WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring support chemical

  1. Monitoring advances in chemical engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, H.P.F.; Hartmann, D; Van Raan, A.F.J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to monitoring scientific progress in chemical engineering in order to operationalize concepts such as 'research performance' which can be used in the retrospective evaluation and the future anticipation of scientific research activities. We focus on various quantitative methods. Bibliometric methods form an important, but not the only, part of the work. The use of bibliometric approaches and measures is plagued by many problems. This is es...

  2. Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Thomas B [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-08-15

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) measures particle mass loading and chemical composition in real time for non-refractory sub-micron aerosol particles. The ACSM is designed for long-term unattended deployment and routine monitoring applications.

  3. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume V. Supporting data for estuarine hydrology, discharge plume analysis, chemical oceanography, biological oceanography, and data management. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume V contains appendices for the following: supporting data for estuarine hydrology and hydrography; supporting data analysis of discharge plume; supporting data for water and sediment chemistry; CTD/DO and pH profiles during biological monitoring; supporting data for nekton; and supporting data for data management.

  4. Physical/chemical closed-loop life support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, James G.

    1988-01-01

    Information on physical/chemical closed-loop life support systems are given in viewgraph form. Information is given on program objectives, the elements of a life support system, and Pathfinder program elements.

  5. Fault Detection for Shipboard Monitoring and Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran; Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a basic idea of a fault-tolerant monitoring and decision support system will be explained. Fault detection is an important part of the fault-tolerant design for in-service monitoring and decision support systems for ships. In the paper, a virtual example of fault detection will be p...

  6. Supporting chemical process design under uncertainty

    OpenAIRE

    Wechsung,A.; Oldenburg, J; J. Yu; Polt,A.

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in chemical process design is to make design decisions based on partly incomplete or imperfect design input data. Still, process engineers are expected to design safe, dependable and cost-efficient processes under these conditions. The complexity of typical process models limits intuitive engineering estimates to judge the impact of uncertain parameters on the proposed design. In this work, an approach to quantify the effect of uncertainty on a process design in order to enh...

  7. Automated chemical monitoring in new projects of nuclear power plant units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanok, O. I.; Fedoseev, M. V.

    2013-07-01

    The development of automated chemical monitoring systems in nuclear power plant units for the past 30 years is briefly described. The modern level of facilities used to support the operation of automated chemical monitoring systems in Russia and abroad is shown. Hardware solutions suggested by the All-Russia Institute for Nuclear Power Plant Operation (which is the General Designer of automated process control systems for power units used in the AES-2006 and VVER-TOI Projects) are presented, including the structure of additional equipment for monitoring water chemistry (taking the Novovoronezh 2 nuclear power plant as an example). It is shown that the solutions proposed with respect to receiving and processing of input measurement signals and subsequent construction of standard control loops are unified in nature. Simultaneous receipt of information from different sources for ensuring that water chemistry is monitored in sufficient scope and with required promptness is one of the problems that have been solved successfully. It is pointed out that improved quality of automated chemical monitoring can be supported by organizing full engineering follow-up of the automated chemical monitoring system's equipment throughout its entire service life.

  8. Performance Monitoring Techniques Supporting Cognitive Optical Networking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caballero Jambrina, Antonio; Borkowski, Robert; Zibar, Darko

    2013-01-01

    to solve this issue by realizing a network that can observe, act, learn and optimize its performance, taking into account end-to-end goals. In this letter we present the approach of cognition applied to heterogeneous optical networks developed in the framework of the EU project CHRON: Cognitive...... Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical Network. We focus on the approaches developed in the project for optical performance monitoring, which enable the feedback from the physical layer to the cognitive decision system by providing accurate description of the performance of the established lightpaths.......High degree of heterogeneity of future optical networks, such as services with different quality-of-transmission requirements, modulation formats and switching techniques, will pose a challenge for the control and optimization of different parameters. Incorporation of cognitive techniques can help...

  9. Does an irreversible chemical cycle support equilibrium?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2013-01-01

    The impossibility of attaining equilibrium for cyclic chemical reaction networks with irreversible steps is apparently due to a divergent entropy production rate. A deeper reason seems to be the violation of the detailed balance condition. In this work, we discuss how the standard theoretical framework can be adapted to include irreversible cycles, avoiding the divergence. With properly redefined force terms, such systems are also seen to reach and sustain equilibria that are characterized by the vanishing of the entropy production rate, though detailed balance is not maintained. Equivalence of the present formulation with Onsager's original prescription is established for both reversible and irreversible cycles, with a few adjustments in the latter case. Further justification of the attainment of true equilibrium is provided with the help of the minimum entropy production principle. All the results are generalized for an irreversible cycle comprising of N number of species.

  10. Instrumentation for monitoring powered support behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smart, B.G.D.; Sommerville, J. M.; McGraw, W.M.

    1987-06-01

    The parameters quantifying powered support performance can be efficiently gathered underground on working faces with an electronic data logger. The paper reports modifications to a British Coal/Rapco Data Logger, to existing analogue transducers, and the development of new transducers to enable various parameters to be logged and related to mining operations. The paper also reports on the management and interpretation of the logged data by a suite of computer programs developed around a P.C. workstation. Conclusions as to the suitability of the system are drawn and recommendations about future transducer development are made. 1 ref.

  11. Self-Monitoring Support for Learning to Write

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kwangsu; Cho, Moon-Heum; Hacker, Douglas J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the role of self-monitoring (SM) support for writing skill improvement in a reciprocal peer review of writing system called scaffolded writing and revision in the disciplines (SWoRD). Based on previous literature on the key role of SM in self-regulated learning, students were provided with opportunities to self-monitor their…

  12. Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Haruo; Yamada, Kenichi; Hori, Hajime; Kumagai, Shinji; Murata, Masaru; Nagoya, Toshio; Nakahara, Hirohiko; Mochida, Nobuyuki

    2017-08-31

    This Document, "Guidelines for personal exposure monitoring of chemicals" ("this Guideline"), has been prepared by "The Committee for Personal Exposure Monitoring" ("the Committee") of the Expert Division of Occupational Hygiene & Ergonomics, Japan Society for Occupational Health.Considering the background of the growing importance of personal exposure monitoring in risk assessment and the need to prepare for the introduction of monitoring using personal samplers from an administrative perspective in recent years, the Committee was organized in November 2012. The Committee has prepared this Guideline as a "practical guideline" for personal exposure monitoring, so as to offer proposals and recommendations to the members of the Japan Society for Occupational Health and to society in general.The scope of this Guideline covers all chemical substances and all related workplaces regarded as targets for general assessment and the management of risk. It thus is not to be considered to comment on legal regulations and methodology. The main text provides the basic methods and concepts of personal exposure monitoring, while 31 "Appendices" are provided later in this Guideline throughout the series; technical descriptions, statistical bases, and actual workplace examples are provided in these appendices, to assist better understanding.The personal exposure monitoring described as per this Guideline is equivalent to an "expert-centered basic method to reasonably proceed with the assessment and management of risk at workplaces." It is considered that practicing and expanding on this method will significantly contribute in reforming the overall framework of occupational hygiene management in Japan.

  13. Spatially resolved chemical reaction monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feindel, Kirk W

    2016-06-01

    Over the previous three decades, the use of MRI for studying dynamic physical and chemical processes of materials systems has grown significantly. This mini-review provides a brief introduction to relevant principles of MRI, including methods of spatial localization, factors contributing to image contrast, and chemical shift imaging. A few historical examples of (1) H MRI for reaction monitoring will be presented, followed by a review of recent research including (1) H MRI studies of gelation and biofilms, (1) H, (7) Li, and (11) B MRI studies of electrochemical systems, in vivo glucose metabolism monitored with (19) F MRI, and in situ temperature monitoring with (27) Al MRI. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Fault-Tolerant Onboard Monitoring and Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran

    The purpose of this research project is to improve current onboard decision support systems. Special focus is on the onboard prediction of the instantaneous sea state. In this project a new approach to increasing the overall reliability of a monitoring and decision support system has been...

  15. 23 CFR 230.206 - Monitoring supportive services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Monitoring supportive services. 230.206 Section 230.206 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS EXTERNAL PROGRAMS Supportive Services for Minority, Disadvantaged, and Women Business Enterprises § 230.206...

  16. Chemical sensor network for pH monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Manjarrés

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of water sources is a major concern worldwide. Wireless sensor networks (WSN may be used for this monitoring. However, current systems employ mainly physical sensors for variables such as temperature, pressure, humidity and light. Wireless chemical sensors networks (WCSNs for environmental monitoring are scarce due to the lack of autonomy of conventional sensors. This paper presents results of a WCSN for monitoring pH based on ion selective field effect transistors (ISFETs. Sensing nodes employ a human interface required for in situ calibration of chemical sensors. Unlike most studies, our work evaluates the network employing chemical measurements and wireless network metrics. Results show zero packet losses by using a time division multiple access (TDMA protocol. The network allows wireless communication within 300 m including attenuation from buildings and trees. Therefore, the system presented in this paper is suitable for long range applications with unobstructed line of sight. pH measurements present a standard deviation below 1%, showing high repeatability. When compared to a commercial pH meter, difference in measurements is below 5%. As a consequence, accuracy is adequate for the application. Measurements also presented high stability during 3 h of continuous measurement.

  17. Monitoring Grinding Wheel Redress-life Using Support Vector Machines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun Chen; Thitikorn Limchimchol

    2006-01-01

    Condition monitoring is a very important aspect in automated manufacturing processes. Any malfunction of a machining process will deteriorate production quality and efficiency. This paper presents an application of support vector machines in grinding process monitoring. The paper starts with an overview of grinding behaviour. Grinding force is analysed through a Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT) to identify features for condition monitoring. The Support Vector Machine (SVM) methodology is introduced as a powerful tool for the classification of different wheel wear situations.After training with available signal data, the SVM is able to identify the state of a grinding process. The requirement and strategy for using SVM for grinding process monitoring is discussed, while the result of the example illustrates how effective SVMs can be in determining wheel redress-life.

  18. Advanced physical-chemical life support systems research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evanich, Peggy L.

    1988-01-01

    A proposed NASA space research and technology development program will provide adequate data for designing closed loop life support systems for long-duration manned space missions. This program, referred to as the Pathfinder Physical-Chemical Closed Loop Life Support Program, is to identify and develop critical chemical engineering technologies for the closure of air and water loops within the spacecraft, surface habitats or mobility devices. Computerized simulation can be used both as a research and management tool. Validated models will guide the selection of the best known applicable processes and in the development of new processes. For the integration of the habitat system, a biological subsystem would be introduced to provide food production and to enhance the physical-chemical life support functions on an ever-increasing basis.

  19. Fault-Tolerant Onboard Monitoring and Decision Support Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lajic, Zoran

    a crude and simple estimation of the actual sea state (Hs and Tz), information about the longitudinal hull girder loading, seakeeping performance of the ship, and decision support on how to operate the ship within acceptable limits. The system is able to identify critical forthcoming events and to give...... advice regarding speed and course changes to decrease the wave-induced loads. The SeaSense system is based on the combined use of a mathematical model and measurements from a set of sensors. The overall dependability of a shipboard monitoring and decision support system such as the SeaSense system can......The purpose of this research project is to improve current onboard decision support systems. Special focus is on the onboard prediction of the instantaneous sea state. In this project a new approach to increasing the overall reliability of a monitoring and decision support system has been...

  20. Tolkku - a toolbox for decision support from condition monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarela, Olli; Lehtonen, Mikko; Halme, Jari; Aikala, Antti; Raivio, Kimmo

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes a software toolbox (a software library) designed for condition monitoring and diagnosis of machines. This toolbox implements both new methods and prior art and is aimed for practical down-to-earth data analysis work. The target is to improve knowledge of the operation and behaviour of machines and processes throughout their entire life-cycles. The toolbox supports different phases of condition based maintenance with tools that extract essential information and automate data processing. The paper discusses principles that have guided toolbox design and the implemented toolbox structure. Case examples are used to illustrate how condition monitoring applications can be built using the toolbox. In the first case study the toolbox is applied to fault detection of industrial centrifuges based on measured electrical current. The second case study outlines an application for centralized monitoring of a fleet of machines that supports organizational learning.

  1. Photonic crystal fiber based chloride chemical sensors for corrosion monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion of steel is one of the most important durability issues in reinforced concrete (RC) structures because aggressive ions such as chloride ions permeate concrete and corrode steel, consequently accelerating the destruction of structures, especially in marine environments. There are many practical methods for corrosion monitoring in RC structures, mostly focusing on electrochemical-based sensors for monitoring the chloride ion which is thought as one of the most important factors resulting in steel corrosion. In this work, we report a fiber-optic chloride chemical sensor based on long period gratings inscribed in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with a chloride sensitive thin film. Numerical simulation is performed to determine the characteristics and resonance spectral response versus the refractive indices of the analyte solution flowing through into the holes in the PCF. The effective refractive index of the cladding mode of the LPGs changes with variations of the analyte solution concentration, resulting in a shift of the resonance wavelength, hence providing the sensor signal. This fiber-optic chemical sensor has a fast response, is easy to prepare and is not susceptible to electromagnetic environment, and can therefore be of use for structural health monitoring of RC structures subjected to such aggressive environments.

  2. Evolutionary Support Vector Machines for Transient Stability Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dora Arul Selvi, B.; Kamaraj, N.

    2012-03-01

    Currently, power systems are in the need of fast and reliable contingency monitoring systems for the purpose of maintaining stability in the presence of deregulated and open market environment. In this paper, a quick and unfailing transient stability monitoring algorithm that considers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults is presented. support vector machines (SVMs) are employed as pattern classifiers so as to construct fast relation mappings between the transient stability results and the selected input attributes using mutual information. The type of fault is recognized by a SVM classifier and the critical clearing time of the fault is estimated by a support vector regression machine. The SVM parameters are tuned by an elitist multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm in such a manner that the best classification and regression performance are accomplished. To demonstrate the good potential of the scheme, IEEE 3 generator system and a South Indian Grid are utilized.

  3. Smokefree implementation in Colombia: Monitoring, outside funding, and business support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uang, Randy; Crosbie, Eric; Glantz, Stanton A

    2017-01-01

    To analyze successful national smokefree policy implementation in Colombia, a middle income country. Key informants at the national and local levels were interviewed and news sources and government ministry resolutions were reviewed. Colombia's Ministry of Health coordinated local implementation practices, which were strongest in larger cities with supportive leadership. Nongovernmental organizations provided technical assistance and highlighted noncompliance. Organizations outside Colombia funded some of these efforts. The bar owners' association provided concerted education campaigns. Tobacco interests did not openly challenge implementation. Health organization monitoring, external funding, and hospitality industry support contributed to effective implementation, and could be cultivated in other low and middle income countries.

  4. A Self-Calibrating Remote Control Chemical Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jessica Croft

    2007-06-01

    The Susie Mine, part of the Upper Tenmile Mining Area, is located in Rimini, MT about 15 miles southwest of Helena, MT. The Upper Tenmile Creek Mining Area is an EPA Superfund site with 70 abandoned hard rock mines and several residential yards prioritized for clean up. Water from the Susie mine flows into Tenmile Creek from which the city of Helena draws part of its water supply. MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana was contracted by the EPA to build a treatment system for the Susie mine effluent and demonstrate a system capable of treating mine waste water in remote locations. The Idaho National Lab was contracted to design, build and demonstrate a low maintenance self-calibrating monitoring system that would monitor multiple sample points, allow remote two-way communications with the control software and allow access to the collected data through a web site. The Automated Chemical Analysis Monitoring (ACAM) system was installed in December 2006. This thesis documents the overall design of the hardware, control software and website, the data collected while MSE-TA’s system was operational, the data collected after MSE-TA’s system was shut down and suggested improvements to the existing system.

  5. Coping strategies, social support and responsibility in chemical intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Maria; Andersson, Linus; Nordin, Steven

    2010-08-01

    To study coping strategies, social support and responsibility for improvement in chemical intolerance (CI). Limited knowledge of CI among health professionals and lay persons places demands on the chemically intolerant individual's coping strategies and perception of social support and ability to take responsibility for improvement. However, there is sparse literature on these issues in CI. A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, quasi-experimental study. Fifty-nine persons with mild, 92 with moderate and 31 with severe CI participated by rating (i) usage and effectiveness of six problem- and six emotion-focused coping strategies, (ii) emotional, instrumental and informative support provided by various sources and (iii) society's and the inflicted individual's responsibility for improvement. The participants reported that the most commonly used and effective coping strategies were avoiding odorous/pungent environments and asking persons to limit their use of odorous/pungent substances (problem-focused strategies) as well as accepting the situation and reprioritising (emotion-focused strategies). High intolerance severity was associated with problem-focused coping strategies and relatively low intolerance with emotion-focused strategies. More emotional than instrumental and informative support was perceived, predominantly from the partner and other family members. Responsibility attributed to society was also found to increase from mild to moderate/severe intolerance. Certain coping strategies are more commonly used and perceived as more effective than others in CI. However, intolerance severity plays a role regarding both coping strategies and responsibility. Emotional support appears to be the most available type of support. For improved care, certain coping strategies may be suggested by nurses, the healthcare system needs to provide better social support to these patients and the issue of responsibility for improvement may be discussed with the patient.

  6. Smokefree implementation in Colombia: Monitoring, outside funding, and business support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy Uang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze successful national smokefree policy implementation in Colombia, a middle income country. Materials and methods. Key informants at the national and local levels were interviewed and news sources and government ministry resolutions were reviewed. Results.Colombia’s Ministry of Health coordinated local implementation practices, which were strongest in larger cities with supportive leadership. Nongovernmental organizations provided technical assistance and highlighted noncompliance. Organizations outside Colombia funded some of these efforts. The bar owners’ association provided concerted education campaigns. Tobacco interests did not openly challenge implementation. Conclusions. Health organization monitoring, external funding, and hospitality industry support contributed to effective implementation, and could be cultivated in other low and middle income countries.

  7. Decision Support for Flood Event Prediction and Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mioc, Darka; Anton, François; Liang, Gengsheng

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the development of Web GIS based decision support system for flood events is presented. To improve flood prediction we developed the decision support system for flood prediction and monitoring that integrates hydrological modelling and CARIS GIS. We present the methodology for data...... integration, floodplain delineation, and online map interfaces. Our Web-based GIS model can dynamically display observed and predicted flood extents for decision makers and the general public. The users can access Web-based GIS that models current flood events and displays satellite imagery and digital...... elevation model integrated with flood plain area. The system can show how the flooding prediction based on the output from hydrological modeling for the next 48 hours along the lower Saint John River Valley....

  8. A MAC Protocol to Support Monitoring of Underwater Spaces †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo; Orozco, Javier; Ochoa, Sergio F.; Meseguer, Roc; Eggly, Gabriel; Pistonesi, Marcelo F.

    2016-01-01

    Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of their everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills), oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geolocalization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. The challenge of performing underwater communications is well known, provided that radio signals are useless in this medium, and a wired solution is too expensive. Therefore, the sensors in these networks transmit their information using acoustic signals that propagate well under water. This data transmission type not only brings an opportunity, but also several challenges to the implementation of these networks, e.g., in terms of energy consumption, data transmission and signal interference. In order to help advance the knowledge in the design and implementation of these networks for monitoring underwater spaces, this paper proposes a MAC protocol for acoustic communications between the nodes, based on a self-organized time division multiple access mechanism. The proposal was evaluated using simulations of a real monitoring scenario, and the obtained results are highly encouraging. PMID:27355950

  9. A MAC Protocol to Support Monitoring of Underwater Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of their everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills, oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geolocalization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. The challenge of performing underwater communications is well known, provided that radio signals are useless in this medium, and a wired solution is too expensive. Therefore, the sensors in these networks transmit their information using acoustic signals that propagate well under water. This data transmission type not only brings an opportunity, but also several challenges to the implementation of these networks, e.g., in terms of energy consumption, data transmission and signal interference. In order to help advance the knowledge in the design and implementation of these networks for monitoring underwater spaces, this paper proposes a MAC protocol for acoustic communications between the nodes, based on a self-organized time division multiple access mechanism. The proposal was evaluated using simulations of a real monitoring scenario, and the obtained results are highly encouraging.

  10. A MAC Protocol to Support Monitoring of Underwater Spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Rodrigo; Orozco, Javier; Ochoa, Sergio F; Meseguer, Roc; Eggly, Gabriel; Pistonesi, Marcelo F

    2016-01-01

    Underwater sensor networks are becoming an important field of research, because of their everyday increasing application scope. Examples of their application areas are environmental and pollution monitoring (mainly oil spills), oceanographic data collection, support for submarine geolocalization, ocean sampling and early tsunamis alert. The challenge of performing underwater communications is well known, provided that radio signals are useless in this medium, and a wired solution is too expensive. Therefore, the sensors in these networks transmit their information using acoustic signals that propagate well under water. This data transmission type not only brings an opportunity, but also several challenges to the implementation of these networks, e.g., in terms of energy consumption, data transmission and signal interference. In order to help advance the knowledge in the design and implementation of these networks for monitoring underwater spaces, this paper proposes a MAC protocol for acoustic communications between the nodes, based on a self-organized time division multiple access mechanism. The proposal was evaluated using simulations of a real monitoring scenario, and the obtained results are highly encouraging.

  11. Using Cloud Technology to Support Monitoring During High Profile Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Megan; Adighibe, Enyinnaya; Lombardo, Joseph; Loschen, Wayne; Stewart, Miles; Vernon, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In May 2012, thousands of protesters, descended on Chicago during the NATO Summit to voice their concern about social and economic inequality. Given the increased numbers of international and domestic visitors to the Windy City and the tension surrounding protesting during the summit, increased monitoring for health events within the city and Chicago metropolitan region was advised. This project represents the first use of cloud technology to support monitoring for a high profile event. Introduction Hospital emergency departments in Cook and surrounding counties currently send data to the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) instance of ESSENCE on CCDPH servers. The cloud instance of ESSENCE has been enhanced to receive and export all meaningful use data elements in the meaningful use format. The NATO summit provided the opportunity for a demonstration project to assess the ability of an Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE to ingest and process meaningful use data, and to export meaningful use surveillance data to the Cook County Locker in BioSense 2.0. Methods In the three weeks leading up to the NATO Summit, HL7 data extracts were sent to BioSense 2.0 and a data feed was established to the Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE. Queries specific to anticipated health events associated with the summit such as injuries, tear gas exposure, and general exposure, were developed. Several features of the cloud instance of ESSENCE enhanced the ability of CCDPH staff epidemiologists to conduct analyses, including the sharing capabilities of queries and the myESSENCE dashboard feature. The sharing capabilities within the cloud instance of ESSENCE allowed queries to be easily shared with multiple staff epidemiologists and across health jurisdictions. The myESSENCE dashboard feature was used to create dashboards of surveillance results, including time series graphs, maps, and records of interest for relevant queries, that were shared with public health

  12. A Collaborative Decision Environment to Support UAV Wildfire Monitoring Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, C. R.; Enomoto, F. Y.; D'Ortenzio, M. V.; Nguyen, Q. B.

    2006-12-01

    NASA developed the Collaborative Decision Environment (CDE), the ground-based component of its Intelligent Mission Management (IMM) technology for science missions employing long endurance unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). The CDE was used to support science mission planning and decision-making for a NASA- and U.S. Forest Service-sponsored mission to monitor wildfires in the western United States using a multi- spectral imager flown onboard the General Atomics Altair UAV in summer of 2006. The CDE is a ground-based system that provides the mission/science team with situational awareness, collaboration, and decision tools. The CDE is used for pre-flight planning, mission monitoring, and visualization of acquired data. It integrates external data products used for planning and executing a mission, such as weather, large wildfire locations, satellite-derived fire detection data, temporarily restricted airspace, and satellite imagery. While a prototype CDE was developed as a Java-based client/server application in 2004-2005, the team investigated the use of Google Earth to take advantage of its 3-D visualization capabilities, friendly user interface, and enhanced graphics performance. External data is acquired via the Internet by leveraging established and emerging Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards and is re-formatted into the Keyhole Markup Language (KML) specification used by Google Earth. Aircraft flight position and sensor data products are relayed from the instrument ground station to CDE servers where they are made available to users. An instant messaging chat server is used to facilitate real-time communication between remote users. This paper will present an overview of the CDE system architecture, and discuss how science user input was crucial to shaping and developing the system. Examples from the UAV mission will be used to illustrate the presentation. Plans for future development work to improve mission operations, such as integration with

  13. Combination Method of Principal Component Analysis and Support Vector Machine for On-line Process Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    On-line monitoring and fault diagnosis of chemical process is extremely important for operation safety and product quality. Principal component analysis (PCA) has been widely used in multivariate statistical process monitoring for its ability to reduce processes dimensions. PCA and other statistical techniques, however, have difficulties in differentiating faults correctly in complex chemical process.Support vector machine (SVM) is a novel approach based on statistical learning theory, which has emerged for feature identification and classification. In this paper, an integrated method is applied for process monitoring and fault diagnosis, which combines PCA for fault feature extraction and multiple SVMs for identification of different fault sources. This approach is verified and illustrated on the Tennessee Eastman benchmark process as a case study.Results show that the proposed PCA-SVMs method has good diagnosis capability and overall diagnosis correctness rate.

  14. Decision support system for monitoring environmental-human interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delavari-Edalat, Farideh; Abdi, M Reza

    2009-06-01

    The specific aim of this study is to investigate popular attitudes toward trees. The paper is involved the understanding of biophilia tendencies with respect to people's views in an urban area. Biophilia is considered as the idea insisting on the dependency of human identity on his relationship with nature. The biophilia fundamental tendencies were explored to establish a biological framework for valuing and affiliating the natural world. Accordingly, the nine tendencies i.e. utilitarian, naturalistic, ecologistic-scientific, aesthetic, symbolic, humanistic, moralistic, dominionistic, and negativistic were investigate to find out how people relate to the nature especially trees. The investigation was based on a quantitative interview which was applied to the public population in the Liverpool urban parks. Data collected from the designed questionnaire was followed by analysis of the data to identify people's attitudes towards trees. The results indicated how important the physical appeal and beauty of trees was for the people and also showed the people's emotional attachments to trees. Furthermore, a decision support model was proposed to evaluate human instincts and preferences in relation to their surrounding areas using the Analytical Hierarchical Process (AHP). The proposed model composed the environmental factors and the biophilia tendencies as the criteria of evaluating environmental-human interactions. A case study was then conducted in Liverpool parks to examine theses interactions. The data gathered was used as the input to the AHP model for the attribute analysis. The AHP model would enable environment managers to compose the relevant information via a link between human feelings about urban trees, and environmental factors for monitoring purposes and performance analysis.

  15. Monitoring chemical reactions by low-field benchtop NMR at 45 MHz: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Elipe, Maria Victoria; Milburn, Robert R

    2016-06-01

    Monitoring chemical reactions is the key to controlling chemical processes where NMR can provide support. High-field NMR gives detailed structural information on chemical compounds and reactions; however, it is expensive and complex to operate. Conversely, low-field NMR instruments are simple and relatively inexpensive alternatives. While low-field NMR does not provide the detailed information as the high-field instruments as a result of their smaller chemical shift dispersion and the complex secondary coupling, it remains of practical value as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool and is complimentary to other established methods, such as ReactIR and Raman spectroscopy. We have tested a picoSpin-45 (currently under ThermoFisher Scientific) benchtop NMR instrument to monitor three types of reactions by 1D (1) H NMR: a Fischer esterification, a Suzuki cross-coupling, and the formation of an oxime. The Fischer esterification is a relatively simple reaction run at high concentration and served as proof of concept. The Suzuki coupling is an example of a more complex, commonly used reaction involving overlapping signals. Finally, the oxime formation involved a reaction in two phases that cannot be monitored by other PAT tools. Here, we discuss the pros and cons of monitoring these reactions at a low-field of 45 MHz by 1D (1) H NMR. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Progress Monitoring to Support Science Learning for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannest, Kimberly J.; Soares, Denise A.; Smith, Stacey L.; Williams, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    Progress monitoring provides teachers with frequent, reliable data on student improvement in academic skills. However, valid and reliable progress monitoring probes are primarily available just for reading fluency, comprehension, spelling, and math. Because the instruction of students with disabilities in science occurs primarily in general…

  17. [Development of medical monitoring and support in the practice of manned space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong-zhi

    2003-01-01

    The astronaut medical monitoring and support is an important part of space operational medicine. With the rapid development of the cause of China's manned space flight, the astronaut medical monitoring and support work has also made considerable progress since 1990s. Space operational medicine is responsible for the medical monitoring and support during astronaut selection and training as well as during the space flight. It's a severe challenge for mid-long term space flight to assure astronauts in sound body and mind and have good working capability. On the basis of the medical monitoring and support in short-term space flight, we should carry out the research of space operational medicine.

  18. Using an APK-051 analyzer in a chemical engineering monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiet, S. V.; Voronov, V. N.; Bushuev, E. N.

    2009-07-01

    The capabilities of an APK-051 automatic analyzer for directly measuring the standardized indicators used for automatic chemical monitoring and indirectly determining the concentration of ammonia in water coolant are described.

  19. Life Support and Environmental Monitoring International System Maturation Team Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Molly; Gatens, Robyn; Ikeda, Toshitami; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Hovland, Scott; Witt, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Human exploration of the solar system is an ambitious goal. Future human missions to Mars or other planets will require the cooperation of many nations to be feasible. Exploration goals and concepts have been gathered by the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) at a very high level, representing the overall goals and strategies of each participating space agency. The Global Exploration Roadmap published by ISECG states that international partnerships are part of what drives the mission scenarios. It states "Collaborations will be established at all levels (missions, capabilities, technologies), with various levels of interdependency among the partners." To make missions with interdependency successful, technologists and system experts need to share information early, before agencies have made concrete plans and binding agreements. This paper provides an overview of possible ways of integrating NASA, ESA, and JAXA work into a conceptual roadmap of life support and environmental monitoring capabilities for future exploration missions. Agencies may have immediate plans as well as long term goals or new ideas that are not part of official policy. But relationships between plans and capabilities may influence the strategies for the best ways to achieve partner goals. Without commitments and an organized program like the International Space Station, requirements for future missions are unclear. Experience from ISS has shown that standards and an early understanding of requirements are an important part of international partnerships. Attempting to integrate systems that were not designed together can create many problems. Several areas have been identified that could be important to discuss and understand early: units of measure, cabin CO2 levels, and the definition and description of fluids like high purity oxygen, potable water and residual biocide, and crew urine and urine pretreat. Each of the partners is exploring different kinds of technologies

  20. Model Based Monitoring and Control of Chemical and Biochemical Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    This presentation will give an overview of the work performed at the department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering related to process control. A research vision is formulated and related to a number of active projects at the department. In more detail a project describing model estimation...... and controller tuning in Model Predictive Control application is discussed....

  1. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  2. An assessment of nondestructive testing technologies for chemical weapons monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, T.T.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), with the US Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center (CRDEC) under the sponsorship of the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA), completed testing of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technology on live agent systems. The tests were conducted at Tooele Army Depot during August 1992. The Nondestructive Evaluation systems were tested for potential use in verifying chemical treaty requirements. Five technologies, two neutron and three acoustic, were developed at DOE laboratories. Two systems from the United Kingdom (one neutron and one acoustic) were also included in the field trials. All systems tested showed the ability to distinguish among the VX, GB, and Mustard. Three of the systems (two acoustic and one neutron) were used by On-Site Inspection Agency (OSIA) personnel.

  3. Monitoring of endocrine disrupting chemicals in surface water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available the surface. The chelated Pluronic-DMDDO ligand can be used for affinity purification of histidine tagged proteins. A regeneration formulation based on anionic SDS detergent desorbed pluronic modified polymeric membranes and the possibility of re... ingredients, household products and industrial chemicals. Surface waters are the main sink of said EDCs. Accurate EDC detection is usually via time consuming and costly ex situ LC-MS and GC-MS analysis. An important class of biosensors include those...

  4. Real time monitoring of accelerated chemical reactions by ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Hsuan; Lo, Ta-Ju; Kuo, Fang-Yin; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonication has been used to accelerate chemical reactions. It would be ideal if ultrasonication-assisted chemical reactions could be monitored by suitable detection tools such as mass spectrometry in real time. It would be helpful to clarify reaction intermediates/products and to have a better understanding of reaction mechanism. In this work, we developed a system for ultrasonication-assisted spray ionization mass spectrometry (UASI-MS) with an ~1.7 MHz ultrasonic transducer to monitor chemical reactions in real time. We demonstrated that simply depositing a sample solution on the MHz-based ultrasonic transducer, which was placed in front of the orifice of a mass spectrometer, the analyte signals can be readily detected by the mass spectrometer. Singly and multiply charged ions from small and large molecules, respectively, can be observed in the UASI mass spectra. Furthermore, the ultrasonic transducer used in the UASI setup accelerates the chemical reactions while being monitored via UASI-MS. The feasibility of using this approach for real-time acceleration/monitoring of chemical reactions was demonstrated. The reactions of Girard T reagent and hydroxylamine with steroids were used as the model reactions. Upon the deposition of reactant solutions on the ultrasonic transducer, the intermediate/product ions are readily generated and instantaneously monitored using MS within 1 s. Additionally, we also showed the possibility of using this reactive UASI-MS approach to assist the confirmation of trace steroids from complex urine samples by monitoring the generation of the product ions.

  5. Antarctic environmental specimen bank. A tool for chemical monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soggia, F.; Dalla Riva, S.; Abelmoschi, M.L.; Frache, R. [Genoa Univ., Genoa (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica e Chimica Industriale

    2000-02-01

    The work illustrates the project on Antarctic Environmental Specimen Bank (BCAA), which is an integral part of the Italian project on the micropollutants chemistry (sector on chemical contamination of the Italian Antarctic Research program, PNRA), begun in 1994 when the BCAA was installed in the department of chemistry and industrial chemistry (Genoa University, Italy). Its objective underlines an emphasis on environmental chemistry and the establishment of baselines similar to the approaches followed by the other environmental specimen banks, begun at the end of Sixties with the aim of long-term storage of representative environmental specimens in order to study the presence and the evolution of dangerous substances, but focus on the chemical characterization of samples. [Italian] Il lavoro illustra le finalita' del Progetto su una Banca Campioni Ambientali Antartici (BCAA), che e' parte integrante del progetto Chmica dei microinquinannti del Settore Contaminazione chimica del Programma Nazionale di ricerche in Antartide (ONRA), nata nel 1994 presso il dipartimento di chimicia e chimica industriale dell'universita' di Genova. A differenza di altri progetti internazionali che enfatizzano gli aspetti biologici, ecologici e medici, il progetto BCAA enfatizza la chimica ambientale.

  6. U.S. SUPPORT PROGRAM CONTRIBUTIONS TO REMOTE MONITORING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PEPPER,S.E.

    2000-05-08

    Since 1993, the IAEA has made great progress in the implementation of remote monitoring. Equipment has been developed and tested, and installed systems are being used for safeguards purposes. The cost of equipment, the complexity of communication technology, and maintenance of the equipment are challenges that still face the IAEA. Resolution of these challenges will require significant effort. The USSP is committed to assisting the IAEA to overcome these challenges.

  7. Chemical gas sensors for car exhaust and cabin air monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, E.-L.; Winquist, F. [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Laboratory of Applied Physics, Linkoeping University, Gothenburg (Sweden); Rudell, B. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Centre of Public Health Sciences, Linkoeping, Gothenburg (Sweden); Loefvendahl, A. [Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wass, U. [Volvo Technological Development Corporation, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    A combination of charcoal and particle filters has previously been shown to reduce effectively the smell of diesel exhaust. In this paper it is shown that the smell of diesel exhaust can successfully be predicted by the concentration of total volatile organic compounds and the concentration of certain carbonyl compounds. Projection to latent structures was utilised for model building. An electronic nose consisting of MOFSET and MOS sensors could less successfully predict the smell, but identified the same filter combination as being most efficient. The car cabin during urban driving was also monitored, both by the means of MOFSET sensors and by chemiluminescence. The pollution level inside the car is shown to be elevated by about 30% compared to outside the car. A combination filter together with an air inlet sensor switch is shown to reduce the NO{sub x} levels inside te car by 30% compared to outside, with the ability to significantly decrease the peak levels. (author)

  8. Dangerous chemical substances – Tools supporting occupational risk assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Elżbieta Dobrzyńska; Małgorzata Pośniak

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of risk associated with exposure to chemicals in the work environment is a task that still poses a lot of difficulties for the employers. At the same time the probability of adverse health effects faced by an employee as a result of such risks, and the related employer’s material losses should motivate employers to seek effective solutions aimed at assessing the risks and controling them to an acceptable level by the application of appropriate preventive measures. The paper pre...

  9. Dangerous chemical substances – Tools supporting occupational risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Dobrzyńska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of risk associated with exposure to chemicals in the work environment is a task that still poses a lot of difficulties for the employers. At the same time the probability of adverse health effects faced by an employee as a result of such risks, and the related employer’s material losses should motivate employers to seek effective solutions aimed at assessing the risks and controling them to an acceptable level by the application of appropriate preventive measures. The paper presents examples of tools to assist the employer in the risk assessment associated with the presence of chemical agents in the workplace. Examples of guides, manuals, checklists and various interactive tools, developed in Poland and other European Union (EU countries, as well as in countries outside the EU and international organizations are described. These tools have been developed to meet the current requirements of the law and allow a rough estimation of chemical risk and based on these estimates take further steps to improve working conditions and safety. Med Pr 2014;65(5:683–692

  10. Methodology and biological monitoring of exposure to chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, M.L.; Smith, J.R.; McMonagle, J.D. [Army Medical Research Inst. of Chemical Defense, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

    1995-06-01

    In the past few years, our institute has developed several GC/MS methods for the detection of the breakdown products of toxic organophosphonates (soman, sarin, GF) and vesicant sulfur mustard in biological samples. Recently we developed a modified GC/MS method for VX and are continually working on the methodology for lewisite and tabun. The purpose is to have an analytical tool to verify the exposure of chemical warfare agents in humans. Analytical procedures for quantitating the hydrolyzed phosphonic acids from nerve agents in environmental samples have been reported by many analysts. For more complex matrices such as biological samples, there is not yet a method reported. To make these polar acids amenable to gas chromatographic analysis a prior derivatization is needed. We found the pentafluorobenzyl ester derivatives of the phosphonates are suitable for verification and pharmacokinetic studies in biological samples. This method may also serve as an alternative method for confirmation purposes in environmental samples.

  11. Effectiveness of a Sugar-Yeast Monitor and a Chemical Lure for Detecting Bed Bugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Narinderpal; Wang, Changlu; Cooper, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Effective bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) monitors have been actively sought in the past few years to help detect bed bugs and measure the effectiveness of treatments. Most of the available active monitors are either expensive or ineffective. We designed a simple and affordable active bed bug monitor that uses sugar-yeast fermentation and an experimental chemical lure to detect bed bugs. The sugar-yeast mixture released carbon dioxide at a similar rate (average 405.1 ml/min) as dry ice (average 397.0 ml/min) during the first 8 h after activation. In naturally infested apartments, the sugar-yeast monitor containing an experimental chemical lure (nonanal, L-lactic acid, 1-octen-3-ol, and spearmint oil) was equally effective as the dry ice monitor containing the same lure in trapping bed bugs. Placing one sugar-yeast monitor per apartment for 1-d was equally effective as 11-d placement of 6-18 Climbup insect interceptors (a commonly used bed bug monitor) under furniture legs for trapping bed bugs. When carbon dioxide was present, pair-wise comparisons showed the experimental lure increased trap catch by 7.2 times. This sugar-yeast monitor with a chemical lure is an affordable and effective tool for monitoring bed bugs. This monitor is especially useful for monitoring bed bugs where a human host is not present. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Nonradiological chemical pathway analysis and identification of chemicals of concern for environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanton, M.L.; Cooper, A.T.; Castleton, K.J.

    1995-11-01

    Pacific Northwest`s Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) is an ongoing effort tot design, review, and conducted monitoring on and off the Hanford site. Chemicals of concern that were selected are listed. Using modeled exposure pathways, the offsite cancer incidence and hazard quotient were calculated and a retrospective pathway analysis performed to estimate what onsite concentrations would be required in the soil for each chemical of concern and other detected chemicals that would be required to obtain an estimated offsite human-health risk of 1.0E-06 cancer incidence or 1.0 hazard quotient. This analysis indicates that current nonradiological chemical contamination occurring on the site does not pose a significant offsite human-health risk; the highest cancer incidence to the offsite maximally exposed individual was from arsenic (1.76E-10); the highest hazard quotient was chromium(VI) (1.48E-04). The most sensitive pathways of exposure were surfacewater and aquatic food consumption. Combined total offsite excess cancer incidence was 2.09E-10 and estimated hazard quotient was 2.40E-04. Of the 17 identified chemicals of concern, the SESP does not currently (routinely) monitor arsenic, benzo(a)pyrene, bis(2- ethylhexyl)phthalate (BEHP), and chrysene. Only 3 of the chemicals of concern (arsenic, BEHP, chloroform) could actually occur in onsite soil at concern high enough to cause a 1.0E-06 excess cancer incidence or a 1.0 hazard index for a given offsite exposure pathway. During the retrospective analysis, 20 other chemicals were also evaluated; only vinyl chloride and thallium could reach targeted offsite risk values.

  13. Supporting prolonged COPD monitoring using an application for mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Andreas; Schuerg, Sebastian; Schudt, Florian; Koczulla, Andreas Rembert; Mursina, Ljudmila; Gross, Volker; Sohrabi, Keywan

    2015-01-01

    COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) is the most frequent form of chronic respiratory disease. During the progress of this disease, phases of aggravation of pulmonary function (exacerbations) can occur, which reduce the quality of life. Clinical experience shows that single investigations are insufficient. Therefore a prolonged monitoring is required to recognize an exacerbation early. This home monitoring will involve a quick respiratory test and a related application for Android, iOS and Windows phones. This rapid test transmits the relevant pulmonary parameters, converted in an Extensible Markup Language file to the smartphone. The application will analyze the incoming data to evaluate the current health status of the patient. Additionally the data will be transferred to the virtual control point (server) and stored in a database. If critical values are detected, the server will send a notification to prior defined relatives and doctors. A connection to a Hospital Information System will be possible through an included Health Level 7 interface. This offers an improved site-independent patient care. The project is planned to be in development until 2016.

  14. Chemical Preparation of Supported Bimetallic Catalysts. Gold-Based Bimetallic, a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Louis, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This review focuses on the chemical methods used to prepare supported bimetallic heterogeneous catalysts, i.e., bimetallic nanoparticles deposited on a support. The review is limited to the preparation of gold-based bimetallic catalysts and moreover to bimetallic nanoparticles supported on powder inorganic supports, i.e., on the surface or in the porosity, and not on model supports such as single crystals.

  15. Role of biomarkers in monitoring exposures to chemicals: present position, future prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, William P; Mutti, Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in toxicology and human health. Many research groups are carrying out studies to develop biomarkers of exposure to chemicals and apply these for human monitoring. There is considerable interest in the use and application of biomarkers to identify the nature and amounts of chemical exposures in occupational and environmental situations. Major research goals are to develop and validate biomarkers that reflect specific exposures and permit the prediction of the risk of disease in individuals and groups. One important objective is to prevent human cancer. This review presents a commentary and consensus views about the major developments on biomarkers for monitoring human exposure to chemicals. A particular emphasis is on monitoring exposures to carcinogens. Significant developments in the areas of new and existing biomarkers, analytical methodologies, validation studies and field trials together with auditing and quality assessment of data are discussed. New developments in the relatively young field of toxicogenomics possibly leading to the identification of individual susceptibility to both cancer and non-cancer endpoints are also considered. The construction and development of reliable databases that integrate information from genomic and proteomic research programmes should offer a promising future for the application of these technologies in the prediction of risks and prevention of diseases related to chemical exposures. Currently adducts of chemicals with macromolecules are important and useful biomarkers especially for certain individual chemicals where there are incidences of occupational exposure. For monitoring exposure to genotoxic compounds protein adducts, such as those formed with haemoglobin, are considered effective biomarkers for determining individual exposure doses of reactive chemicals. For other organic chemicals, the excreted urinary metabolites can also give a useful and complementary indication of

  16. How chemistry supports cell biology: the chemical toolbox at your service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijdeven, Ruud H; Neefjes, Jacques; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-12-01

    Chemical biology is a young and rapidly developing scientific field. In this field, chemistry is inspired by biology to create various tools to monitor and modulate biochemical and cell biological processes. Chemical contributions such as small-molecule inhibitors and activity-based probes (ABPs) can provide new and unique insights into previously unexplored cellular processes. This review provides an overview of recent breakthroughs in chemical biology that are likely to have a significant impact on cell biology. We also discuss the application of several chemical tools in cell biology research.

  17. Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, Susan [Navarro Reserch and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dayvault, Jalena [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2016-05-01

    -redevelopment groundwater samples. Results of this evaluation indicate that this is not the case—groundwater concentrations of uranium, the primary contaminant of concern at most LM UMTRCA sites, generally remained unchanged pre- and post-well-redevelopment. The literature supports redevelopment of monitoring and municipal wells if signs of reduced productivity, biofouling, sediment buildup, or other conditions potentially affecting long-term well integrity are observed. In these cases, use of a downhole camera to examine the condition of the well screen and casing may be useful. However, based on the data sets examined for this study, there is no evidence that well redevelopment is needed in order to obtain samples that have the same chemical concentrations as those in the groundwater. To conclusively demonstrate that point—that is, to define chemical effects—the underlying mechanisms have to be understood. For example, if biofouling is observed in a well and is considered a potential cause of spurious or invalid chemical data, appropriate hypothesis-testing ethodology should be used to test the validity of this claim. Until late 2014, the onset of this project, there was no standard procedure for documenting well redevelopment events; some (perhaps many) had not been captured in the historical record. EMO has made notable progress in this regard since 2015, having established a format for documenting well redevelopment events and associated field measurements, as well as a data repository for capturing those records. This policy should be continued to ensure that all well redevelopment events and associated field observations are recorded and easily tracked.

  18. Investigating Long-Term Monitoring Protocols in support of Quivira NWR Habitat Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project purpose is to investigate long-term monitoring protocols in support of Quivira NWR habitat objectives as described in the Refuge’s recently approved CCP...

  19. Development of NPP Monitoring and Operation Support Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-04-15

    During the first stage (2001.7.1-2004.6.30), we developed general human factors design guidelines VDU-based workstations, PMAS alarm display design guidelines, PMAS SPADES display design guidelines, and the revision of KHNP HFE guidelines (HF-010), which have been applied to domestic NPP designs. We also supported other KNICS projects by performing RPS COM design reviews, development of RPS COM Style Guide, and a review of CEDMCS cabinet operator module display design. We developed the ADIOS prototype, NPP performance analysis systems for YGN No.1, 2 plants and Kori No. 2 plant, alarm cause tracking systems for Kori No. 2 plant and OPR1000, and signal fault detection and diagnosis methods for deaerators and steam generators. During the second stage(2004.7.1-2008.4.30), we supported other KNICS projects by reviewing RPS COM display designs three times, developing ESF-CCS COM style guides and reviewing ESF-CCS COM display design, reviewing CRCS LOM and PCS MTP display designs, and developing requirements for DCS GUI components. We also developed integrated style guide for I and C cabinet operator module display designs. In cooperative research with KOPEC-AE, we developed basic technologies for advanced HSI design including task analysis methods, an information and control requirements database, display design criteria, a HSI prototype with its evaluation, and methods for human factors engineering verification and validation.

  20. Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Chemical Analyses from LM Monitoring Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, Susan [Navarro Reserch and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dayvault, Jalena [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management

    2016-05-01

    This report documents the efforts and analyses conducted for the Applied Studies and Technology (AS&T) Ancillary Work Plan (AWP) project titled Evaluation of Pre- and Post- Redevelopment Groundwater Sample Laboratory Analyses from Selected LM Groundwater Monitoring Wells. This effort entailed compiling an inventory of nearly 500 previous well redevelopment events at 16 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) sites, searching the literature for impacts of well redevelopment on groundwater sample quality, and—the focus of this report—evaluating the impacts of well redevelopment on field measurements and sample analytical results. Study Catalyst Monitoring well redevelopment, the surging or high-volume pumping of a well to loosen and remove accumulated sediment and biological build-up from a well, is considered an element of monitoring well maintenance that is implemented periodically during the lifetime of the well to mitigate its gradual deterioration. Well redevelopment has been conducted fairly routinely at a few LM sites in the western United States (e.g., the Grand Junction office site and the Gunnison processing site in Colorado), but at most other sites in this region it is not a routine practice. Also, until recently (2014–2015), there had been no specific criteria for implementing well redevelopment, and documentation of redevelopment events has been inconsistent. A catalyst for this evaluation was the self-identification of these inconsistencies by the Legacy Management Support contractor. As a result, in early 2015 Environmental Monitoring Operations (EMO) staff began collecting and documenting additional field measurements during well redevelopment events. In late 2015, AS&T staff undertook an independent internal evaluation of EMO's well redevelopment records and corresponding pre- and post-well-redevelopment groundwater analytical results. Study Findings Although literature discussions parallel the prevailing industry

  1. Application of Support Vector Machine to Forex Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamruzzaman, Joarder; Sarker, Ruhul A.

    Previous studies have demonstrated superior performance of artificial neural network (ANN) based forex forecasting models over traditional regression models. This paper applies support vector machines to build a forecasting model from the historical data using six simple technical indicators and presents a comparison with an ANN based model trained by scaled conjugate gradient (SCG) learning algorithm. The models are evaluated and compared on the basis of five commonly used performance metrics that measure closeness of prediction as well as correctness in directional change. Forecasting results of six different currencies against Australian dollar reveal superior performance of SVM model using simple linear kernel over ANN-SCG model in terms of all the evaluation metrics. The effect of SVM parameter selection on prediction performance is also investigated and analyzed.

  2. GREENER CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN ALTERNATIVES ARE REVEALED USING THE WASTE REDUCTION DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM (WAR DSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Waste Reduction Decision Support System (WAR DSS) is a Java-based software product providing comprehensive modeling of potential adverse environmental impacts (PEI) predicted to result from newly designed or redesigned chemical manufacturing processes. The purpose of this so...

  3. Development of chemical monitoring system in geothermal well. Chinetsusei no kagakuteki monitoring system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiroto, K.; Kusaba, S.; Yamauchi, M. (The Kyushu Electric Power Co. Inc., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1993-03-31

    An expert system was constructed to predict the attenuation trend of geothermal well from various kinds of data on the geothermal well of geothermal plant and the chemical knowledge. The logging data and chemical analysis data of 100 wells or more which were drilled at Hacchobaru and Otake areas were collected in the data base. The knowledge concerning the situation change of geothermal well and the reservoir was obtained from the history of attenuation of geothermal well which stopped the gushing in the past at Hacchobaru and Otake areas. It was summarized in six categories of reason for stop of gushing of geothermal well from the phenomena observed in more than 110 items. For quantifying the input data to the expert system, the data on the time course of gushed steam quantity, pit mouth pressure, and temperature change of reservoir obtained from the change in chemical composition such as silica temperature, Na-K-Ca temperature, Na-K temperature, and Cl temperature were employed. The results of prediction of attenuation and the estimation of attenuation cause of some geothermal wells at Hacchobaru and Otake areas according to this system were objectively reasonable. 5 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. WAR DSS: A DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEM FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY CONSCIOUS CHEMICAL PROCESS DESIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    The second generation of the Waste Reduction (WAR) Algorithm is constructed as a decision support system (DSS) in the design of chemical manufacturing facilities. The WAR DSS is a software tool that can help reduce the potential environmental impacts (PEIs) of industrial chemical...

  5. Prioritization of chemical hazards in spices and herbs for European monitoring programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asselt, Van E.D.; Banach, J.L.; Fels, van der Ine

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring programs are preferably risk-based, which allows focusing on the most relevant human health risks. In this study, a risk matrix was used to identify those chemical hazards that have the highest human health risk for the following spices and herbs: paprika/chilli powder, black pepper, nutm

  6. Developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support integrated coastal management in a multiuser nature reserve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pim Vugteveen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We elaborate the necessary conceptual and strategic elements for developing an effective adaptive monitoring network to support Integrated Coastal Management (ICM in a multiuser nature reserve in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. We discuss quality criteria and enabling actions essential to accomplish and sustain monitoring excellence to support ICM. The Wadden Sea Long-Term Ecosystem Research project (WaLTER was initiated to develop an adaptive monitoring network and online data portal to better understand and support ICM in the Dutch Wadden Sea Region. Our comprehensive approach integrates ecological and socioeconomic data and links research-driven and policy-driven monitoring for system analysis using indicators of pressures, state, benefits, and responses. The approach and concepts we elaborated are transferable to other coastal regions to accomplish ICM in complex social-ecological systems in which scientists, multisectoral stakeholders, resource managers, and governmental representatives seek to balance long-term ecological, economic, and social objectives within natural limits.

  7. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-04-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10{sup 4} to 10{sup 6} and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  8. Monitoring and trace detection of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals using resonance Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, A.J. III; Dougherty, D.R.; Chen, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Raman scattering is a coherent, inelastic, two-photon process, which shifts the frequency of an outgoing photon according to the vibrational structure of the irradiated species, thereby providing a unique fingerprint of the molecule. When involving an allowed electronic transition (resonance Raman), this scattering cross section can be enhanced by 10[sup 4] to 10[sup 6] and provides the basis for a viable technique that can monitor and detect trace quantities of hazardous wastes and toxic chemicals. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) possesses many of the ideal characteristics for monitoring and detecting of hazardous waste and toxic chemicals. Some of these traits are: (1) very high selectivity (chemical specific fingerprints); (2) independence from the excitation wavelength (ability to monitor in the solar blind region); (3) chemical mixture fingerprints are the sum of its individual components (no spectral cross-talk); (4) near independence of the Raman fingerprint to its physical state (very similar spectra for gas, liquid, solid and solutions -- either bulk or aerosols); and (5) insensitivity of the Raman signature to environmental conditions (no quenching). Data from a few chemicals will be presented which illustrate these features. In cases where background fluorescence accompanies the Raman signals, an effective frequency modulation technique has been developed, which can completely eliminate this interference.

  9. Inventory of chemicals used at Hanford Site production plants and support operations (1944-1980)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, M. J.

    1990-04-01

    A complete list of chemicals used in the production facilities and support operations of the US Department of Energy Hanford Site is presented to aid development of plans for characterizing the radioactive liquid chemical wastes stored in the 149 single-shell tanks. The complete chemical list is compared to the list provided by the regulatory agencies to identify hazardous chemicals stored in the single-shell tanks. A reduced list has been developed by others and is used to identify the chemical constituents for analysis in the Waste Characterization Plan for the Hanford Site Single-Shell Tanks. The chemical list is based on chemical process flowsheets, essential material consumption records, letters, reports, and other historical data. 14 refs., 36 tabs.

  10. Chemical monitoring in the Dutch Wadden Sea by means of benthic invertebrates and fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essink, Karel

    1989-09-01

    In monitoring, it is of utmost importance to carefully define the purpose, the sampling strategy, as well as the analytical chemical and statistical requirements. Surveys are appropriate for describing the geographical variation in environmental contaminant levels. Repeated surveys and recurrentdata collection at permanent locations provide means of detecting temporal trends. Results are presented here of surveys on pollution by trace metals, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides in the Ems Estuary and Dutch Wadden Sea using Mytilus edulis, Mya arenaria, Arenicoia marina, Nereis diversicolor and Crangon crangon as test organisms. Trends towards decreasing pollution by mercury are illustrated by monitoring data on Mytilus edulis and Zoarces viviparus. It is stressed that the results of chemical monitoring in organisms may be interpreted only in termser the biological effects on the basis of relevant toxicological knowledge and/or additional bio-assays.

  11. Chemical Kinetics in Support of Syngas Turbine Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dryer, Frederick

    2007-07-31

    This document is the final report on an overall program formulated to extend our prior work in developing and validating kinetic models for the CO/hydrogen/oxygen reaction by carefully analyzing the individual and interactive behavior of specific elementary and subsets of elementary reactions at conditions of interest to syngas combustion in gas turbines. A summary of the tasks performed under this work are: 1. Determine experimentally the third body efficiencies in H+O{sub 2}+M = HO{sub 2}+M (R1) for CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. 2. Using published literature data and the results in this program, further develop the present H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent and CO/H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/diluent mechanisms for dilution with CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and N{sub 2} through comparisons with new experimental validation targets for H{sub 2}-CO-O{sub 2}-N{sub 2} reaction kinetics in the presence of significant diluent fractions of CO{sub 2} and/or H{sub 2}O, at high pressures. (task amplified to especially address ignition delay issues, see below). 3. Analyze and demonstrate issues related to NOx interactions with syngas combustion chemistry (task amplified to include interactions of iron pentacarbonyl with syngas combustion chemistry, see below). 4. Publish results, including updated syngas kinetic model. Results are summarized in this document and its appendices. Three archival papers which contain a majority of the research results have appeared. Those results not published elsewhere are highlighted here, and will appear as part of future publications. Portions of the work appearing in the above publications were also supported in part by the Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER-13503. As a result of and during the research under the present contract, we became aware of other reported results that revealed substantial differences between experimental characterizations of ignition delays for syngas mixtures and ignition delay predictions based upon homogenous kinetic modeling. We

  12. The Neogene Redbeds of Iceland - a High-Latitude Terrestrial Paleoclimate Monitor Driven by Chemical Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riishuus, M. S.; Bird, D. K.

