistribution of QD with different funct...

  9. Chronic toxicity of diphenhydramine hydrochloride and erythromycin thiocyanate to Daphnia, Daphnia magna, in a continuous exposure test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Bernardy, Jeffry A.; Franz, Jeanne L.

    2011-01-01

    Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DH; Benadryl(TM), an over-the-counter antihistamine) and erythromycin thiocyanate (ET; a commonly used macrolide antibiotic) are pharmaceutical compounds whose chronic toxicity to Daphnia magna had not been characterized. Continuous exposure to DH concentrations about 5 times greater than the maximum reported environmental concentration of 0.023 μg/L for 21 days or to ET concentrations about 40 times the maximum reported environmental concentration of 6 μg/L for 21 days did not significantly impact D. magna survival and production. In this study the no observable effect concentration for DH was 0.12 μg/L and for ET was 248 μg/L.

  10. Co-exposure to sunlight enhances the toxicity of naturally weathered Deepwater Horizon oil to early lifestage red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus) and speckled seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloy, Matthew; Garner, Thomas Ross; Bridges, Kristin; Mansfield, Charles; Carney, Michael; Forth, Heather; Krasnec, Michelle; Lay, Claire; Takeshita, Ryan; Morris, Jeffrey; Bonnot, Shane; Oris, James; Roberts, Aaron

    2017-03-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill resulted in the accidental release of millions of barrels of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Photo-induced toxicity following co-exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is 1 mechanism by which polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from oil spills may exert toxicity. Red drum and speckled seatrout are both important fishery resources in the Gulf of Mexico. They spawn near-shore and produce positively buoyant embryos that hatch into larvae in approximately 24 h. The goal of the present study was to determine whether exposure to UV as natural sunlight enhances the toxicity of crude oil to early lifestage red drum and speckled seatrout. Larval fish were exposed to several dilutions of high-energy water-accommodated fractions (HEWAFs) from 2 different oils collected in the field under chain of custody during the 2010 spill and 3 gradations of natural sunlight in a factorial design. Co-exposure to natural sunlight and oil significantly reduced larval survival compared with exposure to oil alone. Although both species were sensitive at PAH concentrations reported during the Deepwater Horizon spill, speckled seatrout demonstrated a greater sensitivity to photo-induced toxicity than red drum. These data demonstrate that even advanced weathering of slicks does not ameliorate the potential for photo-induced toxicity of oil to these species. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:780-785. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  11. Integrated risk analysis for acute and chronic exposure to toxic chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurjar, B.R.; Mohan, Manju

    2003-10-01

    The traditional practice to assess and evaluate different types of risk in isolation to each other are liable to give erroneous results. Integrated risk assessment is an answer to overcome this problem. This paper presents the cumulative or integrated assessment of acute risk posed by accidental release of hazardous chemical (e.g. chlorine) and chronic risk induced by toxic chemicals (e.g. cadmium, chromium and nickel) present in the ambient environment. The present study has been carried out in a most simplified way to demonstrate and appreciate the broader context of integrated risk analysis (IRA). It has been observed that the inclusion of background risk factors (BRF) in individual risk factors (IRF) related to an industry may significantly alter the siting and planning strategies of that industry.

  12. Gene expression profiling to identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with environmental heavy metal exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korashy, Hesham M; Attafi, Ibraheem M; Famulski, Konrad S; Bakheet, Saleh A; Hafez, Mohammed M; Alsaad, Abdulaziz M S; Al-Ghadeer, Abdul Rahman M

    2017-02-01

    Heavy metals are the most commonly encountered toxic substances that increase susceptibility to various diseases after prolonged exposure. We have previously shown that healthy volunteers living near a mining area had significant contamination with heavy metals associated with significant changes in the expression of some detoxifying genes, xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, and DNA repair genes. However, alterations of most of the molecular target genes associated with diseases are still unknown. Thus, the aims of this study were to (a) evaluate the gene expression profile and (b) identify the toxicities and potentially relevant human disease outcomes associated with long-term human exposure to environmental heavy metals in mining area using microarray analysis. For this purpose, 40 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a heavy metal-polluted area (Mahd Al-Dhahab city, Saudi Arabia) and 20 healthy male volunteers who were residents of a non-heavy metal-polluted area were included in the study. Total RNA was isolated from whole blood using PAXgene Blood RNA tubes and then reversed transcribed and hybridized to the gene array using the Affymetrix U219 GeneChip. Microarray analysis showed about 2129 genes were identified and differentially altered, among which a shared set of 425 genes was differentially expressed in the heavy metal-exposed groups. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that the most altered gene-regulated diseases in heavy metal-exposed groups included hematological and developmental disorders and mostly renal and urological diseases. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction closely matched the microarray data for some genes tested. Importantly, changes in gene-related diseases were attributed to alterations in the genes encoded for protein synthesis. Renal and urological diseases were the diseases that were most frequently associated with the heavy metal-exposed group. Therefore, there is a need for further studies to validate these

  13. Acute toxicity, respiratory reaction, and sensitivity of three cyprinid fish species caused by exposure to four heavy metals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjun Wang

    Full Text Available Using 3 cyprinid fish species zebra fish, rare minnow, and juvenile grass carp, we conducted assays of lethal reaction and ventilatory response to analyze sensitivity of the fish to 4 heavy metals. Our results showed that the 96 h LC50 of Hg(2+ to zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnow were 0.14 mg L(-1, 0.23 mg L(-1, and 0.10 mg L(-1, respectively; of Cu(2+0.17 mg L(-1, 0.09 mg L(-1, and 0.12 mg L(-1 respectively; of Cd(2+6.5 mg L(-1, 18.47 mg L(-1, 5.36 mg L(-1, respectively; and of Zn(2+44.48 mg L(-1, 31.37 mg L(-1, and 12.74 mg L(-1, respectively. Under a 1-h exposure, the ventilatory response to the different heavy metals varied. Ventilatory frequency (Vf and amplitude (Va increased in zebra fish, juvenile grass carp, and rare minnows exposed to Hg(2+ and Cu(2+ (P<0.05, and the Vf and Va of the 3 species rose initially and then declined when exposed to Cd(2+. Zn(2+ had markedly different toxic effects than the other heavy metals, whose Vf and Va gradually decreased with increasing exposure concentration (P<0.05. The rare minnow was the most highly susceptible of the 3 fish species to the heavy metals, with threshold effect concentrations (TEC of 0.019 mg L(-1, 0.046 mg L(-1, 2.142 mg L(-1, and 0.633 mg L(-1 for Hg(2+, Cu(2+, Cd(2+, and Zn(2+, respectively. Therefore, it is feasible to use ventilatory parameters as a biomarker for evaluating the pollution toxicity of metals and to recognize early warning signs by using rare minnows as a sensor.

  14. St. John's wort significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of methotrexate in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shih-Ying [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Juang, Shin-Hun [Graduate Institute of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Shang-Yuan; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hou, Yu-Chi, E-mail: hou5133@gmail.com [School of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2012-08-15

    St. John's wort (SJW, Hypericum perforatum) is one of the popular nutraceuticals for treating depression. Methotrexate (MTX) is an immunosuppressant with narrow therapeutic window. This study investigated the effect of SJW on MTX pharmacokinetics in rats. Rats were orally given MTX alone and coadministered with 300 and 150 mg/kg of SJW, and 25 mg/kg of diclofenac, respectively. Blood was withdrawn at specific time points and serum MTX concentrations were assayed by a specific monoclonal fluorescence polarization immunoassay method. The results showed that 300 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} and C{sub max} of MTX by 163% and 60%, respectively, and 150 mg/kg of SJW significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} of MTX by 55%. In addition, diclofenac enhanced the C{sub max} of MTX by 110%. The mortality of rats treated with SJW was higher than that of controls. In conclusion, coadministration of SJW significantly increased the systemic exposure and toxicity of MTX. The combined use of MTX with SJW would need to be with caution. -- Highlights: ► St. John's wort significantly increased the AUC{sub 0−t} and C{sub max} of methotrexate. ► Coadministration of St. John's wort increased the exposure and toxicity of methotrexate. ► The combined use of methotrexate with St. John's wort will need to be with caution.

  15. Influence of dissolved organic matter on nickel bioavailability and toxicity to Hyalella azteca in water-only exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Lorne E; Liber, Karsten

    2006-03-10

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is known to reduce the bioavailability of metals in aquatic systems. This study evaluated the effects of DOM from various sources (e.g., Little Bear Lake sediment, Suwannee River, peat moss) and various DOM fractions (humic acids, HA; fulvic acids, FA) on the bioavailability of nickel (Ni) to Hyalella azteca, a common freshwater benthic invertebrate. In particular, this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of surficial sediment DOM on Ni bioavailability. Short-term (48 h) acute toxicity tests with H. azteca conducted in synthetic water demonstrated that the aqueous Ni concentrations required for lethality were greater than what could be significantly complexed by environmentally relevant concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC: 0.6-30.4 mg/L). At Ni concentrations sublethal to H. azteca (500 microg/L), the bioavailability of Ni was significantly reduced in the presence of representative surface water DOC concentrations regardless of DOC source or fraction. DOC fraction (i.e., FA and HA) differentially affected Ni speciation, but had little or no effect on Ni accumulation by H. azteca. Tissue Ni was found to be strongly dependent upon the Ni(2+) concentration in the exposure solutions and the Ni:DOC ratio. Overall, the concentration of DOC played a greater role than either DOC source or fraction in determining Ni speciation and hence bioavailability and toxicity to H. azteca.

  16. Comparative toxicity of physiological and biochemical parameters in Euglena gracilis to short-term exposure to potassium sorbate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Fernanda; Pinto, Luciano Henrique; Del Ciampo, Lineu Fernando; Lorenzi, Luciano; Heyder, Carmen Diamantina Teixeira; Häder, Donat Peter; Erzinger, Gilmar Sidnei

    2015-01-01

    Potassium sorbate is the potassium salt of sorbic acid, is a widespread and efficient antioxidant that has multiple functions in plants, traditionally associated with the reactions of photosynthesis; however, it has moderate toxicity to various species including rat, fish, bacteria and human health. The effects of potassium sorbate on the movement and photosynthetic parameters of Euglena gracilis were studied during short-term exposure. Potassium sorbate showed acute toxicity to the green flagellate E. gracilis affecting different physiological parameters used as endpoints in an automatic bioassay such as motility, precision of gravitational orientation (r-value), upward movement and alignment, with mean EC50 values of 2867.2 mg L(-1). The concentrations above 625 mg L(-1) of potassium sorbate induce an inhibition of the photosynthetic efficiency and electron transport rate and, in concentrations more than 2500.0 mg L(-1), the Euglena cells undergo a complete inhibition of photosynthesis even at low light irradiation.

  17. Human exposure to toxic metals via contaminated dust: Bio-accumulation trends and their potential risk estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohmand, Jawad; Eqani, Syed Ali Musstjab Akber Shah; Fasola, Mauro; Alamdar, Ambreen; Mustafa, Irfan; Ali, Nadeem; Liu, Liangpo; Peng, Siyuan; Shen, Heqing

    2015-08-01

    We assessed the levels of potentially toxic trace metals, Zinc (Zn), Lead (Pb), Manganese (Mn), Copper (Cu), Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), Cobalt (Co), and Cadmium (Cd), in dust, hair, nail and serum, sampled in rural, urban and industrial areas of Punjab, Pakistan. Trace metals occurrence in all samples, in descending order, was: Zn, Pb, Mn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Co, Cd. The samples from the urban areas showed significantly higher concentration of toxic trace metals (Zn, Ni, Cr, Co, Mn, and Cd) than those from industrial (which conversely had higher levels of Pb and Cu), and than samples from rural areas. Bioaccumulation patterns showed that dust exposure is one of the major routes into human body for Cd, Pb, Co, Mn and Cr, while the burden of Zn, Cu, and Ni can be more linked to dietary sources. The concentrations of trace metals in the samples from Punjab were comparable and/or higher than those reported worldwide. In many cases, the levels of Zn, Cr, Pb, Ni and Cd in hair and nail were beyond the ATSDR threshold guideline values that may cause some serious health effects. Hazard Index (HI) calculated for trace metal concentrations in the human population of Punjab points particularly to health risks from Cd (for children in urban and industrial areas) and from Pb (for all sub-groups). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Exposure to Environmental Toxicants and Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: State of the Art and Research Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojsi, Francesca; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Tedeschi, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neuromuscular disease, is caused by gene-environment interactions. In fact, given that only about 10% of all ALS diagnosis has a genetic basis, gene-environmental interaction may give account for the remaining percentage of cases. However, relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron degeneration leading to ALS, although exposure to chemicals—including lead and pesticides—agricultural environments, smoking, intense physical activity, trauma and electromagnetic fields have been associated with an increased risk of ALS. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of potential toxic etiologies of ALS with emphasis on the role of cyanobacteria, heavy metals and pesticides as potential risk factors for developing ALS. We will summarize the most recent evidence from epidemiological studies and experimental findings from animal and cellular models, revealing that potential causal links between environmental toxicants and ALS pathogenesis have not been fully ascertained, thus justifying the need for further research. PMID:23887652

  19. Exposure to Environmental Toxicants and Pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: State of the Art and Research Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Rosaria Monsurrò

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available There is a broad scientific consensus that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neuromuscular disease, is caused by gene-environment interactions. In fact, given that only about 10% of all ALS diagnosis has a genetic basis, gene-environmental interaction may give account for the remaining percentage of cases. However, relatively little attention has been paid to environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger the cascade of motor neuron degeneration leading to ALS, although exposure to chemicals—including lead and pesticides—agricultural environments, smoking, intense physical activity, trauma and electromagnetic fields have been associated with an increased risk of ALS. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge of potential toxic etiologies of ALS with emphasis on the role of cyanobacteria, heavy metals and pesticides as potential risk factors for developing ALS. We will summarize the most recent evidence from epidemiological studies and experimental findings from animal and cellular models, revealing that potential causal links between environmental toxicants and ALS pathogenesis have not been fully ascertained, thus justifying the need for further research.

