WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring student work

  1. Summer student report - Upgrade work for the Fast Beam Condition Monitor at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Tsrunchev, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Report on summer student internship at CERN. Describes work done towards the replacement of the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor (BCM1F) - activities related to the test beam conducted by the BRIL (Background Radiation Instrumentation and Luminosity) experiment in July 2016, analog opto-hybrids testing and XDAQ development for the uTCA readout system currently under development.

  2. Monitoring Technology Meets Care Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, Anne Marie; Bygholm, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring technology, especially sensor-based technology, is increasingly taken into use in care work. Despite the simplicity of these technologies – aimed to automate what appear as mundane monitoring tasks – recent research has identified major challenges primarily related to the technology......'s ability to meet the complexity of care work. Understanding intersectional challenges between these care technologies and care work is fundamental to improve design and use of health informatics. In this paper we present an analysis of interaction challenges between a wet-sensor at the task of monitoring...

  3. Understanding the Working College Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Laura W.

    2010-01-01

    Working is now a fundamental responsibility for many undergraduates. But understanding how employment affects students' educational experiences is complicated by why students work. Many students must work to pay the costs of attending college. Some traditional-age students may use employment as a way to explore career options or earn spending…

  4. Monitoring of Working Conditions and the Nature of Their Influence on Health of Students and Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinichenko, Mikhail V.; Kirillov, Andrey V.; Frolova, Elena V.; Kaurova, Olga V.; Makushkin, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research is conditioned by the need to win the competition struggle by certain organizations and area in general. Education has recently become very popular for the training of highly professional staff. However, achieving this goal is possible by means of creation of favorable working and learning conditions, maintaining…

  5. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  6. Teaching Engineering Students Team Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this manual is to provide professor's in engineering classes which the background necessary to use student team projects effectively. This manual describes some of the characteristics of student teams and how to use them in class. It provides a set of class activities and films which can be used to introduce and support student teams. Finally, a set of teaching modules used in freshmen, sophomore, and senior aeronautical engineering classes are presented. This manual was developed as part of a NASA sponsored project to improve the undergraduate education of aeronautical engineers. The project has helped to purchase a set of team work films which can be checked out from Cal Poly's Learning Resources Center in the Kennedy Library. Research for this project has included literature reviews on team work and cooperative learning; interviews, observations, and surveys of Cal Poly students from Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering and Psychology; participation in the Aeronautical Engineering senior design lab; and interviews with engineering faculty. In addition to this faculty manual, there is a student team work manual which has been designed to help engineering students work better in teams.

  7. Optimal Work Effort and Monitoring Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Todorova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a simple job market equilibrium model we study the relationship between work effort and monitoring by firms. Some other determinants of work effort investigated include the educational level of the worker, the minimum or start-up salary as well as the economic conjuncture. As common logic dictates, optimal work effort increases with the amount of monitoring done by the employer. Quite contrary to common logic, though, we find that at the optimum employers observe and control good workers much more stringently and meticulously than poor workers. This is because under profit maximization most of the employer’s profit and surplus result from good workers and he risks losing a large amount of profit by not observing those. Managers monitor strictly more productive workers, fast learners and those starting at a higher autonomous level of monitoring, as those contribute more substantially to the firm’s profit.

  8. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  9. Testing Group Supervision in Fieldwork Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeira, Anat; Schiff, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    This study monitors group supervision for students' field training in a Bachelor's Degree in Social Work (BSW) program and compares it with the experience of the students receiving the traditional individual supervision. The experimental group supervision model is implemented in two consecutive years. Students' experiences are compared at three…

  10. CERN students display their work

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    The first poster session by students working on the LHC experiments, organised by the LPCC, was a great success. Showcasing the talents of over a hundred young physicists from all over the world, it was an opportunity for everyone at CERN to check out the wide range of research work being done by the new generation of physicists at CERN.   At 5.30 p.m. on Wednesday 23 March, the first poster session by CERN students took place in Restaurant No.1, where no fewer than 87 posters went on public display. The students were split into 8 groups according to their research field* and all were on hand to answer the questions of an inquisitive audience. TH Department's Michelangelo Mangano, who is head of the LHC Physics Centre at CERN (LPCC) and is responsible for the initiative, confirms that nothing was left to chance, even the choice of date: "We wanted to make the most of the general enthusiasm around the winter conferences and the meeting of the LHC Experiments Committee to present the stud...

  11. CERN Summer Student programme work report

    CERN Document Server

    Pol, Adrian PA

    2013-01-01

    My summer studentship at CERN lasted a total of 8 weeks from the 10th of June to the 2nd of August. During this time I was involved in several projects: - my main offiicial project, described in the summer student project list, which was the automatic configuration of CERN's ALICE DAQ Zabbix monitoring tool, described in section 1. - my additional official project, Alice in Wonderland web socket, described in section 2 and a project I worked on during my free time, CERN-maps for Android, described in section 3. In the following sections I will explain in details the purpose and usage of each software package.

  12. Engaging Students: The Next Level of Working on the Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlechty, Phillip C.

    2011-01-01

    In Phillip Schlechty's best-selling book "Working on the Work", he outlined a motivational framework for improving student performance by improving the quality of schools designed for students. "Engaging Students" offers a next-step resource in which Schlechty incorporates what he's learned from the field and from the hundreds of workshops he and…

  13. American College Students and Protestant Work Ethic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, Diane Keyser; Chell, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Hypothesizes that older, graduate, and non-U.S. students would express a greater belief in Max Weber's "Protestant work ethic" (PWE), that posits hard work and delayed gratification as bases for achievement. Finds that younger students, male students, and foreign students have the strongest beliefs in the PWE. Explains the findings. (DSK)

  14. The Financial Literacy of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindle, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    The financial literacy of social work students has become the focus of curriculum development and research, but no study to date has attempted to assess the financial knowledge possessed by social work students. This study addressed that gap by assessing the level of objective financial knowledge reported by social work student respondents…

  15. More than Listening: A Casebook for Using Counseling Skills in Student Affairs Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Ruth; Wilson, Nona L.

    2010-01-01

    Helping skills are an essential component of today's student affairs practice. On a day-to-day basis, it is student affairs professionals who often work directly with students in need of mental health support and monitoring. "More Than Listening: A Casebook for Using Counseling Skills in Student Affairs Work" is written for those student affairs…

  16. Remote Working Level Monitor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-18

    The Remote Working Level Monitor (RWLM) is an instrument used to remotely monitor the RN-daughter concentrations and the Working Level (WL). It is an ac powered, microprocessor based instrument which multiplexes two independent detector units to a single central processor unit (CPU). The CPU controls the actuation of the detector units and processes and outputs the data received from these remote detector units. The remote detector units are fully automated and require no manual operation once they are set up. They detect and separate the alpha emitters of RaA and RaC' as well as detecting the beta emitters of RaB and RaC. The resultant pulses from these detected radioisotopes are transmitted to the CPU for processing. The programmed microprocessor performs the mathematical manipulations necessary to output accurate Rn-daughter concentrations and the WL. A special subroutine within the program enables the RWLM to run and output a calibration procedure on command. The data resulting from this request can then be processed in a separate program on most computers capable of BASIC programming. The calibration program results in the derivation of coefficients and beta efficiencies which provides calibrated coefficients and beta efficiencies.

  17. Working Longer Makes Students Stronger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    Abstract: Despite much discussion on the role of education policy on school and student performance, we know little about the effects of school spending at the margin on student cognitive achievement beyond the effects of class size. Thus this paper examines the effects of annual ninth grade clas...

  18. Student Work and Teacher Practices in Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Julia H.; Hawkins, Evelyn F.; Jakwerth, Pamela M.; Stancavage, Frances B.; Dossey, John A.

    The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) is mandated by the United States Congress to survey the educational accomplishments of U.S. students and monitor changes in those accomplishments. For more than 25 years, NAEP has assessed the educational achievement of 4th-, 8th-, and 12th-grade students in selected subject areas, making it…

  19. Poster Day Showcases Student Work | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Nathalie Walker, Guest Writer, and Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On July 31, NCI at Frederick hosted Student Poster Day, an annual event in which student interns can showcase the work they do in their various positions in NCI at Frederick labs and offices. Participating students are interns in the Student Internship Program, a program designed for undergraduate and graduate students during their summer breaks, as well as interns in the Werner H. Kirsten Student Internship Program (WHK SIP), a program for high school seniors. All the students have an opportunity to present their scientific posters.

  20. Working Longer Makes Students Stronger?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Myrup

    Abstract: Despite much discussion on the role of education policy on school and student performance, we know little about the effects of school spending at the margin on student cognitive achievement beyond the effects of class size. Thus this paper examines the effects of annual ninth grade...... classroom hours in literacy and maths on ninth grade (aged 16) student performance in writing and maths, respectively. Using population data for Denmark in 2003-2006, I exploit unique policy-induced variation in classroom hours.On average, the reform changed classroom hours by 2.2-3.3% in literacy and maths......, with an impact on student achievement. For literacy I find no significant effects of classroom hours, but for maths I find stronger effects. One additional hour per year increases the maths score by 0.21% of a standard deviation....

  1. Essential Values of Student Affairs Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert B.; Elfrink, Victoria L.

    1991-01-01

    Examined perceptions of student affairs professionals about the importance of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing essential values to student affairs work. Findings from 68 student affairs professionals revealed that respondents regarded aesthetics, altruism, community, equality, freedom, human dignity, justice, and truth as essential…

  2. PhD students share their work

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Last week, the second Doctoral Student Assembly gave students in the final stages of their PhD at CERN the chance to meet and present their work.   On 9 May, 24 students who are completing their PhD under the CERN Doctoral Student Programme were joined by their CERN supervisors and some of their university supervisors at an event organised by HR and the Technical Students Committee (TSC). After an address by the Director-General Rolf Heuer and short presentations by Ingrid Haug from HR and TSC Chair Stephan Russenschuck, the students presented their work in a poster session. Held in a packed Council Chamber, the event was a great opportunity for the doctoral students to get to know each other and to share their work in fields as diverse as radiation protection, computing, physics and engineering.

  3. Social Work Students' Attitudes about Working with Involuntary Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Natalie D.; Kang, Byungdeok

    2011-01-01

    Social workers employed in areas such as public child welfare, substance abuse, and corrections often provide services to involuntary clients. These individuals do not seek social work services on their own volition and may be actively opposed to the services they are receiving. This study explores social work students' attitudes about working…

  4. Student Progress Monitoring: What This Means for Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLane, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the concept of progress monitoring to parents, highlighting its goal of providing parents and teachers information that can help children learn more and learn faster, and to help teachers teach more effectively and make better decisions about the type of instruction that will work best with each student.

  5. Student Parents and Financial Aid. Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huelsman, Mark; Engle, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Student parents face many challenges to accessing, persisting, and completing postsecondary education. While some of these challenges are unique to student parents--such as finding quality child care during class and work hours and juggling studying and academic assignments with parenting duties--others are typical of low-income and underserved…

  6. Working in English student's book

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Leo

    2001-01-01

    Working In English is a comprehensive course for Business English learners from Leo Jones, co-author of the successful New International Business English course. The core course comprises 40 one-hour units, focusing on thye practical day-to-day activities that all business people are involved in, and organised into seven modules. It is supplemented by extra activities from the Teacher's Book to offer maximum flexibility. The accompanying Video contains specially filmed documentary sequences, made in Europe and the USA, that relate to the themes of the modules and provide authentic input to the course.

  7. EDITORIAL: Student undergraduate laboratory and project work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Dieter

    2007-05-01

    During the last decade 'labwork' courses at university level have changed significantly. The beginning of this development was indicated and partly initiated by the EU-project 'Labwork in Science Education' funded by the European Community (1999-2001). The present special issue of the European Journal of Physics focuses on a multitude of different aspects of this process. The aim of this publication is to improve the exchange of experience and to promote this important trend. In physics research labs a silent revolution has taken place. Today the personal computer is omnipresent. It controls the experiment via stepping motors, piezo-microdrives etc, it monitors all parameters and collects the experimental data with the help of smart sensors. In particular, computer-based modern scanning and imaging techniques open the possibility of creating really new types of experiments. The computer allows data storage and processing on the one hand and simulation and modelling on the other. These processes occur in parallel or may even be interwoven. The web plays an important role in modern science for inquiry, communication, cooperation and publication. Traditional labwork courses do not prepare students for the many resulting demands. Therefore it is necessary to redefine the learning targets and to reconsider the learning methods. Two contributions show exemplarily how modern experimental devices could find their way into students' labs. In the article 'Infrared thermal imaging as a tool in university physics education' by Klaus-Peter Möllmann and Michael Vollmer we can see that infrared thermal imaging is a valuable tool in physics education at university level. It can help to visualize and thereby enhance understanding of physical phenomena of mechanics, thermal physics, electromagnetism, optics and radiation physics. The contribution 'Using Peltier cells to study solid-liquid-vapor transitions and supercooling' by Giacomo Torzo, Isabella Soletta and Mario Branca proves

  8. Engaging and Informing Students through Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stella

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to explore the benefits of group work as a tool for engaging students with introductory material. It was the researcher's expectation that group work, would provide a means of reducing cognitive load (Kirschner, Sweller & Clark, 2006) and encouraging on task behaviour (Wentzel & Watkins, 2002). This would result…

  9. Case Work for Technical Writing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Ed

    Technical or professional writing classes may be enhanced through real-world writing assignments. Social-service agencies prove to be most agreeable and enthusiastic about working with students on various projects because they have limited--sometimes diminishing--financial support. In addition, most charities are accustomed to working with…

  10. The Psychological Work Preferences of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, G. Ronald; Burnett, Meredith; Leartsurawat, Watcharaphong

    2010-01-01

    This study examines work preferences of 984 students across 6 disciplines within a business school--accounting, finance, information technology/decision science, management and international business, marketing, and hospitality management. Differences are found on 11 of the 17 measures. As predicted, we found that (a) accounting, finance, and…

  11. Productive Group Work for Students. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    There is clear evidence that students who are involved in productive collaborative groups outperform their peers. Cooperative group work also results in improved self-esteem, improved relationships and enhanced social and decision-making skills. Johnson and Johnson (1993) identified the elements of a successful collaborative activity. They include…

  12. NWRS Region 6 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 6, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  13. NWRS Region 1 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 1, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  14. NWRS Region 3 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 3, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  15. NWRS Region 2 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 2, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  16. NWRS Region 8 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  17. NWRS Region 7 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 7, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  18. NWRS Region 4 Inventory & Monitoring FY 2011 Annual Work Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 4, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  19. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior......This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... year of studies formed 20 groups and worked collaboratively to develop video games. Throughout the lab, students have to use a variety of tools for managing and developing their projects, such as software version control, static analysis tools, wikis, mailing lists, etc. The students are also supported...

  20. SE83-9 'Chix in Space' student experimenter monitors STS-29 onboard activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Student experimenter John C. Vellinger watches monitor in the JSC Mission Control Center (MCC) Bldg 30 Customer Support Room (CSR) during the STS-29 mission. Crewmembers are working with his Student Experiment (SE) 83-9 Chicken Embryo Development in Space or 'Chix in Space' onboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103. The student's sponsor is Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC).

  1. Student knowledge and pedagogical work of teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Comas Acuñas

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available it is broken down into several points collected quo beliefs that a group of students having academic class of the event, with the use of the WCC and Posac The PAP and programs. In this we include the description of the methodological design of the different stages of the investigation. The central objective of this work is to record the views of a group of students on academic class, subsequent interpretation of the results and the construction of the substantive theory.

  2. Quality of diet of working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgulho, Bartira; Marchioni, Dirce Maria Lobo; Conceição, Adriana Balian da; Steluti, Josiane; Mussi, Marina Hurga; Nagai-Manelli, Roberta; Teixeira, Liliane Reis; Luz, Andréa Aparecida da; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-01-01

    Considering the scarcity of studies with young workers and the role of diet in the prevention of chronic diseases, the objective of the study was to assess the quality of diet of working college students. The present study investigated 43 university students, aged between 18 and 25 years old who had systematically being involved in a working activity in the past 6 months, paid or unpaid, at least 6 hours daily, five days a week. Dietary intake measured by seven dietary records covering every day of the week was used to calculate the Brazilian Healthy Eating Index Revised (B-HEIR). It was observed a low B-HEIR score (53.43,±7.81) indicating a risk of a poor quality of diet, with high intake of sodium and sugar and low consumption of fruits and whole grains. This poor quality of diet can result in an inadequate nutritional status that may increase the risk of obesity and chronic diseases.

  3. [Effect of work with computer monitors on the visual system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niesłuchowska, M

    1994-03-01

    Computer users complain of numerous visual discomforts. The paper discusses those connected with eye fatigue and changes in visual functions associated with the work with monitor screens; these can be alleviated with an ergonomic organization of the work unit. There is a need for a determination of the requirements in visual functions for computer users.

  4. "Working" towards a Degree in Community College: How Work Intensity and Work Quality Relate to Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kerri Anne

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between community college students' working lives and student engagement. Student engagement has been used as a proxy for student persistence based on its strong association with student persistence and its powerful negative association with school drop-out. Work has been studied extensively as related to…

  5. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at Morrill, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Morrill being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Morrill.

  6. Final work plan : groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2005-08-31

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work for a program of twice yearly groundwater monitoring at the site of a former grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The purposes of this monitoring program are to follow changes in plume dynamics and to collect data necessary to evaluate the suitability of monitored natural attenuation as a remedial option, under the requirements of Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) Policy No.BER-RS-042. This monitoring program is planned for a minimum of 2 yr. The planned monitoring activity is part of an investigation at Centralia being performed on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The CCC/USDA has entered into an interagency agreement with DOE, under which Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at its former grain storage facilities. Details and background for this Work Plan were presented previously (Argonne 2004, 2005). Argonne has also issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of and guidance for all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas. The Master Work Plan (approved by the KDHE) contains the materials common to investigations at all locations in Kansas. These documents must be consulted for the complete details of plans for this work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia.

  7. Metacognitive monitoring and strategic behaviour in working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touron, Dayna R; Oransky, Natalie; Meier, Matthew E; Hines, Jarrod C

    2010-08-01

    Research indicates that cognitive age differences can be influenced by metacognitive factors. This research has generally focused on simple memory tasks. Age differences in working memory (WM) performance are pronounced, but are typically attributed to basic cognitive deficits rather than metacognitive factors. However, WM performance can be influenced by strategic behaviour that might be driven by metacognitive monitoring. In the current project, we attempted to connect these lines of research by examining age differences in metacognitive WM monitoring and strategies. In Experiment 1, younger and older adult participants completed a computerized operation span task in conditions that either required or did not require monitoring reports. Participants in the monitoring condition predicted and postdicted global performance for each block and rated their responses following each trial within a block. In Experiment 2, participants also reported their trial-level strategic approach. In contrast to the age equivalence typically found for simple memory monitoring, results demonstrated age differences in WM monitoring accuracy. Overall age differences in strategy use were not found, but using effective strategies benefited older adults' performance more than younger adults'. Furthermore, age-related differences in the WM task appear to be mediated by the accuracy of performance monitoring.

  8. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N = 154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable…

  9. Social Work Students' Perceptions of Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macke, Caroline; Taylor, Jessica Averitt; Taylor, James E.; Tapp, Karen; Canfield, James

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to examine social work students' perceptions of Team-Based Learning (N = 154). Aside from looking at overall student perceptions, comparative analyses examined differences in perceptions between BSW and MSW students, and between Caucasian students and students of color. Findings for the overall sample revealed favorable…

  10. Progress Monitoring to Support Science Learning for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannest, Kimberly J.; Soares, Denise A.; Smith, Stacey L.; Williams, Lauren E.

    2012-01-01

    Progress monitoring provides teachers with frequent, reliable data on student improvement in academic skills. However, valid and reliable progress monitoring probes are primarily available just for reading fluency, comprehension, spelling, and math. Because the instruction of students with disabilities in science occurs primarily in general…

  11. Graduate Social Work Students' Attitudes toward Research: Problems and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenshtern, Marina; Freymond, Nancy; Agyapong, Samuel; Greeson, Clare

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the attitudes of graduate social work students toward research in the contexts of academic study, professional social work practice, and students' personal lives. The authors collected quantitative and qualitative data from MSW students (n = 102) at a major Canadian school of social work. Findings suggest that MSW students…

  12. Group Work Experiences: Domestic MBA Student Experiences and Outcomes when Working with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Patricia D.