    2012-12-01

    Chemical weathering of tephra and aeolian dust of basaltic composition produces clays and iron oxide/hydroxide minerals preserved in reddened layers referred to as redbeds, boles or paleosols. We propose that the extent of weathering of Neogene redbeds in Iceland and the isotopic composition of structurally bound water in associated weathering clay preserve records of high-latitude paleoclimatic and hydrologic conditions. In support we present whole-rock geochemistry and smectite D/H compositions of redbed horizons from Iceland for comparative analysis with global paleoclimate trends and local independent proxy data. Smectite δD values of 35 basaltic tephras in Iceland (~15-2 Ma) display a general decrease in δD compositions from -110 to -105 ‰ at ~15-13 Ma to -115 to -118 ‰ at ~3-2 Ma which correlates well with the global cooling trend from the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-15 Ma) to present day. Furthermore, the extent of weathering expressed by the Chemical Index of Weathering increases from 40-50 at 2-3 Ma to 80-90 at 15-16 Ma suggesting enhanced chemical weathering rates during the warmer climate conditions. The weathering extent of modern andosols in Iceland is temperature-dependant and allows construction of a paleo-climate proxy [1]. Application of this proxy suggests that mean annual temperatures (MATs) increased from ~0°C at ~2 Ma to ~9°C at 15-16 Ma in general agreement with independent local proxy data. The δD values of paleo meteoric waters in Iceland, estimated using a smectite-water fractionation factor and model MATs, decrease from -41 ‰ at 15-16 Ma (9°C) to -45 ‰ at 2 Ma (0°C). The paleo meteoric water compositions are increasingly enriched in deuterium relative to present day meteoric water in Iceland (δD ≤ -50 ‰). This is in agreement with global cooling since Middle Miocene toward ice-dominated conditions with greater equator-to-pole temperature contrasts, affecting the distillation process between ocean, atmosphere and

  13. The use of thermal desorption in monitoring for the chemical weapons demilitarization program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Martin

    2002-10-01

    Under international treaty, the United States and Russia are disposing of their aging stockpile of chemical weapons. Incineration and chemical neutralization are options for sites in the United States, although Russia prefers the latter. The storage and disposal of bulk and chemical agents and weapons involve unique hazards of handling extremely toxic materials. There are three major areas of concern--the storage stockpile, the disposal area, and the discovery and destruction of "found" material not considered part of the stockpile. Methods have been developed to detect the presence of chemical agents in the air, and these are used to help assure worker protection and the safety of the local population. Exposure limits for all chemical agents are low, sometimes nanograms per cubic meter for worker control limits and picograms per cubic meter for general population limits. There are three types of monitoring used in the USA: alarm, confirmation, and historical. Alarm monitors are required to give relatively immediate real-time responses to agent leaks. They are simple to operate and rugged, and provide an alarm in near real-time (generally a few minutes). Alarm monitors for the demilitarization program are based on sorbent pre-concentration followed by thermal desorption and simple gas chromatography. Alarms may need to be confirmed by another method, such as sample tubes collocated with the alarm monitor and analyzed in a laboratory by more sophisticated chromatography. Sample tubes are also used for historical perimeter monitoring, with sample periods typically of 12 h. The most common detector is the flame photometric detector, in sulfur or phosphorous mode, although others, such as mass-selective detectors, also have been used. All agents have specific problems with collection, chromatography and detection. Monitoring is not made easier by interferences from pesticide spraying, busy roadways or military firing ranges. Exposure limits drive the requirements for

  14. Mass spectrometric analysis of chemical warfare agents in support of a chemical terrorist event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, J.R.; D' Agostino, P.A.; Chenier, C.L. [Defence R and D Canada Suffield, Medicine Hat, AB (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Chemical warfare (CW) agents are considered to be any chemicals which, through their chemical action on life processes can cause death, temporary incapacitation or permanent harm to humans or animals. In Canada, the probability of a CW terrorist attack is low despite the catastrophic consequences that would result from such an attack. The three levels of government would be responding to such an event. CW agent response training for all levels of government is offered at Defence R and D Canada-Suffield. Appropriate samples must be collected for analysis in a laboratory, as such an event would lead to a criminal investigation. Research into new methods for the identification of CW agents is being conducted by the analytical laboratory at Defence R and D Canada-Suffield. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC-MS) are being used extensively to separate and characterize CW agents in organic extracts. In the case of aqueous samples, another method might be more appropriate, since additional sample handling is required before GC-MS analysis can be performed. Minimal sample handling is required when using liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) for direct analysis of CW agents. The authors demonstrated the use of LC-ESI-MS for analyzing CW agents and their hydrolysis products in aqueous samples. For the analysis of nerve agents and phosphonic acids in soil, comparable or superior results to organic extraction and GC-MS were obtained for aqueous extractions followed by LC-ESI-MS. The combination of GC-MS and LC-ESI-MS for the analysis of mustard related compounds in soil extracts from a former mustard storage area showed that the two methods are complementary in this situation. 9 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs.

  15. Multivariate Statistical Process Monitoring and Control:Recent Developments and Applications to Chemical Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁军; 钱积新

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate statistical process monitoring and control (MSPM& C) methods for chemical process monitoring with statistical projection techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) are surveyed in this paper,The four-step procedure of performing MSPM &C for chemical process ,modeling of processes ,detecting abnormal events or faults,identifying the variable(s) responible for the faults and diagnosing the source cause for the abnormal behavior,is analyzed,Several main research directions of MSPM&C reported in the literature are discussed,such as multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) for batch process ,statistical monitoring and control for nonlinear process,dynamic PCA and dynamic PLS,and on -line quality control by infer-ential models,Industrial applications of MSPM&C to several typical chemical processes ,such as chemical reactor,distillation column,polymeriztion process ,petroleum refinery units,are summarized,Finally,some concluding remarks and future considerations are made.

  16. Integrated assessment of oil pollution using biological monitoring and chemical fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ceri; Guitart, Carlos; Pook, Chris; Scarlett, Alan; Readman, James W; Galloway, Tamara S

    2010-06-01

    A full assessment of the impact of oil and chemical spills at sea requires the identification of both the polluting chemicals and the biological effects they cause. Here, a combination of chemical fingerprinting of surface oils, tissue residue analysis, and biological effects measures was used to explore the relationship between spilled oil and biological impact following the grounding of the MSC Napoli container ship in Lyme Bay, England in January 2007. Initially, oil contamination remained restricted to a surface slick in the vicinity of the wreck, and there was no chemical evidence to link biological impairment of animals (the common limpet, Patella vulgata) on the shore adjacent to the oil spill. Secondary oil contamination associated with salvage activities in July 2007 was also assessed. Chemical analyses of aliphatic hydrocarbons and terpanes in shell swabs taken from limpet shells provided an unequivocal match with the fuel oil carried by the ship. Corresponding chemical analysis of limpet tissues revealed increased concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) dominated by phenanthrene and C1 to C3 phenanthrenes with smaller contributions from heavier molecular weight PAHs. Concurrent ecotoxicological tests indicated impairment of cellular viability (p oiled animals. These results illustrate the value of combining biological monitoring with chemical fingerprinting for the rapid identification of spilled oils and their sublethal impacts on biota in situ.

  17. DAWN (Design Assistant Workstation) for advanced physical-chemical life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudokas, Mary R.; Cantwell, Elizabeth R.; Robinson, Peter I.; Shenk, Timothy W.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a project supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology (NASA-OAST) under the Advanced Life Support Development Program. It is an initial attempt to integrate artificial intelligence techniques (via expert systems) with conventional quantitative modeling tools for advanced physical-chemical life support systems. The addition of artificial intelligence techniques will assist the designer in the definition and simulation of loosely/well-defined life support processes/problems as well as assist in the capture of design knowledge, both quantitative and qualitative. Expert system and conventional modeling tools are integrated to provide a design workstation that assists the engineer/scientist in creating, evaluating, documenting and optimizing physical-chemical life support systems for short-term and extended duration missions.

  18. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  19. Nonhazardous Chemical Treatments and Smart Monitoring and Control System for Heating and Cooling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    application of treatments is often inconsistent because treatment lev- els are monitored by manual chemical analysis. When treatment levels drop below lower...corrosion data. These methods of develop- ing corrosion information complement each other, and each method has advantages ; overall correlation of the...RLUs (Relative Light Units) that have been correlated to bacte- ria colony-forming units. There is also a second ATP test for sessile bacteria (surface

  20. A Multimedia Fate Model to Support Chemical Management in China: A Case Study for Selected Trace Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Price, Oliver R; Kilgallon, John; Rendal, Cecilie; Tao, Shu; Jones, Kevin C; Sweetman, Andrew J

    2016-07-05

    SESAMe v3.3, a spatially explicit multimedia fate model for China, is a tool suggested to support quantitative risk assessment for national scale chemical management. The key advantage over the previous version SESAMe v3.0 is consideration of spatially varied environmental pH. We evaluate the model performance using estimates of emission from total industry usage of three UV filters (benzophenone-3, octocrylene, and octyl methoxycinnamate) and three antimicrobials (triclosan, triclocarban, and climbazole). The model generally performs well for the six case study chemicals as shown by the comparison between predictions and measurements. The importance of accounting for chemical ionization is demonstrated with the fate and partitioning of both triclosan and climbazole sensitivity to environmental pH. The model predicts ionizable chemicals (triclosan, climbazole, benzophenone-3) to primarily partition into soils at steady state, despite hypothetically only being released to freshwaters, as a result of agricultural irrigation by freshwater. However, further model calibration is needed when more field data becomes available for soils and sediments and for larger areas of water. As an example, accounting for the effect of pH in the environmental risk assessment of triclosan, limited freshwater areas (0.03% or ca. 55 km(2)) in mainland China are modeled to exceed its conservative environmental no-effect threshold. SESAMe v3.3 can be used to support the development of chemical risk assessment methodologies with the spatial aspects of the model providing a guide to the identification regions of interest in which to focus monitoring campaigns or develop a refined risk assessment.

  1. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, S.M.; Mowry, C.D.; Keenan, M.R.; Bender, S.F.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Gas Analysis Lab.; Owen, T. [Intel Corp., Rio Rancho, NM (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emission to the atmosphere is of great concern to semiconductor manufacturing industries, research laboratories, the public, and regulatory agencies. Some industries are seeking ways to reduce emissions by reducing VOCs at the point of use (or generation). This paper discusses the requirements, design, calibration, and use of a sampling inlet/quadrupole mass spectrometer system for monitoring VOCs in a semiconductor manufacturing production line. The system uses chemical ionization to monitor compounds typically found in the lithography processes used to manufacture semiconductor devices (e.g., acetone, photoresist). The system was designed to be transportable from tool to tool in the production line and to give the operator real-time feedback so the process(es) can be adjusted to minimize VOC emissions. Detection limits ranging from the high ppb range for acetone to the low ppm range fore other lithography chemicals were achieved using chemical ionization mass spectroscopy at a data acquisition rate of approximately 1 mass spectral scan (30 to 200 daltons) per second. A demonstration of exhaust VOC monitoring was performed at a working semiconductor fabrication facility during actual wafer processing.

  2. Evaluation of chemical sensors for in situ ground-water monitoring at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, E.M.; Hostetler, D.D.

    1989-03-01

    This report documents a preliminary review and evaluation of instrument systems and sensors that may be used to detect ground-water contaminants in situ at the Hanford Site. Three topics are covered in this report: (1) identification of a group of priority contaminants at Hanford that could be monitored in situ, (2) a review of current instrument systems and sensors for environmental monitoring, and (3) an evaluation of instrument systems that could be used to monitor Hanford contaminants. Thirteen priority contaminants were identified in Hanford ground water, including carbon tetrachloride and six related chlorinated hydrocarbons, cyanide, methyl ethyl ketone, chromium (VI), fluoride, nitrate, and uranium. Based on transduction principles, chemical sensors were divided into four classes, ten specific types of instrument systems were considered: fluorescence spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), spark excitation-fiber optic spectrochemical emission sensor (FOSES), chemical optrodes, stripping voltammetry, catalytic surface-modified ion electrode immunoassay sensors, resistance/capacitance, quartz piezobalance and surface acoustic wave devices. Because the flow of heat is difficult to control, there are currently no environmental chemical sensors based on thermal transduction. The ability of these ten instrument systems to detect the thirteen priority contaminants at the Hanford Site at the required sensitivity was evaluated. In addition, all ten instrument systems were qualitatively evaluated for general selectivity, response time, reliability, and field operability. 45 refs., 23 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Passive Sampling in Regulatory Chemical Monitoring of Nonpolar Organic Compounds in the Aquatic Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booij, Kees; Robinson, Craig D; Burgess, Robert M;

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths and shor...... is the best available technology for chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds. Key issues to be addressed by scientists and environmental managers are outlined.......We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the European Union, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of the marine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met by passive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths...... and shortcomings of passive sampling are assessed for water, sediments, and biota. Passive water sampling is a suitable technique for measuring concentrations of freely dissolved compounds. This method yields results that are incompatible with the EU's quality standard definition in terms of total concentrations...

  4. Development and laboratory evaluation of chemically-based baited ovitrap for the monitoring of Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baak-Baak, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Américo D; García-Rejón, Julián E; Ríos-Delgado, Silvany; Torres-Estrada, José L

    2013-06-01

    Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti is considered to be the most important dengue vector worldwide. Studies were conducted to design and evaluate a chemically-based baited ovitrap for monitoring Ae. aegypti under laboratory conditions. Several known chemical attractants and three types of ovitraps (ovitraps A, B, and C) were evaluated throughout the oviposition bioassays. Oviposition responses of gravid female Ae. aegypti were evaluated to n-heneicosane, 3-methylindole (skatole), 4-methylphenol (p-cresol), and phenol. Female Ae. aegypti were attracted to all the evaluated compounds. Among them, n-heneicosane at a concentration of 10 ppm (mg/l), skatole from 50 to 1000 ppm, p-cresol at 100 ppm, and phenol at 50 ppm showed a significant positive oviposition response. A blend of the four chemical attractants increased the oviposition response; 67% of the eggs were deposited in the treatment compared to the control. Female Ae. aegypti were significantly more attracted to ovitrap A loaded with the four-component synthetic blend compared to the standard ovitrap in the oviposition bioassays. The compound used in ovitrap A retained its attractant property for up to three days. The chemically-based baited ovitrap may be considered as an option to be integrated during the monitoring of dengue virus vectors in México. © 2013 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  5. IDEA Fiscal Monitoring and Support Activities 2011-2012 Quick Reference Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Resource Center Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This Quick Reference Document is being distributed by the Regional Resource Center Program ARRA/Fiscal Priority Team to provide RRCP state liaisons and other (Technical Assistance) TA providers with a summary of critical fiscal monitoring and support activities they may be involved in during calendar years 2011 and 2012. Like other documents in…

  6. Perceived Socio-Economic Status and Social Inclusion in School: Parental Monitoring and Support as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veland, Jarmund; Bru, Edvin; Idsøe, Thormod

    2015-01-01

    The roles of parental monitoring and support (parenting styles) as mediators of the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and perceived inclusion in school were studied in a sample of 7137 Norwegian primary and secondary school pupils aged between 10 and 16 years. To study whether additional social disadvantages moderated the…

  7. Perceived Socio-Economic Status and Social Inclusion in School: Parental Monitoring and Support as Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veland, Jarmund; Bru, Edvin; Idsøe, Thormod

    2015-01-01

    The roles of parental monitoring and support (parenting styles) as mediators of the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and perceived inclusion in school were studied in a sample of 7137 Norwegian primary and secondary school pupils aged between 10 and 16 years. To study whether additional social disadvantages moderated the…

  8. Chemical Sensor Platform for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Activity and Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Solovei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes’ coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  9. Development of an automated system for continuous monitoring of powered roof support in longwall panel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ATUL Kumar; DHEERAJ Kumar; SINGH U.K.; GUPTA P.S.

    2010-01-01

    Described the development of an Intrinsically Safe System for continuous monitoring of load and convergence of powered roof supports installed at longwall faces.The system developed for monitoring of behavior of a powered support in a mechanized longwall sublevel caving face. The logging system can be programmed for logging the data from the sensors at different logging intervals ranging from 16 h to 1 ms for logging variation in hydraulic pressures in legs and convergence of the support during progressive face advance. For recording dynamic loads, the data logger can be programmed to start fast logging, say at 10 ms intervals, when the pressure in a leg reaches a pre-specified threshold value, and continue fast logging until the pressure drops below this threshold value. This fast logging automatically stops when the pressure drops below this threshold value.

  10. A tiered, integrated biological and chemical monitoring framework for contaminants of emerging concern in aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruya, Keith A; Dodder, Nathan G; Mehinto, Alvine C; Denslow, Nancy D; Schlenk, Daniel; Snyder, Shane A; Weisberg, Stephen B

    2016-07-01

    The chemical-specific risk-based paradigm that informs monitoring and assessment of environmental contaminants does not apply well to the many thousands of new chemicals that are being introduced into ambient receiving waters. We propose a tiered framework that incorporates bioanalytical screening tools and diagnostic nontargeted chemical analysis to more effectively monitor for contaminants of emerging concern (CECs). The framework is based on a comprehensive battery of in vitro bioassays to first screen for a broad spectrum of CECs and nontargeted analytical methods to identify bioactive contaminants missed by the currently favored targeted analyses. Water quality managers in California have embraced this strategy with plans to further develop and test this framework in regional and statewide pilot studies on waterbodies that receive discharge from municipal wastewater treatment plants and stormwater runoff. In addition to directly informing decisions, the data obtained using this framework can be used to construct and validate models that better predict CEC occurrence and toxicity. The adaptive interplay among screening results, diagnostic assessment and predictive modeling will allow managers to make decisions based on the most current and relevant information, instead of extrapolating from parameters with questionable linkage to CEC impacts. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;12:540-547. © 2015 SETAC.

  11. Compact Multi-Gas Monitor for Life Support Systems Control in Space: Evaluation Under Realistic Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jesus Delgado; Phillips, Straun; Chullen, Cinda; Mendoza, Edgar

    2014-01-01

    Advanced space life support systems require lightweight, low-power, durable sensors for monitoring critical gas components. A luminescence-based optical flow-through cell to monitor carbon dioxide, oxygen, and humidity has been developed and was demonstrated using bench-top instrumentation under environmental conditions relevant to portable life support systems, including initially pure oxygen atmosphere, temperature range from 50 F to 150 F, and humidity from dry to 100% RH and under conditions of water condensation. This paper presents the most recent progress in the development of this sensor technology. Trace gas contaminants in a space suit, originating from hardware and material off-gassing and crew member metabolism, are from many chemical families. The result is a gas mix much more complex than the pure oxygen fed into the space suit, and this complexity may interfere with gas sensor readings. This paper presents an evaluation of optical sensor performance when exposed to the most significant trace gases reported to be found in space suits. A study of the calibration stability of the sensors is also presented. For that purpose, a profile of temperature, pressure, humidity, and gas composition for the duration of an EVA has been defined, and the performance of sensors operated repeatedly under those conditions has been studied. Finally, this paper presents the first compact readout unit for these optical sensors, designed for the volume, power, and weight restrictions of a PLSS.

  12. Ozone Monitoring Using Support Vector Machine and K-Nearest Neighbors Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FALEH Rabeb

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to health impacts caused by the pollutant gases, monitoring and controlling air quality is an important field of interest. This paper deals with ozone monitoring in four stations measuring air quality located in many Tunisian cities using numerous measuring instruments and polluting gas analyzers. Prediction of ozone concentrations in two Tunisian cities, Tunis and Sfax is screened based on supervised classification models. The K -Nearest neighbors results reached 98.7 % success rate in the recognition and ozone identification. Support Vector Machines (SVM with the linear, polynomial and RBF kernel were applied to build a classifier and full accuracy (100% was again achieved with the RBF kernel.

  13. An Environment for Guideline-based Decision Support Systems for Outpatients Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zini, Elisa M; Lanzola, Giordano; Bossi, Paolo; Quaglini, Silvana

    2017-08-11

    We propose an architecture for monitoring outpatients that relies on mobile technologies for acquiring data. The goal is to better control the onset of possible side effects between the scheduled visits at the clinic. We analyze the architectural components required to ensure a high level of abstraction from data. Clinical practice guidelines were formalized with Alium, an authoring tool based on the PROforma language, using SNOMED-CT as a terminology standard. The Alium engine is accessible through a set of APIs that may be leveraged for implementing an application based on standard web technologies to be used by doctors at the clinic. Data sent by patients using mobile devices need to be complemented with those already available in the Electronic Health Record to generate personalized recommendations. Thus a middleware pursuing data abstraction is required. To comply with current standards, we adopted the HL7 Virtual Medical Record for Clinical Decision Support Logical Model, Release 2. The developed architecture for monitoring outpatients includes: (1) a guideline-based Decision Support System accessible through a web application that helps the doctors with prevention, diagnosis and treatment of therapy side effects; (2) an application for mobile devices, which allows patients to regularly send data to the clinic. In order to tailor the monitoring procedures to the specific patient, the Decision Support System also helps physicians with the configuration of the mobile application, suggesting the data to be collected and the associated collection frequency that may change over time, according to the individual patient's conditions. A proof of concept has been developed with a system for monitoring the side effects of chemo-radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients. Our environment introduces two main innovation elements with respect to similar works available in the literature. First, in order to meet the specific patients' needs, in our work the Decision

  14. NASA's Plans for Developing Life Support and Environmental Monitoring and Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, B. Michael; Jan, Darrell

    2006-01-01

    Life Support and Monitoring have recently been reworked in response to the Vision for Space Exploration. The Exploration Life Support (ELS) Project has replaced the former Advanced Life Support Element of the Human Systems Research and Technology Office. Major differences between the two efforts include: the separation of thermal systems into a new stand alone thermal project, deferral of all work in the plant biological systems, relocation of food systems to another organization, an addition of a new project called habitation systems, and overall reduction in the number of technology options due to lower funding. The Advanced Environmental Monitoring and Control (AEMC) Element is retaining its name but changing its focus. The work planned in the ELS and AEMC projects is organized around the three major phases of the Exploration Program. The first phase is the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). The ELS and AEMC projects will develop hardware for this short duration orbital and trans-lunar vehicle. The second phase is sortie landings on the moon. Life support hardware for lunar surface access vehicles including upgrades of the CEV equipment and technologies which could not be pursued in the first phase due to limited time and budget will be developed. Monitoring needs will address lunar dust issues, not applicable to orbital needs. The ELS and AEMC equipment is of short duration, but has different environmental considerations. The third phase will be a longer duration lunar outpost. This will consist of a new set of hardware developments better suited for long duration life support and associated monitoring needs on the lunar surface. The presentation will show the planned activities and technologies that are expected to be developed by the ELS and AEMC projects for these program phases.

  15. Chemical analysis of succinylacetone and 4-hydroxyphenyllactate in amniotic fluid using selective ion monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobs, C; Sweetman, L; Nyhan, W L

    1984-01-01

    A method for the measurement of the concentration of succinylacetone and 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid in amniotic fluid was developed for the prenatal diagnosis of hereditary tyrosinemia. Succinylacetone was converted to 5-methyl-3-isoxazolepropionic acid and isolated with 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid by liquid partition chromatography and the trimethylsilyl derivatives quantified by ammonia chemical ionization selected ion monitoring gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with 2-hydroxy-n-caproic acid as the internal standard. The concentration of 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid in normal amniotic fluid was 1.97 +/- 0.75 (S.D.) mumol/l while succinylacetone was undetectable. A pregnancy at risk for tyrosinemia type II was monitored. The concentration of 4-hydroxyphenyllactic acid was within the normal range and a healthy child was born.

  16. Recent trends in chemical composition of bulk precipitation at Estonian monitoring stations 1994-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treier, K.; Pajuste, K.; Frey, J.

    Monthly and annual means of main anions (SO 42-, NO 3-, Cl -) and summed base cations (Ca 2+, Mg 2+, K +, Na +) in bulk precipitation were studied at 10 stations during an 8-year monitoring period. The data showed statistically significant decreasing trends in most cases. Average declines of mean annual volume-weighted concentrations for both anions and cations were about two-fold. Despite the decrease, the loads of S and cations are still relatively high in Estonia (about 4-14 kg S ha -1 and 0.6-1.2 keq ha -1, respectively) compared with the loads in Finland and Sweden. Estimated linear decline trends followed the same pattern as annually combusted oil shale from Estonian power plants and emissions of SO 2 and fly ash. Recent trends in chemical composition of bulk precipitation at the monitoring stations reflected economic changes in Estonia as well as transboundary fluxes from neighbouring countries.

  17. Methods of soil resampling to monitor changes in the chemical concentrations of forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gregory B.; Fernandez, Ivan J.; Hazlett, Paul W.; Bailey, Scott W.; Ross, Donald S.; Villars, Thomas R.; Quintana, Angelica; Ouimet, Rock; McHale, Michael; Johnson, Chris E.; Briggs, Russell D.; Colter, Robert A.; Siemion, Jason; Bartlett, Olivia L.; Vargas, Olga; Antidormi, Michael; Koppers, Mary Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Recent soils research has shown that important chemical soil characteristics can change in less than a decade, often the result of broad environmental changes. Repeated sampling to monitor these changes in forest soils is a relatively new practice that is not well documented in the literature and has only recently been broadly embraced by the scientific community. The objective of this protocol is therefore to synthesize the latest information on methods of soil resampling in a format that can be used to design and implement a soil monitoring program. Successful monitoring of forest soils requires that a study unit be defined within an area of forested land that can be characterized with replicate sampling locations. A resampling interval of 5 years is recommended, but if monitoring is done to evaluate a specific environmental driver, the rate of change expected in that driver should be taken into consideration. Here, we show that the sampling of the profile can be done by horizon where boundaries can be clearly identified and horizons are sufficiently thick to remove soil without contamination from horizons above or below. Otherwise, sampling can be done by depth interval. Archiving of sample for future reanalysis is a key step in avoiding analytical bias and providing the opportunity for additional analyses as new questions arise.

  18. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  19. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  20. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. An introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  1. Application and state of development for remote chemical sensors in environmental monitoring: A literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabron, J.F.; Niss, N.D.; Hart, B.K.

    1991-09-01

    A study was performed on chemical sensor technology currently available and under development. The information was compiled into a format wherein information on the sensors is listed in a comparable manner. As introductory section is provided to illustrate the regulatory environment in which such sensor technology will be used. This information should allow corporations or federal agencies ready access to useful information for the potential licensing of sensor technology for commercial development or specific environmental monitoring operations. Although every attempt was made to identify as many chemical sensors as possible, we recognize that some may be missed inadvertently. The accuracy of the information provided by the various sources regarding the state of development for the various sensors was not verified. Judgments or opinions regarding the actual state of development or utility of these devices are not included in this report. However, we feel that this report accurately reflects the state of the art at the present time.

  2. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor Implementation at the ElectroChemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T.

    2005-11-11

    The implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the ElectroChemical Plant (ECP), Zelenogorsk, Russia, are presented in this report. The FMFM, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS), developed for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower-assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (P-LEU) to the United States from down-blended weapons-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU Purchase Agreement, signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999 and is successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The second BDMS was installed at ECP in February 2003. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) spontaneous neutron sources for a modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments. The FMFM provides unattended, nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow in the HEU, LEU blend stock, and P-LEU process legs. The FMFM also provides the traceability of the HEU flow to the product process leg. This report documents the technical installation requirements and the expected operational characteristics of the ECP FMFM.

  3. Blend Down Monitoring System Fissile Mass Flow Monitor and its Implementation at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise, Seversk, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, T

    2005-07-28

    In this paper the implementation plans and preparations for installation of the Fissile Mass Flow Monitor (FMFM) equipment at the Siberian Chemical Enterprise (SChE), Seversk, Russia, are presented. The FMFM, developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is part of the Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) for the U.S. Department of Energy Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) Transparency Implementation Program. The BDMS provides confidence to the United States that the Russian nuclear facilities supplying the lower assay ({approx}4%) product low enriched uranium (PLEU) to the United States from down-blended weapon-grade HEU are meeting the nonproliferation goals of the government-to-government HEU purchase agreement signed between the Russian Federation and the United States in 1993. The first BDMS has been operational at Ural Electrochemical Integrated Plant, Novouralsk, since February 1999. The second BDMS has been operational at Electro Chemical Plant, Zelenogorsk, since March 2003. These systems are successfully providing HEU transparency data to the United States. The third BDMS was successfully installed on the HEU down-blending tee in the SChE Enrichment Plant in October 2004. The FMFM makes use of a set of thermalized {sup 252}Cf spontaneous neutron sources for modulated fission activation of the UF{sub 6} gas stream for measuring the {sup 235}U fissile mass flow rate. To do this, the FMFM measures the transport time of the fission fragments created from the fission activation process under the modulated source to the downstream detectors by detecting the delayed gamma rays from the fission fragments retained in the flow. The FMFM provides unattended nonintrusive measurements of the {sup 235}U mass flow of the UF{sub 6} gas in the blending tee legs of HEU, the LEU blend stock, and the resulting P-LEU. The FMFM also confirms that highly enriched UF{sub 6} gas identified in the HEU leg flows through the blending tee into the P-LEU leg. This report contains details of

  4. Regenerable mixed copper-iron-inert support oxygen carriers for solid fuel chemical looping combustion process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.; Tian, Hanjing

    2016-12-20

    The disclosure provides an oxygen carrier for a chemical looping cycle, such as the chemical looping combustion of solid carbonaceous fuels, such as coal, coke, coal and biomass char, and the like. The oxygen carrier is comprised of at least 24 weight % (wt %) CuO, at least 10 wt % Fe2O3, and an inert support, and is typically a calcine. The oxygen carrier exhibits a CuO crystalline structure and an absence of iron oxide crystalline structures under XRD crystallography, and provides an improved and sustained combustion reactivity in the temperature range of 600.degree. C.-1000.degree. C. particularly for solid fuels such as carbon and coal.

  5. Oral dosing of chemical indicators for in vivo monitoring of Ca2+ dynamics in insect muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdinandus; Arai, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi; Suzuki, Madoka; Sato, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a remarkably facile staining protocol to visually investigate dynamic physiological events in insect tissues. We attempted to monitor Ca2+ dynamics during contraction of electrically stimulated living muscle. Advances in circuit miniaturization and insect neuromuscular physiology have enabled the hybridization of living insects and man-made electronic components, such as microcomputers, the result of which has been often referred as a Living Machine, Biohybrid, or Cyborg Insect. In order for Cyborg Insects to be of practical use, electrical stimulation parameters need to be optimized to induce desired muscle response (motor action) and minimize the damage in the muscle due to the electrical stimuli. Staining tissues and organs as well as measuring the dynamics of chemicals of interest in muscle should be conducted to quantitatively and systematically evaluate the effect of various stimulation parameters on the muscle response. However, existing staining processes require invasive surgery and/or arduous procedures using genetically encoded sensors. In this study, we developed a non-invasive and remarkably facile method for staining, in which chemical indicators can be orally administered (oral dosing). A chemical Ca2+ indicator was orally introduced into an insect of interest via food containing the chemical indicator and the indicator diffused from the insect digestion system to the target muscle tissue. We found that there was a positive relationship between the fluorescence intensity of the indicator and the frequency of electrical stimulation which indicates the orally dosed indicator successfully monitored Ca2+ dynamics in the muscle tissue. This oral dosing method has a potential to globally stain tissues including neurons, and investigating various physiological events in insects.

  6. Monitoring the Evolution of Major Chemical Compound in Dairy Products During Shelf-Life by FTIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Păucean

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy is considered to be a comprehensive and sensitive method to characterize the chemical composition and for detection of molecular changes in different samples. In this study, FTIRspectroscopy  was employed as an rapid and low-cost technique in order to characterize the FTIR spectra and identify appropriate spectral regions for dairy product fermented by a lactic culture consisting by species of Lactococcus lactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides. A second objective was to monitore the key chemical compounds (lactose, lactic acid, flavors during fermentation and refrigerated storage (1-21 days, at 4-6°C. By FT-IR fingerprint during fermentation we identified changes of the spectra pattern with specific increasing or decreasing peaks for lactose, lactic acid, esters, aromatic compounds, aminoacids, fatty acids. Also the technique was able to identify chemical compounds involved in the microbial activity such as phosphates and phosphorylated carbohydrates during fermentation and dairy product shelf-life. All the major chemical compounds recorded significant increaments during fermentation and refrigerated storage comparing with the raw milk.

  7. Design and Development of a Web-Based Self-Monitoring System to Support Wellness Coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Reza; Kuo, Alex

    2017-01-01

    We analyzed, designed and deployed a web-based, self-monitoring system to support wellness coaching. A wellness coach can plan for clients' exercise and diet through the system and is able to monitor the changes in body dimensions and body composition that the client reports. The system can also visualize the client's data in form of graphs for both the client and the coach. Both parties can also communicate through the messaging feature embedded in the application. A reminder system is also incorporated into the system and sends reminder messages to the clients when their reporting is due. The web-based self-monitoring application uses Oracle 11g XE as the backend database and Application Express 4.2 as user interface development tool. The system allowed users to access, update and modify data through web browser anytime, anywhere, and on any device.

  8. The LUPIN detector supporting least intrusive beam monitoring technique through neutron detection

    CERN Document Server

    Manessi, G P; Welsch, C; Caresana, M; Ferrarini, M

    2013-01-01

    The Long interval, Ultra-wide dynamic Pile-up free Neutron rem counter (LUPIN) is a novel detector initially developed for radiation protection purposes, specifically conceived for applications in pulsed neutron fields. The detector has a measurement capability varying over many orders of neutron burst intensity, from a single neutron up to thousands of interactions for each burst, without showing any saturation effect. Whilst LUPIN has been developed for applications in the radiation protection fields, its unique properties make it also well suited to support other beam instrumentation. In this contribution, the design of LUPIN is presented in detail and results from measurements carried out in different facilities summarize its main characteristics. Its potential use as beam loss monitor (BLM) and complementary detector for non-invasive beam monitoring purposes (e.g. to complement a monitor based on proton beam “halo” detection) in medical accelerators is then examined. In the context of its application...

  9. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  10. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  11. Volunteer stream monitoring: Do the data quality and monitoring experience support increased community involvement in freshwater decision making?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Storey

    2016-12-01

    freshwater decision making. Given adequate professional support, community-based water monitoring can provide data reliable enough to augment professionally collected data, and increase the opportunities, confidence, and skills of community members to engage in freshwater decision making.

  12. Addendum to Environmental Monitoring Plan, Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities; Addendum 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    This 1993 Addendum to the ``Environmental Monitoring Plan Nevada Test Site and Support Facilities -- 1991,`` Report No. DOE/NV/10630-28 (EMP) applies to the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) operations on the Continental US (including Amchitka Island, Alaska) that are under the purview of the DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV). The primary purpose of these operations is the conduct of the nuclear weapons testing program for the DOE and the Department of Defense. Since 1951, these tests have been conducted principally at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. In accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, this 1993 Addendum to the EMP brings together, in one document, updated information and/or new sections to the description of the environmental activities conducted at the NTS by user organizations, operations support contractors, and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) originally published in the EMP. The EPA conducts both the offsite environmental monitoring program around the NTS and post-operational monitoring efforts at non-NTS test locations used between 1961 and 1973 in other parts of the continental US. All of these monitoring activities are conducted under the auspices of the DOE/NV, which has the stated policy of conducting its operations in compliance with both the letter and the spirit of applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards.

  13. Telephone monitoring and support for veterans with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Craig S; DiLandro, Caryn; Corwin, Kim N; Drescher, Kent D; Cooney, Jean H; Gusman, Fred

    2006-10-01

    Dropout from outpatient mental health treatment may contribute to high rates of relapse and rehospitalization among veterans with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In a quasi-experimental cohort study, 87 male and 17 female veterans discharging from residential PTSD treatment received either standard referral to outpatient care (N = 77) or standard referrals supplemented by biweekly telephone calls (N = 27). Telephone monitoring and support was feasible and acceptable to 85% of clients. Compared to prior patient cohorts, clients receiving telephone support were twice as likely (88% vs. 43%) to complete an outpatient visit within 1 month of discharge and reported higher satisfaction with care.

  14. Passive samplers for chemical substance monitoring and associated toxicity assessment in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapie, N; Devier, M H; Soulier, C; Creusot, N; Le Menach, K; Aït-Aïssa, S; Vrana, B; Budzinski, H

    2011-01-01

    The European legislation, and in particular the Water Framework Directive requires the development of cost efficient monitoring tools that can provide the required information for the assessment of water contamination. Passive sampling methods represent one of the novel tools that have a potential to be used in various regulatory monitoring programmes aimed at assessing the levels of chemical pollutants. These methods are particularly interesting for sampling polar organic pollutants in water because they provide representative information of the water quality over extended time periods (days to weeks) in environments with fluctuating contaminant concentrations. This is achieved by integrative sampling of pollutants over the whole sampler deployment period. These tools can be coupled to toxicity testing using bioassays that give information on toxic and ecotoxic hazards associated to substances that are present, these substances being identified or not. In this study the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) was used in surface water to evaluate the water contamination by polar organic compounds and their potential toxicity.

  15. A low power sub- μW chemical gilbert cell for ISFET differential reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalofonou, Melpomeni; Toumazou, Christofer

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a low power current-mode method for monitoring differentially derived changes in pH from ion-sensitive field-effect transistor (ISFET) sensors, by adopting the Chemical Gilbert Cell. The fabricated system, with only a few transistors, achieves differential measurements and therefore drift minimisation of continuously recorded pH signals obtained from biochemical reactions such as DNA amplification in addition to combined gain tunability using only a single current. Experimental results are presented, demonstrating the capabilities of the front-end at a microscopic level through integration in a lab-on-chip (LoC) setup combining a microfluidic assembly, suitable for applications that require differential monitoring in small volumes, such as DNA detection where more than one gene needs to be studied. The system was designed and fabricated in a typical 0.35 μ m CMOS process with the resulting topology achieving good differential pH sensitivity with a measured low power consumption of only 165 nW due to weak inversion operation. A tunable gain is demonstrated with results confirming 15.56 dB gain at 20 nA of ISFET bias current and drift reduction of up to 100 times compared to a single-ended measurement is also reported due to the differential current output, making it ideal for robust, low-power chemical measurement.

  16. Online Decorrelation of Humidity and Temperature in Chemical Sensors for Continuous Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, Ramon; Fonollosa, Jordi; Rulkov, Nikolai F; Rodriguez-Lujan, Irene

    2016-01-01

    A method for online decorrelation of chemical sensor readings from the effects of environmental humidity and temperature variations is proposed. The goal is to improve the accuracy of electronic nose measurements for continuous monitoring by processing data from simultaneous readings of environmental humidity and temperature. The electronic nose setup built for this study included eight different metal-oxide sensors, temperature and humidity sensors with a wireless communication link to PC. This wireless electronic nose was used to monitor air for two years in the residence of one of the authors and collected data continuously during 510 full days with a sampling rate of 2 samples per second. To estimate the effects of variations in air humidity and temperature on the chemical sensors readings, we used a standard energy band model for an n-type metal-oxide sensor. The main assumption of the model is that variations in sensor conductivity can be expressed as a nonlinear function of changes in the semiconductor...

  17. Multiple Lines Of Evidence Supporting Natural Attenuation: Lines Of Inquiry Supporting Monitored Natural Attenuation And Enhanced Attenuatin Of Chlorinated Solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, Karen; Widemeirer, T. H.; Barden, M.J.; Dickson, W. Z.; Major, David

    2004-12-31

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring an initiative to facilitate efficient, effective and responsible use of Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA) and Enhanced Attenuation (EA) for chlorinated solvents. This Office of Environmental Management (EM) ''Alternative Project,'' focuses on providing scientific and policy support for MNA/EA. A broadly representative working group of scientists supports the project along with partnerships with regulatory organizations such as the Interstate Technology Regulatory Council (ITRC) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). The initial product of the technical working group was a summary report that articulated the conceptual approach and central scientific tenants of the project, and that identified a prioritized listing of technical targets for field research. This report documented the process in which: (1) scientific ground rules were developed, (2) lines of inquiry were identified and then critically evaluated, (3) promising applied research topics were highlighted in the various lines of inquiry, and (4) these were discussed and prioritized. The summary report will serve as a resource to guide management and decision making throughout the period of the subject MNA/EA Alternative Project. To support and more fully document the information presented in the summary report, the DOE is publishing a series of supplemental documents that present the full texts from the technical analyses within the various lines of inquiry (see listing). The following report--documenting our evaluation of the state of the science for the lines of evidence for supporting decision-making for MNA--is one of those supplemental documents.

  18. Effect-directed analysis supporting monitoring of aquatic environments--An in-depth overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brack, Werner; Ait-Aissa, Selim; Burgess, Robert M; Busch, Wibke; Creusot, Nicolas; Di Paolo, Carolina; Escher, Beate I; Mark Hewitt, L; Hilscherova, Klara; Hollender, Juliane; Hollert, Henner; Jonker, Willem; Kool, Jeroen; Lamoree, Marja; Muschket, Matthias; Neumann, Steffen; Rostkowski, Pawel; Ruttkies, Christoph; Schollee, Jennifer; Schymanski, Emma L; Schulze, Tobias; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Tindall, Andrew J; De Aragão Umbuzeiro, Gisela; Vrana, Branislav; Krauss, Martin

    2016-02-15

    Aquatic environments are often contaminated with complex mixtures of chemicals that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. This contamination cannot be addressed with target analysis alone but tools are required to reduce this complexity and identify those chemicals that might cause adverse effects. Effect-directed analysis (EDA) is designed to meet this challenge and faces increasing interest in water and sediment quality monitoring. Thus, the present paper summarizes current experience with the EDA approach and the tools required, and provides practical advice on their application. The paper highlights the need for proper problem formulation and gives general advice for study design. As the EDA approach is directed by toxicity, basic principles for the selection of bioassays are given as well as a comprehensive compilation of appropriate assays, including their strengths and weaknesses. A specific focus is given to strategies for sampling, extraction and bioassay dosing since they strongly impact prioritization of toxicants in EDA. Reduction of sample complexity mainly relies on fractionation procedures, which are discussed in this paper, including quality assurance and quality control. Automated combinations of fractionation, biotesting and chemical analysis using so-called hyphenated tools can enhance the throughput and might reduce the risk of artifacts in laboratory work. The key to determining the chemical structures causing effects is analytical toxicant identification. The latest approaches, tools, software and databases for target-, suspect and non-target screening as well as unknown identification are discussed together with analytical and toxicological confirmation approaches. A better understanding of optimal use and combination of EDA tools will help to design efficient and successful toxicant identification studies in the context of quality monitoring in multiply stressed environments.

  19. Chemical and microbiological experimentation for development of environmental control and life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, G. A.; Wilson, M. E.; Cole, H. E.; Traweek, M.

    1992-01-01

    Microbiological techniques are under study with a view to the identification of viable microorganisms in liquid cultures, improve the identification of stressed organisms, and determine the biocidal activity of iodine and other chemicals on isolates from recycled water. A quality-assurance program has been implemented to validate data employed in making decisions concerning engineering and human health and safety. Analytical laboratory refinements will strongly aid the development of environmental control and life-support systems.

  20. Using mobile health technology to deliver decision support for self-monitoring after lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Sereika, Susan M; DeVito Dabbs, Annette; Handler, Steven M; Schlenk, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Lung transplant recipients (LTR) experience problems recognizing and reporting critical condition changes during their daily health self-monitoring. Pocket PATH(®), a mobile health application, was designed to provide automatic feedback messages to LTR to guide decisions for detecting and reporting critical values of health indicators. To examine the degree to which LTR followed decision support messages to report recorded critical values, and to explore predictors of appropriately following technology decision support by reporting critical values during the first year after transplantation. A cross-sectional correlational study was conducted to analyze existing data from 96 LTR who used the Pocket PATH for daily health self-monitoring. When a critical value is entered, the device automatically generated a feedback message to guide LTR about when and what to report to their transplant coordinators. Their socio-demographics and clinical characteristics were obtained before discharge. Their use of Pocket PATH for health self-monitoring during 12 months was categorized as low (≤25% of days), moderate (>25% to ≤75% of days), and high (>75% of days) use. Following technology decision support was defined by the total number of critical feedback messages appropriately handled divided by the total number of critical feedback messages generated. This variable was dichotomized by whether or not all (100%) feedback messages were appropriately followed. Binary logistic regression was used to explore predictors of appropriately following decision support. Of the 96 participants, 53 had at least 1 critical feedback message generated during 12 months. Of these 53 participants, the average message response rate was 90% and 33 (62%) followed 100% decision support. LTR who moderately used Pocket PATH (n=23) were less likely to follow technology decision support than the high (odds ratio [OR]=0.11, p=0.02) and low (OR=0.04, p=0.02) use groups. The odds of following decision

  1. Prediction of hydrogen and carbon chemical shifts from RNA using database mining and support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Joshua D.; Summers, Michael F. [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (United States); Johnson, Bruce A., E-mail: bruce.johnson@asrc.cuny.edu [University of Maryland Baltimore County, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The Biological Magnetic Resonance Data Bank (BMRB) contains NMR chemical shift depositions for over 200 RNAs and RNA-containing complexes. We have analyzed the {sup 1}H NMR and {sup 13}C chemical shifts reported for non-exchangeable protons of 187 of these RNAs. Software was developed that downloads BMRB datasets and corresponding PDB structure files, and then generates residue-specific attributes based on the calculated secondary structure. Attributes represent properties present in each sequential stretch of five adjacent residues and include variables such as nucleotide type, base-pair presence and type, and tetraloop types. Attributes and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR chemical shifts of the central nucleotide are then used as input to train a predictive model using support vector regression. These models can then be used to predict shifts for new sequences. The new software tools, available as stand-alone scripts or integrated into the NMR visualization and analysis program NMRViewJ, should facilitate NMR assignment and/or validation of RNA {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C chemical shifts. In addition, our findings enabled the re-calibration a ring-current shift model using published NMR chemical shifts and high-resolution X-ray structural data as guides.

  2. Shellfish and residual chemical contaminants: hazards, monitoring, and health risk assessment along French coasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéguen, Marielle; Amiard, Jean-Claude; Arnich, Nathalie; Badot, Pierre-Marie; Claisse, Didier; Guérin, Thierry; Vernoux, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    .The human health risks associated with consuming chemical contaminants in shellfish are difficult to assess for several reasons: effects may only surface after long-term exposure (chronic risk), exposures may be discontinuous, and contamination may derive from multiple sources (food, air, occupational exposure, etc.).Therefore, it is not possible to attribute a high body burden specifically to shellfish consumption even if seafood is a major dietary contributor of any contaminant, e.g.,arsenic and mercury.The data assembled in this review provide the arguments for maintaining the chemical contaminant monitoring programs for shellfish. Moreover, the results presented herein suggest that monitoring programs should be extended to other chemicals that are suspected of presenting a risk to consumers, as illustrated by the high concentration reported for arsenic (in urine) of high consumers of seafood products from the CALIPSO study. In addition, the research conducted in shellfish-farming areas of Arcachon Bay highlights the need to monitor TBT and PAH contamination levels to ensure that these chemical pollutants do not migrate from the harbor to oyster farms.Finally, we have concluded that shellfish contamination from seawater offers a rather low risk to the general French population, because shellfish do not constitute a major contributor to dietary exposure of chemical contaminants. Notwithstanding,consumer vigilance is necessary among regular shellfish consumers, and especially for those residing in fishing communities, for pregnant and breast-feeding women,and for very young children.

  3. Applications of Advanced Technology for Monitoring Forest Carbon to Support Climate Change Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Hurtt, G. C.; Dubayah, R.; Hagen, S. C.; Vargas, R.; Nehrkorn, T.; Domke, G. M.; Houghton, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Measurement, Reporting, and Verification (MRV) is a broad concept guiding the application of monitoring technology to the needs of countries or entities for reporting and verifying reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or increases in greenhouse gas sinks. Credibility, cost-effectiveness, and compatibility are important features of global MRV efforts that can support implementation of climate change mitigation programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation and Sustainable Forest Management (REDD+). Applications of MRV technology may be tailored to individual country circumstances following guidance provided by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change; hence, there is no single approach that is uniquely viable but rather a range of ways to integrate new MRV methods. MRV technology is advancing rapidly with new remote sensing and advanced measurement of atmospheric CO2, and in situ terrestrial and ocean measurements, coupled with improvements in data analysis, modeling, and assessing uncertainty. Here we briefly summarize some of the most application-ready MRV technologies being developed under NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS) program, and illustrate how these technologies may be applied for monitoring forests using several case studies that span a range of scales, country circumstances, and stakeholder reporting requirements. We also include remarks about the potential role of advanced monitoring technology in the context of the global climate accord that is expected to result from the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which is expected to take place in December 2015, in Paris, France.

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the

  5. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  6. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  7. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  8. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is

  9. A NEW BIOGENIC SULFIDE CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND SURVEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new convenient sulfide electrochemical sensor for marine environmental in-situ monitoring and real time survey was developed. The new sensor based on a solid Ag2S membrane electrode has outstanding chemical sensitivity and stability. It responds to the activity of sulfide ions according to a Nernstian slope of -31mV/decade. The sensor can be used to determine the total concentration of sulfides (CT) by calibrating the pH value of the solution to a standard pH. The practical measurement range for total sulfide concentration is 0.1-10 mg/L in seawater. The sensor has a very low potential drift (<4mV) during two months in 0.1 mg/L sulfide seawater. This paper describes the preparation of the sensitive membrane and some main properties of the sensor.

  10. Suppressed ion chromatography for monitoring chemical impurities in steam for geothermal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoyo, E; Verma, S P; Sandoval, F; Aparicio, A; García, R

    2002-03-08

    A suppressed ion chromatography (IC) technique has been evaluated as a chemical monitoring tool for detecting major anions (F-, Cl-, NO3- and SO4(2-)) of condensed steam in geothermal power plants. It is shown that the suppressed IC technique provides a suitable means for preventing possible damage to generating equipment in the geothermal industry. An electrical conductivity detector (0.1 microS sensitivity) with an anion-exchange column (IonPac AS4A-SC), a micro-membrane suppressor (AMMS II), and an isocratic high-pressure pump system were successfully used for detecting low concentrations of inorganic anions. Method detection limits for the anions of interest were geothermal steam pipes are also described.

  11. Visualizing Earth Science Data for Environmental Monitoring and Decision Support in Mesoamerica: The SERVIR Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, D.; Graves, S.; Sever, T.; Irwin, D.

    2005-05-01

    In 2002 and 2003 NASA, the World Bank and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) joined with the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD) to develop an advanced decision support system for Mesoamerica (named SERVIR). Mesoamerica - composed of the seven Central American countries and the five southernmost states of Mexico - makes up only a small fraction of the world's land surface. However, the region is home to approximately eight percent of the planet's biodiversity (14 biosphere reserves, 31 Ramsar sites, 8 world heritage sites, 589 protected areas) and 45 million people including more than 50 different ethnic groups. Mesoamerica's biological and cultural diversity are severely threatened by human impact and natural disasters including extensive deforestation, illegal logging, water pollution, slash and burn agriculture, earthquakes, hurricanes, drought, and volcanic eruption. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA/MSFC), together with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and the SERVIR partners are developing state-of-the-art decision support tools for environmental monitoring as well as disaster prevention and mitigation in Mesoamerica. These partners are contributing expertise in space-based observation with information management technologies and intimate knowledge of local ecosystems to create a system that is being used by scientists, educators, and policy makers to monitor and forecast ecological changes, respond to natural disasters, and better understand both natural and human induced effects. The decision support and environmental monitoring data products are typically formatted as conventional two-dimensional, static and animated imagery. However, in addition to conventional data products and as a major portion of our research, we are employing commercial applications that generate three-dimensional interactive visualizations that allow data products to be viewed from multiple angles and at

  12. Integrating SAR and derived products into operational volcano monitoring and decision support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. J.; McAlpin, D. B.; Gong, W.; Ajadi, O.; Arko, S.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-02-01

    Remote sensing plays a critical role in operational volcano monitoring due to the often remote locations of volcanic systems and the large spatial extent of potential eruption pre-cursor signals. Despite the all-weather capabilities of radar remote sensing and its high performance in monitoring of change, the contribution of radar data to operational monitoring activities has been limited in the past. This is largely due to: (1) the high costs associated with radar data; (2) traditionally slow data processing and delivery procedures; and (3) the limited temporal sampling provided by spaceborne radars. With this paper, we present new data processing and data integration techniques that mitigate some of these limitations and allow for a meaningful integration of radar data into operational volcano monitoring decision support systems. Specifically, we present fast data access procedures as well as new approaches to multi-track processing that improve near real-time data access and temporal sampling of volcanic systems with SAR data. We introduce phase-based (coherent) and amplitude-based (incoherent) change detection procedures that are able to extract dense time series of hazard information from these data. For a demonstration, we present an integration of our processing system with an operational volcano monitoring system that was developed for use by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). Through an application to a historic eruption, we show that the integration of SAR into systems such as AVO can significantly improve the ability of operational systems to detect eruptive precursors. Therefore, the developed technology is expected to improve operational hazard detection, alerting, and management capabilities.

  13. CRMs for quality control of determinations of chemical forms of elements in support to EU legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevauviller, P

    1996-03-01

    The concern for the control of toxic chemical forms of elements in the environment is reflected by an increasing number of analyses performed by research and routine laboratories. The European Commission has recognised the need to include some of these species in the list of dangerous substances to be monitored, e.g. in the marine environment or in groundwater. However, in most cases, the specifications are far from being sufficient in respect to the chemical forms of the element to be determined. Furthermore, these determinations are in most cases based on multi-step analytical techniques which are often prone to errors (e.g. at the extraction, derivatization or separation steps). Certified reference materials (CRMs) certified for their content in chemical forms of elements are, therefore, necessary to ensure the accuracy of these measurements and hence the respect of the regulations. However, the lack of CRMs for speciation analysis hampers the quality control of determinations which in turn leads to an incomparability of data produced; so far the number of CRMs produced by international organisations, e.g. NIST (USA), NIES (Japan), NRCC (Canada) and BCR (Belgium), is very limited and concerns mainly compounds such as e.g. methyl-mercury and butyltin compounds in biological matrices or sediments. The Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (formerly BCR) of the European Commission has started a series of projects for the improvement of speciation analysis in environmental matrices, the final aim of which being the production of a variety of environmental CRMs. The existing EU legislation involving chemical forms of elements is presented, the requirements for the preparation of CRMs for speciation analysis are discussed and an update of the most recent CRMs produced within the Standards, Measurements and Testing Programme (SM&T) is given.

  14. Long-term monitored catchments in Norway - a hydrologic and chemical evaluation -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lydersen, E.

    1994-10-20

    About 20 years ago, long-term monitoring of small Norwegian catchments were initiated, because of increasing concern regarding acidification of surface water and damage to fish populations. Long range transported air pollutants were considered to be the major acidification factor and so both precipitation and runoff chemistry were included in the monitoring programme. This report contains a thorough hydrologic and chemical evaluation of precipitation and runoff water separately as well as relationships between precipitation chemistry and runoff chemistry. The data comes from four catchments: Birkenes, Storgama, Langtjern and Kaarvatn. The chapters are (1) Sampling and analysis, (2) Description of the catchments, (3) Hydrology, (4) Chemistry, with subsections on wet deposition, dry deposition, concentration of marine compounds with distance from the sea, acid precipitation, runoff chemistry, sulphuric acid and other acidifying compounds, acid neutralizing capacity, and aluminium, (5) Time trends in precipitation and runoff chemistry. The time trends are evaluated in relation to the declining emissions of sulphur compounds in Europe since the late seventies. 134 refs., 213 figs., 54 tabs.

  15. Analytical Applications of Nanomaterials in Monitoring Biological and Chemical Contaminants in Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Young-Rok

    2016-09-28

    The detection of food pathogens is an important aspect of food safety. A range of detection systems and new analytical materials have been developed to achieve fast, sensitive, and accurate monitoring of target pathogens. In this review, we summarize the characteristics of selected nanomaterials and their applications in food, and place focus on the monitoring of biological and chemical contaminants in food. The unique optical and electrical properties of nanomaterials, such as gold nanoparticles, nanorods, quantum dots, carbon nanotubes, graphenes, nanopores, and polydiacetylene nanovesicles, are closely associated with their dimensions, which are comparable in scale to those of targeted biomolecules. Furthermore, their optical and electrical properties are highly dependent on local environments, which make them promising materials for sensor development. The specificity and selectivity of analytical nanomaterials for target contaminants can be achieved by combining them with various biological entities, such as antibodies, oligonucleotides, aptamers, membrane proteins, and biological ligands. Examples of nanomaterial-based analytical systems are presented together with their limitations and associated developmental issues.

  16. Monitoring bisphenol A and estrogenic chemicals in thermal paper with yeast-based bioreporter assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajasärkkä, Johanna; Koponen, Jani; Airaksinen, Riikka; Kiviranta, Hannu; Virta, Marko

    2014-09-01

    Bioluminescent Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast-based bioreporters were used to monitor bisphenol A and other estrogenic chemicals in thermal paper samples collected mainly from Finland on two occasions in 2010/2011, and 2013. The bisphenol A-targeted (BPA-R) and the human oestrogen receptor (hERα) bioreporters were applied to analyse both non-treated and extracted paper samples. Bisphenol A was readily bioavailable to the yeast bioreporters on the non-treated paper samples without any pre-treatment. Detected concentrations ranged from a detection limit of 9-142 μg/g to over 20 mg/g of bisphenol A equivalents in the thermal papers. Low bisphenol A like activities were detected in many samples, and were considered to be caused by residual bisphenol A or other types of bisphenols, such as bisphenol S. Most of the thermal paper samples were toxic to the yeast bioreporters. The toxicity did not, however, depend on the bisphenol A concentration of the samples. The yeast bioreporters were demonstrated to be a robust and cost-efficient method to monitor thermal paper samples for their bisphenol A content and estrogenicity. Thermal paper was considered as a potential BPA source for both human exposure and environmental emission.

  17. Monitoring of chemical and physical characteristics of stone surfaces by a portable spectroradiometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaiti, Mara; Benvenuti, Marco; Costagliola, Pilar; Di Benedetto, Francesco; Del Ventisette, Chiara; Garfagnoli, Francesca; Lombardi, Luca; Moretti, Sandro; Pecchioni, Elena; Vettori, Silvia

    2013-04-01

    A portable radiometer (ASD-FieldSpec FP Pro spectroradiometer), which continuously and rapidly acquires punctual reflectance spectra in the 350-2500 nm spectral range, has been recently proposed as non-destructive and non-invasive technology for detecting gypsum and other materials (inorganic as well as organic) on surfaces of historical buildings [1,2,3]. The instrument, which is also capable to quantitatively assess physical changes of the surfaces (i. e. color changes), has the potentialities to be used for monitoring the state of conservation of stone surfaces through the monitoring of the relative abundance of some components considered precursor symptoms of decay. The increase of gypsum or the decrease of the relative abundance of organic materials used as protective materials allows, in fact, to control and detect the chemical attack of carbonate surfaces, as well as the efficacy and durability of protective treatments. Although the relative abundance of any compound is theoretically related to the signal intensities of its spectral signature, a quantitative analysis is often compromised by some factors such as the grain dimension of crystals [2 4]. However the monitoring of critical areas may give useful information on the progression of decay provided that the same areas are investigated. The spectroradiometer can operate both in natural light conditions and by a contact probe with fixed illumination and geometry of shot; in this study the second condition was preferred since the same operative conditions can be maintained for all the measurements during the monitoring. Aim of this work was to find an easy to use and accurate system for repositioning the spectroradiometer probe in the same small areas of interest during the long-term monitoring. Two systems (theodolite and distance measuring laser) have been tested and their accuracy has been evaluated on some Florentine historical buildings (Cathedral of Santa Maria del Fiore and Basilica of San Miniato

  18. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) as a process monitoring solution for a production line of roll compaction and tableting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorasani, Milad Rouhi; Amigo Rubio, Jose Manuel; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study the application of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) supported by chemometric modeling as non-destructive tool for monitoring and assessing the roller compaction and tableting processes was investigated. Based on preliminary risk-assessment, discussion with experts and ...... and granule size was established, respectively. These approaches are considered to have a potentially large impact on quality monitoring and control of continuously operating manufacturing lines, such as roller compaction and tableting processes.......In the present study the application of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) supported by chemometric modeling as non-destructive tool for monitoring and assessing the roller compaction and tableting processes was investigated. Based on preliminary risk-assessment, discussion with experts...... settings were carried out which revealed intermediates (ribbons, granules) and final products (tablets) with different properties. Principal component analysis (PCA) based model of NIR images was applied to map the ribbon porosity distribution. The ribbon porosity distribution gained from the PCA based NIR...

  19. Water security: continuous monitoring of water distribution systems for chemical agents by SERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inscore, Frank; Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Farquharson, Stuart

    2007-04-01

    Ensuring safe water supplies requires continuous monitoring for potential poisons and portable analyzers to map distribution in the event of an attack. In the case of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) analyzers are needed that have sufficient sensitivity (part-per-billion), selectivity (differentiate the CWA from its hydrolysis products), and speed (less than 10 minutes) to be of value. We have been investigating the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to meet these requirements by detecting CWAs and their hydrolysis products in water. The expected success of SERS is based on reported detection of single molecules, the one-to-one relationship between a chemical and its Raman spectrum, and the minimal sample preparation requirements. Recently, we have developed a simple sampling device designed to optimize the interaction of the target molecules with the SERS-active material with the goal of increasing sensitivity and decreasing sampling times. This sampling device employs a syringe to draw the water sample containing the analyte into a capillary filled with the SERS-active material. Recently we used such SERS-active capillaries to measure 1 ppb cyanide in water. Here we extend these measurements to nerve agent hydrolysis products using a portable Raman analyzer.