  20. Monitoring the effectiveness of remediation techniques using sediment toxicity tests with the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doe, K.G.; Jackman, P.M. [Environment Canada, Moncton, NB (Canada); Lee, K. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Dartmouth, NS (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a controlled oil release experiment of weathered crude oil was presented. The released oil was applied to a tidal saltwater marsh at Conrod's Beach, Nova Scotia, Canada. The study included 3 replicate blocks which included 2 unoiled treatments and 4 oiled treatments for each block. One unoiled site had no treatment, the second unoiled site had nutrient addition to examine the effect of nutrients. The oiled treatments included natural attenuation, nutrient addition, nutrient addition with plants, and nutrient addition with a garden aerator to introduce oxygen. A standard lab procedure was used to analyze the sediments to determine the effectiveness of the technique as well as the toxic effects on the survival of the amphipod Eohaustorius estuarius. Test results indicated that the unoiled sites were non-toxic, with a slight decrease in survival in the treatment with nutrient addition. All the oiled sites were very toxic at first, but toxicity decreased gradually with time. Treatment with nutrient addition with a garden aerator proved to be the most complete and fastest detoxification method. 8 refs., 4 tabs., 2 figs.

  1. Real-time Monitoring of Non-specific Toxicity Using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reporter System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Karp

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is the simplest and most well-known representative of eukaryotic cells and thus a convenient model organism for evaluating toxic effects in human cells and tissues. Yeast cell sensors are easy to maintain with short generation times, which makes the analytical method of assessing antifungal toxicity cheap and less-time consuming. In this work, the toxicity of test compounds was assessed in bioassays based on bioluminescence inhibition and on traditional growth inhibition on agar plates. The model organism in both tests was a modified S. cerevisiae sensor strain that produces light when provided with D-luciferin in an insect luciferase reporter gene activity assay. The bioluminescence assay showed toxic effects for yeast cell sensor of 5,6-benzo-flavone, rapamycin, nystatin and cycloheximide at concentrations of nM to µM. In addition, arsenic compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate and lead acetate were shown to be potent non-specific inhibitors of the reporter organism described here. The results from a yeast agar diffusion assay correlated with the bioluminescence assay results.

  2. Use of cholinesterase activity in monitoring organophosphate pesticide exposure of cattle produced in tropical areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardío, V T; Ibarra, N; Rodríguez, M A; Waliszewski, K N

    2001-12-01

    The use of cholinesterase activity as a biochemical method for monitoring organophosphate pesticide exposure in cattle is described herein. Determination of cholinesterase activity of whole blood, erythrocyte, and plasma was carried out according to the Ellman modified kinetic method. The mean baseline acetylcholinesterase activities of 9.549 +/- 3.619 IU/mL in whole blood, 9.444 +/- 3.006 IU/mL in erythrocytes, and 0.149 +/- 0.063 IU/mL in plasma were estimated for steers from the control group. Results of multivariate analysis showed that the general responses between the control and experimental groups (in vivo, monitoring and case studies) treated with Coumaphos and Fenthion were statistically different, and the general responses of these experimental groups were statistically different over time as well. Among the fractions that were analyzed, the erythrocyte acetylcholinesterase activity could be adequate for the diagnosis of exposure or acute poisoning in cattle as it showed a good within-run and between-run precision with CVs <10% better than those in plasma.

  3. Structural, Morphological, and Functional Correlates of Corneal Endothelial Toxicity Following Corneal Exposure to Sulfur Mustard Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...of the corneal endothe- lium during the acute SM injury and in resolved versus MGK corneas at 8 weeks. METHODS Ethics Statement and Disclaimers The...Endothelial Permeability Rabbits were euthanized 24 hours after exposure. Five minutes after euthanasia , 20 lL of a 0.1 mg/mL solution of AlexaFluor 488

  4. Conduits from community violence exposure to peer aggression and victimization: contributions of parental monitoring, impulsivity, and deviancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sabina; Espelage, Dorothy

    2014-04-01

    Community violence exposure results in heightened risk for engaging in and being a victim of interpersonal violence. Despite this robust literature, few studies have specifically examined how the relation between community violence exposure, peer aggression, and victimization is modified by individual, peer, and familial influences (considered jointly). In the current study, we used risk and resiliency theory to examine links between community violence exposure and peer aggression and victimization. Impulsivity and parental monitoring were examined as potential moderators of the link between community violence exposure and outcomes, both directly and indirectly via deviant behavior. Survey data on bullying involvement, fighting, deviancy, parental monitoring, and impulsivity were collected on 3 occasions over an 18-month period among a large cohort of adolescents (N = 1,232) in 5th-7th grades. Structural equation modeling suggests that for both male and female adolescents, impulsivity exacerbates the effects of community violence exposure by increasing involvement in deviant behavior. Parental monitoring buffered the effects of community violence exposure on perpetration and victimization (for males and female adolescents) via reduced involvement in deviant behavior. Findings suggest that impulsivity and parental monitoring are implicated in modifying the effects of community violence exposure on both victimization and perpetration through deviancy, although deviancy is not as potent of a predictor for victimization. Thus, prevention efforts would seem to be optimally targeted at multiple ecological levels, including parental involvement and peer networks.

  5. Exposure vs toxicity levels of airborne quartz, metal and carbon particles in cast iron foundries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, Beatrice; Viti, Cecilia; Cappelletti, David

    2014-01-01

    Aerosol dust samples and quartz raw materials from different working stations in foundry plants were characterized in order to assess the health risk in this working environment. Samples were analysed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy coupled with image analysis and microanalysis, and by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. In addition, the concentration and the solubility degree of Fe and other metals of potential health effect (Mn, Zn and Pb) in the bulk samples were determined by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Overall, the results indicate substantial changes in quartz crystal structure and texture when passing from the raw material to the airborne dust, which include lattice defects, non-bridging oxygen hole centres and contamination of quartz grains by metal and/or graphite particles. All these aspects point towards the relevance of surface properties on reactivity. Exposure doses have been estimated based on surface area, and compared with threshold levels resulting from toxicology. The possible synergistic effects of concomitant exposure to inhalable magnetite, quartz and/or graphite particles in the same working environment have been properly remarked.

  6. Toenail as Non-invasive Biomarker in Metal Toxicity Measurement of Welding Fumes Exposure - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, S. F. Z.; Hariri, A.; Ma'arop, N. F.; Hussin, N. S. A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Workers are exposed to a variety of heavy metal pollutants that are released into the environment as a consequence of workplace activities. This chemical pollutants are incorporated into the human by varies of routes entry and can then be stored and distributed in different tissues, consequently have a potential to lead an adverse health effects and/or diseases. As to minimize the impact, a control measures should be taken to avoid these effects and human biological marker is a very effective tool in the assessment of occupational exposure and potential related risk as the results is normally accurate and reproducible. Toenail is the ideal matrix for most common heavy metals due to its reliability and practicality compared to other biological samples as well as it is a non-invasive and this appears as a huge advantage of toenail as a biomarker. This paper reviews studies that measure the heavy metals concentration in toenail as non-invasive matrix which later may adapt in the investigation of metal fume emitted from welding process. The development of new methodology and modern analytical techniques has allowed the use of toenail as non-invasive approach. The presence of a heavy metal in this matrix reflects an exposure but the correlations between heavy metal levels in the toenail must be established to ensure that these levels are related to the total body burden. These findings suggest that further studies on interactions of these heavy metals in metal fumes utilizing toenail biomarker endpoints are highly warranted especially among welders.

  7. Toxicity and bioconcentration evaluation of RDX and HMX using sheepshead minnows in water exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotufo, Guilherme R; Gibson, Alfreda B; Yoo, J Leslie

    2010-10-01

    Lethal effects of the explosives RDX and HMX were assessed using ten-day water exposures to juvenile sheepshead minnows (Cyprinodon variegatus). For RDX, maximum mortality occurred during the first two days of exposure with a 10-d median lethal concentration (LC50) of 9.9 mg L(-1). The RDX 10-d median lethal residue (LR50) was 9.6 mg kg(-1) (34.9 μmol kg(-1)) wet weight (ww), the first RDX critical body residue reported for fish. Previous investigations reported that RDX body residues in marine amphipods up to 96 μmol kg(-1) ww and in marine mussels up to 86 μmol kg(-1) ww failed to result in significant mortality. The highest HMX concentration tested, corresponding to its apparent solubility limit in seawater (2.0 mg L(-1)), and the associated mean body residue (3 mg kg(-1) or 14 μmol kg(-1) ww) resulted in no significant mortality for exposed minnows. The mean 10-d bioconcentration factors for RDX (0.6-0.9 L kg(-1)) and HMX (0.3-1.6 L kg(-1)) were typically lower than 1, reflecting the low bioaccumulative potential for these compounds. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. The overview of occupational exposure monitoring in Lithuania (1999-2004)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griciene, B.; Urboniene, A.; Ladygiene, R. [Radiation Protection Centre, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2006-07-01

    This study deals with the analysis of situation and results of individual dose measurements of external and internal exposure from the year 1999 to 2004 in Lithuania. The legal basis for radiation protection was established according to the IAEA, ICRP, E.C. and other international requirements and recommendations. System of monitoring of occupational exposure was created in the regulatory authority in radiation protection in country - in the Radiation Protection Centre (R.P.C.). The R.P.C. operates the State Register of occupational exposure doses. Additionally to doses, registered by the personal dosimetric service of the R.P.C., doses of workers of Ignalina NPP measured by their own personal dosimetric service are included in the register. For direct measurement of internal exposure the whole body counters with Ge detector and NaI(Tl) thyroid counters at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and Radiation Protection Centre (R.P.C.) are used. The whole body counter allows detecting radionuclides with gamma energies 50 keV to 3 MeV. Internal monitoring is carried out for Ignalina NPP workers since 1988 and nuclear medicine workers working with Tc-{sup 99m}, I-131 since 2005. Intercomparison measurements of internally exposed Ignalina NPP workers between Ignalina NPP and R.P.C. dosimetry laboratories were performed in 2005. Bioassay measurements are performed at the Radiation Protection Centre since 1999. Urine samplers are analyzed by means of gamma spectrometry, liquid scintillation counting and measurements of gross beta activity after chemical separation. For assessment of committed effective and equivalent doses the L.U.D.E.P. and I.M.B.A. software packages are used. Recently two services for external dosimetry are operating in Lithuania. One of them is placed in Ignalina NPP. It evaluates doses of workers of Ignalina NPP workers (about 2900 persons) and outside workers (about 1500 persons). The personal dosimetry laboratory at the Radiation Protection Centre

  9. Assessment of two nonnative poeciliid fishes for monitoring selenium exposure in the endangered desert pupfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiki, Michael K.; Martin, Barbara A.; May, Thomas W.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2012-01-01

    We assessed the suitability of two nonnative poeciliid fishes—western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) and sailfin mollies (Poecilia latipinna)—for monitoring selenium exposure in desert pupfish (Cyprinodon macularius). Our investigation was prompted by a need to avoid lethal take of an endangered species (pupfish) when sampling fish for chemical analysis. Total selenium (SeTot) concentrations in both poeciliids were highly correlated with SeTot concentrations in pupfish. However, mean SeTot concentrations varied among fish species, with higher concentrations measured in mosquitofish than in mollies and pupfish from one of three sampled agricultural drains. Moreover, regression equations describing the relationship of selenomethionine to SeTot differed between mosquitofish and pupfish, but not between mollies and pupfish. Because selenium accumulates in animals primarily through dietary exposure, we examined fish trophic relationships by measuring stable isotopes (δ13C and δ15N) and gut contents. According to δ13C measurements, the trophic pathway leading to mosquitofish was more carbon-depleted than trophic pathways leading to mollies and pupfish, suggesting that energy flow to mosquitofish originated from allochthonous sources (terrestrial vegetation, emergent macrophytes, or both), whereas energy flow to mollies and pupfish originated from autochthonous sources (filamentous algae, submerged macrophytes, or both). The δ15N measurements indicated that mosquitofish and mollies occupied similar trophic levels, whereas pupfish occupied a slightly higher trophic level. Analysis of gut contents showed that mosquitofish consumed mostly winged insects (an indication of terrestrial taxa), whereas mollies and pupfish consumed mostly organic detritus. Judging from our results, only mollies (not mosquitofish) are suitable for monitoring selenium exposure in pupfish.

  10. Exposure assessment and heart rate variability monitoring in workers handling titanium dioxide particles: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Sahoko; Li, Weihua; Omura, Seiichi; Fujitani, Yuji; Liu, Ying; Wang, Qiangyi; Hiraku, Yusuke; Hisanaga, Naomi; Wakai, Kenji; Ding, Xuncheng; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ichihara, Gaku

    2016-03-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) particles are used for surface coating and in a variety of products such as inks, fibers, food, and cosmetics. The present study investigated possible respiratory and cardiovascular effects of TiO2 particles in workers exposed to this particle at high concentration in a factory in China. The diameter of particles collected on filters was measured by scanning electron microscopy. Real-time size-dependent particle number concentration was monitored in the nostrils of four workers using condensation particle counter and optical particle counter. Electrocardiogram was recorded using Holter monitors for the same four workers to record heart rate variability. Sixteen workers underwent assessment of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems. Mass-based individual exposure levels were also measured with personal cascade impactors. The primary particle diameter ranged from 46 to 562 nm. Analysis of covariance of the pooled data of the four workers showed that number of particles with a diameter <300 nm was associated positively with total number of N-N and negatively with total number of increase or decrease in successive RR intervals greater than 50 ms (RR50+/-) or percentage of RR 50+/- that were parameters of parasympathetic function. The total mass concentration was 9.58-30.8 mg/m3 during work, but significantly less before work (0.36 mg/m3). The clear abnormality in respiratory function was not observed in sixteen workers who had worked for 10 months to 13 years in the factory. The study showed that exposure to particles with a diameter <300 nm might affect HRV in workers handling TiO2 particles. The results highlight the need to investigate the possible impact of exposure to nano-scaled particles on the autonomic nervous system.