    2013-01-01

    This article forms part of an exploration into the results of a single-case, embedded study that was conducted to explore how domestic part-time graduate business students in the United States experience group work for summative assessment. Multiple information collection methods were utilised, including open-ended and semi-structured interviews,…

  13. Working with Students with Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Matthew D.

    2010-01-01

    The participation of a student with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in general physical education can often be challenging and rewarding for the student and physical education teacher. This article addresses common characteristics of students with TBI and presents basic solutions to improve the education of students with TBI in the general physical…

  14. Comprehension Monitoring by Elementary Students: When Does It Occur?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Ann Jaffe

    The effect of passage topic and task demands on elementary school students' monitoring of their own comprehension was examined. Second, fourth, and sixth grade students read a short passage about a well-known event (playing checkers) or one about which they had little existing information (making lye soap). Half of the students in each grade were…

  15. University Students' Conceptions and Practice of Collaborative Work on Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutwarasibo, Faustin

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative work is widely regarded as a valuable tool in the development of student-centred learning. Its importance can be viewed in two ways: First of all, when students are regularly exposed to collaborative work (i.e. pair work or group work) they are likely to develop or improve a range of communication and interpersonal skills. It is also…

  16. Monitoring psychosocial stress at work: development of the Psychosocial Working Conditions Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widerszal-Bazyl, M; Cieślak, R

    2000-01-01

    Many studies on the impact of psychosocial working conditions on health prove that psychosocial stress at work is an important risk factor endangering workers' health. Thus it should be constantly monitored like other work hazards. The paper presents a newly developed instrument for stress monitoring called the Psychosocial Working Conditions Questionnaire (PWC). Its structure is based on Robert Karasek's model of job stress (Karasek, 1979; Karasek & Theorell, 1990). It consists of 3 main scales Job Demands, Job Control, Social Support and 2 additional scales adapted from the Occupational Stress Questionnaire (Elo, Leppanen, Lindstrom, & Ropponen, 1992), Well-Being and Desired Changes. The study of 8 occupational groups (bank and insurance specialists, middle medical personnel, construction workers, shop assistants, government and self-government administration officers, computer scientists, public transport drivers, teachers, N = 3,669) indicates that PWC has satisfactory psychometrics parameters. Norms for the 8 groups were developed.

  17. Job Schedules That Work for Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ishai, Liz

    2014-01-01

    The price tag on a college education is higher than ever--but not having a degree is even more costly, according to recent studies. However, for lower-income students, getting to a college degree isn't so simple. Student financial need after grant aid (commonly referred to as "unmet need") averages $6,000 for students, even at…

  18. Exploring Prospective Secondary Mathematics Teachers' Interpretation of Student Thinking through Analysing Students' Work in Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that…

  19. Between international student mobility and work migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilken, Lisanne; Dahlberg, Mette Ginnerskov

    2017-01-01

    Since 2009, there has been a noticeable increase in the number of students from EU’s newer member states, who enrol as full-degree students at Danish universities. Attracted by the fee-free access to highly ranked universities, these students often arrive with dreams of creating better lives...... for themselves, and of accumulating Western educational capital. Students from the EU’s newer member states are usually reliant on jobs to sustain themselves in Denmark. However, many find it hard to get regular jobs, and some of them become trapped in semi-legal employment or in low-status, low-paid jobs....... Drawing on empirical material collected during a long-term ethnographic fieldwork among full-degree students attending English-medium MA-programmes at a Danish university, this article explores how students from the EU’s newer member states make sense of their lives as students and workers in Denmark...

  20. Reflecting on industry and student expectations for working in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflecting on industry and student expectations for working in the tourism and ... staff within an industry that is intensely service-driven and customer-oriented. ... and Hospitality Management students of the Central University of Technology, ...

  1. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  2. Student Work Experience: A Realistic Approach to Merchandising Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horridge, Patricia; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relevant and realistic experiences are needed to prepare the student for a future career. Addresses the results of a survey of colleges and universities in the United States in regard to their student work experience (SWE) in fashion merchandising. (Author)

  3. Strategies to Improve Student Reaction to Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriflik, Lynda; Mullan, Judy

    2007-01-01

    After receiving negative feedback from students and tutors about their group work experiences in a health subject, strategies to resolve these collaborative learning issues were considered. The objectives were to facilitate student ability to resolve group work issues, highlight group work as an important graduate attribute and to improve…

  4. STUDENTS CONFLICTOLOGICAL COMPETENCE ASSESSMENT INVOLVED INTO PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakovleva I. P.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the investigation is students’ conflictological competence assessment method elaboration. The methodological foundations are system approach (considered the pedagogical monitoring as education quality management component, personal oriented approach (focused the educational process on student persona, competence oriented approach (oriented the educational process to personally-professional abilities formation which integrated the knowledge, skills, motives, values and ability to their control and quality measurement approach (we have considered the conflictological competence preparedness as a multi-criterion parameter. The theoretical foundations are socially-philosophic works dedicated to students’ conflictological competence formation, and pedagogical works, dedicated to education quality management. The normative foundations of investigation are Law “About Education” (2012, state educational standards for vocational training (2009, “Strategy of state youth policy in Russian Federation”, state program “Patriotic education of Russian Federation citizens during 2011-2015”. The methods of investigation are scientific literature and pedagogical practice analysis, survey, modeling, pedagogical monitoring, quality measurement and complex systems polyvalent analysis

  5. Structured Learning Teams: Reimagining Student Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvay, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Even in a standards-based curriculum, teachers can apply constructivist practices such as structured learning teams. In this environment, students become invested in the learning aims, triggering the desire in students to awaken, get information, interpret, remix, share, and design scenarios.

  6. Some Hints to Work With Vietnamese Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    This aid for teachers of Vietnamese children is an attempt to identify the educational needs and describe the background of Vietnamese students. Many of the educational needs of these students are a result of the differences between U.S. culture and Vietnamese culture which is more than a thousand years old. Because of the large number of student…

  7. Teaching Clinical Social Work under Occupation: Listening to the Voices of Palestinian Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaliari, Efrosini; Berzoff, Joan; Byers, David S.; Fareed, Anan; Berzoff-Cohen, Jake; Hreish, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    The authors were invited to teach clinical social work in the Palestinian West Bank. In order to teach, we designed a study exploring how 65 Palestinian social work students described the psychological and social effects of working under occupation. Students described social stressors of poverty, unemployment, lack of infrastructure, violence,…

  8. Students work as scientists for the summer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryde, Marianne Vang

    2006-01-01

    Each year, Risø offers its PhD students a course to challenge the natural scientists of the future and to provide them with a more balanced view of their own role as scientists in society.......Each year, Risø offers its PhD students a course to challenge the natural scientists of the future and to provide them with a more balanced view of their own role as scientists in society....

  9. Factors Promoting Vocational Students' Learning at Work: Study on Student Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtanen, Anne; Tynjälä, Päivi; Eteläpelto, Anneli

    2014-01-01

    In order to promote effective pedagogical practices for students' work-based learning, we need to understand better how students' learning at work can be supported. This paper examines the factors explaining students' workplace learning (WPL) outcomes, addressing three aspects: (1) student-related individual factors, (2) social and…

  10. Using Portfolios: Integrating Learning and Promoting for Social Work Students

    OpenAIRE

    Mona Schatz

    2004-01-01

    Portfolios are a valuable educational tool to aid in the integrative experience for graduate social work students. Forty-one graduate students were asked to evaluate their portfolio experience. A Pearson correlation shows that graduate students find the experience of developing a portfolio to be reflective of their second year MSW program (r=.511; p

  11. Focusing on Doctoral Students' Experiences of Engagement in Thesis Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekkaila, Jenna; Pyhältö, Kirsi; Lonka, Kirsti

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about what inspires students to be involved in their doctoral process and stay persistent when facing challenges. This study explored the nature of students' engagement in the doctoral work. Altogether, 21 behavioural sciences doctoral students from one top-level research community were interviewed. The interview data were…

  12. Using Portfolios: Integrating Learning and Promoting for Social Work Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Schatz

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Portfolios are a valuable educational tool to aid in the integrative experience for graduate social work students. Forty-one graduate students were asked to evaluate their portfolio experience. A Pearson correlation shows that graduate students find the experience of developing a portfolio to be reflective of their second year MSW program (r=.511; p

  13. Student Preference for Residential or Online Project Work in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Helen; Barrett, Jane P.; Knightley, Wendy M.

    2013-01-01

    Psychology students at the Open University (OU) can choose whether to complete their project work at residential school or by participating in an online equivalent. This study identifies different factors governing module choice and student experience: When choosing residential school, social aspects are important, whereas for online, students are…

  14. Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) Students' Prior Sexual Abuse Victimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gore, Michele T.; Black, Pamela J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports findings of an exploratory study surveying 61 students about their prior child sexual abuse victimization. Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) students were surveyed at the beginning and end of a child abuse course and results indicated that 19.7 % of the students reported being sexually abused during childhood. Results also indicated…

  15. Students' motivation toward laboratory work in physiology teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohn, Niels Bonderup; Fago, Angela; Overgaard, Johannes;

    2016-01-01

    our students' levels of interest, willingness to engage (effort), and confidence in understanding (self-efficacy). We also asked students about the role of laboratory work for their own learning and their experience in the physiology laboratory. Our results documented high levels of interest, effort......The laboratory has been given a central role in physiology education, and teachers report that it is motivating for students to undertake experimental work on live animals or measuring physiological responses on the students themselves. Since motivation is a critical variable for academic learning...... and achievement, then we must concern ourselves with questions that examine how students engage in laboratory work and persist at such activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how laboratory work influences student motivation in physiology. We administered the Lab Motivation Scale to assess...

  16. Feminist Self-Identification among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    The literature points to a concerning relationship that social work students have with feminism, including a hesitance to identify as feminist despite endorsing feminist principles. The present study sought to gain a better understanding of how current social work students perceive feminism and whether they self-identify as feminist. In this study…

  17. An Exploration of Students' Conceptions of Accounting Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Samantha; Reid, Anna; Jones, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This study, undertaken at an Australian university, investigates undergraduate accounting students' conceptions of accounting work and discusses the relevance of such conceptions for the work readiness of graduates. Findings based on a phenomenographic investigation show variations in students' awareness of the functional and human aspects of…

  18. Mapping Graduate Social Work Student Learning Journeys about Heterosexual Privilege

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, N. Eugene; Griffin, Rachel; Arnold-Renicker, Heather; Burson, Michael; Johnston, Clare; Moorman, Nichole; Nelsen, Jenny; Schutte, Elsa Campos

    2009-01-01

    This study uses qualitative data from student Web logs (blogs) that were required for a graduate social work course addressing issues of privilege to examine the learning journey trajectory for students in a master's of social work program who participated in a single-identity caucus examining heterosexual privilege. The study includes reflections…

  19. Feminist Self-Identification among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charter, Mollie Lazar

    2015-01-01

    The literature points to a concerning relationship that social work students have with feminism, including a hesitance to identify as feminist despite endorsing feminist principles. The present study sought to gain a better understanding of how current social work students perceive feminism and whether they self-identify as feminist. In this study…

  20. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  1. An Exploration of Students' Conceptions of Accounting Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Samantha; Reid, Anna; Jones, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This study, undertaken at an Australian university, investigates undergraduate accounting students' conceptions of accounting work and discusses the relevance of such conceptions for the work readiness of graduates. Findings based on a phenomenographic investigation show variations in students' awareness of the functional and human aspects of…

  2. Group work as an incentive for learning - students' experiences of group work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Group work is used as a means for learning at all levels in educational systems. There is strong scientific support for the benefits of having students learning and working in groups. Nevertheless, studies about what occurs in groups during group work and which factors actually influence the students' ability to learn is still lacking. Similarly, the question of why some group work is successful and other group work results in the opposite is still unsolved. The aim of this article is to add to the current level of knowledge and understandings regarding the essence behind successful group work in higher education. This research is focused on the students' experiences of group work and learning in groups, which is an almost non-existing aspect of research on group work prior to the beginning of the 21st century. A primary aim is to give university students a voice in the matter by elucidating the students' positive and negative points of view and how the students assess learning when working in groups. Furthermore, the students' explanations of why some group work ends up being a positive experience resulting in successful learning, while in other cases, the result is the reverse, are of interest. Data were collected through a study-specific questionnaire, with multiple choice and open-ended questions. The questionnaires were distributed to students in different study programs at two universities in Sweden. The present result is based on a reanalysis and qualitative analysis formed a key part of the study. The results indicate that most of the students' experiences involved group work that facilitated learning, especially in the area of academic knowledge. Three important prerequisites (learning, study-social function, and organization) for group work that served as an effective pedagogy and as an incentive for learning were identified and discussed. All three abstractions facilitate or hamper students' learning, as well as impact their experiences with group work.

  3. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A.; Bell, C.; Dakin, B.; Hoeschele, M.

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis (UC Davis) and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village, the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. The energy efficiency measures that are incorporated into these apartments include increased wall & attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. Results discuss how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10 month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  4. West Village Student Housing Phase I: Apartment Monitoring and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, A. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Bell, C. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Dakin, B. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, M. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI), Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Building America team Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) worked with the University of California, Davis and the developer partner West Village Community Partnership (WVCP) to evaluate performance on 192 student apartments completed in September, 2011 as part of Phase I of the multi-purpose West Village project. West Village is the largest planned zero net energy community in the United States. The campus neighborhood is designed to enable faculty, staff, and students to affordably live near campus, take advantage of environmentally friendly transportation options, and participate fully in campus life. The aggressive energy efficiency measures that are incorporated in the design contribute to source energy reductions of 37% over the B10 Benchmark. These measures include increased wall and attic insulation, high performance windows, high efficiency heat pumps for heating and cooling, central heat pump water heaters (HPWHs), 100% high efficacy lighting, and ENERGY STAR major appliances. The report discusses how measured energy use compares to modeling estimates over a 10-month monitoring period and includes a cost effective evaluation.

  5. All Students Need Advanced Mathematics. Math Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achieve, Inc., 2013

    2013-01-01

    This fact sheet explains that to thrive in today's world, all students will need to graduate with very strong math skills. That can only mean one thing: advanced math courses are now essential math courses. Highlights of this paper include: (1) Advanced math equals college success; (2) Advanced math equals career opportunity; and (3) Advanced math…

  6. The Wall: Engaging Students in Real Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, Marie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a year-long project which combined the curricula of a language arts class, a library skills class, and an art class as 3 teachers and 163 sixth-grade students designed and created a 58-foot mural depicting the Dewey Decimal System. Notes that the mural adorns the school library and assists library users in locating the volumes they seek.…

  7. Student Text-Making as Semiotic Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavers, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Semiotic work is principled engagement in the making of meaning. The semiotic work of school-based learning entails interpretation and expression framed by the curriculum and the social practices of the classroom, and realized multimodally in diverse pedagogic interactions and activities. Micro-examination of the relationship between a teacher's…

  8. Monitoring the Veterinary Medical Student Experience: An Institutional Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, RoseAnn; Mavis, Brian E; Lloyd, James W; Grabill, Chandra M; Henry, Rebecca C; Patterson, Coretta C

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary medical school challenges students academically and personally, and some students report depression and anxiety at rates higher than the general population and other medical students. This study describes changes in veterinary medical student self-esteem (SE) over four years of professional education, attending to differences between high and low SE students and the characteristics specific to low SE veterinary medical students. The study population was students enrolled at the Michigan State University College of Veterinary Medicine from 2006 to 2012. We used data from the annual anonymous survey administered college-wide that is used to monitor the curriculum and learning environment. The survey asked respondents to rate their knowledge and skill development, learning environment, perceptions of stress, skill development, and SE. Participants also provided information on their academic performance and demographics. A contrasting groups design was used: high and low SE students were compared using logistic regression to identify factors associated with low SE. A total of 1,653 respondents met inclusion criteria: 789 low SE and 864 high SE students. The proportion of high and low SE students varied over time, with the greatest proportion of low SE students during the second-year of the program. Perceived stress was associated with low SE, whereas perceived supportive learning environment and skill development were associated with high SE. These data have provided impetus for curricular and learning environment changes to enhance student support. They also provide guidance for additional research to better understand various student academic trajectories and their implications for success.

  9. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior...

  10. Experiences of Social Work Educators Working with Students with Psychiatric Disabilities or Emotional Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Social work educators have an ethical responsibility to graduate students who are academically, behaviorally, and professionally prepared to enter the social work profession. Although a student's suitability to the profession is not necessarily hindered because of the effects of a psychiatric disability or an emotional problem, sometimes it is.…

  11. Online Training for Working with Student Veterans: A Social Work Elective Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Wright, Micah C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes one school of social work's innovative online elective course to prepare Masters of Social Work (MSW) students for practice with the military, veterans and their families. Developed as part of a university-wide Veterans Initiative, this online course keeps the focus on the student veteran and uses the best practices of…

  12. Dual Mission: An Innovative Field Model for Training Social Work Students for Work with Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive article explores a collaborative model that blends the dual missions of training social work students to work with military personnel, veterans, and their families while serving student veterans on campus. The model consists of 2 main components: (1) a nationally recognized service component for providing academic, health and…

  13. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  14. Balancing Work with Study: Impact on Marketing Students' Experience of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Steven; Volet, Simone

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 57% of students in the United States work while attending college. For most of these students (81%), this is more than 20 hours a week. There has been shown to be a negative relationship between hours worked and academic achievement in studies in the United States as well as the United Kingdom and Australia. There is, however, no…

  15. Working and Non-Working University Students: Anxiety, Depression, and Grade Point Average

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounsey, Rebecca; Vandehey, Michael A.; Diekhoff, George M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the differences between 110 working and non-working students in terms of mental health, academic achievement, and perceptions about student employment. Anxiety and depression were measured by the Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory-II. Academic achievement was measured by grade point average. Perceptions of…

  16. Dual Mission: An Innovative Field Model for Training Social Work Students for Work with Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selber, Katherine; Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Biggs, Mary Jo Garcia

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive article explores a collaborative model that blends the dual missions of training social work students to work with military personnel, veterans, and their families while serving student veterans on campus. The model consists of 2 main components: (1) a nationally recognized service component for providing academic, health and…

  17. Work Personality, Work Engagement, and Academic Effort in a Group of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between the variables of work engagement, developmental work personality, and academic effort in a sample of college students. This study provides evidence for the hypothesized positive relationship between academic effort, engagement, and work personality. When gender was controlled, the Work Tasks…

  18. Work Personality, Work Engagement, and Academic Effort in a Group of College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, David R.; O'Sullivan, Deirdre; Wong, Alex W. K.

    2012-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationship between the variables of work engagement, developmental work personality, and academic effort in a sample of college students. This study provides evidence for the hypothesized positive relationship between academic effort, engagement, and work personality. When gender was controlled, the Work Tasks…

  19. Does Working Help or Hurt College Students? The Effects of Federal Work-Study Participation on Student Outcomes. A CAPSEE Working Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliz, Adela; Long, Bridget Terry

    2016-01-01

    Due to rising costs and declining affordability, many students have to work while attending college. The federal government takes a major role in subsidizing the wages of college students and spent over $1 billion on the Work-Study program in 2010-11 (College Board, 2011), yet little is known about how working during the school year impacts…

  20. Exploring prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretation of student thinking through analysing students' work in modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didis, Makbule Gozde; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat; Cetinkaya, Bulent; Cakiroglu, Erdinc; Alacaci, Cengiz

    2016-09-01

    Researchers point out the importance of teachers' knowledge of student thinking and the role of examining student work in various contexts to develop a knowledge base regarding students' ways of thinking. This study investigated prospective secondary mathematics teachers' interpretations of students' thinking as manifested in students' work that embodied solutions of mathematical modelling tasks. The data were collected from 25 prospective mathematics teachers enrolled in an undergraduate course through four 2-week-long cycles. Analysis of data revealed that the prospective teachers interpreted students' thinking in four ways: describing, questioning, explaining, and comparing. Moreover, whereas some of the prospective teachers showed a tendency to increase their attention to the meaning of students' ways of thinking more while they engaged in students' work in depth over time and experience, some of them continued to focus on only judging the accuracy of students' thinking. The implications of the findings for understanding and developing prospective teachers' ways of interpreting students' thinking are discussed.