  20. Supported liquid membrane stability in chiral resolution by chemically and physically modified membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molinari, R.; Argurio, P. [Arcavata di Rende Univ. of Calabria, Arcavata di Rende, CS (Italy). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2001-04-01

    In the present work some stability studies on Supported Liquid Membranes (SLMs) to be used for chiral separations were realized. In particular, primary aim was to determine how a modification of the support surface influences the SLM stability. First, the procedure for support modification was optimised, making a screening of various compounds (sulphuric acid, nitric acid, chromic acid, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS), glycerol, oleic alcohol, propylene glycol (PPG), bovine serum albumin (BSA)) and testing their performance by means of contact angle measurements. Next, a second screening was realized by permeation tests in a stirred cell. Finally, to compare the stability of modified with unmodified support in a process of interest for chemical and/or biochemical industries, some permeation tests for resolution of DNB-DL-Leucine were realized in a re-circulation system. Results showed a better surface hydrophilization of chemically modified support and better stability of the sulphonated support. However, in operating conditions a little high stability of the unmodified support was obtained. [Italian] Nel presente lavoro sono stati realizzati degli studi di stabilita' di Membrane Liquide Supportate (SLMs) da impiegare in separazioni chirali. In particolare, obiettivo principale e' stato quello di determinare l'influenza che una modifica della superficie del supporto ha sulla stabilita' della SLM. Cosi', in un primo momento, e' stata ottimizzata le procedura di modifica del supporto, facendo una selezione tra vari composti (acido solforico, acido nitrico, acido cromico, sodio dodecil solfato (SDS), glicerolo, alcool oleico, glicole propilenico (PPG), siero di albumina bovina (BSA)) basata su misure dell'angolo di contatto. Successivamente, e' stata realizzata una seconda selezione mediante prove di permeazione in una cella agitata. Infine, con lo scopo di confrontare la stabilita' della SLM con supporto modificato rispetto

  1. Impact of clinical decision support guidelines on therapeutic drug monitoring of gentamicin in newborns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonzo-Christe, Caroline; Guignard, Bertrand; Zaugg, Claudia; Coehlo, Ana; Posfay-Barbe, Klara M; Gervaix, Alain; Desmeules, Jules; Rollason, Victoria; Combescure, Christophe; Corbelli, Regula; Rimensberger, Peter; Pfister, Riccardo; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2014-10-01

    Our institution's gentamicin dosing and therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) practices for newborns were suspected to be very heterogeneous. Once-daily dosing (ODD) or extended-interval dosing (EID) and trough concentration measurement were recommended. Clinical decision support guidelines were developed and implemented as clinical decision support in the computerized prescriber order entry system. Impact on dosing, TDM practices, and blood sampling were evaluated. A 1-year retrospective historically controlled study before (April 2008-March 2009) and after the implementation of guidelines (January 2010-December 2010) for newborns ( 0.05). After implementation of the guidelines, an ODD/EID regimen was almost exclusively used (97.7% versus 61.6%, P Guideline implementation generated a sharp reduction in blood sampling. Clinical benefits of better gentamicin dosing and TDM practices were evident. Cost-effectiveness and clinical benefit of reduced blood sampling should be evaluated.

  2. Computer-based Monitoring for Decision Support Systems and Disaster Preparedness in Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Vinh

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The operation of modern buildings can support a vast amount of static and real-time data. Static information such as building schematics is vital for security and rescue purposes. There is a need for building managers and for first responders to be notified of designated building alerts in real-time so that actions can be performed promptly. The capability to monitor building devices and to keep the first responder community updated with the latest building information during emergency situations, as well as the ability to remotely control certain building devices and processes, can be realized today. This paper describes the various challenges encountered in the research area of building interoperability and proposes methods and insights for developing a standards framework to enable communication between building information systems and first responder information systems. Having a standards framework in place will assist in the development and deployment of commercial products in support of building interoperability.

  3. The ToF-ACSM: a portable aerosol chemical speciation monitor with TOFMS detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fröhlich

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a new instrument for monitoring aerosol composition, the time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM, combining precision state-of-the-art time-of-flight mass spectrometry with stability, reliability, and easy handling, which are necessities for long-term monitoring operations on the scale of months to years. Based on Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS technology, the ToF-ACSM provides continuous online measurements of chemical composition and mass of non-refractory submicron aerosol particles. In contrast to the larger AMS, the compact-sized and lower-priced ToF-ACSM does not feature particle sizing, similar to the widely-used quadrupole-ACSM (Q-ACSM. Compared to the Q-ACSM, the ToF-ACSM features a better mass resolution of M/ΔM = 600 and better detection limits on the order of −3 for a time resolution of 30 min. With simple upgrades these limits can be brought down by another factor of ~ 8. This allows for operation at higher time resolutions and in low concentration environments. The associated software packages (single packages for integrated operation and calibration and analysis provide a high degree of automation and remote access, minimising the need for trained personnel on site. Intercomparisons with Q-ACSM, C-ToF-AMS, nephelometer and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS measurements, performed during a first long-term deployment (> 10 months on the Jungfraujoch mountain ridge (3580 m a.s.l. in the Swiss Alps, agree quantitatively. Additionally, the mass resolution of the ToF-ACSM is sufficient for basic mass defect resolved peak fitting of the recorded spectra, providing a data stream not accessible to the Q-ACSM. This allows for quantification of certain hydrocarbon and oxygenated fragments (e.g. C3H7+ and C2H3O+, both occurring at m/Q = 43 Th, as well as improving inorganic/organic separation.

  4. Predictive based monitoring of nuclear plant component degradation using support vector regression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, Statistics; Alamaniotis, Miltiadis [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Nuclear Engineering; Tsoukalas, Lefteri H. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-01

    Nuclear power plants (NPPs) are large installations comprised of many active and passive assets. Degradation monitoring of all these assets is expensive (labor cost) and highly demanding task. In this paper a framework based on Support Vector Regression (SVR) for online surveillance of critical parameter degradation of NPP components is proposed. In this case, on time replacement or maintenance of components will prevent potential plant malfunctions, and reduce the overall operational cost. In the current work, we apply SVR equipped with a Gaussian kernel function to monitor components. Monitoring includes the one-step-ahead prediction of the component’s respective operational quantity using the SVR model, while the SVR model is trained using a set of previous recorded degradation histories of similar components. Predictive capability of the model is evaluated upon arrival of a sensor measurement, which is compared to the component failure threshold. A maintenance decision is based on a fuzzy inference system that utilizes three parameters: (i) prediction evaluation in the previous steps, (ii) predicted value of the current step, (iii) and difference of current predicted value with components failure thresholds. The proposed framework will be tested on turbine blade degradation data.

  5. Reinforcing user data analysis with Ganga in the LHC era: scalability, monitoring and user-support.

    CERN Document Server

    Brochu, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Ebke, J; Egede, U; Elmsheuser, J; Jha, M K; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lee, H C; Maier, A; Moscicki, J; Munchen, T; Reece, W; Samset, B; Slater, M; Tuckett, D; Van der Ster, D; Williams, M

    2011-01-01

    Ganga is a grid job submission and management system widely used in the ATLAS and LHCb experiments and several other communities in the context of the EGEE project. The particle physics communities have entered the LHC operation era which brings new challenges for user data analysis: a strong growth in the number of users and jobs is already noticeable. Current work in the Ganga project is focusing on dealing with these challenges. In recent Ganga releases the support for the pilot job based grid systems Panda and Dirac of the ATLAS and LHCb experiment respectively have been strengthened. A more scalable job repository architecture, which allows efficient storage of many thousands of jobs in XML or several database formats, was recently introduced. A better integration with monitoring systems, including the Dashboard and job execution monitor systems is underway. These will provide comprehensive and easy job monitoring. A simple to use error reporting tool integrated at the Ganga command-line will help to imp...

  6. Reinforcing User Data Analysis with Ganga in the LHC Era: Scalability, Monitoring and User-support

    CERN Document Server

    Brochu, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Ebke, J; Egede, U; Elmsheuser, J; Jha, M K; Kokoszkiewicz, L; Lee, H C; Maier, A; Moscicki, J; Munchen, T; Reece, W; Samset, B; Slater, M; Tuckett, D; Van der Ster, D; Williams, M

    2010-01-01

    Ganga is a grid job submission and management system widely used in the ATLAS and LHCb experiments and several other communities in the context of the EGEE project. The particle physics communities have entered the LHC operation era which brings new challenges for user data analysis: a strong growth in the number of users and jobs is already noticable. Current work in the Ganga project is focusing on dealing with these challenges. In recent Ganga releases the support for the pilot job based grid systems Panda and Dirac of the ATLAS and LHCb experiment respectively have been strengthened. A more scalable job repository architecture, which allows efficient storage of many thousands of jobs in XML or several database formats, was recently introduced. A better integration with monitoring systems, including the Dashboard and job execution monitor systems is underway. These will provide comprehensive and easy job monitoring. A simple to use error reporting tool integrated at the Ganga command-line will help to impr...

  7. Monitoring of cigarette smoking using wearable sensors and support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Meyer, Paulo; Tiffany, Stephen; Patil, Yogendra; Sazonov, Edward

    2013-07-01

    Cigarette smoking is a serious risk factor for cancer, cardiovascular, and pulmonary diseases. Current methods of monitoring of cigarette smoking habits rely on various forms of self-report that are prone to errors and under reporting. This paper presents a first step in the development of a methodology for accurate and objective assessment of smoking using noninvasive wearable sensors (Personal Automatic Cigarette Tracker-PACT) by demonstrating feasibility of automatic recognition of smoke inhalations from signals arising from continuous monitoring of breathing and hand-to-mouth gestures by support vector machine classifiers. The performance of subject-dependent (individually calibrated) models was compared to performance of subject-independent (group) classification models. The models were trained and validated on a dataset collected from 20 subjects performing 12 different activities representative of everyday living (total duration 19.5 h or 21,411 breath cycles). Precision and recall were used as the accuracy metrics. Group models obtained 87% and 80% of average precision and recall, respectively. Individual models resulted in 90% of average precision and recall, indicating a significant presence of individual traits in signal patterns. These results suggest the feasibility of monitoring cigarette smoking by means of a wearable and noninvasive sensor system in free living conditions.

  8. The Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilardo, Vincent J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The various elements of the Physical/Chemical Closed-Loop Life Support Research Project (P/C CLLS) are described including both those currently funded and those planned for implementation at ARC and other participating NASA field centers. The plan addresses the entire range of regenerative life support for Space Exploration Initiative mission needs, and focuses initially on achieving technology readiness for the Initial Lunar Outpost by 1995-97. Project elements include water reclamation, air revitalization, solid waste management, thermal and systems control, and systems integration. Current analysis estimates that each occupant of a space habitat will require a total of 32 kg/day of supplies to live and operate comfortably, while an ideal P/C CLLS system capable of 100 percent reclamation of air and water, but excluding recycling of solid wastes or foods, will reduce this requirement to 3.4 kg/day.

  9. Calculation of Decision Support Interface Values for FEWS NET Remote Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husak, G. J.

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to expand the spatial extent of monitoring activities, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) is seeking new techniques to leverage remotely sensed data. The Decision Support Interface (DSI) represents a new product that is part of a growing suite of remote monitoring tools using existing data products to assist in assessing crop-growing conditions. The DSI indicates areas where remotely sensed data show that further investigation into conditions may be needed. It is designed to be a first-check of conditions for both core monitoring areas as well as those where standard FEWS NET monitoring information may not be available. Initially developed for Africa, the DSI integrates different products and methods into a single assessment of crop-growing conditions. Two primary data inputs drive the DSI: NOAA produced satellite rainfall estimates and eMODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The temporal monitoring unit is the dekad, defined as an approximately 10-day period encompassing either the first ten days (1st-10th), second ten days (11th-20th), or remainder of the month (21st-end). Rainfall accumulations at durations of 1, 3, 6, 9, and 18-dekads are used to capture rainfall conditions for various intervals of the crop calendar. NDVI data are a composite of greenness values over a 10-day period, smoothed in time to correct for atmospheric contamination. Spatial averages of these input data are extracted for defined agricultural regions. The agricultural areas synthesize the best available data for each country, and contain information about typical start and end of the growing season used to determine the period of monitoring for each polygon. Spatial averages of rainfall and NDVI for each polygon are assigned two percentiles, one - termed empirical - based on the ranking of the amount compared to historical amounts for the interval, and a second - termed theoretical - based on a parametric distribution derived from the

  10. Continued Development of Compact Multi-gas Monitor for Life Support Systems Control in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Alonso, Jesús; Phillips, Straun; Chullen, Cinda; Quinn, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Miniature optic gas sensors (MOGS) based on luminescent materials have shown great potential as alternatives to Near-Infrared-based gas sensor systems for the advanced space suit portable life support system (PLSS). The unique capability of MOGS for carbon dioxide and oxygen monitoring under wet conditions has been reported, as has the fast recovery of MOGS humidity sensors after long periods of being wet. Lower volume and power requirements are also potential advantages of MOGS over both traditional and advanced Non-Dispersive Infrared (NDIR) gas sensors, which have shown so far longer life than luminescent sensors. This paper presents the most recent results in the development and analytical validation of a compact multi-gas sensor unit based on luminescent sensors for the PLSS. Results of extensive testing are presented, including studies conducted at Intelligent Optical Systems laboratories, a United Technology Corporation Aerospace Systems (UTAS) laboratory, and a Johnson Space Center laboratory. The potential of this sensor technology for gas monitoring in PLSSs and other life support systems and the advantages and limitations found through detailed sensor validation are discussed.

  11. Anticipatory Monitoring and Control of Complex Systems using a Fuzzy based Fusion of Support Vector Regressors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltiadis Alamaniotis; Vivek Agarwal

    2014-10-01

    This paper places itself in the realm of anticipatory systems and envisions monitoring and control methods being capable of making predictions over system critical parameters. Anticipatory systems allow intelligent control of complex systems by predicting their future state. In the current work, an intelligent model aimed at implementing anticipatory monitoring and control in energy industry is presented and tested. More particularly, a set of support vector regressors (SVRs) are trained using both historical and observed data. The trained SVRs are used to predict the future value of the system based on current operational system parameter. The predicted values are then inputted to a fuzzy logic based module where the values are fused to obtain a single value, i.e., final system output prediction. The methodology is tested on real turbine degradation datasets. The outcome of the approach presented in this paper highlights the superiority over single support vector regressors. In addition, it is shown that appropriate selection of fuzzy sets and fuzzy rules plays an important role in improving system performance.

  12. Compressed air energy storage monitoring to support refrigerated mined rock cavern technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Moo Yul; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2004-06-01

    This document is the final report for the Compressed Air Energy Storage Monitoring to Support Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology (CAES Monitoring to Support RMRCT) (DE-FC26-01NT40868) project to have been conducted by CAES Development Co., along with Sandia National Laboratories. This document provides a final report covering tasks 1.0 and subtasks 2.1, 2.2, and 2.5 of task 2.0 of the Statement of Project Objectives and constitutes the final project deliverable. The proposed work was to have provided physical measurements and analyses of large-scale rock mass response to pressure cycling. The goal was to develop proof-of-concept data for a previously developed and DOE sponsored technology (RMRCT or Refrigerated-Mined Rock Cavern Technology). In the RMRCT concept, a room and pillar mine developed in rock serves as a pressure vessel. That vessel will need to contain pressure of about 1370 psi (and cycle down to 300 psi). The measurements gathered in this study would have provided a means to determine directly rock mass response during cyclic loading on the same scale, under similar pressure conditions. The CAES project has been delayed due to national economic unrest in the energy sector.

  13. Structural Design and Monitoring Analysis of Foundation Pit Support in Yiwu Huishang Tiandi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunsu

    2017-08-01

    Huishang Tiandi deep foundation pit in Yiwu is a two-story basement,which is located in the downtown area and adjacent to the city center main traffic trunk. The surrounding environment is too com-plex to slope. The excavation depth is large, the formation is weak and complex, and the groundwater level is high.In order to ensure the safety of the foundation wall and the surrounding environment, the deformation of the foundation pit support is strictly controlled, and the deformation and internal force of the foundation supporting structure and the surrounding building are monitored.The deformation law of the foundation pit is obtained through the analysis of the horizontal displacement, the deformation rate of the supporting struc-ture, the surrounding environment of the foundation pit and the internal force of the anchor cable. The relia-bility and rationality of the design of foundation pit support are verified. It is of reference value for the de-sign and construction of other deep foundation pit engineering in Yiwu area.

  14. Efficacy of Electroencephalographic Monitoring for the Evaluation of Intracranial Injury during Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support in Neonates and Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Seok Jeong

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: Normal electroencephalographic findings are closely related to normal or mild neurologic impairment. Our results indicate that electroencephalographic monitoring during ECMO support can be a feasible tool for evaluating brain injury although further prospective studies are needed.

  15. [2015 survey overview and future plans : Investigating Long-Term Monitoring Protocols in support of Quivira NWR Habitat Objectives

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is an overview of 2015 surveying for the Investigating Long-Term Monitoring Protocols in support of Quivira NWR Habitat Objectives project led by Fort...

  16. The support of multidimensional approaches in integrate monitoring for SEA: a case of study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, C. M.; Selicato, M.

    2013-01-01

    During the centuries, the seaside has represented a crucial pole for future human development and civilization. The use of the sea for transport and trade and the overwhelming availability of food derived from coastal waters have encouraged and strengthened the growth of urban settlements. In the same time, the human pressure menaces to destroy coastal habitats and consequently their carrying capacity that allows for many essential functions. Low-impact activities are often replaced, on the surface, by new intensive ones that are attractive in the short term, but that in the long term undermine by reducing the resilience of the coast. It is clear that, in a perspective of sustainable development, economically efficient and socially equitable use of coastal areas need to be supported inside strategies to correct these weaknesses. The definition of such strategies and their implementation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is an essential tool for supporting decisions and of monitoring. The issues of monitoring, more in particular, have been the subject of study and modelling by the use of Dynamic Spatial Data Analysis (DSDA), in the case of the SEA of the Coastal Plan of the Italian Apulia Region, as an information instrument for regulating the anthropogenic changes; a possibility to implement the analysis of environmental sensitivity and propensity to Coastal erosion has been explored, in order to control the level of human pressure on land. The monitoring system should provide an automatic "alert" when the dimension and the velocity of the change of land use overpass some threshold of environmental pressure.

  17. The support of multidimensional approaches in integrate monitoring for SEA: a case of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Torre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During centuries, seaside has represented a crucial pole for future human development and civilization. The use of the sea for transport and trade and the overwhelming availability of food derived from coastal waters have encouraged and strengthened the growth of urban settlements. In the same time, the human pressure menaces to destroy coastal habitats, and consequently their carrying capacity that permits to guest many essential functions.

    Low-impact activities are often replaced on the surface by new intensive others that are attractive in the short term, but that in the long term undermine of reducing the resilience of the coast. It is clear that, in a perspective of sustainable development, economically efficient and socially equitable use of coastal areas need to be supported inside strategies to correct these weaknesses. The definition of such strategies and their implementation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA is an essential tool of decision support and of monitoring.

    The issues of monitoring, more in particular, have been subject of study and modeling by the use of Dynamic Spatial Data Analisys (DSDA, in the case of the SEA of the Coastal Plan of the Italian Apulia Region, as an information instrument for regulating the anthropogenic changes; a possibility to implement the analysis of environmental sensitivity and propensity to Coastal erosion has been explored, in order to control the level of human pressure on land. The monitoring system should provide an automatic "alert" when the dimension and the velocity of change of land use overpass some threshold of environmental pressure.

  18. The support of multidimensional approaches in integrate monitoring for SEA: a case of study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Torre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available During the centuries, the seaside has represented a crucial pole for future human development and civilization. The use of the sea for transport and trade and the overwhelming availability of food derived from coastal waters have encouraged and strengthened the growth of urban settlements. In the same time, the human pressure menaces to destroy coastal habitats and consequently their carrying capacity that allows for many essential functions. Low-impact activities are often replaced, on the surface, by new intensive ones that are attractive in the short term, but that in the long term undermine by reducing the resilience of the coast. It is clear that, in a perspective of sustainable development, economically efficient and socially equitable use of coastal areas need to be supported inside strategies to correct these weaknesses. The definition of such strategies and their implementation in the Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA is an essential tool for supporting decisions and of monitoring. The issues of monitoring, more in particular, have been the subject of study and modelling by the use of Dynamic Spatial Data Analysis (DSDA, in the case of the SEA of the Coastal Plan of the Italian Apulia Region, as an information instrument for regulating the anthropogenic changes; a possibility to implement the analysis of environmental sensitivity and propensity to Coastal erosion has been explored, in order to control the level of human pressure on land. The monitoring system should provide an automatic "alert" when the dimension and the velocity of the change of land use overpass some threshold of environmental pressure.

  19. Keep Talking & Monitoring: the importance of longitudinal research & community-based monitoring to support sustainable land management in southern Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougill, Andrew; Stringer, Lindsay

    2015-04-01

    Projects come and go with researchers, development practioners and government staff initiating new forms of community engagement in environmental monitoring and land management practices. We analyse interventions from Botswana and Swaziland and highlight that for benefits to be long-lived and lead to sustainable land management, requires community engagement in project design, implementation and for project outputs to be used in developing community-led environmental monitoring tools that can then help to guide local decision-making systems. We stress the vital importance of continued participatory engagement of researchers with community leaders and key government staff beyond the timeframe of their initial research such that longitudinal research approaches can realise significant benefits to all concerned. In dynamic (non-equilibrium) dryland environments, it is vitally important that research approaches address temporal and spatial variability by mapping patterns of change, using a range of participatory tools to enhance understandings of the causes of land degradation and the opportunities for shifts towards more sustainable land management. Decision-support tools, such as rangeland assessment guides produced for various Kalahari rangeland settings in Botswana (via a UNEP project and affiliated research), provide opportunities to support more sustainable land management. However, at present benefits are not being fully realised as project and research staff move on after projects end. Similarly, findings from mixed farming systems in Swaziland (assessing a JICA-funded project) show problems in maintaining new institutional structures to manage rangeland degradation, whilst issues on arable areas associated with parasitic weeds (Striga asiatica) remain problematic. Findings from longitudinal research in Swaziland also show that community understandings of environmental problems have evolved over 10 years and identify new problems associated with intensified

  20. Chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas using ceria-supported oxygen carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, H B; Aisyah, L; Ashman, P J; Leung, Y C; Kwong, C W

    2013-07-01

    Cu, Ni and Fe oxides supported on ceria were investigated for their performance as oxygen carriers during the chemical looping combustion of biomass-derived syngas. A complex gas mixture containing CO, H2, CO2, CH4 and other hydrocarbons was used to simulate the complex fuel gas environment derived from biomass gasification. Results show that the transfer of the stored oxygen into oxidants for the supported Cu and Ni oxides at 800°C for the combustion of syngas was effective (>85%). The unsupported Cu oxide showed high oxygen carrying capacity but particle sintering was observed at 800°C. A reaction temperature of 950°C was required for the supported Fe oxides to transfer the stored oxygen into oxidants effectively. Also, for the complex fuel gas environment, the supported Ni oxide was somewhat effective in reforming CH4 and other light hydrocarbons into CO, which may have benefits for the reduction of tar produced during biomass pyrolysis.

  1. Recombinant human albumin supports single cell cloning of CHO cells in chemically defined media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Wooh, Jong Wei; Hou, Jeff Jia Cheng; Hughes, Benjamin S; Gray, Peter P; Munro, Trent P

    2012-01-01

    Biologic drugs, such as monoclonal antibodies, are commonly made using mammalian cells in culture. The cell lines used for manufacturing should ideally be clonal, meaning derived from a single cell, which represents a technically challenging process. Fetal bovine serum is often used to support low cell density cultures, however, from a regulatory perspective, it is preferable to avoid animal-derived components to increase process consistency and reduce the risk of contamination from adventitious agents. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are the most widely used cell line in industry and a large number of serum-free, protein-free, and fully chemically defined growth media are commercially available, although these media alone do not readily support efficient single cell cloning. In this work, we have developed a simple, fully defined, single-cell cloning media, specifically for CHO cells, using commercially available reagents. Our results show that a 1:1 mixture of CD-CHO™ and DMEM/F12 supplemented with 1.5 g/L of recombinant albumin (Albucult®) supports single cell cloning. This formulation can support recovery of single cells in 43% of cultures compared to 62% in the presence of serum.

  2. National Satellite Land Monitoring Systems for REDD+ : the UN-REDD support to countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, I. G. C.

    2015-12-01

    REDD+, which stands for 'Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation in Developing Countries' - is a climate mitigation effort and aims to create a financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. The UN-REDD Programme, a collaborative partnership between FAO, UNDP and UNEP launched in September 2008, supports nationally-led REDD+ processes and promotes the imeaningful involvement of all stakeholders, including Indigenous Peoples and other forest-dependent communities, in national and international REDD+ implementation.The Programme supports national REDD+ readiness efforts in partner countries spanning Africa, Asia-Pacific and Latin America, in two ways: (i) direct support to the design and implementation of UN-REDD National Programmes; and (ii) complementary support to national REDD+ action through common approaches, analyses, methodologies, tools, data and best practices. The UN-REDD Programme currently supports 62 partner countries. The UN-REDD Programme gathers technical teams from around the world to develop common approaches, analyses and guidelines on issues such as measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of carbon emissions and flows, remote sensing, and greenhouse gas inventories. Within the partnership, FAO supports countries on technical issues related to forestry and the development of cost effective and credible MRV processes for emission reductions. While at the international level, it fosters improved guidance on MRV approaches, including consensus on principles and guidelines for MRV and training programmes. It provides guidance on how best to design and implement REDD, to ensure that forests continue to provide multiple benefits for livelihoods and biodiversity to societies while storing carbon at the same time. Other areas of work include national forest assessments and monitoring

  3. Chemical and benthos data collected from CTD, bottle, and other instruments in the Chukchi Sea in 2009-2010 as part of the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area - Chemical and Benthos (COMIDA-CAB) project (NODC Accession 0095566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This accession contains physical, chemical, and biological data collected during research cruises for the Chukchi Sea Offshore Monitoring in Drilling Area (Chemical...

  4. Efficient and selective chemical transformations under flow conditions: The combination of supported catalysts and supercritical fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Isabel Burguete

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current trends in the combined use of supported catalytic systems, either on solid supports or in liquid phases and supercritical fluids (scFs, to develop selective and enantioselective chemical transformations under continuous and semi-continuous flow conditions. The results presented have been selected to highlight how the combined use of those two elements can contribute to: (i Significant improvements in productivity as a result of the enhanced diffusion of substrates and reagents through the interfaces favored by the scF phase; (ii the long term stability of the catalytic systems, which also contributes to the improvement of the final productivity, as the use of an appropriate immobilization strategy facilitates catalyst isolation and reuse; (iii the development of highly efficient selective or, when applicable, enantioselective chemical transformations. Although the examples reported in the literature and considered in this review are currently confined to a limited number of fields, a significant development in this area can be envisaged for the near future due to the clear advantages of these systems over the conventional ones.

  5. Nanostructural and Chemical Characterization of Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts by Aberration Corrected Analytical Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wu

    In this thesis, aberration corrected STEM imaging and chemical analysis techniques have been extensively applied in the structural and chemical characterization of supported tungsten oxide catalysts in an attempt to reveal the structure-activity relationships at play in these catalyst systems. The supported WO3/ZrO2 solid acid catalyst system is a major focal point of this thesis, and detailed aberration-corrected STEM-HAADF imaging studies were performed on a systematic set of catalysts showing different level of catalytic performance. The nature of the catalytically most active WOx species was identified by correlating structural information, obtained from STEM-HAADF and in-situ optical spectroscopy studies, with catalytic testing results. Specifically, ˜1nm distorted Zr-WOx mixed oxide clusters were identified to be the most active species for both the methanol dehydration and n-pentane isomerization reactions in the WO3/ZrO2 catalyst system. The use of amorphous zirconia as a precursor support material makes it much easier to extract and incorporate Zr cations into the surface WOx clusters during calcination. The calcination temperature was also identified to also play an important role in the formation of these most active Zr-WOx clusters. When the calcination temperature is comparable to or higher than the 896K Huttig temperature of ZrO2 (at which surface ZrO x species have sufficient mobility to agglomerate and sinter), the chance for successful surface WOx and ZrOx intermixing is significantly increased. Based on this perceived structure-activity relationship, several new catalyst synthesis strategies were developed in an attempt to optimize the catalytic performance of WOx-based catalysts. We have demonstrated in Chapter 3 that co-impregnation of WOx and ZrOx precursors onto an inactive model WO3/ZrO2 catalyst, followed by a calcination treatment above the 896K Huttig temperature of ZrO 2, promotes the surface diffusion of ZrO2 and intermixing of Zr

  6. ROBIN, a Telepresence Robot to Support Older Users Monitoring and Social Inclusion: Development and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellessa, Gabriella; Fracasso, Francesca; Sorrentino, Alessandra; Orlandini, Andrea; Bernardi, Giulio; Coraci, Luca; De Benedictis, Riccardo; Cesta, Amedeo

    2017-08-03

    This article describes an enhanced telepresence robot named ROBIN, part of a telecare system derived from the GIRAFFPLUS project for supporting and monitoring older adults at home. ROBIN is integrated in a sensor-rich environment that aims to continuously monitor physical and psychological wellbeing of older persons living alone. The caregivers (formal/informal) can communicate through it with their assisted persons. Long-term trials in real houses highlighted several user requirements that inspired improvements on the robotic platform. The enhanced telepresence robot was assessed by users to test its suitability to support social interaction and provide motivational feedback on health-related aspects. Twenty-five users (n = 25) assessed the new multimodal interaction capabilities and new communication services. A psychophysiological approach was adopted to investigate aspects like engagement, usability, and affective impact, as well as the possible role of individual differences on the quality of human-robot interaction. ROBIN was overall judged usable, the interaction with/through it resulted pleasant and the required workload was limited, thus supporting the idea of using it as a central component for remote assistance and social participation. Open-minded users tended to have a more positive interaction with it. This work describes an enabling technology for remote assistance and social communication. It highlights the importance of being compliant with users' needs to develop solutions easy to use and able to foster their social connections. The role of personality appeared to be relevant for the interaction, underscoring a clear role of the service personalization.

  7. Model-driven decision support for monitoring network design: methods and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D. R.; Mishra, P. K.; Katzman, D.

    2012-12-01

    A crucial aspect of any decision-making process for environmental management of contaminated sites and protection of groundwater resources is the identification of scientifically defensible remediation scenarios. The selected scenarios are ranked based on both their protective and cost effectiveness. The decision-making process is facilitated by implementation of site-specific data- and model-driven analyses for decision support (DS) taking into account existing uncertainties to evaluate alternative characterization and remedial activities. However, due to lack of data and/or complex interdependent uncertainties (conceptual elements, model parameters, measurement/computational errors, etc.), the DS optimization problem is ill posed (non unique) and the model-prediction uncertainties are difficult to quantify. Recently, we have developed and implemented several novel theoretical approaches and computational algorithms for model-driven decision support. New and existing DS tools have been employed for model analyses of the fate and extent of a chromium plume in the regional aquifer at Sandia Canyon Site, LANL. Since 2007, we have performed three iterations of DS analyses implementing different models, decision-making tools, and data sets providing guidance on design of a subsurface monitoring network for (1) characterization of the flow and transports processes, and (2) protection of the water users. The monitoring network is augmented by new wells at locations where acquired new data can effectively reduce uncertainty in model predicted contaminant concentrations. A key component of the DS analyses is contaminant source identification. Due to data and conceptual uncertainties, subsurface processes controlling the contaminant arrival at the top of the regional aquifer are not well defined. Nevertheless, the model-based analyses of the existing data and conceptual knowledge, including respective uncertainties, provide constrained probabilistic estimates of the

  8. Monitoring and telemedicine support in remote environments and in human space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cermack, M

    2006-07-01

    The common features of remote environments are geographical separation, logistic problems with health care delivery and with patient retrieval, extreme natural conditions, artificial environment, or combination of all. The exposure can have adverse effects on patients' physiology, on care providers' performance and on hardware functionality. The time to definite treatment may vary between hours as in orbital space flight, days for remote exploratory camp, weeks for polar bases and months to years for interplanetary exploration. The generic system architecture, used in any telematic support, consists of data acquisition, data-processing and storage, telecommunications links, decision-making facilities and the means of command execution. At the present level of technology, a simple data transfer and two-way voice communication could be established from any place on the earth, but the current use of mobile communication technologies for telemedicine applications is still low, either for logistic, economic and political reasons, or because of limited knowledge about the available technology and procedures. Criteria for selection of portable telemedicine terminals in remote terrestrial places, characteristics of currently available mobile telecommunication systems, and the concept of integrated monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters are mentioned in the first section of this paper. The second part describes some aspects of emergency medical support in human orbital spaceflight, the limits of telemedicine support in near-Earth space environment and mentions some open issues related to long-term exploratory missions beyond the low Earth orbit.

  9. Designing monitoring programs for chemicals of emerging concern in potable reuse ⋯ What to include and what not to include?

    KAUST Repository

    Drewes, Jorg

    2012-11-01

    This study discussed a proposed process to prioritize chemicals for reclaimed water monitoring programs, selection of analytical methods required for their quantification, toxicological relevance of chemicals of emerging concern regarding human health, and related issues. Given that thousands of chemicals are potentially present in reclaimed water and that information about those chemicals is rapidly evolving, a transparent, science-based framework was developed to guide prioritization of which compounds of emerging concern (CECs) should be included in reclaimed water monitoring programs. The recommended framework includes four steps: (1) compile environmental concentrations (e.g., measured environmental concentration or MEC) of CECs in the source water for reuse projects; (2) develop a monitoring trigger level (MTL) for each of these compounds (or groups thereof) based on toxicological relevance; (3) compare the environmental concentration (e.g., MEC) to the MTL; CECs with a MEC/MTL ratio greater than 1 should be prioritized for monitoring, compounds with a ratio less than \\'1\\' should only be considered if they represent viable treatment process performance indicators; and (4) screen the priority list to ensure that a commercially available robust analytical method is available for that compound. © IWA Publishing 2013.

  10. Monitoring the fate and transport of deicing chemicals in lysimeter experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lißner, H.; Wehrer, M.; Totsche, K. U.

    2012-04-01

    Large amounts of the deicing chemicals (DIC) propylene glycol (PG) and formate are spread for removal of snow and ice on the aircrafts and airfields every winter. A considerable amount of these chemicals are carried into surrounding areas, where they mix with snow and infiltrate in the soil during snowmelt. Even though DIC are easily degradable, the high mobility and the high biological oxygen demand of PG in particular can influence the hydrogeochemistry of the unsaturated and saturated zone. The aims of the study were to evaluate and quantify transport of deicing chemicals during snowmelt under field conditions, and to study effects of DIC degradation on the hydrogeochemistry of the unsaturated zone. Eight undisturbed soil cores (0.3 m x 1 m, 0.071 m3) were retrieved at the Gardermoen Airport, Norway, and installed as non-weighable small scale lysimeters at a nearby field site. Before snowmelt in March 2010, a mix of snow containing 350 g/m2 PG, 71 g/m2 formate, and 17 g/m2 of bromide were added to the lysimeters. To determine the fate and transport of PG we monitored PG and its metabolites, bromide, manganese, and iron in the seepage water. High cumulative infiltration and marginal degradation of PG during the snowmelt period allowed up to 50 % of the PG to leave the upper, microbially most active, region of the soil. Only marginal concentrations of formate were analysed in all lysimeters, indicating fast degradation and favoured metabolism by soil bacteria compared to PG. Low contents of metabolites and the concurrent breakthrough of PG and Br in the seepage water even imply that PG was not significantly degraded before June. Redox values down to 200 mV in April, the detection of propionate and manganese, as well as a rise in pH, suggest partially anearobic localities in the soil, not only during high soil water saturation in April and May but also during summer when PG degradation was very efficient. In the longterm, the intense depletion of electron acceptors

  11. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in

  12. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in

  13. A Real-Time Interference Monitoring Technique for GNSS Based on a Twin Support Vector Machine Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wutao; Huang, Zhigang; Lang, Rongling; Qin, Honglei; Zhou, Kai; Cao, Yongbin

    2016-03-04

    Interferences can severely degrade the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. As the first step of GNSS any anti-interference measures, interference monitoring for GNSS is extremely essential and necessary. Since interference monitoring can be considered as a classification problem, a real-time interference monitoring technique based on Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM) is proposed in this paper. A TWSVM model is established, and TWSVM is solved by the Least Squares Twin Support Vector Machine (LSTWSVM) algorithm. The interference monitoring indicators are analyzed to extract features from the interfered GNSS signals. The experimental results show that the chosen observations can be used as the interference monitoring indicators. The interference monitoring performance of the proposed method is verified by using GPS L1 C/A code signal and being compared with that of standard SVM. The experimental results indicate that the TWSVM-based interference monitoring is much faster than the conventional SVM. Furthermore, the training time of TWSVM is on millisecond (ms) level and the monitoring time is on microsecond (μs) level, which make the proposed approach usable in practical interference monitoring applications.

  14. A Real-Time Interference Monitoring Technique for GNSS Based on a Twin Support Vector Machine Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wutao Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferences can severely degrade the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers. As the first step of GNSS any anti-interference measures, interference monitoring for GNSS is extremely essential and necessary. Since interference monitoring can be considered as a classification problem, a real-time interference monitoring technique based on Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM is proposed in this paper. A TWSVM model is established, and TWSVM is solved by the Least Squares Twin Support Vector Machine (LSTWSVM algorithm. The interference monitoring indicators are analyzed to extract features from the interfered GNSS signals. The experimental results show that the chosen observations can be used as the interference monitoring indicators. The interference monitoring performance of the proposed method is verified by using GPS L1 C/A code signal and being compared with that of standard SVM. The experimental results indicate that the TWSVM-based interference monitoring is much faster than the conventional SVM. Furthermore, the training time of TWSVM is on millisecond (ms level and the monitoring time is on microsecond (μs level, which make the proposed approach usable in practical interference monitoring applications.

  15. Analysis of stresses on the 1st phase support of the monitoring drifts of the radioactive waste repository

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatala Jozef

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the stability analysis of the radioactive waste repository monitoring drifts’ support by means of the numerical modelling - finite element method is described. The aim of this analysis was to judge to what extent the designed 1st phase support’s parameters correspond with the geomechanical conditions determined by the engineering-geological survey.

  16. Improving Capacity to Monitor and Support Sustainability of Mental Health Peer-Run Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Laysha; Leaf, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Peer-run mental health organizations are managed and staffed by people with lived experience of the mental health system. These understudied organizations are increasingly recognized as an important component of the behavioral health care and social support systems. This Open Forum describes the National Survey of Peer-Run Organizations, which was conducted in 2012 to gather information about peer-run organizations and programs, organizational operations, policy perspectives, and service systems. A total of 895 entities were identified and contacted as potential peer-run organizations. Information was obtained for 715 (80%) entities, and 380 of the 715 responding entities met the criteria for a peer-run organization. Implementation of the Affordable Care Act may entail benefits and unintended consequences for peer-run organizations. It is essential that we understand this population of organizations and continue to monitor changes associated with policies intended to provide better access to care that promotes wellness and recovery. PMID:24492900

  17. [Mathematical simulation support to the dosimetric monitoring on the Russian segment of the International Space Station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    To ensure radiation safety of cosmonauts, it is necessary not only to predict, but also to reconstruct absorbed dose dynamics with the knowledge of how long cosmonauts stay in specific space vehicle compartments with different shielding properties and lacking equipment for dosimetric monitoring. In this situation, calculating is one and only way to make a correct estimate of radiation exposure of cosmonaut's organism as a whole (tissue-average dose) and of separate systems and organs. The paper addresses the issues of mathematical simulation of epy radiation environment of standard dosimetric instruments in the Russian segments of the International Space Station (ISS RS). Results of comparing the simulation and experimental data for the complement of dosimeters including ionization chamber-based radiometer R-16, DB8 dosimeters composed of semiconductor detectors, and Pille dosimeters composed of thermoluminescent detectors evidence that the current methods of simulation in support of the ISS RS radiation monitoring provide a sufficiently good agreement between the calculated and experimental data.

  18. Monitoring And Modeling Environmental Water Quality To Support Environmental Water Purchase Decision-making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Null, S. E.; Elmore, L.; Mouzon, N. R.; Wood, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    More than 25 million cubic meters (20,000 acre feet) of water has been purchased from willing agricultural sellers for environmental flows in Nevada's Walker River to improve riverine habitat and connectivity with downstream Walker Lake. Reduced instream flows limit native fish populations, like Lahontan cutthroat trout, through warm daily stream temperatures and low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Environmental water purchases maintain instream flows, although effects on water quality are more varied. We use multi-year water quality monitoring and physically-based hydrodynamic and water quality modeling to estimate streamflow, water temperature, and dissolved oxygen concentrations with alternative environmental water purchases. We simulate water temperature and dissolved oxygen changes from increased streamflow to prioritize the time periods and locations that environmental water purchases most enhance trout habitat as a function of water quality. Monitoring results indicate stream temperature and dissolved oxygen limitations generally exist in the 115 kilometers upstream of Walker Lake (about 37% of the study area) from approximately May through September, and this reach acts as a water quality barrier for fish passage. Model results indicate that low streamflows generally coincide with critically warm stream temperatures, water quality refugia exist on a tributary of the Walker River, and environmental water purchases may improve stream temperature and dissolved oxygen conditions for some reaches and seasons, especially in dry years and prolonged droughts. This research supports environmental water purchase decision-making and allows water purchase decisions to be prioritized with other river restoration alternatives.

  19. Cloud Monitoring for Solar Plants with Support Vector Machine Based Fault Detection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Chan Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study endeavors to develop a cloud monitoring system for solar plants. This system incorporates numerous subsystems, such as a geographic information system, an instantaneous power-consumption information system, a reporting system, and a failure diagnosis system. Visual C# was integrated with ASP.NET and SQL technologies for the proposed monitoring system. A user interface for database management system was developed to enable users to access solar power information and management systems. In addition, by using peer-to-peer (P2P streaming technology and audio/video encoding/decoding technology, real-time video data can be transmitted to the client end, providing instantaneous and direct information. Regarding smart failure diagnosis, the proposed system employs the support vector machine (SVM theory to train failure mathematical models. The solar power data are provided to the SVM for analysis in order to determine the failure types and subsequently eliminate failures at an early stage. The cloud energy-management platform developed in this study not only enhances the management and maintenance efficiency of solar power plants but also increases the market competitiveness of solar power generation and renewable energy.

  20. [Chemical analysis of wastewater as a new way of monitoring drugs and medicines consumption at workplace].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiergowski, Marek; Sołtyszewski, Ireneusz; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    The available information on the quality and frequency of illegal psychoactive substances used or medicines misused by workers, are often out of date at the time of its publication. This is due to the dynamic introduction of new synthetic drugs on the black market, changes in trends in the recreational use of medicines and the lack of readily available and reliable tests for fast identification. Strategy for detection of narcotic and non-medical psychoactive drugs use at workplace should embrace all possible sources of information. Classical sources of information on the use of psychoactive substances at the workplace include: statistical data (general information on trends and magnitude of drug and medicine addiction collected by the Polish National Police, the National Bureau for Drug Prevention and emergency medical services), surveys, psychomotor tests and qualitative and quantitative analyses of biological material. Of the new and promising methods, used throughout the world in recent years, chemical-toxicological analysis of surface water and wastewater deserve special mention. An increasing interest in the study of urban waste water can significantly complement the source of knowledge about drug and medicine addiction using obtainable conventional methods. In recent years, a municipal wastewater analysis has become a new and very promising way of collecting updated information on the use of psychoactive substances and medicines. It seems that this kind of study may play an important role in the ongoing monitoring of drug and/or medicines use by selected groups of population (e.g., students, military, firemen, policemen, etc.).

  1. Monitoring Chemical and Biological Electron Transfer Reactions with a Fluorogenic Vitamin K Analogue Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzile, Mei-Ni; Godin, Robert; Durantini, Andrés M; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2016-12-21

    We report herein the design, synthesis, and characterization of a two-segment fluorogenic analogue of vitamin K, B-VKQ, prepared by coupling vitamin K3, also known as menadione (a quinone redox center), to a boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) fluorophore (a lipophilic reporter segment). Oxidation-reduction reactions, spectroelectrochemical studies, and enzymatic assays conducted in the presence of DT-diaphorase illustrate that the new probe shows reversible redox behavior on par with that of vitamin K, provides a high-sensitivity fluorescence signal, and is compatible with biological conditions, opening the door to monitor remotely (i.e., via imaging) redox processes in real time. In its oxidized form, B-VKQ is non-emissive, while upon reduction to the hydroquinone form, B-VKQH2, BODIPY fluorescence is restored, with emission quantum yield values of ca. 0.54 in toluene. Density functional theory studies validate a photoinduced electron transfer intramolecular switching mechanism, active in the non-emissive quinone form and deactivated upon reduction to the emissive dihydroquinone form. Our results highlight the potential of B-VKQ as a fluorogenic probe to study electron transfer and transport in model systems and biological structures with optimal sensitivity and desirable chemical specificity. Use of such a probe may enable a better understanding of the role that vitamin K plays in biological redox reactions ubiquitous in key cellular processes, and help elucidate the mechanism and pathological significance of these reactions in biological systems.

  2. Investigations of high mobility single crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromson, D.; Descamps, C.; Tranchant, N.; Bergonzo, P.; Nesladek, M.; Isambert, A.

    2008-03-01

    The intrinsic properties of diamond make this material theoretically very suitable for applications in medical physics. Until now ionization chambers have been fabricated from natural stones and are commercialized by PTW, but their fairly high costs and long delivery times have often limited their use in hospital. The properties of commercialized intrinsic polycrystalline diamond were investigated in the past by many groups. The results were not completely satisfactory due to the nature of the polycrystalline material itself. In contrast, the recent progresses in the growth of high mobility single crystal synthetic diamonds prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique offer new alternatives. In the framework of the MAESTRO project (Methods and Advanced Treatments and Simulations for Radio Oncology), the CEA-LIST is studying the potentialities of synthetic diamond for new techniques of irradiation such as intensity modulated radiation therapy. In this paper, we present the growth and characteristics of single crystal diamond prepared at CEA-LIST in the framework of the NoRHDia project (Novel Radiation Hard CVD Diamond Detector for Hadrons Physics), as well as the investigations of high mobility single crystal CVD diamond for radiotherapy photon beam monitoring: dosimetric analysis performed with the single crystal diamond detector in terms of stability and repeatability of the response signal, signal to noise ratio, response speed, linearity of the signal versus the absorbed dose, and dose rate. The measurements performed with photon beams using radiotherapy facilities demonstrate that single crystal CVD diamond is a good alternative for air ionization chambers for beam quality control.

  3. SIAM-SERVIR: An Environmental Monitoring and Decision Support System for Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel E.; Sever, Tom; Graves, Sara; Hardin, Danny

    2005-01-01

    In 2002/2003 NASA, the World Bank and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) joined with the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD) to develop an advanced decision support system for Mesoamerica (named SERVIR) as part of the Mesoamerican Environmental Information System (SIAM). Mesoamerica - composed of the seven Central American countries and the five southernmost states of Mexico - make up only a small fraction of the world s land surface. However, the region is home to seven to eight percent of the planet s biodiversity (14 biosphere reserves, 31 Ramsar sites, 8 world heritage sites, 589 protected areas) and 45 million people including more than 50 different ethnic groups. Today Mesoamerica s biological and cultural diversity is severely threatened by extensive deforestation, illegal logging, water pollution, and uncontrolled slash and burn agriculture. Additionally, Mesoamerica's distinct geology and geography result in disproportionate vulnerability to natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, drought, and volcanic eruptions. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and the SIAM-SERVIR partners are developing state-of-the-art decision support tools for environmental monitoring as well as disaster prevention and mitigation in Mesoamerica. These partners are contributing expertise in space-based observation with information management technologies and intimate knowledge of local ecosystems to create a system that is being used by scientists, educators, and policy makers to monitor and forecast ecological changes, respond to natural disasters and better understand both natural and human induced effects. In its first year of development and operation, the SIAM-SERVIR project has already yielded valuable information on Central American fires, weather conditions, and the first ever real-time data on red tides. This paper presents the progress thus far

  4. SIAM-SERVIR: An Environmental Monitoring and Decision Support System for Mesoamerica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel E.; Sever, Tom; Graves, Sara; Hardin, Danny

    2005-01-01

    In 2002/2003 NASA, the World Bank and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) joined with the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD) to develop an advanced decision support system for Mesoamerica (named SERVIR) as part of the Mesoamerican Environmental Information System (SIAM). Mesoamerica - composed of the seven Central American countries and the five southernmost states of Mexico - make up only a small fraction of the world s land surface. However, the region is home to seven to eight percent of the planet s biodiversity (14 biosphere reserves, 31 Ramsar sites, 8 world heritage sites, 589 protected areas) and 45 million people including more than 50 different ethnic groups. Today Mesoamerica s biological and cultural diversity is severely threatened by extensive deforestation, illegal logging, water pollution, and uncontrolled slash and burn agriculture. Additionally, Mesoamerica's distinct geology and geography result in disproportionate vulnerability to natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, drought, and volcanic eruptions. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, together with the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) and the SIAM-SERVIR partners are developing state-of-the-art decision support tools for environmental monitoring as well as disaster prevention and mitigation in Mesoamerica. These partners are contributing expertise in space-based observation with information management technologies and intimate knowledge of local ecosystems to create a system that is being used by scientists, educators, and policy makers to monitor and forecast ecological changes, respond to natural disasters and better understand both natural and human induced effects. In its first year of development and operation, the SIAM-SERVIR project has already yielded valuable information on Central American fires, weather conditions, and the first ever real-time data on red tides. This paper presents the progress thus far

  5. Aluminum Oxide Formation On Fecral Catalyst Support By Electro-Chemical Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang H.S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available FeCrAl is comprised essentially of Fe, Cr, Al and generally considered as metallic substrates for catalyst support because of its advantage in the high-temperature corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and ductility. Oxidation film and its adhesion on FeCrAl surface with aluminum are important for catalyst life. Therefore various appropriate surface treatments such as thermal oxidation, Sol, PVD, CVD has studied. In this research, PEO (plasma electrolytic oxidation process was applied to form the aluminum oxide on FeCrAl surface, and the formed oxide particle according to process conditions such as electric energy and oxidation time were investigated. Microstructure and aluminum oxide particle on FeCrAl surface after PEO process was observed by FE-SEM and EDS with element mapping analysis. The study presents possibility of aluminum oxide formation by electro-chemical coating process without any pretreatment of FeCrAl.

  6. Web-Based Implementation of E-Marketing to Support Product Marketing of Chemical Manufacturing Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riswan Efendi Tarigan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many company’s marketing strategies are limited only to face-to-face communication, telephone, facsimile, company portfolio, and product brochures. However, those marketing strategies are well- known to have limited impacts. Therefore, the presence of e-marketing as one of the marketing strategies would be appropriate to cover the weaknesses and to solve a number of the marketing problems. The purpose of this study is to discuss matters related to marketing, such    as, proposing a marketing plan using website, expanding marketing segment, and introducing existing  products for a chemical manufacturing company. The adopted research method is a descriptive method where the study is directly performed on the research object to acquire necessary data. The collected data are further analyzed using the Porter’s Five Force and SWOT analysis. Fi- nally, the work provides a number of recommendations for implementing e-marketing strategies to support the company business.

  7. Effect of chemically reduced palladium supported catalyst on sunflower oil hydrogenation conversion and selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulmajid Alshaibani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of sunflower oil was studied in order to improve the conversion and to reduce the trans-isomerization selectivity. The hydrogenation was performed using Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 prepared catalyst and Pd/Al2O3 commercial catalyst under similar conditions. The Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation and chemical reduction processes. It was characterized by Brunauer–Emmett–Teller surface area analysis (BET, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The result of sunflower oil hydrogenation on Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst showed a 17% higher conversion and a 23% lower trans-isomerization selectivity compared to the commercial Pd/Al2O3 catalyst. The chemical reduction of palladium supported catalyst using potassium borohydride (KBH4 has affected the Pd–B/γ-Al2O3 catalyst’s structure and particle size. These most likely influenced its catalytic performance toward higher conversion and lower trans-isomerization selectivity.

  8. Design of a perfluorocarbon tracer based monitoring network to support monitoring verification and accounting of sequestered CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, T.; Sullivan, T.

    2013-05-01

    The levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have been growing since the beginning of the industrial revolution. The current level is 391 ppm. If there are no efforts to mitigate CO2 emissions, the levels will rise to 750 ppm by 2100. Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy that may be used to begin to reduce emissions. Sequestration will not be effective unless reservoir leak rates are significantly less than 1%. There must be rigorous monitoring protocols in place to ensure sequestration projects meet regulatory and environmental goals. Monitoring for CO2 leakage directly is difficult because of the large background levels and variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Using tracers to tag the sequestered CO2 can mitigate some of the difficulties of direct measurement but a tracer monitoring network and the levels of tagging need to be carefully designed. Simple diffusion and dispersion models are used to predict the surface and atmospheric concentrations that would be seen by a network monitoring a sequestration site. Levels of tracer necessary to detect leaks from 0.01 to 1% are presented and suggestions for effective monitoring and protection of global tracer utility are presented.

  9. Design of a perfluorocarbon tracer based monitoring network to support monitoring verification and accounting of sequestered CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sullivan T.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The levels of CO2 in the atmosphere have been growing since the beginning of the industrial revolution. The current level is 391 ppm. If there are no efforts to mitigate CO2 emissions, the levels will rise to 750 ppm by 2100. Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy that may be used to begin to reduce emissions. Sequestration will not be effective unless reservoir leak rates are significantly less than 1%. There must be rigorous monitoring protocols in place to ensure sequestration projects meet regulatory and environmental goals. Monitoring for CO2 leakage directly is difficult because of the large background levels and variability of CO2 in the atmosphere. Using tracers to tag the sequestered CO2 can mitigate some of the difficulties of direct measurement but a tracer monitoring network and the levels of tagging need to be carefully designed. Simple diffusion and dispersion models are used to predict the surface and atmospheric concentrations that would be seen by a network monitoring a sequestration site. Levels of tracer necessary to detect leaks from 0.01 to 1% are presented and suggestions for effective monitoring and protection of global tracer utility are presented.

  10. Development of a strategy for biological monitoring in a chemical plant producing 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, Kristian F; Will, Norbert; Leng, Gabriele; Selinski, Silvia; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus; Bolt, Hermann M

    2012-01-01

    In a chemical plant in Germany producing 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine dihydrochloride for the manufacture of colorants, blood and urine samples were taken for biological monitoring. 3,3'-Dichlorobenzidine (DBZ) was analyzed in urine by thin-layer chromatography and subsequently further combined with analysis of adducts of 3,3'-DBZ in hemoglobin. Data highlight current ranges of industrial exposure to 3,3'-DBZ in Germany and demonstrate the applicability of biological monitoring to minimize this exposure. Effective biological monitoring was achieved by a combination of monitoring hemoglobin adducts with spot samplings of urinary 3,3'-DBZ excretion in cases of reported exposure periods. Data presented might help to identify biological guidance values (BGV/BAR) for 3,3'-DBZ-exposed individuals.

  11. Big Data Architectures for Operationalized Seismic and Subsurface Monitoring and Decision Support Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, D. H.; Rasheed, M.; Hillman, C.; O'Doherty, N.

    2012-12-01

    Oilfield management is moving to a more operational footing with near-realtime seismic and sensor monitoring governing drilling, fluid injection and hydrocarbon extraction workflows within safety, productivity and profitability constraints. To date, the geoscientific analytical architectures employed are configured for large volumes of data, computational power or analytical latency and compromises in system design must be made to achieve all three aspects. These challenges are encapsulated by the phrase 'Big Data' which has been employed for over a decade in the IT industry to describe the challenges presented by data sets that are too large, volatile and diverse for existing computational architectures and paradigms. We present a data-centric architecture developed to support a geoscientific and geotechnical workflow whereby: ●scientific insight is continuously applied to fresh data ●insights and derived information are incorporated into engineering and operational decisions ●data governance and provenance are routine within a broader data management framework Strategic decision support systems in large infrastructure projects such as oilfields are typically relational data environments; data modelling is pervasive across analytical functions. However, subsurface data and models are typically non-relational (i.e. file-based) in the form of large volumes of seismic imaging data or rapid streams of sensor feeds and are analysed and interpreted using niche applications. The key architectural challenge is to move data and insight from a non-relational to a relational, or structured, data environment for faster and more integrated analytics. We describe how a blend of MapReduce and relational database technologies can be applied in geoscientific decision support, and the strengths and weaknesses of each in such an analytical ecosystem. In addition we discuss hybrid technologies that use aspects of both and translational technologies for moving data and analytics

  12. The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects database (CAFE), a tool that supports assessments of chemical spills in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Adriana C; Farr, James K; Jenne, Polly; Chu, Valerie; Hielscher, Al

    2016-06-01

    The Chemical Aquatic Fate and Effects (CAFE) database is a centralized repository that allows for rapid and unrestricted access to data. Information in CAFE is integrated into a user-friendly tool with modules containing fate and effects data for 32 377 and 4498 chemicals, respectively. Toxicity data are summarized in the form of species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) with associated 1st and 5th percentile hazard concentrations (HCs). An assessment of data availability relative to reported chemical incidents showed that CAFE had fate and toxicity data for 32 and 20 chemicals, respectively, of 55 chemicals reported in the US National Response Center database (2000-2014), and fate and toxicity data for 86 and 103, respectively, of 205 chemicals reported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (2003-2014). Modeled environmental concentrations of 2 hypothetical spills (acrylonitrile, 625 barrels; and denatured ethanol, 857 barrels) were used to demonstrate CAFE's practical application. Most species in the 24-h SSD could be potentially impacted by acrylonitrile and denatured ethanol during the first 35 min and 15 h post spill, respectively, with concentrations falling below their HC5s (17 mg/L and 2676 mg/L) at 45 min and 60 h post spill, respectively. Comparisons of CAFE-based versus published HC5 values for 100 chemicals showed that nearly half of values were within a 2-fold difference, with a relatively small number of comparisons exceeding a 10-fold difference. The development of CAFE facilitates access to relevant environmental information, with potential uses likely expanding beyond those related to assessment of spills in aquatic environments. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1576-1586. © 2015 SETAC.

  13. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques.

  14. Monitoring the Interaction of Two Heterocyclic Compounds on Carbon Steel by Electrochemical Polarization, Noise, and Quantum Chemical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod P. Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A heterocyclic phenylhydrazone 2-[(E-(2-phenylhydrazinylidenemethyl]pyridine (P2APH and its reduced form 2-[(2-phenylhydrazinylmethyl]pyridine (RP2APH were synthesized, characterized, and subjected to corrosion inhibition investigation on carbon steel (CS in 1 M HCl using gravimetric, polarization, electrochemical noise, quantum chemical, and surface studies. P2APH showed more inhibition capacity than RP2PPH. But RP2PPH was very stable in acid medium and showed pronounced corrosion inhibition efficacy for days. Energy of HOMO and LUMO, their difference, number of electrons transferred, electronegativity, chemical hardness, and so forth were evaluated by quantum chemical studies. Agreeable correlation was observed between the results of quantum chemical calculations and other corrosion monitoring techniques.