  11. Evaluation of exposure to PAHs in asphalt workers by environmental and biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Laura; Buratti, Marina; Fustinoni, Silvia; Cirla, Piero E; Martinotti, Irene; Longhi, Omar; Cavallo, Domenico; Foà, Vito

    2006-09-01

    In the present article we assessed exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Italian asphalt workers (AW, n = 100), exposed to bitumen fumes and diesel exhausts, and in roadside construction workers (CW, n = 47), exposed to diesel exhausts, by means of environmental and biological monitoring. 1-hydroxypyrene (OH-Py) was determined in urine spot samples collected, respectively, after 2 days of vacation (baseline), before, and at the end of the monitored work shift, in the second part of the workweek. Median airborne levels during the work shift of 15 PAHs (both vapor and particulate phases), from naphthalene (NAP) to indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, ranged from below 0.03 to 426 ng/m(3). Median excretion values of OH-Py in baseline, before- and end-shift samples were 228, 402, and 690 ng/L for AW and 260, 304, and 378 ng/L for CW. Lower values were found in nonsmokers compared to smokers (e.g., in AW 565 and 781 versus 252 and 506 ng/L in before-shift and end-shift samples, respectively). In all subjects a weak correlation between personal exposure to the sum of airborne 15 PAHs and OH-Py was observed (r = 0.30). The results of this article show that AW experienced a moderate occupational exposure to airborne PAHs, resulting in a significant increase of urinary OH-Py during the workday and the workweek. The contribution of working activities to internal dose was in the same order of magnitude of the contribution of cigarette smoking.

  12. Targeting aquatic micropollutants for monitoring: Exposure categorization and application to the Swiss situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götz, C. W.; Stamm, C.; Fenner, K.; Singer, H. P.; Schärer, M.; Hollender, J.

    2009-04-01

    For water pollution control and the evaluation of water protection measures it is crucial to screen for micropollutants (MPs). However, the selection of which MPs to screen for from several hundreds to thousands of potentially important MPs is complex. Existing methods usually are limited because of a lack of requested data. We propose a simple methodology that provides a systematic overview of a broad range of MPs according to their potential to occur in the water-phase of surface waters. The method requires only input of publically available data and missing data are estimated with quantitative structure-property-relationships (QSPRs). We distinguish seven different exposure categories based on different compound properties and input dynamics. Ranking the defined exposure categories based on a chemical's potential to occur in the water-phase of surface waters, exposure categories I and II contain chemicals with a very high potential, categories III and IV contain chemicals with a high potential, and categories V and VI contain chemicals with a low potential. The presented methodology supports compound selection for (i) water quality guidance, (ii) monitoring programs, and (iii) further research on the chemical's ecotoxicology.

  13. Bioindicators of contaminant exposure and effect in aquatic and terrestrial monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, Mark J.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John

    2003-01-01

    Bioindicators of contaminant exposure presently used in environmental monitoring arc discussed. Some have been extensively field-validated and arc already in routine application. Included are (1) inhibition of brain or blood cholinesterase by anticholinesterase pesticides, (2) induction of hepatic microsomal cytochromes P450 by chemicals such as PAHs and PCBs, (3) reproductive problems such as terata and eggshell thinning, and (4) aberrations of hemoglobin synthesis, including the effects of lead and of certain chlorinated hydrocarbons. Many studies on DNA damage and of histopathological effects, particularly in the form of tumors, have already been completed. There are presently numerous other opportunities for field validation. Bile metabolites of contaminants in fish reveal exposure to contaminants that might otherwise be difficult to detect or quantify. Bile analysis is beginning to be extended to species other than fishes. Assessment of oxidative damage and immune competence appear to be valuable biomarkers. needing only additional field validation for wider use. The use of metallothioneins as biomarkers depends on the development of convenient, inexpensive methodology that provides information not available from measurements of metal ions. The use of stress proteins as biomarkers depends on development of convenient, inexpensive methodology and field validation. Gene arrays and proteomics hold promise as bioindicators for contaminant exposure or effect, particularly because of the large amount of data that could be generated, but they still need extensive development and testing.

  14. Biological monitoring of pyrethroid exposure of pest control workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Kamijima, Michihiro; Imai, Ryota; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Kameda, Yohei; Asai, Kazumi; Okamura, Ai; Naito, Hisao; Ueyama, Jun; Saito, Isao; Nakajima, Tamie; Goto, Masahiro; Shibata, Eiji; Kondo, Takaaki; Takagi, Kenji; Takagi, Kenzo; Wakusawa, Shinya

    2007-11-01

    Synthetic pyrethroids such as cypermethrin, deltamethrin and permethrin, which are usually used in pest control operations, are metabolized to 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and excreted in urine. Though 3-PBA can be used to assess exposure to pyrethroids, there are few reports describing urinary 3-PBA levels in Japan. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal variation of the exposure levels of pyrethroids and the concentration of urinary 3-PBA among pest control operators (PCOs) in Japan. The study subjects were 78 and 66 PCOs who underwent a health examination in December 2004 and in August 2005, respectively. 3-PBA was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The geometric mean concentration of urinary 3-PBA in winter (3.9 microg/g creatinine) was significantly lower than in summer (12.2 microg/g creatinine) (p0.05), respectively. A significant association of 3-PBA levels and pyrethroid spraying was thus observed only in winter. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that the exposure level of pyrethroids among PCOs in Japan assessed by monitoring urinary 3-PBA was higher than that reported in the UK but comparable to that in Germany. Further research should be accumulated to establish an occupational reference value in Japan.

  15. Inter-comparison of personal monitors for nanoparticles exposure at workplaces and in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todea, Ana Maria; Beckmann, Stefanie; Kaminski, Heinz; Bard, Delphine; Bau, Sébastien; Clavaguera, Simon; Dahmann, Dirk; Dozol, Hélène; Dziurowitz, Nico; Elihn, Karine; Fierz, Martin; Lidén, Göran; Meyer-Plath, Asmus; Monz, Christian; Neumann, Volker; Pelzer, Johannes; Simonow, Barbara Katrin; Thali, Patrick; Tuinman, Ilse; van der Vleuten, Arjan; Vroomen, Huub; Asbach, Christof

    2017-12-15

    Personal monitors based on unipolar diffusion charging (miniDiSC/DiSCmini, NanoTracer, Partector) can be used to assess the individual exposure to nanoparticles in different environments. The charge acquired by the aerosol particles is nearly proportional to the particle diameter and, by coincidence, also nearly proportional to the alveolar lung-deposited surface area (LDSA), the metric reported by all three instruments. In addition, the miniDiSC/DiSCmini and the NanoTracer report particle number concentration and mean particle size. In view of their use for personal exposure studies, the comparability of these personal monitors was assessed in two measurement campaigns. Altogether 29 different polydisperse test aerosols were generated during the two campaigns, covering a large range of particle sizes, morphologies and concentrations. The data provided by the personal monitors were compared with those obtained from reference instruments: a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) for LDSA and mean particle size and a ultrafine particle counter (UCPC) for number concentration. The results indicated that the LDSA concentrations and the mean particle sizes provided by all investigated instruments in this study were in the order of ±30% of the reference value obtained from the SMPS when the particle sizes of the test aerosols generated were within 20-400nm and the instruments were properly calibrated. Particle size, morphology and concentration did not have a major effect within the aforementioned limits. The comparability of the number concentrations was found to be slightly worse and in the range of ±50% of the reference value obtained from the UCPC. In addition, a minor effect of the particle morphology on the number concentration measurements was observed. The presence of particles >400nm can drastically bias the measurement results of all instruments and all metrics determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of the oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, as a prey organism for toxicant exposure of fish through the diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, D.R.; Highland, T.L.; Mattson, V.R.; Dawson, T.D.; Lott, K.G.; Ingersoll, C.G.

    2006-01-01

    The oligochaete, Lumbriculus variegatus, has several characteristics that make it desirable as a prey organism for conducting dietary exposure studies with fish. We conducted 21- and 30-d experiments with young fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), respectively, to determine whether a diet consisting solely of L. variegatus would support normal growth and to compare performance with standard diets (Artemia nauplii, frozen brine shrimp, or trout chow). All diets were readily accepted, and fish survived and grew well. Food conversion in both fathead minnows and rainbow trout was as high as or higher for the oligochaete diet compared with others, although this comparison is influenced by differences in ration, ingestion rate, or both. The oligochaete diet had gross nutritional analysis similar to the other diets, and meets fish nutrition guidelines for protein and essential amino acids. Methodologies and practical considerations for successfully using oligochaetes as an experimental diet are discussed. Considering their ready acceptance by fish, their apparent nutritional sufficiency, the ease of culturing large numbers, and the ease with which they can be loaded with exogenous chemicals, we believe that L. variegatus represents an excellent choice of exposure vector for exposing fish to toxicants via the diet. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  17. Developmental toxicity and DNA damage from exposure to parking lot runoff retention pond samples in the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Meryl D; Kwok, Kevin W H; Brandon, Jennifer A; Warren, Isaac H; Ryde, Ian T; Cooper, Ellen M; Hinton, David E; Rittschof, Daniel; Meyer, Joel N

    2014-08-01

    Parking lot runoff retention ponds (PLRRP) receive significant chemical input, but the biological effects of parking lot runoff are not well understood. We used the Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a model to study the toxicity of water and sediment samples from a PLRRP in Morehead City, NC. Medaka exposed in ovo to a dilution series of PLRRP water had increased odds of death before hatching, but not teratogenesis or delayed hatching. Next, we adapted a long-amplicon quantitative PCR (LA-QPCR) assay for DNA damage for use with the Japanese medaka. We employed LA-QPCR to test the hypotheses that PLRRP water and sediments would cause nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage with and without full-spectrum, natural solar radiation. Fluoranthene with and without natural sunlight was a positive control for phototoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced DNA damage. Fluoranthene exposure did not result in detectable DNA damage by itself, but in combination with sunlight caused significant DNA damage to both genomes. PLRRP samples caused DNA damage to both genomes, and this was not increased by sunlight exposure, suggesting the DNA damage was unlikely the result of PAH phototoxicity. We report for the first time that PLRRP-associated pollutants cause both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and that fluoranthene-mediated phototoxicity results in similar levels of damage to the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. These effects may be especially significant in sensitive marine ecosystems.

  18. Chronic TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallis, Lindsay K. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Diamond, Stephen A. [Nanosafe Inc., Blacksburg, VA, 24060 (United States); Ma, Hongbo [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Zilber School of Public Health, Milwaukee, WI, 53211 (United States); Hoff, Dale J. [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States); Al-Abed, Souhail R. [National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Li, Shibin, E-mail: lishibinepa@gmail.com [Office of Research and Development, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN, 55804 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (nano-TiO{sub 2}) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH){sub 3} coated nano-TiO{sub 2} used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO{sub 2} exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH){sub 3} coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings. - Highlights: • Chronic toxicity of nano-TiO{sub 2} to a benthic organism (Hyalella azteca) was examined. • Phototoxicity was investigated through exposure of solar simulated radiation (SSR). • The degradation of a surface coating resulted in an increase in photoactivity. • In this testing scenario, UV had a larger impact than chemical exposure in toxicity.

  19. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Piedrahita

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost wearable air quality monitors (M-Pods using the Arduino platform. The M-Pods use commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx sensors to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors to measure CO2. MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. Two deployments were conducted at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado. M-Pod concentrations were determined using laboratory calibration techniques and co-location calibrations, in which we place the M-Pods near regulatory monitors to then derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. A separate user study was also conducted to assess personal exposure and M-Pod reliability. In this study, 10 M-Pods were calibrated via co-location multiple times over 4 weeks and sensor drift was analyzed with the result being a calibration function that included drift. We found that co-location calibrations perform better than laboratory calibrations. Lab calibrations suffer from bias and difficulty in covering the necessary parameter space. During co-location calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0–6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4–8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28–0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S/N ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher for M-Pods than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42

  20. Assessment of narghile (shisha, hookah smokers’ actual exposure to toxic chemicals requires further sound studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco smoking is hazardous for health. However, not all forms of tobacco use entail the same risks and the latter should be studied and compared in a sound realistic way. Smoking machines for cigarettes (which are consumed in a few minutes were early designed as a tool to evaluate the actual intake of toxic substances (‘toxicants’ by smokers. However, the yields (tar, nicotine, CO, etc. provided by such machines poorly reflect the actual human smoking behaviour known to depend on numerous factors (anxiety, emotions, anthropological situation, etc.. In the case of narghile smoking, the problems are even more complex, particularly because of the much longer duration of a session. A recent study from the US-American University of Beirut was based on a field smoking topography and claimed consistency with a laboratory smoking machine. We offer a point by point critical analysis of such methods on which most of the ‘waterpipe’ antismoking literature since 2002 is based.

  1. Organophosphorus flame retardants and plasticizers: sources, occurrence, toxicity and human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Gao-Ling; Li, Ding-Qiang; Zhuo, Mu-Ning; Liao, Yi-Shan; Xie, Zhen-Yue; Guo, Tai-Long; Li, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Si-Yi; Liang, Zhi-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Due to the restricted use and ban of brominated flame retardants, organophosphorus compounds (OPs), extensively used as flame retardants and plasticizers, are ubiquitous in various environmental compartments worldwide. The present study shows that the release of OPs from a wide variety of commercial products and wastewater discharge might be considered as primary emission sources and that high potential of long-range atmospheric transport and persistence of OPs would be responsible for their presence in various matrices on a global scale. The occurrence and environmental behaviors of OPs in diverse matrices (e.g., dust, air, water, sediment, soil and biota) are reviewed. Human exposures to OPs via dermal contact, dust ingestion, inhalation and dietary intake are comprehensively evaluated. Finally, this study identifies gaps in the existing issues and generates a future agenda for the emerging contaminants OPs.