  1. Summer Student Work Project Report - STEFANO PIOLI

    CERN Document Server

    Pioli, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    In this work I learned more about of the language CUDA to evaluate the possibility to implement the parallel computing on GPU in some FLUKA's routine. The project focused on the generation of random numbers by analyzing how this was currently done by FLUKA's routine and how it was possible to reproduce and / or optimize by implementing the use of a GPU. During the work it was necessary to study the properties of the RNG algorithms, the best strategies for allocating memory in CUDA and benchmarking techniques.

  2. Preventing halo bias in grading the work of university students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Malouff

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Experts have advocated anonymous marking as a means of minimizing bias in subjective student assessment. In the present study, 159 faculty members or teaching assistants across disciplines were randomly assigned (1 to grade a poor oral presentation of a university student, (2 to grade a good oral presentation of the same student, or (3 not to grade any oral presentation of the student. All graders then assessed the same written work by the student. A linear-contrasts analysis showed that, as hypothesized, the graders assigned significantly higher scores to written work following the better oral presentation than following the poor oral presentation, with intermediate scores for the written work of the student whose oral presentation was not seen by the graders. The results provide evidence of a halo effect in that prior experience with a student biased the grading of written work completed by the student. The findings suggest that keeping students anonymous, as in the condition with no knowledge of the student’s performance in the oral presentation, helps prevent bias in grading.

  3. Evaluating Social Work Students' Attitudes toward Physical Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, Rachael A.

    2010-01-01

    Given the social work profession's commitment to serving individuals with disabilities and cultural competence, the promotion of favorable attitudes toward persons with disabilities within social work education is critical. This study examined the question: "what are the attitudes of undergraduate social work students at three universities…

  4. Supporting Students' Pedagogical Working Life Horizon in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttinen, Leena; Skaniakos, Terhi; Lairio, Marjatta

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we introduce a model of a pedagogical working life horizon. It encompasses questions posed by individual students concerning their future and incorporates the idea of a working life orientation to the pedagogical possibilities within education. Working life orientation consists of three elements: individual relationship, knowledge…

  5. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  6. Evaluating Team Work on Student Projects: The Use of Behaviorally Anchored Scales To Evaluate Student Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Daniel; Cadiz, David

    One of the biggest problems students face in team projects is social loafing, a situation in which students may view team projects as a free ride. Social loafers let others do the work, knowing that the professor will only grade the completed project. This research examined the performance of students grading other student team members on a group…

  7. Students as Facilitators: An Evaluation of Student-Led Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a two year study evaluating student-led group work in the context of a clinical legal education module. The aim of the study was to shift the balance of control from tutor to student, by allowing students to take on the facilitator role in weekly meetings. The findings suggest that (a) students can successfully design and…

  8. Student Orientation to Grammatical Aspects of Interaction in Group Work

    OpenAIRE

    アリン, デビッド; 細田, 由利; Aline, David; Hosoda, Yuri

    2005-01-01

    Using the framework of Conversation Analysis, this paper examines the interaction found in task-based group work, and explores the effects of interaction on second language acquisition. For this study 26 hours of conversation by 23 small groups of Japanese university students were audio taped. A close analysis of the students' interaction in the group discussion revealed the students' competence in managing grammatical problems through self-repair and peer-assistance. The data show some of th...

  9. Bibliotherapy for Disabled Students in School-to-Work Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins-Best, Mary; Wiinamaki, Margaret

    1985-01-01

    Applications of bibliotherapy to disabled students facing the transition from school to work are examined. Group discussion, role playing, reading aloud, and creative writing are suggested as bibliotherapy techniques. An annotated bibliography lists 11 references. (CL)

  10. Exposure of Senior School Students to Practical Work in Agriculture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Exposure of Senior School Students to Practical Work in Agriculture in Ikwerre and ... It was concluded that Teachers adoption Learner-Centred rather than lecture ... that teachers will have enough time to attend to Practical Agricultural lessons.

  11. Project Work by Students for First Degree: An Appraisal | Ekwenze ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Project Work by Students for First Degree: An Appraisal. ... The proper order, format and form for legal research and writing must be observed. ... law faculties should have websites that will enable supervisors cross-check projects for originality.

  12. Students' motivation toward laboratory work in physiology teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Niels Bonderup; Fago, Angela; Overgaard, Johannes; Madsen, Peter Teglberg; Malte, Hans

    2016-09-01

    The laboratory has been given a central role in physiology education, and teachers report that it is motivating for students to undertake experimental work on live animals or measuring physiological responses on the students themselves. Since motivation is a critical variable for academic learning and achievement, then we must concern ourselves with questions that examine how students engage in laboratory work and persist at such activities. The purpose of the present study was to investigate how laboratory work influences student motivation in physiology. We administered the Lab Motivation Scale to assess our students' levels of interest, willingness to engage (effort), and confidence in understanding (self-efficacy). We also asked students about the role of laboratory work for their own learning and their experience in the physiology laboratory. Our results documented high levels of interest, effort, and self-efficacy among the students. Correlation analyses were performed on the three motivation scales and exam results, yet a significant correlation was only found between self-efficacy in laboratory work and academic performance at the final exam. However, almost all students reported that laboratory work was very important for learning difficult concepts and physiological processes (e.g., action potential), as the hands-on experiences gave a more concrete idea of the learning content and made the content easier to remember. These results have implications for classroom practice as biology students find laboratory exercises highly motivating, despite their different personal interests and subject preferences. This highlights the importance of not replacing laboratory work by other nonpractical approaches, for example, video demonstrations or computer simulations.

  13. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  14. Graduate Social Work Students' Attitudes toward Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccio, Elaine M.

    2011-01-01

    Service-learning attitudes among graduate social work students enrolled in a course on human diversity and oppression are presented. A survey was administered at the beginning and at the end of the semester to students enrolled in the course, which was taught using a service-learning approach. Among the results were believing that service-learning…

  15. Group Work and Leadership: Perception of FCS Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Susan W.; Gregoire, Mary B.

    2006-01-01

    No known studies have examined the perception of family and consumer science (FCS) students related to group work in the classroom and its relationship to leadership. In this qualitative study, two groups of FCS students--hospitality management and dietetics--viewed group projects as exercises in leadership skills that had many barriers.…

  16. Compassion Fatigue among Social Work Students in Field Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Cynthia; Moore, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study, conducted with BSW and MSW field students at a public university in Southwestern United States, explored the psychological effect of compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction on social work students in field placements. Results from the Professional Quality of Life Scale's compassion satisfaction and fatigue subscales…

  17. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  18. Apples and Pears: Engaging Social Work Students in Social Dialogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyneke, Roelof P.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate how an adventure-based activity could help facilitate dialogue and enable a safe process where students could engage in a difficult topic such as diversity without feeling threatened. Method: A qualitative study was used in which 89 social work students who took part in diversity training gave permission that their…

  19. Creating Online Worlds: The Future of Student Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegle, Rodney P.

    2007-01-01

    In the 20th century, student work was dominated by paper-print assignments, particularly essays. This was a reflection of the dominant media technology of that century--books, magazines, newspapers, radio, and television. But those days are gone. In the 21st century, the dominant media technology of today's students is the Internet. In addition to…

  20. Students Integrate Knowledge Acquisition and Practical Work in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E. I.; Sánchez-Hermosín, P.; Díz-Pérez, J.; Tovar, P.; Camacho, R.; Escribano, B. M.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in…

  1. Preparation for Computer Usage in Social Work: Student Consumer Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurius, Paula S.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A survey of students in a large master's program in social work investigated student training in and experience with computers and attitudes about computer applications for human service activities. The value of the findings in curriculum planning, practica development, computer resources management, and faculty and agency involvement are…

  2. Students' Motivation toward Laboratory Work in Physiology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohn, Niels Bonderup; Fago, Angela; Overgaard, Johannes; Madsen, Peter Teglberg; Malte, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory has been given a central role in physiology education, and teachers report that it is motivating for students to undertake experimental work on live animals or measuring physiological responses on the students themselves. Since motivation is a critical variable for academic learning and achievement, then we must concern ourselves…

  3. Engineering Students' Experiences from Physics Group Work in Learning Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential…

  4. Lessons Learned from Working with High-Ability Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Steven I.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses three lessons that stand out as particularly poignant in the author's career working with high-ability students. The author recounts personal and professional experiences that influenced his thinking. The three lessons are that identifying high-ability students is not an easy business, the development of talent requires more…

  5. Compassion Fatigue among Social Work Students in Field Placements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harr, Cynthia; Moore, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study, conducted with BSW and MSW field students at a public university in Southwestern United States, explored the psychological effect of compassion fatigue and compassion satisfaction on social work students in field placements. Results from the Professional Quality of Life Scale's compassion satisfaction and fatigue subscales…

  6. Improving Performance to Engineering Students through Virtual Labs and its Monitoring in Cockpit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Rosniak Tibola

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern education needs use all resources to improve teaching-learning process. To achieve this goal, technology can be a sharp allied. Especially to the engineering education, which seeks the balance among theoretical and practice lessons. Thus, many universities are using the virtual labs and virtual worlds 3D like way to support the student's learning and enrich the teaching methods. High tech classes, broadband communication, mobility and ubiquity aren't enough if the student's engagement can't be measured. This work presents a proposal to monitor the virtual lab use by students, showing the educational parameters in a graphical interface, following the suitable pedagogical concepts.

  7. Organization and control of independent work of students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaydalova L.G.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical methodical aspects of independent work of students, organization and control, educational methodical providing, forms and types of independent work are examined. Efficiency of independent work is provided high-quality educational literature. The basic forms of control is: current, result and module, examinations, term papers, diploma works, licensed computer-integrated examinations, state attestation. Control can be conducted in a kind: expressquestioning, interview. Control is an information generator for a teacher about motion of independent capture the student of educational by material.

  8. Graduate Social Work Students' Experiences with Group Work in the Field and the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Harriet; Knight, Carolyn; Khudododov, Khudodod

    2014-01-01

    For decades, group work scholars have described a discrepancy between student preparation for group work practice and opportunities to work with groups in the field practicum and professional practice. Educators in related disciplines such as counseling and psychology have expressed similar concerns. This article reports findings of a study of MSW…

  9. Group Work as a Means of Getting Students to Participate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forero Tovar Luz Marina

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Three types of activities were worked on with a group of 15 shy and slow 10th grade students at the Centro Educativo Integral Colsubsidio to get them to participate and talk more often and fluently than they were doing. Activities selected for that purpose were : games, role-plays and interviews that had to be carried out in groups. Students’ difficulties expressing their ideas fluently rather than accurately were confirmed by means of a questionnaire, then the activities listed above were piloted and the results of their effectiveness were measured by a teacher observer, by my own field notes and by interviews as well as a final questionnaire applied during and at the end of the piloting stage. Results from these three sources were analysed and showed that some students benefited slightly from the activities while others just improved their pronunciation as a result of their work with different partners. Also, some students were not keen on working in groups because they preferred individual work. Speaking ability was not improved as much as expected but the kind of work (group work helped students to participate more in class. It is also interesting to point out that female students preferred role-plays to the other two activities while male students enjoyed games the most.

  10. Analysing tutor feedback to students: first steps towards constructing an electronic monitoring system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Whitelock

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Learning Environments provide the possibility of offering additional support to tutors, monitors and students in writing and grading essays and reports. They enable monitors to focus on the assignments that need most attention. This paper reports the findings from phase one of a feasibility study to assist the monitoring of student essays. It analyses tutor comments from electronically marked assignments and investigates how they match the mark awarded to each essay by the tutor. This involved carrying out a category analysis of the tutors' feedback to the students using Bales's 'interactional categories' as a theoretical basis. The advantage of this category system is that it distinguishes between task-orientated contributions, and the 'socio-emotive' element used by tutors to maintain student motivation. This reveals both how the tutor makes recommendations to improve the assignment content, and how they provide emotional support to students. Bales's analysis was presented to a group of tutors who felt an electronic feedback system based on this model would help them to get the right balance of responses to their students. These findings provide a modest start to designing a model of feedback for tutors of distance education students. Future work will entail refining these categories and testing this model with a larger sample from a different subject domain.

  11. Emotional work and diversity in clinical placements of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Daniella

    2013-06-01

    To learn how students experience clinical placements in a setting of diversity and how they cope with the emotional challenges involved. This study is based on inductive, qualitative research undertaken with Israeli nursing students. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 students: 10 Arabs (5 men and 5 women), 9 Jews (2 men and 7 women), and 1 Circassian. The interviews were analyzed through coding and categorization. The students' experiences are characterized by emotional strains of various sorts-stress, ambivalence, disgust, frustration, and conflict-that arise in three types of relationships: relationships with patients, with the clinical instructors, and with other students who are on their teams. The data show that diversity has an impact on all these relationships. The data further show that the students cope with the emotional strains by using several strategies of emotional work: distancing, self-strengthening, self-motivation work, and minimizing significance. (a) Nursing students' experiences during their clinical placements should be understood in terms of emotional challenges, and their emotional work and coping strategies call for appropriate forms of support. (b) The diversity of the clinical placement environment should be considered as an important factor, both in understanding students' experiences and learning processes and in designing the support that they need. Culturally diverse settings entail distinct challenges that impact students' emotional reaction to clinical work. Understanding the types of emotional work students do in the process of their clinical experience is critical for educators seeking to promote genuinely caring and effective nursing in culturally diverse settings.  © 2013 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  12. Social Studies Progress Monitoring and Intervention for Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyers, Sarah J.; Lembke, Erica S.; Curs, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the technical adequacy of vocabulary-matching curriculum-based measurement (CBM) to identify and monitor the progress of 148 middle school students in social studies. In addition, the effectiveness of a reading comprehension intervention, Collaborative Strategic Reading (Klingner, Vaughn, Dimino, Schumm, & Bryant, 2001),…

  13. Monitoring Social Media: Students Satisfaction with University Administration Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshkin, Andrey Petrovich; Rassolov, Ilya Mihajlovich; Novikov, Andrey Vadimovich

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents an original method of identifying satisfaction of students with the activities of their university administration based on studying the content of comments on the social networks. The analysis of student opinions revealed areas of concern and priority areas in the work of the university administration. The paper characterizes…

  14. Working Students' Perceptions of Paying for College: Understanding the Connections between Financial Aid and Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziskin, Mary; Fischer, Mary Ann; Torres, Vasti; Pellicciotti, Beth; Player-Sanders, Jacquelyn

    2014-01-01

    Based on 22 focus groups conducted at institutions located in a Midwestern metropolitan region, this study explores working, commuting and adult-learner college students' implicit theories about financial aid policy and seeks to understand how students make sense of their own experiences in paying for college. The institutions participating in the…

  15. Clinical working postures of bachelor of oral health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, S J; Johnstone, C L; Hutchinson, C M W; Taylor, P A; Wade, K J

    2011-09-01

    To observe and describe the clinical working postures of final-year Bachelor of Oral Health (BOH) students. Pilot observational study. The University of Otago Faculty of Dentistry and School of Physiotherapy. Eight final-year BOH students voluntarily participated in this study, where postural data were collected using a digital video camera during a standard clinical treatment session. The postural data were analysed using 3D Match biomechanical software. Final-year BOH students who work in the seated position are exposed to neck flexion of greater than 35 degrees, together with trunk flexion greater than 20 degrees and bilateral elbow flexion greater than 90 degrees. The findings of this study agree with the findings of previous postural studies of dental professionals. Dental hygiene students, together with their clinical supervisors, need to be aware of the importance of good working posture early in their careers, and pay particular attention to the degree of neck flexion occurring for prolonged periods.

  16. Sleep patterns and sleepiness of working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Liliane; Lowden, Arne; da Luz, Andrea Aparecida; Turte, Samantha Lemos; Valente, Daniel; Matsumura, Roberto Jun; de Paula, Leticia Pickersgill; Takara, Meire Yuri; Nagai-Manelli, Roberta; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-01-01

    The double journey (work and study) may result or aggravate health problems, including sleep disturbances, as observed in previous studies with high school students. The aim of this study is to analyze the sleep-wake cycle and perceived sleepiness of working college students during weekdays. Twenty-three healthy college male students, 21-24 years old, working during the day and attending classes in the evening, participated in this study. During five consecutive days, the students filled out daily activities logs and wore actigraphs. Mean sleeping time was lower than 6 hours per night. No significant differences were observed in the sleep-wake cycle during the weekdays. The observed lack of changes in the sleepwake cycle of these college students might occur as participants were not on a free schedule, but exposed to social constraints, as was the regular attendance to evening college and day work activities. Sleepiness worsened over the evening school hours. Those results show the burden carried by College students who perform double activities - work and study.

  17. Engineering students' experiences from physics group work in learning labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strøm Mellingsæter, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background: This paper presents a case study from a physics course at a Norwegian university college, investigating key aspects of a group-work project, so-called learning labs, from the participating students' perspective. Purpose: In order to develop these learning labs further, the students' perspective is important. Which aspects are essential for how the students experience the learning labs, and how do these aspects relate to the emergence of occurrences termed joint workspace, i.e. the maintenance of content-related dialogues within the group? Programme description: First year mechanical engineering students attended the learning labs as a compulsory part of the physics course. The student groups were instructed to solve physics problems using the interactive whiteboard and then submit their work as whiteboard files. Sample: One group of five male students was followed during their work in these learning labs through one term. Design and methods: Data were collected as video recordings and fieldwork observation. In this paper, a focus group interview with the students was the main source of analysis. The interpretations of the interview data were compared with the video material and the fieldwork observations. Results: The results show that the students' overall experience with the learning labs was positive. They did, however, point to internal aspects of conflicting common and personal goals, which led to a group-work dynamics that seemed to inhibit elaborate discussions and collaboration. The students also pointed to external aspects, such as a close temporal proximity between lectures and exercises, which also seemed to inhibit occurrences termed joint workspace. Conclusions: In order to increase the likelihood of a joint workspace throughout the term in the learning labs, careful considerations have to be made with regard to timing between lectures and exercises, but also with regard to raising the students' awareness about shared and personal goals.

  18. Randomized Trial of Suicide Gatekeeper Training for Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Jodi M.; Osteen, Phillip J.; Sharpe, Tanya L.; Pastoor, Jennifer B.

    2012-01-01

    Problem: Education and research on social work's role in preventing client suicide is limited. Method: Seventy advanced master of social work students were randomly assigned to either the training group (Question, Persuade, and Referral suicide gatekeeper training) or the control group. Outcomes measured over time included suicide knowledge,…

  19. Working Memory Weaknesses in Students with ADHD: Implications for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Rhonda; Major, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for academic underachievement. Children and youth with ADHD have been found to exhibit impairments on neuropsychological measures of executive functions, including working memory. Working memory is important to attentional control and learning. This article defines working…

  20. Working Memory Weaknesses in Students with ADHD: Implications for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinussen, Rhonda; Major, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are at risk for academic underachievement. Children and youth with ADHD have been found to exhibit impairments on neuropsychological measures of executive functions, including working memory. Working memory is important to attentional control and learning. This article defines working…

  1. Working Toward Robust Process Monitoring for Safeguards Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krichinsky, Alan M [ORNL; Bell, Lisa S [ORNL; Gilligan, Kimberly V [ORNL; Laughter, Mark D [ORNL; Miller, Paul [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    New safeguards technologies allow continuous monitoring of plant processes. Efforts to deploy these technologies, as described in a preponderance of literature, typically have consisted of case studies attempting to prove their efficacy in proof-of-principle installations. While the enhanced safeguards capabilities of continuous monitoring have been established, studies thus far have not addressed such challenges as manipulation of a system by a host nation. To prevent this and other such vulnerabilities, one technology, continuous load cell monitoring, was reviewed. This paper will present vulnerabilities as well as mitigation strategies that were identified.

  2. Work-school conflict and health outcomes: beneficial resources for working college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngah; Sprung, Justin M

    2013-10-01

    This study extends prior college student employment research by examining health as an outcome variable. Using 2-wave data from a sample of 216 student workers, this study examined work-school conflict as a predictor of psychological and physical health among working college students. Additionally, 3 resource-providing variables--work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment at work--were tested for buffering effects in the relation between work-school conflict and health. Results demonstrated that work-school conflict was a significant predictor of psychological health but not physical health. All 3 resource-providing variables ameliorated the negative relation between work-school conflict and psychological health, whereas only personal fulfillment weakened the positive relation between work-school conflict and physical symptoms. These findings suggest the benefits of work-school facilitation, supervisor work-school support, and personal fulfillment in minimizing the detrimental effects of work-school conflict on health outcomes. Theoretical and practical implications for researchers, educational institutions, and organizations are discussed.