  15. Chemical analysis of wastewater as a new way of monitoring drugs and medicines consumption at workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Wiergowski

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The available information on the quality and frequency of illegal psychoactive substances used or medicines misused by workers, are often out of date at the time of its publication. This is due to the dynamic introduction of new synthetic drugs on the black market, changes in trends in the recreational use of medicines and the lack of readily available and reliable tests for fast identification. Strategy for detection of narcotic and non-medical psychoactive drugs use at workplace should embrace all possible sources of information. Classical sources of information on the use of psychoactive substances at the workplace include: statistical data (general information on trends and magnitude of drug and medicine addiction collected by the Polish National Police, the National Bureau for Drug Prevention and emergency medical services, surveys, psychomotor tests and qualitative and quantitative analyses of biological material. Of the new and promising methods, used throughout the world in recent years, chemical-toxicological analysis of surface water and wastewater deserve special mention. An increasing interest in the study of urban waste water can significantly complement the source of knowledge about drug and medicine addiction using obtainable conventional methods. In recent years, a municipal wastewater analysis has become a new and very promising way of collecting updated information on the use of psychoactive substances and medicines. It seems that this kind of study may play an important role in the ongoing monitoring of drug and/or medicines use by selected groups of population (e.g., students, military, firemen, policemen, etc.. Med Pr 2015;66(6:837–847

  16. The codevelopment of coastal fisheries monitoring methods to support local management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Schemmel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale fisheries across the globe provide critical food security, livelihoods, and human well-being, but are threatened by a combination of local and global stressors, including overexploitation, pollution, and climate change. Participatory approaches to management, especially those that incorporate local communities and customary knowledge can provide meaningful biological information that supports sustainable fisheries management and builds local adaptive capacity to changing ocean conditions. Through a collaboration between fishers, scientists, NGOs, and regulating agencies, we developed a low-cost, low-tech method to assess the seasonal spawning peaks, lunar spawning cycles, and size at maturity (L50 for key targeted reef fish, combining traditional knowledge and practice with modern scientific approaches, including gonadosomatic index (GSI and histology. Two years of community-based monitoring resulted in data from 57 species and 15 families of reef and nearshore fishes (n = 2595, with detailed information for 10 species at 4 locations across the Hawaiian Islands. Comparisons between community-collected GSI data and scientifically (histologically assessed spawning cycles and size at reproductive maturity produced similar results suggesting that these approaches can be applied in data-poor fisheries to assess spawning seasons and size at maturity (L50, both of which are critical needs for effective fisheries management. Semistructured surveys revealed a large body of local knowledge on spawning times and harvest practices based on allowing spawning to occur before harvesting and protecting small and large size classes, but little evidence that fishers understand temporal patterns of spawning. This suggests that monitoring methods that fill key gaps such as this and are congruent with these local knowledge systems and customary harvest practices may be key for local stewardship and adaptive management.

  17. Monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy: A case of Fe³⁺ to Fe²⁺ conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Suhua; Meng, Juan; Tang, Xianghu; Yang, Liangbao

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the process of organic chemical reactions to study the kinetics by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is currently of immense interest. However, monitoring the inorganic chemical reaction is still an extremely difficulty for researchers. This study exactly focused on the monitor of inorganic chemical reaction. Capillary coated with silver nanoparticles was introduced, which was an efficient platform for monitoring reactions with SERS due to the advantages of sensitivity and excellent reproducibility. The photoreduction of [Fe(phen)3](3+) to [Fe(phen)3](2+) was used as model reaction to demonstrated the feasibility of SERS monitoring inorganic chemical reaction by involving in metal-organic complexes. Moreover, the preliminary implementation demonstrated that the kinetics of photoreduction can be real-time monitored by in situ using the SERS technique on a single constructed capillary, which may be useful for the practical application of SERS technique.

  18. Quantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions by autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhenqian; Bartmess, John E; McNally, Mary Ellen; Hoffman, Ron M; Cook, Kelsey D; Song, Liguo

    2012-09-04

    Although qualitative and/or semiquantitative real-time monitoring of chemical reactions have been reported with a few mass spectrometric approaches, to our knowledge, no quantitative mass spectrometric approach has been reported so far to have a calibration valid up to molar concentrations as required by process control. This is mostly due to the absence of a practical solution that could well address the sample overloading issue. In this study, a novel autosampling flow injection analysis coupled with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (FIA/APCI-MS) system, consisting of a 1 μL automatic internal sample injector, a postinjection splitter with 1:10 splitting ratio, and a detached APCI source connected to the mass spectrometer using a 4.5 in. long, 0.042 in. inner diameter (ID) stainless-steel capillary, was thus introduced. Using this system together with an optional FIA solvent modifier, e.g., 0.05% (v/v) isopropylamine, a linear quantitative calibration up to molar concentration has been achieved with 3.4-7.2% relative standard deviations (RSDs) for 4 replicates. As a result, quantitative real-time monitoring of a model reaction was successfully performed at the 1.63 M level. It is expected that this novel autosampling FIA/APCI-MS system can be used in quantitative real-time monitoring of a wide range of reactions under diverse reaction conditions.

  19. Chemical analysis of simulated high level waste glasses to support stage III sulfate solubility modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-17

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms within the DOE complex. These wastes can contain relatively high concentrations of sulfate, which has low solubility in borosilicate glass. This is a significant issue for low-activity waste (LAW) glass and is projected to have a major impact on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Sulfate solubility has also been a limiting factor for recent high level waste (HLW) sludge processed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The low solubility of sulfate in glass, along with melter and off-gas corrosion constraints, dictate that the waste be blended with lower sulfate concentration waste sources or washed to remove sulfate prior to vitrification. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerate mission completion.The objective of the current scope being pursued by SHU is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DWPF and WTP, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput at these facilities. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the model and is identified as Stage III. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to SRNL for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for the Stage III, simulated HLW glasses fabricated by SHU in support of the sulfate solubility model development.

  20. Joint PDL and In-band OSNR Monitoring Supported by Data-Aided Channel Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittalà, Fabio; Hauske, Fabian N.; Ye, Yabin;

    2012-01-01

    Employing a known training sequence robust and precise PDL and OSNR monitoring is demonstrated over a wide range of combined distortions. The proposed in-service monitoring technique is insensitive to CD, PMD and SOP rotation....

  1. Trade study of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies to support Hanford single-shell waste retrieval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertzel, J.S.

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy has established the Tank Waste Remediation System to safely manage and dispose of low-level, high-level, and transuranic wastes currently stored in underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site in Eastern Washington. This report supports the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone No. M-45-08-T01 and addresses additional issues regarding single-shell tank leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation technologies and provide an indication of the scope of leakage detection, monitoring, and mitigation activities necessary to support the Tank Waste Remedial System Initial Single-shell Tank Retrieval System project.

  2. CFORS - Regional Chemical and Weather Forecast System in Support of Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yienger, J. J.; Uno, I.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Tang, Y.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Woo, J.; Dorwart, J.; Streets, D.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we will present the development, evaluation, and use of improved modeling techniques and methodologies for the integration of meteorological forecasts with air pollution forecasts in support of field operations during the TRACE-P and Ace-Asia experiments in East Asia. During the campaign period we provided a variety of forecast products using our regional modeling system built upon the dynamic meteorological model RAMS and the 3-D regional chemical transport models STEM-III. These models were run in both on-line and off-line modes, and the results integrated into an interactive web-based data mining and analysis framework. This resulting Chemical Weather Forecasting System CFORS, was run operationally for the period February through May 2001, and provided 72-hr forecasts of a variety of aerosol, chemical and air mass and emission marker quantities. These included aerosol mass distribution and optical depth by major component (e.g., dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and sulfate), photochemical quantities including ozone and OH/HO2, and air mass & emissions markers including lightning, volcanic, mega-cities, and biomass burning. These model products were presented along with meteorological forecasts and satellite products, and used to help determine the flight plans, the positioning of the ship, and to alert surface stations of upcoming events (such as dust storms). The use of CFORS forecasts (along with other model results) models were shown to provide important new information and level of detail into mission planning. For example many of the mission objectives required designing flight paths that sampled across gradients of optical depth, or flew above, below and through vertical layers of aerosol, intercepted biomass emission plumes, or sampled dust storms. CFORS, forecasts of dust outbreaks and plume locations, etc., proved to be very useful in designing missions that meet these objective. In this paper we will present an overview of

  3. CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF SIMULATED HIGH LEVEL WASTE GLASSES TO SUPPORT SULFATE SOLUBILITY MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2014-08-14

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM) is sponsoring an international, collaborative project to develop a fundamental model for sulfate solubility in nuclear waste glass. The solubility of sulfate has a significant impact on the achievable waste loading for nuclear waste forms both within the DOE complex and to some extent at U.K. sites. The development of enhanced borosilicate glass compositions with improved sulfate solubility will allow for higher waste loadings and accelerated cleanup missions. Much of the previous work on improving sulfate retention in waste glasses has been done on an empirical basis, making it difficult to apply the findings to future waste compositions despite the large number of glass systems studied. A more fundamental, rather than empirical, model of sulfate solubility in glass, under development at Sheffield Hallam University (SHU), could provide a solution to the issues of sulfate solubility. The model uses the normalized cation field strength index as a function of glass composition to predict sulfate capacity, and has shown early success for some glass systems. The objective of the current scope is to mature the sulfate solubility model to the point where it can be used to guide glass composition development for DOE waste vitrification efforts, allowing for enhanced waste loadings and waste throughput. A series of targeted glass compositions was selected to resolve data gaps in the current model. SHU fabricated these glasses and sent samples to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for chemical composition analysis. SHU will use the resulting data to enhance the sulfate solubility model and resolve any deficiencies. In this report, SRNL provides chemical analyses for simulated waste glasses fabricated SHU in support of sulfate solubility model development. A review of the measured compositions revealed that there are issues with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations

  4. NR TrA (Nova TrA 2008) monitoring in support of XMM observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waagen, Elizabeth O.

    2017-03-01

    Dr. Fred Walter (Stony Brook University) has requested AAVSO observers' assistance in monitoring NR TrA (Nova TrA 2008) in support of upcoming XMM Newton observations. The XMM observations will take place 2017 March 13 06:21 through March 14 10:34 UT. Walter writes: "NR TrA (Nova TrA 2008) is a compact eclipsing system with a 5.5 hour period. It was a normal Fe II nova that, upon reaching quiescence, took on the appearance of a super-soft source in the optical high state, which suggests an extremely high mass accretion rate. The optical spectrum is dominated by hot permitted lines of O VI, N V, C IV, and He II. Some nova-like variables have similar spectra, though generally without the hot emission lines. Primary eclipse is broad - nearly 40% of the orbit - and deeper at shorter wavelengths, which suggests the eclipse of a hot accretion disk. Primary eclipse depth is about 1 mag at V. There appears to be a shallow secondary eclipse.The primary aim [of the XMM observations] is to detect and characterize the eclipse at X-ray and UV wavelengths. We will obtain low cadence BVRI/JHK observations with SMARTS/Andicam. We request AAVSO support to obtain continuous photometric time series simultaneous with the XMM observation. Any filters are acceptable, but standard Johnson B, V or Cousins R, I are preferred. Clear filters are acceptable. Time resolution better than 5 minutes and uncertainties (outside of eclipse) <0.02 mag are preferred. The best ephemeris I have is: minimum light at JD 55956.822 + 0.219109E. This is based on data from 2013-2015." Finder charts with sequence may be created using the AAVSO Variable Star Plotter (https://www.aavso.org/vsp). Observations should be submitted to the AAVSO International Database. See full Alert Notice for more details.

  5. Condition index monitoring supports conservation priorities for the protection of threatened grass-finch populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maute, Kimberly; French, Kristine; Legge, Sarah; Astheimer, Lee; Garnett, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Conservation agencies are often faced with the difficult task of prioritizing what recovery actions receive support. With the number of species under threat of decline growing globally, research that informs conservation priorities is greatly needed. The relative vulnerability of cryptic or nomadic species is often uncertain, because populations are difficult to monitor and local populations often seem stable in the short term. This uncertainty can lead to inaction when populations are in need of protection. We tested the feasibility of using differences in condition indices as an indication of population vulnerability to decline for related threatened Australian finch sub-species. The Gouldian finch represents a relatively well-studied endangered species, which has a seasonal and site-specific pattern of condition index variation that differs from the closely related non-declining long-tailed finch. We used Gouldian and long-tailed finch condition variation as a model to compare with lesser studied, threatened star and black-throated finches. We compared body condition (fat and muscle scores), haematocrit and stress levels (corticosterone) among populations, seasons and years to determine whether lesser studied finch populations matched the model of an endangered species or a non-declining species. While vulnerable finch populations often had lower muscle and higher fat and corticosterone concentrations during moult (seasonal pattern similar to Gouldian finches), haematocrit values did not differ among populations in a predictable way. Star and black-throated finch populations, which were predicted to be vulnerable to decline, showed evidence of poor condition during moult, supporting their status as vulnerable. Our findings highlight how measures of condition can provide insight into the relative vulnerability of animal and plant populations to decline and will allow the prioritization of efforts towards the populations most likely to be in jeopardy of extinction.

  6. Earth observation in support of malaria control and epidemiology: MALAREO monitoring approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Franke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria affects about half of the world’s population, with the vast majority of cases occuring in Africa. National malaria control programmes aim to reduce the burden of malaria and its negative, socioeconomic effects by using various control strategies (e.g. vector control, environmental management and case tracking. Vector control is the most effective transmission prevention strategy, while environmental factors are the key parameters affecting transmission. Geographic information systems (GIS, earth observation (EO and spatial modelling are increasingly being recognised as valuable tools for effective management and malaria vector control. Issues previously inhibiting the use of EO in epidemiology and malaria control such as poor satellite sensor performance, high costs and long turnaround times, have since been resolved through modern technology. The core goal of this study was to develop and implement the capabilities of EO data for national malaria control programmes in South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique. High- and very high resolution (HR and VHR land cover and wetland maps were generated for the identification of potential vector habitats and human activities, as well as geoinformation on distance to wetlands for malaria risk modelling, population density maps, habitat foci maps and VHR household maps. These products were further used for modelling malaria incidence and the analysis of environmental factors that favour vector breeding. Geoproducts were also transferred to the staff of national malaria control programmes in seven African countries to demonstrate how EO data and GIS can support vector control strategy planning and monitoring. The transferred EO products support better epidemiological understanding of environmental factors related to malaria transmission, and allow for spatio-temporal targeting of malaria control interventions, thereby improving the cost-effectiveness of interventions.

  7. Alternative Processes for Water Reclamation and Solid Waste Processing in a Physical/chemical Bioregenerative Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Tom D.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on alternative processes for water reclamation and solid waste processing in a physical/chemical-bioregenerative life support system are presented. The main objective is to focus attention on emerging influences of secondary factors (i.e., waste composition, type and level of chemical contaminants, and effects of microorganisms, primarily bacteria) and to constructively address these issues by discussing approaches which attack them in a direct manner.

  8. Earth Observations, Models and Geo-Design in Support of SDG Implementation and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plag, H. P.; Jules-Plag, S.

    2016-12-01

    Implementation and Monitoring of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) requires support from Earth observation and scientific communities. Applying a goal-based approach to determine the data needs to the Targets and Indicators associated with the SDGs demonstrates that integration of environmental with socio-economic and statistical data is required. Large data gaps exist for the built environment. A Geo-Design platform can provide the infrastructure and conceptual model for the data integration. The development of policies and actions to foster the implementation of SDGs in many cases requires research and the development of tools to answer "what if" questions. Here, agent-based models and model webs combined with a Geo-Design platform are promising avenues. This advanced combined infrastructure can also play a crucial role in the necessary capacity building. We will use the example of SDG 5 (Gender equality) to illustrate these approaches. SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) is used to underline the cross-goal linkages and the joint benefits of Earth observations, data integration, and modeling tools for multiple SDGs.

  9. Earth Observation in Support of Sustainable Urban Planning: Results of the Dragon-3 Monitor Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartalis, C.; Polydoros, A.; Mavrakou, T.; Asimakopoulos, D. N.

    2016-08-01

    Sustainable urban planning increasingly demands innovative concepts and techniques to obtain up-to-date and area-wide information on the characteristics and development of the urban system. In this paper, a thorough and conclusive presentation is made in terms of the results of the DRAGON-3 MONITOR project as based on the use of Earth Observation. Results refer in particular to a set of EO based dynamic urban indicators (i.e. urban form and expansion, land use/land cover changes, land surface temperature distribution, the presence and strength of urban heat island) with the capacity to describe the state, dynamic changes and interaction of the land and thermal environment in urban areas. Furthermore results are assessed in terms of their potential to operationally support sustainable urban planning and bridge the gap between EO scientists and urban planners. Constraints related to the spatial resolution and revisit time of satellite sensors are discussed as they influence the accuracy and applicability of the indicators. Methodologies to improve the applicability of the indicators are also discussed along with the presentation of the respective results.

  10. SYSTEM FOR DETECTION AND CONTROL OF DEPOSITION IN KRAFT CHEMICAL RECOVERY BOILERS AND MONITORING GLASS FURNACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Peter Ariessohn

    2003-04-15

    Combustion Specialists, Inc. has just completed a project designed to develop the capability to monitor and control the formation of deposits on the outside of boiler tubes inside an operating kraft recovery furnace. This project, which was carried out in the period from April 1, 2001 to January 31, 2003, was funded by the Department of Energy's Inventions and Innovations program. The primary objectives of the project included the development and demonstration of the ability to produce clear images of deposits throughout the convective sections of operating recovery boilers using newly developed infrared imaging technology, to demonstrate the automated detection and quantification of these deposits using custom designed image processing software developed as part of the project, and to demonstrate the feasibility of all technical elements required for a commercial ''smart'' sootblowing control system based on direct feedback from automated imaging of deposits in real-time. All of the individual tasks have been completed and all objectives have been substantially achieved. Imaging of deposits throughout the convective sections of several recovery boilers has been demonstrated, a design for a combined sootblower/deposit inspection probe has been developed and a detailed heat transfer analysis carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of this design, an improved infrared imager which can be sufficiently miniaturized for this application has been identified, automated deposit detection software has been developed and demonstrated, a detailed design for all the necessary communications and control interfaces has been developed, and a test has been carried out in a glass furnace to demonstrate the applicability of the infrared imaging sensor in that environment. The project was completed on time and within the initial budget. A commercial partner has been identified and further federal funding will be sought to support a project to develop a

  11. Use of chemical etching of CR-39 foils at elevated temperature for fast neutron personnel monitoring in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathian, Deepa; Rohatgi, Rupali; Jayalakshmi, V.; Marathe, P. K.; Nair, Sarala; Kolekar, R. V.; Chourasiya, G.; Kannan, S.

    2009-06-01

    CR-39 Solid State Nuclear Track Detecting foils (SSNTD), along with 1 mm thick polyethylene radiator, sealed in triple laminated pouches, are used for country wide Fast Neutron Personnel Monitoring in India. With the present system of processing by elevated temperature electrochemical etching (ETECE) and evaluation using automatic image analysis, only 16 foils are processed at a time and it is useful over the dose equivalent range 0.2 mSv to 10 mSv. It has been reported that, by processing CR-39 of good detection efficiency by chemical etching at elevated temperature, more numbers of foils can be processed simultaneously. In the present study, CR-39 foils from Pershore Moulding (UK) have been chemically etched using 7 N KOH under various conditions of temperature and etching durations and evaluated using high magnification microscope. The duration of chemical etching, has been optimized at a constant temperature of 60°C for chemical etching process. The characteristics of the chemically etched CR-39 foils are compared with the characteristics of the CR-39 foils processed by the existing system of ETECE and the detailed results are presented in the full text of the paper. It has been observed that by chemical etching process, the dose equivalent range of CR-39 foils can be extended above 60 mSv.

  12. Micro flow reactor chips with integrated luminescent chemosensors for spatially resolved on-line chemical reaction monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitlin, Leonid; Hoera, Christian; Meier, Robert J; Nagl, Stefan; Belder, Detlev

    2013-10-21

    Real-time chemical reaction monitoring in microfluidic environments is demonstrated using luminescent chemical sensors integrated in PDMS/glass-based microscale reactors. A fabrication procedure is presented that allows for straightforward integration of thin polymer layers with optical sensing functionality in microchannels of glass-PDMS chips of only 150 μm width and of 10 to 35 μm height. Sensor layers consisting of polystyrene and an oxygen-sensitive platinum porphyrin probe with film thicknesses of about 0.5 to 4 μm were generated by combining spin coating and abrasion techniques. Optimal coating procedures were developed and evaluated. The chip-integrated sensor layers were calibrated and investigated with respect to stability, reproducibility and response times. These microchips allowed observation of dissolved oxygen concentration in the range of 0 to over 40 mg L(-1) with a detection limit of 368 μg L(-1). The sensor layers were then used for observation of a model reaction, the oxidation of sulphite to sulphate in a microfluidic chemical reactor and could observe sulphite concentrations of less than 200 μM. Real-time on-line monitoring of this chemical reaction was realized at a fluorescence microscope setup with 405 nm LED excitation and CCD camera detection.

  13. European alerting and monitoring data as inputs for the risk assessment of microbiological and chemical hazards in spices and herbs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banach, J.L.; Stratakou, I.; Fels-Klerx, van der H.J.; Besten, den H.M.W.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2016-01-01

    Food chains are susceptible to contaminations from food-borne hazards, including pathogens and chemical contaminants. An assessment of the potential product-hazard combinations can be supported by using multiple data sources. The objective of this study was to identify the main trends of food saf

  14. Dragon in Support Harmonizing European and Chinese Marine Monitoring for Environment and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnos, Yves-Louis; Zmuda, Andy; Li, Zengyuan; Gao, Zhihai

    2008-04-01

    ESA has been cooperating with National Remote Sensing Center of China (NRSCC), Ministry Of Science and Technology of China (MOST) in the development of Earth Observation (EO) applications for the last 15 years. In 2004, this cooperation was reinforced with the creation of a dedicated three-year EO science and exploitation programme called "Dragon". The programme brings together joint Sino-European teams to address 16 identified priority themes investigating land, ocean and atmospheric applications using data from ESA's ERS and Envisat missions. Detailed coordination of all requested acquisitions over China has been performed since the programme started. Consequently a large amount of data has now been delivered.The results of the joint teams' research have been presented at annual Symposia and regular progress meeting with Chinese scientists in Beijing. The mid term results of the programme have been published as a joint ESA and NRSCC publication entitled "Proceedings of Dragon Programme Mid Term Results (SP-611)". Since then, notable results have been achieved in all the thematic areas under investigation exploiting both archive ERS and Envisat instrument data, for example: • Forest cover and forest biomass maps of NE China using ERS SAR tandem data from the 1990s and change detection using up-to-date forest maps based on ASAR AP data• Flood monitoring and mapping and NRT information provision to local and national authorities• Ship cruises for collection of validation data in support of ocean colour studies • Exploitation of the ASAR, RA, MERIS and AA TSR sensors for bio-physical parameter retrieval for China seas• Quantification and modelling of NO2, CO and CH4 levels and their increasing trend since the 1990s •Mixing and modelling and changes in NO2 distribution and concentration in the middle atmospheric layers • Rice mapping and methane modelling exploiting Envisat's optical, SAR and atmospheric sensors• Impact of the Olympic games on the

  15. Feeder cells support the culture of induced pluripotent stem cells even after chemical fixation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Shan Yue

    Full Text Available Chemically fixed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs, instead of live feeder cells, were applied to the maintenance of mouse induced pluripotent stem (miPS cells. Formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde were used for chemical fixation. The chemically fixed MEF feeders maintained the pluripotency of miPS cells, as well as their undifferentiated state. Furthermore, the chemically fixed MEF feeders were reused several times without affecting their functions. These results indicate that chemical fixation can be applied to modify biological feeders chemically, without losing their original functions. Chemically fixed MEF feeders will be applicable to other stem cell cultures as a reusable extracellular matrix candidate that can be preserved on a long-term basis.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF PAH-IMPACTED SITES VIA IN SITU CHEMICAL CONTAINMENT AND MONITORING

    Science.gov (United States)

    On a world-wide basis the magnitude of environmental contamination problems involving polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) is unmatched by any other group of organic chemicals. Despite the recognized limitations to PAH biodegradation (e.g., intrinsic chemical stability of the h...

  17. Utilizing environmental management information systems to monitor chemical usage and facilitate waste minimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazer, T.L.; Kinney, R.W. [Modern Technologies Corporation, Dayton, OH (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Waste minimization and pollution prevention activities have proven to be valuable to the chemical industry`s and the chemical user`s bottom line. Many companies have found that, with a modest initial capital investment and product modifications, mounds of bureaucratic liability can be removed and substantial cost savings can be realized.

  18. High frequency bulk resonators for bio/chemical diagnostics and monitoring applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cagliani, Alberto

    In the environmental monitoring eld there is a vast variety of possible applications for microfabricated MEMS sensors. As an example, a network of miniaturized sensors could detect toxic gases, harmful airbornes, explosives in air or, in liquid, monitor the quality of drinking water...... is by monitoring the target mass, that is continuously deposited or removed from the sensor's surface, while the sensor's structure vibrates in resonance. This thesis presents the development of MEMS mass sensors based on mechanical microresonators in the very high frequency range 12-132 MHz. This devices can...

  19. Human life support during interplanetary travel and domicile. VI - Generic modular flow schematic for hybrid physical/chemical-biological life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani B.; Seshan, P. K.; Ferrall, Joseph; Rohatgi, Naresh

    1992-01-01

    An extension is proposed for the NASA Space Exploration Initiative's Generic Modular Flow Schematics for physical/chemical life support systems which involves the addition of biological processes. The new system architecture includes plant, microbial, and animal habitat, as well as the human habitat subsystem. Major Feedstock Production and Food Preparation and Packaging components have also been incorporated. Inedible plant, aquaculture, microbial, and animal solids are processed for recycling.

  20. Verifying of endocrine disruptor chemical affect to the mouse testes: can raman spectroscopy support histology study?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriana, Bibin B.; Oshima, Yusuke; Takanezawa, Sota; Tay, Tat W.; Rosawati Soeratman, Catherine Linda; Alam, Mohammad S.; Mitsuoka, Hiroki; Zhu, Xiao B.; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Kanai, Yoshiakira; Kurohmaru, Masamichi; Sato, Hidetoshi

    2009-02-01

    One of suspect environmental endocrine disruptors that affect mouse male reproduction by altering the morphology of Sertoli cells and spermatogenic cells is phthalate. The effects of mono(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (MEHP), one of metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate , on immature mouse testes in vivo were examined. We have recently shown that MEHP induced Sertoli cells necrosis and spermatogenic cells apoptosis in mice by TUNEL method, F-actin staining, and ultrastructural study, but there is no data for biochemical changing of testes due to those methods could not explore. To verify in detail of it, we conducted Raman spectroscopy study with 785 nm wavelength laser line, 50mW of laser power and 3 minutes of exposure time to analysis the MEHP-treated testicular tissue, which has been fixatived by 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA). Five weeks old (5 w.o) male mice were used in this experiment. As the results, the alterations were observed by Raman spectroscopy that there are significantly differences of DNA, actin filament, type IV collagen and amide I between control group (0 μM MEHP) and treatment group (100 μM MEHP). These results significantly support histology staining observation (such as the apoptotic spermatogenic cells which is associated with DNA fragmentation and F-actin disruption) and ultrastructural observation (such as mitochondria rupture and disintegration of nucleus membrane). Raman spectroscopy can be used for 4% PFA-fixatived tissue observation. However, we recommend that Raman spectroscopy may be able to be expanded as an armamentarium not just for the clarification of histology staining and ultrastructural study, but furthermore, it may be as a non-invasion assessment for screening animal tissue toxicity of chemical in future.

  1. High-throughput exposure modeling to support prioritization of chemicals in personal care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csiszar, Susan A.; Ernstoff, Alexi; Fantke, Peter;

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of a high-throughput modeling framework to estimate exposure to chemicals used in personal care products (PCPs). As a basis for estimating exposure, we use the product intake fraction (PiF), defined as the mass of chemical taken by an individual or population per mass...... intakes were associated with body lotion. Bioactive doses derived from high-throughput in vitro toxicity data were combined with the estimated PiFs to demonstrate an approach to estimate bioactive equivalent chemical content and to screen chemicals for risk....

  2. Toward a Public Toxicogenomics Capability for Supporting Predictive Toxicology: Survey of Current Resources and Chemical Indexing of Experiments in GEO and ArrayExpress

    Science.gov (United States)

    A publicly available toxicogenomics capability for supporting predictive toxicology and meta-analysis depends on availability of gene expression data for chemical treatment scenarios, the ability to locate and aggregate such information by chemical, and broad data coverage within...

  3. Chemical analysis of fish bile extracts for monitoring endocrine disrupting chemical exposure in water: Bisphenol A, alkylphenols, and norethindrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minghong; Pan, Chenyuan; Yang, Ming; Xu, Bentuo; Lei, Xiangjie; Ma, Jing; Cai, Ling; Chen, Jingsi

    2016-01-01

    The present study determined concentrations of estrogenic bisphenol A (BPA), nonylphenol, octylphenol (4-tert-octylphenol), butylphenol (4-tert-butylphenol), and progestogenic norethindrone by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in bile extracts from field fish from the Xin'an River and market fish in Shanghai, China. Compared with the field fish, endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC) concentrations in market fish bile were at relatively high levels with high detectable rates. The average concentrations of BPA, nonylphenol, 4-tert-octylphenol, 4-tert-butylphenol, and norethindrone in field fish bile were 30.1 µg/L, 203 µg/L, 4.69 µg/L, 7.84 µg/L, and 0.514 µg/L, respectively; in market fish bile they were 240 µg/L, 528 µg/L, 76.5 µg/L, 12.8 µg/L, and 5.26 µg/L, respectively; and in the surface water of Xin'an River they were 38.8 ng/L, 7.91 ng/L, 1.98 ng/L, 2.66 ng/L, and 0.116 ng/L, respectively. The average of total estrogenic activity of river water was 3.32 ng/L estradiol equivalents. High bioconcentration factors (BCFs) were discovered for all 5 EDCs (≧998-fold) in field fish bile. Furthermore, the authors analyzed the BCF value of BPA in fish bile after 30-d exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA in the laboratory, and the analysis revealed that BCF in fish bile (BCF(Fish bile)) changed in an inverse concentration-dependent manner based on the log10-transformed BPA concentration in water. Strikingly, the data from the field study were well fitted within this trend. The data together suggested that analysis of fish bile extracts could be an efficient method for assessing waterborne EDCs exposure for aquatic biota.

  4. TOOL FOR MONITORING HYDROPHILIC CONTAMINANTS IN WATER: POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global emissions of persistent bioconcentratable organic chemicals have resulted in a wide range of adverse ecological effects. Consequently, industry was led to develop less persistent, more water soluble, polar or hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs), which generally have low ...

  5. A REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS OF LUMINESCENCE TO MONITORING OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent analytical literature on the application of luminescence techniques to the measurement of various classes of environmentally significant chemicals has been reviewed. Luminescent spectroscopy based methods are compared to other current techniques. Also, examples of rece...

  6. TOOL FOR MONITORING HYDROPHILIC CONTAMINANTS IN WATER: POLAR ORGANIC CHEMICAL INTEGRATIVE SAMPLER (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global emissions of persistent bioconcentratable organic chemicals have resulted in a wide range of adverse ecological effects. Consequently, industry was led to develop less persistent, more water soluble, polar or hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs), which generally have low ...

  7. Environmental monitoring and assessment of short-term exposures to hazardous chemicals of a sterilization process in hospital working environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koda S

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess short-term exposures to ethylene oxide, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde in a sterilization process, the authors conducted continuous environmental monitoring of these chemicals in the breathing zone of workers in 2 hospitals. The arithmetic mean of ethylene oxide was 1.2 ppm near unventilated cabinets housing sterilizing materials, and environmental concentrations of ethylene oxide could not be reduced under threshold limit values time weighted average by only managing general ventilation. Environmental concentration of formaldehyde was lower in a properly ventilated pathology division in which no large specimens were stored (0.3 ppm than in the pathology division where large specimens were stored (2.3 ppm. Although environmental concentrations of glutaraldehyde in an endoscopy unit with proper general ventilation were not detectable, environmental concentration levels in an endoscopy unit without general ventilation system were 0.2 and 0.5 ppm. According to the results of environmental monitoring in the breathing zone of workers, extremely high concentrations were observed in some work practices (ethylene oxide, 300 ppm; formaldehyde, 8.6 ppm; glutaraldehyde, 2.6 ppm. In order to avoid occupational exposures to these chemicals and prevent potential chronic and acute health hazards, good communications with these chemicals, good work practices, appropriate personal protective equipment, and engineering controls should be required.

  8. Effect-directed analysis supporting monitoring of aquatic environments - An in-depth overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic environments are often contaminated with complex mixtures of chemicals that may pose a risk to ecosystems and human health. This contamination cannot be addressed with target analysis alone but tools are required to reduce this complexity and identify those chemicals that...

  9. High-throughput exposure modeling to support prioritization of chemicals in personal care products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csiszar, Susan A.; Ernstoff, Alexi; Fantke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the application of a high-throughput modeling framework to estimate exposure to chemicals used in personal care products (PCPs). As a basis for estimating exposure, we use the product intake fraction (PiF), defined as the mass of chemical taken by an individual or population per mass...

  10. CHEMICALS

    CERN Document Server

    Medical Service

    2002-01-01

    It is reminded that all persons who use chemicals must inform CERN's Chemistry Service (TIS-GS-GC) and the CERN Medical Service (TIS-ME). Information concerning their toxicity or other hazards as well as the necessary individual and collective protection measures will be provided by these two services. Users must be in possession of a material safety data sheet (MSDS) for each chemical used. These can be obtained by one of several means : the manufacturer of the chemical (legally obliged to supply an MSDS for each chemical delivered) ; CERN's Chemistry Service of the General Safety Group of TIS ; for chemicals and gases available in the CERN Stores the MSDS has been made available via EDH either in pdf format or else via a link to the supplier's web site. Training courses in chemical safety are available for registration via HR-TD. CERN Medical Service : TIS-ME :73186 or service.medical@cern.ch Chemistry Service : TIS-GS-GC : 78546

  11. The use of long term monitoring data for the extension of the service duration of existing wind turbine support structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loraux, C.; Brühwiler, E.

    2016-09-01

    Actual wind energy converter (WEC) are designed for a relatively short service life of 20 years and the limiting criterion is the fatigue safety. However, effective fatigue loading endured by the structural components of the wind turbines (WT) is likely to be much below design assumptions provided by current codes. This paper describes a simple but efficient long term monitoring system that allows owners to verify the fatigue safety of their existing WTs. The monitored data will also help to drastically extend the service life of existing wind turbine support structure and will thus reduce the global environmental footprint of WTs.

  12. Use of monitoring data to support conservation management and policy decisions in Micronesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montambault, Jensen Reitz; Wongbusarakum, Supin; Leberer, Trina; Joseph, Eugene; Andrew, Wayne; Castro, Fran; Nevitt, Brooke; Golbuu, Yimnang; Oldiais, Noelle W; Groves, Craig R; Kostka, Willy; Houk, Peter

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive management implies a continuous knowledge-based decision-making process in conservation. Yet, the coupling of scientific monitoring and management frameworks remains rare in practice because formal and informal communication pathways are lacking. We examined 4 cases in Micronesia where conservation practitioners are using new knowledge in the form of monitoring data to advance marine conservation. These cases were drawn from projects in Micronesia Challenge jurisdictions that received funding for coupled monitoring-to-management frameworks and encompassed all segments of adaptive management. Monitoring in Helen Reef, Republic of Palau, was catalyzed by coral bleaching and revealed evidence of overfishing that led to increased enforcement and outreach. In Nimpal Channel, Yap, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), monitoring the recovery of marine food resources after customary restrictions were put in place led to new, more effective enforcement approaches. Monitoring in Laolao Bay, Saipan, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, was catalyzed by observable sediment loads from poor land-use practices and resulted in actions that reduced land-based threats, particularly littering and illegal burning, and revealed additional threats from overfishing. Pohnpei (FSM) began monitoring after observed declines in grouper spawning aggregations. This data led to adjusting marine conservation area boundaries and implementing market-based size class restrictions. Two themes emerged from these cases. First, in each case monitoring was conducted in a manner relevant to the social and ecological systems and integrated into the decision-making process. Second, conservation practitioners and scientists in these cases integrated culturally appropriate stakeholder engagement throughout all phases of the adaptive management cycle. More broadly, our study suggests, when describing adaptive management, providing more details on how monitoring and management activities are

  13. Off-label psychopharmacologic prescribing for children: History supports close clinical monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fegert Joerg M

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The review presents pediatric adverse drug events from a historical perspective and focuses on selected safety issues associated with off-label use of medications for the psychiatric treatment of youth. Clinical monitoring procedures for major psychotropic drug classes are reviewed. Prior studies suggest that systematic treatment monitoring is warranted so as to both minimize risk of unexpected adverse events and exposures to ineffective treatments. Clinical trials to establish the efficacy and safety of drugs currently being used off-label in the pediatric population are needed. In the meantime, clinicians should consider the existing evidence-base for these drugs and institute close clinical monitoring.

  14. Data Quality Objectives Supporting the Environmental Soil Monitoring Program for the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Thomas Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This document describes the process used to develop data quality objectives for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Environmental Soil Monitoring Program in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance. This document also develops and presents the logic that was used to determine the specific number of soil monitoring locations at the INL Site, at locations bordering the INL Site, and at locations in the surrounding regional area. The monitoring location logic follows the guidance from the U.S. Department of Energy for environmental surveillance of its facilities.

  15. Statistical Monitoring of Chemical Processes Based on Sensitive Kernel Principal Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Qingchao; YAN Xuefeng

    2013-01-01

    The kernel principal component analysis (KPCA) method employs the first several kernel principal components (KPCs),which indicate the most variance information of normal observations for process monitoring,but may not reflect the fault information.In this study,sensitive kernel principal component analysis (SKPCA) is proposed to improve process monitoring performance,i.e.,to deal with the discordance of T2 statistic and squared prediction error δspE statistic and reduce missed detection rates.T2 statistic can be used to measure the variation directly along each KPC and analyze the detection performance as well as capture the most useful information in a process.With the calculation of the change rate of T2 statistic along each KPC,SKPCA selects the sensitive kernel principal components for process monitoring.A simulated simple system and Tennessee Eastman process are employed to demonstrate the efficiency of SKPCA on online monitoring.The results indicate that the monitoring performance is improved significantly.

  16. Can Pelvis Angle be Monitored From Seat Support Forces in Healthy Subjects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, van Paul; Veltink, Peter H.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals who cannot functionally reposition themselves often need dynamic seating interventions that change body posture from automatic chair adjustments. Pelvis alignment directly affects sitting posture, and systems that adjust and monitor pelvis angle simultaneously might be applicable to cont

  17. Materials and boiler rig testing to support chemical cleaning of once-through AGR boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tice, D.R.; Platts, N.; Raffel, A.S. [Serco Assurance (United Kingdom); Rudge, A. [British Energy Generation Ltd. (United Kingdom)

    2002-07-01

    An extensive programme of work has been carried out to evaluate two candidate inhibited cleaning solutions for possible implementation on plant, which would be the first chemical clean of an AGR boiler. The two candidate cleaning solutions considered were a Stannine-inhibited citric acid/formic acid mixture (GOM106) and inhibited hydrofluoric acid. Citric acid-based cleaning processes are widely used within the UK Power Industry. The GOM106 solution, comprising a mixture of 3% citric acid, 0.5% formic acid and 0.05% Stannine LTP inhibitor, buffered with ammonia to pH 3.5, was developed specifically for the AGR boilers during the 1970's. Although a considerable amount of materials testing work was carried out by British Energy's predecessor companies to produce a recommended cleaning procedure there were some remaining concerns with the use of GOM106, from these earlier studies, for example, an increased risk of pitting attack associated with the removal of thick 9Cr oxide deposits and a risk of unacceptable damage in critical locations such as the upper transition joints and other weld locations. Hence, additional testing was still required to validate the solution for use on plant. Inhibited hydrofluoric acid (HFA) was also evaluated as an alternative reagent to GOM106. HFA has been used extensively for cleaning mild and low'alloy steel boiler tubes in fossil-fired plant in the UK and elsewhere in Europe and is known to remove oxide quickly. Waste treatment is also easier than for the GOM106 process and some protection against damage to the boiler tube materials is provided by complexing of fluoride with ferric ion. Validation of the potential reagents and inhibitors was achieved by assessing the rate and effectiveness of oxide removal from specimens of helical boiler tubing and welds, together with establishing the extent of any metal loss or localised damage. The initial materials testing resulted in the inhibited ammoniated citric / formic acid

  18. Staff acceptance of video monitoring for coordination: a video system to support perioperative situation awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Ju; Xiao, Yan; Hu, Peter; Dutton, Richard

    2009-08-01

    To understand staff acceptance of a remote video monitoring system for operating room (OR) coordination. Improved real-time remote visual access to OR may enhance situational awareness but also raises privacy concerns for patients and staff. Survey. A system was implemented in a six-room surgical suite to display OR monitoring video at an access restricted control desk area. Image quality was manipulated to improve staff acceptance. Two months after installation, interviews and a survey were conducted on staff acceptance of video monitoring. About half of all OR personnel responded (n = 63). Overall levels of concerns were low, with 53% rated no concerns and 42% little concern. Top two reported uses of the video were to see if cases are finished and to see if a room is ready. Viewing the video monitoring system as useful did not reduce levels of concern. Staff in supervisory positions perceived less concern about the system's impact on privacy than did those supervised (p staff privacy and performance monitoring. Technical means such as manipulating image quality helped staff acceptance. Manipulation of image quality resulted overall acceptance of monitoring video, with residual levels of concerns. OR nurses may express staff privacy concern in the form of concerns over patient privacy. This study provided suggestions for technological and implementation strategies of video monitoring for coordination use in OR. Deployment of communication technology and integration of clinical information will likely raise concerns over staff privacy and performance monitoring. The potential gain of increased information access may be offset by negative impact of a sense of loss of autonomy.

  19. Chapter 8 Tool for monitoring hydrophilic contaminants in water: polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David A.; Huckins, James N.; Petty, Jimmie D.; Jones-Lepp, Tammy L.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Frank; Getting, Dominic T.; Goddard, Jon P.; Gravell, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    The development of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) provides environmental scientists and policy makers a tool for assessing the presence and potential impacts of the hydrophilic component of these organic contaminants. The POCIS provides a means for determining the time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations of targeted chemicals that can be used in risk assessments to determine the biological impact of hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) on the health of the impacted ecosystem. Field studies have shown that the POCIS has advantages over traditional sampling methods in sequestering and concentrating ultra-trace to trace levels of chemicals over time resulting in increased method sensitivity, ability to detect chemicals with a relatively short residence time or variable concentrations in the water, and simplicity in use. POCIS extracts can be tested using bioassays and can be used in organism dosing experiments for determining toxicological significance of the complex mixture of chemicals sampled. The POCIS has been successfully used worldwide under various field conditions ranging from stagnant ponds to shallow creeks to major river systems in both fresh and brackish water.

  20. Nanoreactors for simultaneous remote thermal activation and optical monitoring of chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Vázquez, Carmen; Vaz, Belén; Giannini, Vincenzo; Pérez-Lorenzo, Moisés; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Correa-Duarte, Miguel A

    2013-09-18

    We report herein the design of plasmonic hollow nanoreactors capable of concentrating light at the nanometer scale for the simultaneous performance and optical monitoring of thermally activated reactions. These reactors feature the encapsulation of plasmonic nanoparticles on the inner walls of a mesoporous silica capsule. A Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was carried out in the inner cavities of these nanoreactors to evidence their efficacy. Thus, it is demonstrated that reactions can be accomplished in a confined volume without alteration of the temperature of the bulk solvent while allowing real-time monitoring of the reaction progress.

  1. Big Brother Is Helping You: Supporting Self-Access Language Learning with a Student Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinders, Hayo

    2007-01-01

    Self-access and language advising are relatively recent and increasingly common types of language support offered in schools and tertiary institutions around the world. There is a great deal of anecdotal support for the positive contribution of such support to student learning. Self-access and language advising hold strong potential as…

  2. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): application for monitoring organic micropollutants in wastewater effluent and surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miège, Cécile; Budzinski, Hélène; Jacquet, Romain; Soulier, Coralie; Pelte, Thomas; Coquery, Marina

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) for the evaluation of river water quality downstream of wastewater treatment plants. POCIS proved well adapted to sampling alkylphenols and several pharmaceuticals. Concentration factors and the decrease in limits of quantification, compared to grab water sample analyses, were significant except for hormones, β-blockers and bronchodilators. Promising preliminary results obtained in situ on deuterated atenolol used as a performance reference compound need to be confirmed in-lab. This work confirms that POCIS is a valuable tool for monitoring hydrophilic organic molecules in river and wastewaters.

  3. Monitoring and analysis of nonlinear dynamic damage of transport roadway supported by composite hard rock materials in Linglong Gold Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The study concentrates mainly on the development of failure process in composite rock mass. By use of acoustic emission(AE), convergence inspection, pressure monitoring, level measurement techniques and the modem signal analysis technology, as wellas scan electron microscopy (SEM) experiment, various aspects of nonlinear dynamic damage of composite rock mass surroundingthe transport roadway in Linglong gold mine are discussed. According to the monitoring results, the stability of the rock mass can besynthetically evaluated, and the intrinsic relation between the damage and the characteristic parameters of acoustic emission can bedetermined. The location of the damage of rock mass can also be detected based on the acoustic emission couple monitoring signals.Finally, the key factors which influence the stability of the transport roadway supported by composite hard rock materials are foundout.

  4. Support and monitoring of families after child abuse detection based on parental characteristics at the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diderich, H M; Pannebakker, F D; Dechesne, M; Buitendijk, S E; Oudesluys-Murphy, A M

    2015-03-01

    The 'Hague Protocol' enables professionals at the adult Emergency Department (ED) to detect child abuse based on three parental characteristics: (i) suicide attempt or self-harm, (ii) domestic violence or (iii) substance abuse, and to refer them to the Reporting Centre for Child Abuse and Neglect (RCCAN). This study investigates what had happened to the families three months after this referral. ED referrals based on parental characteristics (N = 100) in which child abuse was confirmed after investigation by the RCCAN were analysed. Information was collected regarding type of child abuse, reason for reporting, duration of problems prior to the ED referral, previous involvement of support services or other agencies, re-occurrence of the problems and outcome of the RCCAN monitoring according to professionals and the families. Of the 100 referred cases, 68 families were already known to the RCCAN, the police or family support services, prior to the ED referral. Of the 99 cases where information was available, existing support was continued or intensified in 31, a Child Protection Services (CPS) report had to be made in 24, new support was organized for 27 cases and in 17 cases support was not necessary, because the domestic problems were already resolved. Even though the RCCAN is mandated to monitor all referred families after three months, 31 cases which were referred internally were not followed up. Before referral by the ED two thirds of these families were already known to organizations. Monitoring may help provide a better, more sustained service and prevent and resolve domestic problems. A national database could help to link data and to streamline care for victims and families. We recommend a Randomized Controlled Trial to test the effectiveness of this Protocol in combination with the outcomes of the provided family support. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Passive sampling in regulatory chemical monitoring of nonpolar organic compounds in the aquatic environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, K.; Robinson, C.D.; Burgess, R.M.; Mayer, P.; Roberts, C.A.; Ahrens, L.; Allan, I.J.; Brant, J.; Jones, L.; Kraus, U.R.; Larsen, M.M.; Lepom, P.; Petersen, J.; Pröfrock, D.; Roose, P.; Schäfer, S.; Smedes, F.; Tixier, C.; Vorkamp, K.; Whitehouse, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reviewed compliance monitoring requirements in the EuropeanUnion, the United States, and the Oslo-Paris Convention for the protection of themarine environment of the North-East Atlantic, and evaluated if these are met bypassive sampling methods for nonpolar compounds. The strengths andshortcoming

  6. On Monitoring Physical and Chemical Degradation and Life Estimation Models for Lubricating Greases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Rezasoltani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradation mechanisms for lubricating grease are categorized and described. An extensive survey of the available empirical and analytical grease life estimation models including degradation monitoring standards and methods are presented. A summary of the important contributions on grease degradation is presented.

  7. Benzoin Condensation: Monitoring a Chemical Reaction by High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Apurba; Purohit, Vikram C.; Bellar, Nicholas R.

    2004-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is the preferred method of separating a variety of materials in complex mixtures such as pharmaceuticals, polymers, soils, food products and biological fluids and is also considered to be a powerful analytical tool in both academia and industry. The use of HPLC analysis as a means of monitoring and…

  8. Sensitive monitoring of volatile chemical warfare agents in air by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry with counter-flow introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Yasuo; Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Tsuge, Koichiro; Ohsawa, Isaac; Iura, Kazumitsu; Itoi, Teruo; Sekiguchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushita, Koji; Yamashiro, Shigeharu; Sano, Yasuhiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Maruko, Hisashi; Takayama, Yasuo; Sekioka, Ryoji; Okumura, Akihiko; Takada, Yasuaki; Nagano, Hisashi; Waki, Izumi; Ezawa, Naoya; Tanimoto, Hiroyuki; Honjo, Shigeru; Fukano, Masumi; Okada, Hidehiro

    2013-03-05

    A new method for sensitively and selectively detecting chemical warfare agents (CWAs) in air was developed using counter-flow introduction atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (MS). Four volatile and highly toxic CWAs were examined, including the nerve gases sarin and tabun, and the blister agents mustard gas (HD) and Lewisite 1 (L1). Soft ionization was performed using corona discharge to form reactant ions, and the ions were sent in the direction opposite to the airflow by an electric field to eliminate the interfering neutral molecules such as ozone and nitrogen oxide. This resulted in efficient ionization of the target CWAs, especially in the negative ionization mode. Quadrupole MS (QMS) and ion trap tandem MS (ITMS) instruments were developed and investigated, which were movable on the building floor. For sarin, tabun, and HD, the protonated molecular ions and their fragment ions were observed in the positive ion mode. For L1, the chloride adduct ions of L1 hydrolysis products were observed in negative ion mode. The limit of detection (LOD) values in real-time or for a 1 s measurement monitoring the characteristic ions were between 1 and 8 μg/m(3) in QMS instrument. Collision-induced fragmentation patterns for the CWAs were observed in an ITMS instrument, and optimized combinations of the parent and daughter ion pairs were selected to achieve real-time detection with LOD values of around 1 μg/m(3). This is a first demonstration of sensitive and specific real-time detection of both positively and negatively ionizable CWAs by MS instruments used for field monitoring.

  9. Modeling of Global BEAM Structure for Evaluation of MMOD Impacts to Support Development of a Health Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, Karen H.; Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the initial modeling of the global response of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) to micrometeorite and orbital debris(MMOD) impacts using a structural, nonlinear, transient dynamic, finite element code. These models complement the on-orbit deployment of the Distributed Impact Detection System (DIDS) to support structural health monitoring studies. Two global models were developed. The first focused exclusively on impacts on the soft-goods (fabric-envelop) portion of BEAM. The second incorporates the bulkhead to support understanding of bulkhead impacts. These models were exercised for random impact locations and responses monitored at the on-orbit sensor locations. The report concludes with areas for future study.

  10. Reviews and synthesis: Carbon capture and storage monitoring - an integrated biological, biophysical and chemical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, N.; Vik, U.; Taylor, P.; Ladoukakis, E.; Park, J.; Kolisis, F.; Stahl, H.; Jakobsen, K. S.

    2015-06-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a developing technology that seeks to mitigate against the impact of increasing anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) production by capturing CO2 from large point source emitters. After capture the CO2 is compressed and transported to a reservoir where it is stored for geological time scales. Potential leakages from CCS projects, where stored CO2 migrates through the overlaying sediments, are likely to have severe implications on benthic and marine ecosystems. Nonetheless, prokaryotic response to elevated CO2 concentrations has been suggested as one of the first detectable warnings if a CO2 leakage should occur. Applying properties of prokaryotic communities (i.e. community composition and metabolic status) as a novel CO2 monitoring application is highly reliable within a multidisciplinary framework, where deviations from the baseline can easily be identified. In this paper we review current knowledge about the impact of CO2 leakages on marine sediments from a multidisciplinary-based monitoring perspective. We focus on aspects from the fields of biology, geophysics, and chemistry, and discuss a case study example. We argue the importance of an integrative multidisciplinary approach, incorporating biogeochemistry, geophysics, microbial ecology and modelling, with a particular emphasis on metagenomic techniques and novel bioinformatics, for future CCS monitoring. Within this framework, we consider that an effective CCS monitoring programme will ensure that large-scale leakages with potentially devastating effects for the overlaying ecosystem are avoided. Furthermore, the multidisciplinary approach suggested here for CCS monitoring is generic, and can be adapted to other systems of interest.

  11. Connecting World Heritage Nominations and Monitoring with the Support of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vileikis, O.; Dumont, B.; Serruys, E.; Van Balen, K.; Tigny, V.; De Maeyer, P.

    2013-07-01

    Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are challenging the way cultural heritage has been managed and evaluated in the past. Serial transnational World Heritage nominations are unique in that they consist of multiple sites listed as one property, distributed in different countries, involving a large diversity of stakeholders in the process. As a result, there is a need for precise baseline information for monitoring, reporting and decision making. This type of nomination requires different methodologies and tools to improve the monitoring cycle from the beginning of the nomination towards the periodic reporting. The case study of the Silk Roads Cultural Heritage Resource Information System (CHRIS) illustrates the use of a Geographical Content Management System (Geo-CMS) supporting the serial transnational World Heritage nomination and the monitoring of the Silk Roads in the five Central Asian countries. The Silk Roads CHRIS is an initiative supported by UNESCO World Heritage Centre (WHC) and the Belgian Federal Science Policy Office (BELSPO), and developed by a consortium headed by the Raymond Lemaire International Centre for Conservation (RLICC) at the KULeuven. The Silk Roads CHRIS has been successfully assisting in the preparation of the nomination dossiers of the Republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan and will be used as a tool for monitoring tool in the Central Asian countries.

  12. [Indicators monitoring the process of specialized nutritional support. Grupo de Nutrición de la SEFH].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirvent, Mariola; Victoria Calvo, María; Sagalés, María; Rodríguez-Penin, Isaura; Cervera, Mercedes; Piñeiro, Guadalupe; García-Rodicio, Sonsoles; Gomis, Pilar; Caba, Isabel; Vazquez, Amparo; Gomez, María E; Pedraza, Luis

    2013-01-01

    To identify and develop monitoring indicators of the process of specialized nutritional support that will allow measuring the level of adherence to the established practice standards. Those practice standards considered to be key elements of the process were selected to develop performance indicators. The construction of these indicators combined the scientific evidence with expert opinion. Key goals were identified within each standard provided that its consecution would allow increasing the achievement of the standard. Particular improvement initiatives associated to each key goal were generated. Lastly, monitoring indicators were defined allowing undertaking a follow-up of the implementation of the improvement initiatives or either to assess the level of achievement of the key goals identified. Nineteen practice standards were selected representative of the critical points of the process. The strategic map for each standard has been defined, with the identification of 43 key goals. In order to achieve these key goals, a portfolio of improvements has been generated comprising 56 actions. Finally, 44 monitoring indicators have been defined grouped into three categories: 1. Numeric: they assess the level of goal achievement; 2. Dichotomic (yes/no): they inform on the execution of the improvement actions; 3. Results of the practice audits. We have made available monitoring indicators that allow assessing the level of adherence to the practice standards of the process of specialized nutritional support and the impact of the implementation of improvement actions within this process. Copyright © 2013 SEFH. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving Air Force Command and Control Through Enhanced Agile Combat Support Planning, Execution, Monitoring, and Control Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    assess, plan, execute [ MAPE ] model) are an integral part of Air Force enterprise and joint command and control capability. In the revised copy of Air...operations. 2 Similar in construct, the Air Force uses the MAPE model when discussing ACS processes. 3 In the revised copy of AFDD 1, dated November 12, 2010...MAJCOM major command xliv Improving Air Force C2 Through Enhanced Agile Combat Support Processes MAJCOM/CC commander, major command MAPE monitor, assess

  14. Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J. Matthew; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2012-11-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1

  15. Mother's and father's monitoring is more important than parental social support regarding sexual risk behaviour among 15-year-old adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalina, Ondrej; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; Klein, Daniel; Jarcuska, Pavol; Orosova, Olga; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives There is strong evidence that parental processes such as monitoring and social support play an important role with regard to sexual risk behaviour among adolescents. We wished to explore the influence of both parents 'monitoring and support on sexual risk behaviour among ad

  16. Data Quality Objectives Summary Report Supporting Radiological Air Surveillance Monitoring for the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haney, Thomas Jay [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report documents the Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) developed for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site ambient air surveillance program. The development of the DQOs was based on the seven-step process recommended “for systematic planning to generate performance and acceptance criteria for collecting environmental data” (EPA 2006). The process helped to determine the type, quantity, and quality of data needed to meet current regulatory requirements and to follow U.S. Department of Energy guidance for environmental surveillance air monitoring design. It also considered the current air monitoring program that has existed at INL Site since the 1950s. The development of the DQOs involved the application of the atmospheric dispersion model CALPUFF to identify likely contamination dispersion patterns at and around the INL Site using site-specific meteorological data. Model simulations were used to quantitatively assess the probable frequency of detection of airborne radionuclides released by INL Site facilities using existing and proposed air monitors.

  17. REMOTE MONITORING OF PATIENTS WITH LONG-TERM MECHATRONIC CIRCULATORY SUPPORT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Adaskin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the technology of remote patient monitoring and the parameters of circulatory assist device AVK-N as well as the advantages of said technology to improve the efficiency of personalized medicine in diagnosis and treatment of patients with AVK-N in the postoperative period. Authors show the capabilities of remote monitoring technology to determine the location of the patient by satellite navigation in the case of emergency call for medical and technical services, and present the structure and modes of the displayed information for mobile devices and Web-server. Doctor-patient interaction based on remote monitoring technology via mobile/ satellite/wired Internet is also shown. 

  18. Data Quality Objectives Supporting the Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program for the INL Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundell, J. F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Magnuson, S. O. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scherbinske, P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Case, M. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This document presents the development of the data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Environmental Direct Radiation Monitoring Program and follows the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) DQO process (EPA 2006). This document also develops and presents the logic to determine the specific number of direct radiation monitoring locations around INL facilities on the desert west of Idaho Falls and in Idaho Falls, at locations bordering the INL Site, and in the surrounding regional area. The selection logic follows the guidance from the Department of Energy (DOE) (2015) for environmental surveillance of DOE facilities.

  19. Chemical and biological monitoring of MIOR on the pilot area of Vyngapour oil field, West Sibera, Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arinbasarov, M.U.; Murygina, V.P.; Mats, A.A.

    1995-12-31

    The pilot area of the Vyngapour oil field allotted for MIOR tests contains three injection and three producing wells. These wells were treated in summer 1993 and 1994. Before, during, and after MIOR treatments on the pilot area the chemical compounds of injected and formation waters were studied, as well as the amount and species of microorganisms entering the stratum with the injected water and indigenous bacteria presented in bottomhole zones of the wells. The results of monitoring showed that the bottomhole zone of the injection well already had biocenosis of heterotrophic, hydrocarbon-oxidizing, methanogenic, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, which were besides permanently introduced into the reservoir during the usual waterflooding. The nutritious composition activated vital functions of all bacterial species presented in the bottomhole zone of the injection well. The formation waters from producing wells showed the increase of the content of nitrate, sulfate, phosphate, and bicarbonate ions by the end of MIOR. The amount of hydrocarbon-oxidizing bacteria in formation waters of producing wells increased by one order. The chemical and biological monitoring revealed the activation of the formation microorganisms, but no transport of food industry waste bacteria through the formation from injection to producing wells was found.

  20. Well network for long-term monitoring of agricultural chemicals in the High Plains Aquifer, Colorado

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data are in support of report DS 456 (Arnold and others, 2009). Data set contains point locations of 20 wells located in areas overlying the High Plains...