  2. Reproductive Toxicity to Male Mice of Nose Only Exposure to Water- Pipe Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badreldin H. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Water-pipe smoking (WPS is popular in the Middle East and is starting to gain popularity in several Western countries as well. It is widely and erroneously perceived to be less harmful than other forms of tobacco use. The reproductive adverse effects of cigarette smoking have been studied before with conflicting results, but data on the possible adverse reproductive effects of WPS are lacking. Here, we assessed the effects of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS generated by commercially available honey-flavored "moasel" tobacco in mice. Methods: The duration of the session was 30 min/day for one month. Control mice were exposed to air. Twenty- four h after the last exposure, mice were killed and the testes and plasma removed for analysis. In testicular homogenates total protein, alkaline phosphatase activity, several indices of oxidative damage and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 (VEGFR2 were quantified. The plasma concentrations of leptin, testosterone, estrogen and luteinizing hormone (LH were also measured. Histological analysis of testes and lungs was also conducted. Results: WPS caused statistically significant decreases in the plasma concentrations of leptin, testosterone, and LH, and in the concentrations of total protein and the antioxidant indices measured. A statistically non - significant decrease in VEGFR2 protein in the WPS - exposed mice compared to the control mice was also found. The body and testicular weights of mice exposed to WPS, as well as their testicular alkaline phosphatase activity and light microscopic histology, and plasma estrogen concentration were all not significantly affected by WPS. Conclusion: Further studies on the functional implications of these findings in mice exposed to WPS for longer durations are warranted.

  3. Developmental toxicity in white leghorn chickens following in ovo exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peden-Adams, M. M.; Stuckey, Joyce E.; Gaworecki, K.M.; Berger-Ritchie, J.; Bryant, K.; Jodice, P.G.; Scott, T.R.; Ferrario, J.B.; Guan, B.; Vigo, C.; Boone, J.S.; McGuinn, W.D.; DeWitt, J.C.; Keil, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    Studies show that perfluorinated compounds cause various toxicological effects; nevertheless, effects on immune function and developmental endpoints have not been addressed at length. This study examined the effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) in white leghorn hatchlings on various developmental, immunological, and clinical health parameters. In addition, serum PFOS concentrations were determined by LC/MS/MS. Embryonic day (ED) 0 eggs were injected with either safflower oil/10% DMSO (control, 0 mg/kg egg wt) or PFOS in safflower oil/10% DMSO at 1, 2.5, or 5 mg/kg egg wt, and the chicks were grown to post-hatch day (PHD) 14. Treatment with PFOS did not affect hatch rate. Following in ovo exposure chicks exhibited increases in spleen mass at all treatment levels, in liver mass at 2.5 and 5 mg/kg egg wt, and in body length (crown-rump length) at the 5 mg/kg treatment. Right wings were shorter in all treatments compared to control. Increases in the frequency of brain asymmetry were evident in all treatment groups. SRBC-specific immunoglobulin (IgM and IgY combined) titers were decreased significantly at all treatment levels, while plasma lysozyme activity was increased at all treatment levels. The PHA skin test response decreased in relation to increasing PFOS dose. Serum concentrations where significant immunological, morphological, and neurological effects were observed at the lowest dose (1 mg/kg egg wt) averaged 154 ng PFOS/g serum. These concentrations fall within environmental ranges reported in blood samples from wild caught avian species; thereby, verifying that the environmental egg concentrations used for the injections do indeed relate to serum levels in hatchlings that are also environmentally relevant. These data indicate that immune alterations and brain asymmetry can occur in birds following in ovo exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of PFOS and demonstrates the need for further research on the developmental effects of

  4. Induction of gene expression as a monitor of exposure to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundson, S A; Bittner, M; Meltzer, P; Trent, J; Fornace, A J

    2001-11-01

    The complex molecular responses to genotoxic stress are mediated by a variety of regulatory pathways. The transcription factor TP53 plays a central role in the cellular response to DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation, but other pathways also play important roles. In addition, differences in radiation quality, such as the exposure to high-LET radiation that occurs during space travel, may influence the pattern of responses. The premise is developed that stress gene responses can be employed as molecular markers for radiation exposure using a combination of informatics and functional genomics approaches. Published studies from our laboratory have already demonstrated such transcriptional responses with doses of gamma rays as low as 2 cGy, and in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) irradiated ex vivo with doses as low as 20 cGy. We have also found several genes elevated in vivo 24 h after whole-body irradiation of mice with 20 cGy. Such studies should provide insight into the molecular responses to physiologically relevant doses, which cannot necessarily be extrapolated from high-dose studies. In addition, ongoing experiments are identifying large numbers of potential biomarkers using microarray hybridization and various irradiation protocols including expression at different times after exposure to low- and high-LET radiation. Computation-intensive informatics analysis methods are also being developed for management of the complex gene expression profiles resulting from these experiments. With further development of these approaches, it may be feasible to monitor changes in gene expression after low-dose radiation exposure and other physiological stresses that may be encountered during manned space flight, such as the planned mission to Mars.

  5. Wearable real-time direct reading naphthalene and VOC personal exposure monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, W. F.; Bhartia, R.; Reid, R. D.; Reid, M. R.; Oswal, P.; Lane, A. L.; Sijapati, K.; Sullivan, K.; Hulla, J. E.; Snawder, J.; Proctor, S. P.

    2012-06-01

    Naphthalene has been identified by the National Research Council as a serious health hazard for personnel working with jet fuels and oil-based sealants containing naphthalene. We are developing a family of miniature, self-contained, direct reading personal exposure monitors (PEMs) to detect, differentiate, quantify, and log naphthalene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the breathing zone of the wearer or in the hands of an industrial hygienist with limits of detection in the low parts per billion (ppb) range. The VOC Dosimeter (VOCDos) described here is a PEM that provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose, with alarms addressing long term and immediate exposure limits. We will describe the sensor, which employs optical methods with a unique excitation source and rapidly refreshable vapor concentrator. This paper addresses the rapidly increasing awareness of the health risks of inhaling jet fuel vapors by Department of Defense (DOD) personnel engaged in or around jet fueling operations. Naphthalene is a one to three percent component of the 5 billion gallons of jet fuels used annually by DOD. Naphthalene is also a component of many other petroleum products such as asphalt and other oil-based sealants. The DOD is the single largest user of petroleum fuels in the United States (20% of all petroleum fuel used). The VOCDos wearable sensor provides real-time detection and data logging of exposure as well as accumulated dose. We will describe the sensor, which employs endogenous fluorescence from VOCs accumulated on a unique, rapidly refreshable, patent-pending concentrator, excited by a unique deep ultraviolet excitation source.

  6. Reference manual for toxicity and exposure assessment and risk characterization. CERCLA Baseline Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, 1980) (CERCLA or Superfund) was enacted to provide a program for identifying and responding to releases of hazardous substances into the environment. The Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA, 1986) was enacted to strengthen CERCLA by requiring that site clean-ups be permanent, and that they use treatments that significantly reduce the volume, toxicity, or mobility of hazardous pollutants. The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) (USEPA, 1985; USEPA, 1990) implements the CERCLA statute, presenting a process for (1) identifying and prioritizing sites requiring remediation and (2) assessing the extent of remedial action required at each site. The process includes performing two studies: a Remedial Investigation (RI) to evaluate the nature, extent, and expected consequences of site contamination, and a Feasibility Study (FS) to select an appropriate remedial alternative adequate to reduce such risks to acceptable levels. An integral part of the RI is the evaluation of human health risks posed by hazardous substance releases. This risk evaluation serves a number of purposes within the overall context of the RI/FS process, the most essential of which is to provide an understanding of ``baseline`` risks posed by a given site. Baseline risks are those risks that would exist if no remediation or institutional controls are applied at a site. This document was written to (1) guide risk assessors through the process of interpreting EPA BRA policy and (2) help risk assessors to discuss EPA policy with regulators, decision makers, and stakeholders as it relates to conditions at a particular DOE site.

  7. Exposure to Enriched Environment Decreases Neurobehavioral Deficits Induced by Neonatal Glutamate Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kiss

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Environmental enrichment is a popular strategy to enhance motor and cognitive performance and to counteract the effects of various harmful stimuli. The protective effects of enriched environment have been shown in traumatic, ischemic and toxic nervous system lesions. Monosodium glutamate (MSG is a commonly used taste enhancer causing excitotoxic effects when given in newborn animals. We have previously demonstrated that MSG leads to a delay in neurobehavioral development, as shown by the delayed appearance of neurological reflexes and maturation of motor coordination. In the present study we aimed at investigating whether environmental enrichment is able to decrease the neurobehavioral delay caused by neonatal MSG treatment. Newborn pups were treated with MSG subcutaneously on postnatal days 1, 5 and 9. For environmental enrichment, we placed rats in larger cages, supplemented with different toys that were altered daily. Normal control and enriched control rats received saline treatment only. Physical parameters such as weight, day of eye opening, incisor eruption and ear unfolding were recorded. Animals were observed for appearance of reflexes such as negative geotaxis, righting reflexes, fore- and hindlimb grasp, fore- and hindlimb placing, sensory reflexes and gait. In cases of negative geotaxis, surface righting and gait, the time to perform the reflex was also recorded daily. For examining motor coordination, we performed grid walking, footfault, rope suspension, rota-rod, inclined board and walk initiation tests. We found that enriched environment alone did not lead to marked alterations in the course of development. On the other hand, MSG treatment caused a slight delay in reflex development and a pronounced delay in weight gain and motor coordination maturation. This delay in most signs and tests could be reversed by enriched environment: MSG-treated pups kept under enriched conditions showed no weight retardation, no reflex delay in

  8. Specifying the interrelationship between exposure to violence and parental monitoring for younger versus older adolescents: a five year longitudinal test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Richard; Rivera, Craig; Vazsonyi, Alexander T; Bolland, John M

    2012-03-01

    Five waves of longitudinal data collected from 349 African American youth living in extreme poverty were used to examine the interrelationship between exposure to violence and parenting during adolescence. Semi-parametric group based modeling was used to identify trajectories of parental monitoring and exposure to violence from T1 to T5. Results from these analyses revealed: (1) a trajectory of declining parental monitoring for 48% of youth; and (2) four distinct trajectories of exposure to violence. Multivariate findings were largely consistent with the ecological-transactional model of community violence. Youth with stable and/or increasing trajectories of exposure to violence were more likely than youth with stable-low exposure to violence to have declining parental monitoring, but additional analyses revealed a similar pattern of findings for younger adolescents (age 9-11 T1), but no evidence of linkages between trajectories of exposure to violence and parental monitoring for older adolescents (age 12-16 T1). The theoretical and policy implications of these findings as well as areas for future research are also discussed.

  9. 3D Case Studies of Monitoring Dynamic Structural Tests using Long Exposure Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. M. J.; Chandler, J. H.; Palmeri, A.

    2014-06-01

    Structural health monitoring uses non-destructive testing programmes to detect long-term degradation phenomena in civil engineering structures. Structural testing may also be carried out to assess a structure's integrity following a potentially damaging event. Such investigations are increasingly carried out with vibration techniques, in which the structural response to artificial or natural excitations is recorded and analysed from a number of monitoring locations. Photogrammetry is of particular interest here since a very high number of monitoring locations can be measured using just a few images. To achieve the necessary imaging frequency to capture the vibration, it has been necessary to reduce the image resolution at the cost of spatial measurement accuracy. Even specialist sensors are limited by a compromise between sensor resolution and imaging frequency. To alleviate this compromise, a different approach has been developed and is described in this paper. Instead of using high-speed imaging to capture the instantaneous position at each epoch, long-exposure images are instead used, in which the localised image of the object becomes blurred. The approach has been extended to create 3D displacement vectors for each target point via multiple camera locations, which allows the simultaneous detection of transverse and torsional mode shapes. The proposed approach is frequency invariant allowing monitoring of higher modal frequencies irrespective of a sampling frequency. Since there is no requirement for imaging frequency, a higher image resolution is possible for the most accurate spatial measurement. The results of a small scale laboratory test using off-the-shelf consumer cameras are demonstrated. A larger experiment also demonstrates the scalability of the approach.

  10. Linking embryo toxicity with genotoxic responses in the freshwater snail Physa acuta: single exposure to benzo(a)pyrene, fluoxetine, bisphenol A, vinclozolin and exposure to binary mixtures with benzo(a)pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Argüello, Paloma; Aparicio, Natalia; Fernández, Carlos

    2012-06-01

    Genotoxic effects on fauna after waterborne pollutant exposure have been demonstrated by numerous research programmes. Less effort has been focused on establishing relationship between genotoxicity and long-term responses at higher levels of biological organization. Taking into account that embryos may be more sensitive indicators of reproductive impairment than alterations in fertility, we have developed two assays in multiwell plates to address correlations between embryo toxicity and genotoxicity. The potential teratogenicity was assessed by analyzing abnormal development and mortality of Physa acuta at embryonic stage. Genotoxicity was measured by the micronucleus (MN) test using embryonic cells. Our results showed that linkage between genotoxicity and embryo toxicity depends on mechanisms of action of compounds under study. Embryo toxic responses showed a clear dose-related tendency whereas no clear dose-dependent effect was observed in micronucleus induction. The higher embryo toxicity was produced by benzo(a)pyrene exposure followed by fluoxetine and bisphenol A. Vinclozolin was the lower embryo toxic compound. Binary mixtures with BaP always resulted in higher embryo toxicity than single exposures but antagonistic effects were observed for MN induction. Benzo(a)pyrene produced the higher MN induction at 0.04 mg/L, which also produced clear embryo toxic effects. Fluoxetine did not induce cytogenetic effects but 0.25mg/L altered embryonic development. Bisphenol A significantly reduced hatchability at 0.5mg/L while MN induction appeared with higher treatments than those that start causing teratogenicity. Much higher concentration of vinclozolin (5mg/L) reduced hatchability and induced maximum MN formation. In conclusion, while validating one biomarker of genotoxicity and employing one ecologically relevant effect, we have evaluated the relative sensitivity of a freshwater mollusc for a range of chemicals. The embryo toxicity test is a starting point for the

  11. A Novel Alternative to Environmental Monitoring to Detect Workers at Risk for Beryllium Exposure-Related Health Effects

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a methodology for surveillance and monitoring of beryllium exposure using biological monitoring to complement environmental monitoring. Eighty-three Israeli dental technicians (mean age 41.6 ± 1.36 years) and 80 American nuclear machining workers (54.9 ± 1.21 years) were enrolled. Biological monitoring was carried out by analyzing particle size (laser technique) and shape (image analysis) in 131/163 (80.3%) induced sputum samples (Dipa Analyser, Donne...