  3. Students integrate knowledge acquisition and practical work in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, E I; Sánchez-Hermosín, P; Díz-Pérez, J; Tovar, P; Camacho, R; Escribano, B M

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present work was to transfer a wider concept of teamwork and self-learning to the laboratory, encouraging students' capabilities when seeking, acquiring, and processing knowledge. This educational innovation was carried out with a total of 38 students (fourth year of degree in Biology) in the area of physiology (Advances in Reproduction course) at University of Córdoba in Córdoba, Spain. The design of the project's application methodology consisted of establishing a way in which problems would be tackled in the practical classes. For this purpose, the different tasks were set up so that students could relate them to the concepts learned in the theory classes. On the first day of class, the project was presented to the students. Groups of two to three students worked in the laboratory and set up an outline of the protocol of the practical work that they had done. This outline was performed individually and sent to the lecturers through a learning management system (Moodle). The teachers gave feedback and assessed student submissions. Upon finishing the course, students completed a survey. The project-based learning method promotes practical self-learning on the part of students. This methodology demonstrated to us that it stimulates a critical and self-critical capacity in students, both individually and in groups, and that writing didactic practical material helped students to enhance their theory knowledge. The experiment was a success in view of the scores obtained upon finishing the subject. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  4. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Group work in the context of higher education is a teaching and learning method which has the aim to facilitate learning processes due to students learning by cooperation and mutual feedback. At the same time group work might offer various challenges on a social, moral and intellectual level....... This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...

  5. High School Students' Goals for Working Together in Mathematics Class: Mediating the Practical Rationality of Studenting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webel, Corey

    2013-01-01

    In this article I explore high school students' perspectives on working together in a mathematics class in which they spent a significant amount of time solving problems in small groups. The data included viewing session interviews with eight students in the class, where each student watched video clips of their own participation, explaining and…

  6. Training Graduate Students for Psychodiagnostics in the Structure of Educational Outcomes Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashlova G.M.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the stages of professional skills development in graduate students within the module “Psychological Diagnostics inChildren” (master's programme in School Psychology based on the requirements of the professional standard and aimed at providing effective screening (monitoring of mental development in children and adolescents in order to reveal those in need of psychological help. The article addresses the issue of instructional content selection in the module that would allow undergraduates to develop the ability and willingness to conduct unassisted psychodiagnostics in the process of monitoring children’s educational outcomes. Also, the article discusses the specifics of sharing between a university and an educational institution the responsibility for developing competencies in students required for carrying out such professional activities as screening (monitoring, processing data, interpreting data, and presenting outcomes. These aspects of work are covered in relation to the documents regulating the educational process, for instance, the Federal State Standards in General Education.

  7. Practical Work in Chemistry: Chemistry Students' Perceptions of Working Independently in a Less Organised Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyall, Robert James

    2010-01-01

    A study of chemistry students in an organic practical class, where they were required to work on their own, found considerable benefits in allowing them to work independently in a less organised environment. Although apprehensive at first, they soon gained a self-belief in their own abilities and were able to complete the course with minimal input…

  8. Academic and Work-Related Burnout: A Longitudinal Study of Working Undergraduate University Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Craig S.; Merrill, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the interaction between academic burnout and work-related burnout for a sample of working undergraduate university students. Using a longitudinal design we found that the factors of burnout (Exhaustion, Cynicism, and Efficacy) change significantly over the semester. In addition, the study suggests there are distinct differences in how…

  9. The Role of Work-Integrated Learning in Developing Students' Perceived Work Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddan, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The notion of work self-efficacy is significant as the self-efficacy beliefs of an individual have considerable influence on his/her level of motivation and performance in the workplace. This paper aims to determine the effects of the learning activities of a work-integrated learning course in Exercise Science in relation to students' perceived…

  10. Teacher-Student Relationships: The Meaning of Teachers' Experience Working with Underachieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreshkina, Maria; Greenberg, Katherine H.

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on phenomenological interviews with teachers who worked with underachieving students in South Africa, Russia, and the United States. It focuses on the analysis of meanings that teachers constructed while describing their relationship with underachieving students and how metaphors worked to construct such meanings. The…

  11. The Effectiveness of a Working Memory Training Regimen for Iranian University Students: Implications for Medical Students

    OpenAIRE

    Gholam Reza Kiany; Bahman Mehraban; Reza Ghafar Samar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Working memory is thought to serve as a part of memory structure where functions like temporary storage and manipulation of information take place. This study investigates the effectiveness of working memory training regimens with Iranian university students, while considering the implications for medical students. Methods: Thirty university students studying at different universities in Kermanshah took part in the study. They were divided into two groups as the experimental...

  12. Using consultation in student groups to improve development of team work skills amongst more reluctant students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study and also very good problem solving skills and team work competencies both highly appreciated by the Danish companies. An important aspect of the first semester of the education is a course where the students get tools and tricks for good......Since Aalborg University (AAU) was founded it has been using an educational model, where Problem Based Learning is the turning point. Each semester the students work in groups using half of the study time to solve and document a real-world engineering problem. Working with problems gives...... showed less interest in the course than e.g. Software and Computer Science students. The consequences of this are that app. 1/3 of the BAIT students don’t develop their team work skills and competences to the level that is expected. The development of team work skills is closely connected to how...

  13. Financial Literacy and Social Work Students: Knowledge is Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martie Gillen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The continued economic turmoil makes it imperative for the profession of social work, specifically within academic programs, to teach students how to utilize their education, training and skills to promote social and economic justice and to create social change on multiple levels, in numerous setting, and with clients in diverse economic situations. In order to create curricular components that can help social workers to better practice with marginalized populations, we must first better understand what social work students do (or do not know about financial literacy. The purpose of this exploratory study was to better understand the financial literacy of undergraduate and graduate social work students. Findings suggest that students are not gaining the skills they need to successfully navigate the complexities of the personal finance landscape. Further, it suggests that they will not be well equipped to help clients in this area. Social workers, especially those at the BASW level, work primarily in case management positions wherein they can be called upon to help clients in this area.  We, in academia, must create opportunities for education to enhance student competency in this area.

  14. PORTFOLIO INVOLVED INTO STUDENTS PERSONALLY-PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT MONITORING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. GREBENNIKOV

    2016-01-01

     results integrated evaluation. However, the portfolio technology is accorded to competence oriented approach requirements and may be used as education quality monitoring component, because its allowed the assessment of learning-vocational activity control efficiency and students support in personallyprofessional self-determination productivity.

  15. Data Mining for Social Work Students: Teaching Practice-Based Research in Conjunction with a Field Work Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auslander, Gail K.; Rosenne, Hadas

    2016-01-01

    Although research studies are important for social work students, the students rarely like research classes or see their value. At the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, one group of BSW students was encouraged to carry out the required research in their field work setting, the Hadassah University Medical Center. Students used data mining, that is,…

  16. [Sleep patterns and fatigue of nursing students who work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Luciane Ruiz Carmona; de Martino, Milva Maria Figueiredo

    2012-10-01

    It has been observed there is currently a growing interest in developing research regarding the sleep patterns of workers who must wake up very early or who work nights. Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the levels of fatigue and the sleep patterns of nursing students who study during the day and work at night. Participants were thirty students who completed the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Sleep Journal for thirty days. It was found that sleep duration was longer among men compared to women on days off work, and when on vacation from school compared to the regular school period. Participants showed high levels of fatigue and sleepiness, characterized by the incidence of excessive daytime sleepiness. In conclusion, night workers who endure sleep deprivation have additional wake hours due to studying, thus causing high levels of fatigue, which may harm their performance at school and at work.

  17. Dark chocolate administration improves working memory in students

    OpenAIRE

    Nawanto Agung Prastowo; Samuel Kristanto; Poppy Kristina Sasmita

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have positive effects on health, including the nervous system. High flavonoid content can be found in chocolate, especially dark chocolate. Verbal working memory is important for reasoning, language comprehension, planning, and spatial processing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single dose of dark and white chocolate administration on verbal working memory in medical students. Methods A study of experimental pre-post test design with...

  18. Dark chocolate administration improves working memory in students

    OpenAIRE

    Nawanto Agung Prastowo; Samuel Kristanto; Poppy Kristina Sasmita

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have positive effects on health, including the nervous system. High flavonoid content can be found in chocolate, especially dark chocolate. Verbal working memory is important for reasoning, language comprehension, planning, and spatial processing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single dose of dark and white chocolate administration on verbal working memory in medical students. Methods A study of experimental pre-post test design with...

  19. Personality, Vocational Interests, and Work Values of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Interests, personality, and values figure prominently in work motivation, yet little research has examined the combined influence of these factors on vocational behavior. The present study therefore examined relationships among these variables in a sample of 282 medical students (169 women, 113 men) who responded to the Strong Interest Inventory,…

  20. Exploring Urban Students' Constructions about School, Work, Race, and Ethnicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L.; Murphy, Kerri A.; Kenny, Maureen E.; Jernigan, Maryam; Perez-Gualdron, Leyla; Castaneda, Tani; Koepke, Margaret; Land, Marie; Urbano, Alessandra; Davis, Ophera

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study is an exploration of 32 urban high school students' narratives about the connection between school, work, and societal expectations of their future success related to their racial and ethnic background. The sample varied along 2 contextual dimensions: participation in a psychoeducational intervention (Tools for Tomorrow) and…

  1. Work Placements for Languages Students: A Transformative Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organ, Alison

    2016-01-01

    A work placement module is compulsory in the second year of most degree programmes at York St John University, as part of an institution-wide strategy to embed employability in the curriculum. As most languages students spend their second year studying abroad, the Languages in the Workplace module was designed in such a way that the setting up of…

  2. Voice Assessment of Student Work: Recent Studies and Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhouse, Barry; Carroll, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Although relatively little attention has been given to the voice assessment of student work, at least when compared with more traditional forms of text-based review, the attention it has received strongly points to a promising form of review that has been hampered by the limits of an emerging technology. A fresh review of voice assessment in light…

  3. Intelligent Agents To Support Students Working in Groups Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Janice; Staniford, Geof; Beer, Martin; Scown, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Describes initial investigations into the problems encountered when college students undertake online group projects and introduces a method for designing intelligent software agents capable of recognizing and alleviating problems concerned with the maintenance roles of group project work. Discusses computer mediated communication and user…

  4. Personality, Vocational Interests, and Work Values of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Borges, Nicole J.; Hartung, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Interests, personality, and values figure prominently in work motivation, yet little research has examined the combined influence of these factors on vocational behavior. The present study therefore examined relationships among these variables in a sample of 282 medical students (169 women, 113 men) who responded to the Strong Interest Inventory,…

  5. Dark chocolate administration improves working memory in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawanto Agung Prastowo

    2016-04-01

    Dark chocolate as a single dose is capable of improving verbal working memory in students, 3 hours after its consumption. Since cocoa contains multiple bioactive compounds, one approach might be to examine the neurocognitive effects of combinations of potential functional ingredients.

  6. Strategies for Teaching about Trauma to Graduate Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilin, Barbara; Kauffman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Actual exposure to the details of trauma within the classroom setting is considered to be a necessary part of preparation for social work practice with traumatized clients. This article reviews the reasons why it is important for faculty to understand students' possible reactions to exposure to trauma content. One factor believed to increase the…

  7. School Students' Part-Time Work: Understanding What They Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Jim; Hobbs, Sandy; Simpson, Amanda; Anderson, Seonaid; Howieson, Cathy; Semple, Sheila

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that the majority of school students combine full-time education with part-time employment. To date educationalists have paid little attention to this, in part due to the negative views about the "quality" of such work and its effect on educational attainment. In this research, a case study approach is used to explore…

  8. Student Aid: Is It Working Like It's Supposed To?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frances, Carol

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of patterns of federal and state spending on student aid, enrollment patterns, and policies that sometimes work at cross-purposes suggests that, although the machinery is in place for an equitable system, the American people must adjust their spending priorities to invest more seriously in the country's human resources. (MSE)

  9. Strategies for Teaching about Trauma to Graduate Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilin, Barbara; Kauffman, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Actual exposure to the details of trauma within the classroom setting is considered to be a necessary part of preparation for social work practice with traumatized clients. This article reviews the reasons why it is important for faculty to understand students' possible reactions to exposure to trauma content. One factor believed to increase the…

  10. Fairness and respect in nurse educators' work- nursing students' perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Leena; Rinne, Jenni; Stolt, Minna; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2017-03-01

    This study describes how the ethical principles of fairness and respect come true in the work of nurse educators from the perspective of nursing students. Nurse educators' competence of professional ethics is important in providing an ethical role model to nursing students and to professionals in the field of health care. The descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. The data were collected from graduating nursing students (n = 202) in Finland with an internet-based questionnaire consisting of 22 structured questions with 5-point Likert scale. The data were analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings revealed that educators' fairness and respect towards others (colleagues, superiors, mentors, nursing leaders) was good but towards students their fairness did not achieve as good a level. Also, according to the students' assessment, the educators did not respect the students' individual opinions in all cases. Educators' fairness and respect towards their colleagues was satisfactory. The appreciation of educators in the society was reasonably good, but in the opinion of the students the views of educators were not respected very much. As a conclusion, can be said that educators need to put more emphasis on their action. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Learning rights, participation and toleration in student group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiberg, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Group work in the context of higher education is a teaching and learning method which has the aim to facilitate learning processes due to students learning by cooperation and mutual feedback. At the same time group work might offer various challenges on a social, moral and intellectual level....... This article offers a moral perspective on group work by introducing a concept of ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work. The aim of the paper is theoretically to offer a vocabulary concerning ‘learning rights’ of the individual in group work by applying John Dewey’s metaphor ‘the spectator versus...... the participator’ to discuss attitudes concerning toleration in group work with respect to openness, demarcation and not indifferent attitudes to each other....

  12. Did Nongovernmental Monitoring improve Working Conditions in the case of Nike and the Footwear Industry?

    OpenAIRE

    FERDOUS AHAMED, Ph.D

    2013-01-01

    This article examines working conditions in the RMG sector of Bangladesh could improve through effective monitoring system. In a significant case Nike suggested that working conditions and labour rights can be improved through a systematic approach and a comprehensive and transparent monitoring system. External pressure from NGOs and other advocacy groups motivated Nike to introduce a Code of Conduct and a monitoring system. The process is discussed in this section. Conclusion: In conclusion,...

  13. MSc Agriculture students working with ex-campus stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Vibeke; Lund, Mogens; Bendevis, Mira Arpe

    2014-01-01

    general knowledge, in working systematically with complex problems and in reflection on the working process. In a mandatory 9 week full time course we team up with a partner enterprise (a large organic and conventional vegetable producer) with the aim of developing solutions and creating value...... in collaboration with stakeholders. Students are physically on the partner enterprise four times, altogether three weeks, and use Kolb’s learning cycle as a guiding reference through a structured work process. Deliverables from the course are a scientific group report, a group partner document, a group learning...

  14. MSc Agriculture students working with ex-campus stakeholders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langer, Vibeke; Lund, Mogens; Bendevis, Mira Arpe

    2014-01-01

    In the MSc program in Agriculture at University of Copenhagen we experience that both domestic and international students increasingly enter the programme without a contextual background of “agriculture” and with solid, but fragmented disciplinary and applied knowledge acquired in other courses...... general knowledge, in working systematically with complex problems and in reflection on the working process. In a mandatory 9 week full time course we team up with a partner enterprise (a large organic and conventional vegetable producer) with the aim of developing solutions and creating value...... in collaboration with stakeholders. Students are physically on the partner enterprise four times, altogether three weeks, and use Kolb’s learning cycle as a guiding reference through a structured work process. Deliverables from the course are a scientific group report, a group partner document, a group learning...

  15. Work Values of Lithuanian University Students: Internal Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincentas Lamanauskas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Individual’s work values define his/her career purposefulness. Individual’s chosen work values allow foreseeing what activity context and career model is important for him/her, seeking to successfully realize oneself in professional activity. Planning his/her professional career an individual is searching for the activity sphere, which could conform not only to his/her personal features, but also to his/her value orientations. Work values important for the individual allow realizing if they form conditions for planning modern career (successfully solve constantly changing activity problems and to correspond to always new raised requirements for a person in the organisation or in labour market, the realisation of which in today’s constantly changing labour market and social context becomes more and more problematic. Empiric research was carried out seeking to discover the work (activity value structure. The research instrument was created by the authors of the research. Two hundred sixty five first-year students from three Lithuanian universities participated in the research. These are the main higher education institutions, preparing teachers in Lithuania. The obtained results show that work value structure of the first year students studying in social and humanitarian science programmes can be expressed by 6 main factors: responsible activity values, active work values, harmony values, reward values, activity style values, and social status values. Also, the main differences were ascertained between female and male work value structure. Responsible activity values, active work values and harmony values were much more important for female than male students.

  16. Collaborative Project Work Development in a Virtual Environment with Low-Intermediate Undergraduate Colombian Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yakelin Salinas Vacca

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an exploratory, descriptive, and interpretive study in which the roles of discussion boards, the students, the teacher, and the monitors were explored as they constructed a collaborative class project in a virtual environment. This research was conducted in the virtual program of a Colombian public university. Data were gathered through a questionnaire, recordings of conversations through Skype, and artifacts or samples of students’ participation in the discussion boards. The analysis of the data followed the principles of grounded theory. The main findings suggest that as they were doing project work in a virtual environment, students played the role of team workers, the teacher and monitors played shared roles, and the discussion boards served as a facilitating tool.

  17. Career Development and Personal Functioning Differences between Work-Bound and Non-Work Bound Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Peter A.; Patton, Wendy; Hood, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    We surveyed 506 Australian high school students on career development (exploration, planning, job-knowledge, decision-making, indecision), personal functioning (well-being, self-esteem, life satisfaction, school satisfaction) and control variables (parent education, school achievement), and tested differences among work-bound, college-bound and…

  18. Most Important Work Values in Bulgarian University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetoslava Bayrakova

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to identify the most important work values of university students. For this purpose, data from an empirical study among students (N = 208, from different study programmes, are presented. Results obtained with the Bulgarian version of the questionnaire WIS/SVP (OS Bulgaria, 2007 revealed that in 2013 there were some gender significant differences in the respondents’ values. The students’ important values were Economic Security, Personal Development, Ability Utilization, Achievement and Advancement. The data could be used for vocational guidance.

  19. Multicultural student group work in higher education: a study on challenges as perceived by students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Brinkman, B.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.; Kuznetsov, A.M.; Noroozi, O.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to examine challenges that are inherent in multicultural student group work (MCSG) in higher education and the differences between students from different cultural backgrounds in how they perceive the importance of challenges in MCSG. For this purpose, a 19-item survey was completed

  20. Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

  1. Bachelor of Social Work Students and Mental Health Stigma: Understanding Student Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellmann, Karen T.; Madden, Elissa E.; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2014-01-01

    Bachelor-level social work students (n = 198) at a midsized Midwestern public university were surveyed to evaluate their attitudes toward those with mental health concerns. Additionally, students were surveyed regarding their willingness to seek treatment for their own mental health needs. Results of the analyses suggest that the majority of…

  2. WORK EXPERIENCE INTERNSHIP THROUGH THE EYES OF TECHNICAL UNIVERSITY STUDENTS (ON THE MATERIALS OF SOCIOLOGICAL RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr Yu. Myagkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to study the problem of efficiency of work experience internship in a technical university and its role in the education of future professionals (problem has been investigated in the framework of the research project «Monitoring of social well-being and problems of professional adaptation of ISPEU students».Methods. While carrying out of sociological research, selection of respondents was occurred on the multistage combined (serially-nested model of sample among students I, III and V courses of six faculties of full-time course of ISPEU. The complex of questions (its answers show features of professional identity of the future experts on initial (I course, intermediate (III course and finishing (V course stages of their professional formation has been developed to find out the dynamics of process of professional adaptation of students from the first to the fifth year. The information was processed with application of program and analytical complex SPSS. The comparative analysis to a gender sign of degree of satisfaction/dissatisfaction has been undertaken by the work experience internship organization on the side of high school and the accepting enterprises.Results. The level of graduates’ satisfaction with the work experience internship is revealed that works on an estimation by students of quality of preparation in high school, the relation to a received speciality and success in the future profession. The data on a self-estimation of readiness of students to work experience internship is cited. Criteria of successful work experience internship are formulated.Scientific novelty. The given researches carried out by the authors, prove that work experience internship positively influences professional consciousness of students and promote formation of steady positive installations for professional job. However, work experience internship in its institutional forms is functional and appears to be the effective

  3. Isopropanol exposure : environmental and biological monitoring in a printing works

    OpenAIRE

    Brugnone, F; Perbellini, L; Apostoli, P.; Bellomi, M; Caretta, D.