  1. Electro-chemical methods of corrosion monitoring for marine concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Page, C.L.; Cunningham, P.J. [Aston Univ., Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    1988-12-31

    Corrosion potential mapping and concrete resistivity measurements have been used for several years for the assessment of reinforced concrete structures. These techniques have also been used to characterise the corrosion state of reinforcing steel used in marine concrete structures. The object of the research was to examine the effectiveness of these electrochemical methods of corrosion monitoring and to assess their reliability, reproducibility and sensitivity when applied to marine concrete structures. (author)

  2. Online monitoring of chemical reactions by polarization-induced electrospray ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Anil Kumar; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-09-21

    Polarization-induced electrospray ionization (PI-ESI) is a simple technique for instant generation of gas-phase ions directly from a microliter-sized droplet for mass spectrometric analysis. A sample droplet was placed over a dielectric substrate and in proximity (2-3 mm) to the inlet of a mass spectrometer. Owing to the polarization effect induced by the high electric field provided by the mass spectrometer, the droplet was polarized and the electrospray was generated from the apex of the droplet. The polarization-induced electrospray could last for tens of seconds, which was sufficiently long to monitor fast reactions occurring within few seconds. Thus, we demonstrated the feasibility of using the droplet-based PI-ESI MS for the online monitoring of fast reactions by simply mixing two droplets (5-10 μL) containing reactants on a dielectric substrate placed in front of a mass spectrometer applied with a high voltage (-4500 V). Schiff base reactions and oxidation reactions that can generate intermediates/products within a few seconds were selected as the model reactions. The ionic reaction species generated from intermediates and products can be simultaneously monitored by PI-ESI MS in real time. We also used this approach to selectively detect acetone from a urine sample, in which acetone was derivatized in situ. In addition, the possibility of using this approach for quantitative analysis of acetone from urine samples was examined.

  3. Optical fiber chemical sensors with sol-gel derived nanomaterials for monitoring high temperature/high pressure reactions in clean energy technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shiquan

    2010-04-01

    The development of sensor technologies for in situ, real time monitoring the high temperature/high pressure (HTP) chemical processes used in clean energy technologies is a tough challenge, due to the HTP, high dust and corrosive chemical environment of the reaction systems. A silica optical fiber is corrosive resistance, and can work in HTP conditions. This paper presents our effort in developing fiber optic sensors for in situ, real time monitoring the concentration of trace ammonia and hydrogen in high temperature gas samples. Preliminary test results illustrate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensor technologies for monitoring HTP processes for next generation energy industry.

  4. Automated radioanalytical system incorporating microwave-assisted sample preparation, chemical separation, and online radiometric detection for the monitoring of total 99Tc in nuclear waste processing streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, Oleg B; O'Hara, Matthew J; Grate, Jay W

    2012-04-03

    An automated fluidic instrument is described that rapidly determines the total (99)Tc content of aged nuclear waste samples, where the matrix is chemically and radiologically complex and the existing speciation of the (99)Tc is variable. The monitor links microwave-assisted sample preparation with an automated anion exchange column separation and detection using a flow-through solid scintillator detector. The sample preparation steps acidify the sample, decompose organics, and convert all Tc species to the pertechnetate anion. The column-based anion exchange procedure separates the pertechnetate from the complex sample matrix, so that radiometric detection can provide accurate measurement of (99)Tc. We developed a preprogrammed spike addition procedure to automatically determine matrix-matched calibration. The overall measurement efficiency that is determined simultaneously provides a self-diagnostic parameter for the radiochemical separation and overall instrument function. Continuous, automated operation was demonstrated over the course of 54 h, which resulted in the analysis of 215 samples plus 54 hly spike-addition samples, with consistent overall measurement efficiency for the operation of the monitor. A sample can be processed and measured automatically in just 12.5 min with a detection limit of 23.5 Bq/mL of (99)Tc in low activity waste (0.495 mL sample volume), with better than 10% RSD precision at concentrations above the quantification limit. This rapid automated analysis method was developed to support nuclear waste processing operations planned for the Hanford nuclear site.

  5. Chemically unassisted phototherapy: dose effects via real-time optical monitoring of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Sylvie; Keeler, Werden

    2010-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light and short wavelength visible (VIS) light have been used to kill pathogens for many years. Although the adverse effects of UV radiation on living cells have been extensively studied using biochemical and biomolecular techniques, most of the light therapies used for medical treatment are chemically assisted (i.e., photodynamic therapy). However, the use of light alone could prove both cost and therapeutically effective as an alternative treatment modality for localized diseases. In this study, real-time oblique incidence reflection (OIR) microscopy and image analysis were used to visualize and quantify the effects of chemically unassisted light therapy on untagged live cancer cells in vitro. The incident radiation fluence (in mJ/cm^2) required to induce cell death was determined for selected quasi-monochromatic UV to VIS wavelengths ranging from 275nm to 460nm. A predictive mathematical equation quantifying the lethal fluence as a function of wavelength will be discussed.

  6. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  7. Individualized real-time clinical decision support to monitor cardiac loading during venoarterial ECMO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broomé, Michael; Donker, DW

    2016-01-01

    Veno-arterial extracoporeal membrane oxygenation (VA ECMO) is increasingly used for acute and refractory cardiogenic shock. Yet, in clinical practice, monitoring of cardiac loading conditions during VA ECMO can be cumbersome. To this end, we illustrate the validity and clinical applicability of a re

  8. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to

  9. Efficacy, nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity of aminoglycosides, mathematically modelled for modelling-supported therapeutic drug monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croes, Sander; Koop, Arjen H.; van Gils, Stephanus A.; Neef, Cees

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of aminoglycosides has been a topic during the last thirty years. There is a tendency that – because of the once-daily regimen – TDM is considered not necessary anymore. Although once daily dosing has the potential for decreased toxicity, long-term usage can cause

  10. Use of models to support the monitoring requirements in the water framework directive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Højberg, A.L.; Refsgaard, J.C.; Geer, F. van; Jørgensen, L.F.; Zsuffa, I.

    2007-01-01

    Implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive (WFD) poses many new challenges to European water managers. Monitoring programmes play a key role to assess the status and identify possible trends in the environmental conditions of river basins; to gain new knowledge on water processes and to asse

  11. ELF Communications System Ecological Monitoring Program: Electromagnetic Field Measurements and Engineering Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    based studies. A full report of the Wisconsin studies was Issued In 1990 (URM Technical5 ~Report E06620-5, ELF Communicatin System Ecological...IITRI developed a monitoring system based on a Tattletalem" single-board computer data logger manufactured by ONSET Computer Corporation . The data

  12. Monitoring chemical degradation of thermally cycled glass-fibre composites using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, V. M.; Müller, B.; Hagenbeek, M.; Sinke, J.; Groves, R. M.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the application of glass-fibre composites in light-weight structures is growing. Although mechanical characterizations of those structures are commonly performed in testing, chemical changes of materials under stresses have not yet been well documented. In the present work coupon tests and Hyperspectral Imaging (HSI) have been used to categorise possible chemical changes of glass-fibre reinforced polymers (GFRP) which are currently used in the aircraft industry. HSI is a hybrid technique that combines spectroscopy with imaging. It is able to detect chemical degradation of surfaces and has already been successfully applied in a wide range of fields including astronomy, remote sensing, cultural heritage and medical sciences. GFRP specimens were exposed to two different thermal loading conditions. One thermal loading condition was a continuous thermal exposure at 120°C for 24h, 48 h and 96h, i.e. ageing at a constant temperature. The other thermal loading condition was thermal cycling with three different numbers of cycles (4000, 8000, 12000) and two temperature ranges (0°C to 120°C and -25°C to 95°C). The effects of both conditions were measured using both HSI and interlaminar shear (ILSS) tests. No significant changes of the physical properties of the thermally cycled GFRP specimens were detected using interlaminar shear strength tests and optical microscopy. However, when using HIS, differences of the surface conditions were detected. The results showed that the different thermal loading conditions could be successfully clustered in different colours, using the HSI linear unmixing technique. Each different thermal loading condition showed a different chemical degradation level on its surface which was indicated using different colours.

  13. Operational Authority, Support, and Monitoring of School Turnaround. NCEE Evaluation Brief. NCEE 2014-4008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Rebecca; Graczewski, Cheryl; James-Burdumy, Susanne; Murray, Matthew; Perez-Johnson, Irma; Tanenbaum, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    The federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) program, to which $3 billion were allocated under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), supports schools attempting to turn around a history of low performance. School turnaround also is a focus of Race to the Top (RTT), another ARRA-supported initiative, which involved a roughly $4…

  14. Genetic monitoring of supportive breeding in brown trout ( Salmo trutta L.), using microsatellite DNA markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Møller; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Ruzzante, D.E.;

    2000-01-01

    Stocking with offspring of local wild fish, so-called supportive breeding, is often advocated as an alternative to stocking domesticated fish. However, it is important to ensure that supportive breeding does not result in inbreeding and loss of genetic variability. We analysed eight microsatellite...

  15. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  16. Environmental monitoring of selected pesticides and organic chemicals in urban stormwater recycling systems using passive sampling techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Declan; Miotliński, Konrad; Gonzalez, Dennis; Barry, Karen; Dillon, Peter; Gallen, Christie

    2014-03-01

    Water recycling via aquifers has become a valuable tool to augment urban water supplies in many countries. This study reports the first use of passive samplers for monitoring of organic micropollutants in Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR). Five different configurations of passive samplers were deployed in a stormwater treatment wetland, groundwater monitoring wells and a recovery tank to capture a range of polar and non-polar micropollutants present in the system. The passive samplers were analysed for a suite of pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and other chemicals. As a result, 17 pesticides and pesticide degradation products, 5 PAHs and 8 other organic chemicals including flame retardants and fragrances were detected in urban stormwater recharging Aquifer Storage and Recovery (ASR) and an Aquifer Storage Transfer and Recovery (ASTR) system. Of the pesticides detected, diuron, metolachlor and chlorpyrifos were generally detected at the highest concentrations in one or more passive samplers, whereas chlorpyrifos, diuron, metolachlor, simazine, galaxolide and triallate were detected in multiple samplers. Fluorene was the PAH detected at the highest concentration and the flame retardant Tris(1-chloro-2-propyl)phosphate was the chemical detected in the greatest abundance at all sites. The passive samplers showed different efficiencies for capture of micropollutants with the Empore disc samplers giving the most reliable results. The results indicate generally low levels of organic micropollutants in the stormwater, as the contaminants detected were present at very low ng/L levels, generally two to four orders of magnitude below the drinking water guidelines (NHMRC, 2011). The efficiency of attenuation of these organic micropollutants during MAR was difficult to determine due to variations in the source water concentrations. Comparisons were made between different samplers, to give a field-based calibration where existing lab-based calibrations were

  17. Near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) as a process monitoring solution for a production line of roll compaction and tableting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Milad; Amigo, José M; Sun, Changquan Calvin; Bertelsen, Poul; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-06-01

    In the present study the application of near-infrared chemical imaging (NIR-CI) supported by chemometric modeling as non-destructive tool for monitoring and assessing the roller compaction and tableting processes was investigated. Based on preliminary risk-assessment, discussion with experts and current work from the literature the critical process parameter (roll pressure and roll speed) and critical quality attributes (ribbon porosity, granule size, amount of fines, tablet tensile strength) were identified and a design space was established. Five experimental runs with different process settings were carried out which revealed intermediates (ribbons, granules) and final products (tablets) with different properties. Principal component analysis (PCA) based model of NIR images was applied to map the ribbon porosity distribution. The ribbon porosity distribution gained from the PCA based NIR-CI was used to develop predictive models for granule size fractions. Predictive methods with acceptable R(2) values could be used to predict the granule particle size. Partial least squares regression (PLS-R) based model of the NIR-CI was used to map and predict the chemical distribution and content of active compound for both roller compacted ribbons and corresponding tablets. In order to select the optimal process, setting the standard deviation of tablet tensile strength and tablet weight for each tablet batch was considered. Strong linear correlation between tablet tensile strength and amount of fines and granule size was established, respectively. These approaches are considered to have a potentially large impact on quality monitoring and control of continuously operating manufacturing lines, such as roller compaction and tableting processes.

  18. Ionic Liquids as Solvent, Catalyst Support Chemical Agent Decontamination and Detoxification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-15

    Anastas , P. T.; Warner, J. C. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice; Oxford University Press: Oxford, 1998. (27) Zhang, S. G.; Zhang, Z. C. Green...31) Owens, G. S.; Abu-Omar, M. M. J. Mol. Catal. A-Chemical. 2002, 187, 215-225. (32) Anastas , P. T. Green Chem. 2003, 5, G29-G34. (33) Currie, F

  19. The Teaching and Learning of Chemical Kinetics Supported with MS Excel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain, Sharifuddin Md; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abdul; Chin, Lee Sui

    2013-01-01

    Students in 12 secondary schools in three states of Malaysia were taught to use worksheets on the chemical kinetics topic which had been pre-created using the MS Excel worksheets. After the teaching, an opinion survey of 612 Form Six students from these schools was conducted. The results showed that almost all the students felt that MS Excel…

  20. Deciphering chemical interactions between Glycyrrhizae Radix and Coptidis Rhizoma by liquid chromatography with transformed multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhao; Liu, Ting; Liao, Jie; Ai, Ni; Fan, Xiaohui; Cheng, Yiyu

    2017-01-18

    In this study, we propose an integrated strategy for the efficient identification and quantification of herbal constituents using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry. First, liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry was employed for the chemical profiling of herbs, where a targeted following nontargeted approach was developed to detect trace constituents by using structural correlations and extracted ion chromatograms. Next, ion pairs and parameters of MS(2) of quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry were selected to design multiple reaction monitoring transitions for the identified compounds on liquid chromatography with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry. The relative concentration of each constituent was then calculated using a semiquantitative calibration curve. The proposed strategy was applied in a study of chemical interactions between Glycyrrhizae Radix and Coptidis Rhizoma. A total of 140 compounds were identified or tentatively characterized from the herbs, 132 of which were relatively quantified. The visualized quantitative results clearly showed codecoction produced significant constituent concentration variations especially for those with a low polarity. The case study also indicated that the present methodology could provide a reliable, accurate, and labor-saving solution for chemical studies of herbal medicines.

  1. Advances in cheminformatics methodologies and infrastructure to support the data mining of large, heterogeneous chemical datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Rajarshi; Gilbert, Kevin; Fox, Geoffrey; Pierce, Marlon; Wild, David; Yuan, Huapeng

    2010-03-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion in the availability of publicly accessible chemical information, including chemical structures of small molecules, structure-derived properties and associated biological activities in a variety of assays. These data sources present us with a significant opportunity to develop and apply computational tools to extract and understand the underlying structure-activity relationships. Furthermore, by integrating chemical data sources with biological information (protein structure, gene expression and so on), we can attempt to build up a holistic view of the effects of small molecules in biological systems. Equally important is the ability for non-experts to access and utilize state of the art cheminformatics method and models. In this review we present recent developments in cheminformatics methodologies and infrastructure that provide a robust, distributed approach to mining large and complex chemical datasets. In the area of methodology development, we highlight recent work on characterizing structure-activity landscapes, Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) model domain applicability and the use of chemical similarity in text mining. In the area of infrastructure, we discuss a distributed web services framework that allows easy deployment and uniform access to computational (statistics, cheminformatics and computational chemistry) methods, data and models. We also discuss the development of PubChem derived databases and highlight techniques that allow us to scale the infrastructure to extremely large compound collections, by use of distributed processing on Grids. Given that the above work is applicable to arbitrary types of cheminformatics problems, we also present some case studies related to virtual screening for anti-malarials and predictions of anti-cancer activity.

  2. PS2-17: Diabetes Social Support Feasibility Pilot Study: Utilizing Mobile Technology and Self-Identified Supporters to Enhance Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Brandi; Roblin, Douglas; Hipkens, James; Vupputuri, Suma; McMahon, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims: Self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is associated with improved glycemic control among patients with type 2 diabetes, however, the practice of daily self-monitoring is not optimal. Telecommunications technology may improve adherence to recommended self-management practices by remotely transmitting automated reminders to motivate patients, and utilizing social networking for peer support. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and usability of mobile technology and the potential added value of social support to improve SMBG frequency and glycemic control among adults with type 2 diabetes. Methods: Adults 25–74 years of age with type 2 DM and an average HbA1c > 8.0% were recruited from Kaiser Permanente Georgia (KPGA) and Oakhurst Medical Center (OMC, a community health clinic) to participate in a 3-month study using wireless technology. Enrollment sessions with presentations on SMBG techniques, use of the wireless technology, and motivational coaching to enhance social support were conducted in November 2009. During the subsequent 3-months, both diabetes patients and their self-selected supporters will receive text messages to their cell phones summarizing a patient’s SMBG frequency and levels. Participants and their supporters will attend a disenrollment session in February 2010 when feasibility and usability will be assessed in focus groups. Results: 6 of 161 eligible diabetes patients at KPGA and 9 of 28 eligible diabetes patients at OMC, and their self-selected supporters, consented to participate. The average age of diabetes patients was 49.3 years. 86.7% (N=13) were African-American; and 33.3% (N=5) were male. Five days after enrollment, 60% (N=9) of patients had connected their wireless transmitters and had current blood glucose data. Follow-up phone calls will be made to ensure that all participants are connected to the wireless technology within 10 days of the enrollment session. Conclusion

  3. Forest condition and chemical characteristics of atmospheric depositions: research and monitoring network in Lombardy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaminio DI GIROLAMO

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Since 1987, the Regional Forestry Board of Lombardy and the Water Research Institute of the National Research Council have been carrying out surveys of forest conditions and the response of the ecosystem to environmental factors. The study approach is based on a large number of permanent plots for extensive monitoring (Level 1. At this level, crown condition is assessed annually, and soil condition and the nutritional status of forests surveyed. Some of the permanent plots were selected for intensive monitoring (Level 2, focussing mainly on the impact of atmospheric pollution on forest ecosystems. Level 2 monitoring also includes increment analyses, ground vegetation assessment, atmospheric deposition, soil solution analyses and climatic observations. This paper summarises the main results of a pluriannual research, which provides a general picture of the state of forest health in the region and focuses on more detailed investigations, described as case studies. Modified wet and dry samplers which use a water surface to collect dry deposition were used in a pluriannual field campaign at five sites in alpine and prealpine areas, to measure the total atmospheric depositions and to evaluate the nitrogen and sulphate exceedances of critical loads. Throughfall and bulk precipitation chemistry were studied for five years (June 1994-May 1999 at two high elevation forest sites (Val Gerola and Val Masino which were known to differ in terms of tree health, as assessed by live crown condition. Results indicated a higher contribution from the dry deposition of N-NO3 -, N-NH4 + and H+ and considerable canopy leaching of Ca2+, K+ and weak organic acids at Val Gerola, where the symptoms of damage were more evident. In the area of Val Masino (SO, included since 1997 in the national CONECOFOR network, investigations focused on the effectiveness of the biological compartment in modifying fluxes of atmospheric elements, and on the role of nitrogen both as an

  4. 多模态化工过程的全局监控策略%Global monitoring strategy for multimode chemical processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解翔; 侍洪波

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate statistical process monitoring (SPM) has gained tremendous attention in both academic and industrial circles over the past two decades. Most of the existing statistical monitoring algorithms are established on the assumption that the monitored industrial processes work under single operating mode. However, in order to meet the demands of markets, multimode has become a significant feature of modern chemical industry. To meet the monitoring demands of multimode processes, a global monitoring strategy based on locality preserving projection (LPP) and Gaussian mixture model (GMM) is proposed. By integrating probability indices of each operating modes, the online monitoring is guaranteed to be continuous and uninterrupted. The efficiency and effectiveness of the novel monitoring strategy is verified though the Tennessee Eastman (TE) simulation platform.

  5. Oxidation of CO and Methanol on Pd-Ni Catalysts Supported on Different Chemically-Treated Carbon Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Calderón

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, palladium-nickel nanoparticles supported on carbon nanofibers were synthesized, with metal contents close to 25 wt % and Pd:Ni atomic ratios near to 1:2. These catalysts were previously studied in order to determine their activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction. Before the deposition of metals, the carbon nanofibers were chemically treated in order to generate oxygen and nitrogen groups on their surface. Transmission electron microscopy analysis (TEM images revealed particle diameters between 3 and 4 nm, overcoming the sizes observed for the nanoparticles supported on carbon black (catalyst Pd-Ni CB 1:2. From the CO oxidation at different temperatures, the activation energy Eact for this reaction was determined. These values indicated a high tolerance of the catalysts toward the CO poisoning, especially in the case of the catalysts supported on the non-chemically treated carbon nanofibers. On the other hand, apparent activation energy Eap for the methanol oxidation was also determined finding—as a rate determining step—the COads diffusion to the OHads for the catalysts supported on carbon nanofibers. The results here presented showed that the surface functional groups only play a role in the obtaining of lower particle sizes, which is an important factor in the obtaining of low CO oxidation activation energies.

  6. In situ chemical fabrication of polyaniline/multi-walled carbon nanotubes composites as supports of Pt for methanol electrooxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAL; Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    In this study,platinum(Pt)-polyaniline(PANI)/MWNTs catalysts were synthesized by two sequential reactions.First,coreshell structural PANI/MWNTs composites were fabricated by in-situ chemical oxidation polymerization,in which MWNTs act as the core and PANI as the shell.Then,Pt particles were deposited on the PANI/MWNTs composites by a chemical reduction method.The morphology and constitution of the products were characterized by FT IR,scanning electron microscopy,transmission electron microscopy and XRD.It was observed that the Pt particles were smaller in size and more uniformly distributed on these composite supports than those on the reference,pure MWNT supports.XRD results showed higher Pt(111) content in the catalyst deposited on PANI/MWNTs supports than that on MWNTs.The cyclic voltammeter(CV) tests demonstrated that the electrode modified by Pt-PANI/MWNTs ternary composite catalyst showed a higher catalytic stability than Pt-MWNT binary catalyst did,due to the synergic interaction between Pt and the composite support.

  7. Hydrogeo-chemical impacts of air sparging remediation on a semi-confined aquifer: evidences from field monitoring and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, W; Yang, Y S; Lu, Y; Du, X Q; Zhang, G X

    2013-01-01

    Air sparging (AS) was explored for remediation of a petroleum contaminated semi-confined groundwater system in NE China. Physical, hydro-chemical and hydraulic behaviors in subsurface environment during AS were investigated with support of modeling to understand the hydrogeo-chemical impacts of AS on the aquifer. The responses of groundwater, dissolved oxygen and temperature indicated that the radius of influence of AS was up to 8-9 m, and a 3D boundary of the zone of influence (ZOI) was accordingly obtained with volume of 362 m(3). Water mounding unlike normal observations was featured by continuous up-lift and blocked dissipation. AS induced water displacement was calculated showing no obvious spreading of contaminant plume under this AS condition. Slug tests were employed before and after AS to reveal that the physical perturbation led to sharp increase in permeability and porosity. Modeling indicated that the regional groundwater flow field was not affected by AS except the physical perturbation in ZOI. Hydro-chemically increase of pH and Eh, and reduction of TDS, electrical conductivity and bicarbonate were observed in ZOI during AS. PHREEQC modeling inferred that these chemical phenomena were induced by the inorganic carbon transfer during air mixing.

  8. Jogging support system with portable monitoring device and health manage software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makikawa, Masaki; Isaka, Tadao; Iida, Takeo; Asajima, Shuzo; Tsukise, Kanji; Shiozawa, Narihiro; Nishiyama, Kento; Wada, Sumio; Nakayama, Kyochiro; Horiguchi, Michiyuki; Torimoto, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    At MEDINFO 2001 we reported about an ambulatory biosignal memory device. As an application of this system, we have developed a portable jogging monitoring device and studied its application for health management here. This device is a micro processor based system with some sensors necessary to monitor condition of the user during jogging, that is, a heart rate sensor, a GPS sensor and a physical activity sensor. We also have developed PC based health management software that receives jogging data after jogging and stores it as a long term jogging trend data. From these long term data it feeds back the distance completion of jogging on the virtual course. Moreover it can show the trend of jogging time, distance, average heart rate and the user can know his/her own health condition.

  9. Proposal for the award of an industrial support contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of an Industrial Service contract for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling. Following a market survey carried out among 34 firms in nine Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2769/SL/LEP) was sent on 13 March 2000 to seven firms and three consortia in five Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received six tenders from three firms and three consortia in four Member States. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the consortium ISS MULTISERVICE (CH), NFI (SE) and ISS GEBÄUDESERVICE (DE), the lowest technically qualified bidder, for radiation monitoring services for LEP dismantling for a total amount of 990 792 Swiss francs, not subject to revision. The firm has indicated the following distribution by country of the contract value covered by this adjudication proposal: CH-59%, DE-26%, SE-15%.

  10. Opto-numerical procedures supporting dynamic lower limbs monitoring and their medical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkowski, Marcin; Kujawińska, Malgorzata; Rapp, Walter; Sitnik, Robert

    2006-01-01

    New optical full-field shape measurement systems allow transient shape capture at rates between 15 and 30 Hz. These frequency rates are enough to monitor controlled movements used e.g. for medical examination purposes. In this paper we present a set of algorithms which may be applied for processing of data gathered by fringe projection method implemented for lower limbs shape measurement. The purpose of presented algorithms is to locate anatomical structures based on the limb shape and its deformation in time. The algorithms are based on local surface curvature calculation and analysis of curvature maps changes during the measurement sequence. One of anatomical structure of high medical interest that is possible to scan and analyze, is patella. Tracking of patella position and orientation under dynamic conditions may lead to detect pathological patella movements and help in knee joint disease diagnosis. Therefore the usefulness of the algorithms developed was proven at examples of patella localization and monitoring.

  11. Real-time monitoring and chemical profiling of a cultivation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter P.; Bro, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    A method for at-line quality assessment of a cultivation process is developed in order to (1) enable improved process control, (2) enable faster detection of batch end point, and (3) enable immediate quality assessment of final product. Fluorescence excitation-emission measurements are used because...... for predicting product quality (enzymatic activity). The fluorescence data are also modeled by a PARAFAC model, providing a chemically interpretable visualization of the process variation thereby enhancing the possibilities for gaining in-depth process understanding. The results of our investigations...

  12. Website Resource Monitoring Platform Supporting Tibetan and Uyghur Language based on Semantics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lirong Qiu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available With the development of the Internet and the increasing minority language websites, people of ethnic minorities begin to browse the news, comments and other content on the Internet according to their own interests. At present, there is still no websites to provide the Chinese–Tibetan or Chinese-Uyghur co-occurrence search engine in China. In this paper, a platform for Tibetan and Uyghur website monitoring is proposed. The functions and characterizes are proposed in detail.

  13. More than just consumers: Integrating local observations into drought monitoring to better support decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, D. B.; Masayesva, A.; Meadow, A. M.; Crimmins, M.

    2016-12-01

    Drought monitoring and drought planning are complex endeavors. Measures of precipitation or streamflow provide little context for understanding how social and environmental systems impacted by drought are responding. In arid and semi-arid regions of the world, this challenge is particularly acute since social-ecological systems are already well-adapted to dry conditions. Understanding what drought means in these regions is an important first step in developing a decision-relevant monitoring system. Traditional drought indices may be of some use, but local observations may ultimately be more relevant for informing difficult decisions in response to unusually dry conditions. This presentation will focus on insights gained from a collaborative project between the University of Arizona and the Hopi Tribe-a Native American community in the U.S. Southwest-to develop a drought information system that is responsive to local needs. The primary goal of the project was to develop a system that: is based on how drought is experienced by Hopi citizens and resource managers, can incorporate local observations of drought impacts as well as conventional indicators, and brings together local expertise with conventional science-based observations. This kind of drought monitoring system can harnesses as much available information as possible to inform resource managers, political leaders, and citizens about drought conditions, but such a system can also engage these local drought stakeholders in observing, thinking about, and helping guide planning for drought.

  14. An Adaptive Framework for Selecting Environmental Monitoring Protocols to Support Ocean Renewable Energy Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J. Shumchenia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore renewable energy developments (OREDs are projected to become common in the United States over the next two decades. There are both a need and an opportunity to guide efforts to identify and track impacts to the marine ecosystem resulting from these installations. A monitoring framework and standardized protocols that can be applied to multiple types of ORED would streamline scientific study, management, and permitting at these sites. We propose an adaptive and reactive framework based on indicators of the likely changes to the marine ecosystem due to ORED. We developed decision trees to identify suites of impacts at two scales (demonstration and commercial depending on energy (wind, tidal, and wave, structure (e.g., turbine, and foundation type (e.g., monopile. Impacts were categorized by ecosystem component (benthic habitat and resources, fish and fisheries, avian species, marine mammals, and sea turtles and monitoring objectives were developed for each. We present a case study at a commercial-scale wind farm and develop a monitoring plan for this development that addresses both local and national environmental concerns. In addition, framework has provided a starting point for identifying global research needs and objectives for understanding of the potential effects of ORED on the marine environment.

  15. Monitoring and evaluation to support adaptive co-management: Lessons learned from the Millennium Villages Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sarah; Sullivan, Clare; Palm, Cheryl; Huynh, Uyen; Diru, William; Masira, Jessica

    2016-12-01

    This article focuses attention on monitoring and evaluation approaches that will help resource managers to manage for change and uncertainty in adaptive co-management (ACM). ACM is a learning-by-doing approach that aims to build flexible community-based natural resource governance systems through collaborative or otherwise participatory means. We describe the framework for monitoring and evaluation that we developed and applied in ten African countries, which includes fixed indicators and measures for co-management performance monitoring, a process evaluation element, a platform for repeat ecological surveillance, and a longitudinal household survey. We comment on the usefulness of this framework, and its applicability to a wide range of geographic contexts. We then present a four step model to assist managers in applying the framework to specific co-management problems. The model suggests a cascade approach to defining key evaluations questions at a systems, network, individual and synthesis level. We illustrate the application of our model and framework by means of a case study of a co-managed agroforestry program in western Kenya. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Monitoring and sustainable management of oil polluting wrecks and chemical munitions dump sites in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassellöv, Ida-Maja; Tengberg, Anders

    2017-04-01

    The Baltic Sea region contains a dark legacy of about 100 000 tons of dumped chemical warfare agents. As time passes the gun shells corrode and the risks of release of contaminants increase. A major goal of the EU-flagship project Daimon is to support governmental organisations with case-to-case adapted methods for sustainable management of dumped toxic munitions. At the Chalmers University of Technology, a partner of Daimon, a unique ISO 31000 adapted method was developed to provide decision support regarding potentially oilpolluting shipwrecks. The method is called VRAKA and is based on probability calculations. It includes site-specific information as well as expert knowledge. VRAKA is now being adapted to dumped chemical munitions. To estimate corrosion potential of gun shells and ship wrecks along with sediment re-suspension and transport multiparameter instruments are deployed at dump sites. Parameters measured include Currents, Salinity, Temperature, Oxygen, Depth, Waves and Suspended particles. These measurements have revealed how trawling at dump sites seems to have large implications in spreading toxic substances (Arsenic) over larger areas. This presentation will shortly describe the decision support model, the used instrumentation and discuss some of the obtain results.

  17. A decision support system-based procedure for evaluation and monitoring of protected areas sustainability for the Mediterranean region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Pediaditi; F Buono; F Pompigna; C Bogliotti; E Nurlu; G Ladisa; G P Petropoulos

    2011-10-01

    Despite common acknowledgement of the value of protected areas as instruments in ensuring sustainability, and their promotion for the achievement of policies on halting the loss of biodiversity, there is no common approach today for monitoring and evaluating them. This paper presents a novel integrated nature conservation management procedure developed to monitor and evaluate the sustainability of Mediterranean protected areas. This procedure was successfully implemented and formally evaluated by protected area managers in six Mediterranean countries, results of which are presented here together with an overview of the web-based Decision Support System (DSS) developed to facilitate its wide adoption. The DSS and procedure has been designed and evaluated by managers as a useful tool, which facilitates and provides needed procedural guidance for protected area monitoring whilst minimizing input requirements to do so. The procedure and DSS were developed following a review of existing protected area assessment tools and a detailed primary investigation of the needs and capacity of its intended users. Essentially, the procedure and DSS guides provide the facilities for protected area managers, in following a participatory approach to develop a context-specific sustainability monitoring strategy, for their protected area. Consequently, the procedure is, by design, participatory, context specific, holistic and relevant to protected area management and institutional procedures. The procedure was piloted and formally evaluated in Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Malta and Cyprus. Feedback collected from the pilot evaluations is also summarised herein.

  18. Auditing of Monitoring and Respiratory Support Equipment in a Level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Bergon-Sendin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Random safety audits (RSAs are a safety tool but have not been widely used in hospitals. Objectives. To determine the frequency of proper use of equipment safety mechanisms in relation to monitoring and mechanical ventilation by performing RSAs. The study also determined whether factors related to the patient, time period, or characteristics of the area of admission influenced how the device safety systems were used. Methods. A prospective observational study was conducted in a level III-C Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU during 2012. 87 days were randomly selected. Appropriate overall use was defined when all evaluated variables were correctly programmed in the audited device. Results. A total of 383 monitor and ventilator audits were performed. The Kappa coefficient of interobserver agreement was 0.93. The rate of appropriate overall use of the monitors and respiratory support equipment was 33.68%. Significant differences were found with improved usage during weekends, OR 1.85 (1.12–3.06, p=0.01, and during the late shift (3 pm to 10 pm, OR 1.59 (1.03–2.4, p=0.03. Conclusions. Equipment safety systems of monitors and ventilators are not properly used. To improve patient safety, we should identify which alarms are really needed and where the difficulties lie for the correct alarm programming.

  19. Development of system decision support tools for behavioral trends monitoring of machinery maintenance in a competitive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeri, Michael Kanisuru; Mpofu, Khumbulani

    2017-01-01

    The article is centred on software system development for manufacturing company that produces polyethylene bags using mostly conventional machines in a competitive world where each business enterprise desires to stand tall. This is meant to assist in gaining market shares, taking maintenance and production decisions by the dynamism and flexibilities embedded in the package as customers' demand varies under the duress of meeting the set goals. The production and machine condition monitoring software (PMCMS) is programmed in C# and designed in such a way to support hardware integration, real-time machine conditions monitoring, which is based on condition maintenance approach, maintenance decision suggestions and suitable production strategies as the demand for products keeps changing in a highly competitive environment. PMCMS works with an embedded device which feeds it with data from the various machines being monitored at the workstation, and the data are read at the base station through transmission via a wireless transceiver and stored in a database. A case study was used in the implementation of the developed system, and the results show that it can monitor the machine's health condition effectively by displaying machines' health status, gives repair suggestions to probable faults, decides strategy for both production methods and maintenance, and, thus, can enhance maintenance performance obviously.

  20. Development of system decision support tools for behavioral trends monitoring of machinery maintenance in a competitive environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyeri, Michael Kanisuru; Mpofu, Khumbulani

    2017-01-01

    The article is centred on software system development for manufacturing company that produces polyethylene bags using mostly conventional machines in a competitive world where each business enterprise desires to stand tall. This is meant to assist in gaining market shares, taking maintenance and production decisions by the dynamism and flexibilities embedded in the package as customers' demand varies under the duress of meeting the set goals. The production and machine condition monitoring software (PMCMS) is programmed in C# and designed in such a way to support hardware integration, real-time machine conditions monitoring, which is based on condition maintenance approach, maintenance decision suggestions and suitable production strategies as the demand for products keeps changing in a highly competitive environment. PMCMS works with an embedded device which feeds it with data from the various machines being monitored at the workstation, and the data are read at the base station through transmission via a wireless transceiver and stored in a database. A case study was used in the implementation of the developed system, and the results show that it can monitor the machine's health condition effectively by displaying machines' health status, gives repair suggestions to probable faults, decides strategy for both production methods and maintenance, and, thus, can enhance maintenance performance obviously.

  1. Multi-mode process monitoring based on a novel weighted local standardization strategy and support vector data description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵付洲; 宋冰; 侍洪波

    2016-01-01

    There are multiple operating modes in the real industrial process, and the collected data follow the complex multimodal distribution, so most traditional process monitoring methods are no longer applicable because their presumptions are that sampled-data should obey the single Gaussian distribution or non-Gaussian distribution. In order to solve these problems, a novel weighted local standardization (WLS) strategy is proposed to standardize the multimodal data, which can eliminate the multi-mode characteristics of the collected data, and normalize them into unimodal data distribution. After detailed analysis of the raised data preprocessing strategy, a new algorithm using WLS strategy with support vector data description (SVDD) is put forward to apply for multi-mode monitoring process. Unlike the strategy of building multiple local models, the developed method only contains a model without the prior knowledge of multi-mode process. To demonstrate the proposed method’s validity, it is applied to a numerical example and a Tennessee Eastman (TE) process. Finally, the simulation results show that the WLS strategy is very effective to standardize multimodal data, and the WLS-SVDD monitoring method has great advantages over the traditional SVDD and PCA combined with a local standardization strategy (LNS-PCA) in multi-mode process monitoring.

  2. Detection and monitoring of toxic chemical at ultra trace level by utilizing doped nanomaterial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sher Bahadar Khan

    Full Text Available Composite nanoparticles were synthesized by eco-friendly hydrothermal process and characterized by different spectroscopic techniques. All the spectroscopic techniques suggested the synthesis of well crystalline optically active composite nanoparticles with average diameter of ∼ 30 nm. The synthesized nanoparticles were applied for the development of chemical sensor which was fabricated by coating the nanoparticles on silver electrode for the recognition of phthalimide using simple I-V technique. The developed sensor exhibited high sensitivity (1.7361 µA.mM(-1.cm(-2, lower detection limit (8.0 µM and long range of detection (77.0 µM to 0.38 M. Further the resistances of composite nanoparticles based sensor was found to be 2.7 MΩ which change from 2.7 to 1.7 with change in phthalimide concentration. The major advantages of the designed sensor over existing sensors are its simple technique, low cost, lower detection limit, high sensitivity and long range of detection. It can detect phthalimide even at trace level and sense over wide range of concentrations. Therefore the composite nanoparticals would be a better choice for the fabrication of phthalimide chemical sensor and would be time and cost substituted implement for environmental safety.

  3. Supporting smarter, healthier and greener societies: the dawn of operational environmental information services Some examples from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) programme in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peuch, V. H.

    2016-12-01

    Operational environmental services are a reality today, as exemplified by the Copernicus Atmospheric Monitoring Service in Europe. Air quality forecasts, information on the long-range transport of dust or of fire plumes or on greenhouse gas fluxes have become reliable enough to be considered by decision makers and to be communicated broadly -making our societies more informed about the changing environment and about the direct link between human activities, atmospheric composition, weather and climate. Many aspects of the value-adding information chains that have been built over the years share commonalities with Numerical Weather Prediction: global and regional numerical models, reflecting both the level of understanding of physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere and the contemporary computing capabilities, are used to blend observations from different in situ and, increasingly, Earth Observation sources. Significantly, the World Meteorological Organisation has recently added a new component to the Global Atmospheric Watch programme in the form of a Science Advisory Group on "Applications". The main objectives of this group are to develop a portfolio of products and services related to atmospheric composition and to demonstrate particularly the usefulness of exchanging chemical observational data in Near-Real-Time. Exchanging best practices worldwide and facilitating the set-up of new applications are also among the activities. Having operational applications does not imply that research efforts to improve environmental monitoring and forecasting services have become obsolete. Quite the contrary: feedbacks and increasingly demanding requirements from users are stimulating steady progress. The last part of the talk will support the idea that atmospheric compositions services are not only an application or an extension of weather services but contribute now also to the core of them. Atmospheric composition information has become indeed of high interest for

  4. A Medical Research and Evaluation Facility (MREF) and Studies Supporting the Medical Chemical Defense Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    8 2.7 Sinorhizobium meliloti Toxicity Test-New Mexico State University (Las Cruces, N M...problems. NRL continues to analyze chemicals and data will be added as it becomes available. 2.7 Sinorhizobium meliloti Toxicity Test-New Mexico State...University (Las Cruces, NM) This test uses the bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti , a bacterium that readily reduces a tetrazolium dye. The dye is normally

  5. Evaluation of chemical data from selected sites in the Surface-Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B.G.; Collins, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    A cooperative study between the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) and the U.S. Geological Survey was conducted to assess the integrity of selected water-quality data collected at 150 sites in the FDEP Surface-Water Ambient Monitoring Program (SWAMP) in Florida. The assessment included determining the consistency of the water-quality data collected statewide, including commonality of monitoring procedures and analytes, screening of the gross validity of a chemical analysis, and quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) procedures. Four tests were used to screen data at selected SWAMP sites to estimate the gross validity of selected chemical data: (1) the ratio of dissolved solids (in milligrams per liter) to specific conductance (in microsiemens per centimeter); (2) the ratio of total cations (in milliequivalents per liter) multiplied by 100 to specific conductance (in microsiemens per centimeter); (3) the ratio of total anions (in milliequivalents per liter) multiplied by 100 to specific conductance (in microsiemens per centimeter); and (4) the ionic charge-balance error. Although the results of the four screening tests indicate that the chemical data generally are quite reliable, the extremely small number of samples (less than 5 percent of the total number of samples) with sufficient chemical information to run the tests may not provide a representative indication of the analytical accuracy of all laboratories in the program. In addition to the four screening tests, unusually low or high values were flagged for field and laboratory pH (less than 4.0 and greater than 9.0) and specific conductance (less than 10 and greater than 10,000 microsiemens per centimeter). The numbers of flagged data were less than 1 percent of the 19,937 water samples with pH values and less than 0.6 percent of the 16,553 water samples with specific conductance values. Thirty-four agencies responded to a detailed questionnaire that was sent to more than 60 agencies

  6. Spectral Induced Polarization monitoring of the groundwater physico-chemical parameters daily variations for stream-groundwater interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jougnot, Damien; Camerlynck, Christian; Robain, Henri; Tallec, Gaëlle; Ribolzi, Olivier; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, geophysical methods have been attracting an increasing interest in hydrology and environmental sciences given their sensitivity to parameters of interests and their non-intrusive nature. The Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) is a low frequency electro-magnetic method that allows the characterization of the subsurface through its complex electrical conductivity. It reports the modulus of the conductivity and the phase between an injected current and a measured voltage over a rather large frequency range (from few millihertz to few tens of kilohertz). The real part of the conductivity is sensitive to lithological (porosity, specific surface area) and hydrological (water saturation, water salinity) parameters, while the imaginary part is linked to electrochemical polarizations, that have been shown to be largely influenced by the chemistry of the pore water. In the present contribution, we aim at better characterizing the exchanges between a stream and the surrounding groundwater using the SIP method and its sensitivity to pore water changes over time. Two sites from the OZCAR Research Infrastructure (French Critical Zone observatories) have been chosen for this study: the Houay Pano catchment (Laos) and the Orgeval catchment (France). These two sites have a good existing infrastructure and have been already studied extensively in terms of hydrology, geophysics, and hydrochemistry. They constitute perfect experimental sites to develop novel methodologies for the assessment of stream-groundwater exchanges. We propose to obtain a vertical description of the changes in complex electrical conductivity with depth based on SIP soundings undertaken with the multi-channel system SIP Fuchs III. We conducted a high-frequency monitoring close to a river stream (one vertical profiles every 30 min). In parallel, a high frequency monitoring of the physico-chemical parameters (temperature, conductivity, ionic concentrations) in the river stream has been

  7. Evaluation and monitoring of direct support for the agricultural development in Fieri Region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Bani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the Strategy of Rural Development, the Albanian Government supports directly the agricultural sector. Approximately 3.5 milliard leks have been spent from the state budget. Until now, there has not been an independent evaluation of the efficiency of the use of funds by the government. Such evaluation would be necessary not only to see what is given and how the money are spent, but to have a complete frame and to fully argue the programming of support in the future by respective institutions. Our aim is to identify some of the key outcomes of direct support policy in Fier’s region, to analyze and to evaluate the principles, the effects of supporting schemes as well as to identify the strong and weak points of the subvention scheme from which the direct state support in agriculture would become more effective and efficient. The verification of the effectiveness of the given funds will be achieved through comprehensive analysis described all the way from the application, the selection of applicants, the allocated amount, investment direction, absorption in different times until the final realization. This study was undertaken during 2011 through the development of a standardized methodology. In Fieri region, for 4 years, there have been allocated 435 million leke for direct support to the farmer’s families, respectively: 46 million in 2007, 114 million in 2008, 122 million in 2009 and 153 million lekë in 2010. The projects are invested in olives, vineyards, fruit trees, drip irrigation, greenhouses, livestock, etc. Our study showed that the state support measures for the period 2007-2010 have given significant positive results in the increasing of planted surfaces with fruit trees, olives and vineyards, for their production and productivity. On the other hand the study also showed that for higher grant effectiveness a harmonization of several factors is needed, such as soil, climate studies, seed quality etc.

  8. CardioGuard: a brassiere-based reliable ECG monitoring sensor system for supporting daily smartphone healthcare applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeehoon; Kang, Seungwoo; Lee, Youngki; Baek, Hyunjae; Park, Kwangsuk

    2014-12-01

    We propose CardioGuard, a brassiere-based reliable electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring sensor system, for supporting daily smartphone healthcare applications. It is designed to satisfy two key requirements for user-unobtrusive daily ECG monitoring: reliability of ECG sensing and usability of the sensor. The system is validated through extensive evaluations. The evaluation results showed that the CardioGuard sensor reliably measure the ECG during 12 representative daily activities including diverse movement levels; 89.53% of QRS peaks were detected on average. The questionnaire-based user study with 15 participants showed that the CardioGuard sensor was comfortable and unobtrusive. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio test and the washing durability test were conducted to show the high-quality sensing of the proposed sensor and its physical durability in practical use, respectively.

  9. Biosensors for environmental monitoring of aquatic systems. Bioanalytical and chemical methods for endocrine disruptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcelo, Damia [IDAEA-CSIC, Barcelona (Spain). Dept. of Environmental Chemistry; Girona Univ. (ES). Catalan Inst. for Water Research (ICRA); Hansen, Peter-Diedrich (eds.) [Berlin Inst. of Technology, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Ecotoxicology

    2009-07-01

    There is an increasing need for effective methods of estimating the risks caused by the large number of pollutants released into the environment by human activities. This volume provides an overview of biosensors as a key tool for the environmental monitoring of aquatic systems. Biosensor technology is based on a specific biological recognition element in combination with a transducer for signal processing. In particular, the detection and identification of endocrine-disrupting compounds and other toxins in wastewater are treated in detail. Biosensors are presented as a practical alternative or supplement to traditional chromatographic techniques. Emphasis is also placed on the validation of the applied technology and its application to real-world environmental samples. (orig.)

  10. A decision support framework for characterizing and managing dermal exposures to chemicals during Emergency Management and Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, G Scott; Hudson, Naomi L; Maier, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Emergency Management and Operations (EMO) personnel are in need of resources and tools to assist in understanding the health risks associated with dermal exposures during chemical incidents. This article reviews available resources and presents a conceptual framework for a decision support system (DSS) that assists in characterizing and managing risk during chemical emergencies involving dermal exposures. The framework merges principles of three decision-making techniques: 1) scenario planning, 2) risk analysis, and 3) multicriteria decision analysis (MCDA). This DSS facilitates dynamic decision making during each of the distinct life cycle phases of an emergency incident (ie, preparedness, response, or recovery) and identifies EMO needs. A checklist tool provides key questions intended to guide users through the complexities of conducting a dermal risk assessment. The questions define the scope of the framework for resource identification and application to support decision-making needs. The framework consists of three primary modules: 1) resource compilation, 2) prioritization, and 3) decision. The modules systematically identify, organize, and rank relevant information resources relating to the hazards of dermal exposures to chemicals and risk management strategies. Each module is subdivided into critical elements designed to further delineate the resources based on relevant incident phase and type of information. The DSS framework provides a much needed structure based on contemporary decision analysis principles for 1) documenting key questions for EMO problem formulation and 2) a method for systematically organizing, screening, and prioritizing information resources on dermal hazards, exposures, risk characterization, and management.

  11. A low cost implementation of multi-parameter patient monitor using intersection kernel support vector machine classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Dhanya; Kumar, C. Santhosh

    2016-03-01

    Predicting the physiological condition (normal/abnormal) of a patient is highly desirable to enhance the quality of health care. Multi-parameter patient monitors (MPMs) using heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiration rate and oxygen saturation (S pO2) as input parameters were developed to monitor the condition of patients, with minimum human resource utilization. The Support vector machine (SVM), an advanced machine learning approach popularly used for classification and regression is used for the realization of MPMs. For making MPMs cost effective, we experiment on the hardware implementation of the MPM using support vector machine classifier. The training of the system is done using the matlab environment and the detection of the alarm/noalarm condition is implemented in hardware. We used different kernels for SVM classification and note that the best performance was obtained using intersection kernel SVM (IKSVM). The intersection kernel support vector machine classifier MPM has outperformed the best known MPM using radial basis function kernel by an absoute improvement of 2.74% in accuracy, 1.86% in sensitivity and 3.01% in specificity. The hardware model was developed based on the improved performance system using Verilog Hardware Description Language and was implemented on Altera cyclone-II development board.

  12. A NEW BIOGENIC SULFIDE CHEMICAL SENSOR FOR MARINE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND SURVEY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋金明; 赵卫东

    2001-01-01

    A new convenient sulfide electrochemical sensor for marine environmental insitumonitoring and real time survey was developed. The new sensor based on a solid Ag2 S membrane electrode has outstanding chemical sensitivity and stability. It responds to the activity of sulfide ions according to a Nernsfian slope of - 31mV/decade. The sensor can be used to determine the total concentration of sulfides ( CT ) by calibrating the pH value of the solution to a standard pH. The practical measurement range for total sulfide concentration is 0.1 - 10 mg/L in seawater. The sensor has a very low potential drift ( < 4mV) during two months in 0.1 mg/L sulfide seawater. This paper describes the preparation of the sensitive membrane and some main properties of the sensor.

  13. Monitoring the effect of chemicals on biological communities. The biofilm as an interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabater, Sergi; Guasch, Helena; Ricart, Marta; Romani, Anna; Vidal, Gemma [Universitat de Girona, Institute of Aquatic Ecology, Faculty of Sciences, Girona (Spain); Kluender, Christina; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild [UFZ Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig-Halle, Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Leipzig (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    Biofilms can be regarded as early warning systems for detection of the effects of toxicants on aquatic systems, because they have been successfully used for detection of other environmental stressors (e.g. pH, salinity, organic pollution). A variety of methods is used for detection of the effects of toxicants by use of biofilms. The methods range from structurally-based to functionally-based, and from in vitro-based to systemic approaches. Physiological approaches may be appropriate for detection of acute effects. Among these methods, photosynthesis is more related to the effect of toxicants affecting algal communities, directly or indirectly, and extracellular enzyme activity is less specific. Selecting one or the other may depend on the suspected direct effect of the toxicant. Integrated studies have revealed the relevance of toxicants to top-down or bottom-up regulation of the biofilm community. Persistent or chronic effects should affect other biofilm indicators, for example growth or biomass-related factors (e.g. chlorophyll), or community composition. Among these, community composition might better reflect the effects of the toxicant(s), because this may cause a shift from a sensitive to a progressively tolerant community. Community composition-based approaches do not usually adequately reflect cause-effect relationships and require complementary analysis of properties affected in the short-term, for example physiological properties. The current array of methods available must be wisely combined to disentangle the effects of chemicals on biofilms, and whether these effects are transient or persistent, to successfully translate the chemical action of toxicants into the effect they might have on the river ecosystem. (orig.)

  14. Borehole Calibration Facilities to Support Gamma Logging for Hanford Subsurface Investigation and Contaminant Monitoring - 13516

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCain, R.G.; Henwood, P.D.; Pope, A.D.; Pearson, A.W. [S M Stoller Corporation, 2439 Robertson Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Repeated gamma logging in cased holes represents a cost-effective means to monitor gamma-emitting contamination in the deep vadose zone over time. Careful calibration and standardization of gamma log results are required to track changes and to compare results over time from different detectors and logging systems. This paper provides a summary description of Hanford facilities currently available for calibration of logging equipment. Ideally, all logging organizations conducting borehole gamma measurements at the Hanford Site will take advantage of these facilities to produce standardized and comparable results. (authors)

  15. Rapid Monitoring of Mercury in Air from an Organic Chemical Factory in China Using a Portable Mercury Analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Yasutake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A chemical factory, using a production technology of acetaldehyde with mercury catalysis, was located southeast of Qingzhen City in Guizhou Province, China. Previous research showed heavy mercury pollution through an extensive downstream area. A current investigation of the mercury distribution in ambient air, soils, and plants suggests that mobile mercury species in soils created elevated mercury concentrations in ambient air and vegetation. Mercury concentrations of up to 600 ng/m3 in air over the contaminated area provided evidence of the mercury transformation to volatile Hg(0. Mercury analysis of soil and plant samples demonstrated that the mercury concentrations in soil with vaporized and plant-absorbable forms were higher in the southern area, which was closer to the factory. Our results suggest that air monitoring using a portable mercury analyzer can be a convenient and useful method for the rapid detection and mapping of mercury pollution in advanced field surveys.

  16. Calibration and field evaluation of Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) for monitoring pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly, Emilie; Levi, Yves; Karolak, Sara

    2013-03-01

    The Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler (POCIS) is a new tool for the sampling of organic pollutants in water. We tested this device for the monitoring of pharmaceuticals in hospital wastewater. After calibration, a field application was carried out in a French hospital for six pharmaceutical compounds (Atenolol, Prednisolone, Methylprednisolone, Sulfamethoxazole, Ofloxacin, Ketoprofen). POCIS were calibrated in tap water and wastewater in laboratory conditions close to relevant environmental conditions (temperature, flow velocity). Sampling rates (R(s)) were determined and we observed a significant increase with flow velocity and temperature. Whatever the compound, the R(s) value was lower in wastewater and the linear phase of uptake was shorter. POCIS were deployed in a hospital sewage pipe during four days and the estimated water concentrations were close to those obtained with twenty-four hour composite samples. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Electronic Field Data Collection in Support of Satellite-Based Food Security Monitoring in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakalembe, C. L.; Dempewolf, J.; Justice, C. J.; Becker-Reshef, I.; Tumbo, S.; Maurice, S.; Mbilinyi, B.; Ibrahim, K.; Materu, S.

    2016-12-01

    In Tanzania agricultural extension agents traditionally collect field data on agriculture and food security on paper, covering most villages throughout the country. The process is expensive, slow and cumbersome and prone to data transcription errors when the data get entered at the district offices into electronic spreadsheets. Field data on the status and condition of agricultural crops, the population's nutritional status, food storage levels and other parameters are needed in near realtime for early warning to make critical but most importantly timely and appropriate decisions that are informed with verified data from the ground. With the ubiquitous distribution of cell phones, which are now used by the vast majority of the population in Tanzania including most farmers, new, efficient and cost-effective methods for field data collection have become available. Using smartphones and tablets data on crop conditions, pest and diseases, natural disasters and livelihoods can be collected and made available and easily accessible in near realtime. In this project we implemented a process for obtaining high quality electronic field data using the GeoODK application with a large network of field extension agents in Tanzania and Uganda. These efforts contribute to work being done on developing an advanced agriculture monitoring system for Tanzania, incorporating traditional data collection with satellite information and field data. The outcomes feed directly into the National Food Security Bulletin for Tanzania produced by the Ministry of Agriculture as well as a form a firm evidence base and field scale monitoring of the disaster risk financing in Uganda.

  18. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the international space station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The dev

  19. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the International Space Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The dev

  20. MONITORING OF STUDENTS' INFORMATION COMPETENCE OF THE SPECIALITY 032001 − DOCUMENTATION MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav V. Persianov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the method of information competence development of Documentation management and administrative support students (specialty 032001. The method is approved in the educational environment of Tula state pedagogical university by L.N. Tolstoy and has proved its high effi ciency. 

  1. The Sulfidation of gamma-Alumina and Titania Supported (Cobalt) Molybdenum Oxide Catalysts Monitored by EXAFS.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koningsberger, D.C.; Leliveld, R.G.; Dillen, A.J. van; Geus, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The sulfidation of @c-alumina- and titania-supported(cobalt)molybdenum oxide catalysts has been studied with X-rayabsorption spectroscopy and temperature programmed sulfidation (TPS).The catalysts were stepwise sulfided at temperatures between 298 and673 K and their structure was determined with EXA

  2. Capacity for DNA-barcode based taxonomy in support of Great Lakes biological monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enumerating organisms collected via nets and sediment grabs is a mainstay of aquatic ecology. Since morphological taxonomy can require considerable resources and expertise, DNA barcode-based identification of mixed-organism samples offers a valuable tool in support of biological...

  3. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the international space station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2007-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The

  4. Microbial detection and monitoring in advanced life support systems like the International Space Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Krooneman, Janneke; Raangs, Gerwin C.; Welling, Gjalt W.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Potentially pathogenic microbes and so-called technophiles may form a serious threat in advanced life support systems, such as the International Space Station (ISS). They not only pose a threat to the health of the crew, but also to the technical equipment and materials of the space station. The

  5. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2010 Regional Mussel Watch (AMB02)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2010-10-20

    The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) and Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton (Shipyard) located in Bremerton, WA are committed to a culture of continuous process improvement for all aspects of Shipyard operations, including reducing the releases of hazardous materials and waste in discharges from the Shipyard. Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, a cooperative project among PSNS&IMF, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders (US Navy, EPA and Ecology 2002) has been helping to improve the environmental quality of the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet Watershed (ENVVEST 2006). An ambient monitoring program for sediment, water, and indigenous mussels began in 2009 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. This document presents the 2010 chemical residue data and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) for the regional mussel watch stations located in Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. Indigenous bivalves were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc. The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These chemical residue data provide the first year of the biota ambient monitoring.

  6. Gas phase propylene epoxidation over Au supported on titanosilicates with different Ti chemical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuan-Ye; Chen, Shi-Long; Jia, Ai-Pin; Lu, Ji-Qing; Huang, Wei-Xin

    2017-01-01

    Three Ti-containing porous materials - a mesoporous Ti-MCM-41 with distorted tetrahedral framework Ti sites (denoted as Ti-MCM-41-C), a microporous titanium silicate (TS-1) with tetrahedral framework Ti sites and a hybrid Ti-MCM-41 containing TS-1 microstructure (denoted as Ti-MCM-41-H) were used to prepare supported Au catalysts for gas phase propylene epoxidation in the presence of H2 and O2. Both catalyst structures and catalytic reaction kinetics were investigated in detail. The kinetic results show that the apparent activation energies for both PO and CO2 formation follow the order of Au/Ti-MCM-41-C Au/TS-1 > Au/Ti-MCM-41-C, in consistence with the order of propylene conversion rate, and the adsorption stability follows the order of Au/TS-1 > Au/Ti-MCM-41-H > Au/Ti-MCM-41-C, in consistence with the order of apparent activation energy. These results demonstrated that the adsorption strength of propylene on the titanosilicates supports strongly affected the catalytic behavior, and implied that the support with balanced defective Ti sites and mesoporous/microporous structure may be a promising approach in the preparation of high-performance supported Au catalysts.