  12. Evaluation of a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonic acid oil derived from Mortierella alpina in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, R.A.; Lina, B.A.R.; Haggitt, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid oil (ARA-oil) derived from the fungus Mortierella alpina for use in infant nutrition was tested in a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study in rats, preceded by an in utero exposure phase. The ARA-oil was administered as admixture to the rodent diet at dose levels of 3000 ppm, 15,

  13. Evaluation of a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonic acid oil derived from Mortierella alpina in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, R.A.; Lina, B.A.R.; Haggitt, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid oil (ARA-oil) derived from the fungus Mortierella alpina for use in infant nutrition was tested in a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study in rats, preceded by an in utero exposure phase. The ARA-oil was administered as admixture to the rodent diet at dose levels of 3000 ppm,

  14. Use of a custom RT-PCR array to analyze toxicity pathways at different life stages in Brown Norway Rat Brain following acute Toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we utilized a custom designed RT-PCR array to examine the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.65 or 1.0 glkg) in the brains of ma1e Brown Norwa...

  15. Evaluation of a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study, preceded by an in utero exposure phase, with arachidonic acid oil derived from Mortierella alpina in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hempenius, R.A.; Lina, B.A.R.; Haggitt, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid oil (ARA-oil) derived from the fungus Mortierella alpina for use in infant nutrition was tested in a subchronic (13-week) oral toxicity study in rats, preceded by an in utero exposure phase. The ARA-oil was administered as admixture to the rodent diet at dose levels of 3000 ppm, 15,

  16. Use of a custom RT-PCR array to analyze toxicity pathways at different life stages in Brown Norway Rat Brain following acute Toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we utilized a custom designed RT-PCR array to examine the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.65 or 1.0 glkg) in the brains of ma1e Brown Norwa...

  17. Integrating the impact of cigarette and waterpipe tobacco use among adolescents in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: a cross-sectional, population-level model of toxicant exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Mohammed; Roderick, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Waterpipe smoking is more prevalent than cigarette smoking among adolescents in the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR); however, simple prevalence masks complex waterpipe smoking patterns and makes uncertain its contribution to risk of tobacco-related harm. This study aimed to integrate the impact of cigarette and waterpipe tobacco use on toxicant exposure among EMR adolescents. A cross-sectional model made equivalent individual-level toxicant exposure data for cigarettes and waterpipes, and aggregated it to 23 countries in the EMR using the Global Youth Tobacco Survey. The waterpipe model adjusted for estimated frequency of use, session duration and sharing behaviours. The final model included 60 306 12-17-year olds, and modelled as outcomes nicotine, carbon monoxide (CO) and 14 carcinogens. Sensitivity analyses substantially reduced session duration and proportion of solo use. Our model suggests waterpipe use may contribute a median of 36.4% (IQR 26.7-46.8%, n=16) of the total toxicant exposure from tobacco, and may reach up to 73.5% and 71.9% of total CO and benzene exposure, respectively. Sensitivity analyses reduced all values by 4.3-21.0%, but even the most conservative scenarios suggested over 50% of benzene and CO exposure was from waterpipe use. Between 69.2% and 73.5% of total toxicant exposure derived from dual cigarette and waterpipe users, who smoked cigarettes and waterpipe more frequently and intensely than single users. More research is warranted to refine our model's parameters. Tobacco control researchers should consider a move towards a single unit of measure for cigarette and waterpipe tobacco exposure in order to better inform health policy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  18. Integrating smart-phone based momentary location tracking with fixed site air quality monitoring for personal exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jason G; Jerrett, Michael; Meng, Ying-Ying; Pickett, Melissa; Ritz, Beate

    2015-02-15

    Epidemiological studies investigating relationships between environmental exposures from air pollution and health typically use residential addresses as a single point for exposure, while environmental exposures in transit, at work, school or other locations are largely ignored. Personal exposure monitors measure individuals' exposures over time; however, current personal monitors are intrusive and cannot be operated at a large scale over an extended period of time (e.g., for a continuous three months) and can be very costly. In addition, spatial locations typically cannot be identified when only personal monitors are used. In this paper, we piloted a study that applied momentary location tracking services supplied by smart phones to identify an individual's location in space-time for three consecutive months (April 28 to July 28, 2013) using available Wi-Fi networks. Individual exposures in space-time to the traffic-related pollutants Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) were estimated by superimposing an annual mean NOX concentration surface modeled using the Land Use Regression (LUR) modeling technique. Individual's exposures were assigned to stationary (including home, work and other stationary locations) and in-transit (including commute and other travel) locations. For the individual, whose home/work addresses were known and the commute route was fixed, it was found that 95.3% of the time, the individual could be accurately identified in space-time. The ambient concentration estimated at the home location was 21.01 ppb. When indoor/outdoor infiltration, indoor sources of air pollution and time spent outdoors were taken into consideration, the individual's cumulative exposures were 28.59 ppb and 96.49 ppb, assuming a respective indoor/outdoor ratio of 1.33 and 5.00. Integrating momentary location tracking services with fixed-site field monitoring, plus indoor-outdoor air exchange calibration, makes exposure assessment of a very large population over an extended time period

  19. Pseudo-nitzschia physiological ecology, phylogeny, toxicity, monitoring and impact on ecosystem health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trainer, Vera L.; Bates, Steve S.; Lundholm, Nina

    2012-01-01

    , marine mammals and birds, as well as in sediments, demonstrating its stable transfer through the marine food web and abiotically to the benthos. The linkage of DA production to nitrogenous nutrient physiology, trace metal acquisition, and even salinity, suggests that the control of toxin production...... is complex and likely influenced by a suite of environmental factors that may be unique to a particular region. Advances in our knowledge of Pseudo-nitzschia sexual reproduction, also in field populations, illustrate its importance in bloom dynamics and toxicity. The combination of careful taxonomy...

  20. Immunoassays and Biosensors for Monitoring Environmental and Human Exposure to Pyrethroid Insecticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ki Chang; Kim, Hee-Joo; Mccoy, Mark R.; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    This manuscript describes some of the early work on pyrethroid insecticides in the Casida laboratory and briefly reviews the development and application of immunochemical approaches for the detection of pyrethroid insecticides and their metabolites for monitoring environmental and human exposure. Multiple technologies can be combined to enhance the sensitivity and speed of immunochemical analysis. The pyrethroid assays are used to illustrate the use of some of these immunoreagents such as antibodies, competitive mimics, and novel binding agents such as phage-displayed peptides. We also illustrate reporters such as fluorescent dyes, chemiluminescent compounds, and luminescent lanthanide nanoparticles, as well as the application of magnetic separation, and automatic instrumental systems, biosensor and novel immunological technologies. These new technologies alone and in combination result in an improved ability to determine both if effective levels of pyrethroids are being used in the field as well as evaluate possible contamination. PMID:21105656

  1. Uveka: a UV exposure monitoring system using autonomous instruments network for Reunion Island citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sébastien, Nicolas; Cros, Sylvain; Lallemand, Caroline; Kurzrock, Frederik; Schmutz, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Reunion Island is a French oversea territory located in the Indian Ocean. This tropical Island has about 840,000 inhabitants and is visited every year by more than 400,000 tourists. On average, 340 sunny days occurs on this island in a whole year. Beyond these advantageous conditions, exposure of the population to ultraviolet radiation constitutes a public health issue. The number of hospitalisations for skin cancer increased by 50% between 2005 and 2010. Health insurance reimbursements due to ophthalmic anomalies caused by the sun is about two million Euros. Among the prevention measures recommended by public health policies, access to information on UV radiation is one of the basic needs. Reuniwatt, supported by the Regional Council of La Reunion, is currently developing the project Uveka. Uveka is a solution permitting to provide in real-time and in short-term forecast (several hours), the UV radiation maps of the Reunion Island. Accessible via web interface and smartphone application, Uveka informs the citizens about the UV exposure rate and its risk according to its individual characteristics (skin phototype, past exposure to sun etc.). The present work describes this initiative through the presentation of the UV radiation monitoring system and the data processing chain toward the end-users. The UV radiation monitoring system of Uveka is a network of low cost UV sensors. Each instrument is equipped with a solar panel and a battery. Moreover, the sensor is able to communicate using the 3G telecommunication network. Then, the instrument can be installed without AC power or access to a wired communication network. This feature eliminates a site selection constraint. Indeed, with more than 200 microclimates and a strong cloud cover spatial variability, building a representative measurement site network in this island with a limited number of instruments is a real challenge. In addition to these UV radiation measurements, the mapping of the surface solar radiation

  2. Earth Observation Tools for Risk Exposure Monitoring: Welcoming Sentinel-2 Data in Risk Assessment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchi, Daniele; Dell'Acqua, Fabio

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of different FP7 projects, a set of open-source tools has been developed and refined with the aim to monitor the exposure component in risk assessment. The recent launch of Sentinels 1 and 2 with their open data license attracted a lot of attention in the remote sensing community stimulating new research and applications. To our tools, this meant Open Data feed into Open Source code. The similarity in both spectral and geometric resolutions between Landsat and Sentinel-2 satellites raises good hopes for reusability of the developed tools. In this paper, modifications to the original algorithms will be suggested according to the experiments outcome, in view of a new generation of Open Tools in line with the new Copernicus-aware Earth Observation scenario.

  3. Exposure of Laboratory Mice to Domestic Cooking Gas: - Implications for Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madu D. Ibegbu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The ability of domestic cooking gas to induce hepatotoxicity and clastogenicity in mice was studied. The mice were exposed to domestic gas for twenty-one days at doses of 100 mg/kg, 200 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg respectively. The positive control group of mice were given sodium arsenite intraperitoneously at a dose of 2.5mg/kg body weight. While the negative control group had only distilled water, sodium arsenite significantly (p < 0.05 induced the formation of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (mPCEs, serum and liver gamma glutamyl transferase (γGT and alkaline phosphatase (AP activities respectively as compared with the observations made in the negative control group. Similarly, the domestic gas significantly (p<0.05 induced mPCEs formation, serum and liver, γGT and AP activities. The degree of induction was in the order of 100 mg/kg < 200 mg/kg < 300 mg/kg. However, when compared with the positive control group, the domestic cooking gas at the tested doses was not as potent as sodium arsenite in its ability to induce enzyme activity and mPCEs formation. Limited histopathological analysis of liver samples from treated and untreated mice showed distended blood vessels, necrosis and hepatocellular degeneration in the groups treated with high doses of domestic gas or sodium arsenite as compared with the untreated group. Our findings suggest that the domestic cooking gas has some degree of clastogenic and hepatotoxic activities in mice. Health risks may therefore be associated with long-term occupational and / or domestic exposure in humans.

  4. Toxic Volatile Organic Compounds in Environmental Tobacco Smoke:Emission Factors for Modeling Exposures of California Populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daisey, J.M.; Mahanama, K.R.R.; Hodgson, A.T.

    1994-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to measure emission factors for selected toxic air in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) using a room-sized environmental chamber. The emissions of 23 volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including 1,3-butadiene, three aldehydes and two vapor-phase N-nitrosarnines were determined for six commercial brands of cigarettes and reference cigarette 1R4F. The commercial brands were selected to represent 62.5% of the cigarettes smoked in California. For each brand, three cigarettes were machine smoked in the chamber. The experiments were conducted over four hours to investigate the effects of aging. Emission factors of the target compounds were also determined for sidestream smoke (SS). For almost all target compounds, the ETS emission factors were significantly higher than the corresponding SS values probably due to less favorable combustion conditions and wall losses in the SS apparatus. Where valid comparisons could be made, the ETS emission factors were generally in good agreement with the literature. Therefore, the ETS emission factors, rather than the SS values, are recommended for use in models to estimate population exposures from this source. The variabilities in the emission factors (pgkigarette) of the selected toxic air contaminants among brands, expressed as coefficients of variation, were 16 to 29%. Therefore, emissions among brands were generally similar. Differences among brands were related to the smoked lengths of the cigarettes and the masses of consumed tobacco. Mentholation and whether a cigarette was classified as light or regular did not significantly affect emissions. Aging was determined not to be a significant factor for the target compounds. There were, however, deposition losses of the less volatile compounds to chamber surfaces.

  5. Field surveys of carbon monoxide in commercial settings using personal exposure monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flachsbart, P. G.; Ott, W. R.

    1984-02-01

    Miniaturized personal exposure monitors (PEMs) were employed to measure carbon monoxide (CO) in 588 different commercial settings (e.g., retail stores, office buildings, hotels, restaurants) in five California cities. Altogether, 5000 CO observations were made by recording the instantaneous instrument reading at 1-minute intervals as the investigators walked along sidewalks and into buildings. For 11 of 15 survey dates, two investigators walked side-by-side, permitting two adjacent PEMs to be compared. Quality assurance tests for 1706 pairs of values showed a very high degree of agreement. CO levels for indoor commercial settings were similar to those measured outdoors on sidewalks, apparently because the pollutant seeps into the structures from traffic outside. Although indoor levels usually were above 0 ppm, they seldom were above 9 ppm (the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for an 8-hour exposure), unless some indoor source could be identified. Carbon monoxide levels on outdoor streets did not vary greatly on different sides of the street, on corners and faces of blocks, and intersections.