    1983-01-01

    Occupational exposure to isopropanol was studied in 12 workers by testing environmental air, alveolar air, venous blood, and urine during their work shift. Isopropanol, which ranged in environmental air between 7 and 645 mg/m3, was detected in alveolar air, where it ranged between 4 and 437 mg/m3, but not in blood or in urine. Alveolar isopropanol concentration (Ca) was significantly correlated with environmental isopropanol concentration (Ci) at any time of exposure. The value of the arithme...

  4. Where do Foreign Student STEM graduates work after they graduate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Foreign students and entrepreneurs add path-breaking innovative ideas and billions of dollars to the United States economy. This presentation takes a look at where foreign students originate, what degrees and subjects they are pursuing in the U.S., and where they work after they graduate from U.S. universities. With a special focus on STEM degrees and physics, Dr. Ruiz will show how foreign students open up markets in their hometown cities which facilitates trade, foreign direct investment and knowledge transfer. In addition, they infuse revenue into local communities, and they help fill demand for jobs requiring specific skills in local U.S. labor markets. He argues that America's business, educational, and community leaders need to develop better strategies that retain their talents after they graduate. Invited speaker number 44869.

  5. Prospective Teachers Proportional Reasoning and Presumption of Student Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujiyem Sapti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to describe the proportional reasoning of prospective teachers and their predictions about students' answers. Subjects were 4 prospective teacher  7th semester Department of Mathematics Education, Muhammadiyah University of Purworejo. Proportional reasoning task used to obtain research data. Subjects were asked to explain their reasoning and write predictions of student completion. Data was taken on October 15th, 2014. Interviews were conducted after the subjects completed the task and recorded with audio media. The research data were subject written work and interview transcripts. Data were analyzed using qualitative analysis techniques. In solving the proportional reasoning task, subjects using the cross product. However, they understand the meaning of the cross product. Subject also could predict students' reasoning on the matter.

  6. Using consultation in student groups to improve development of team work skills amongst more reluctant students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    the students a very deep learning of the subjects they study and also very good problem solving skills and team work competencies both highly appreciated by the Danish companies. An important aspect of the first semester of the education is a course where the students get tools and tricks for good...... showed less interest in the course than e.g. Software and Computer Science students. The consequences of this are that app. 1/3 of the BAIT students don’t develop their team work skills and competences to the level that is expected. The development of team work skills is closely connected to how...... the theory and methods presented in the CLP course is used in the projects. The idea ofcombining exercises in the course with the use of theory and methods in the project was introduced in 2014: The teams hand in written answers to the exercises and The lecturer visit each team as a consultant two weeks...

  7. Activities for education at work for Medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna León Acebo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: the growing demands of a health professional that combines study and work, school with life and teaching-learning in primary and secondary health care constitute a current social problem for the country.Objective: to design a set of activities for education at work for first year medical students, from the family doctor's office, to contribute to health promotion and disease prevention in the community, favoring the integral formation of future doctors.Methods: the program was designed in work areas for the integrated teaching of biomedical disciplines for contributing to health promotion and disease prevention in "Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” polyclinic in Las Tunas. It carried out the historic and graphical analysis of the problem; students’,  professors’ and community members’ behaviors were observed; interviews and surveys were applied to explore knowledge and experiences of students and health professionals on the promotion of health education at work; workshops on critical opinion and collective elaboration were carried out and permitted to  socialize with other teachers and health professionals the proposed program for its redesign based on collective criticism.Results: the shortcomings caused by the fragmentation of subject contents and biomedical disciplines in education at work were characterized and the plan to help to eliminate the inadequacies that occur in education at work was designed by work areas and determined by the general guidelines for its implementation, without specific indications.Conclusions: the clinical method was applied its pedagogical dimension, allowing the coordination between the traditional methods of teaching-learning and for diagnosing, to contribute to eliminate the spontaneous character in the development of education in the workplace. The program of activities was designed by work areas.

  8. Traditional-Age Students Becoming At-Risk: Does Working Threaten College Students' Academic Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Vasti; Gross, Jacob P. K.; Dadashova, Afet

    2011-01-01

    Using survey information from undergraduate students who work while attending two urban commuter institutions in Indiana, this study explores evidence that on average undergraduates under 21 years of age worked more than 31 hours a week while also enrolled in a full course load. The findings in this study indicate that grade point average and…

  9. Student Affairs Case Management: Merging Social Work Theory with Student Affairs Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sharrika D.; Hazelwood, Sherry; Hayden, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Case management is a functional area in higher education and student affairs that emerged after the mass shootings at Virginia Tech in 2007. Although new to higher education, case management emerged from established social work practice. This article compares social work theory and case management standards with a new case management model for…

  10. Investigating General Chemistry Students' Metacognitive Monitoring of Their Exam Performance by Measuring Postdiction Accuracies over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J.; Dysleski, Lisa; Rickey, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Metacognitive monitoring of one's own understanding plays a key role in learning. An aspect of metacognitive monitoring can be measured by comparing a student's prediction or postdiction of performance (a judgment made before or after completing the relevant task) with the student's actual performance. In this study, we investigated students'…

  11. Investigating General Chemistry Students' Metacognitive Monitoring of Their Exam Performance by Measuring Postdiction Accuracies over Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Morgan J.; Dysleski, Lisa; Rickey, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    Metacognitive monitoring of one's own understanding plays a key role in learning. An aspect of metacognitive monitoring can be measured by comparing a student's prediction or postdiction of performance (a judgment made before or after completing the relevant task) with the student's actual performance. In this study, we investigated students'…

  12. Nutritional quality evaluation of school dinners and monitoring of food habits and their changes at students of multiannual gymnasium

    OpenAIRE

    Havel, David

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this diploma thesis was to evaluate the eating habits of students at a grammar school. We directly monitored students of the first, third, fifth and seventh year of an eight-year grammar school in Trebon during the academic year 2010/2011. The research can be divided into several parts. The first part of this work consists of evaluating the nutritional quality of lunches of selected micronutrients and macronutrients and comparison with the standard requirements for the age brackets...

  13. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Darakananda, K.; Ball, O.; Butti, C.; Yang, G.; Vetter, M.; Grimaldi, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Olivia Ball, Karin Darakananda, Matt Vetter, Grant Yang, Charlotte Butti, Zoe Grimaldi The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of the project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects (A and B) and using randomly determined points within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will analyze the population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high intertidal zone which experiences the greatest amount of human

  14. ASPIRE: Teachers and researchers working together to enhance student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, P. L.; Garay, D. L.; Warburton, J.

    2016-02-01

    Given the impact of human activities on the ocean, involving teachers, students, and their families in scientific inquiry has never been more important. Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines have become key focus areas in the education community of the United States. Newly adopted across the nation, Next Generation Science Standards require that educators embrace innovative approaches to teaching. Transforming classrooms to actively engage students through a combination of knowledge and practice develops conceptual understanding and application skills. The partnerships between researchers and educators during the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE) offer an example of how academic research can enhance K-12 student learning. In this presentation, we illustrate how ASPIRE teacher-scientist partnerships helped engage students with actual and virtual authentic scientific investigations. Scientists benefit from teacher/researcher collaborations as well, as funding for scientific research also depends on effective communication between scientists and the public. While contributing to broader impacts needed to justify federal funding, scientists also benefit by having their research explained in ways that the broader public can understand: collaborations with teachers produce classroom lessons and published work that generate interest in the scientists' research specifically and in marine science in general. Researchers can also learn from their education partners about more effective teaching strategies that can be transferred to the college level. Researchers who work with teachers in turn gain perspectives on the constraints that teachers and students face in the pre-college classroom. Crosscutting concepts of research in polar marine science can serve as intellectual tools to connect important ideas about ocean and climate science for the public good.

  15. Close monitoring as a contextual stimulator : How need for structure affects the relation between close monitoring and work outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietzschel, Eric F.; Slijkhuis, Marjette; Van Yperen, Nico W.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we argue and demonstrate that employees' Personal Need for Structure (PNS) moderates the negative effects of close monitoring on job satisfaction, intrinsic work motivation, and innovative job performance (as rated by their supervisors). In a field study (N=295), we found that emplo

  16. National Wildlife Refuge System Region 7 Inventory and Monitoring Regional Annual Work Plan Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The annual work plan for Region 7 discusses the goals and objectives of the Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program for fiscal year 2012. The introduction...

  17. Region 1 National Wildlife Refuge System Inventory and Monitoring Program : Annual Work Plan : Fiscal Year 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The annual work plan for Region 1 discusses the goals and objectives of the Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) program for fiscal year 2012. The introduction...

  18. Pacific Southwest Region Inventory & Monitoring Initiative: Annual Work Plan FY 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  19. Pacific Southwest Region Inventory & Monitoring Initiative: Annual Work Plan FY 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  20. Pacific Southwest Region Inventory & Monitoring Initiative: Annual Work Plan FY 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  1. Pacific Southwest Region Inventory & Monitoring Initiative: Annual Work Plan FY 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual work plan for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Wildlife Refuge System, Region 8, Inventory and Monitoring Program (I present vision and...

  2. Changes in Knowledge, Attitudes, and Work Preferences Following Courses in Gerontology among Medical, Nursing, and Social Work Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmel, Sara; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Completion of Palmore's Facts on Aging Quiz by 127 medical, 52 nursing, and 45 social work students in Israel revealed that nursing and social work students increased knowledge of aging and that no correlation was found among knowledge, attitudes, and work preferences among any group, implying that increased knowledge about aging does not…

  3. Work at the ALPHA Collaboration as a Summer Student

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Peter Granum

    2017-01-01

    This report covers my work during my stay as a summer student at the ALPHA experiment at CERN in the period 25th June to 18th August 2017. I have been assisting in the daily running of the experiment on equal terms with other people in the collaboration. This implies being on 8 hour morning, afternoon or night shifts. The different types of work I have been doing on the shift are described in this report. Shift work has taken priority over additional projects, which I have also been doing. One project has been the installation of a new detector, which is meant to be part of the setup for a new cooling technique of the positrons with beryllium ions. Another project has been to prepare for the installation of a new sCMOS camera.

  4. Comparison of Orbicularis Oculi Muscle Activity during Computer Work with Single and Dual Monitors

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the orbicularis oculi muscle activity during computer work with single and dual monitors. [Subjects] Ten computer workers 22–27 years of age were included in this study. [Methods] Subjects performed computer work with single or dual monitors, and the activity of the right orbicularis oculi muscle was measured with a MP150 system. [Results] The muscle activity of the orbicularis oculi under condition 1 was significantly decreased compared with that under condition...

  5. The Effects of Work on Leadership Development among First-Year College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salisbury, Mark H.; Pascarella, Ernest T.; Padgett, Ryan D.; Blaich, Charles

    2012-01-01

    A substantial proportion of college students have always worked while pursuing their college degree. However, despite decades of research on working college students, very little consensus has emerged about the effect of work on college student development. This study analyzes Wabash National Study (WNS) data from 2,931 first-year students at 19…

  6. Are Students Who Do Not Participate in Work-Integrated Learning (WIL) Disadvantaged? Differences in Work Self-Efficacy between WIL and Non-WIL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carleen M.; Bates, Lyndel; Bates, Merrelyn

    2016-01-01

    If work-integrated learning (WIL) improves students' work self-efficacy (WSE), are students who do not participate in WIL disadvantaged? This study answers this question by examining differences in WSE between final-year criminal justice students at Griffith University (Brisbane, Australia) who elected to undertake WIL and those who did not.…

  7. An education management information system with simultaneous monitoring of stress stimulators for students Mental Health management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimaran, S; Jayakumar, S; Lakshmi, K Bhagya

    2016-11-14

    Education Management Information System (EMIS) is a widely acceptable and developing technology within the Information Technology field. The advancement in technology in this century is being collaborated with scientific invention or explorer and information strengthening or development. This paper presents the results and experiences gained from applying students oriented EMIS for monitoring and managing mental health. The Mental Health of students depends on the acquiring adequate knowledge on basic concepts within a time period or academic schedule. It's obviously significance to evaluate and appraise the stress stimulators as a challenge or threat. The theoretical framework for the study was designed for analyzing the stress stimulators, academic performance and EMIS accessibility. The sample examined in this study was stratified random sample from 75 students specifically all engineering college in Dindigul District of Tamilnadu. The primary factor is the academic stress stimulators that form one module of EMIS for each of the key variable such as curriculum & instruction related stressors, placement related, teamwork related and assessment related. The Mental Health related stress stimulators namely curriculum & syllabus, placement related, assessment related and team work related have a significant influence on academic performance by students in various institution. The important factor leading to the EMIS application in monitoring stress stimulators is curriculum & syllabus related and assessment related.

  8. Student attitudes towards socially acceptable and unacceptable group working practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Jean D M

    2003-08-01

    While there is much support for co-operative learning among learning theorists, not all learners exhibit the same enthusiasm for groupwork. A number of factors such as sex, group size and ability mix, subject domain, task type and organization have been shown to influence the effectiveness of co-operative and collaborative learning. This study established learners' attitudes to various shared working scenarios. In this mixed design, 140 post-graduate teacher trainees were asked to imagine their responses to seven groupwork scenarios presented as a series of short vignettes. The vignettes varied on the degree of co-operation required; the sex of the prospective co-worker(s) including single and mixed-sex groups; type of assessment, including no assessment at all; and on academically acceptable and unacceptable 'shared' working practices. Anticipated attitudinal and behavioural responses of the students were assessed by questionnaire. On the whole, students were cautiously willing to be involved in groupwork. There were caveats, however. Factors such as the characteristics of the group members, the level and type of assessment procedures in operation, and individual differences, including sex and self-reported social deviance, also governed their responses. There was very limited agreement to be involved in socially undesirable collaborative group activities at a personal level or to condone such activities by others. Those students who showed a tendency towards mild anti-social behaviour were more willing to take direct punitive action against non-contributors than their peers. Female students were more willing to invoke the help of the tutor than their male counterparts, but only if the anti-social behaviour impacted on them personally.

  9. Relation Between Near Work and Myopia Progression in Student Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamedagic, Lejla; Muhamedagic, Belma; Halilovic, Emina Alimanovic; Halimic, Jasmina Alajbegovic; Stankovic, Aleksa; Muracevic, Bedrana

    2014-01-01

    Aim To determine relation between near work and myopia progression in student population. Causes of myopia occurrence are not sufficiently explained. Methods This retrospective-prospective, descriptive research included 100 students with verified myopia up to -3 Dsph. Ophthalmological examination and measurement diopter-hours variable (Dh) were done twice, in the period from January 2011 until January 2012. Results A multivariate regression analysis of impact on the difference of distance visual acuity without correction to the right and left eye and difference of automatic computer refractometry in cycloplegia of both eyes indicates that, diopter-hours variable (Dh) had statistically significant impact on increase of distance visual acuity difference (right eye OR: I measurement–Dh 1.489, II measurement–Dh 1.544, prefractometry in cycloplegia (right eye OR: I measurement 1.361, II measurement 1.493, p<0.05; left eye OR: I measurement 0.931, II measurement 1.019, p<0.05) during both measurements. Conclusion Near work cause the increase of myopia. This research opened a perspective for other researches on the impact of near work on myopia. PMID:24944532

  10. Climate Change Student Summits: A Model that Works (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    The C2S2: Climate Change Student Summit project has completed four years of activities plus a year-long longitudinal evaluation with demonstrated positive impacts beyond the life of the project on both students and teachers. This presentation will share the lessons learned about implementing this climate change science education program and suggest that it is a successful model that can be used to scale up from its Midwestern roots to achieve measurable national impact. A NOAA Environmental Literacy grant allowed ANDRILL (ANtarctic geological DRILLing) to grow a 2008 pilot program involving 2 Midwestern sites, to a program 4 years later involving 10 sites. The excellent geographical coverage included 9 of the U.S. National Climate Assessment regions defined by the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Through the delivery of two professional development (PD) workshops, a unique opportunity was provided for both formal and informal educators to engage their classrooms/audiences in understanding the complexities of climate change. For maximum contact hours, the PD experience was extended throughout the school year through the use of an online grouphub. Student teams were involved in a creative investigative science research and presentation experience culminating in a Climate Change Student Summit, an on-site capstone event including a videoconference connecting all sites. The success of this program was based on combining multiple aspects, such as encouraging the active involvement of scientists and early career researchers both in the professional development workshops and in the Student Summit. Another key factor was the close working relationships between informal and formal science entities, including involvement of informal science learning facilities and informal science education leaders. The program also created cutting-edge curriculum materials titled the ELF, (Environmental Literacy Framework with a focus on climate change), providing an earth systems

  11. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesel, A.; Soave, K.; Dean, A.; Grimaldi, Z.; Buie, A.; Dattels, C.; Steiger, C.; Wallace, K.; Salmi, I.; Tillapaugh, J.

    2011-12-01

    Kathy Soave, Amy Dean, Alexa Boesel, Andrew Buie, Celia Dattels, Zoe Grimaldi, Isabella Salmi, Cameryn Steiger, Joey Tillapaugh, Kathleen Wallace The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species and the requirements for maintaining a healthy, diverse intertidal ecosystem; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within a permanent 100 m2 area, three times per year (fall, winter, and late spring). Using the data collected since 2004, we will once again compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis and Anthopluera elegantissima. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the workings of the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the

  12. A Survey Comparison of Career Motivations of Social Work and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, Randall E.; Buchanan, F. Robert

    2009-01-01

    This survey provides valuable insight for social work educators into the goals and career intentions of working students who pursue master's degrees in social work, as compared to master's degrees in business. Social work graduate students were surveyed and compared to business graduate students in terms of their motivations for seeking advanced…

  13. A Survey Comparison of Career Motivations of Social Work and Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basham, Randall E.; Buchanan, F. Robert

    2009-01-01

    This survey provides valuable insight for social work educators into the goals and career intentions of working students who pursue master's degrees in social work, as compared to master's degrees in business. Social work graduate students were surveyed and compared to business graduate students in terms of their motivations for seeking advanced…

  14. The Effect of Educational Disequilibrium in Field Work on Graduate Social Work Students' Self-Concept and Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Yu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    The author used a mixed methods design to assess field work-related educational disequilibrium and its effect on the self-concept and mental health of MSW students. Twenty-eight advanced, fourth-semester MSW students were compared with 37 entering, first-semester MSW students in practice-related sense of accomplishment. Compared with first-year…

  15. The Similarities and Differences between Working and Non-Working Students at a Mid-Sized American Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, K. Brandon

    2012-01-01

    Using data collected as part of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE), this study examines differences between the grades, time spent preparing for class, involvement in co-curricular activities, time spent socializing and overall enjoyment of their college experience of working and non-working students at a mid-sized public university.…

  16. First year engineering students: Perceptions of engineers and engineering work amongst domestic and international students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Bennett

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite being well ahead of many other disciplines in establishing strong and evidence-based research and practice, engineering in many countries still experiences high rates of student and graduate attrition. One possible reason for this is that students enter engineering study without understanding the realities of either their degree program or engineering work, and without a sense of motivation and commitment. The research reported here aimed to extend understanding of first year engineering students’ thinking about their competencies, identity, self-efficacy, motivation, and career. The study involved over 1,100 first year engineering students enrolled in a common first year unit. Responses were coded using the Engineers Australia graduate competencies as a framework, and this paper reports findings from the most diverse cohort of students (n=260, of whom 49% were international students with English as their second language. The research identified differences between international and domestic students’ perceptions of self and of career competencies, possibly related to self-esteem. Implications include improved confidence and motivation to learn as students consider their strengths, interests and goals. Further, the research raises the need for analysis of international students’ cultural and educational background to determine how different cohorts of international students self-appraise and how they associate learning with their future careers.

  17. "I Hate Group Work!": Addressing Students' Concerns about Small-Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Elizabeth G.