  7. Clinical and microbiologic effects of chemical versus mechanical cleansing in professional supportive implant therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strooker, H; Rohn, S; Van Winkelhoff, AJ

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the cleansing properties of mechanical supportive care for dental implants with the use of an etching gel. Sixteen patients underwent a 5-month clinical trial with monthly recalls. These patients, wearing maxillary complete dentures and mandibular overdent

  8. Monitoring of urine by extraction chromatography with tri-n-octylphosphine oxide supported on a polypropylene column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, N.; Diodati, J.; Cena, M.R. [Gerencia de Seguridad Radiologica y Nuclear, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1992-07-01

    Monitoring of personnel working with 20% enriched uranium implies development of techniques for excreta analysis, mainly for urine, with very low detection limits. The method described allows the determination of 20% enriched uranium after extraction in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), 0.5 in toluene, supported on polypropylene capillary columns. Alpha activity is later measured in a low background liquid scintillation equipment and the fluorescence in a fluorimeter, with detection limits, for 800 mL of urine, of 15.0 {+-} 4.0 mBq L{sup -1} and 5x10{sup -2} {+-} 10{sup -2} {mu}g L{sup -1}. (author)

  9. A mountain environmental virtual observatory (Mountain-EVO) to support participatory monitoring in a network of Andean catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buytaert, Wouter; Ochoa Tocachi, Boris; De Bievre, Bert; Zulkafli, Zed

    2015-04-01

    The tropical Andes are a hotspot of environmental change. The combination of dramatic land-use change with global climate change, demographic growth, and increasing water demand is causing extreme pressures on water resources. This is of particular concern to rural upland communities. They are facing a double challenge of maintaining their own livelihoods with dwindling natural resources, and at the same time supporting downstream ecosystem services such as a well buffered stream flow and good water quality. This challenge is complicated further by the acute lack of data on the hydrological functioning of Andean catchments. The factors controlling their hydrological response are extremely variable in space and time, including meteorological forcing, land cover types, soil properties and geology. This makes it very difficult to predict accurately the impact of human activities such as land use, ecosystem management, and watershed investments. Such predictions are essential for policy-making and sustainable ecosystem management. To tackle the issue of hydrological data scarcity in the tropical Andes, an initiative was set up to implement a network of hydrological monitoring of upland catchments in a pairwise fashion. Using a trading-space-for-time approach, the initiative intends to use these data to improve predictions about the impact of land-use changes and other ecosystem management practices on the hydrological response. Currently, over 25 catchments are being monitored for precipitation and streamflow in 9 sites located in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Venezuela. The sites are supported by local stakeholders and communities in a participatory monitoring scheme that otherwise would be impractical or prohibitively expensive. To overcome the technical challenges of monitoring hydrological variables in remote mountain areas, the initiative has set up a web-based infrastructure to support local technicians and stakeholders. Additionally, using open data standards such

  10. Selective production of chemicals from biomass pyrolysis over metal chlorides supported on zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Shuai; Wang, Xinde; Cai, Qiuxia; Ma, Fengyun; Liu, Yue'e; Wang, Jianguo

    2013-12-01

    Direct biomass conversion into chemicals remains a great challenge because of the complexity of the compounds; hence, this process has attracted less attention than conversion into fuel. In this study, we propose a simple one-step method for converting bagasse into furfural (FF) and acetic acid (AC). In this method, bagasse pyrolysis over ZnCl2/HZSM-5 achieved a high FF and AC yield (58.10%) and a 1.01 FF/AC ratio, but a very low yield of medium-boiling point components. However, bagasse pyrolysis using HZSM-5 alone or ZnCl2 alone still remained large amounts of medium-boiling point components or high-boiling point components. The synergistic effect of HZSM-5 and ZnCl2, which combines pyrolysis, zeolite cracking, and Lewis acid-selective catalysis results in highly efficient bagasse conversion into FF and AC. Therefore, our study provides a novel, simple method for directly converting biomass into high-yield useful chemical.

  11. An Integrated Chemical Environment to Support 21st-Century Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Shannon M; Phillips, Jason; Sedykh, Alexander; Tandon, Arpit; Sprankle, Catherine; Morefield, Stephen Q; Shapiro, Andy; Allen, David; Shah, Ruchir; Maull, Elizabeth A; Casey, Warren M; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C

    2017-05-25

    SUMMARY: Access to high-quality reference data is essential for the development, validation, and implementation of in vitro and in silico approaches that reduce and replace the use of animals in toxicity testing. Currently, these data must often be pooled from a variety of disparate sources to efficiently link a set of assay responses and model predictions to an outcome or hazard classification. To provide a central access point for these purposes, the National Toxicology Program Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods developed the Integrated Chemical Environment (ICE) web resource. The ICE data integrator allows users to retrieve and combine data sets and to develop hypotheses through data exploration. Open-source computational workflows and models will be available for download and application to local data. ICE currently includes curated in vivo test data, reference chemical information, in vitro assay data (including Tox21(TM)/ToxCast™ high-throughput screening data), and in silico model predictions. Users can query these data collections focusing on end points of interest such as acute systemic toxicity, endocrine disruption, skin sensitization, and many others. ICE is publicly accessible at https://ice.ntp.niehs.nih.gov. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP1759.

  12. On-line monitoring of chemical reactions by using bench-top nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, E; Perlo, J; Duchateau, A L L; Verzijl, G K M; Litvinov, V M; Blümich, B; Casanova, F

    2014-10-06

    Real-time nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements carried out with a bench-top system installed next to the reactor inside the fume hood of the chemistry laboratory are presented. To test the system for on-line monitoring, a transfer hydrogenation reaction was studied by continuously pumping the reaction mixture from the reactor to the magnet and back in a closed loop. In addition to improving the time resolution provided by standard sampling methods, the use of such a flow setup eliminates the need for sample preparation. Owing to the progress in terms of field homogeneity and sensitivity now available with compact NMR spectrometers, small molecules dissolved at concentrations on the order of 1 mmol L(-1) can be characterized in single-scan measurements with 1 Hz resolution. Owing to the reduced field strength of compact low-field systems compared to that of conventional high-field magnets, the overlap in the spectrum of different NMR signals is a typical situation. The data processing required to obtain concentrations in the presence of signal overlap are discussed in detail, methods such as plain integration and line-fitting approaches are compared, and the accuracy of each method is determined. The kinetic rates measured for different catalytic concentrations show good agreement with those obtained with gas chromatography as a reference analytical method. Finally, as the measurements are performed under continuous flow conditions, the experimental setup and the flow parameters are optimized to maximize time resolution and signal-to-noise ratio.

  13. Biological and chemical detections in adsorbent layer for monitoring microbial production of primycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Antal; Kónya, Attila; Széll, Valéria; Máté, György; Erdélyi, Balázs

    2007-08-01

    Primycin is a macrolide antibiotic complex produced in microbiological fermentation processes. The microbial production of primycin requires an in-process analytical method suitable for monitoring the level of the active agents. In this paper, a method fulfilling the described requirement is presented. This method consists of a simple, efficacious extraction step, an instrumental sample application followed by a high-performance thin-layer chromatographic separation in relatively short time and a quantitative chromatogram evaluation. A dipping technique, in a solution containing sulfuric acid followed by heating at 120 degrees C, is used for chromogen formation, resulting in an absorption maximum at 290 nm. A progress diagram of the fermentation obtained by this technique is compared with one obtained by a microbiological agar diffusion method. The bioautographic evaluation of the active spots in the chromatogram are also presented. By our TLC method, the group of the active primycin components in the fermentation broth and by-products formed during the fermentation can be well separated. The relative intensities of the different TLC spots provide some information on the formation of the active components.

  14. SPECTRAL AND CHEMICAL MONITORING OF CYCLO-ADDITION REACTION OF CO2 WITH POLY(MMA-co-GMA) COPOLYMERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Yadollahi; H.Bouhendi; M.J.Zohuriaan-Mehr; K.Kabiri

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the monitoring cyclo-addition of CO2 to methyl methacrylate (MMA)-glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) copolymers using spectral (1H-NMR and FTIR) and chemical (elemental analysis and titration) methods.Thus,poly(MMA-co-GMA),was first prepared via solution polymerization.The copolymer was then treated with CO2 gas flow in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammoniumbromide as a catalyst.In terms of the carbonation reaction time,the terpolymer poly(MMA-co-GMA-co-2-oxo-l,3-dioxolane-4-yl-methyl methacrylate) was prepared in various yield of CO2 fixation (> 90%).The peak intensity changes in the 1H-NMR and FTIR spectra provided excellent demonstrative techniques to monitor the carbonation reaction progression.In a comparative analytical viewpoint,the NMR and elemental analysis were recognized to be the most accurate ways to follow the cyclo-addition reaction progression.However,titration was recognized to be the most preferred method,because it is a very inexpensive,facile and available method with a reasonable costaccuracy balance.

  15. Polar organic chemical integrative samplers for pesticides monitoring: impacts of field exposure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissalde, Sophie; Mazzella, Nicolas; Mazellier, Patrick

    2014-08-01

    This study focuses on how Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Samplers (POCIS) work in real environmental conditions. A selection of 23 polar pesticides and 8 metabolites were investigated by exposure of triplicates of integrative samplers in two rivers in France for successive 14-day periods. The pesticides and metabolites were trapped not only in Oasis HLB sorbent but also in the polyethersulfone (PES) membrane of the POCIS. The distribution of pesticides depended on the molecular structure. The use of the Performance Reference Compound (PRC) is also discussed here. The impact of some environmental parameters and exposure setup on the transfer of pesticides in POCIS sorbent was studied: river flow rate, biofouling on membranes, sampler holding design and position in the stream. Results show a significant impact of river flow velocity on PRC desorption, especially for values higher than 4 cm·s(-1). Some fouling was observed on the PES membrane which could potentially have an impact on molecule accumulation in the POCIS. Finally, the positioning of the sampler in the river did not have significant effects on pesticide accumulation, when perpendicular exposures were used (sampler positioning in front of the water flow). The POCIS with PRC correction seems to be a suitable tool for estimating time-weighted average (TWA) concentrations, for all the molecules except for one of the nine pesticides analyzed in these two French rivers.

  16. Monitoring of 45 pesticides in Lebanese surface water using polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aisha, Al Ashi; Hneine, Wael; Mokh, Samia; Devier, Marie-Hélène; Budzinski, Hélèn; Jaber, Farouk

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the dissolved concentration of 45 pesticides in the surface waters of the Lebanese Republic using Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler "POCIS". All of the sampling sites are located in the major agricultural land areas in Lebanon. POCIS (n = 3) were deployed at Ibrahim River, Qaraoun Lake and Hasbani River for a duration of 14 days. The total concentration of pesticides ranged from not detected (nd) to 137.66 ng.L-1. Chlorpyrifos, DDE-pp, diazinon and Fenpropathrin were the most abundant compounds. Qaraoun Lake and Hasbani River were found to be more polluted than Ibrahim River, since they receive large amounts of waste water derived from nearby agricultural lands and they had the lowest dilution factor. The aqueous average concentration of the target compounds were estimated using sampling rates obtained from the literature. Comparison between Time Weighed Average concentrations "TWA" using POCIS and spot sampling is presented. Results showed that POCIS TWA concentrations are in agreement with spot sampling concentrations for Ibrahim and Hasbani Rivers. The toxicity of the major detected pesticides on three representative aquatic species (Daphnia magna, Scenedesmus quadricauda and Oncorhynchus mykiss) is also reported.

  17. Predictive Toxicology: Modeling Chemical Induced Toxicological Response Combining Circular Fingerprints with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios eKoutsoukas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern drug discovery and toxicological research are under pressure, as the cost of developing and testing new chemicals for potential toxicological risk is rising. Extensive evaluation of chemical products for potential adverse effects is a challenging task, due to the large number of chemicals and the possible hazardous effects on human health. Safety regulatory agencies around the world are dealing with two major challenges. First, the growth of chemicals introduced every year in household products and medicines that need to be tested, and second the need to protect public welfare. Hence, alternative and more efficient toxicological risk assessment methods are in high demand. The Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 consortium a collaborative effort was formed to develop and investigate alternative assessment methods. A collection of 10,000 compounds composed of environmental chemicals and approved drugs were screened for interference in biochemical pathways and released for crowdsourcing data analysis. The physicochemical space covered by Tox21 library was explored, measured by Molecular Weight (MW and the octanol/water partition coefficient (cLogP. It was found that on average chemical structures had MW of 272.6 Daltons. In case of cLogP the average value was 2.476. Next relationships between assays were examined based on compounds activity profiles across the assays utilizing the Pearson correlation coefficient r. A cluster was observed between the Androgen and Estrogen Receptors and their ligand bind domains accordingly indicating presence of cross talks among the receptors. The highest correlations observed were between NR.AR and NR.AR_LBD, where it was r=0.66 and between NR.ER and NR.ER_LBD, where it was r=0.5.Our approach to model the Tox21 data consisted of utilizing circular molecular fingerprints combined with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine by modeling each assay independently. In all of the 12 sub-challenges our modeling

  18. Quality Monitoring for Laser Welding Based on High-Speed Photography and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the prediction ability of welding quality during high-power disk laser welding, a new approach was proposed and applied in the classification of the dynamic features of metal vapor plume. Six features were extracted through the color image processing method. Three features, including the area of plume, number of spatters, and horizontal coordinate of plume centroid, were selected based on the classification accuracy rates and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients. A support vector machine model was adopted to classify the welding quality status into two categories, good or poor. The results demonstrated that the support vector machine model established according to the selected features had satisfactory prediction and generalization ability. The classification accuracy rate was higher than 90%, and the model could be applied in the prediction of welding quality during high-power disk laser welding.

  19. Supporting Medical Research on Chronic Diseases using Integrated Health Monitoring Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Krukowski, Artur; Vogiatzaki, Emmanouela; Charalambides, Marios; Chouchoulis, Michalis

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes combined experiences in developing e-Health platforms and services with respect of supporting medical research into the causes and relationships among physiological parameters and health problems concerning different chronic diseases, from cardiovascular to stroke, epilepsy, and others. The Personal Health Records (PHR) is presented as new technological approaches aimed at standardizing electronic management of medical information between the patient and its physicians, a...

  20. Social support net for chemically dependents: ecomap as instrumental in health assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layana de Paula Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The social support net is composed by the group of bonds related to the individual. Taking into account that the quality, as well as the quantity of these bonds can interfere in the person's life, acting as positive or negative element, it was identified the need to know this net of relationships by the professionals that takes care of such individuals. It was aimed to assess the Ecomap of drug users assisted in a specialized service as instrumental of support for health care. This is a qualitative research carried out with 19 subjects assisted in a public service, through the Ecomap elaboration. Results show that CAPSad, family and religion constituted strong ties; work, colleagues and friends, links to be strengthened. Neighbors and former fellow drugs users were mentioned as stressors. Ecomap was an evaluation instrument that can be used to help the user to work his bonds, with special reference to those that need to be kept, broken or strengthened as social support.

  1. The chemical signature of a livestock farming catchment: synthesis from a high-frequency multi-element long term monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Aubert

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of human pressures on water quality is difficult. First, there is a high temporal and spatial variability of climate and human activity. Second, chemical elements have their own characteristics mixing short and long term dynamics. High frequency, long-term and multi-element measurements are required. But, such data series are scarce. This paper aims at determining what the hydro-chemical particularities of a livestock farming catchment are in a temperate climatic context.

    It is based on an original and never published time series, from Kervidy-Naizin headwater catchment. Stream chemistry was monitored daily and shallow groundwater roughly every four month, for 10 yr and five elements (nitrate, sulphate, chloride, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon.

    The five elements present strong but different seasonal patterns. Nitrate and chloride present a seasonal flush, all along or at the beginning of the wet season, respectively. Sulphate, organic and inorganic carbon present storm flushes, with constant or decreasing peaks throughout the wet season. These depicted nitrate and chloride patterns are typical of a livestock farming catchment. There, nitrate and chloride coming from organic fertilisation have been accumulating over years in the shallow groundwater. They are seasonally flushed when the groundwater connects to the stream. Sulphate, organic and inorganic carbon patterns do not seem specific to agricultural catchments. These elements are produced each year and flushed by storms. Finally, a generic classification of temporal patterns and elements is established for agricultural catchments. It is based on the distance of the source component to the stream and the dominant controlling process (accumulation versus production. This classification could be applied to any chemical element and help assessing the level of water disturbances.

  2. Multi-wall carbon nanotubes supported on carbon fiber paper synthesized by simple chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ya-hao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Hong-quan [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Yang, Jian-hong, E-mail: zyy_yjh@rilm.com.cn [Zhengzhou Research Institute of Chalco, Zhengzhou 450041 (China); Gao, Wen-liang; Xiang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Li, Qing-yu, E-mail: 13975808173@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guangxi Normal University, Guilin, Guangxi 541004 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • We deposited multi-wall carbon nanotubes on carbon fiber paper with a simple CVD. • We investigated the inherent mechanism of Ni particle's self-dispersion. • The MWCNTs/CFP composite possesses wonderful electrical conductivity. - Abstract: Aiming at developing a novel carbon/carbon composite as an electrode in the electrochemical capacitor applications, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/carbon fiber paper (CFP) composite has been synthesized using a simple chemical vapor deposition, in which different metal catalysts such as Fe, Ni and Cu are used. However, randomly oriented MWCNTs were only obtained on Ni particles. The mechanism for this unique phenomenon is investigated in this article. The physical and electrochemical properties of as-prepared MWCNTs/CFP composite are characterized and the results show that the as-prepared composite is a promising substrate for electrochemical capacitor applications.

  3. Chemical effects head-loss research in support of generic safety issue 191.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. H.; Kasza, K.; Fisher, B.; Oras, J.; Natesan, K.; Shack, W. J.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-10-31

    This summary report describes studies conducted at Argonne National Laboratory on the potential for chemical effects on head loss across sump screens. Three different buffering solutions were used for these tests: trisodium phosphate (TSP), sodium hydroxide, and sodium tetraborate. These pH control agents used following a LOCA at a nuclear power plant show various degrees of interaction with the insulating materials Cal-Sil and NUKON. Results for Cal-Sil dissolution tests in TSP solutions, settling rate tests of calcium phosphate precipitates, and benchmark tests in chemically inactive environments are also presented. The dissolution tests were intended to identify important environmental variables governing both calcium dissolution and subsequent calcium phosphate formation over a range of simulated sump pool conditions. The results from the dissolution testing were used to inform both the head loss and settling test series. The objective of the head loss tests was to assess the head loss produced by debris beds created by Cal-Sil, fibrous debris, and calcium phosphate precipitates. The effects of both the relative arrival time of the precipitates and insulation debris and the calcium phosphate formation process were specifically evaluated. The debris loadings, test loop flow rates, and test temperature were chosen to be reasonably representative of those expected in plants with updated sump screen configurations, although the approach velocity of 0.1 ft/s used for most of the tests is 3-10 times that expected in plants with large screens . Other variables were selected with the intent to reasonably bound the head loss variability due to arrival time and calcium phosphate formation uncertainty. Settling tests were conducted to measure the settling rates of calcium phosphate precipitates (formed by adding dissolved Ca to boric acid and TSP solutions) in water columns having no bulk directional flow. For PWRs where NaOH and sodium tetraborate are used to control

  4. Practical silicon deposition rules derived from silane monitoring during plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlome, Richard, E-mail: richard.bartlome@alumni.ethz.ch; De Wolf, Stefaan; Demaurex, Bénédicte; Ballif, Christophe [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71b, 2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Amanatides, Eleftherios; Mataras, Dimitrios [University of Patras, Department of Chemical Engineering, Plasma Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 1407, 26504 Patras (Greece)

    2015-05-28

    We clarify the difference between the SiH{sub 4} consumption efficiency η and the SiH{sub 4} depletion fraction D, as measured in the pumping line and the actual reactor of an industrial plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. In the absence of significant polysilane and powder formation, η is proportional to the film growth rate. Above a certain powder formation threshold, any additional amount of SiH{sub 4} consumed translates into increased powder formation rather than into a faster growing Si film. In order to discuss a zero-dimensional analytical model and a two-dimensional numerical model, we measure η as a function of the radio frequency (RF) power density coupled into the plasma, the total gas flow rate, the input SiH{sub 4} concentration, and the reactor pressure. The adjunction of a small trimethylboron flow rate increases η and reduces the formation of powder, while the adjunction of a small disilane flow rate decreases η and favors the formation of powder. Unlike η, D is a location-dependent quantity. It is related to the SiH{sub 4} concentration in the plasma c{sub p}, and to the phase of the growing Si film, whether the substrate is glass or a c-Si wafer. In order to investigate transient effects due to the RF matching, the precoating of reactor walls, or the introduction of a purifier in the gas line, we measure the gas residence time and acquire time-resolved SiH{sub 4} density measurements throughout the ignition and the termination of a plasma.

  5. Stimulating innovation for global monitoring of agriculture and its impact on the environment in support of GEOGLAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bydekerke, Lieven; Gilliams, Sven; Gobin, Anne

    2015-04-01

    There is an urgent need to ensure food supply for a growing global population. To enable a sustainable growth of agricultural production, effective and timely information is required to support decision making and to improve management of agricultural resources. This requires innovative ways and monitoring methods that will not only improve short-term crop production forecasts, but also allow to assess changes in cultivation practices, agricultural areas, agriculture in general and, its impact on the environment. The G20 launched in June 2011 the "GEO Global Agricultural Monitoring initiative (GEOGLAM), requesting the GEO (Group on Earth Observations) Agricultural Community of Practice to implement GEOGLAM with the main objective to improve crop yield forecasts as an input to the Agricultural Market Information System (AMIS), in order to foster stabilisation of markets and increase transparency on agricultural production. In response to this need, the European Commission decided in 2013 to fund an international partnership to contribute to GEOGLAM and its research agenda. The resulting SIGMA project (Stimulating Innovation for Global Monitoring of Agriculture), a partnership of 23 globally distributed expert organisations, focusses on developing datasets and innovative techniques in support of agricultural monitoring and its impact on the environment in support of GEOGLAM. SIGMA has 3 generic objectives which are: (i) develop and test methods to characterise cropland and assess its changes at various scales; (ii) develop and test methods to assess changes in agricultural production levels; and; (iii) study environmental impacts of agriculture. Firstly, multi-scale remote sensing data sets, in combination with field and other ancillary data, will be used to generate an improved (global) agro-ecological zoning map and crop mask. Secondly, a combination of agro-meteorological models, satellite-based information and long-term time series will be explored to assess crop

  6. Monitoring alkylphenols in water using the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): Determining sampling rates via the extraction of PES membranes and Oasis beads

    OpenAIRE

    Silvani, Ludovica; Riccardi, Carmela; Eek, Espen; Papini, Marco Petrangeli; morin, nicolas; Cornelissen, Gerard; Oen, Amy M P; Hale, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCIS) have previously been used to monitor alkylphenol (AP) contamination in water and produced water. However, only the sorbent receiving phase of the POCIS (Oasis beads) is traditionally analyzed, thus limiting the use of POCIS for monitoring a range of APs with varying hydrophobicity. Here a "pharmaceutical" POCIS was calibrated in the laboratory using a static renewal setup for APs (from 2-ethylphenol to 4-n-nonylphenol) with varying hydrophob...

  7. Oil degradation monitoring with chemical sensors and molecular imprinted polymer; Monitorizacion de la degradacion de aceites con sensores quimicos y polimeros de impronta molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, J.L.; Meizoso, M.C.; Gonzalez Rodriguez, M.V.; Lopez Vilarino, J.M.; Cela, M.C.

    2010-07-01

    The engine operation state can be reported by real-time monitoring programs. Detecting early signs of equipment failure is the aim of these maintenance programs.Chemical sensors are devices that can perform this function in predictive maintenance.The monitoring of the degradation of automotive engine oils has been achieved by chemical sensors coated with synthetic recognition elements. Following, the elements that make up the QCM device, MIPs, organic-inorganic hybrid materials obtained by sol-gel and electronic packaging are described. (Author).

  8. Information to support to monitoring and habitat restoration on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppettone, G. Gary

    2013-01-01

    for monitoring native fish populations in relation to restoration efforts on the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. There are no precise records on conditions of each of the spring systems prior to anthropogenic alteration; however, fostering conditions that favor native over non-natives will be key to habitat restoration. Information regarding native species carbon source is needed to create habitat that favors native species, thus habitat restoration fostering food stuff consumed by native species should be considered in restoration efforts. In compiling data for the first part of this report, we tracked carbon source for native and non-native species at four stations along the Jackrabbit Spring system. Thus, we were able to contrast carbon source in warm- and cool-water habitats. Habitat in Jackrabbit Spring was improved for native fishes in 2007. The second paper in this report focuses on native fish populations in Jackrabbit Spring system pre- and post-restoration. Much of the Ash Meadows Oases is marsh habitat where non-native red swamp crayfish and western mosquitofish are often abundant, to the detriment of non-natives. Because marsh habitat is broadly represented in the Ash Meadows landscape, establishing marsh habitat most conducive to the native fishes is important to the restoration effort, and the third paper addresses marsh habitat type with the relative abundance of fishes and crayfish. There are previous years of monitoring Ash Meadows’ native fish populations, but not all monitoring occurred at the same time of year. Desert-fish populations sometimes undergo seasonal fluctuation, so it might not be valid to compare population trends using difference seasons. For report four, we tracked a closed population of Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis) year round to track seasonal trends. Knowledge of seasonal trends is important in tracking changes of populations pre- and post-restoration.

  9. Airborne imaging sensors for environmental monitoring & surveillance in support of oil spills & recovery efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Jones, James; Frystacky, Heather; Coppin, Gaelle; Leavaux, Florian; Neyt, Xavier

    2011-11-01

    Collection of pushbroom sensor imagery from a mobile platform requires corrections using inertial measurement units (IMU's) and DGPS in order to create useable imagery for environmental monitoring and surveillance of shorelines in freshwater systems, coastal littoral zones and harbor areas. This paper describes a suite of imaging systems used during collection of hyperspectral imagery in northern Florida panhandle and Gulf of Mexico airborne missions to detect weathered oil in coastal littoral zones. Underlying concepts of pushbroom imagery, the needed corrections for directional changes using DGPS and corrections for platform yaw, pitch, and roll using IMU data is described as well as the development and application of optimal band and spectral regions associated with weathered oil. Pushbroom sensor and frame camera data collected in response to the recent Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster is presented as the scenario documenting environmental monitoring and surveillance techniques using mobile sensing platforms. Data was acquired during the months of February, March, April and May of 2011. The low altitude airborne systems include a temperature stabilized hyperspectral imaging system capable of up to 1024 spectral channels and 1376 spatial across track pixels flown from 3,000 to 4,500 feet altitudes. The hyperspectral imaging system is collocated with a full resolution high definition video recorder for simultaneous HD video imagery, a 12.3 megapixel digital, a mapping camera using 9 inch film types that yields scanned aerial imagery with approximately 22,200 by 22,200 pixel multispectral imagery (~255 megapixel RGB multispectral images in order to conduct for spectral-spatial sharpening of fused multispectral, hyperspectral imagery. Two high spectral (252 channels) and radiometric sensitivity solid state spectrographs are used for collecting upwelling radiance (sub-meter pixels) with downwelling irradiance fiber optic attachment. These sensors are utilized for

  10. TPR system: a powerful technique to monitor carbon nanotube formation during chemical vapour deposition; Sistema RTP: uma tecnica poderosa para o monitoramento da formacao de nanotubos de carbono durante o processo por deposicao de vapor quimico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristao, Juliana Cristina; Moura, Flavia Cristina Camilo; Lago, Rochel Montero, E-mail: rochel@ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DQ/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Sapag, Karim [Universidade Nacional de San Luis (Argentina). Lab. de Ciencias de Superficies y Medios Porosos

    2010-07-01

    In this work, a TPR (Temperature Programmed Reduction) system is used as a powerful tool to monitor carbon nanotubes production during CVD (Chemical Vapour Deposition), The experiments were carried out using catalyst precursors based on Fe-Mo supported on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and methane as carbon source. As methane reacts on the Fe metal surface, carbon is deposited and H2 is produced. TPR is very sensitive to the presence of H2 and affords information on the temperature where catalyst is active to form different forms of carbon, the reaction kinetics, the catalyst deactivation and carbon yields. (author)

  11. Water-quality monitoring and process understanding in support of environmental policy and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    The quantity and quality of freshwater at any point on the landscape reflect the combined effects of many processes operating along hydrological pathways within a drainage basin/watershed/catchment. Primary drivers for the availability of water are landscape changes and patterns, and the processes affecting the timing, magnitude, and intensity of precipitation, including global climate change. The degradation of air, land, and water in one part of a drainage basin can have negative effects on users downstream; the time and space scales of the effects are determined by the residence time along the various hydrological pathways. Hydrology affects transport, deposition, and recycling of inorganic materials and sediment. These components affect biota and associated ecosystem processes, which rely on sustainable flows throughout a drainage basin. Human activities on all spatial scales affect both water quantity and quality, and some human activities can have a disproportionate effect on an entire drainage basin. Aquatic systems have been continuously modified by agriculture, through land-use change, irrigation and navigation, disposal of urban, mining, and industrial wastes, and engineering modifications to the environment. Interdisciplinary integrated basin studies within the last several decades have provided a more comprehensive understanding of the linkages among air, land, and water resources. This understanding, coupled with environmental monitoring, has evolved a more multidisciplinary integrated approach to resource management, particularly within drainage basins.

  12. IMPLEMENTATION OF OPEN-SOURCE WEB MAPPING TECHNOLOGIES TO SUPPORT MONITORING OF GOVERNMENTAL SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pulsani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several schemes are undertaken by the government to uplift social and economic condition of people. The monitoring of these schemes is done through information technology where involvement of Geographic Information System (GIS is lacking. To demonstrate the benefits of thematic mapping as a tool for assisting the officials in making decisions, a web mapping application for three government programs such as Mother and Child Tracking system (MCTS, Telangana State Housing Corporation Limited (TSHCL and Ground Water Quality Mapping (GWQM has been built. Indeed the three applications depicted the distribution of various parameters thematically and helped in identifying the areas with higher and weaker distributions. Based on the three applications, the study tends to find similarities of many government schemes reflecting the nature of thematic mapping and hence deduces to implement this kind of approach for other schemes as well. These applications have been developed using SharpMap Csharp library which is a free and open source mapping library for developing geospatial applications. The study highlights upon the cost benefits of SharpMap and brings out the advantage of this library over proprietary vendors and further discusses its advantages over other open source libraries as well.

  13. Giving Asthma Support to Patients (GASP): a novel online asthma education, monitoring, assessment and management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Felix S; McNaughton, Wendy

    2014-09-01

    Giving Asthma Support to Patients (GASP) is a unique online tool developed to provide asthma education at point of care, and to provide health care professionals in primary care with skills and knowledge to undertake a structured asthma assessment. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken to evaluate the effectiveness of GASP. Data for patients aged 5-64 years seen in primary care (Waitemata region of Auckland) with uncontrolled asthma who had completed a minimum of two GASP assessments between 1 November 2008 and 17 April 2011 were extracted from a secure, self-populating database. Outcome measures were compared between each patient's visit 1 and 2 assessments. A total of 761 patients provided data using GASP. There was a significant reduction between GASP assessments in the risk of exacerbations, hospital admissions, emergency department presentations, requirement for corticosteroids, and bronchodilator reliance. Results from this retrospective cohort study are promising. A randomised controlled trial of the use of GASP in primary care is warranted to confirm these findings. The effectiveness of the GASP tool also needs to be further investigated in Maori and Pacific populations. The findings of this study of GASP show its potential and support its use in the primary care setting.

  14. Maintaining professional confidence--monitoring work with obese schoolchildren with support of an action plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllersdorf, Maria; Zuccato, Linda Martinson; Nimborg, Jennie; Eriksson, Henrik

    2010-03-01

    School nurses meet obese children in their everyday work. Although school nurses acknowledge the importance of getting hold of school children's obesity, they seem to lack strategies enabling them to handle the delicacy of the problem. The aim of this study was to describe how school nurses perceive their work with obese children with support of an action plan. Qualitative in-depth interviews were performed with six school nurses working in a municipality, where an action plan for the work with obese school-age children had been implemented. The transcribed data was analysed by a manifest content analysis. The results showed that the informants perceived having a key role in the obesity work, which they experienced as meaningful, but full of pitfalls. They found themselves suitable for the task, but perceived lacking deeper knowledge about specific modes of work such as motivational conversation. As the task was considered delicate, there were great demands for guidelines, education and cooperation. The action plan served as support for maintaining professional confidence throughout the process, but there was room for improvements.

  15. Fabrication of optical chemical ammonia sensors using anodized alumina supports and sol-gel method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovics, Akos; Kovács, Barna

    2013-05-15

    In this comparative study, the fabrication and the sensing properties of various reflectometric optical ammonia gas sensors are described. In the first set of experiments the role of the support material was investigated on four different sensor membranes. Two of them were prepared by the adsorption of bromocresol green indicator on anodized aluminum plates. The applied anodizing voltages were 12 V and 24 V, which resulted in different dynamic ranges and response times for gaseous ammonia. The sol-gel method was used for the preparation of the other batch of sensors. These layers were coated on anodized aluminum plates (24 V) and on standard microscope cover glasses. In spite of the identical sensing chemistry, slightly different response times were measured merely because of the aluminum surface porosity. Gas molecules can remain entrapped in the pores, which results in delayed recovery time. On the other hand, the porous oxide film provides excellent adhesion, making the anodized aluminum an attractive support for the sol-gel layer.

  16. Monitoring heavy metals, residual agricultural chemicals and sulfites in traditional herbal decoctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, In-Sil; Lee, Jeong-Sook; Kim, Sung-Dan; Kim, Yun-Hee; Park, Hae-Won; Ryu, Hoe-Jin; Lee, Jib-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Mi; Jung, Kweon; Na, Cheol; Joung, Jin-Yong; Son, Chang-Gue

    2017-03-14

    Asian traditional herbal preparations are frequently considered for the contamination with undeclared toxic or hazardous substances. The aim of this study was to determine the toxic heavy metals, pesticides and sulfur dioxide in decoctions that is a common form of final utilization in Korea. A total of 155 decoctions composed of multi-ingredient traditional herbs were randomly sampled from Seoul in Korea between 2013 and 2014. For each decoction, the concentrations of four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury), 33 pesticides and sulfur dioxide were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), mercury analyzer, gas chromatography/nitrogen phosphorous detector (GC/NPD), gas chromatography/micro electron capture detector (GC/μECD), and Monier-Williams method respectively. One hundred fifty-two of One hundred fifty-five decoctions (98.1%) contained one of three heavy metals (96.1% for As, 97.4% for Cd, and 90.3% for Pb, 0.0% for Hg). Their average concentrations (77.0 ± 79.7 ug/kg for As, 20.4 ± 23.7 ug/kg for Cd, and 68.8 ± 76.5 ug/kg for Pb) were approximately 20% of the maximum allowable limits of vegetable or ginseng beverage described in the Korean Food Standard Codex while their 95th percentile concentrations were below than the guideline for them. None of 33 pesticides was detected in 155 decoction samples, and only one sample showed over limit of detection for residual sulfites. This study support that the contained status of toxic heavy metals, pesticides and sulfur dioxide in herbal decoctions are currently within safe level in Korea, and provide a reference data for the further studies focused on the safety herbal preparations.

  17. Thermo-hydrological and chemical (THC) modeling to support Field Test Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, Philip H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jordan, Amy B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Harp, Dylan Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zyvoloski, George Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boukhalfa, Hakim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Caporuscio, Florie Andre [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Terry Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Bruce Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This report summarizes ongoing efforts to simulate coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes occurring within a hypothetical high-level waste (HLW) repository in bedded salt. The report includes work completed since the last project deliverable, “Coupled model for heat and water transport in a high level waste repository in salt”, a Level 2 milestone submitted to DOE in September 2013 (Stauffer et al., 2013). Since the last deliverable, there have been code updates to improve the integration of the salt module with the pre-existing code and development of quality assurance (QA) tests of constitutive functions and precipitation/dissolution reactions. Simulations of bench-scale experiments, both historical and currently in the planning stages have been performed. Additional simulations have also been performed on the drift-scale model that incorporate new processes, such as an evaporation function to estimate water vapor removal from the crushed salt backfill and isotopic fractionation of water isotopes. Finally, a draft of a journal paper on the importance of clay dehydration on water availability is included as Appendix I.

  18. Validation in Support of Internationally Harmonised OECD Test Guidelines for Assessing the Safety of Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourmelon, Anne; Delrue, Nathalie

    Ten years elapsed since the OECD published the Guidance document on the validation and international regulatory acceptance of test methods for hazard assessment. Much experience has been gained since then in validation centres, in countries and at the OECD on a variety of test methods that were subjected to validation studies. This chapter reviews validation principles and highlights common features that appear to be important for further regulatory acceptance across studies. Existing OECD-agreed validation principles will most likely generally remain relevant and applicable to address challenges associated with the validation of future test methods. Some adaptations may be needed to take into account the level of technique introduced in test systems, but demonstration of relevance and reliability will continue to play a central role as pre-requisite for the regulatory acceptance. Demonstration of relevance will become more challenging for test methods that form part of a set of predictive tools and methods, and that do not stand alone. OECD is keen on ensuring that while these concepts evolve, countries can continue to rely on valid methods and harmonised approaches for an efficient testing and assessment of chemicals.

  19. Catalytic oxidation of biorefinery lignin to value-added chemicals to support sustainable biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Transforming plant biomass to biofuel is one of the few solutions that can truly sustain mankind's long-term needs for liquid transportation fuel with minimized environmental impact. However, despite decades of effort, commercial development of biomass-to-biofuel conversion processes is still not an economically viable proposition. Identifying value-added co-products along with the production of biofuel provides a key solution to overcoming this economic barrier. Lignin is the second most abundant component next to cellulose in almost all plant biomass; the emerging biomass refinery industry will inevitably generate an enormous amount of lignin. Development of selective biorefinery lignin-to-bioproducts conversion processes will play a pivotal role in significantly improving the economic feasibility and sustainability of biofuel production from renewable biomass. The urgency and importance of this endeavor has been increasingly recognized in the last few years. This paper reviews state-of-the-art oxidative lignin depolymerization chemistries employed in the papermaking process and oxidative catalysts that can be applied to biorefinery lignin to produce platform chemicals including phenolic compounds, dicarboxylic acids, and quinones in high selectivity and yield. The potential synergies of integrating new catalysts with commercial delignification chemistries are discussed. We hope the information will build on the existing body of knowledge to provide new insights towards developing practical and commercially viable lignin conversion technologies, enabling sustainable biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass to be competitive with fossil fuel. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Passive sampling methods for the measurement of organic chemical contaminants and application to monitoring discharges from the offshore oil industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harman, Christopher

    2009-07-01

    The presence of persistent organic pollutants in the environment has been of increasing concern and is subject to control through several international conventions. The ability of these compounds to accumulate in biological systems and cause adverse effects at vanishingly low concentrations requires comprehensive and cost-effective monitoring methods. Passive sampling techniques show promise to fulfill several of these requirements, with time integrated sampling that compensates for fluctuating discharges, and (equivalent) large volume samples that provide the low detection limits necessary. Additionally, they do not suffer from some of the complicating issues associated with using biological monitoring methods. Operational discharges from the offshore oil industry represent a significant point source of such pollutants to the marine environment. Concerns surrounding these discharges in the North Sea are due to a combination of the proved toxicity of several of the chemical components present, the increasing volume of the discharges in line with the age of the fields, and the lack of knowledge of the overall long term effects. As such they warrant investigation, and sensitive techniques are required to monitor levels in situ. The main objectives of this dissertation were; i) provide sampling rate data for environmentally important compounds; ii) test the applicability of an empirical uptake model for these compounds; iii) examine the effects of membrane fouling on uptake; iv) measure contaminant concentrations in the receiving waters around oil platforms; v) assess the biological relevance of passive sampler accumulations. In order to achieve these objectives, a suite of laboratory experiments were carried out using flow through exposures of passive samplers to known concentrations of contaminants. These exposures included comparisons between uptake of contaminants in fouled and non-fouled samplers and in fish. Field deployments of passive samplers were performed

  1. Acceptability Study of "Ascenso": An Online Program for Monitoring and Supporting Patients with Depression in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, H Daniel; Carrasco, Álvaro; Moessner, Markus; Cáceres, Cristian; Gloger, Sergio; Rojas, Graciela; Perez, J Carola; Vanegas, Jorge; Bauer, Stephanie; Krause, Mariane

    2016-07-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent and severe mental disease. Despite the effective treatment options available, the risk of relapse is high. Interventions based on information and communication technologies generate innovative opportunities to provide support to patients after they completed treatment for depression. This acceptability study evaluated the Internet-based program Apoyo, Seguimiento y Cuidado de Enfermedades a partir de Sistemas Operativos (ASCENSO) in terms of its feasibility and acceptability in a sample of 35 patients in Chile. The study reveals high rates of acceptance and satisfaction among patients who actively used the program. As obstacles, patients mentioned technical problems, a lack of contact with other participants, and an insufficient connection between the program and the health service professionals. ASCENSO appears to be a promising complement to regular care for depression. Following improvements of the program based on participants' feedback, future research should evaluate its efficacy and cost-effectiveness.

  2. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Marilyn; Goparaju, Balaji; Castillo, Jelina; Alameddine, Yvonne; Bianchi, Matt T

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Periodic limb movements of sleep (PLMS) may increase cardiovascular and cerebrovascular morbidity. However, most people with PLMS are either asymptomatic or have nonspecific symptoms. Therefore, predicting elevated PLMS in the absence of restless legs syndrome remains an important clinical challenge. Methods We undertook a retrospective analysis of demographic data, subjective symptoms, and objective polysomnography (PSG) findings in a clinical cohort with or without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) from our laboratory (n=443 with OSA, n=209 without OSA). Correlation analysis and regression modeling were performed to determine predictors of periodic limb movement index (PLMI). Markov decision analysis with TreeAge software compared strategies to detect PLMS: in-laboratory PSG, at-home testing, and a clinical prediction tool based on the regression analysis. Results Elevated PLMI values (>15 per hour) were observed in >25% of patients. PLMI values in No-OSA patients correlated with age, sex, self-reported nocturnal leg jerks, restless legs syndrome symptoms, and hypertension. In OSA patients, PLMI correlated only with age and self-reported psychiatric medications. Regression models indicated only a modest predictive value of demographics, symptoms, and clinical history. Decision modeling suggests that at-home testing is favored as the pretest probability of PLMS increases, given plausible assumptions regarding PLMS morbidity, costs, and assumed benefits of pharmacological therapy. Conclusion Although elevated PLMI values were commonly observed, routinely acquired clinical information had only weak predictive utility. As the clinical importance of elevated PLMI continues to evolve, it is likely that objective measures such as PSG or at-home PLMS monitors will prove increasingly important for clinical and research endeavors. PMID:27540316

  3. Periodic limb movements of sleep: empirical and theoretical evidence supporting objective at-home monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moro M

    2016-08-01

    at-home PLMS monitors will prove increasingly important for clinical and research endeavors.Keywords: periodic limb movements, polysomnography, predictors, sleep, decision analysis, cost-effectiveness, diagnostic

  4. INTEGRATED WATER MONITORING TO SUPPORT THE MANAGEMENT OF HEALTHY SEGARA ANAKAN ESTUARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Noegrahati

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Estuaries provide vital nesting and feeding habitats for many aquatic plants and animals, therefore suitable methods are needed for monitoring the changes in estuarine waters to keep the health of coastal habitats. Limitations in understanding the relationship between discrete physicochemical measurements and cause of the alteration in the quality and functioning of an ecosystem, has lead to the integration of physicochemical and biological monitoring. In this work, spatial time series integrated monitoring of Southern part of Segara Anakan Estuary, Central Java, Indonesia, was carried out from August 2003 to May 2004. The parameters were measured at the lowest water depth. Dramatic changes in physicochemical parameters of salinity, total suspended solids, turbidity and biological parameters of phytoplankton diversity, density was observed during dry season (August-September 2003 and wet season (December 2003-March 2004, while the changes in parameters of organics (DO, BOD and COD and nutrients (N-NH3 N-NO and P were not significant. The difference of freshwater influx into the estuary caused higher salinity in dry season (25 to 2 ppt and faster water velocity in wet season (0,4 to 0,2 m/detik. The higher rainfall and faster water velocity in wet season caused more re-aeration via the water surface, therefore, photosynthetic production, measured as increase rate of DO in day time, could be assessed only in dry season. Limitation of phytoplankton ability to carry out photosynthesis in wet season, as observed by the decrease of the daytime CO consumption rate, were due to the drastic increase of turbidity (0,8 to 14,1 NTU caused by total suspended solids transported with the freshwater influx. In other turn, this limitation caused the decrease of phytoplankton diversity and density. Considering that healthy estuaries are critical for the continued survival of many species of fish and other aquatic life, and phytoplankton forms the base of

  5. AMCO Off-Site Air Monitoring Polygons, Oakland CA, 2017, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This feature class was developed to support the AMCO Chemical Superfund Site air monitoring process and depicts a single polygon layer, Off-Site Air Monitors,...

  6. Year-Long Monitoring of Physico-Chemical and Biological Variables Provide a Comparative Baseline of Coral Reef Functioning in the Central Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Roik, Anna Krystyna

    2016-11-09

    Coral reefs in the central Red Sea are sparsely studied and in situ data on physico-chemical and key biotic variables that provide an important comparative baseline are missing. To address this gap, we simultaneously monitored three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient for an entire year over four seasons, collecting data on currents, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-a, turbidity, inorganic nutrients, sedimentation, bacterial communities of reef water, and bacterial and algal composition of epilithic biofilms. Summer temperature (29–33°C) and salinity (39 PSU) exceeded average global maxima for coral reefs, whereas DO concentration was low (2–4 mg L-1). While temperature and salinity differences were most pronounced between seasons, DO, chlorophyll-a, turbidity, and sedimentation varied most between reefs. Similarly, biotic communities were highly dynamic between reefs and seasons. Differences in bacterial biofilms were driven by four abundant families: Rhodobacteraceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Flammeovirgaceae, and Pseudanabaenaceae. In algal biofilms, green crusts, brown crusts, and crustose coralline algae were most abundant and accounted for most of the variability of the communities. Higher bacterial diversity of biofilms coincided with increased algal cover during spring and summer. By employing multivariate matching, we identified temperature, salinity, DO, and chlorophyll-a as the main contributing physico-chemical drivers of biotic community structures. These parameters are forecast to change most with the progression of ocean warming and increased nutrient input, which suggests an effect on the recruitment of Red Sea benthic communities as a result of climate change and anthropogenic influence. In conclusion, our study provides insight into coral reef functioning in the Red Sea and a comparative baseline to support coral reef studies in the region.

  7. Year-Long Monitoring of Physico-Chemical and Biological Variables Provide a Comparative Baseline of Coral Reef Functioning in the Central Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roik, Anna; Röthig, Till; Roder, Cornelia; Ziegler, Maren; Kremb, Stephan G; Voolstra, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    Coral reefs in the central Red Sea are sparsely studied and in situ data on physico-chemical and key biotic variables that provide an important comparative baseline are missing. To address this gap, we simultaneously monitored three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient for an entire year over four seasons, collecting data on currents, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-a, turbidity, inorganic nutrients, sedimentation, bacterial communities of reef water, and bacterial and algal composition of epilithic biofilms. Summer temperature (29-33°C) and salinity (39 PSU) exceeded average global maxima for coral reefs, whereas DO concentration was low (2-4 mg L-1). While temperature and salinity differences were most pronounced between seasons, DO, chlorophyll-a, turbidity, and sedimentation varied most between reefs. Similarly, biotic communities were highly dynamic between reefs and seasons. Differences in bacterial biofilms were driven by four abundant families: Rhodobacteraceae, Flavobacteriaceae, Flammeovirgaceae, and Pseudanabaenaceae. In algal biofilms, green crusts, brown crusts, and crustose coralline algae were most abundant and accounted for most of the variability of the communities. Higher bacterial diversity of biofilms coincided with increased algal cover during spring and summer. By employing multivariate matching, we identified temperature, salinity, DO, and chlorophyll-a as the main contributing physico-chemical drivers of biotic community structures. These parameters are forecast to change most with the progression of ocean warming and increased nutrient input, which suggests an effect on the recruitment of Red Sea benthic communities as a result of climate change and anthropogenic influence. In conclusion, our study provides insight into coral reef functioning in the Red Sea and a comparative baseline to support coral reef studies in the region.

  8. Research progress of plant monitoring for indoor chemical pollution gases%室内化学污染气体的植物监测研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁敏; 刘顺腾; 赵洁

    2013-01-01

    随着室内装修装饰的大量涌现,室内化学污染物超标现象日趋严重,现代人类已经继第一污染时期—煤烟型污染和第二污染时期—光化学烟雾污染后,进入以室内化学污染为标志的第三污染时期.利用植物监测室内化学污染气体已成为安全有效的监测、控制室内化学污染的重要途径.文章阐述了室内化学污染物的特点、危害及植物监测的作用;从外部数量性状、生理生化指标、综合指标三方面综述了植物对室内化学污染监测的相关研究进展,并对植物监测研究和应用前景做出展望.%With the proliferation of the interior decoration, the phenomenon of exceeding standard of the indoor chemical pollutants is becoming more and more serious, modern human has come into the third pollution period- "indoor chemical pollution" from the first pollution period- "soot pollution" and the second pollution period- "photochemical smoke pollution". Using plants to monitor indoor chemical pollution gases has become a safe and effective way to monitor and control indoor chemical pollution. The paper expounds the characteristics and harm of indoor chemical pollution and the role of plant monitoring, summarizes the research progress of plant monitoring for indoor chemical pollution from external quantitative traits, physiological and biochemical index and comprehensive index, and makes prospect of plant monitoring research and application.

  9. Programme for terrestrial monitoring of nature. Monitoring of chemical precipitation connected to the field research areas, 1994; Program for terrestrisk naturovervaaking. Overvaaking av nedboerkjemi i tilknytning til feltforskningsomraadene, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toerseth, K.; Hermansen, O.

    1995-06-01

    The report relates to the Norwegian programme for terrestrial monitoring covering precipitation sampling and chemical analysis from seven experimental fields. Weekly precipitation samples are analysed for all main ions together with monthly samples for different trace elements. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Continuous Water Quality Monitoring in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta to support Ecosystem Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, B. D.; Bergamaschi, B. A.; Pellerin, B. A.; Saraceno, J.; Sauer, M.; Kraus, T. E.; Burau, J. R.; Fujii, R.

    2013-12-01

    Characterizing habitat quality and nutrient availability to food webs is an essential step for understanding and predicting the success of pelagic organisms in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta). The difficulty is that water quality and nutrient supply changes continuously as tidal and wind-driven currents move new water parcels to and from comparatively static geomorphic settings. Understanding interactions between nutrient cycling, suspended sediment, and plankton dynamics with flow and tidal range relative to position in the estuary is critical to predicting and managing bottom up effects on aquatic habitat in the Delta. Historically, quantifying concentrations and loads in the Delta has relied on water quality data collected at monthly intervals. Current in situ optical sensors for nutrients, dissolved organic matter (DOM) and algal pigments (chlorophyll-A, phycocyanin) allow for real-time, high-frequency measurements on time scales of seconds, and extending up to years. Such data is essential for characterizing changes in water quality over short and long term temporal scales as well as over broader spatial scales. High frequency water quality data have been collected at key stations in the Delta since 2012. Sensors that continuously measure nitrate, DOM, algal pigments and turbidity have been co-located at pre-existing Delta flow monitoring stations. Data from the stations are telemetered to USGS data servers and are designed to run autonomously with a monthly service interval, where sensors are cleaned and checked against calibration standards. The autonomous system is verified against discrete samples taken monthly and intensively over periodic ebb to flood tidal cycles. Here we present examples of how coupled optical and acoustic data from the sensor network to improve our understanding of nutrient and DOM dynamics and fluxes. The data offer robust quantitative estimates of concentrations and constituent fluxes needed to investigate biogeochemical

  11. Supportive monitoring and disease management through the internet: an internet-delivered intervention strategy for recurrent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordy, Hans; Backenstrass, Matthias; Hüsing, Johannes; Wolf, Markus; Aulich, Kai; Bürgy, Martin; Puschner, Bernd; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Vedder, Helmut

    2013-11-01

    Major depression is a highly prevalent, disabling disorder associated with loss of quality of life and large economic burden for the society. Depressive disorders often follow a chronic or recurrent course. The risk of relapses increases with each additional episode. The internet-deliverable intervention strategy SUMMIT (SUpportive Monitoring and Disease Management over the InTernet) for patients with recurrent depression has been developed with the main objectives to prolong symptom-free phases and to shorten symptom-loaden phases. This paper describes the study design of a six-sites, three-arm, randomized clinical trial intended to evaluate the efficacy of this novel strategy compared to treatment as usual (TAU). Two hundred thirty six patients who had been treated for their (at least) third depressive episode in one of the six participating psychiatric centers were randomized into one of three groups: 1) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation with personal support or 2) TAU plus a twelve-month SUMMIT program participation without personal support, or 3) TAU alone. Primary outcome of this study is defined as the number of "well weeks" over 24months after index treatment assessed by blind evaluators based on the Longitudinal Interval Follow-Up Evaluation. If efficacious, the low monetary and nonmonetary expenditures of this automated, yet individualized intervention may open new avenues for providing an acceptable, convenient, and affordable long-term disease management strategy to people with a chronic mental condition such as recurrent depression. © 2013.

  12. Online Condition Monitoring of Bearings to Support Total Productive Maintenance in the Packaging Materials Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovan Gligorijevic

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The packaging materials industry has already recognized the importance of Total Productive Maintenance as a system of proactive techniques for improving equipment reliability. Bearing faults, which often occur gradually, represent one of the foremost causes of failures in the industry. Therefore, detection of their faults in an early stage is quite important to assure reliable and efficient operation. We present a new automated technique for early fault detection and diagnosis in rolling-element bearings based on vibration signal analysis. Following the wavelet decomposition of vibration signals into a few sub-bands of interest, the standard deviation of obtained wavelet coefficients is extracted as a representative feature. Then, the feature space dimension is optimally reduced to two using scatter matrices. In the reduced two-dimensional feature space the fault detection and diagnosis is carried out by quadratic classifiers. Accuracy of the technique has been tested on four classes of the recorded vibrations signals, i.e., normal, with the fault of inner race, outer race, and ball operation. The overall accuracy of 98.9% has been achieved. The new technique can be used to support maintenance decision-making processes and, thus, to increase reliability and efficiency in the industry by preventing unexpected faulty operation of bearings.

  13. Rubric-based tools to support the monitoring and assessment of Bachelor’s Final Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica MORENO OLIVER

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of Bachelor’s Final Projects (BFP in Engineering Education is critical since it offers the opportunity for students to integrate and employ specific and transversal competences they have developed along the degree. However, given the special characteristics of this curriculum component (personalized according to the student’s interests, the number of teachers involved, the changing assessment boards, etc., the systematization of its formative and summative assessment has been extensively recognized as problematic but highly necessary. To face this problem, there are several recent initiatives reported in the literature that propose a set of rubrics as tools for project advisors and board members to structure the assessment. In this paper, we report the experience in the Engineering School at Universitat Pompeu Fabra (Barcelona employing a rubricbased approach as part of an assessment guide (with a web-based support tool for BFP. The guide has been evaluated using quantitative and qualitative data gathering techniques used before, during and after the rubrics use, and the results provide insights about its utility, pertinence, user-friendliness, preciseness and actual adoption. Findings led to the provision an additional feature in the web-based tool for the integrated assessment of transversal and specific competences and a view of a summarized version of the rubrics that can be used using mobile devices.

  14. Online Condition Monitoring of Bearings to Support Total Productive Maintenance in the Packaging Materials Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gligorijevic, Jovan; Gajic, Dragoljub; Brkovic, Aleksandar; Savic-Gajic, Ivana; Georgieva, Olga; Di Gennaro, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    The packaging materials industry has already recognized the importance of Total Productive Maintenance as a system of proactive techniques for improving equipment reliability. Bearing faults, which often occur gradually, represent one of the foremost causes of failures in the industry. Therefore, detection of their faults in an early stage is quite important to assure reliable and efficient operation. We present a new automated technique for early fault detection and diagnosis in rolling-element bearings based on vibration signal analysis. Following the wavelet decomposition of vibration signals into a few sub-bands of interest, the standard deviation of obtained wavelet coefficients is extracted as a representative feature. Then, the feature space dimension is optimally reduced to two using scatter matrices. In the reduced two-dimensional feature space the fault detection and diagnosis is carried out by quadratic classifiers. Accuracy of the technique has been tested on four classes of the recorded vibrations signals, i.e., normal, with the fault of inner race, outer race, and ball operation. The overall accuracy of 98.9% has been achieved. The new technique can be used to support maintenance decision-making processes and, thus, to increase reliability and efficiency in the industry by preventing unexpected faulty operation of bearings.

  15. Design and development of a miniaturised total chemical analysis system for on-line lactate and glucose monitoring in biological samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dempsey, Eithne; Diamond, Dermot; Smyth, Malcolm R.; Urban, Gerald; Jobst, Gerhard; Moser, Isabella; Verpoorte, Elisabeth M.J.; Manz, Andreas; Widmer, H. Michael; Rabenstein, Kai; Freaney, Rosemarie

    1997-01-01

    A miniaturised Total chemical Analysis System (μTAS) for glucose and lactate measurement in biological samples constructed based on an integrated microdialysis sampling and detection system. The complete system incorporates a microdialysis probe for intravascular monitoring in an ex vivo mini-shunt

  16. Carbon-supported platinum alloy catalysts for phenol hydrogenation for making industrial chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivas, S.T.; Song, C.

    1999-07-01

    Phenol is available in large quantities in liquids derived from coal and biomass. Phenol hydrogenation is an industrially important reaction to produce cyclohexanone and cyclohexanol. Cyclohexane, cyclohexene and benzene are obtained as minor products in this reaction. Cyclohexanone is an important intermediate in the production of caprolactam for nylon 6 and cyclohexanol for adipic acid production. In USA, cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone are produced by benzene hydrogenation to cyclohexane over nickel or noble metal catalysts, followed by oxidation of cyclohexane to produce a mixture of cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Then cyclohexanol is dehydrogenated in the presence of Cu-Zn catalyst to cyclohexanone. Usually phenol hydrogenation is also carried out by using Ni catalyst in liquid phase. However, a direct single-step vapor phase hydrogenation of phenol to give cyclohexanone selectively is more advantageous in terms of energy savings and process economics, since processing is simplified and the endothermic step of cyclohexanol dehydrogenation can be avoided, as demonstrated by Montedipe and Johnson Matthey using promoted Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. While it is not the purpose of this paper to dwell on the relative merits of these routes, it is necessary to mention that while using monometallic catalysts, generally the problem of catalyst deactivation of sintering as well as coking is frequently encountered. Addition and alloying of noble metal (e.g. Pt) with a second metal can result in a catalyst with better selectivity and activity in the reaction which is more resistant to deactivation. This paper presents the results on the single-step vapor phase hydrogenation of phenol over carbon-supported Pt-M (M=Cr, V, Zr) alloy catalysts to yield mainly cyclohexanone or cyclohexanol.

  17. Decision making technical support study for the US Army's Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.L.; Dobson, J.E.

    1990-08-01

    This report examines the adequacy of current command and control systems designed to make timely decisions that would enable sufficient warning and protective response to an accident at the Edgewood area of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, and at Pine Bluff Arsenal (PBA), Arkansas. Institutional procedures designed to facilitate rapid accident assessment, characterization, warning, notification, and response after the onset of an emergency and computer-assisted decision-making aids designed to provide salient information to on- and-off-post emergency responders are examined. The character of emergency decision making at APG and PBA, as well as potential needs for improvements to decision-making practices, procedures, and automated decision-support systems (ADSSs), are described and recommendations are offered to guide equipment acquisition and improve on- and off-post command and control relationships. We recommend that (1) a continued effort be made to integrate on- and off-post command control, and decision-making procedures to permit rapid decision making; (2) the pathways for alert and notification among on- and off-post officials be improved and that responsibilities and chain of command among off-post agencies be clarified; (3) greater attention be given to organizational and social context factors that affect the adequacy of response and the likelihood that decision-making systems will work as intended; and (4) faster improvements be made to on-post ADSSs being developed at APG and PBA, which hold considerable promise for depicting vast amounts of information. Phased development and procurement of computer-assisted decision-making tools should be undertaken to balance immediate needs against available resources and to ensure flexibility, equity among sites, and compatibility among on- and off-post systems. 112 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Integration of chemical-specific exposure and pharmacokinetic information with the chemical-agnostic AOP framework to support high throughput risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Application of the Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) framework and high throughput toxicity testing in chemical-specific risk assessment requires reconciliation of chemical concentrations sufficient to trigger a molecular initiating event measured in vitro and at the relevant target ...