  6. Monitoring of perchlorate in diverse foods and its estimated dietary exposure for Korea populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Woo; Oh, Sung-Hee; Oh, Jeong-Eun

    2012-12-01

    The perchlorate concentrations in various Korean food samples were monitored, and 663 samples belonging to 39 kinds of food were analyzed. The analysis results revealed that dairy products contain the highest average concentration of 6.34 μg/kg and high detection frequency of over 85%. Fruit and vegetables showed the next highest perchlorate concentration with an average of 6.17 μg/kg. Especially, with its average concentration of 39.9 μg/kg, spinach showed the highest perchlorate level among all target food samples studied. Tomato was followed by spinach, which showed a high perchlorate average concentration of 19.8 μg/kg, and over 7 μg/kg was detected in ham and sausage (avg. 7.31 μg/kg) and in instant noodles (avg. 7.58 μg/kg). Less than 2 μg/kg was detected in fishes, meats and beverages. The exposure dose of perchlorate in Korean by food intake was calculated on the basis of the analyzed perchlorate levels in this study. The daily perchlorate dose to which Korean adults are exposed is 0.04 μg/kg bw/day, which is lower than the RfD (0.7 μg/kg bw/day) value suggested by US NAS. This result indicates that Korean people's current exposure to perchlorate from domestic food consumption is evaluated as safe. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effect of Realtime Monitoring on Dose Exposure to Staff Within an Interventional Radiology Setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Frederic, E-mail: fredericbaumann@hotmail.com; Katzen, Barry T. [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute (MCVI) (United States); Carelsen, Bart [Philips HealthCare, Clinical Science Interventional X-ray (Netherlands); Diehm, Nicolas [Kantonsspital Aarau, Clinical and Interventional Angiology (Switzerland); Benenati, James F.; Peña, Constantino S. [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute (MCVI) (United States)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe purpose of this study is to evaluate a new device providing real-time monitoring on radiation exposure during fluoroscopy procedures intending to reduce radiation in an interventional radiology setting.Materials and MethodsIn one interventional suite, a new system providing a real-time radiation dose display and five individual wireless dosimeters were installed. The five dosimeters were worn by the attending, fellow, nurse, technician, and anesthesiologist for every procedure taking place in that suite. During the first 6-week interval the dose display was off (closed phase) and activated thereafter, for a 6-week learning phase (learning phase) and a 10-week open phase (open phase). During these phases, the staff dose and the individual dose for each procedure were recorded from the wireless dosimeter and correlated with the fluoroscopy time. Further subanalysis for dose exposure included diagnostic versus interventional as well as short (<10 min) versus long (>10 min) procedures.ResultsA total of 252 procedures were performed (n = 88 closed phase, n = 50 learning phase, n = 114 open phase). The overall mean staff dose per fluoroscopic minute was 42.79 versus 19.81 µSv/min (p < 0.05) comparing the closed and open phase. Thereby, anesthesiologists were the only individuals attaining a significant dose reduction during open phase 16.9 versus 8.86 µSv/min (p < 0.05). Furthermore, a significant reduction of total staff dose was observed for short 51 % and interventional procedures 45 % (p < 0.05, for both).ConclusionA real-time qualitative display of radiation exposure may reduce team radiation dose. The process may take a few weeks during the learning phase but appears sustained, thereafter.

  8. Contribution of job-exposure matrices for exposure assessment in occupational safety and health monitoring systems: application from the French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florentin, Arnaud; Zmirou-Navier, Denis; Paris, Christophe

    2017-08-01

    To detect new hazards ("signals"), occupational health monitoring systems mostly rest on the description of exposures in the jobs held and on reports by medical doctors; these are subject to declarative bias. Our study aims to assess whether job-exposure matrices (JEMs) could be useful tools for signal detection by improving exposure reporting. Using the French national occupational disease surveillance and prevention network (RNV3P) data from 2001 to 2011, we explored the associations between disease and exposure prevalence for 3 well-known pathology/exposure couples and for one debatable couple. We compared the associations measured when using physicians' reports or applying the JEMs, respectively, for these selected diseases and across non-selected RNV3P population or for cases with musculoskeletal disorders, used as two reference groups; the ratio of exposure prevalences according to the two sources of information were computed for each disease category. Our population contained 58,188 subjects referred with pathologies related to work. Mean age at diagnosis was 45.8 years (95% CI 45.7; 45.9), and 57.2% were men. For experts, exposure ratios increase with knowledge on exposure causality. As expected, JEMs retrieved more exposed cases than experts (exposure ratios between 12 and 194), except for the couple silica/silicosis, but not for the MSD control group (ratio between 0.2 and 0.8). JEMs enhanced the number of exposures possibly linked with some conditions, compared to experts' assessment, relative to the whole database or to a reference group; they are less likely to suffer from declarative bias than reports by occupational health professionals.

  9. Sorbent track: Quantitative monitoring of adsorbed VOCs under in-situ plasma exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zixian; Rousseau, Antoine

    2016-08-01

    Sorbent-TRACK is a new device developed to monitor adsorption and surface oxidation of pollutants under direct plasma exposure. It is based on direct transmitted Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. A pyrex reactor under controlled gas pressure and composition is inserted on the infrared beam of a commercially available Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer. A substrate holder is located on the optical path of the infrared beam. A thin pellet of a dedicated catalyst (CeO2 in the present work) is inserted in a substrate holder and can be exposed to direct plasma treatment using a Dielectric Barrier Discharge. The time resolution of Sorbent-TRACK is limited by the time resolution of the Nicolet 5700 FTIR spectrometer and close to 30 s. The dynamic of the adsorption and plasma oxidation of acetone and isopropanol on CeO2 are studied and intermediates are monitored. Performances and sensitivity of Sorbent-TRACK are reported Adsorption and oxidation of acetone leads to production of adsorbed isobutene and acetic acid, where oxidation of isopropanol gives mainly to adsorbed acetone, mesityl oxide and acetate. An increase of the plasma power leads to an increase of the isopropanol and acetone oxidation rate and a related increase of the production of adsorbed intermediates.

  10. The next generation of low-cost personal air quality sensors for quantitative exposure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piedrahita, R.; Xiang, Y.; Masson, N.; Ortega, J.; Collier, A.; Jiang, Y.; Li, K.; Dick, R. P.; Lv, Q.; Hannigan, M.; Shang, L.

    2014-10-01

    Advances in embedded systems and low-cost gas sensors are enabling a new wave of low-cost air quality monitoring tools. Our team has been engaged in the development of low-cost, wearable, air quality monitors (M-Pods) using the Arduino platform. These M-Pods house two types of sensors - commercially available metal oxide semiconductor (MOx) sensors used to measure CO, O3, NO2, and total VOCs, and NDIR sensors used to measure CO2. The MOx sensors are low in cost and show high sensitivity near ambient levels; however they display non-linear output signals and have cross-sensitivity effects. Thus, a quantification system was developed to convert the MOx sensor signals into concentrations. We conducted two types of validation studies - first, deployments at a regulatory monitoring station in Denver, Colorado, and second, a user study. In the two deployments (at the regulatory monitoring station), M-Pod concentrations were determined using collocation calibrations and laboratory calibration techniques. M-Pods were placed near regulatory monitors to derive calibration function coefficients using the regulatory monitors as the standard. The form of the calibration function was derived based on laboratory experiments. We discuss various techniques used to estimate measurement uncertainties. The deployments revealed that collocation calibrations provide more accurate concentration estimates than laboratory calibrations. During collocation calibrations, median standard errors ranged between 4.0-6.1 ppb for O3, 6.4-8.4 ppb for NO2, 0.28-0.44 ppm for CO, and 16.8 ppm for CO2. Median signal to noise (S / N) ratios for the M-Pod sensors were higher than the regulatory instruments: for NO2, 3.6 compared to 23.4; for O3, 1.4 compared to 1.6; for CO, 1.1 compared to 10.0; and for CO2, 42.2 compared to 300-500. By contrast, lab calibrations added bias and made it difficult to cover the necessary range of environmental conditions to obtain a good calibration. A separate user study

  11. Contamination monitoring and control on ASML MS-VII 157-nm exposure tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoroanyanwu, Uzodinma; Gronheid, Roel; Coenen, Jan; Hermans, Jan; Ronse, Kurt G.

    2004-05-01

    This paper presents results of monitoring and control of contaminants in an ASML MS-VII 157nm full-field exposure tool at IMEC, as verified lithographically in terms of field uniformity, lens transmission, CD uniformity, and scattered light. The daily contamination monitoring system utilizes in-line photo-ionization detector, oxygen and moisture analyzers, as well as chemiluminescent detector, and gas chromatograph that is coupled to a mass spectrometer. On a monthly basis, contamination monitoring was performed with thermal desorption-gas chromatographi/mass spectrometric techniques. The following four locations within the optical path of the MS-VII are monitored: source optic assembly, condenser lens optic, 1X relay station, and projection optics box. Contamination control is realized in the system with an on-board purge control unit, which is equipped with gas purifiers that remove contaminants such as H2O, O2, CO, CO2, hydrocarbons, H2, and sulfur compounds. All the observed contaminants have been trending within expected values and no contamination-related tool performance degradation has been observed. The excursions observed in the contaminant concentrations are coincident with tool downtime/maintenance events. Siloxane levels appear to be consistently below 50 ppt in all the monitored locations within the optical path of the tool, except on one occasion when it reached 90 ppt in the projection optics. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentration within the MS-VII enclosure show a stable background level of around 10-25 ppb during weekends and levels of 45-60 ppb (during working days). VOCs concentration variations inside the MS-VII enclosure during the working days correlate well with activities inside the clean room. Air recirculation and low intake of fresh air inside the MS-VII tend to slow down the speed with which the VOCs levels decreases to stable background level, whenever there was a major upward excursion in their concentration. Average light

  12. Individual monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechler, S; Stritt, N; Bochud, F O

    2011-03-01

    Monitoring of internal exposure for nuclear medicine workers requires frequent measurements due to the short physical half-lives of most radionuclides used in this field. The aim of this study was to develop screening measurements performed at the workplace by local staff using standard laboratory instrumentation, to detect whether potential intake has occurred. Such measurements do not enable to determine the committed effective dose, but are adequate to verify that a given threshold is not exceeded. For radioiodine, i.e. (123)I, (124)I, (125)I and (131)I, a calibrated surface contamination monitor is placed in front of the thyroid to detect whether the activity threshold has been exceeded. For radionuclides with very short physical half-lives (≤ 6 h), such as (99m)Tc and those used in positron emission tomography imaging, i.e. (11)C, (15)O, (18)F and (68)Ga, screening procedures consist in performing daily measurements of the ambient dose rate in front of the abdomen. Other gamma emitters used for imaging, i.e. (67)Ga, (111)In and (201)Tl, are measured with a scintillation detector located in front of the thorax. For pure beta emitters, i.e. (90)Y and (169)Er, as well as beta emitters with low-intensity gamma rays, i.e. (153)Sm, (177)Lu, (186)Re and (188)Re, the procedure consists in measuring hand contamination immediately after use. In Switzerland, screening procedures have been adopted by most nuclear medicine services since such measurements enable an acceptable monitoring while taking into account practical and economic considerations.

  13. Cellular metabolic, stress, and histological response on exposure to acute toxicity of endosulfan in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Sharma, Rupam; Tripathi, Gayatri; Kumar, Kundan; Dalvi, Rishikesh S; Krishna, Gopal

    2016-01-01

    Endosulfan is one of the most hazardous organochlorines pesticides responsible for environmental pollution, as it is very persistent and shows bio-magnification. This study evaluated the impact of acute endosulfan toxicity on metabolic enzymes, lysozyme activities, heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 expression, and histopathology in Tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus). Among the indicators that were induced in dose dependent manner were the enzymes of amino acid metabolism (serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase), carbohydrate metabolism (serum lactate dehydrogenase), pentose phosphate pathway (Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase) as well as lysozyme and Hsp70 in liver and gill, while liver and gill Isocitrate dehydrogenase (TCA cycle enzyme) and marker of general energetics (Total adenosine triphosphatase) were inhibited. Histopathological alterations in gill were clubbing of secondary gill lamellae, marked hyperplasia, complete loss of secondary lamellae and atrophy of primary gill filaments. Whereas in liver, swollen hepatocyte, and degeneration with loss of cellular boundaries were distinctly noticed. Overall results clearly demonstrated the unbalanced metabolism and damage of the vital organs like liver and gill in Tilapia due to acute endosulfan exposure.

  14. Carbofuran and its toxic metabolites provide forensic evidence for furadan exposure in vultures (Gyps africanus) in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, Peter O; Lalah, Joseph O; Virani, Munir; Jondiko, Isaac O; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2010-05-01

    Forensic analysis of carbofuran residues in weathered tissue samples for evidence of Furadan exposure in vultures (Gps africanus) by HPLC gave concentration (mg/Kg dry tissue weight) ranges of bdl - 0.07 (carbofuran), bdl - 0.499 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.013-0.147 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in beaks, bdl-0.65 (carbofuran), 0.024-0.190 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.017-0.098 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in feet, 0.179-0.219 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.081-0.093 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in crop content, 0.078-0.082 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.091-0.101 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in muscle of a laced carcass and 0.006-0.014 (carbofuran), 0.590-1.010 (3-ketocarbofuran) and 0.095-0.135 (3-hydroxycarbofuran) in soil sampled from a poisoning site. These compounds were confirmed by GC-MS. The results showed that HPLC combined with GC-MS is suitable for forensic analysis of carbofuran residues in bird tissue samples and that forensic investigation should include its two toxic metabolites, 3-hydroxycarbofuran and 3-ketocarbofuran.