    2016-01-01

    This article identifies the strategies used by architecture professors and their undergraduate students to mitigate common issues that students raise about group work. Based on participant-observation, interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of instructional materials and student work, this IRB-approved ethnographic case study…

  18. Text Composition by Deaf and Hearing Middle-School Students: The Role of Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamargot, Denis; Lambert, Eric; Thebault, Claire; Dansac, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the compositional performances of deaf and hearing students and to investigate the relationships between these performances and working memory capacities. Fifteen prelingually deaf, sign-using students and 15 hearing students composed a descriptive text and performed working memory tasks. The deaf students had…

  19. Health Monitoring and Management for Manufacturing Workers in Adverse Working Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoya; Zhong, Miao; Wan, Jiafu; Yi, Minglun; Gao, Tiancheng

    2016-10-01

    In adverse working conditions, environmental parameters such as metallic dust, noise, and environmental temperature, directly affect the health condition of manufacturing workers. It is therefore important to implement health monitoring and management based on important physiological parameters (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature). In recent years, new technologies, such as body area networks, cloud computing, and smart clothing, have allowed the improvement of the quality of services. In this article, we first give five-layer architecture for health monitoring and management of manufacturing workers. Then, we analyze the system implementation process, including environmental data processing, physical condition monitoring and system services and management, and present the corresponding algorithms. Finally, we carry out an evaluation and analysis from the perspective of insurance and compensation for manufacturing workers in adverse working conditions. The proposed scheme will contribute to the improvement of workplace conditions, realize health monitoring and management, and protect the interests of manufacturing workers.

  20. The Use of Technology in Group-Work: A Situational Analysis of Students' Reflective Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Pamela; Sen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Group work is a powerful constructivist pedagogy for facilitating students' personal and professional development, but it can be difficult for students to work together in an academic context. The assessed reflective writings of undergraduate students studying Information Management are used as data in this exploration of the group work situation…

  1. 20 CFR 404.1028 - Student working for a school, college, or university.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Student working for a school, college, or... Work Excluded from Employment § 404.1028 Student working for a school, college, or university. (a) For... by, or in connection with, the school, college, or university. (c) Whether you are a student...

  2. The Use of Technology in Group-Work: A Situational Analysis of Students' Reflective Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Pamela; Sen, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Group work is a powerful constructivist pedagogy for facilitating students' personal and professional development, but it can be difficult for students to work together in an academic context. The assessed reflective writings of undergraduate students studying Information Management are used as data in this exploration of the group work situation…

  3. Promotion of students' mastery goal orientations : does TARGET work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, Marko; van de Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Finsterwald, Monika; Spiel, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Achievement goal orientations are important for students' ongoing motivation. Students with a mastery goal orientation show the most advantageous achievement and motivational patterns. Much research has been conducted to identify classroom structures which promote students' mastery goal orientation.

  4. Promotion of students' mastery goal orientations : does TARGET work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lüftenegger, Marko; van de Schoot, Rens; Schober, Barbara; Finsterwald, Monika; Spiel, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    Achievement goal orientations are important for students' ongoing motivation. Students with a mastery goal orientation show the most advantageous achievement and motivational patterns. Much research has been conducted to identify classroom structures which promote students' mastery goal orientation.

  5. Off-Campus Work and Its Relationship to Students' Experiences with Faculty Using the College Student Experiences Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakes, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Statistics on the numbers of college students working have shown an increase as students cope with rising costs of education, decreasing financial aid, greater personal financial commitments, and the expectation that students should contribute to the cost of their own education. These facts combined with the students' need to secure employment…

  6. Who wants to work with older people? Swedish student nurses' willingness to work in elderly care--a questionnaire study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Idvall, Ewa

    2015-07-01

    The aging population is a globally recognized challenge for the health care service. The growing number of older people will probably lead to increased demands for nurses working in elderly care. Clinical practice has been shown to have an impact on how student nurses perceive a particular field of nursing. To compare perceptions of the clinical learning environment in nursing homes among students considering a career in aged care or not, and to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience as health care assistants in elderly care between the two groups. This was a cross-sectional study using the Swedish version of the Clinical Learning Environment and Nurse Teacher evaluation scale. Consecutive sampling was performed over three semesters from September 2011 to December 2012. The survey was conducted with 183 student nurses. Mann-Whitney U-test was used to examine differences in relation to two groups namely student nurses who did or did not consider to work in elderly care. A chi-square test of independence was performed to examine the difference in age, gender and previous working experience between the two groups. The analysis leaned towards an overall positive evaluation of the clinical learning environment with more positive values for students considering a career. There were no significant differences between younger students (18-23) and older students (24-50) regarding willingness to work in elderly care or not. Neither was any significant difference displayed between students, based on gender nor for previous work experience. Age, gender and previous work experiences as health care assistants did not impact on students' willingness to work in elderly care. Future studies need to acknowledge the complexity of why student nurses choose a particular pathway in nursing by longitudinal studies following cohorts of students during the course of the nursing programme. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Boarding School Students Monitoring Systems (E-ID Using Radio Frequency Identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herdawatie B.A. Kadir

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Monitoring Boarding school student movement using the old-fashioned study system is inefficient and brings difficulty to the hostel management to check attendance manually. By using RFID technology, student movement is quick and easy. Approach: The application of RFID Matrix Card system as a boarding school students monitoring system (E-ID were purposed to improve school management system and to monitor interest group movement. The RFID tags enable school management to track the students movements in and out of the hostel. An individual without RFID card will trigger the alarm and this will inform school management about availability of students using an online monitoring system. Results: This system used main component of passive RFID system, database management system and wireless networking. When RFID tag pass through the RFID reader in read range zone, system recorded data from the RFID tag to the database system. Data sent online to the management for the supervision of students. This ease management to monitor availability of boarding school students and access the students personal records. Conclusion: This research study offer important implication for monitoring the boarding school students. Although this project cannot control the punctuation of student but it can ease the workload of school management and save time.

  8. Training of Social Science Students to Work With Disabled Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Eugenia Carvajal Palacios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The research project was conducted at the University of Nariño in Pasto with undergraduate students of basic education with emphasis in Social Sciences, to care for people suffering from disabilities, this project enrolled within the qualitative paradigm with critical- social approach; it was participatory research-action, which favored the observation, interviews and workshops. 15 students of social science program and 4 teachers linked to PROFESA School, which was established as teaching and research center practice. The data analysis was performed from the categorial system resulting in the conceptualization of disability, feelings towards disability, work with parents and teacher training to look after people with disabilities. It was evident that at the University of Nariño specifically Welfare services does activities, programs and events to support the educational and social inclusion, however the forming of teachers with academic units still pending task of training on disability, inclusion and diversity. It was found that in the undergraduate program of basic education with emphasis on social sciences there is no problem oriented core, seminar or explicit activity in the curriculum regarding disability as indicated by Decree 2082/1996, which in turn, was established in the legal and indicative benchmark of this research.

  9. RCRA and operational monitoring 1994 fiscal year work plan, WBS 1.5.3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    RCRA & Operational Monitoring (ROM) Program Office manages the direct funded Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Operational Monitoring under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 1.5.3. The ROM Program Office is a Branch of liquid Waste Disposal, a part of Restoration and Remediation of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Fiscal Year Work Plan (FYWP) takes it direction from the Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP). The FYWP provides the near term, enhanced details for the Program Office to use as baseline Cost, Scope and Schedule. Changs Control administered during the fiscal year is against the baseline provided by the FYWP.

  10. Teaching demography: strategies that work with students of all ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, K

    1992-01-01

    Teaching demography is appropriate for all ages depending on how lessons are designed and concrete information is provided. The advice for teaching elementary students is to begin in the 3rd or 4th grades by integrating demography into concepts about the world and the geography of different countries and regions. Population size distribution and structure are appropriate topics. In grades 4-6, tools for understanding size can be integrated into math classes, i.e., reading graphs, learning percentages, and working with place values in the billions. Science classes might focus on environmental problems due to population pressure. Resources from the Population Reference Bureau that are helpful are noted. Comparisons can be made between countries, regions, and states. An assignment might be to create a statistical portrait of a child in a selected country. Population growth might be demonstrated with each child representing a unit, such as 500 million persons; the class should stand in rows in a pyramidal shape expressing different time frames and population growth. Secondary school education may provide conceptualization of complex charts of population growth and global issues. Teenagers are able to manipulate data better even though the materials used are the same for elementary grades. The example is given of a 10th grade class using the tabled data and the MacAtlas software to construct a choropleth map of population concentration in Africa. The indicator was analyzed and compared with 6 countries outside Africa. At the college level it is expected that few have a grasp of population concepts. Students might be asked to analyze projections, discuss data collection processes, or speculate about future trends in any set of indicators. An assignment might be to break the classes into groups representing regions of the world, and select countries that fit the definition of developed or developing (least or moderately). More detailed mapping work is also possible

  11. How do working-memory-related demand, reasoning ability and aversive reinforcement modulate conflict monitoring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja eLeue

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Conflict monitoring is a process of stimulus evaluation and a pre-requisite for subsequent recruitment of cognitive control and behavioral adaptations. This study investigated how experimentally manipulated working-memory-related cognitive demand and aversive reinforcement modulate individual differences of conflict monitoring intensity and behavioral adjustments. Individual differences were assessed by means of an anxiety-related trait dimension (trait-BIS and by means of reasoning abilities–a core determinant of intelligence. Moreover, we investigated the special role of verbal reasoning ability and figural reasoning ability for the modulation of the conflict monitoring intensity. Ninety participants performed a go/nogo task with four conditions each comprising a combination of low vs. high working-memory-related cognitive demand and low vs. high aversive reinforcement. No effect of aversive reinforcement was observed for the N2 amplitude. The fronto-central nogo N2 amplitude was more pronounced for high demand vs. low demand suggesting that cognitive demand served as an aversive costly event. Higher total reasoning abilities were associated with more intense conflict monitoring and shorter response times with increasing aversive reinforcement (defined as verbal error-feedback vs. monetary loss. Individuals with higher trait-BIS scores demonstrated a more intense conflict monitoring even in conditions with low aversive reinforcement and also a more cautious responding (i.e., response times slowing with increasing aversive reinforcement indicating a focus on negative feedback prevention. The findings provide evidence for the conflict-monitoring theory and suggest that working-memory-related demand overrules the impact of aversive reinforcement on conflict monitoring intensity. Reasoning abilities and anxiety-related traits go along with an intensification of conflict monitoring but differences in the flexibility of behavioral adjustment.

  12. How do working-memory-related demand, reasoning ability and aversive reinforcement modulate conflict monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leue, Anja; Weber, Bernd; Beauducel, André

    2014-01-01

    Conflict monitoring is a process of stimulus evaluation and a pre-requisite for subsequent recruitment of cognitive control and behavioral adaptations. This study investigated how experimentally manipulated working-memory-related cognitive demand and aversive reinforcement modulate individual differences of conflict monitoring intensity and behavioral adjustments. Individual differences were assessed by means of an anxiety-related trait dimension (trait-BIS) and by means of reasoning abilities-a core determinant of intelligence. Moreover, we investigated the special role of verbal reasoning ability and figural reasoning ability for the modulation of the conflict monitoring intensity. Ninety participants performed a go/nogo task with four conditions each comprising a combination of low vs. high working-memory-related cognitive demand and low vs. high aversive reinforcement. No effect of aversive reinforcement was observed for the N2 amplitude. The fronto-central nogo N2 amplitude was more pronounced for high demand vs. low demand suggesting that cognitive demand served as an aversive costly event. Higher total reasoning abilities were associated with more intense conflict monitoring and shorter response times with increasing aversive reinforcement (defined as verbal error-feedback vs. monetary loss). Individuals with higher trait-BIS scores demonstrated a more intense conflict monitoring even in conditions with low aversive reinforcement and also a more cautious responding (i.e., response times slowing) with increasing aversive reinforcement indicating a focus on negative feedback prevention. The findings provide evidence for the conflict monitoring theory and suggest that working-memory-related demand overrules the impact of aversive reinforcement on conflict monitoring intensity. Reasoning abilities and anxiety-related traits go along with an intensification of conflict monitoring but differences in the flexibility of behavioral adjustment.

  13. A Group Contingency Plus Self-Management Intervention Targeting At-Risk Secondary Students' Class-Work and Active Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino-Maack, Sylvia I; Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to show that an independent group contingency (GC) combined with self-management strategies and randomized-reinforcer components can increase the amount of written work and active classroom responding in high school students. Three remedial reading classes and a total of 15 students participated in this study. Students used self-management strategies during independent reading time to increase the amount of writing in their reading logs. They used self-monitoring strategies to record whether or not they performed expected behaviors in class. A token economy using points and tickets was included in the GC to provide positive reinforcement for target responses. The results were analyzed through visual inspection of graphs and effect size computations and showed that the intervention increased the total amount of written words in the students' reading logs and overall classroom and individual student academic engagement.

  14. Plan of Work 2010: Towards True Student-Centered Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    European Students' Union (NJ1), 2010

    2010-01-01

    The European Students' Union's (ESU's) vision regarding the Student Centered Learning concept stems from the fundamental belief that the learning process should have at its core learning objectives as they are prioritized by each individual students, also that each (potential) student should be empowered to define those objectives and progress…

  15. Student and staff experiences of attendance monitoring in undergraduate obstetrics and gynecology: a cross-sectional survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deane, Richard P; Murphy, Deirdre J

    2016-01-01

    Despite the widespread introduction of active learning strategies to engage students across modern medical curricula, student attendance and attendance monitoring remain a challenging issue for medical educators...

  16. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, Mike; /Fermilab; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  17. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    CERN Document Server

    Church, Mike; 10.1063/1.3520295

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  18. Assessing and Monitoring Student Progress in an E-Learning Personnel Preparation Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyen, Edward L.; Aust, Ronald J.; Bui, Yvonne N.; Isaacson, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of e-learning in special education personnel preparation focuses on student assessment in e-learning environments. It includes a review of the literature, lessons learned by the authors from assessing student performance in e-learning environments, a literature perspective on electronic portfolios in monitoring student progress, and the…

  19. Monitoring student attendance, participation, and performance improvement: an instrument and forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    When students receive consistent and fair feedback about their behavior, program liability decreases. To help students to have a clearer understanding of minimum program standards and the consequences of substandard performance, the author developed attendance and participation monitoring and performance improvement instruments. The author discusses the tools that address absenteeism, tardiness, unprofessional, and unsafe clinical behaviors among students.

  20. The Impact of Mass Layoffs on the Educational Investments of Working College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ost, Ben; Pan, Weixiang; Webber, Douglas A.

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing how working students weather personal economic shocks is increasingly important as the fraction of college students working substantial hours has increased dramatically over the past few decades. Using administrative data on Ohio college students linked to matched firm-worker data on earnings, we examine how layoff affects the educational outcomes of working college students. Theoretically, layoff decreases the opportunity cost of college enrollment, but it could also make financing...

  1. Boreal partners in flight: Working together to build a regional research and monitoring program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handel, Colleen M.; Bonney, Rick; Pashley, David N.; Cooper, Robert J.; Niles, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Boreal regions of western North America regularly support breeding populations of 130 species of landbirds, including 68 Nearctic-Neotropical migrants. Primary conservation concerns within the region include increased timber harvesting, insect outbreaks, fire suppression, mining, impacts of military training activities, urbanization, and recreational activities. Under auspices of Partners in Flight, biologists, land and resource managers, and conservationists from Alaska and western Canada have combined efforts to develop a regional research and monitoring program for landbirds. An experimental monitoring program has been under way during the past four years to test the relative statistical power and cost-effectiveness of various monitoring methods in Alaska. Joint efforts currently include the Alaska Checklist Project on National Wildlife Refuges, 75 Breeding Bird Surveys along the road system, 122 Off-road Point Count routes, 27 Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship banding sites, and 8 migration banding stations. The ultimate goal is to design a comprehensive monitoring program that is sensitive to changes in population size, survival rates, and productivity, but robust enough to accommodate logistical constraints that arise when working in vast, roadless areas with limited funds and staff. Primary challenges that must be faced to assure the long-term future of such a program are obtaining long-term commitment from resource agencies in the region, integrating this program with other national and regional programs that address those species and habitats that are inadequately monitored by established techniques, and developing cooperative research, monitoring, and management programs at the landscape level.

  2. The Problem of Privilege: Male Social Work Students' Preservice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Male social work students are a numerical minority in Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) programs, a reality that warrants exploration as the academy strives for greater diversity within preservice social work programs. The present qualitative phenomenological study examined how male social work students in one BSW university program perceived their…

  3. Growth monitoring and diagnostic work-up of short stature: An International Inventorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Dekker, F.W.; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background/Aims: Growth monitoring is almost universally performed, but few data are available on which referral criteria and diagnostic work-up are used worldwide for children with short stature. Methods: A short questionnaire, containing questions on auxological screening and on diagnostic criteri

  4. Dimensional comparability of psychosocial working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formazin, M.; Burr, H.; Aagestad, C.; Tynes, T.; Thorsen, S.V.; Perkio-Makela, M.; Díaz Aramburu, C.I.; Pinilla García, F.J.; Galiana Blanco, L.; Vermeylen, G.; Parent-Thirion, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background.In most countries in the EU, national surveys are used to monitor working conditions and health. Since the development processes behind the various surveys are not necessarily theoretical, but certainly practical and political, the extent of similarity among the dimensions covered in

  5. Growth monitoring and diagnostic work-up of short stature: An International Inventorization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grote, F.K.; Oostdijk, W.; Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S.M.P.F. de; Dekker, F.W.; Verkerk, P.H.; Wit, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Background/Aims: Growth monitoring is almost universally performed, but few data are available on which referral criteria and diagnostic work-up are used worldwide for children with short stature. Methods: A short questionnaire, containing questions on auxological screening and on diagnostic

  6. Research progress and prospects on machinery monitoring under varying working condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Jing; Zhao Ming

    2013-01-01

    A general review is given about the research progress of the rotating machinery condition monitoring under varying working condition.The major typical methods for analyzing are reviewed,including their progress,deficiencies and capabilities.Some prospects are given finally.

  7. Dimensional comparability of psychosocial working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formazin, M.; Burr, H.; Aagestad, C.; Tynes, T.; Thorsen, S.V.; Perkio-Makela, M.; Díaz Aramburu, C.I.; Pinilla García, F.J.; Galiana Blanco, L.; Vermeylen, G.; Parent-Thirion, A.; Hooftman, W.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background.In most countries in the EU, national surveys are used to monitor working conditions and health. Since the development processes behind the various surveys are not necessarily theoretical, but certainly practical and political, the extent of similarity among the dimensions covered in thes

  8. Phonological working memory and reading in students with dyslexia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alves Ferreira De Carvalho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate parameters related to fluency, reading comprehension and phonological processing (operational and short-term memory and identify potential correlation between the variables in Dyslexia and in the absence of reading difficulties. Method: One hundred and fifteen students from the third to eighth grade of elementary school were grouped into a Control Group (CG and Group with Dyslexia (GDys. Reading of words, pseudowords and text (decoding; listening and reading comprehension; phonological short-term and working memory (repetition of pseudowords and Digit Span were evaluated. Results: The comparison of the groups showed significant differences in decoding, phonological short-term memory (repetition of pseudowords and answers to text-connecting questions (TC on reading comprehension, with the worst performances identified for GDys. In this group there were negative correlations between pseudowords repetition and TC answers and total score, both on listening comprehension. No correlations were found between operational and short-term memory (Digit Span and parameters of fluency and reading comprehension in dyslexia. For the sample without complaint, there were positive correlations between some parameters of reading fluency and repetition of pseudowords and also between answering literal questions in listening comprehension and repetition of digits on the direct and reverse order. There was no correlation with the parameters of reading comprehension. Conclusion: GDys and CG showed similar performance in listening comprehension and in understanding of explicit information and gap-filling inference on reading comprehension. Students of GDys showed worst performance in reading decoding, phonological short-term memory (pseudowords and on inferences that depends on textual cohesion understanding in reading. There were negative correlations between pseudowords repetition and TC answers and total score, both in listening comprehension.

  9. STUDENT FORUMS AS MOTIVATION FOR CREATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Nelly A. Finskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers participating of students in the annual electronic Student forums of RANS as motivation to continue their scientific activity and research of cross-cultural communication in the sphere of professional education .