  19. 独立元分析方法(ICA)及其在化工过程监控和故障诊断中的应用%ICA AND ITS APPLICATION TO CHEMICAL PROCESS MONITORING AND FAULT DIAGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈国金; 梁军; 钱积新

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate statistical process control (MSPC) has been successfully applied to performance monitoring and fault diagnosis for chemical processes. However, traditional MSPC are based upon the assumption that the separated latent variables must be subject to normal probability distribution, which sometimes can not be satisfied. In this paper, a novel method combining principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA) is proposed to model non-Gaussian data from industry and improve the monitoring performance of process. In order to deal with the uncertainty of probability distribution within the independent component, a kind of classifier referred to as support vector classifier is used for classifying the abnormal modes. Simulation result for a nonisothermal continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) by the presented method verifies the effectiveness of ICA-based algorithm.

  20. Supportive Mental Health Self-Monitoring among Smartphone Users with Psychological Distress: Protocol for a Fully Mobile Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Till Beiwinkel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mobile health (mHealth could be widely used in the population to improve access to psychological treatment. In this paper, we describe the development of a mHealth intervention on the basis of supportive self-monitoring and describe the protocol for a randomized controlled trial to evaluate its effectiveness among smartphone users with psychological distress. Based on power analysis, a representative quota sample of N = 186 smartphone users will be recruited, with an over-sampling of persons with moderate to high distress. Over a 4-week period, the intervention will be compared to a self-monitoring without intervention group and a passive control group. Telephone interviews will be conducted at baseline, post-intervention (4 weeks, and 12-week follow-up to assess study outcomes. The primary outcome will be improvement of mental health. Secondary outcomes will include well-being, intentions toward help-seeking and help-seeking behavior, user activation, attitudes toward mental-health services, perceived stigmatization, smartphone app quality, user satisfaction, engagement, and adherence with the intervention. Additionally, data from the user’s daily life as collected during self-monitoring will be used to investigate risk and protective factors of mental health in real-world settings. Therefore, this study will allow us to demonstrate the effectiveness of a smartphone application as a widely accessible and low-cost intervention to improve mental health on a population level. It also allows to identify new assessment approaches in the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

  1. Geoelectrical monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage to support high-hazard nuclear decommissioning at the Sellafield Site, UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuras, Oliver, E-mail: oku@bgs.ac.uk [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Paul B.; Meldrum, Philip I.; Oxby, Lucy S. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Uhlemann, Sebastian [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); ETH-Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Institute of Geophysics, Sonneggstr. 5, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Chambers, Jonathan E. [British Geological Survey, Keyworth, Nottingham NG12 5GG (United Kingdom); Binley, Andrew [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YQ (United Kingdom); Graham, James [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); Smith, Nicholas T. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Central Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1PG (United Kingdom); School of Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Williamson Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Atherton, Nick [Sellafield Ltd, Albion Square, Swingpump Lane, Whitehaven CA28 7NE (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    A full-scale field experiment applying 4D (3D time-lapse) cross-borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to the monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage was undertaken at a legacy nuclear waste silo at the Sellafield Site, UK. The experiment constituted the first application of geoelectrical monitoring in support of decommissioning work at a UK nuclear licensed site. Images of resistivity changes occurring since a baseline date prior to the simulated leaks revealed likely preferential pathways of silo liquor simulant flow in the vadose zone and upper groundwater system. Geophysical evidence was found to be compatible with historic contamination detected in permeable facies in sediment cores retrieved from the ERT boreholes. Results indicate that laterally discontinuous till units forming localized hydraulic barriers substantially affect flow patterns and contaminant transport in the shallow subsurface at Sellafield. We conclude that only geophysical imaging of the kind presented here has the potential to provide the detailed spatial and temporal information at the (sub-)meter scale needed to reduce the uncertainty in models of subsurface processes at nuclear sites. - Graphical abstract: 3D fractional resistivity change (resistivity change Δρ divided by baseline resistivity ρ{sub 0}) image showing results of Stage 1 silo liquor simulant injection. The black line delineates the preferential flow path; green cylinders show regions of historic contamination found in sediment cores from ERT boreholes. - Highlights: • 4D geoelectrical monitoring at Sellafield detected and tracked simulated silo leaks. • ERT revealed likely pathways of silo liquor simulant flow in the subsurface. • The method can reduce uncertainty in subsurface process models at nuclear sites. • Has been applied in this form at a UK nuclear licensed site for the first time • Study demonstrates value of 4D geophysics for nuclear decommissioning.

  2. Earth Observation as a Support to Marine Aquaculture (Sites Optimization and Monitoring)- The DUE-SMART Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, Antoine; Bryere, Philippe; Pastres, Roberto; Loisel, Hubert; Vincent, Chloe; Palazzo, Dalila; Brigolin, Daniele; Hembise, Odile; Arino, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    The SMART project (Sustainable Management of Aquaculture through Remote sensing Technology, www.smart-eo.eu), supported by ESA DUE-Innovator program, aims to use the most advanced of Earth Observation (EO) to develop coastal aquaculture services. We present here the results concerning the monitoring of natural marine conditions for operational aquaculture, the optimization of locations for farming and the mapping of potential in terms of carrying capacity for shellfish. In this context EO derived information like Sea Surface Temperature (SST), Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) and Suspended Matters (SPM), has been validated and used as input for a growth model of mussels. Moreover, a fish cage detection methodology based on Sentinel-1 and 2 images has been developed to map out cages number and location in the western Mediterranean Sea.

  3. Electronic Performance Support for Operational Systems: A Case Study of the Link Monitor and Control Operator Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Randall W., Jr.; Cooper, Lynne P.

    1993-01-01

    For complex operational systems, help needs to come from the inside out. It is often not realistic to call a help desk for problems that need immediate attention, especially for tasks that put a heavy cognitive load on the system operator. This session addresses the issues associated with providing electronic performance support for operational systems, including situations where the system is already fielded and can only change through evolution rather than revolution. We present a case study based on our experiences in developing the Link Monitor and Control Operator Assistant for NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN). The goals of the Operator Assistant are to improve the operability of the system and increase the efficiency of mission operations.

  4. Gnss Geodetic Monitoring as Support of Geodynamics Research in Colombia, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Paez, H.; Acero-Patino, N.; Rodriguez-Zuluaga, J. S.; Diederix, H.; Bohorquez-Orozco, O. P.; Martinez-Diaz, G. P.; Diaz-Mila, F.; Giraldo-Londono, L. S.; Cardozo-Giraldo, S.; Vasquez-Ospina, A. F.; Lizarazo, S. C.

    2013-05-01

    To support the geodynamics research at the northwestern corner of South America, GEORED, the acronym for "Geodesia: Red de Estudios de Deformación" has been adopted for the Project "Implementation of the National GNSS Network for Geodynamics" carried out by the Colombian Geological Survey, (SGC), formerly INGEOMINAS. Beginning in 2007, discussions within the GEORED group led to a master plan for the distribution of the base permanent GPS/GNSS station array and specific areas of interest for campaign site construction. The use of previously identified active faults as preferred structures along which stresses are transferred through the deformational area led to the idea of segmentation of the North Andes within Colombia into 20 tectonic sub-blocks. Each of the 20 sub-blocks is expected to have, at least, three-four permanent GPS/GNSS stations within the block along with construction of campaign sites along the boundaries. Currently, the GEORED Network is managing 46 continuously including: 40 GEORED GPS/GNSS continuously operating stations; 4 GNSS continuously operating stations provided by the COCONet (Continuously Operating Caribbean GPS Observational Network) Project; the Bogotá IGS GPS station (BOGT), installed in 1994 under the agreement between JPL-NASA and the SGC; and the San Andres Island station, installed in 2007 under the MOU between UCAR and the SGC. In addition to the permanent installations, more than 230 GPS campaign sites have been constructed and are being occupied one time per year. The Authority of the Panama Canal and the Escuela Politecnica de Quito have also provided data of 4 and 5 GPS/GNSS stations respectively. The GPS data are processed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, and the GPS time series of daily station positions give fundamental information for both regional and local geodynamics studies. Until now, we have obtained 100 quality vector velocities for Colombia, 23 of them as part of the permanent network. The GPS/GNSS stations

  5. Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS: an online service for near real-time satellite monitoring of volcanic plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Brenot

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Volcanic eruptions emit plumes of ash and gases in the atmosphere, potentially at very high altitudes. Ash rich plumes are hazardous for airplanes as ash is very abrasive and easily melts inside their engines. With more than 50 active volcanoes per year and the ever increasing number of commercial flights, the safety of airplanes is a real concern. Satellite measurements are ideal for monitoring global volcanic activity and, in combination with atmospheric dispersion models, to track and forecast volcanic plumes. Here we present the Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS, http://sacs.aeronomie.be, which is a free online service initiated by ESA for the near real-time (NRT satellite monitoring of volcanic plumes of SO2 and ash. It combines data from two UV-visible (OMI, GOME-2 and two infrared (AIRS, IASI spectrometers. This new multi-sensor warning system of volcanic plumes, running since April 2012, is based on the detection of SO2 and is optimised to avoid false alerts while at the same time limiting the number of notifications in case of large plumes. The system shows successful results with 95% of our notifications corresponding to true volcanic activity.

  6. Design of Online Monitoring and Fault Diagnosis System for Belt Conveyors Based on Wavelet Packet Decomposition and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Belt conveyors are the equipment widely used in coal mines and other manufacturing factories, whose main components are a number of idlers. The faults of belt conveyors can directly influence the daily production. In this paper, a fault diagnosis method combining wavelet packet decomposition (WPD and support vector machine (SVM is proposed for monitoring belt conveyors with the focus on the detection of idler faults. Since the number of the idlers could be large, one acceleration sensor is applied to gather the vibration signals of several idlers in order to reduce the number of sensors. The vibration signals are decomposed with WPD, and the energy of each frequency band is extracted as the feature. Then, the features are employed to train an SVM to realize the detection of idler faults. The proposed fault diagnosis method is firstly tested on a testbed, and then an online monitoring and fault diagnosis system is designed for belt conveyors. An experiment is also carried out on a belt conveyor in service, and it is verified that the proposed system can locate the position of the faulty idlers with a limited number of sensors, which is important for operating belt conveyors in practices.

  7. Monitoring tools for assessing the effectiveness and resilience of geotextile-supported soil bioengineering systems - a conceptional approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obriejetan, Michael; Rauch, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    Geotextile-supported systems are widely accepted as a convenient facility for erosion control measures. Technical auxiliaries such as geotextiles are typically used where difficult site conditions and human interventions, as a result of construction activity, require instant protection until its tasks as erosion-resistant layer can be assumed by vegetation. However, erosion control within an initial phase is directly related to restoration techniques whereas vegetation plays a major role for sustainable slope protection. To obtain desired system development over time, periodic monitoring can serve as quality assurance as well as economically viable resource. Practice shows that in-time interventions and maintenance activities have been more successful with regard to vegetation development and economic feasibility than missing supervision strategies. From the maintenance personnel perspective, monitoring tools are required to be designed for easy and valuable handling and processing. On that account specific tools for assessing the functional capacity of combined erosion control measures have been developed. One of these tools takes advantage of digital image processing for analyzing vegetation cover in a simple but effective way. Another tool serves as classification appliance based on condition data input (e.g. degree of vegetation cover, erosion damage) to gain automated reference concerning system status, resilience and presumable future development. Beside system assessment these appliances may be considered as contribution to quality improvement and sustainable ecosystem restoration and slope protection. At the conference the practical application and of these tools are demonstrated and its substantial advantages are displayed.

  8. Simplified automated image analysis for detection and phenotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on porous supports by monitoring growing microcolonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice L den Hertog

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Even with the advent of nucleic acid (NA amplification technologies the culture of mycobacteria for diagnostic and other applications remains of critical importance. Notably microscopic observed drug susceptibility testing (MODS, as opposed to traditional culture on solid media or automated liquid culture, has shown potential to both speed up and increase the provision of mycobacterial culture in high burden settings. METHODS: Here we explore the growth of Mycobacterial tuberculosis microcolonies, imaged by automated digital microscopy, cultured on a porous aluminium oxide (PAO supports. Repeated imaging during colony growth greatly simplifies "computer vision" and presumptive identification of microcolonies was achieved here using existing publically available algorithms. Our system thus allows the growth of individual microcolonies to be monitored and critically, also to change the media during the growth phase without disrupting the microcolonies. Transfer of identified microcolonies onto selective media allowed us, within 1-2 bacterial generations, to rapidly detect the drug susceptibility of individual microcolonies, eliminating the need for time consuming subculturing or the inoculation of multiple parallel cultures. SIGNIFICANCE: Monitoring the phenotype of individual microcolonies as they grow has immense potential for research, screening, and ultimately M. tuberculosis diagnostic applications. The method described is particularly appealing with respect to speed and automation.

  9. Geoelectrical monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage to support high-hazard nuclear decommissioning at the Sellafield Site, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuras, Oliver; Wilkinson, Paul B; Meldrum, Philip I; Oxby, Lucy S; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Chambers, Jonathan E; Binley, Andrew; Graham, James; Smith, Nicholas T; Atherton, Nick

    2016-10-01

    A full-scale field experiment applying 4D (3D time-lapse) cross-borehole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to the monitoring of simulated subsurface leakage was undertaken at a legacy nuclear waste silo at the Sellafield Site, UK. The experiment constituted the first application of geoelectrical monitoring in support of decommissioning work at a UK nuclear licensed site. Images of resistivity changes occurring since a baseline date prior to the simulated leaks revealed likely preferential pathways of silo liquor simulant flow in the vadose zone and upper groundwater system. Geophysical evidence was found to be compatible with historic contamination detected in permeable facies in sediment cores retrieved from the ERT boreholes. Results indicate that laterally discontinuous till units forming localized hydraulic barriers substantially affect flow patterns and contaminant transport in the shallow subsurface at Sellafield. We conclude that only geophysical imaging of the kind presented here has the potential to provide the detailed spatial and temporal information at the (sub-)meter scale needed to reduce the uncertainty in models of subsurface processes at nuclear sites.

  10. Simplified Automated Image Analysis for Detection and Phenotyping of Mycobacterium tuberculosis on Porous Supports by Monitoring Growing Microcolonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hertog, Alice L.; Visser, Dennis W.; Ingham, Colin J.; Fey, Frank H. A. G.; Klatser, Paul R.; Anthony, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Even with the advent of nucleic acid (NA) amplification technologies the culture of mycobacteria for diagnostic and other applications remains of critical importance. Notably microscopic observed drug susceptibility testing (MODS), as opposed to traditional culture on solid media or automated liquid culture, has shown potential to both speed up and increase the provision of mycobacterial culture in high burden settings. Methods Here we explore the growth of Mycobacterial tuberculosis microcolonies, imaged by automated digital microscopy, cultured on a porous aluminium oxide (PAO) supports. Repeated imaging during colony growth greatly simplifies “computer vision” and presumptive identification of microcolonies was achieved here using existing publically available algorithms. Our system thus allows the growth of individual microcolonies to be monitored and critically, also to change the media during the growth phase without disrupting the microcolonies. Transfer of identified microcolonies onto selective media allowed us, within 1-2 bacterial generations, to rapidly detect the drug susceptibility of individual microcolonies, eliminating the need for time consuming subculturing or the inoculation of multiple parallel cultures. Significance Monitoring the phenotype of individual microcolonies as they grow has immense potential for research, screening, and ultimately M. tuberculosis diagnostic applications. The method described is particularly appealing with respect to speed and automation. PMID:20544033

  11. Impact of Sport Context and Support on the Use of a Self-Report Measure for Athlete Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna E. Saw, Luana C. Main, Paul B. Gastin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Athlete self-report measures (ASRM are a popular method of athlete monitoring in high-performance sports. With increasing recognition and accessibility, ASRM may potentially be utilized by athletes from diverse sport contexts. The purpose of the present study was to improve understanding of ASRM implementation across different sport contexts by observing uptake and compliance of a newly implemented ASRM over 16 weeks, and investigating the perceived roles and factors influencing implementation. Athletes (n=131 completed an electronic survey at baseline and week 16 on their perceptions and experiences with ASRM implementation respectively. Despite initial interest, only 70 athletes attempted to use the ASRM. Of these athletes, team sport athletes who were supported by their coach or sports program to use the ASRM were most compliant (p < 0.001 with a mean compliance of 84 ± 21 %. Compliance for self-directed individual and team sport athletes was 28 ± 40 % and 8 ± 18 % respectively. Self-directed athletes were motivated to monitor themselves, and rated desired content and minimal burden as key factors for initial and ongoing compliance. Supported athletes were primarily motivated to comply for the benefit of their coach or sports program rather than themselves, however rated data output as a key factor for their continued use. Factors of the measure outweighed those of the social environment regardless of sport context, however the influence of social environmental factors should not be discounted. The findings of the present study demonstrate the impact of sport context on the implementation of an ASRM and the need to tailor implementation strategies accordingly.

  12. Controlling the chemical stability of a moisture-sensitive drug product through monitoring and identification of coating process microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestur, Umesh; Pandey, Preetanshu; Badawy, Sherif; Lin, Judy; Desai, Divyakant

    2014-12-10

    The objective of this work was to monitor and identify the impact of coating microenvironment, as measured by PyroButtons(®) data loggers, on the chemical stability of a moisture-sensitive drug molecule brivanib alaninate (BA). BA tablets were coated at two different scales (15 and 24 in pan). PyroButtons(®) data loggers were allowed to move freely within the tablet bed to record the temperature and relative humidity conditions of the tablet bed. The tablet moisture content at the end of the coating runs, and the rate of hydrolysis of the BA tablets based on HPLC analysis was found to be a function of the coating thermodynamic microenvironment. Wetter coating conditions resulted in tablets with higher water content and showed greater degradation upon storage. The coating process which yielded acceptable stability in a 15 in coater was transferred to a 24 in coater by maintaining similar tablet-bed relative humidity and temperature conditions. This was compared to a traditional scale-up approach where the environmental equivalency factor (EEF) was matched between scales during coating. The moisture content observed across the two scales indicated that maintaining a similar tablet-bed microenvironment ensured consistent results between scales.

  13. Long-term environmental monitoring of persistent organic pollutants and metals in a chemical/petrochemical area: human health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

    2011-07-01

    Organic pollutants such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as some metals are periodically monitored in soil and vegetation samples collected in Tarragona County (Spain). We here report the temporal trends of the concentrations of the above pollutants between the initial survey (2002) and that recently (2009) performed. The area under evaluation was divided into 4 sections (chemical, petrochemical, urban/residential and unpolluted). In general terms, urban soils presented the highest concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCNs and PAHs, confirming that traffic is a very important emission source of these pollutants. In addition, substantially higher levels of PAHs and some metals were found in vegetation samples from the petrochemical complex. The assessment of health risks of these contaminants indicated that the current concentrations of micropollutants did not mean additional non-carcinogenic or cancer risks for the population living in the zone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Long-term environmental monitoring of persistent organic pollutants and metals in a chemical/petrochemical area: Human health risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadal, Marti [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Schuhmacher, Marta [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain); Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Domingo, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.domingo@urv.cat [Laboratory of Toxicology and Environmental Health, School of Medicine, IISPV, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Sant Llorenc 21, 43201 Reus, Catalonia (Spain)

    2011-07-15

    Organic pollutants such as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), as well as some metals are periodically monitored in soil and vegetation samples collected in Tarragona County (Spain). We here report the temporal trends of the concentrations of the above pollutants between the initial survey (2002) and that recently (2009) performed. The area under evaluation was divided into 4 sections (chemical, petrochemical, urban/residential and unpolluted). In general terms, urban soils presented the highest concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCNs and PAHs, confirming that traffic is a very important emission source of these pollutants. In addition, substantially higher levels of PAHs and some metals were found in vegetation samples from the petrochemical complex. The assessment of health risks of these contaminants indicated that the current concentrations of micropollutants did not mean additional non-carcinogenic or cancer risks for the population living in the zone. - Highlights: > Traffic is an important emission source of persistent organic pollutants. > Oil refineries could be notable releasers of PAHs and some metals in the area. > Soil pollutant levels are notably lower than threshold values. > The air quality of Tarragona area is not greatly affected by metals and POPs. > The current exposure to micropollutants does not mean additional health risks. - Human exposure to environmental micropollutants in the industrial area of Tarragona does not mean additional health risks.

  15. Investigation of Dynamic Multivariate Chemical Process Monitoring%动态多变量过程监控研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢磊; 张建明; 王树青

    2006-01-01

    Chemical process variables are always driven by random noise and disturbances. The closed-loop control yields process measurements that are auto and cross correlated. The influence of auto and cross correlations on statistical process control (SPC) is investigated in detail by Monte Carlo experiments. It is revealed that in the sense of average performance, the false alarms rates (FAR) of principal component analysis (PCA), dynamic PCA are not affected by the time-series structures of process variables. Nevertheless, non-independent identical distribution will cause the actual FAR to deviate from its theoretic value apparently and result in unexpected consecutive false alarms for normal operating process. Dynamic PCA and ARMA-PCA are demonstrated to be inefficient to remove the influences of auto and cross correlations. Subspace identification-based PCA (SI-PCA) is proposed to improve the monitoring of dynamic processes. Through state space modeling, SI-PCA can remove the auto and cross correlations efficiently and avoid consecutive false alarms. Synthetic Monte Carlo experiments and the application in Tennessee Eastman challenge process illustrate the advantages of the proposed approach.

  16. Quantitation of low molecular weight sugars by chemical derivatization-liquid chromatography/multiple reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jun; Lin, Karen; Sequria, Carita; Yang, Juncong; Borchers, Christoph H

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the separation and quantitation of 13 mono- and disaccharides has been developed by chemical derivatization/ultra-HPLC/negative-ion ESI-multiple-reaction monitoring MS. 3-Nitrophenylhydrazine (at 50°C for 60 min) was shown to be able to quantitatively derivatize low-molecular weight (LMW) reducing sugars. The nonreducing sugar, sucrose, was not derivatized. A pentafluorophenyl-bonded phase column was used for the chromatographic separation of the derivatized sugars. This method exhibits femtomole-level sensitivity, high precision (CVs of ≤ 4.6%) and high accuracy for the quantitation of LMW sugars in wine. Excellent linearity (R(2) ≥ 0.9993) and linear ranges of ∼500-fold for disaccharides and ∼1000-4000-fold for monosaccharides were achieved. With internal calibration ((13) C-labeled internal standards), recoveries were between 93.6% ± 1.6% (xylose) and 104.8% ± 5.2% (glucose). With external calibration, recoveries ranged from 82.5% ± 0.8% (ribulose) to 105.2% ± 2.1% (xylulose). Quantitation of sugars in two red wines and two white wines was performed using this method; quantitation of the central carbon metabolism-related carboxylic acids and tartaric acid was carried out using a previously established derivatization procedure with 3-nitrophenylhydrazine as well. The results showed that these two classes of compounds-both of which have important organoleptic properties-had different compositions in red and white wines.

  17. Assessment of powder blend uniformity: Comparison of real-time NIR blend monitoring with stratified sampling in combination with HPLC and at-line NIR Chemical Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Barbara; Weimer, Marco; Hauck, Gerrit; Reich, Gabriele

    2015-11-01

    Scope of the study was (1) to develop a lean quantitative calibration for real-time near-infrared (NIR) blend monitoring, which meets the requirements in early development of pharmaceutical products and (2) to compare the prediction performance of this approach with the results obtained from stratified sampling using a sample thief in combination with off-line high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and at-line near-infrared chemical imaging (NIRCI). Tablets were manufactured from powder blends and analyzed with NIRCI and HPLC to verify the real-time results. The model formulation contained 25% w/w naproxen as a cohesive active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), microcrystalline cellulose and croscarmellose sodium as cohesive excipients and free-flowing mannitol. Five in-line NIR calibration approaches, all using the spectra from the end of the blending process as reference for PLS modeling, were compared in terms of selectivity, precision, prediction accuracy and robustness. High selectivity could be achieved with a "reduced" approach i.e. API and time saving approach (35% reduction of API amount) based on six concentration levels of the API with three levels realized by three independent powder blends and the additional levels obtained by simply increasing the API concentration in these blends. Accuracy and robustness were further improved by combining this calibration set with a second independent data set comprising different excipient concentrations and reflecting different environmental conditions. The combined calibration model was used to monitor the blending process of independent batches. For this model formulation the target concentration of the API could be achieved within 3 min indicating a short blending time. The in-line NIR approach was verified by stratified sampling HPLC and NIRCI results. All three methods revealed comparable results regarding blend end point determination. Differences in both mean API concentration and RSD values could be

  18. Science Letters:Development of supported boron-doping TiO2 catalysts by chemical vapor deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, supported nonmetal (boron) doping TiO2 coating photocatalysts were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to enhance the activity under visible light irradiation and avoid the recovering of TiO2. Boron atoms were successfully doped into the lattice of TiO2 through CVD, as evidenced from XPS analysis. B-doped TiO2 coating catalysts showed drastic and strong absorption in the visible light range with a red shift in the band gap transition. This novel B-TiO2 coating photocatalyst showed higher photocatalytic activity in methyl orange degradation under visible light irradiation than that of the pure TiO2 photocatalyst.

  19. Effect of counterpart metals in carbon-supported Pt-based catalysts prepared using radiation chemical method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Tomohisa; Seino, Satoshi; Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Otake, Hiroaki; Kugai, Junichiro; Ohkubo, Yuji; Nitani, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2017-04-01

    The process of nanoparticle formation by radiation chemical synthesis in a heterogeneous system has been investigated. Carbon-supported Pt-based bimetallic nanoparticles were synthesized using a high-energy electron beam. Rh, Cu, Ru, and Sn were used as counterpart metals. The nanoparticles were characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. PtRh formed a uniform random alloy nanoparticle, while Cu partially formed an alloy with Pt and the remaining Cu existed as CuO. PtRu formed an alloy structure with a composition distribution of a Pt-rich core and Ru-rich shell. No alloying was observed in PtSn, which had a Pt-SnO2 structure. The alloy and oxide formation mechanisms are discussed considering the redox potentials, the standard enthalpy of oxide formation, and the solid solubilities of Pt and the counterpart metals.

  20. Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

  1. Adaptive sampling strategy support for the unlined chromic acid pit, chemical waste landfill, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, R.L.

    1993-11-01

    Adaptive sampling programs offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the real-time data generated by an adaptive sampling program. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system (SitePlanner{trademark} ) for data fusion, management, and display and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods (PLUME) for contamination-extent estimation and sample location selection. This approach is applied in a retrospective study of a subsurface chromium plume at Sandia National Laboratories` chemical waste landfill. Retrospective analyses suggest the potential for characterization cost savings on the order of 60% through a reduction in the number of sampling programs, total number of soil boreholes, and number of samples analyzed from each borehole.

  2. Enterprise tools to promote interoperability: MonitoringResources.org supports design and documentation of large-scale, long-term monitoringprograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltzin, J. F.; Scully, R. A.; Bayer, J.

    2016-12-01

    Individual natural resource monitoring programs have evolved in response to different organizational mandates, jurisdictional needs, issues and questions. We are establishing a collaborative forum for large-scale, long-term monitoring programs to identify opportunities where collaboration could yield efficiency in monitoring design, implementation, analyses, and data sharing. We anticipate these monitoring programs will have similar requirements - e.g. survey design, standardization of protocols and methods, information management and delivery - that could be met by enterprise tools to promote sustainability, efficiency and interoperability of information across geopolitical boundaries or organizational cultures. MonitoringResources.org, a project of the Pacific Northwest Aquatic Monitoring Partnership, provides an on-line suite of enterprise tools focused on aquatic systems in the Pacific Northwest Region of the United States. We will leverage on and expand this existing capacity to support continental-scale monitoring of both aquatic and terrestrial systems. The current stakeholder group is focused on programs led by bureaus with the Department of Interior, but the tools will be readily and freely available to a broad variety of other stakeholders. Here, we report the results of two initial stakeholder workshops focused on (1) establishing a collaborative forum of large scale monitoring programs, (2) identifying and prioritizing shared needs, (3) evaluating existing enterprise resources, (4) defining priorities for development of enhanced capacity for MonitoringResources.org, and (5) identifying a small number of pilot projects that can be used to define and test development requirements for specific monitoring programs.

  3. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2012-09-01

    Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded

  4. Facile hydrolysis-based chemical destruction of the warfare agents VX, GB, and HD by alumina-supported fluoride reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershonov, E; Columbus, I; Zafrani, Y

    2009-01-02

    A facile solvent-free hydrolysis (chemical destruction) of the warfare agents VX (O-ethyl S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GB (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate or sarin), and HD (2,2'-dichloroethyl sulfide or sulfur mustard) upon reaction with various solid-supported fluoride reagents is described. These solid reagents include different alumina-based powders such as KF/Al(2)O(3), AgF/KF/Al(2)O(3), and KF/Al(2)O(3) enriched by so-called coordinatively unsaturated fluoride ions (termed by us as ECUF-KF/Al(2)O(3)). When adsorbed on these sorbents, the nerve agent VX quickly hydrolyzed (t(1/2) range between 0.1-6.3 h) to the corresponding nontoxic phosphonic acid EMPA as a major product (>90%) and to the relatively toxic desethyl-VX (<10%). The latter byproduct was further hydrolyzed to the nontoxic MPA product (t(1/2) range between 2.2-161 h). The reaction rates and the product distribution were found to be strongly dependent on the nature of the fluoride ions in the KF/Al(2)O(3) matrix and on its water content. All variations of the alumina-supported fluoride reagents studied caused an immediate hydrolysis of the highly toxic GB (t(1/2) < 10 min) to form the corresponding nontoxic phosphonic acid IMPA. A preliminary study of the detoxification of HD on these catalyst supports showed the formation of the nontoxic 1,4-thioxane as a major product together with minor amounts of TDG and vinylic compounds within a few days. The mechanisms and the efficiency of these processes were successfully studied by solid-state (31)P, (13)C, and (19)F MAS NMR.

  5. A Regional Monitoring and Visualization System for Decision Support and Disaster Management Applications for the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC)-a network of managed and protected areas extending from Mexico to Columbia-is a crucial initiative for the Mesoamerican region, with a central development concept of integrating conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity within the framework of sustainable economic development. The MBC is of particular importance to the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), which is comprised of the environmental ministers from the seven Central American countries. Responsible for determining priority areas for action in the corridor, CCAD decision makers require current and accurate information, and access to the dynamic knowledge of the changes in the MBC such as deforestation hotspots, fires, and the effects of natural disasters. Currently this information is not integrated and in disparate locations throughout the region and the world. Leveraging NASA technology, satellite data, and capability, we propose to team with the World Bank and the CCAD to develop a regional monitoring and visualization system-with central nodes at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and at CCAD headquarters. This system will assimilate NASA spatial datasets (e.g. MODIS, Landsat, etc.), spatial data from other sources (commercial and public-domain), and ancillary data developed in each of the seven Central American countries (soils, transportation networks, biodiversity indicator maps, etc.). The system will function as a "virtual dashboard" for monitoring the MBC and provide the critical decision support tools for CCAD decision makers. The CCAD central node will also serve as a high-tech showcase for the corridor among the international community, other decision-makers, the media, and students.

  6. A Regional Monitoring and Visualization System for Decision Support and Disaster Management Applications for the Mesoamerican Biological Corridor and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The Mesoamerican Biological Corridor (MBC)-a network of managed and protected areas extending from Mexico to Columbia-is a crucial initiative for the Mesoamerican region, with a central development concept of integrating conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity within the framework of sustainable economic development. The MBC is of particular importance to the Central American Commission for Environment and Development (CCAD), which is comprised of the environmental ministers from the seven Central American countries. Responsible for determining priority areas for action in the corridor, CCAD decision makers require current and accurate information, and access to the dynamic knowledge of the changes in the MBC such as deforestation hotspots, fires, and the effects of natural disasters. Currently this information is not integrated and in disparate locations throughout the region and the world. Leveraging NASA technology, satellite data, and capability, we propose to team with the World Bank and the CCAD to develop a regional monitoring and visualization system-with central nodes at the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center and at CCAD headquarters. This system will assimilate NASA spatial datasets (e.g. MODIS, Landsat, etc.), spatial data from other sources (commercial and public-domain), and ancillary data developed in each of the seven Central American countries (soils, transportation networks, biodiversity indicator maps, etc.). The system will function as a "virtual dashboard" for monitoring the MBC and provide the critical decision support tools for CCAD decision makers. The CCAD central node will also serve as a high-tech showcase for the corridor among the international community, other decision-makers, the media, and students.

  7. An approach to integrate spatial and climatological data as support to drought monitoring and agricultural management problems in South Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Sabrina; Facello, Anna; Camaro, Walther; Isotta Cristofori, Elena; Demarchi, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    Drought is a natural hazard characterized by an abnormally dry event in the hydrological cycle caused by insufficient precipitation over an extended period of time, which affects more people than any other natural disaster and results in social, economic and environmental costs. In Africa, the economic system is based primarily on natural resources for example farming. For this reason, climate variability and events such as drought are phenomena that can represent significant disturbances and threats in the agricultural systems. In particular, this study concerns the monitoring of environmental changes in the south sector of South Sudan. The climate and environment in the South Sudan have shown localised changes during the course of this century and recurrent wars and droughts in the last years determined a large food-crisis. Actually, the security situation is stabilised with sporadic fighting concentrated in Jonglei, Unity and Upper Nile States. With the stabilisation of the conflict, many refugees have returned to their regions, trying to recover the economic structure based mainly on agriculture. For this reason, it is important to monitoring and analysis the vegetation and drought trend over the last years to support agricultural development and food security, in particular in post-conflict areas. This study focuses on the analysis of the relationship between the temporal variations of state of vegetation and the precipitation patterns. A historical analysis of the vegetation behaviour (NDVI) and the drought during the year is developed. In addition, with the aim to identify the wet and dry seasons, an analysis of precipitation is performed. Based on the vegetation and precipitation trends obtained, it is possible to characterize the best areas to start an agricultural system, giving priority to certain areas in order to plan the land use for agricultural purposes and programming crop (which and where). Consequently, with the aim to identify possible

  8. Interactive Genetic Algorithm - An Adaptive and Interactive Decision Support Framework for Design of Optimal Groundwater Monitoring Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babbar-Sebens, M.; Minsker, B. S.

    2006-12-01

    In the water resources management field, decision making encompasses many kinds of engineering, social, and economic constraints and objectives. Representing all of these problem dependant criteria through models (analytical or numerical) and various formulations (e.g., objectives, constraints, etc.) within an optimization- simulation system can be a very non-trivial issue. Most models and formulations utilized for discerning desirable traits in a solution can only approximate the decision maker's (DM) true preference criteria, and they often fail to consider important qualitative and incomputable phenomena related to the management problem. In our research, we have proposed novel decision support frameworks that allow DMs to actively participate in the optimization process. The DMs explicitly indicate their true preferences based on their subjective criteria and the results of various simulation models and formulations. The feedback from the DMs is then used to guide the search process towards solutions that are "all-rounders" from the perspective of the DM. The two main research questions explored in this work are: a) Does interaction between the optimization algorithm and a DM assist the system in searching for groundwater monitoring designs that are robust from the DM's perspective?, and b) How can an interactive search process be made more effective when human factors, such as human fatigue and cognitive learning processes, affect the performance of the algorithm? The application of these frameworks on a real-world groundwater long-term monitoring (LTM) case study in Michigan highlighted the following salient advantages: a) in contrast to the non-interactive optimization methodology, the proposed interactive frameworks were able to identify low cost monitoring designs whose interpolation maps respected the expected spatial distribution of the contaminants, b) for many same-cost designs, the interactive methodologies were able to propose multiple alternatives

  9. Computerized clinical decision support systems for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing: A decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weise-Kelly Lorraine

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some drugs have a narrow therapeutic range and require monitoring and dose adjustments to optimize their efficacy and safety. Computerized clinical decision support systems (CCDSSs may improve the net benefit of these drugs. The objective of this review was to determine if CCDSSs improve processes of care or patient outcomes for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing. Methods We conducted a decision-maker-researcher partnership systematic review. Studies from our previous review were included, and new studies were sought until January 2010 in MEDLINE, EMBASE, Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews, and Inspec databases. Randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of a CCDSS on process of care or patient outcomes were selected by pairs of independent reviewers. A study was considered to have a positive effect (i.e., CCDSS showed improvement if at least 50% of the relevant study outcomes were statistically significantly positive. Results Thirty-three randomized controlled trials were identified, assessing the effect of a CCDSS on management of vitamin K antagonists (14, insulin (6, theophylline/aminophylline (4, aminoglycosides (3, digoxin (2, lidocaine (1, or as part of a multifaceted approach (3. Cluster randomization was rarely used (18% and CCDSSs were usually stand-alone systems (76% primarily used by physicians (85%. Overall, 18 of 30 studies (60% showed an improvement in the process of care and 4 of 19 (21% an improvement in patient outcomes. All evaluable studies assessing insulin dosing for glycaemic control showed an improvement. In meta-analysis, CCDSSs for vitamin K antagonist dosing significantly improved time in therapeutic range. Conclusions CCDSSs have potential for improving process of care for therapeutic drug monitoring and dosing, specifically insulin and vitamin K antagonist dosing. However, studies were small and generally of modest quality, and effects on patient outcomes were uncertain, with no convincing

  10. Using smartphones to decrease substance use via self-monitoring and recovery support: study protocol for a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Christy K; Dennis, Michael L; Gustafson, David H

    2017-08-10

    Alcohol abuse, other substance use disorders, and risk behaviors associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent three of the top 10 modifiable causes of mortality in the US. Despite evidence that continuing care is effective in sustaining recovery from substance use disorders and associated behaviors, patients rarely receive it. Smartphone applications (apps) have been effective in delivering continuing care to patients almost anywhere and anytime. This study tests the effectiveness of two components of such apps: ongoing self-monitoring through Ecological Momentary Assessments (EMAs) and immediate recovery support through Ecological Momentary Interventions (EMIs). The target population, adults enrolled in substance use disorder treatment (n = 400), are being recruited from treatment centers in Chicago and randomly assigned to one of four conditions upon discharge in a 2 × 2 factorial design. Participants receive (1) EMAs only, (2) EMIs only, (3) combined EMAs + EMIs, or (4) a control condition without EMA or EMI for 6 months. People in the experimental conditions receive smartphones with the apps (EMA and/or EMI) specific to their condition. Phones alert participants in the EMA and EMA + EMI conditions at five random times per day and present participants with questions about people, places, activities, and feelings that they experienced in the past 30 min and whether these factors make them want to use substances, support their recovery, or have no impact. Those in the EMI and EMA + EMI conditions have continual access to a suite of support services. In the EMA + EMI condition, participants are prompted to use the EMI(s) when responses to the EMA(s) indicate risk. All groups have access to recovery support as usual. The primary outcome is days of abstinence from alcohol and other drugs. Secondary outcomes are number of HIV risk behaviors and whether abstinence mediates the effects of EMA, EMI, or EMA + EMI on HIV

  11. Long-term Measurements of Submicrometer Aerosol Chemistry at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Using an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parworth, Caroline; Fast, Jerome D.; Mei, Fan; Shippert, Timothy R.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Tilp, Alison; Watson, Thomas; Zhang, Qi

    2015-04-01

    In this study the long-term trends of non-refractory submicrometer aerosol (NR-PM1) composition and mass concentration measured by an Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are discussed. Over the period of 19 months (Nov. 20, 2010 – June 2012) highly time resolved (~30 min.) NR-PM1 data was recorded. Using this dataset the value-added product (VAP) of deriving organic aerosol components (OACOMP) is introduced. With this VAP, multivariate analysis of the measured organic mass spectral matrix can be performed on long term data to return organic aerosol (OA) factors that are associated with distinct sources, evolution processes, and physiochemical properties. Three factors were obtained from this VAP including two oxygenated OA (OOA) factors, differing in degrees of oxidation, and a biomass burning OA (BBOA) factor. Back trajectory analyses were performed to investigate possible sources of major NR-PM1 species at the SGP site. Organics dominated NR-PM1 mass concentration for the majority of the study with the exception of winter, when nitrate increased due to transport of precursor species from surrounding urban and agricultural areas and also due to cooler temperatures. Sulfate mass concentrations showed little seasonal variation with mixed regional and local sources. In the spring BBOA emissions increased and were mainly associated with local fires. Isoprene and carbon monoxide emission rates were computed by the Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN) to represent the spatial distribution of biogenic and anthropogenic sources, respectively. From this model there is evidence to support that biogenic emissions from the southeast contribute to SOA formation at the SGP site during the summer.

  12. DIWA trademark. AREVA's approach of intelligent computer-aided support of water chemistry monitoring in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fandrich, Joerg [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The complexity of power plant operation makes stringent demands on the chemical quality of the coolant in process systems and loops. Optimal water chemistry ensures high corrosion resistance of these systems and is thus essential for safe and economic long term plant operation. The market offers a huge variety of commercial software packages for water chemistry control. Most of these computer programs have to be considered as data analysis or, respectively, data acquisition programs. Some of them require manual data input (Laboratory Information Management Systems), others are capable of performing a fully automated data acquisition. However, the plant operator typically is left alone with the actual interpretation of all collected and validated data, which would be the main characteristic feature of an analysis (or monitoring) system. The data validation is typical being performed by means of numerical methods in the broadest sense. This activity requires a long working experience and specific skills by the plant chemistry operator. True diagnostic systems need to be significantly more advanced. They contain the capability of data interpretation and derivation of specific diagnoses. This is combined with additional explanations on how the diagnoses were derived. Additionally, further recommendations are offered on how to proceed to reach the normal operational behavior as soon as possible. AREVA's DIWA trademark system features a fuzzy logic expert system that is based on expert knowledge. It is built on symptoms, which are combined in rules as part of the fuzzy tool set. These components can be edited without programming knowledge, which significantly reduces training efforts. It makes the system more robust, more compact and simpler compared to other so-called expert systems. DIWA trademark represents the knowledge in a natural way, in which other conventional expert system may have difficulties or need a larger set of rule algorithms. (orig.)

  13. The Development of a Remote Sensor System and Decision Support Systems Architecture to Monitor Resistance Development in Transgenic Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacas, Joseph; Glaser, John; Copenhaver, Kenneth; May, George; Stephens, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has declared that "significant benefits accrue to growers, the public, and the environment" from the use of transgenic pesticidal crops due to reductions in pesticide usage for crop pest management. Large increases in the global use of transgenic pesticidal crops has reduced the amounts of broad spectrum pesticides used to manage pest populations, improved yield and reduced the environmental impact of crop management. A significant threat to the continued use of this technology is the evolution of resistance in insect pest populations to the insecticidal Bt toxins expressed by the plants. Management of transgenic pesticidal crops with an emphasis on conservation of Bt toxicity in field populations of insect pests is important to the future of sustainable agriculture. A vital component of this transgenic pesticidal crop management is establishing the proof of concept basic understanding, situational awareness, and monitoring and decision support system tools for more than 133650 square kilometers (33 million acres) of bio-engineered corn and cotton for development of insect resistance . Early and recent joint NASA, US EPA and ITD remote imagery flights and ground based field experiments have provided very promising research results that will potentially address future requirements for crop management capabilities.

  14. Study of core support barrel vibration monitoring using ex-core neutron noise analysis and fuzzy logic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, Robby; Song, Seon Ho [Nuclear and Quantum Engineering Department, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun Gook [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    The application of neutron noise analysis (NNA) to the ex-core neutron detector signal for monitoring the vibration characteristics of a reactor core support barrel (CSB) was investigated. Ex-core flux data were generated by using a nonanalog Monte Carlo neutron transport method in a simulated CSB model where the implicit capture and Russian roulette technique were utilized. First and third order beam and shell modes of CSB vibration were modeled based on parallel processing simulation. A NNA module was developed to analyze the ex-core flux data based on its time variation, normalized power spectral density, normalized cross-power spectral density, coherence, and phase differences. The data were then analyzed with a fuzzy logic module to determine the vibration characteristics. The ex-core neutron signal fluctuation was directly proportional to the CSB's vibration observed at 8Hz and15Hzin the beam mode vibration, and at 8Hz in the shell mode vibration. The coherence result between flux pairs was unity at the vibration peak frequencies. A distinct pattern of phase differences was observed for each of the vibration models. The developed fuzzy logic module demonstrated successful recognition of the vibration frequencies, modes, orders, directions, and phase differences within 0.4 ms for the beam and shell mode vibrations.

  15. Monitoring of N-methyl carbamate pesticide residues in water using hollow fibre supported liquid membrane and solid phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msagati, Titus A. M.; Mamba, Bhekie B.

    The aim of this work was to develop a method for the determination of N-methyl carbamates in water involving hollow fibre supported liquid membrane (HFSLM) and solid phase extraction (SPE) as sample preparation methods. Four N-methyl carbamate pesticides, aldicarb, carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb sulfoxide, were simultaneously extracted and analysed by a liquid chromatograph with a diode array detector (LC-UV/DAD) and a liquid chromatograph coupled to a ion trap quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC-ESI-MS). The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation of carabamate extracts was performed on a C18 column with water-acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The mass spectrometry analyses were carried out in the positive mode, operating under both the selected ion monitoring (SIM) and full scan modes. The solid phase recoveries of the extracts ranged between 8% and 98%, with aldicarb having the highest recoveries, followed by carbaryl, carbofuran and methiocarb had the lowest recovery. The HFSLM recovery ranged between 8% and 58% and the order of recovery was similar to the SPE trend. Factors controlling the efficiency of the HFSLM extraction such as sample pH, stripping phase pH, enrichment time, stirring speed as well as organic solvent used for entrapment of analytes, were optimised to achieve the highest enrichment factors.

  16. Guidelines for the use of the semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) and the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) in environmental monitoring studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The success of an environmental monitoring study using passive samplers, or any sampling method, begins in the office or laboratory. Regardless of the specific methods used, the general steps include the formulation of a sampling plan, training of personnel, performing the field (sampling) work, processing the collected samples to recover chemicals of interest, analysis of the enriched extracts, and interpretation of the data. Each of these areas will be discussed in the following sections with emphasis on specific considerations with the use of passive samplers. Water is an extremely heterogeneous matrix both spatially and temporally (Keith, 1991). The mixing and distribution of dissolved organic chemicals in a water body are controlled by the hydrodynamics of the water, the sorption partition coefficients of the chemicals, and the amount of organic matter (suspended sediments, colloids, and dissolved organic carbon) present. In lakes and oceans, stratification because of changes in temperature, water movement, and water composition can occur resulting in dramatic changes in chemical concentrations with depth (Keith, 1991). Additional complications related to episodic events, such as surface runoff, spills, and other point source contamination, can result in isolated or short-lived pulses of contaminants in the water. The application of passive sampling technologies for the monitoring of legacy and emerging organic chemicals in the environment is becoming widely accepted worldwide. The primary use of passive sampling methods for environmental studies is in the area of surface-water monitoring; however, these techniques have been applied to air and groundwater monitoring studies. Although these samplers have no mechanical or moving parts, electrical or fuel needs which require regular monitoring, there are still considerations that need to be understood in order to have a successful study. Two of the most commonly used passive samplers for organic contaminants are

  17. Au-Rh and Au-Pd nanocatalysts supported on rutile titania nanorods: structure and chemical stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konuspayeva, Zere; Afanasiev, Pavel; Nguyen, Thanh-Son; Di Felice, Luca; Morfin, Franck; Nguyen, Nhat-Tai; Nelayah, Jaysen; Ricolleau, Christian; Li, Z Y; Yuan, Jun; Berhault, Gilles; Piccolo, Laurent

    2015-11-14

    Au, Rh, Pd, Au-Rh and Au-Pd nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by colloidal chemical reduction and immobilized on hydrothermally-prepared rutile titania nanorods. The catalysts were characterized by aberration-corrected TEM/STEM, XPS, and FTIR, and were evaluated in the hydrogenation of tetralin in the presence of H2S. Oxidizing and reducing thermal treatments were employed to remove the polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) surfactant. Reduction in H2 at 350 °C was found efficient for removing the PVA while preserving the size (ca. 3 nm), shape and bimetallic nature of the NPs. While Au-Pd NPs are alloyed at the atomic scale, Au-Rh NPs contain randomly distributed single-phase domains. Calcination-reduction of Au-Rh NPs mostly leads to separated Au and Rh NPs, while pre-reduction generates a well-defined segregated structure with Rh located at the interface between Au and TiO2 and possibly present around the NPs as a thin overlayer. Both the titania support and gold increase the resistance of Rh and Pd to oxidation. Furthermore, although detrimental to tetralin hydrogenation initial activity, gold stabilizes the NPs against surface sulfidation in the presence of 50 ppm H2S, leading to increased catalytic performances of the Au-Rh and Au-Pd systems as compared to their Rh and Pd counterparts.

  18. [Choice of a method and a type of device for water decontamination and warming within physical-chemical life support systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimarev, S I; Il'in, V K; Starkova, L V

    2008-01-01

    The review has been undertaken within project Mars-500 supported by the Russian Academy of Sciences and aimed to make choice of a method and associated device for effective decontamination and warming potable water for humans during long confinement and isolation. Analysis of the literary data and patent specifications of chemical, physical and hybrid methods of water decontamination and warming guided the choice of energy of ultrahigh frequencies (UHF). Also, a waveguide-coaxial UHF-device implementing this method was proposed. Ease of the UHF energy transformation to heat, reliability, friendliness and impart attractiveness to the method in the eye of developers of long-operating physical-chemical life support systems.

  19. Evaluation of beta spectrometry for environmental monitoring of undeclared nuclear activities. Report on task FIN A846 on the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, R.; Lipponen, M. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland); Jaakkola, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Radiochemistry

    1996-03-01

    The IAEA (the Agency) is considering environmental monitoring as a possible method to detect the presence of undeclared nuclear activities in a country covered by a comprehensive safeguards agreement. The Finnish support program (FINSP), implemented by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK), is supporting the Agency in this new programme. This Agency Task FIN A 846, addresses the possibility of using beta-emitting nuclides as indicators for covert nuclear fuel reprocessing activities. (90 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.).

  20. Baseline map of organic carbon in Australian soil to support national carbon accounting and monitoring under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscarra Rossel, Raphael A; Webster, Richard; Bui, Elisabeth N; Baldock, Jeff A

    2014-09-01

    We can effectively monitor soil condition-and develop sound policies to offset the emissions of greenhouse gases-only with accurate data from which to define baselines. Currently, estimates of soil organic C for countries or continents are either unavailable or largely uncertain because they are derived from sparse data, with large gaps over many areas of the Earth. Here, we derive spatially explicit estimates, and their uncertainty, of the distribution and stock of organic C in the soil of Australia. We assembled and harmonized data from several sources to produce the most comprehensive set of data on the current stock of organic C in soil of the continent. Using them, we have produced a fine spatial resolution baseline map of organic C at the continental scale. We describe how we made it by combining the bootstrap, a decision tree with piecewise regression on environmental variables and geostatistical modelling of residuals. Values of stock were predicted at the nodes of a 3-arc-sec (approximately 90 m) grid and mapped together with their uncertainties. We then calculated baselines of soil organic C storage over the whole of Australia, its states and territories, and regions that define bioclimatic zones, vegetation classes and land use. The average amount of organic C in Australian topsoil is estimated to be 29.7 t ha(-1) with 95% confidence limits of 22.6 and 37.9 t ha(-1) . The total stock of organic C in the 0-30 cm layer of soil for the continent is 24.97 Gt with 95% confidence limits of 19.04 and 31.83 Gt. This represents approximately 3.5% of the total stock in the upper 30 cm of soil worldwide. Australia occupies 5.2% of the global land area, so the total organic C stock of Australian soil makes an important contribution to the global carbon cycle, and it provides a significant potential for sequestration. As the most reliable approximation of the stock of organic C in Australian soil in 2010, our estimates have important applications. They could support

  1. Risk assessment and risk management at the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA): a perspective on the monitoring of foods for chemical residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bietlot, Henri P; Kolakowski, Beata

    2012-08-01

    The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) uses 'Ranked Risk Assessment' (RRA) to prioritize chemical hazards for inclusion in monitoring programmes or method development projects based on their relative risk. The relative risk is calculated for a chemical by scoring toxicity and exposure in the 'risk model scoring system' of the Risk Priority Compound List (RPCL). The relative ranking and the risk management options are maintained and updated in the RPCL. The ranking may be refined by the data generated by the sampling and testing programs. The two principal sampling and testing programmes are the National Chemical Residue Monitoring Program (NCRMP) and the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP). The NCRMP sampling plans focus on the analysis of federally registered products (dairy, eggs, honey, meat and poultry, fresh and processed fruit and vegetable commodities, and maple syrup) for residues of veterinary drugs, pesticides, environmental contaminants, mycotoxins, and metals. The NCRMP is complemented by the Food Safety Action Plan (FSAP) targeted surveys. These surveys focus on emerging chemical hazards associated with specific foods or geographical regions for which applicable maximum residue limits (MRLs) are not set. The data from the NCRMP and FSAP also influence the risk management (follow-up) options. Follow-up actions vary according to the magnitude of the health risk, all with the objective of preventing any repeat occurrence to minimize consumer exposure to a product representing a potential risk to human health. © Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada 2012. Drug Testing and Analysis © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. In Situ Solid-State Reactions Monitored by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Temperature-Induced Proton Transfer Leads to Chemical Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Joanna S; Walczak, Monika; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A

    2016-10-24

    The dramatic colour and phase alteration with the solid-state, temperature-dependent reaction between squaric acid and 4,4'-bipyridine has been probed in situ with X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The electronic and chemical sensitivity to the local atomic environment through chemical shifts in the near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) revealed proton transfer from the acid to the bipyridine base through the change in nitrogen protonation state in the high-temperature form. Direct detection of proton transfer coupled with structural analysis elucidates the nature of the solid-state process, with intermolecular proton transfer occurring along an acid-base chain followed by a domino effect to the subsequent acid-base chains, leading to the rapid migration along the length of the crystal. NEXAFS thereby conveys the ability to monitor the nature of solid-state chemical reactions in situ, without the need for a priori information or long-range order.

  3. The Role of Parental Support, Parental Monitoring, and Time Spent with Parents in Adolescent Academic Achievement in Iceland: A Structural Model of Gender Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between parental support, parental monitoring, and time spent with parents and academic achievement among adolescent girls and boys in Iceland, a high-income per-capita Nordic country. The indirect role of school effort is also examined. Data of 7430 9th and 10th graders is analyzed in the study. Structural…

  4. Monitoring and Assessment Science to Support Decision-Making by the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, M.; Akhtar-Schuster, M.; Cherlet, M.; Martius, C.; Sommer, S.; Thomas, R.; Vogt, J.

    2009-12-01

    The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) is a global treaty that emerged from the Rio Earth Summit and formally took force in 1996. It has now been ratified by 193 countries (known as Parties to the Convention). Yet the UNCCD has gained only modest support from donors, largely due to questions about the science base underlying its target issue (desertification) resulting in ambiguous definitions and quantification of the problem. The UNCCD recognizes the need to reform itself and commissioned a scientific conference in Buenos Aires, Argentina in September 2009 to discuss ways to improve the scientific underpinning of monitoring and assessment (M&A) of desertification, land degradation and drought (DLDD). Previous attempts by the UNCCD on M&A focused largely on a search for a common, simple, universal set of indicators that could be reported by country Parties to the Convention Secretariat, which would collate them into a global report. However experience found that no single set of indicators is satisfactory to all countries, because DLDD depends strongly on the local environmental and human/social context. Three preparatory Working Groups analyzed the issue of DLDD M&A and recommended the following. Parties should recognize that M&A methods must integrate human-environment parameters to capture the complexity of DLDD phenomena as defined in the Convention’s text. Traditional tendencies had been to isolate biophysical from social and economic parameters, leading to unrealistic conclusions. Parties should take advantage of a much wider range of analytical techniques than just the coarse-scale indicators that had been their main focus to date. Powerful but underutilized techniques include integrated assessment models, remote sensing, geographic information systems and mapping, participatory stakeholder assessment, hierarchical aggregation of related data, knowledge management and many others. Multiple methods could provide validation checks

  5. Biological effects-based tools for monitoring impacted surface waters in the Great Lakes: a multiagency program in support of the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Drew R.; Ankley, Gerald T.; Blazer, Vicki; Collette, Timothy W.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Jorgensen, Zachary G.; Lee, Kathy E.; Mazik, Pat M.; Miller, David H.; Perkins, Edward J.; Smith, Edwin T.; Tietge, Joseph E.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing demand for the implementation of effects-based monitoring and surveillance (EBMS) approaches in the Great Lakes Basin to complement traditional chemical monitoring. Herein, we describe an ongoing multiagency effort to develop and implement EBMS tools, particularly with regard to monitoring potentially toxic chemicals and assessing Areas of Concern (AOCs), as envisioned by the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative (GLRI). Our strategy includes use of both targeted and open-ended/discovery techniques, as appropriate to the amount of information available, to guide a priori end point and/or assay selection. Specifically, a combination of in vivo and in vitro tools is employed by using both wild and caged fish (in vivo), and a variety of receptor- and cell-based assays (in vitro). We employ a work flow that progressively emphasizes in vitro tools for long-term or high-intensity monitoring because of their greater practicality (e.g., lower cost, labor) and relying on in vivo assays for initial surveillance and verification. Our strategy takes advantage of the strengths of a diversity of tools, balancing the depth, breadth, and specificity of information they provide against their costs, transferability, and practicality. Finally, a series of illustrative scenarios is examined that align EBMS options with management goals to illustrate the adaptability and scaling of EBMS approaches and how they can be used in management decisions.

  6. Mining Available Data from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to Support Rapid Life Cycle Inventory Modeling of Chemical Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Sarah A; Meyer, David E; Edelen, Ashley N; Ingwersen, Wesley W; Abraham, John P; Barrett, William M; Gonzalez, Michael A; Randall, Paul M; Ruiz-Mercado, Gerardo; Smith, Raymond L

    2016-09-06

    Demands for quick and accurate life cycle assessments create a need for methods to rapidly generate reliable life cycle inventories (LCI). Data mining is a suitable tool for this purpose, especially given the large amount of available governmental data. These data are typically applied to LCIs on a case-by-case basis. As linked open data becomes more prevalent, it may be possible to automate LCI using data mining by establishing a reproducible approach for identifying, extracting, and processing the data. This work proposes a method for standardizing and eventually automating the discovery and use of publicly available data at the United States Environmental Protection Agency for chemical-manufacturing LCI. The method is developed using a case study of acetic acid. The data quality and gap analyses for the generated inventory found that the selected data sources can provide information with equal or better reliability and representativeness on air, water, hazardous waste, on-site energy usage, and production volumes but with key data gaps including material inputs, water usage, purchased electricity, and transportation requirements. A comparison of the generated LCI with existing data revealed that the data mining inventory is in reasonable agreement with existing data and may provide a more-comprehensive inventory of air emissions and water discharges. The case study highlighted challenges for current data management practices that must be overcome to successfully automate the method using semantic technology. Benefits of the method are that the openly available data can be compiled in a standardized and transparent approach that supports potential automation with flexibility to incorporate new data sources as needed.