  15. Chronic TiO₂ nanoparticle exposure to a benthic organism, Hyalella azteca: impact of solar UV radiation and material surface coatings on toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Lindsay K; Diamond, Stephen A; Ma, Hongbo; Hoff, Dale J; Al-Abed, Souhail R; Li, Shibin

    2014-11-15

    There is limited information on the chronic effects of nanomaterials to benthic organisms, as well as environmental mitigating factors that might influence this toxicity. The present study aimed to fill these data gaps by examining various growth endpoints (weight gain, instantaneous growth rate, and total protein content) for up to a 21 d sediment exposure of TiO2 nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) to a representative benthic species, Hyalella azteca. An uncoated standard, P25, and an Al(OH)3 coated nano-TiO2 used in commercial products were added to sediment at 20 mg/L or 100 mg/L Under test conditions, UV exposure alone was shown to be a greater cause of toxicity than even these high levels of nano-TiO2 exposure, indicating that different hazards need to be addressed in toxicity testing scenarios. In addition, this study showed the effectiveness of a surface coating on the decreased photoactivity of the material, as the addition of an Al(OH)3 coating showed a dramatic decrease in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, this reduced photoactivity was found to be partially restored when the coating had been degraded, leading to the need for future toxicity tests which examine the implications of weathering events on particle surface coatings.

  16. Effects of six priority controlled phthalate esters with long-term low-dose integrated exposure on male reproductive toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hai-Tao; Xu, Run; Cao, Wei-Xin; Qian, Liang-Liang; Wang, Min; Lu, Lingeng; Xu, Qian; Yu, Shu-Qin

    2017-03-01

    Human beings are inevitably exposed to ubiquitous phthalate esters (PEs) surroundings. The purposes of this study were to investigate the effects of long-term low-dose exposure to the mixture of six priority controlled phthalate esters (MIXPs): dimethyl phthalate (DMP), diethyl phthalate (DEP), di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP), butyl benzyl phthalate (BBP), di(2-ethyhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-n-octyl phthalate (DNOP), on male rat reproductive system and further to explore the underlying mechanisms of the reproductive toxicity. The male rats were orally exposed to either sodium carboxymethyl cellulose as controls or MIXPs at three different low-doses by gavage for 15 weeks. Testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) in serum were analyzed, and pathological examinations were performed for toxicity evaluation. Steroidogenic proteins (StAR, P450scc, CYP17A1 and 17β-HSD), cell cycle and apoptosis-related proteins (p53, Chk1, Cdc2, CDK6, Bcl-2 and Bax) were measured for mechanisms exploration. MIXPs with long-term low-dose exposure could cause male reproductive toxicity to the rats, including the decrease of both serum and testicular testosterone, and the constructional damage of testis. These effects were related to down-regulated steroidogenic proteins, arresting cell cycle progression and promoting apoptosis in rat testicular cells. The results indicate that MIXPs with long-term low-dose exposure may pose male reproductive toxicity in human. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of the mortality among Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz-Flamant, C.; Hitz, M.; Samson, E.; Rogel, A.; Telle-Lamberton, M.; Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Caer, S.; Quesne, B. [Cogema, Coordination Medicale, 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The present study follows 9287 Cogema workers exposed to low level of ionizing radiation from the beginning of employment to the end of 1994. This paper presents analyses of the mortality of Cogema workers monitored for external radiation exposure and the relation between their mortality and their cumulative external radiation dose. Workers were followed up for an average of 13 years. The percentage of subjects lost to follow up was less than 1%. during the follow-up period, 441 deaths occurred. The mean cumulative dose among the whole cohort was 19.4 mSv. As expected, the mortality of the cohort was lower than that of the French national population. The healthy worker effect is often observed in other nuclear workers studies. Part of the healthy worker effect is explained by a proportion of unemployed persons in general population, with a higher mortality rate. All causes S.M.R. increased with calendar period and duration of employment. this increase was not significant for all cancers S.M.R. by duration of employment. This could illustrate the decrease of the initial selection at employment with time. A significant increase in risk was observed for all cancers excluding leukemia mortality with increase of radiation dose in the 15-country study. Significant excess of leukemia by cumulative radiation exposure was observed in the 3-country study and was borderline significant in the 15-country study and in the UK National register for radiation workers study. A positive trend, not statistically significant, by level of external doses was observed in our study for all cancers and leukemia excluding chronic lymphatic leukemia mortality, but the analyses lack of statistical power. A significant trend was observed only for non-Hodgkin lymphoma death, but considering the large number of statistic tests computed, this result must be carefully interpreted. A borderline significant trend was observed for lung cancer death, a significant increase risk of lung cancer death

  18. Cross-sectional assessment of infants' exposure to toxic metals through breast milk in a prospective cohort study of mining communities in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansa, David Kwaku; Awua, Adolf Kofi; Boatin, Rose; Adom, Theodosia; Brown-Appiah, Edward Christian; Amewosina, Kennedy Kwame; Diaba, Akusika; Datoghe, Dominic; Okwabi, Wilhelmina

    2017-05-25

    Although breastfeeding of infants is recommended globally, the fact that maternal toxic metal stores are mobilised into breast milk implies infants, whose mothers live and work in mining communities, are at risk of multiple exposure to mining related toxic metals, such as Lead (Pb), Mercury (Hg), Cadmium (Cd) and Arsenic (As), through breast milk intake, in addition to in utero exposure. A total of 114 mother-baby pairs, recruited from two community hospitals servicing mining communities in two different regions in Ghana (57 each), were involved in this study. When the babies were 3 months old, the amount of breast milk intake, concentrations of selected toxic metals in the breast milk and therefore the amount of toxic metals exposure through breast milk were determined. The study also, determined the amount of these toxic metals in the hair and urine of each mother-baby pair at 3 months postpartum. Based on the amounts of milk intake and non-milk oral intakes (geometric mean of 0.701 (95% CL 0.59-0.81) Kg/day and median of 0.22 Kg/day respectively), 90% of the babies were determined to have been exclusively breastfed. The amounts of most of the toxic metals in breast milk were higher than the WHO set limits and for 46.4%, 33.3% and 4.4% of the babies, their intake of As, Hg and Pb respectively were above the WHO provisional tolerable daily intake (PTDI) values. An appreciable proportion of babies living within the communities served by the Mangoasi Community Hospital in the Obuasi Municipality of the Ashanti Region and the Dompime Health Centre in the Tarkwa Municipality of the Western Region were exposed to Hg, As and Pb through breast milk in excess of what they should and these may have health implication for the infants and therefore calls for interventions.

  19. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Goeroge P. Miller; Dr. Christopher B. Winstead

    2001-12-04

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the avsorved signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time.

  20. Aluminum exposure and toxicity in neonates:a practical guide to halt aluminum overload in the prenatal and perinatal periods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela Fanni; Rossano Ambu; Clara Gerosa; Sonia Nemolato; Nicoletta Iacovidou; Peter Van Eyken; Vassilios Fanos; Marco Zaffanello; Gavino Faa

    2014-01-01

    Background: During the last years, human newborns have been overexposed to biologically reactive aluminum, with possible relevant consequences on their future health and on their susceptibility to a variety of diseases. Children, newborns and particularly preterm neonates are at an increased risk of aluminum toxicity because of their relative immaturity. Data sources: Based on recent original publications and classical data of the literatures, we reviewed the aluminum content in mother's food during the intrauterine life as well as in breast milk and infant formula during lactation. We also determined the possible role of aluminum in parenteral nutrition solutions, in adjuvants of vaccines and in pharmaceutical products. A special focus is placed on the relationship between aluminum overexposure and the insurgence of bone diseases. Results: Practical points of management and prevention are suggested. Aluminum sources that infants may receive during the fi rst 6 months of life are presented. In the context of prevention of possible adverse effects of aluminum overload in fetal tissues during development, simple suggestions to pregnant women are described. Finally, practical points of management and prevention are suggested. Conclusions: Pediatricians and neonatologists must be more concerned about aluminum content in all products our newborns are exposed to, starting from monitoring aluminum concentrations in milk- and soybased formulas in which, on the basis of recent studies, there is still too much aluminum.

  1. Effect of concentration, exposure time, temperature, and relative humidity on the toxicity of sulfur dioxide to the spores of Botrytis cinerea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couey, H.M.; Uota, M.

    1961-12-01

    When spores of Botrytis cinerea are exposed to SO/sub 2/ gas, the subsequent reduction in spore germination is quantitatively proportional to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and the exposure time. The toxicity of SO/sub 2/ increases with increasing relative humidity. In an atmosphere of 96% RH, SO/sub 2/ is more than 20 times as effective as at 75% RH. The toxicity also increases about 1.5 times for each 10/sup 0/C rise in temperature between 0/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/C. 8 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  2. Evaluation of pulmonary and systemic toxicity following lung exposure to graphite nanoplates: a member of the graphene-based nanomaterial family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jenny R; Mercer, Robert R; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Seehra, Mohindar S; Geddam, Usha K; Chaudhuri, Ishrat S; Kyrlidis, Angelos; Kodali, Vamsi K; Sager, Tina; Kenyon, Allison; Bilgesu, Suzan A; Eye, Tracy; Scabilloni, James F; Leonard, Stephen S; Fix, Natalie R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Farris, Breanne Y; Wolfarth, Michael G; Porter, Dale W; Castranova, Vincent; Erdely, Aaron

    2016-06-21

    Graphene, a monolayer of carbon, is an engineered nanomaterial (ENM) with physical and chemical properties that may offer application advantages over other carbonaceous ENMs, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT). The goal of this study was to comparatively assess pulmonary and systemic toxicity of graphite nanoplates, a member of the graphene-based nanomaterial family, with respect to nanoplate size. Three sizes of graphite nanoplates [20 μm lateral (Gr20), 5 μm lateral (Gr5), and  5 μm laterally inducing greater toxicity which peaked at the early time points post-exposure relative to the 1-2 μm graphite nanoplate.

  3. A novel alternative to environmental monitoring to detect workers at risk for beryllium exposure-related health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, Elizabeth; Lerman, Yehuda; Stark, Moshe; Pardo, Asher; Schwarz, Yehuda; Van Dyke, Michael V; Elliot, Jill; Barkes, Briana; Newman, Lee; Maier, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a methodology for surveillance and monitoring of beryllium exposure using biological monitoring to complement environmental monitoring. Eighty-three Israeli dental technicians (mean age 41.6 ± 1.36 years) and 80 American nuclear machining workers (54.9 ± 1.21 years) were enrolled. Biological monitoring was carried out by analyzing particle size (laser technique) and shape (image analysis) in 131/163 (80.3%) induced sputum samples (Dipa Analyser, Donner Tech, Or Aquiva, Israel). Environmental monitoring was carried out only in the United States (Sioutas impactor, SKC, Inc., Eighty Four, Pa.). Pulmonary function testing performance and induced sputum retrieval were done by conventional methods. Sixty-three Israeli workers and 37 American workers were followed up for at least 2 years. Biological monitoring by induced sputum indicated that a >92% accumulation of beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test result (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-11.4, p = 0.015) among all participants. Environmental monitoring showed that beryllium particles were machining workers compared to dental technicians. The small fractions positively correlated with induced sputum macrophages (r = 0.21 p = 0.01) and negatively correlated with diffusion lung carbon monoxide single breath (DLCO-SB r = 0.180 p = 0.04) in all subjects. Years of exposure were positively correlated to the number of accumulated particles 2-3 μ in diameter (r = 0.2, p = 0.02) and negatively correlated to forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity findings (r = -0.18, p = 0.02). DLCO was decreased in both groups after two years of monitoring. Biological monitoring is more informative than environmental monitoring in the surveillance and monitoring of workers in beryllium industries. Induced sputum is a feasible and promising biomonitoring method that should be included in the surveillance of exposed workers.

  4. The margin of internal exposure (MOIE) concept for dermal risk assessment based on oral toxicity data - A case study with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessems, Jos G M; Paini, Alicia; Gajewska, Monika; Worth, Andrew

    2017-03-10

    Route-to-route extrapolation is a common part of human risk assessment. Data from oral animal toxicity studies are commonly used to assess the safety of various but specific human dermal exposure scenarios. Using theoretical examples of various user scenarios, it was concluded that delineation of a generally applicable human dermal limit value is not a practicable approach, due to the wide variety of possible human exposure scenarios, including its consequences for internal exposure. This paper uses physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling approaches to predict animal as well as human internal exposure dose metrics and for the first time, introduces the concept of Margin of Internal Exposure (MOIE) based on these internal dose metrics. Caffeine was chosen to illustrate this approach. It is a substance that is often found in cosmetics and for which oral repeated dose toxicity data were available. A rat PBK model was constructed in order to convert the oral NOAEL to rat internal exposure dose metrics, i.e. the area under the curve (AUC) and the maximum concentration (Cmax), both in plasma. A human oral PBK model was constructed and calibrated using human volunteer data and adapted to accommodate dermal absorption following human dermal exposure. Use of the MOIE approach based on internal dose metrics predictions provides excellent opportunities to investigate the consequences of variations in human dermal exposure scenarios. It can accommodate within-day variation in plasma concentrations and is scientifically more robust than assuming just an exposure in mg/kg bw/day. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring of radioactive contamination and radiation exposure. Tasks, technical aspects, implementation; Ueberwachung radioaktiver Kontamination und Strahlenexposition. Aufgaben, Techniken, Umsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, A.

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring of environmental radioactivity in Germany started in the early Fifties with measurements of radioactive fallout, i.e. mainly airborne particles and precipitation. Since then, scientists of laboratories, universities, research institutions and authorities have become aware of the danger of increasing environmental radioactivity. The Deutscher Wetterdienst (DWD) was commissioned by law with monitoring of radioactivity in atmosphere and precipitation on a large-scale basis as part of general preventive health protection. This brochure informs on the tasks, techniques and implementation of monitoring of radioactive contamination and radiation exposure. (orig.)