  10. Students' Mathematical Work on Absolute Value: Focusing on Conceptions, Errors and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; Özel, Serkan; Gagatsis, Athanasios; Panaoura, Areti; Özel, Zeynep Ebrar Yetkiner

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates students' conceptions of absolute value (AV), their performance in various items on AV, their errors in these items and the relationships between students' conceptions and their performance and errors. The Mathematical Working Space (MWS) is used as a framework for studying students' mathematical work on AV and the…

  11. Understanding Students' Attitudes about Group Work: What Does This Suggest for Instructors of Business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Melanie Beth; O'Connor, Abigail H.

    2013-01-01

    A survey was administered to college students to gain insight into their attitudes about classroom group work. Students responded that group work is generally a positive experience; however, they do not necessarily prefer it to individual assignments. Students' responses also indicated concerns about instructors' motivations for using…

  12. Overcoming Student Resistance to Group Work: Online Versus Face-to-Face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Glenn Gordon; Sorensen, Chris; Gump, Andrew; Heindel, Allen J.; Caris, Mieke; Martinez, Christopher D.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared student group work experiences in online (OL) versus face-to-face (f2f) sections of the same graduate course, over three years, to determine what factors influence student group work experiences and how do these factors play out in f2f versus OL environments. Surveys and student journals suggest that communication issues,…

  13. Group work: Facilitating the learning of international and domestic undergraduate nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Julie; Mitchell, Creina; Del Fabbro, Letitia

    2015-01-01

    Devising innovative strategies to address internationalization is a contemporary challenge for universities. A Participatory Action Research (PAR) project was undertaken to identify issues for international nursing students and their teachers. The findings identified group work as a teaching strategy potentially useful to facilitate international student learning. The educational intervention of structured group work was planned and implemented in one subject of a Nursing degree. Groups of four to five students were formed with one or two international students per group. Structural support was provided by the teacher until the student was learning independently, the traditional view of scaffolding. The group work also encouraged students to learn from one another, a contemporary understanding of scaffolding. Evaluation of the group work teaching strategy occurred via anonymous, self-completed student surveys. The student experience data were analysed using descriptive statistical techniques, and free text comments were analysed using content analysis. Over 85% of respondents positively rated the group work experience. Overwhelmingly, students reported that class discussions and sharing nursing experiences positively influenced their learning and facilitated exchange of knowledge about nursing issues from an international perspective. This evaluation of a structured group work process supports the use of group work in engaging students in learning, adding to our understanding of purposeful scaffolding as a pathway to enhance learning for both international and domestic students. By explicitly using group work within the curriculum, educators can promote student learning, a scholarly approach to teaching and internationalization of the curriculum.

  14. The Impact of an Authentic, Simulated Learning Activity on Student Preparedness for Work-Integrated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola-Richmond, Kelli; Richards, Kieva; Britt, Kellie

    2016-01-01

    Student preparation for work-integrated learning using simulated learning experiences is an under researched field in occupational therapy. In 2013 the Deakin University occupational therapy degree introduced a simulated learning experience for students aimed at preparing them for work-integrated learning experiences. The session gave students an…

  15. Practicing Professional Values: Factors Influencing Involvement in Social Work Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Dorothy; Olate, René; Anderson, Keith A.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most promising avenues for the development of professional values is involvement in professional student organizations. A convenience sample of baccalaureate social work students (n = 482) was drawn from 15 institutions. Regression analyses revealed several predictors of involvement in social work student organizations, including…

  16. Students' Mathematical Work on Absolute Value: Focusing on Conceptions, Errors and Obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elia, Iliada; Özel, Serkan; Gagatsis, Athanasios; Panaoura, Areti; Özel, Zeynep Ebrar Yetkiner

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates students' conceptions of absolute value (AV), their performance in various items on AV, their errors in these items and the relationships between students' conceptions and their performance and errors. The Mathematical Working Space (MWS) is used as a framework for studying students' mathematical work on AV and the…

  17. Implications of Teacher-Student Relationships in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Man Keung

    1975-01-01

    Changes toward a more egalitarian teacher-student relationship are discussed, including elimination of the academic caste system, increased faculty encouragement of student autonomy, reconstruction of fieldwork experiences, increased student involvement in school administration, and individual instruction based on contract. (Editor/PG)

  18. The Effect of Student Working Group Establishment on Teaching General Embryology Course to Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozafar Khazaei

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Quantitative and qualitative enhancement of educational activities is an essential issue. Learners’ cooperation in the teaching process in order to increase teaching effectiveness and promotion is considered significant. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of establishment of student working group on the teaching general embryology course to medical students.Methods: Ten students (1% of medical embryology course were selected to analyze the topics to be taught before each session according to lesson plan, and observe the whole teaching process during lesson presentation. Then, having asked the other students’ viewpoints and discussing with one another, they provided the teacher with a written report on the strengths and weaknesses of the teaching and its problems. The teacher analyzed the problems proposed by the working group to improve teaching process in the next session. At the end of the semester, a questionnaire was administered to all the participants. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics.Results: The mean of students’ scores was 74.26%. The most important findings obtained in this study included positive role of film projection in teaching the materials (95.34%, significance of presentation of various pictures from different books (88.4%, changing students’ attitude toward application of embryology in different diseases (86%, and repetition of previous session’s pictures (83.75%. The weak points mentioned, however, were physical problems of the classroom and deficiency of audio visual equipment.Conclusion: Student working group has a positive impact on the teaching medical general embryology.

  19. An experimental work on wireless structural health monitoring system applying on a submarine model scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, W. H.; Purnomo, N. J. H.; Soedarto, T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental work to monitor the health of submarine hull structures using strain sensors and wireless communication technology. The monitored - submarine hull was built in a hydro elastic model scale 1: 30 with a steel bar backbone and tested on water tank of Indonesian Hydrodynamic Laboratory (IHL). Specifically, this health monitoring system for the submarine model was developed using wireless modems, data communication software and conventional strain sensors. This system was used to monitor the loads on a steel bar backbone of the running submarine model from the edge of the water tank. Commands were issued from a notebook to instruct the health monitoring system to acquire data from sensors mounted externally to the steel bar. Data from measurements made on the structure are then transmitted wirelessly back to a notebook computer for processing and analysis. The results of the tank test have been validated and showed no loss of communication signal over an area of the tank. This work also presents a potential use of involving complete automation of this system with an in-service structure coupled with an on-line warning/damage detection capability.

  20. 20 CFR 645.245 - Who is responsible for oversight and monitoring of Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... monitoring of Welfare-to-Work grants? 645.245 Section 645.245 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING WELFARE-TO-WORK GRANTS General Program and Administrative Requirements § 645.245 Who is responsible for oversight and monitoring of Welfare-to-Work...

  1. “ERGONOMIZATION” OF THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT AND BUILDING UP OF HEALTHY WORKING POSTURE OF DENTAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Lydia G. Katrova; Ivan Ivanov; Marin Ivanov; Кalina Pejcheva

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the knowledge of dental students of the ergonomics’ principles and how they develop adequate skills to work safe in clinic. Methods: A questionnaire, comprising a set of 25 close-ended questions and 2 open-ended questions to rate the knowledge, attitude and motivation regarding the good posture, training environment and real clinical practice’ organization, was distributed among 260 from a total of 685 dental students. Demonstration of proper working posture and trai...

  2. Effects of passive computer use time and non-computer work time on the performance of electronic activity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Yaw-Huei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yeh, Jao-Yu; Liang, Huey-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the effects of passive and non-computer work time on the estimation of computer use times by electronic activity monitoring. A total of 20 subjects with computers were monitored for 3 h. Average relative error for total computer use time estimation was about 4%, given that non-computer work time was 20% of the 3-h monitored period. No significant impact of passive computer use time was found in this study. Non-computer work time of 40% or less is suggested as criteria for the application of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the physical work loading assessment. Statement of Relevance: This research studied the criteria of non-computer work time for the appropriate use of electronic activity monitoring to ensure reliability in the assessment of physical work loading. It is suggested that it should be set to 40% or less of the 3-h monitoring period.

  3. Collaborative Faculty Assessment of Service-Learning Student Work to Improve Student and Faculty Learning and Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Daniel F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper illustrates an approach for using university-wide service-learning student outcomes to assess student work for the purpose of improving service-learning student and faculty learning and course design. The author and a colleague used this approach to study the author's service-learning course. The results of this study generated an…

  4. “ERGONOMIZATION” OF THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT AND BUILDING UP OF HEALTHY WORKING POSTURE OF DENTAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia G. Katrova

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose was to assess the knowledge of dental students of the ergonomics’ principles and how they develop adequate skills to work safe in clinic. Methods: A questionnaire, comprising a set of 25 close-ended questions and 2 open-ended questions to rate the knowledge, attitude and motivation regarding the good posture, training environment and real clinical practice’ organization, was distributed among 260 from a total of 685 dental students. Demonstration of proper working posture and training in it had been given to 4-th and 5-th year’ students. The process was registered by photos. Data were treated statistically using SPSS. 16.1. Results: Most of students report they know the right working posture (52,6% or “have an idea” (36,6%. Almost all of them are persuaded it is important to work in good posture (95,9%. They would like to be trained in ergonomics (96,4%, and think it should be done before graduation (90,2%. Students agree on integrating ergonomic training into the clinical training and think it is possible (73,6%. The students originating from “dental” families demonstrated higher interest in ergonomics. The photos taken before the training showed that knowledge without practice is not stable. Conclusion: The students understand the importance of the practical application of the dental ergonomics principles. Registering skills is an important education tool. The findings of the research support the argument for integrating ergonomics in clinical studies.

  5. Teaching Note--Ask the Audience: Using Student Response Systems in Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Terri; Mann, Aaron R.; Lieberman, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Social work educators are uniquely tasked with balancing content while helping students evaluate personal biases and develop ethical conduct necessary for social work professionalism. Social work education may benefit from technology like Student Response Systems (SRS) that allow educators to pose questions on sensitive topics in real time while…

  6. Effect of Daily Work on Student's Memorization Ability in Piano Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toptas, Baris

    2016-01-01

    It is very important for a student to study regularly so that the results of effective training given by the teacher can be positive. It is an inevitable fact that daily and regular work will bring success to students. Therefore, daily work is highly important in music education. Daily work in instrumental education, which is a part of music…

  7. "I Didn't Feel Equipped": Social Work Students' Reflections on a Simulated Client "Coming Out"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H.; Bogo, Marion; Katz, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined social work students' reflections on and experiences working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, queer, and questioning persons and addressing the intersection of race/ethnicity and sexuality within practice. This study explored current master's of social work student (n = 11) and recent graduate (n = 7) reflections on…

  8. Improving Student Confidence in Using Group Work Standards: A Controlled Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Wong, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This is a replication of a study that examined the effects of teaching foundation competencies in group work to social work students and assessed their self-confidence in applying these skills. This study improves on the first by utilizing a controlled design. Method: Twenty-six master of social work students were taught group work…

  9. Habitus Transformation and Hidden Injuries: Successful Working-Class University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    As the numbers of working-class students at university grow, we need to gain a better understanding of the different ways in which they consolidate their working-class habitus with the middle-class culture of the academic field. Drawing on data from a four-year longitudinal, qualitative study of working-class students at a large,…

  10. Multitasking, but for What Benefit? The Dilemma Facing Nigerian University Students Regarding Part-Time Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gbadamosi, Gbolahan; Evans, Carl; Obalola, Musa Adebayo

    2016-01-01

    Students working part-time while studying for a full-time university degree are commonplace in many Western countries. This paper, however, examines the historically uncommon part-time working activities and career aspirations among Nigerian university students. In particular, how working is perceived to contribute to developing employability…

  11. Exploring Students' Group Work Needs in the Context of Internationalisation Using a Creative Visual Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Andrew; Chiles, Prue; Care, Leo

    2012-01-01

    While UK universities see group work as essential to building higher order intellectual and team skills, many international students are unfamiliar with this way of studying. Group work is also a focus of home students' concerns. Cultural differences in the interpretation of space for learning or how spatial issues affect group work processes has…

  12. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  13. Applying Group Work to Improve College Students' Oral English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yongmei

    2009-01-01

    After a brief introduction, this paper dwells on the merits of group work, and then suggested the evaluation methods of group work. The author also mentioned the Demerits of group work and how to avoid them.

  14. Who Can Help Working Students? The Impact of Graduate School Involvement and Social Support on School-Work Facilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyland, Rebecca L.; Winkel, Doan E.; Lester, Scott W.; Hanson-Rasmussen, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    A significant number of employees attend graduate school, and the impact of the student role may be substantial and valuable to the work-life literature. In this study the authors examine whether psychological involvement in graduate school increases school-work facilitation. Further, they suggest that employers and graduate schools can provide…

  15. Teacher Working Conditions Are Student Learning Conditions: A Report on the 2006 North Carolina Teacher Working Conditions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Eric; Emerick, Scott

    2007-01-01

    Governor Easley of North Carolina has made a sustained commitment to listening to educators and reforming schools to create the working conditions necessary for student and teacher success. With three iterations of the working conditions survey and about 150,000 responses to critical questions about their workplace, analyses have been consistent…

  16. Quality Indicators and Expected Outcomes for Social Work PhD Programs: Perceptions of Social Work Students, Faculty, and Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petr, Christopher G.; Harrington, Donna; Kim, Kyeongmo; Black, Beverly; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.; Bentley, Kia J.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents and discusses the results of a national survey of social work PhD students, faculty, and administrators (n = 416), conducted by the Group for the Advancement of Doctoral Education in Social Work (GADE), in December 2012. The survey was undertaken to inform the updating of GADE's 2003 "Guidelines for Quality in Social…

  17. The Relation between Supervisor Self-Disclosure and the Working Alliance among Social Work Students in Field Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Clare

    2011-01-01

    The author examined supervisor self-disclosure and the supervisory working alliance with the hope of adding to research-supported techniques in field work supervision. Students enrolled in an MSW program at a large urban university were asked to complete a survey on the frequency and content of their supervisor's self-disclosures and on their…

  18. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK — SUBJECT INFORMATIONEDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to consider the characteristics of the electronic textbook as the subject of the information-educational environment, which ensures the unity both of the procedural and substantive aspects of training.Results. The evolution of views on the electronic textbook in the course of the expansion and awareness of the didactic potential of information and communication technologies is shown. The structure of the electronic textbook is presented in the paper. It includes the following modules: information (invariant content of education and the expansion of its variability; organizational and procedural (variable-based assignments aimed at acquiring information, as well as a means of reflection and evaluation of results; personal (information and telecommunication means of organizing own knowledge; communicative (the field of information and assessment of interaction; and pedagogical (monitoring cognitive activity of students. The structure has been developed with due regard to the need of independent work of a student with the content of education in information and educational environment.Scientific novelty. The features of the independent work of the student in terms of abundance of information through information and communication technologies are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the development of independent cognitive activity of students, their subject position in education. On this bases, the key position that should be considered during the development of the electronic textbook are specified: cognitive activity is considered as an active process of constructing students’ new knowledge based on earlier formed personal experience; personal experience arises as a result of intellectual and cognitive activity of the student; cognition of something new requires an activity in the field of social communication; the efficiency of absorption of the content of education depends on the conditions of implementation of each

  19. ELECTRONIC TEXTBOOK — SUBJECT INFORMATIONEDUCATIONAL ENVIRONMENT OF INDEPENDENT WORK OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena O. Ivanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to consider the characteristics of the electronic textbook as the subject of the information-educational environment, which ensures the unity both of the procedural and substantive aspects of training.Results. The evolution of views on the electronic textbook in the course of the expansion and awareness of the didactic potential of information and communication technologies is shown. The structure of the electronic textbook is presented in the paper. It includes the following modules: information (invariant content of education and the expansion of its variability; organizational and procedural (variable-based assignments aimed at acquiring information, as well as a means of reflection and evaluation of results; personal (information and telecommunication means of organizing own knowledge; communicative (the field of information and assessment of interaction; and pedagogical (monitoring cognitive activity of students. The structure has been developed with due regard to the need of independent work of a student with the content of education in information and educational environment.Scientific novelty. The features of the independent work of the student in terms of abundance of information through information and communication technologies are analyzed. Special attention is paid to the development of independent cognitive activity of students, their subject position in education. On this bases, the key position that should be considered during the development of the electronic textbook are specified: cognitive activity is considered as an active process of constructing students’ new knowledge based on earlier formed personal experience; personal experience arises as a result of intellectual and cognitive activity of the student; cognition of something new requires an activity in the field of social communication; the efficiency of absorption of the content of education depends on the conditions of implementation of each

  20. To Work or Not to Work: Student Employment, Resiliency, and Institutional Engagement of Low-Income, First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Edward F.; Bilges, Dolores C.; Shabazz, Sherrille T.; Miller, Rhoda; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the difference between two college persistence factors--resiliency and institutional engagement--for low-income, working, first-generation college students. Participants in the study consisted of 52 respondents to the Family History Knowledge and College Persistence Survey. Among respondents, 50 students reported…

  1. Learning to Speak: Student Work. Female Studies X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfelt, Deborah Silverton, Ed.

    The tenth volume in a series, this publication is a collection of papers produced by college students in women's studies classes around the country. The major purpose of the collection is to provide teachers and students in the field with access to the products of classes other than their own. Most of the writings come from the humanities or from…

  2. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  3. Mature Students Speak Up: Career Exploration and the Working Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pott, Terilyn

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study was undertaken to learn more about how mature students perceive the career counselling process in a post-secondary institution. Through the use of critical incident technique this study examined how three mature students interpret their relationship between themselves and their counsellors. Significant factors identified as…

  4. Learning to Teach Literacy through Collaborative Discussions of Student Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Marie Tejero; Parker-Katz, Michelle; Balasubramanian, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high numbers of students with disabilities struggling with literacy, few teachers report feeling well prepared to address it. Most students with disabilities encounter challenges in reading and professional development can help teachers learn a range of ways to address those. In this article, we discuss a professional development…

  5. What Works for Doctoral Students in Completing Their Thesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Siân

    2015-01-01

    Writing a thesis is one of the most challenging activities that a doctoral student must undertake and can represent a barrier to timely completion. This is relevant in light of current and widespread concerns regarding doctoral completion rates. This study explored thesis writing approaches of students post or near Ph.D. completion through…

  6. How Movies Work for Secondary School Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coencas, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Joseph Coencas shows scenes from films to help special education students improve their visual and auditory skills, build confidence in their abilities to talk about and analyze the components of a narrative, and feel comfortable engaging in class discussion and writing. He also encourages students to pursue their interests in subjects they have…

  7. Managing Student Behavior during Large Group Guidance: What Works Best?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarto, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Participants provided information pertaining to managing non-task-related behavior of students during large group guidance lessons. In particular, school counselors were asked often how often they provide large group guidance, the frequency of which students exhibit off-task and/or disruptive behavior during guidance lessons, and techniques they…

  8. Working with Shy or Withdrawn Students. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere

    This ERIC digest focuses on students who are commonly described as shy (inhibited, lacking in confidence, socially anxious) or withdrawn (unresponsive, uncommunicative, or daydreaming). Symptoms of shyness or withdrawal may appear as part of the student's overall personality or as a situation-specific response to a particular stress factor.…

  9. New Challenges in Working with Traditional-Aged College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keup, Jennifer R.

    2008-01-01

    Although the transition from high school to college is a predictable rite of passage for students in their late teens and early twenties, much about the nature of these students and their environments is changing. In this chapter, the author focuses on four of the many new issues that have an effect on the transition experience of today's…

  10. METHODS OF STATISTICAL MONITORING OF PROFESSIONAL ORIENTATION WORK OF SOCIAL EDUCATORS IN PERSONAL LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr M. Korniiets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the application of social services WEB 2.0 for personal learning environment creation that is used for professional orientation work of social educator. The feedback is must be in personal learning environment for the effective professional orientation work. This feedback can be organized through statistical monitoring. The typical solution for organizing personal learning environment with built-in statistical surveys and statistical data processing is considered in the article. The possibilities of the statistical data collection and processing services on the example of Google Analytics are investigated.