  7. Effects of catalyst support and chemical vapor deposition condition on synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanocoils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Iida, Tetsuo; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Harigai, Toru; Ue, Hitoshi; Umeda, Yoshito

    2016-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanocoil (MWCNC) is a carbon nanotube (CNT) with helical shape. We have synthesized MWCNCs and MWCNTs hybrid by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). MWCNCs are considered to be a potential material in nanodevices, such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. It is very important to take into account the purity of MWCNCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs by changing catalyst preparation and CVD conditions. As a catalyst, Fe2O3/zeolite was prepared by dissolving Fe2O3 fine powder and Y-type zeolite (catalyst support material) in ethanol with an Fe density of 0.5wt.% and with a zeolite density of 3.5wt.%. The catalyst-coated Si substrate was transferred immediately onto a hotplate and was heated at 80°C for 5 min. Similarly, Fe2O3/Al2O3, Co/zeolite/Al2O3, Co/zeolite, and Co/Al2O3 were prepared. The effect of the difference of the composite catalysts on synthesis of MWCNCs was considered. The CVD reactor was heated in a tubular furnace to 660-790°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 1000 ml/min. Subsequently, acetylene was mixed with nitrogen at a flow rate ratio of C2H2/N2 = 0.02-0.1. The reaction was kept under these conditions for 10 min. MWCNTs and MWCNCs were well grown by the catalysts of Co/zeolite and Co/Al2O3. The composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was increased by using a combination of zeolite and Al2O3. The highest composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was 12%.

  8. Biochemical characterization of the castor bean ent-kaurene synthase(-like) family supports quantum chemical view of diterpene cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alana J; Hershey, David M; Chesnut, Taylor; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J

    2014-07-01

    It has become apparent that plants have extensively diversified their arsenal of labdane-related diterpenoids (LRDs), in part via gene duplication and neo-functionalization of the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase (KS) required for gibberellin metabolism. For example, castor bean (Ricinus communis) was previously shown to produce an interesting set of biosynthetically related diterpenes, specifically ent-sandracopimaradiene, ent-beyerene, and ent-trachylobane, in addition to ent-kaurene, using four separate diterpene synthases, albeit these remain unidentified. Notably, despite mechanistic similarity of the underlying reaction to that catalyzed by KSs, ent-beyerene and ent-trachylobane synthases have not yet been identified. Given our interest in LRD biosynthesis, and the recent availability of the castor bean genome sequence, a synthetic biology approach was applied to biochemically characterize the four KS(-like) enzymes [KS(L)s] found in Ricinus communis [i.e., the RcKS(L)s]. In particular, using bacteria engineered to produce the relevant ent-copalyl diphosphate precursor and synthetic genes based on the predicted RcKS(L)s, although this ultimately required correction of a "splicing" error in one of the predicted genes, highlighting the dependence of such a synthetic biology approach on accurate gene sequences. Nevertheless, it is possible to assign each of the four RcKS(L)s to one of the previously observed diterpene synthase activities, providing access to functionally enzymes. Intriguingly, the product distribution of the RcKS(L)s seems to support the distinct diterpene synthase reaction mechanism proposed by quantum chemical calculations, rather than the classically proposed pathway.

  9. Biochemical characterization of the castor bean ent-kaurene synthase(-like) family supports quantum chemical view of diterpene cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Alana J.; Hershey, David M.; Chesnut, Taylor; Xu, Meimei; Peters, Reuben J.

    2014-01-01

    It has become apparent that plants have extensively diversified their arsenal of labdane-related diterpenoids (LRDs), in part via gene duplication and neo-functionalization of the ancestral ent-kaurene synthase (KS) required for gibberellin metabolism. For example, castor bean (Ricinus communis) was previously shown to produce an interesting set of biosynthetically related diterpenes, specifically ent-sandracopimaradiene, ent-beyerene, and ent-trachylobane, in addition to ent-kaurene, using four separate diterpene synthases, albeit these remain unidentified. Notably, despite mechanistic similarity of the underlying reaction to that catalyzed by KSs, ent-beyerene and ent-trachylobane synthases have not yet been identified. Given our interest in LRD biosynthesis, and the recent availability of the castor bean genome sequence, we applied a synthetic biology approach to biochemically characterize the four KS(-like) enzymes [KS(L)s] found in Ricinus communis [i.e., the RcKS(L)s]. In particular, using bacteria engineered to produce the relevant ent-copalyl diphosphate precursor and synthetic genes based on the predicted RcKS(L)s, although this ultimately required correction of a “splicing” error in one of the predicted genes, highlighting the dependence of such a synthetic biology approach on accurate gene sequences. Nevertheless, we can assign each of the four RcKS(L)s to one of the previously observed diterpene synthase activities, providing access to functionally novel enzymes. Intriguingly, the product distribution of the RcKS(L)s seems to support the distinct diterpene synthase reaction mechanism proposed by quantum chemical calculations, rather than the classically proposed pathway. PMID:24810014

  10. Building a data set over 12 globally distributed sites to support the development of agriculture monitoring applications with Sentinel-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing better agricultural monitoring capabilities based on Earth Observation data is critical for strengthening food production information and market transparency. The coming Sentinel-2 mission has the optimal capacity for regional to global agriculture monitoring in terms of resolution (10-20...

  11. Source apportionment of submicron organic aerosol collected from Atlanta, Georgia, during 2014-2015 using the aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ACSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanavaraha, Weruka; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Budisulistiorini, Sri Hapsari; Croteau, Philip L.; Baumann, Karsten; Canonaco, Francesco; Prevot, Andre S. H.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Zhang, Zhenfa; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Gold, Avram; Shaw, Stephanie L.; Surratt, Jason D.

    2017-10-01

    The Aerodyne Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM) was redeployed at the Jefferson Street (JST) site in downtown Atlanta, Georgia (GA) for 1 year (March 20, 2014-February 08, 2015) to chemically characterize non-refractory submicron particulate matter (NR-PM1) in near real-time and to assess whether organic aerosol (OA) types and amounts change from year-to-year. Submicron organic aerosol (OA) mass spectra were analyzed by season using multilinear engine (ME-2) to apportion OA subtypes to potential sources and chemical processes. A suite of real-time collocated measurements from the Southeastern Aerosol Research and Characterization (SEARCH) network was compared with ME-2 factor solutions to aid in the interpretation of OA subtypes during each season. OA tracers measured from high-volume filter samples using gas chromatography interfaced with electron ionization-mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) also aided in identifying OA sources. The initial application of ME-2 to the yearlong ACSM dataset revealed that OA source apportionment by season was required to better resolve sporadic OA types. Spring and fall OA mass spectral datasets were separated into finer periods to capture potential OA sources resulting from non-homogeneous emissions during transitioning periods. NR-PM1 was highest in summer (16.7 ± 8.4 μg m-3) and lowest in winter (8.0 ± 5.7 μg m-3), consistent with prior studies. OA dominated NR-PM1 mass (56-74% on average) in all seasons. Hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA) from primary emissions was observed in all seasons, averaging 5-22% of total OA mass. Strong correlations of HOA with carbon monoxide (CO) (R = 0.71-0.88) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) (R = 0.55-0.79) indicated that vehicular traffic was the likely source. Biomass burning OA (BBOA) was observed in all seasons, with lower contributions (2%) in summer and higher in colder seasons (averaging 8-20% of total OA mass). BBOA correlated strongly with levoglucosan (R = 0.78-0.95) during colder seasons

  12. Effects of catalyst support and chemical vapor deposition condition on synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanocoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: suda@ee.tut.ac.jp; Iida, Tetsuo; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Harigai, Toru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ue, Hitoshi [Fuji Research Laboratory, Tokai Carbon Co., Ltd., Oyama, Shizuoka 410-1431 (Japan); Umeda, Yoshito [Toho Gas Co., Ltd., Tokai, Aichi 476-8501 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanocoil (MWCNC) is a carbon nanotube (CNT) with helical shape. We have synthesized MWCNCs and MWCNTs hybrid by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). MWCNCs are considered to be a potential material in nanodevices, such as electromagnetic wave absorbers and field emitters. It is very important to take into account the purity of MWCNCs. In this study, we aimed to improve the composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs by changing catalyst preparation and CVD conditions. As a catalyst, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/zeolite was prepared by dissolving Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} fine powder and Y-type zeolite (catalyst support material) in ethanol with an Fe density of 0.5wt.% and with a zeolite density of 3.5wt.%. The catalyst-coated Si substrate was transferred immediately onto a hotplate and was heated at 80°C for 5 min. Similarly, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co/zeolite/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Co/zeolite, and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were prepared. The effect of the difference of the composite catalysts on synthesis of MWCNCs was considered. The CVD reactor was heated in a tubular furnace to 660-790°C in a nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 1000 ml/min. Subsequently, acetylene was mixed with nitrogen at a flow rate ratio of C{sub 2}H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} = 0.02-0.1. The reaction was kept under these conditions for 10 min. MWCNTs and MWCNCs were well grown by the catalysts of Co/zeolite and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was increased by using a combination of zeolite and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The highest composition ratio of MWCNCs to MWCNTs was 12%.

  13. Integrated Information Support System (IISS). Volume 6. Network Transaction Manager Subsystem. Part 5. NTM Monitor Product Specification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    2032)] HOST-LINK-TABLE - RECED RET-STATUS - DSPLY [1(5)] INCLUDE FILES: SNDARG - ARGUMENTS TO CALL SENDMG CHISTS - CHECK STATUSS MTRCMN - MONITOR... CHISTS - CHECK STATUS SNDARG - ARGUMENTS TO CALL SENDMG MTRCMN - MONITOR COMMON BLOCK TBLAPC - THIS IS THE APC STATUS TABLE .... A HOST GLOBALU TBLHST...TABLE - RECRD HOST-STATUS-TABLE - RECRD LINK-STATUS-TABLE - RECRD) HOST-LINK-TABLE - RECRD RET-STATUS - DSPLY [1(5)] INCLUDE FILES: CHISTS - CHECK

  14. Monitoring Disinfection Byproduct Forming Potential with Simultaneous Absorbance Spectra and Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Mapping: Supporting Stage 2 EPA Regulation Monitoring Compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Water treatment plants in the United States will soon (by 2013 to 2013) be required to initialize enhanced monitoring for reducing disinfection by-products (DBPs) to meet the Stage 2 levels enforced by the EPA. The key to successfully meeting these requirements lies in the treatment plant's ability to deal with often dramatic source-water variations in natural organic matter (NOM) content. Whereas the regulated levels of NOM must be determined by measuring total organic carbon (TOC) often this parameter does not provide rapid or cost-effective qualitative or quantitative assessment of the various humic, fulvic and other aromatic NOM components. However, 2 main optical techniques namely UV absorbance and fluorescence excitation-emission mapping can be used for rapid assessment with precise identification of humic and fulvic components. This study presents data from a new type of instrument which simultaneously measures the UV-VIS absorbance spectrum and EEM. The rapid absorbance-EEM is facilitated by a single system that is more than 100 time faster than conventional scanning absorbance and fluoresence optical benches. The new system can continuously collect EEMs and absorbance spectra at a rate often greater than 1 per min with the extra capacity to monitor the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence emission spectrum excited at 254 nm in 4 ms intervals (an equivalent scan rate of 5.5 million nm/min). The EEM spectral data is corrected for all instrumental response factors including concentration dependent inner-filter effects. The accumulated EEM data sets can be modeled using conventional peak identification, PARAFAC and or PCA analysis of the fractionated samples to predict the trihalomethane forming potential (THMFP). This study compares the effectiveness of THFMP predictive models based on these three techniques and explains how these can be readily employed to facilitate the Stage 2 regulation compliance for DBP monitoring.

  15. Automatic chemical monitoring in the composition of functions performed by the unit level control system in the new projects of nuclear power plant units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, L. G.; Khrennikov, N. N.

    2014-08-01

    The article presents information on the state of regulatory framework and development of a subsystem for automated chemical monitoring of water chemistries in the primary and secondary coolant circuits used as part of the automatic process control system in new projects of VVER reactor-based nuclear power plant units. For the strategy of developing and putting in use the water chemistry-related part of the automated process control system within the standard AES-2006 nuclear power plant project to be implemented, it is necessary to develop regulatory documents dealing with certain requirements imposed on automatic water chemistry monitoring systems in accordance with the requirements of federal codes and regulations in the field of using atomic energy.

  16. Replacement of chemical oxygen demand (COD) with total organic carbon (TOC) for monitoring wastewater treatment performance to minimize disposal of toxic analytical waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubber, Donata; Gray, Nicholas F

    2010-10-01

    Chemical oxygen demand (COD) is widely used for wastewater monitoring, design, modeling and plant operational analysis. However this method results in the production of hazardous wastes including mercury and hexavalent chromium. The study examined the replacement of COD with total organic carbon (TOC) for general performance monitoring by comparing their relationship with influent and effluent samples from 11 wastewater treatment plants. Biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) was also included in the comparison as a control. The results show significant linear relationships between TOC, COD and BOD5 in settled (influent) domestic and municipal wastewaters, but only between COD and TOC in treated effluents. The study concludes that TOC can be reliably used for the generic replacement of both COD (COD=49.2+3.00*TOC) and BOD5 (BOD5=23.7+1.68*TOC) in influent wastewaters but only for COD (COD=7.25+2.99*TOC) in final effluents.

  17. Chemical gas sensors and the characterization, monitoring and sensor technology needs of the US Department of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastiaans, G.J.; Haas, W.J. Jr.; Junk, G.A.

    1993-10-01

    The Office of Technology Development within the Dept. of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility of providing new technologies to aid the environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) activities of the DOE. There is a perception that application and judicious development of chemical sensor technologies could result in large cost savings and reduced risk to the health and safety of ER/WM personnel. A number of potential gas sensor applications which exist within DOE ER/WM operations are described. The capabilities of several chemical sensor technologies and their potential to meet the needs of ER/WM applications in the present or near term future are discussed.

  18. Short-term biological variation of clinical chemical values in dumeril's monitors (Varanus dumerili)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Mads Frost; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads Jens; Howell, Jennifer R.

    2007-01-01

    Plasma biochemical values are routinely used in the medical management of ill reptiles, and for monitoring the health of clinically normal animals. Laboratory tests, including clinical biochemical values, are subject to biological and analytical variation, the magnitude of which determines the ut...

  19. A COMPENDIUM OF CHEMICAL, PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL METHODS FOR ASSESSING AND MONITORING THE REMEDIATION OF CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT SITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considering the many organizations which have published methods for monitoring contaminated sediments and the large number of documents on this subject, it can be a formidable task for a superfund project manager to find methods appropriate for his or her contaminated sediment si...

  20. The effectiveness of a life style modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring in control of hypertension: protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tin Tin; Majid, Hazreen Abdul; Nahar, Azmi Mohamed; Azizan, Nurul Ain; Hairi, Farizah Mohd; Thangiah, Nithiah; Dahlui, Maznah; Bulgiba, Awang; Murray, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Death rates due to hypertension in low and middle income countries are higher compared to high income countries. The present study is designed to combine life style modification and home blood pressure monitoring for control of hypertension in the context of low and middle income countries. The study is a two armed, parallel group, un-blinded, cluster randomized controlled trial undertaken within lower income areas in Kuala Lumpur. Two housing complexes will be assigned to the intervention group and the other two housing complexes will be allocated in the control group. Based on power analysis, 320 participants will be recruited. The participants in the intervention group (n = 160) will undergo three main components in the intervention which are the peer support for home blood pressure monitoring, face to face health coaching on healthy diet and demonstration and training for indoor home based exercise activities while the control group will receive a pamphlet containing information on hypertension. The primary outcomes are systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Secondary outcome measures include practice of self-blood pressure monitoring, dietary intake, level of physical activity and physical fitness. The present study will evaluate the effect of lifestyle modification and peer support home blood pressure monitoring on blood pressure control, during a 6 month intervention period. Moreover, the study aims to assess whether these effects can be sustainable more than six months after the intervention has ended.

  1. Two year-long continuous monitoring of PM1 aerosol chemical composition at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory. Source apportionment of the Organic content and geographic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavroulas, Iasonas; Pikridas, Michael; Oikonomou, Kostantina; Vasiliadou, Emily; Savvides, Chrysanthos; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Gros, Valerie; Sciare, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter with diameter smaller than 1{μ}m (PM1) induces direct and indirect effects on local and regional pollution, global climate and health. As of the beginning of 2015, the chemical composition of submicron aerosols, is continuously being monitored at the newly established Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO, http://www.cyi.ac.cy/index.php/cao.html), a national facility of the ACTRIS Research Infrastructure operated by The Cyprus Institute. Cyprus, an island located in the Eastern Mediterranean Middle East region and influenced by diverse air masses throughout the year, is ideal for monitoring photochemically aged aerosols and gaseous pollutants of both natural and anthropogenic origin. Furthermore this is a unique dataset for this area in such proximity to the Middle East, a poorly documented area in terms of atmospheric aerosol observations. An Aerodyne Quadrupole Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (Q-ACSM) is currently deployed at the CAO premises (35.04N - 33.06E) situated at the rural area of Agia Marina Xyliatou on the foothill of mount Troodos at an elevation of 532m above sea level (asl). The ACSM delivers chemical composition of the major non-refractory aerosol (PM1) chemical constituents (organics, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, chloride) with an effective (close to 100{%}) collection efficiency for particles in the diameter range of 65-700 nm at a 30 minute temporal resolution. Black Carbon (BC) was also monitored using both Magee Scientific AE-31 and AE-33 aethalometers. Quality control of the PM chemical dataset was conducted by comparison with chemical analysis performed on collocated 24-h filter samples (PM1) and comparison with 1-h PM2.5 derived from a Thermo Scientific TEOM (1400a) Monitor. Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) was conducted and different organic aerosol factors were distinguished using the Igor based SoFi toolkit utilizing the ME-2 multilinear engine. Air mass origin was investigated for each measurement day using the

  2. Technical implementation in support of the IAEA`s remote monitoring field trial at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbell, B.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moran, B.W.; Pickett, C.A.; Whitaker, J.M. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); Resnik, W. [Aquila Technologies Group Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Landreth, D. [COMSAT/RSI, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    A remote monitoring system (RMS) field trial will be conducted for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on highly enriched uranium materials in a vault at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Remote monitoring technologies are being evaluated to verify their capability to enhance the effectiveness and timeliness of IAEA safeguards in storage facilities while reducing the costs of inspections and burdens on the operator. Phase one of the field trial, which involved proving the satellite transmission of sensor data and safeguards images from a video camera activated by seals and motion sensors installed in the vault, was completed in September 1995. Phase two involves formal testing of the RMS as a tool for use by the IAEA during their tasks of monitoring the storage of nuclear material. The field trial to be completed during early 1997 includes access and item monitoring of nuclear materials in two storage trays. The RMS includes a variety of Sandia, Oak Ridge, and Aquila sensor technologies that provide video monitoring, radiation attribute measurements, and container identification to the on-site data acquisition system (DAS) by way of radio-frequency and Echelon LONWorks networks. The accumulated safeguards information will be transmitted to the IAEA via satellite (COMSAT/RSI) and international telephone lines.

  3. Challenges to Providing a Successful Central Configuration Service to Support CERN’s New Controls Diagnostics and Monitoring System

    CERN Document Server

    Makonnen, Z; Zaharieva, Z

    2014-01-01

    The Controls Diagnostic and Monitoring service (DIAMON) provides monitoring and diagnostics tools to the operators in the CERN Control Centre. A recent reengineering presented the opportunity to restructure its data management and to integrate it with the central Controls Configuration Service (CCS). The CCS provides the Configuration Management for the Controls System for all accelerators at CERN. The new facility had to cater for the configuration management of all agents monitored by DIAMON, (>3000 computers of different types), provide deployment information, relations between metrics, and historical information. In addition, it had to be integrated into the operational CCS, while ensuring stability and data coherency. An important design decision was to largely reuse the existing infrastructure in the CCS and adapt the DIAMON data management to it e.g. by using the device/property model through a Virtual Devices framework to model the DIAMON agents. This article will show how these challenging requiremen...

  4. US Army Public Health Command’s (Prov) (Formly USACHPPM) Process to Screen Chemicals in Support of DoD’s CMRM Emerging Contaminants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    US Army Public Health Command’s (Prov) (Formly USACHPPM) Process to Screen Chemicals in Support of DoD’s CMRM Emerging Contaminants Program...CMRM Emerging Contaminants Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER...Occupational Health • DoD Instruction 5000.2 Operation of the Defense Acquisition System • DoD Instruction 4715.18 Emerging Contaminants (EC

  5. Submicron aerosol source apportionment of wintertime pollution in Paris, France by Double Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF2 using Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM and multi-wavelength Aethalometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-E. Petit

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Online non-refractory submicron Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS measurements in urban areas have successfully allowed the apportionment of specific sources and/or physical and chemical properties of the organic fraction. However, in order to be fully representative of PM pollution, a comprehensive source apportionment analysis is needed by taking into account all major components of submicron aerosols, creating strengthened bonds between the organic components and pollution sources. We present here a novel two-step methodology to perform such an analysis, by taking advantage of high time resolution of monitoring instruments: the Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor (ACSM and the multi-wavelength absorption measurements (Aethalometer AE31 in Paris, France. As a first step, organic aerosols (OA were deconvoluted to hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA, Biomass Burning OA (BBOA and Oxygenated OA (OOA with Positive Matrix Factorization, and black carbon was deconvolved into its wood burning and fossil fuel combustion fractions. A second PMF analysis was then carried out with organic factors, BC fractions and inorganic species (nitrate, sulfate, ammonium, chloride, leading to a~four-factor solution allowing real-time characterization of the major sources of PM1. Outputs of this PMF2 include two dominant combustion sources (wood burning and traffic as well as semi-volatile and low-volatile secondary aerosols. While HOA is found to be emitted by both wood burning and traffic, the latter sources occurred to significantly contribute also to OOA.

  6. Real-time monitoring of viscosity changes triggered by chemical reactions using a high-speed imaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseok Jung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to monitor in real time peptide self-assembly or polymerization events. The temperature controlled modification of a previously reported splash test setup using high speed imaging enables to observe and measure rheological changes in liquid samples and can, in turn, monitor a peptide self-assembly or polymerization reaction accompanied with specific changes in solution viscosity. A series of 2 mm glass beads were dropped into an Fmoc-L3-OMe (methylated Fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl-trileucine solution mixed with Alcalase 2.4 L (EC 3.4.21.62 or first dipped in Tetramethylethylenediamine (TEMED, a catalyst for acrylamide polymerization, then dropped into acrylamide. The resulting splashes were observed using a high speed camera. The results demonstrate that the viscosity changes of the peptide sample during the peptide self-assembly or acrylamide polymerization affect the specific shape and evolution of the splashing event. Typically, the increase in viscosity while the reaction occurs decreased the size of the splash and the amount of time for the splash to reach maximum extension from the moment for the beads to impact the sample. The ability to observe rheological changes of sample state presents the opportunity to monitor the real time dynamics of peptide self-assembly or cross-polymerization.

  7. Continuous Medication Monitoring (CoMM): A foundational model to support the clinical work of community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedken, Amber M; Butler, Christine M; McDonough, Randal P; Deninger, Michael J; Doucette, William R

    2017-01-02

    Under the Continuous Medication Monitoring (CoMM) approach, community pharmacists prevent, identify, resolve, and document drug therapy problems during the dispensing process. To describe the patients receiving CoMM interventions and the pattern of delivery of CoMM interventions. Pharmacy dispensing and clinical records were reviewed for patients filling at least one prescription and receiving at least one continuous medication monitoring intervention at a community pharmacy from April 2014 through March 2015. The proportion of patients receiving an intervention type and the number of interventions per patient were computed. Nearly 2500 patients received 16,986 continuous medication monitoring interventions over the year. The average age of the patients receiving the interventions was 59.1 years, and they filled an average of 8.0 unique medications. An average of 6.8 interventions was delivered to each patient. About half (49.7%) of interventions addressed drug therapy problems. The pharmacists delivered 3.0 patient counseling and education and 3.4 drug therapy problem interventions per patient on average. There are many opportunities to improve patients' medication use that can be identified and addressed under a Continuous Medication Monitoring model. Movement to this model of practice is desirable, but changes are needed to facilitate the shift. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A SAR Ice-Motion Processing Chain in Support of PROMICE (Programme for the Monitoring of the Greenland Ice Sheet)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merryman Boncori, John Peter; Dall, Jørgen; Ahlstrøm, A. P.;

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a SAR icemotion processing chain developed for the PROMICE project – a long-term program funded by the Danish ministry of Climate and Energy to monitor the mass budget of the Greenland ice sheet. The end goal of the SAR data processing is to output map...

  9. Randomized controlled trial on cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses supported by self-monitoring in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiessen, Ans H.; Smit, Andries J.; Broer, Jan; Groenier, Klaas H.; van der Meer, Klaas

    2012-01-01

    Background: Treatment goals for cardiovascular risk management are generally not achieved. Specialized practice nurses are increasingly facilitating the work of general practitioners and self-monitoring devices have been developed as counseling aid. The aim of this study was to compare standard trea

  10. RESEARCH OF NETWORK MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS AND DEVELOPMENT OF STRUCTURE OF INFORMATION SUPPORT SYSTEMS DIAGNOSTICS, MONITORING AND CONTROL OF INDUSTRIAL OBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Abramov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents research of network energy management systems in buildings and constructions that show the possibility of use the Ethernet networks. The platform and aids implementation monitoring and energy management are chosen, database structure a high level of abstraction and a generalized block diagram are proposed.

  11. Peer-Monitoring vs. Micro-Script Fading for Enhancing Knowledge Acquisition when Learning in Computer-Supported Argumentation Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyias, Yannis; Demetriadis, Stavros

    2012-01-01

    Research on computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has strongly emphasized the value of providing student support with micro-scripts, which should withdraw (fade-out) allowing students to practice the acquired skills. However, research on fading shows conflicting results and some researchers suggest that the impact of fading is enhanced…

  12. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS): application for monitoring organic micropollutants in wastewater effluent and surface water

    OpenAIRE

    Miège, C.; Budzinski, H.; Jacquet, R.; Soulier, C.; Pelte, T.; Coquery, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the advantages and drawbacks of POCIS (Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) for the evaluation of river water quality downstream of wastewater treatment plants. POCIS proved well adapted to sampling alkylphenols and several pharmaceuticals. Concentration factors and the decrease in limits of quantification, compared to grab water sample analyses, were significant except for hormones, β-blockers and bronchodilators. Promising preliminary results obtained i...

  13. Effect-based tools for monitoring and predicting the ecotoxicological effects of chemicals in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connon, Richard E; Geist, Juergen; Werner, Inge

    2012-01-01

    Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s). The promising concept of "adverse outcome pathways (AOP)" links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  14. Effect-Based Tools for Monitoring and Predicting the Ecotoxicological Effects of Chemicals in the Aquatic Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard E. Connon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecotoxicology faces the challenge of assessing and predicting the effects of an increasing number of chemical stressors on aquatic species and ecosystems. Herein we review currently applied tools in ecological risk assessment, combining information on exposure with expected biological effects or environmental water quality standards; currently applied effect-based tools are presented based on whether exposure occurs in a controlled laboratory environment or in the field. With increasing ecological relevance the reproducibility, specificity and thus suitability for standardisation of methods tends to diminish. We discuss the use of biomarkers in ecotoxicology including ecotoxicogenomics-based endpoints, which are becoming increasingly important for the detection of sublethal effects. Carefully selected sets of biomarkers allow an assessment of exposure to and effects of toxic chemicals, as well as the health status of organisms and, when combined with chemical analysis, identification of toxicant(s. The promising concept of “adverse outcome pathways (AOP” links mechanistic responses on the cellular level with whole organism, population, community and potentially ecosystem effects and services. For most toxic mechanisms, however, practical application of AOPs will require more information and the identification of key links between responses, as well as key indicators, at different levels of biological organization, ecosystem functioning and ecosystem services.

  15. Monitoring the effects of storage in caviar from farmed Acipenser transmontanus using chemical, SEM, and NMR methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussoni, Maristella; Greco, Fulvia; Vezzoli, Alessandra; Paleari, Maria Antonietta; Moretti, Vittorio Maria; Beretta, Giuseppe; Caprino, Fabio; Lanza, Barbara; Zetta, Lucia

    2006-09-06

    The effects of storage at 4 degrees C on the quantity and quality of chemical components in the caviar from farmed Acipenser transmontanus have been analyzed by SEM, chemical methods, and NMR and MRI techniques. Particular attention has been focused on the lipid components, the distribution and mobility of which were strongly affected by the storage time. MRI and relaxation data indicated that lipids are endowed with two different mobility regimes, one slow (short T1) and one fast (long T1), both lengthening with the storage time. Chemical analysis assessed a total fat content that remained practically unchanged and a constant fatty acid composition during the total storage time. The combination of the two methods allowed one (a) to suppose that a mechanism of lipid hydrolysis (faster in unsalted than in salted eggs) is still occurring during storage of caviar at 4 degrees C for up to approximately 4 months and (b) to exclude that an intensive oxidative process is active in the same storage period.

  16. Evaluating the polar organic chemical integrative sampler for the monitoring of beta-blockers and hormones in wastewater treatment plant effluents and receiving surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, Romain; Miège, Cécile; Bados, Philippe; Schiavone, Séverine; Coquery, Marina

    2012-02-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) are known to be a source of surface water contamination by organic compounds such as pharmaceuticals. The objective of the present work was to study the suitability of the polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) to monitor beta-blockers and hormones in effluents and surface waters. Four sampling campaigns were carried out in French rivers (the Saône, the Ardières, the Bourbre, and the Seine) between November 2007 and September 2008. Passive samplers were exposed in surface waters, upstream and downstream of WWTP outflows, and in effluents. Exposures lasted for up to 24 d to study the uptake kinetics directly in situ, and repeatability was assessed by exposure of triplicates. A good agreement was found between POCIS and water samples. With the exception of atenolol, beta-blockers showed a linear uptake during at least three weeks, and their sampling rates could be determined in situ. These sampling rates were then used to calculate time-weighted average concentrations of beta-blockers in the Seine River with an overall good accuracy and repeatability. Such calculations could not be performed for hormones because of their variable occurrences and low concentrations in water and POCIS. Polar organic chemical integrative sampler therefore seems to be a suitable tool for monitoring beta-blockers in surface waters impacted by WWTP effluents. Longer exposure durations would be necessary to determine the suitability of POCIS for monitoring hormones. Finally, preliminary assays on the use of several deuterated compounds as performance reference compounds showed promising results for deuterated atenolol. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  17. Evaluating the potential for quantitative monitoring of in situ chemical oxidation of aqueous-phase TCE using in-phase and quadrature electrical conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hort, R. D.; Revil, A.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Mao, D.

    2015-07-01

    Electrical resistivity measurements can potentially be used to remotely monitor fate and transport of ionic oxidants such as permanganate (MnO4-) during in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) of contaminants like trichloroethene (TCE). Time-lapse two-dimensional bulk conductivity and induced polarization surveys conducted during a sand tank ISCO simulation demonstrated that MnO4- plume movement could be monitored in a qualitative manner using bulk conductivity tomograms, although chargeability was below sensitivity limits. We also examined changes to in-phase and quadrature electrical conductivity resulting from ion injection, MnO2 and Cl- production, and pH change during TCE and humate oxidation by MnO4- in homogeneous aqueous solutions and saturated porous media samples. Data from the homogeneous samples demonstrated that inversion of the sand tank resistivity data using a common Tikhonov regularization approach was insufficient to recover an accurate conductivity distribution within the tank. While changes to in-phase conductivity could be successfully modeled, quadrature conductivity values could not be directly related to TCE oxidation product or MnO4- concentrations at frequencies consistent with field induced polarization surveys, limiting the utility of quadrature conductivity for monitoring ISCO.

  18. A New Publicly Available Chemical Query Language, CSRML, to support Chemotype Representations for Application to Data-Mining and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new XML-based query language, CSRML, has been developed for representing chemical substructures, molecules, reaction rules, and reactions. CSRML queries are capable of integrating additional forms of information beyond the simple substructure (e.g., SMARTS) or reaction transfor...

  19. Integrating Academic and Mentoring Support for the Development of First-Year Chemical Engineering Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Edmond I.; Chau, Ying

    2010-01-01

    An academic and professional development course has been introduced to help first-year chemical engineering students to deal proactively with the transition from secondary school to university and to develop professional skills. The course uses the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a personality model to facilitate skills development and many…

  20. Update on EPA’s ToxCast Program: Providing High Throughput Decision Support Tools for Chemical Risk Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The field of toxicology is on the cusp of a major transformation in how the safety and hazard of chemicals are evaluated for potential effects on human health and the environment. Brought on by the recognition of the limitations of the current paradigm in terms of cost, time, and...

  1. 多变量统计过程监控:进展及其在化学工业的应用%Multivariate Statistical Process Monitoring and Control: Recent Developments and Applications to Chemical Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁军; 钱积新

    2003-01-01

    Multivariate statistical process monitoring and control (MSPM&C) methods for chemical process monitoring with statistical projection techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) are surveyed in this paper. The four-step procedure of performing MSPM&C for chemical process, modeling of processes, detecting abnormal events or faults, identifying the variable(s) responsible for the faults and diagnosing the source cause for the abnormal behavior, is analyzed. Several main research directions of MSPM&C reported in the literature are discussed, such as multi-way principal component analysis (MPCA) for batch process, statistical monitoring and control for nonlinear process, dynamic PCA and dynamic PLS, and on-line quality control by inferential models. Industrial applications of MSPM&C to several typical chemical processes, such as chemical reactor, distillation column, polymerization process, petroleum refinery units, are summarized. Finally, some concluding remarks and future considerations are made.

  2. Modeling and Real-Time Process Monitoring of Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition of III-V Phosphides and Nitrides at Low and High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, K. J.; Cardelino, B. H.; Moore, C. E.; Cardelino, C. A.; Sukidi, N.; McCall, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review modeling and real-time monitoring by robust methods of reflectance spectroscopy of organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) processes in extreme regimes of pressure. The merits of p-polarized reflectance spectroscopy under the conditions of chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) and of internal transmission spectroscopy and principal angle spectroscopy at high pressure are assessed. In order to extend OMCVD to materials that exhibit large thermal decomposition pressure at their optimum growth temperature we have designed and built a differentially-pressure-controlled (DCP) OMCVD reactor for use at pressures greater than or equal to 6 atm. We also describe a compact hard-shell (CHS) reactor for extending the pressure range to 100 atm. At such very high pressure the decomposition of source vapors occurs in the vapor phase, and is coupled to flow dynamics and transport. Rate constants for homogeneous gas phase reactions can be predicted based on a combination of first principles and semi-empirical calculations. The pressure dependence of unimolecular rate constants is described by RRKM theory, but requires variational and anharmonicity corrections not included in presently available calculations with the exception of ammonia decomposition. Commercial codes that include chemical reactions and transport exist, but do not adequately cover at present the kinetics of heteroepitaxial crystal growth.

  3. Developing human rights based indicators to support country monitoring of rehabilitation services and programmes for people with disabilities: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skempes, Dimitrios; Bickenbach, Jerome

    2015-09-24

    Rehabilitation care is fundamental to health and human dignity and a human right enshrined in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The provision of rehabilitation is important for reducing the need for formal support and enabling persons with disabilities to lead an independent life. Increasingly scholars and advocacy groups voice concerns over the significant barriers facing people with disabilities in accessing appropriate and quality rehabilitation. A growing body of research highlights a "respond-need" gap in the provision of rehabilitation and assistive technologies and underscore the lack of indicators for assessing performance of rehabilitation systems and monitoring States compliance with human rights standards in rehabilitation service planning and programming. While research on human rights and health monitoring has increased exponentially over the last decade far too little attention has been paid to rehabilitation services. The proposed research aims to reduce this knowledge gap by developing a human rights based monitoring framework with indicators to support human rights accountability and performance assessment in rehabilitation. Concept mapping, a stakeholder-driven approach will be used as the core method to identify rights based indicators and develop the rehabilitation services monitoring framework. Concept mapping requires participants from various stakeholders groups to generate a list of the potential indicators through on line brainstorming, sort the indicators for conceptual similarity into clusters and rate them against predefined criteria. Multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster data analysis will be performed to develop the monitoring framework while bridging analysis will provide useful insights about patterns of agreement or disagreement among participants views on indicators. This study has the potential to influence future practices on data collection and measurement of compliance with

  4. 15 GHz Monitoring of Gamma-ray Blazars with the OVRO 40 Meter Telescope in Support of Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Richards, J L; Pavlidou, V; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Stevenson, M A; Healey, S E; Romani, R W; Shaw, M S; Fuhrmann, L; Angelakis, E; Zensus, J A; Grainge, K; Taylor, G B

    2009-01-01

    We present results from the first two years of our fast-cadence 15 GHz gamma-ray blazar monitoring program, part of the F-GAMMA radio monitoring project. Our sample includes the 1158 blazars north of -20 degrees declination from the Candidate Gamma-Ray Blazar Survey (CGRaBS), which encompasses a significant fraction of the extragalactic sources detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We introduce a novel likelihood analysis for computing a time series variability amplitude statistic that separates intrinsic variability from measurement noise and produces a quantitative error estimate. We use this method to characterize our radio light curves. We also present results indicating a statistically significant correlation between simultaneous average 15 GHz radio flux density and gamma-ray photon flux.

  5. Building a Data Set over 12 Globally Distributed Sites to Support the Development of Agriculture Monitoring Applications with Sentinel-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Bontemps

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Developing better agricultural monitoring capabilities based on Earth Observation data is critical for strengthening food production information and market transparency. The Sentinel-2 mission has the optimal capacity for regional to global agriculture monitoring in terms of resolution (10–20 meter, revisit frequency (five days and coverage (global. In this context, the European Space Agency launched in 2014 the “Sentinel­2 for Agriculture” project, which aims to prepare the exploitation of Sentinel-2 data for agriculture monitoring through the development of open source processing chains for relevant products. The project generated an unprecedented data set, made of “Sentinel-2 like” time series and in situ data acquired in 2013 over 12 globally distributed sites. Earth Observation time series were mostly built on the SPOT4 (Take 5 data set, which was specifically designed to simulate Sentinel-2. They also included Landsat 8 and RapidEye imagery as complementary data sources. Images were pre-processed to Level 2A and the quality of the resulting time series was assessed. In situ data about cropland, crop type and biophysical variables were shared by site managers, most of them belonging to the “Joint Experiment for Crop Assessment and Monitoring” network. This data set allowed testing and comparing across sites the methodologies that will be at the core of the future “Sentinel­2 for Agriculture” system.

  6. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Bronikowski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA was reported. Garmin Vivofit® activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2, 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2 and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4. An experimental design was employed, with “goal” and “do your best” groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities.

  7. Do They Need Goals or Support? A Report from a Goal-Setting Intervention Using Physical Activity Monitors in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronikowski, Michal; Bronikowska, Malgorzata; Glapa, Agata

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between physical activity (PA) and different goal setting and strategies in youth. The study took into consideration different sources of support as well as gender variations. Classmate and Teacher Support scales were used to evaluate support in physical education (PE) classes, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was reported. Garmin Vivofit® activity trackers were used during an 8 week-long intervention to count daily steps. Data was collected from 65 adolescents (mean age 17.2 ± 0.2), 74 young adolescents (mean age 15.3 ± 0.2) and 57 children (mean age 11.5 ± 0.4). An experimental design was employed, with “goal” and “do your best” groups given different step goal strategies. The results show that both groups achieved a comparable number of steps. Two-way ANOVA showed interactional effects between gender and teacher support. There were no such effects for MVPA and number of steps. Although classmate support in PE was reported to be reasonably high, the findings show that it does not play a significant role in increasing MVPA behaviors in youths. However, the problem of significantly lower support given to adolescent girls by PE teachers should be embedded into the teaching context of PE students and counteracted in school setting realities. PMID:27649219

  8. Scheme Design of the Deformation Monitoring in the Foundation Pit Supporting Project%浅谈基坑支护工程变形监测方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹安安

    2012-01-01

    针对基坑支护围护结构顶部沉降与水平位移监测技术与变形方法进行研究。通过对基坑支护围护结构顶部沉降与水平位移监测数据进行分析,解算各监测点的累积沉降和总体位移变化量,从而及时掌握基坑的变形状况。根据监测点的变形限值标准,确定可能出现预警的变形点,并分析基坑不同部位发生沉降和偏移的原因。%Foundation pit support for the building envelope at the top of the settlement and horizontal displacement monitoring technology and methods of deformation. Through the excavation enclosure at the top of the settlement and horizontal displacement monitoring data analysis, calculate the cumula- tive settlement of all monitoring points and the overall displacement volume, and thus grasp the de- formation of foundation. According to the deformation limit of the standard monitoring to identify early warning of possible deformation point, and analysis of foundation settlement and migration occurred in different parts of the reason.

  9. Source Water Management for Disinfection By-Product Control using New York City's Operations Support Tool and On-Line Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, W. J.; Becker, W.; Schindler, S.

    2012-12-01

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's 2006 Stage 2 Disinfectant / Disinfection Byproduct Rule (DBPR) for finished drinking waters is intended to reduce overall DBP levels by limiting the levels of total trihalomethanes (TTHM) and five of the haloacetic acids (HAA5). Under Stage 2, maximum contaminant levels (MCLs), 80 μg/L for TTHM and 60 μg/L for HAA5, are based on a locational running annual average for individual sites instead of as the system-wide quarterly running annual average of the Stage 1 DBPR. This means compliance will have to be met at sampling locations of peak TTHM and HAA5 concentrations rather than an average across the entire system. Compliance monitoring under the Stage 2 DBPR began on April 1, 2012. The New York City (NYC) Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) began evaluating potential impacts of the Stage 2 DBPR on NYC's unfiltered water supply in 2002 by monitoring TTHM and HAA5 levels at various locations throughout the distribution system. Initial monitoring indicated that HAA5 levels could be of concern in the future, with the potential to intermittently violate the Stage 2 DBPR at specific locations, particularly those with high water age. Because of the uncertainty regarding the long-term prospect for compliance, DEP evaluated alternatives to ensure compliance, including operational changes (reducing chlorine dose, changing flow configurations to minimize water age, altering pH, altering source water withdrawals); changing the residual disinfectant from free chlorine to chloramines; and engineered treatment alternatives. This paper will discuss the potential for using DEP's Operations Support Tool (OST) and enhanced reservoir monitoring to support optimization of source water withdrawals to minimize finished water DBP levels. The OST is a state-of-the-art decision support system (DSS) to provide computational and predictive support for water supply operations and planning. It incorporates a water supply system

  10. Data in support of manuscript "Evaluation of Chemical Control for Invasive Crayfish at a Warmwater Fish Production Hatchery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allert, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Invasive crayfish are known to displace native crayfish species, alter aquatic habitat and community structure and function, and are serious pests for fish hatcheries. White River Crawfish (WRC; Procambarus acutus) were inadvertently introduced to a warm-water fish hatchery in Missouri, USA, possibly in an incoming fish shipment. We evaluated the use of chemical control for crayfish to ensure incoming and outgoing fish shipments from hatcheries do not contain live crayfish. We conducted acute (less than or equal to 24 hr) static toxicity tests to determine potency, dose-response, and selectivity of pesticides to WRC, Virile Crayfish (VC; Orconectes virilis), and Fathead Minnow (FHM; Pimephales promelas). Data included are: Collection location and size of test organisms; Test chemical concentrations and recovery; Mortality and effect-based responses of test organisms; Water quality of test solutions

  11. Visual inspection technology of the narrow and small confined area for monitoring feederpipe support of pressure tube in calandria reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jae Wan; Lee, Nam Ho; Choi, Young Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    There are 760 feederpipes, which they are connected to inlet/outlet of the 380 pressure tube channels on the front of the calandria, in CANDU-type Reactor of Wolsung Nuclear Power Plant. As an ISI(In-Service Inspection) and PSI (Post-Service Inspection) requirements, maintenance activities of measuring the thickness of curvilinear part of feederpipe and inspecting the feederpipe support area within calandria are needed to ensure continued reliable operation of nuclear power plant. And ultrasonic probe is used to measure the thickness of curvilinear part of feederpipe, however workers are exposed to radioactivity irradiation during the measurement period. But, it is exposed to radioactivity irradiation during the measurement period. But, it is impossible to inspect feederpipe support area thoroughly because of narrow and confined accessibility, that is , an inspection space between the pressure tube channels is less than 100 mm and pipes in feederpipe support area are congested. And also, workers involved in inspecting feederpipe support area are under the jeopardy of high-level radiation exposure. Concerns about sliding home, which make the move of feederpipe connected to pressure tube channel smooth as pressure tube expands and contracts in its axial direction, stuck to feedeerpipe support and some of the structural components have made necessary the development of video inspection probe system with narrow and confined accessibility to observe and inspect feederpipe support area more close. Using video inspection probe system, it is possible to inspect and repair abnormality of feederpipe support connected to pressure tube channels of the calandria more accurate and quantative than naked eye. Therefore, that will do much for ensuring safety of CANDU-type nuclear power plant. 45 figs.,31 tabs. (Author)

  12. Combined chemical and toxicological long-term monitoring for AhR agonists with SPMD-based virtual organisms in drinking water Danjiangkou Reservoir, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingxian; Song, Guoqiang; Li, Aimin; Henkelmann, Bernhard; Pfister, Gerd; Tong, Anthony Z; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-08-01

    SPMD-based virtual organisms (VOs) were employed for time-integrating, long-term sampling combined biological and chemical analyses for exposure assessment of hydrophobic organic pollutants (HOPs) in a drinking water reservoir, China. The SPMDs were deployed at four and five sites in the Danjiangkou (DJK) reservoir over two periods of 26 and 31 d to sequester the hydrophobic contaminants in water. The chosen bioassay response for the extracts of the SPMDs, the induction of 7-ethoxyresorufin-o-deethylase (EROD) was assayed using a rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). The known aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) agonists PAHs and PCBs were analyzed by HRGC/HRMS instrument. The cause-effect relationship between the observed AhR activities and chemical concentrations of detected AhR agonists was examined. The results show that the extracts from the SPMD samples could induce AhR activity significantly, whereas the chemically derived 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) equivalent (TEQcal) was not correlated with the bioassay-derived TCDD equivalent (TEQbio). The known AhR agonists could only account for 2-10% of the observed AhR responses among which the contribution of PCBs could almost be neglected. Unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a greater proportion of the TCDD equivalent (TCDD-EQ) in SPMD samples from DJK. Based on the first assessment, the VO followed by the combination of chemical and biological analyses emerges as a resource efficient water monitoring device in ecotoxicological assessment for toxicologically relevant compounds which are readily available for uptake by resident aquatic biota in drinking water resources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of Forearm Support on Upper Body for People in Front of Monitor: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Jingtong; Wu, Xiaojing; Duan, Xin; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    With the ever-growing number of people who work at visual display terminals, the work-related musculoskeletal disorders of the upper body are believed to be an important problem all over the world. The forearm support, which can keep the forearm and wrist in biomechanical posture, is a possible protective factor of the development of upper body syndrome. This meta-analysis examines the efficacy of forearm support in reducing upper body syndrome. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Ovid, ScienceDirect, SpringerLink, Google Scholar, CNKI database, and Wanfang database were searched from inception until May 29, 2013. Relevant studies were included after the screening of title, abstract, and the full text. Impact of bias was assessed independently by 2 authors. Four studies that met all the inclusion criteria were included finally. The combined results based on all studies suggested that statistically the forearm support had a nonsignificant effect on upper body syndrome (odds ratio [OR] = 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.49, 1.02). The result of subgroup analysis suggested that forearm support has a significant effect on neck or shoulder syndrome (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.43, 1.14) and the effect on upper extremity syndrome (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.49, 1.19) is not significant. This meta-analysis suggested that the forearm support had statistically nonsignificant effect on preventing upper body syndrome on the whole.

  14. On-line sensor monitoring for chemical contaminant attenuation during UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hye-Weon; Anumol, Tarun; Park, Minkyu; Pepper, Ian; Scheideler, Jens; Snyder, Shane A

    2015-09-15

    A combination of surrogate parameters and indicator compounds were measured to predict the removal efficiency of trace organic compounds (TOrCs) using low pressure (LP)-UV/H2O2 advanced oxidation process (AOP), engaged with online sensor-based monitoring system. Thirty-nine TOrCs were evaluated in two distinct secondary wastewater effluents in terms of estimated photochemical reactivity, as a function of the rate constants of UV direct photolysis (kUV) and hydroxyl radical (OH) oxidation (kOH). The selected eighteen TOrCs were classified into three groups that served as indicator compounds: Group 1 for photo-susceptible TOrCs but with minor degradation by OH oxidation (diclofenac, fluoxetine, iohexol, iopamidol, iopromide, simazine and sulfamethoxazole); Group 2 for TOrCs susceptible to both direct photolysis and OH oxidation (benzotriazole, diphenhydramine, ibuprofen, naproxen and sucralose); and Group 3 for photo-resistant TOrCs showing dominant degradation by OH oxidation (atenolol, carbamazepine, DEET, gemfibrozil, primidone and trimethoprim). The results indicate that TOC (optical-based measurement), UVA254 or UVT254 (UV absorbance or transmittance at 254 nm), and total fluorescence can all be used as suitable on-line organic surrogate parameters to predict the attenuation of TOrCs. Furthermore, the automated real-time monitoring via on-line surrogate sensors and equipped with the developed degradation profiles between sensor response and a group of TOrCs removal can provide a diagnostic tool for process control during advanced treatment of reclaimed waters.

  15. MobileHeart, a mobile smartphone-based application that supports and monitors coronary artery disease patients during rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederix, I; Sankaran, S; Coninx, K; Dendale, P

    2016-08-01

    Conventional center-based cardiac rehabilitation adherence is poor, adversely affecting long-term efficacy. Innovative strategies such as telerehabilitation are perceived as promising alternatives to improve care delivery. This paper presents the results of prior and ongoing work on the design and development of MobileHeart, a telemedical smartphone-based application to be used in secondary prevention for ischemic heart disease patients. Its constituent components are discussed separately, the minimal necessary cardiovascular monitoring requirements are elaborated in more detail. The results are offered starting from a clinical perspective to stress its relevance in the establishment of scientifically/medically sound programs.

  16. ECOAL Project—Delivering Solutions for Integrated Monitoring of Coal-Related Fires Supported on Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Ribeiro

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The combustion of coal wastes resulting from mining is of particular environmental concern, and the importance of proper management involving real-time assessment of their status and identification of probable evolution scenarios is recognized. Continuous monitoring of the combustion temperature and emission levels of certain gases allows for the possibility of planning corrective actions to minimize their negative impact on the surroundings. Optical fiber technology is well suited to this purpose and here we describe the main attributes and results obtained from a fiber optic sensing system projected to gather data on distributed temperature and gas emissions in these harsh environments.

  17. Development of biological and chemical methods for environmental monitoring of DOE waste disposal and storage facilities. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-01

    Hazardous chemicals in the environment have received ever increasing attention in recent years. In response to ongoing problems with hazardous waste management, Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) in 1976. In 1980, Congress adopted the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), commonly called Superfund to provide for emergency spill response and to clean up closed or inactive hazardous waste sites. Scientists and engineers have begun to respond to the hazardous waste challenge with research and development on treatment of waste streams as well as cleanup of polluted areas. The magnitude of the problem is just now beginning to be understood. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) National Priorities List as of September 13 1985, contained 318 proposed sites and 541 final sites (USEPA, 1985). Estimates of up to 30,000 sites containing hazardous wastes (1,200 to 2,000 of which present a serious threat to public health) have been made (Public Law 96-150). In addition to the large number of sites, the costs of cleanup using available technology are phenomenal. For example, a 10-acre toxic waste site in Ohio is to be cleaned up by removing chemicals from the site and treating the contaminated groundwater. The federal government has already spent more than $7 million to remove the most hazardous wastes and the groundwater decontamination alone is expected to take at least 10 years and cost $12 million. Another example of cleanup costs comes from the State of California Commission for Economic Development which predicts a bright economic future for the state except for the potential outlay of $40 billion for hazardous waste cleanup mandated by federal and state laws.

  18. In-situ, Real-Time Monitoring of Mechanical and Chemical Structure Changes in a V2O5 Battery Electrode Using a MEMS Optical Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, H. [University of Maryland; Gerasopoulos, K. [University of Maryland; Gnerlich, Markus [University of Maryland; Talin, A. Alec [Sandia National Laboratories; Ghodssi, Reza [University of Maryland

    2014-06-01

    This work presents the first demonstration of a MEMS optical sensor for in-situ, real-time monitoring of both mechanical and chemical structure evolutions in a V2O5 lithium-ion battery (LIB) cathode during battery operation. A reflective membrane forms one side of a Fabry-Perot (FP) interferometer, while the other side is coated with V2O5 and exposed to electrolyte in a half-cell LIB. Using one microscope and two laser sources, both the induced membrane deflection and the corresponding Raman intensity changes are observed during lithium cycling. Results are in good agreement with the expected mechanical behavior and disorder change of the V2O5 layers, highlighting the significant potential of MEMS as enabling tools for advanced scientific investigations.

  19. Monitoring human factor risk characteristics at nuclear legacy sites in northwest Russia in support of radiation safety regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheblanov, V Y; Sneve, M K; Bobrov, A F

    2012-12-01

    This paper describes research aimed at improving regulatory supervision of radiation safety during work associated with the management of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste at legacy sites in northwest Russia through timely identification of employees presenting unfavourable human factor risk characteristics. The legacy sites of interest include sites of temporary storage now operated by SevRAO on behalf of Rosatom. The sites were previously operational bases for servicing nuclear powered submarines and are now subject to major remediation activities. These activities include hazardous operations for recovery of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste from sub-optimal storage conditions. The paper describes the results of analysis of methods, procedures, techniques and informational issues leading to the development of an expert-diagnostic information system for monitoring of workers involved in carrying out the most hazardous operations. The system serves as a tool for human factor and professional reliability risk monitoring and has been tested in practical working environments and implemented as part of regulatory supervision. The work has been carried out by the Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center, within the framework of the regulatory cooperation programme between the Federal Medical-Biological Agency of Russia and the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority.

  20. The Virtual Maintenance System: A Computer-Based Support Tool for Robust Design, Product Monitoring, Fault Diagnosis and Maintenance Planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, van F.J.A.M.; Kimura, F.

    2000-01-01

    Digital (geometric) product models can be used for maintainability analysis and maintenance planning. It is not feasible to build digital product models for maintenance purposes only, but if a digital product model is available, it may be used to support many maintenance-related engineering tasks. E

  1. The virtual maintenance system: a computer-based support tool for robust design, product monitoring, fault diagnosis and maintenance planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, Frederikus J.A.M.; Kimura, F.

    2000-01-01

    Digital (geometric) product models can be used for maintainability analysis and maintenance planning. It is not feasible to build digital product models for maintenance purposes only, but if a digital product model is available, it may be used to support many maintenance-related engineering tasks.

  2. Eating of the pudding - Supporting the development life-cycle of wireless sensor networks for environmental monitoring scientists and ecologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Kui

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we present design and tooling solutions as well as network protocols to support application experts in the entire development life-cycle of wireless sensor networks. The complete life-cycle of wireless sensor networks starts with the user/application requirement analysis. It then goes

  3. GPS positioning and desktop mapping. Applications to environmental monitoring. Report on task JNT B898 on the Finnish support programme to IAEA safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kansanaho, A.; Ilander, T.; Toivonen, H.

    1995-10-01

    Satellite navigation has been used for in-field applications by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety since 1993. Because of this experience, training in the use of GPS positioning and desktop mapping was chosen as a task under the Finnish Support programme to IAEA safeguards. A lecture and a field experiment was held in the training course on environmental monitoring at the IAEA headquarters in June 1995. Real-time mapping of the co-ordinates and storing information on sampling sites and procedures can make safeguards implementation more efficient and effective. Further software development are needed for these purposes. (author) (6 figs.).

  4. Assessment of silicone as support to investigate the transformation routes of organic chemicals under environmental conditions and UV exposure. Application to selected fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cabo, T; Rodríguez, I; Ramil, M; Cela, R

    2013-05-01

    The suitability of bulk silicone as support to follow the degradation of chemical compounds under environmental conditions and UV radiation is illustrated selecting three fungicides (fenhexamid, FEN; triadimenol, TRI and difenoconazole, DIF) as model compounds. These precursor species were first absorbed in silicone supports (10 mm length × 2 mm i.d. and 0.5 mm thickness) and then kept outdoors for several days (up to 2 months) or exposed to UV radiation (254 nm), from a low pressure mercury lamp, in the laboratory. Degradation of precursor fungicides and by-products formation was followed by liquid chromatography (LC) quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) mass spectrometry (MS), after desorption of silicone supports using 0.5 mL of acetonitrile. Half-lives (t(1/2)) measured under UV exposure varied from 5 to 100 min. As regards environmental conditions, the most stable fungicide was DIF, degraded by just 15 % after 2 months; whereas, t(1/2) values of 30 and 83 h were calculated for FEN during summer and autumn, respectively. Supports contained by-products arising from precursor species through de-chlorination, cleavage, hydroxylation, intra-molecular cyclation and oligomerization reactions. Most of them have been previously identified in soil surface, vegetable leaves and water after application of fungicides in agriculture fields. The low cost of silicone tubes (ca. 0.4 Euros), added to their excellent chemical stability and capability to retain precursor species and their by-products, make them ideal supports to follow the transformation routes of organic compounds under environmental and simulated conditions, even for relatively stable species with t(1/2) in the range of weeks or months.

  5. Identification of dominant hydrogeochemical processes for groundwaters in the Algerian Sahara supported by inverse modeling of chemical and isotopic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Rabia; Guendouz, Abdelhamid; Trolard, Fabienne; Souffi Moulla, Adnane; Hamdi-Aïssa, Belhadj; Bourrié, Guilhem

    2017-03-01

    Unpublished chemical and isotopic data taken in November 1992 from the three major Saharan aquifers, namely the Continental Intercalaire (CI), the Complexe Terminal (CT) and the phreatic aquifer (Phr), were integrated with original samples in order to chemically and isotopically characterize the largest Saharan aquifer system and investigate the processes through which groundwaters acquire their mineralization. Instead of classical Debye-Hückel extended law, a specific interaction theory (SIT) model, recently incorporated in PHREEQC 3.0, was used. Inverse modeling of hydrochemical data constrained by isotopic data was used here to quantitatively assess the influence of geochemical processes: at depth, the dissolution of salts from the geological formations during upward leakage without evaporation explains the transitions from CI to CT and to a first end member, a cluster of Phr (cluster I); near the surface, the dissolution of salts from sabkhas by rainwater explains another cluster of Phr (cluster II). In every case, secondary precipitation of calcite occurs during dissolution. All Phr waters result from the mixing of these two clusters together with calcite precipitation and ion exchange processes. These processes are quantitatively assessed by the PHREEQC model. Globally, gypsum dissolution and calcite precipitation were found to act as a carbon sink.

  6. The Effect of Alumina and Magnesia Supported Germanium Nanoparticles on the Growth of Carbon Nanotubes in the Chemical Vapor Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Allaedini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of alumina and magnesia supported germanium (Ge nanoparticles on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD method in atmospheric pressure was investigated. The TEM micrographs confirmed the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM analysis suggested a tip-growth mechanism for the grown carbon nanotubes. The X-ray diffraction (XRD pattern indicated a graphitic nature of the carbon nanotubes. The obtained CNTs using Ge nanoparticles supported by Mg