  6. Toxic cyanobacterial breakthrough and accumulation in a drinking water plant: a monitoring and treatment challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamyadi, Arash; MacLeod, Sherri L; Fan, Yan; McQuaid, Natasha; Dorner, Sarah; Sauvé, Sébastien; Prévost, Michèle

    2012-04-01

    The detection of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins has intensified in recent years in both drinking water sources and the raw water of drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs). The objectives of this study were to: 1) estimate the breakthrough and accumulation of toxic cyanobacteria in water, scums and sludge inside a DWTP, and 2) to determine whether chlorination can be an efficient barrier to the prevention of cyanotoxin breakthrough in drinking water. In a full scale DWTP, the fate of cyanobacteria and their associated toxins was studied after the addition of coagulant and powdered activated carbon, post clarification, within the clarifier sludge bed, after filtration and final chlorination. Elevated cyanobacterial cell numbers (4.7 × 10(6)cells/mL) and total microcystins concentrations (up to 10 mg/L) accumulated in the clarifiers of the treatment plant. Breakthrough of cells and toxins in filtered water was observed. Also, a total microcystins concentration of 2.47 μg/L was measured in chlorinated drinking water. Cyanobacterial cells and toxins from environmental bloom samples were more resistant to chlorination than results obtained using laboratory cultured cells and dissolved standard toxins.

  7. Facility monitoring of toxic industrial compounds in air using an automated, fieldable, miniature mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jonell N; Keil, Adam; Likens, Jane; Noll, Robert J; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-05-01

    Gaseous samples of nine toxic industrial compounds (acrolein, acrylonitrile, carbon disulfide, cyanogen chloride, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, hydrogen cyanide, phosgene, and sulfur dioxide) were detected, identified, and quantitated using a fully automated, fieldable, miniature mass spectrometer equipped with a glow discharge electron ionization source and a cylindrical ion trap mass analyzer. The instrument was outfitted with a combined direct air leak and dual thermal desorption tube inlet that allowed for continuous sampling of compounds with throughput times of 2 min or less. Most compounds showed a linear response over the concentration ranges studied (sub-parts per billion [ppb] to parts per million [ppm]). Sorbent tube limits of detection (20 ppb to 8 ppm for all analytes) were lower than those reported for the two compounds examined using direct leak (acrylonitrile 16 ppm and phosgene 500 ppb). All limits of detection were below the concentration at which the compound poses an immediate danger to life and health. Sensitivity, probability of true positives, and the false positive rate for each analyte were investigated and described using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. High quality data with low false positive and negative rates are indicative of the good chemical specificity and sensitivity of the instrument. Complex matrices consisting of second-hand smoke, gasoline exhaust, diesel fuel exhaust, and multiple analytes were also studied. Detection limits for analytes generally increased in the mixtures, but analytes were still detected at concentrations as low as 100 ppb.

  8. Insufficient fluconazole exposure in pediatric cancer patients and the need for therapeutic drug monitoring in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Elst, Kim CM; Pereboom, Marieke; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Kosterink, Jos G W; Scholvinck, Elisabeth H.; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C

    2014-01-01

    Background. Fluconazole is recommended as first-line treatment in invasive candidiasis in children and infants. Although timely achievement of adequate exposure of fluconazole improves outcome, therapeutic drug monitoring is currently not recommended. Methods. We conducted a retrospective study of c

  9. Effects of Parental Monitoring and Exposure to Community Violence on Antisocial Behavior and Anxiety/Depression among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchini, Dario; Miranda, Maria Concetta; Affuso, Gaetana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of gender, exposure to community violence, and parental monitoring upon antisocial behavior and anxiety/depression in adolescence. Involved in the study were 489 adolescents (290 males and 189 females) from 4 secondary schools in the city of Naples, Italy. The age of participants ranged from…

  10. Community Violence Exposure and Adolescent Substance Use: Does Monitoring and Positive Parenting Moderate Risk in Urban Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rosalyn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether monitoring and positive parenting moderate the relationship between community violence exposure (CVE) and youth substance use. Analyses utilized a subsample (N = 2197) of a cross-sectional, ethnically diverse, urban school district sample. Dependent variables were any past year alcohol or drug use (AOD) and binge…

  11. Effects of Parental Monitoring and Exposure to Community Violence on Antisocial Behavior and Anxiety/Depression among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchini, Dario; Miranda, Maria Concetta; Affuso, Gaetana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to investigate the influence of gender, exposure to community violence, and parental monitoring upon antisocial behavior and anxiety/depression in adolescence. Involved in the study were 489 adolescents (290 males and 189 females) from 4 secondary schools in the city of Naples, Italy. The age of participants ranged from…

  12. Internal exposure in nuclear medicine: application of IAEA criteria to determine the need for internal monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Maranhão Dantas

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The manipulation of unsealed sources in nuclear medicine poses significant risks of internal exposure to the staff. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency, the radiological protection program should include an evaluation of such risks and an individual monitoring plan, assuring acceptable radiological safety conditions in the workplace. The IAEA Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 recommends that occupational monitoring should be implemented whenever it is likely that committed effective doses from annual intakes of radionuclides would exceed 1 mSv. It also suggests a mathematical criterion to determine the need to implement internal monitoring. This paper presents a simulation of the IAEA criteria applied to commonly used radionuclides in nuclear medicine, taking into consideration usual manipulated activities and handling conditions. It is concluded that the manipulation of 131I for therapy presents the higher risk of internal exposure to the workers, requiring the implementation of an internal monitoring program by the Nuclear Medicine Centers.A manipulação de fontes abertas em Serviços de Medicina Nuclear envolve riscos de exposição externa e contaminação interna. O plano de proteção radiológica das Instalações licenciadas pela CNEN deve incluir a avaliação de tais riscos e propor um programa de monitoração individual de forma a controlar as exposições e garantir a manutenção das condições de segurança radiológica. As recomendações da AIEA apresentadas no Safety Guide RS-G-1.2 sugerem que seja implementado um programa de monitoração interna do trabalhador sempre que houver possibilidade da contaminação interna conduzir a valores de dose efetiva comprometida anual igual ou superior a 1 mSv. Este trabalho apresenta a simulação da aplicação de tais critérios para os radionuclídeos mais utilizados na área de Medicina Nuclear, levando-se em consideração as condições usuais de manipulação das fontes e as

  13. Can commercial low-cost sensor platforms contribute to air quality monitoring and exposure estimates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, Nuria; Dauge, Franck R; Schneider, Philipp; Vogt, Matthias; Lerner, Uri; Fishbain, Barak; Broday, David; Bartonova, Alena

    2017-02-01

    The emergence of low-cost, user-friendly and very compact air pollution platforms enable observations at high spatial resolution in near-real-time and provide new opportunities to simultaneously enhance existing monitoring systems, as well as engage citizens in active environmental monitoring. This provides a whole new set of capabilities in the assessment of human exposure to air pollution. However, the data generated by these platforms are often of questionable quality. We have conducted an exhaustive evaluation of 24 identical units of a commercial low-cost sensor platform against CEN (European Standardization Organization) reference analyzers, evaluating their measurement capability over time and a range of environmental conditions. Our results show that their performance varies spatially and temporally, as it depends on the atmospheric composition and the meteorological conditions. Our results show that the performance varies from unit to unit, which makes it necessary to examine the data quality of each node before its use. In general, guidance is lacking on how to test such sensor nodes and ensure adequate performance prior to marketing these platforms. We have implemented and tested diverse metrics in order to assess if the sensor can be employed for applications that require high accuracy (i.e., to meet the Data Quality Objectives defined in air quality legislation, epidemiological studies) or lower accuracy (i.e., to represent the pollution level on a coarse scale, for purposes such as awareness raising). Data quality is a pertinent concern, especially in citizen science applications, where citizens are collecting and interpreting the data. In general, while low-cost platforms present low accuracy for regulatory or health purposes they can provide relative and aggregated information about the observed air quality.

  14. PRD3000: A novel Personnel Radiation Detector with Radiation Exposure Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Micou, C.; Schulcz, F.; Fellinger, J. [Mirion Technologies - MGPI SA (France)

    2015-07-01

    PRD3000{sup TM} is a novel Personal Radiation Detector (PRD) with personnel radiation dose exposure monitoring. It is intended for First Responders, Law Enforcement, Customs Inspectors protecting critical infrastructures for detecting unexpected radioactive sources, who also need real time Hp(10) dose equivalent information. Traditional PRD devices use scintillator materials instrumented through either a photomultiplier tube or a photodiode photodetector. While the former is bulky and sensitive to magnetic fields, the latter has to compromise radiation sensitivity and energy threshold given its current noise per unit of photo-detection surface. Recently, solid state photodetectors (SiPM), based on arrays of Geiger operated diodes, have emerged as a scalable digital photodetector for photon counting. Their strong breakdown voltage temperature dependence (on the order of tens of milli-volts per K) has however limited their use for portable instruments where strong temperature gradients can be experienced, and limited power is available to temperature stabilize. The PRD3000 is based on the industry standard DMC3000 active dosimeter that complies with IEC 61526 Ed. 3 and ANSI 42.20 for direct reading personal dose equivalent meters and active personnel radiation monitors. An extension module is based on a CsI(Tl) scintillator readout by a temperature compensated SiPM. Preliminary nuclear tests combined with a measured continuous operation in excess of 240 hours from a single AAA battery cell indicate that the PRD3000 complies with the IEC 62401 Ed.2 and ANSI 42.32 without sacrificing battery life time. We present a summary of the device test results, starting with performance stability over a temperature range of - 20 deg. C to 50 deg. C, false alarm rates and dynamic response time. (authors)

  15. [Methodological aspects in environmental and biological monitoring of exposure to low doses of benzene: problems and possible solutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranfo, Giovanna; Paci, Enrico; Fustinoni, Silvia; Barbieri, Anna; Carrieri, Mariella

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some methods to measure human exposure to benzene, both in life and occupational environments, through environmental and biological monitoring, examining the critical issues and optimal conditions of use. The overall performance of environmental monitoring, from the analytical point of view, strongly depend on the choice of an appropriate method of sampling and analysis. Urinary SPMA and t, t-MA are the biomarkers listed by ACGIH to evaluate occupational exposure: most of the recent studies use HPLC with tandem mass spectrometry, but since t, t-MA is present in the urine in larger quantities it is also determinable with UV detectors. The urinary benzene is an index not officially included in the list of the ACGIH BEIs, but it is useful to assess exposure and benzene at low concentrations, that most frequently are found today in the occupational and life environments.

  16. Establishing an air pollution monitoring network for intra-urban population exposure assessment : a location-allocation approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanaroglou, P.S. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). School of Geography and Geology; Jerrett, M.; Beckerman, B.; Arain, M.A. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). School of Geography and Geology]|[McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). McMaster Inst. of Environment and Health; Morrison, J. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada). School of Computer Science; Gilbert, N.L. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Air Health Effects Div; Brook, J.R. [Meteorological Service of Canada, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2004-10-01

    A study was conducted to assess the relation between traffic-generated air pollution and health reactions ranging from childhood asthma to mortality from lung cancer. In particular, it developed a formal method of optimally locating a dense network of air pollution monitoring stations in order to derive an exposure assessment model based on the data obtained from the monitoring stations and related land use, population and biophysical information. The method for determining the locations of 100 nitrogen dioxide monitors in Toronto, Ontario focused on land use, transportation infrastructure and the distribution of at-risk populations. The exposure assessment produced reasonable estimates at the intra-urban scale. This method for locating air pollution monitors effectively maximizes sampling coverage in relation to important socio-demographic characteristics and likely pollution variability. The location-allocation approach integrates many variables into the demand surface to reconfigure a monitoring network and is especially useful for measuring traffic pollutants with fine-scale spatial variability. The method also shows great promise for improving the assessment of exposure to ambient air pollution in epidemiologic studies. 19 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  17. Exposure to ethylene oxide in hospitals: biological monitoring and influence of glutathione S-transferase and epoxide hydrolase polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haufroid, Vincent; Merz, Brigitte; Hofmann, Annette; Tschopp, Alois; Lison, Dominique; Hotz, Philippe

    2007-04-01

    Ethylene oxide is considered as a human carcinogen. A biomarker of exposure would be a useful instrument to assess the risk in occupationally exposed workers. This cross-sectional study aimed at examining (a) whether the urinary excretion of a metabolite of ethylene oxide, 2-hydroxyethyl mercapturic acid (HEMA), could be used for monitoring occupational exposure and (b) whether glutathione S-transferase (GST) and epoxide hydrolase genotypes influenced biological monitoring. Exposure to ethylene oxide was measured by personal sampling in 80 hospital workers (95% of those eligible). HEMA concentrations were determined in three urine samples (baseline, end of shift, and next morning) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. GSTs (GSTT1, GSTM1, and GSTP1) and epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) were also genotyped. The influence of exposure, genotypes, and several other factors was examined in multiple regression analyses. Exposure was always <1 parts per million. On a group basis, exposure and a non-null GSTT1 genotype increased the HEMA concentrations in the urine sample collected at the end of the shift and these factors remained statistically significant after considering possible confounding or modifying factors.

  18. Epigenetic toxicity of environmental chemicals upon exposure during development - Bisphenol A and valproic acid may have epigenetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideta-Otsuka, Maky; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Narita, Minoru; Hirabayashi, Yoko

    2017-09-06

    As of 2017, chemical substances registered in Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) exceed 100 million, which is increasing yearly. The safety of chemical substances is adequately managed by regulations based on scientific information from toxicity tests. However, there are substances reported to have "biological effects" even though they are judged to be nontoxic in conventional toxicity tests. Therefore, it is necessary to consider a new concept on toxicity, "epigenetic toxicity". In this review, we explain about epigenetic toxicity using bisphenol A