  11. Self-Monitoring Interventions for At-Risk Middle School Students: The Importance of Considering Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briere, Donald E., III; Simonsen, Brandi

    2011-01-01

    Self-monitoring is a popular, efficient, and effective intervention that is associated with improved academic and social behavior for students across age and ability levels. To date, this is the first study to directly compare the outcomes of self-monitoring functionally relevant and non-relevant replacement behaviors. Specifically, we used an…

  12. Water Quality Monitoring: An Environmental Studies Unit for Biology 20/30. Student Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberta Environment, Edmonton. Environmental Education Resources Branch.

    The objective of this environmental studies unit is to establish a water quality monitoring project for high school students in Alberta while simultaneously providing a unit which meets the objectives of the Biology 20 program (and which may also be used in Biology 10 and 30). Through this project, students assist in the collection,…

  13. An exploratory survey of Spanish and English nursing students' views on studying or working abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Benny; Jones, Ray; Sanchón Macias, Marivi

    2008-04-01

    Student mobility within Europe is encouraged by the EU's 'Bologna process' and financially supported by the Socrates programme. However, relatively few UK nursing students travel to Europe for study. To compare the willingness to study or work abroad and the perceived barriers and benefits of doing so, amongst students in England and Spain. Third year nursing students completed a 15 item questionnaire on work and study abroad. Spanish students were younger than UK students, had fewer family commitments, and better language skills. There was little difference between Spanish and UK students in wanting to study abroad, UK students named English speaking countries as likely destinations. Spanish students named Italy; the UK and USA were also popular. Perceived barriers for UK students were funding, family, and language. Family commitments were not a major problem for Spanish students. Spanish were more likely than English students to see language as a problem. UK and Spanish Nursing students are equally enthusiastic about studying or working abroad but UK students have limited language skills, are less able to access Socrates funding for European destinations, and given their age and family commitments, funding is a barrier for 'non-Socrates' destinations.

  14. Laboratory Works Designed for Developing Student Motivation in Computer Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Petre Ogrutan; Lia Elena Aciu

    2017-01-01

    In light of the current difficulties related to maintaining the students’ interest and to stimulate their motivation for learning, the authors have developed a range of new laboratory exercises intended for first-year students in Computer Science as well as for engineering students after completion of at least one course in computers. The educational goal of the herein proposed laboratory exercises is to enhance the students’ motivation and creative thinking by organizing a relaxed yet compet...

  15. Financing College in Hard Times: Work and Student Aid

    OpenAIRE

    Leisenring, Amy; Santos, Jose Luis; Orfield, Gary

    2011-01-01

    These are the third in a series of reports exploring the impact of California's fiscal crisis on the opportunities for underrepresented students in the California State University system. Although the Master Plan for Higher Education called for tuition-free affordable college for all qualified California students, the fiscal reality of California has led to the abandonment of that promise and rapidly rising tuition and other costs of college. Over the last decade, the California State Univers...

  16. Business process improvement: an electronic system to monitor compliance with medical resident work hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landesman, Linda Young; Markowitz, Forest; Conde, Nelson

    2010-01-01

    The limitation of medical intern and resident work hours, known as the Bell 405 regulations, was initiated in New York State in 1989 with a modification to the state hospital code. The Bell 405 regulations were strengthened in 2000, and facilities would now be fined for noncompliance. Monitoring systems in place at that time were insufficient to provide an adequate level of review for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) with more than 7,000 medical residents whose training is based at or who rotate through these public hospitals. A "simple to use," yet comprehensive, method of monitoring compliance needed to be developed to ensure that residents and interns complied with laws regulating working hours. The subsequent development of national accreditation standards increased the stakes for reliable scrutiny. HHC developed and implemented a Web-based Structured Query Language (SQL) application that facilitated easy access to work hour surveys captured through electronic time sheets. The time sheet data automatically entered a database that provided instant analysis of conformance to state law. The development of an electronic on-line application accessible from anywhere allowed HHC to efficiently identify nonconformance and pinpoint corrective action. Since the inception of the application and its expansion allowing access through the intranet, 26,000 individual time sheets have been submitted for evaluation. With the national movement regulating work hours, other hospitals still at the pencil and manual computation stage would greatly benefit by developing a similar application.

  17. Use of Stewart Control Chart Technique in Monitoring Student Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Akinrefon

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Students' academic performance was assessed using quality control techniques. Results show that performance of students was out of control using mean chart (X ̅-Chart with Central Limit (CL = 2.35, Upper Control Limit (UCL = 3.20 (although grade points above this limit may not necessarily be regarded as out-of-control-points for academic performance and Lower Control Limit (LCL = 1.51. Similarly, students' performance was also found not to be in control using Standard Deviation (S-Chart with Central Limit (CL = 0.71, Upper Control Limit = 1.34, Lower Control Limit = 0.001 approximately.The chart shows point falling below lower control limit (1.51; that is, students with poor performance. This can be adopted as a bench mark for assessing whether or not students should proceed to the next academic level, some sort of 'Academic Good-Standing'. Above the upper control limit are exceptional/ good results. The average performance of students is 2.35 which corresponds to third class grade; this implies that on average, students graduate with third class.

  18. Experiencing Work: Supporting the Undergraduate Hospitality, Tourism and Cruise Management Student on an Overseas Work Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Philip; Busby, Graham

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a funded research project into the experiences of tourism, hospitality and cruise management students on internship outside the UK as part of their British university degree between 2007 and 2009. The research reflected on the perceptions of students, course managers, placement officers and members of university placement…

  19. Experiencing Work: Supporting the Undergraduate Hospitality, Tourism and Cruise Management Student on an Overseas Work Placement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Philip; Busby, Graham

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on a funded research project into the experiences of tourism, hospitality and cruise management students on internship outside the UK as part of their British university degree between 2007 and 2009. The research reflected on the perceptions of students, course managers, placement officers and members of university placement…

  20. Work All Day, Study at Night: The Interactive Evening Lecture to Invigorate Working Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gerard Stone was asked to present the evening lecture in a first-year undergraduate accounting subject. The aim of the subject matter was to provide students with an understanding of fundamental accounting issues and concepts. The subject coordinator advised Stone that, from past experience, most students who attend the evening lecture would be…

  1. Work All Day, Study at Night: The Interactive Evening Lecture to Invigorate Working Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gerard

    2014-01-01

    Gerard Stone was asked to present the evening lecture in a first-year undergraduate accounting subject. The aim of the subject matter was to provide students with an understanding of fundamental accounting issues and concepts. The subject coordinator advised Stone that, from past experience, most students who attend the evening lecture would be…

  2. Strengthening the "Work" in Federal Work-Study: Improving Access to Financial Aid and Career-Related Work Experience for Low-Income and Post-Traditional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenefick, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Low-income students must increasingly rely on work and loans to meet the high costs of college. Too often, though, the jobs they take are not in their field of study, which can impair the potential for career exploration and improved employment outcomes in the future. Despite the need to combine work and school in a meaningful way, only a limited…

  3. Understanding nursing students' perspectives on the grading of group work assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Morgan; Rogers, John

    2014-03-01

    Grading group work assessments so that students perceive the grade to be fair to all group members is sometimes challenging. This is particularly important in a higher education environment that is increasingly concerned with student perceptions of teaching quality and satisfaction. This article reports on research that compared undergraduate nursing students perceptions of two different approaches to the grading of group work assessment. A survey design was used to identify students' perspectives and preferences for different group work assessment methods. Participants were undergraduate bachelor of nursing students from a large, metropolitan university in Australia. Data analysis indicated that the perceptions of students around group work assessments changed little as they progressed across the program, although students who had experienced the calculation of individual grades for a group assessment preferred this approach. Many believed the grading of group assessments penalised good students and were less reliable than individual assessments. Students maintained the belief that teamwork skills were essential for the registered nurse role. In conclusion group work assessment should only be used when it is the best assessment method to demonstrate student learning of specific objectives. The weighted mark approach is the group work assessment grading approach of choice.

  4. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation with Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use…

  5. Challenges Social Work Students Encounter in International Field Placements and Recommendations for Responsible Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Lenore E.; Lough, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Social work students often face personal and institutional challenges prior to, during, and after international field placements. If not managed, these challenges may compromise students' professional development and hinder their meaningful contribution to placements abroad, which is of particular concern when students from the Global North are…

  6. Students' Reflections on Industry Placement: Comparing Four Undergraduate Work-Integrated Learning Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Karen; Mylonas, Aliisa; Benckendorff, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    This paper compares four work-integrated learning (WIL) streams embedded in a professional Development course for tourism, hospitality and event management students. Leximancer was used to analyze key themes emerging from reflective portfolios completed by the 137 students in the course. Results highlight that student learning outcomes and…

  7. Overcoming Barriers in Intimate Partner Violence Education and Training of Graduate Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Pamela D.; Nouer, Simonne S.; Mackey, SeeTrail N.; Banet, Megan S.; Tipton, Nathan G.

    2012-01-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a highly prevalent problem detected frequently in the social work field, and also extends to the personal lives of social workers and students, with compelling evidence that professionals and students are often victims of IPV. However, students continue to lack substantive knowledge of IPV. This article addresses…

  8. Working with Schools To Ease Student Transition to the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lemuel W.

    2000-01-01

    Interinstitutional collaboration can help educators in local communities identify and respond to the unique challenges they face. Student support services at high schools and community colleges can work together to design programs (e.g. new student orientations, counselor-to-counselor activities, staff development) to assist students in their…

  9. High Schools that Work and Tech Prep: Improving Student Performance in Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, Jim

    2000-01-01

    Test results for 244 agricultural education students in High Schools that Work (HSTW) sites in North Carolina indicated that, compared to all students at HSTW sites and to college-prep students, they failed to meet HSTW goals in math, reading, and science but were making progress. Their math and science performance was higher than other vocational…

  10. Reconceptualizing Teacher-Student Relationships to Foster School Success: Working Alliance within Classroom Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toste, Jessica R.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher-student relationship has been shown to be a powerful predictor of students' classroom and school adjustment. Beyond the characteristics of warmth, trust, and bond that define an emotional connection, a positive working relationship also includes a sense of collaboration and partnership shared between the teacher and the student. Classroom…

  11. First-Year Students' Employment, Engagement, and Academic Achievement: Untangling the Relationship between Work and Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pike, Gary R.; Kuh, George D.; Massa-McKinley, Ryan C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among first-year students' employment, engagement, and academic achievement using data from the 2004 National Survey of Student Engagement. A statistically significant negative relationship was found between working more than 20 hours per week and grades, even after controlling for students' characteristics…

  12. The Challenges, Persistence, and Success of White, Working-Class, First-Generation College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightweis, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This essay addresses persistence and success of an underrepresented group enrolled in college who are white, working-class first-generation students. The discussion examines these college students and the challenges they face. The discussion analyzes why first-generation college students persist while others do not. Additionally, the discussion…

  13. The Effects of the Federal Work-Study Program on Student Persistence and Accrued Loan Debt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Ronatta Daphne

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of participation and non-participation in a federal work-study (FWS) program on student persistence and accrued student debt for undergraduate students enrolled in a small, public, four-year, liberal arts college in the South. Sanford's (1967) theory of Challenge and Support and Tinto's (1986) Integration Model were…

  14. Third-Country National Students and Trainees in the EU: Caught between Learning and Work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. de Lange

    2015-01-01

    Foreign students and trainees are welcomed by the EU for study purposes. Member States must ensure that during their studies third-country national (TCN) students can legally work for at least ten hours a week, whereas trainees may not. This article deals with these often overlooked TCN students and

  15. Promoting Election-Related Policy Practice among Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritzker, Suzanne; Burwell, Christianna

    2016-01-01

    Political involvement is an integral component of the social work profession, yet there is no explicit reference to social work participation in election-related activities in either the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics or the Council on Social Work Education Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards. Social work…

  16. Activities of the US-Japan Safety Monitor Joint Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard L. Savercool; Lee C. Cadwallader

    2004-09-01

    This paper documents the activities of the US-Japan exchange in the area of personnel safety at magnetic and laser fusion experiments. A near-miss event with a visiting scientist to the US in 1992 was the impetus for forming the Joint Working Group on Fusion Safety. This exchnge has been under way for over ten years and has provided many safety insights for both US and Japanese facility personnel at national institutes and at universities. The background and activities of the Joint Working Group are described, including the facilities that have been visited for safety walkthroughs, the participants from both countries, and the main safety issues examined during visits. Based on these visits, some operational safety ideas to enhance experiment safety are given. The near-term future plans of the Safety Monitor Joint Working group are also discussed.

  17. Teaching Standards-Based Group Work Competencies to Social Work Students: An Empirical Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgowan, Mark J.; Vakharia, Sheila P.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Accreditation standards and challenges in group work education require competency-based approaches in teaching social work with groups. The Association for the Advancement of Social Work with Groups developed Standards for Social Work Practice with Groups, which serve as foundation competencies for professional practice. However, there…

  18. How Do Students Perceive the International Dimension in Social Work Education?: An Enquiry among Swedish and German Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trygged, Sven; Eriksson, Bodil

    2012-01-01

    Globalization, internationalization, and regionalization affect domestic social work. This paper explores how undergraduate students perceive international aspects of their social work education. A questionnaire was distributed to social work undergraduates in Stockholm, Sweden (n = 97), and Darmstadt, Germany (n = 43). Results showed that a…

  19. Self-monitoring of pace to improve math fluency of high school students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Anthony; McDougall, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    This study illustrates how a behavioral self-management intervention, which combined tactile and visual cued self-monitoring, self-graphing, and goal setting, improved the math fluency of five high school students with various disabilities during independent math practice. The intervention helped students monitor, adjust, and increase the pace at which they produced answers to simple addition and subtraction problems during daily 3-minute sessions. Using the self-management techniques, the students systematically increased the number and pace of correct responses, and concurrently, kept the number of error responses minimal and maintained or improved accuracy of responses. The paper includes recommendations for teaching students how to monitor their own academic performances rather than relying on teachers.

  20. Influences on Interdisciplinary Collaboration among Social Work and Health Sciences Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is an effective and satisfying way to provide health care services and learning across professions. This study aimed to explore interdisciplinary collaboration experiences amongst social work and allied health sciences graduate students and examined factors that contributed to their interdisciplinary collaboration. An interdisciplinary survey was conducted in a Mid-Atlantic public university. Analysis was conducted using hierarchical regressions from 112 health sciences and social work students. Students with positive attitudes toward interdisciplinary health care teams and part-time students compared to full-time students presented higher flexibility of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students with positive experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration demonstrated higher levels of interdependence, compared to those with no and negative experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students in medicine were less likely to show interdependence, compared to those in social work. Professional disciplines and educators should put efforts in offering opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration practice and building curricula to promote positive attitudes toward interdisciplinary teamwork.

  1. Monitoring study of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren in the Russian Federation regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vyacheslavovich Chegodaev

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research into the quality of work with talented schoolchildren in the Russian Federation subjects. It shows that it is the regional and municipal levels that should be most actively involved in the identification and development of such children. The author suggests his methodology of calculating the integral index of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren in the regional educational systems. The article shows that Russia’s territories differ considerably according to this indicator. The highest value of the index is registered in the Volga Federal District (average rating is 0.499 and the Central (0.480 Federal District. The constituent entities of the North Caucasian (0.303 and Far Eastern (0.358 federal districts have the lowest average rating. The regions were divided into five groups by the index of quality of work with gifted schoolchildren. The Vologda Oblast joined the group in which the level of quality of work with gifted schoolchildren was above average; the Oblast ranked 22nd in the country and 5th in the Northwestern Federal District. The Oblast has the greatest progress by the set of indicators “Olympiad movement” (6th place among Russian regions. According to some indicators, the Oblast’s results were below the threshold indicators. The dynamics of the integral index of the quality of work with gifted students for 2012–2013 was analysed by the cross grouping of the regions according to the level and rate of growth (decline of the integral index. The Vologda Oblast was included in the group of regions with low growth rates of the integral index (94%, which creates the risk of decrease in the quality of work with gifted students. The article states the main reasons for the integral index decline; it also suggests certain measures for the improvement of the quality of work with gifted schoolchildren

  2. A social work study on aggressive behavior among Iranian students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Iravani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive behavior has many bad effects on people's health care and lifestyle and any attempt to find the main issues influencing aggressive behavior among young students could help setup appropriate programs to control and possibly reduce aggressive attitudes. The proposed study of this paper performs an empirical study to find out the relationship between aggressive behavior and other important factors such as gender, age, etc. The survey uses a well-known questionnaire introduced by Buss and Perry (The aggression questionnaire, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 63, 452-459, 1992. The survey distributes 50 questionnaire consists of different questions based on Likert scale among 25 female and 25 male students. The questionnaire consists of various questions including anger, physical aggression, verbal aggression and hostility. The results indicate that while there is no meaningful difference between aggression attitudes of female and male students (with p-value<0.001, the aggressive attitudes increases among older male students but this aggressive reduces among female students as they get older.

  3. "I Hate Group Work!": Addressing Students' Concerns About Small-Group Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth G. Allan, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies the strategies used by architecture professors and their undergraduate students to mitigate common issues that students raise about group work. Based on participant-observation, interviews with students and faculty, and analysis of instructional materials and student work, this IRB-approved ethnographic case study complicates the separation of collaborative, cooperative, and problem-based learning into distinct pedagogical models. Rather than viewing students’ concerns as a form of resistance that can be avoided with the right approach to small-group learning, this article explores how the hybrid model operating in design studio pedagogy confronts the problems inherent in any form of group work.

  4. Attitudes about Mental Illness and Professional Danger among New Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Matthew T.; Lodato, Gayle A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study comparing attitudes toward mental illness and perceptions of professional danger among new social work students (n=64) and other university students (n=111). Such topics have implications for social work education and curriculum development but have not been studied adequately. Results from…

  5. What Makes Social Work Students Implement Evidence-Based Practice Behaviors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Yaron; Enosh, Guy; Havron, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to recognize the factors influencing social work students' evidence-based practice (EBP) behaviors. The authors sought to examine the roles of attitudes, EBP feasibility, and familiarity with EBP in implementing EBP behaviors. Social work students (161 in total) completed a self-report questionnaire measuring…

  6. Research Learning Attributes of Graduate Students in Social Work, Psychology, and Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert G.; Bretzin, Antoinette; Leininger, Christine; Stauffer, Rose

    2001-01-01

    Compared the self-reported research anxiety, computer anxiety, and research orientations of 149 full-time graduate social work, psychology, and business students at a research university. Found that social work students reported more research and computer anxiety and generally believed that research was less important to their profession that…

  7. Attitudes about Mental Illness and Professional Danger among New Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Matthew T.; Lodato, Gayle A.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the results of a study comparing attitudes toward mental illness and perceptions of professional danger among new social work students (n=64) and other university students (n=111). Such topics have implications for social work education and curriculum development but have not been studied adequately. Results from…

  8. Self-Efficacy, Curriculum Content, Practicum Experience, and the Interest of Social Work Students in Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the linkages among perceptions of self-efficacy, curriculum, and field experience on students' attitudes and interest in working with older adults. Graduate level social work students were surveyed regarding perceived self-efficacy to intervene with older adult clients, the amount of aging content in the master of social…

  9. Self-Efficacy, Curriculum Content, Practicum Experience, and the Interest of Social Work Students in Gerontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the linkages among perceptions of self-efficacy, curriculum, and field experience on students' attitudes and interest in working with older adults. Graduate level social work students were surveyed regarding perceived self-efficacy to intervene with older adult clients, the amount of aging content in the master of social…

  10. Students' Use of the Interactive Whiteboard during Physics Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellingsaeter, Magnus Strøm; Bungum, Berit

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how the interactive whiteboard (IWB) may facilitate collective meaning-making processes in group work in engineering education. In the case, first-year students attended group-work sessions as an organised part of a basic physics course at a Norwegian university college. Each student group was equipped with an…

  11. Social Work Students and Self-Care: A Model Assignment for Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharon E.; Bledsoe, Linda K.; Perry, Armon R.; Robinson, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    The literature reveals scant research on self-care practices among social work students; yet self-care is vital as students prepare to be practitioners who are not only effective in working with all aspects of the clients' total selves, but who are themselves healthy. They are not prepared to be good practitioners unless they have first learned to…

  12. Integration of Work Experience and Learning for International Students: From Harmony to Inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly Thi; Soejatminah, Sri

    2017-01-01

    The integration of work experience and learning in tertiary education is a complex issue for different stakeholders, including students, institutions, and employers. The provision of course-related work experience for international students is far more challenging as it involves issues of visa status, different cultural expectations,…

  13. Work-Plan Heroes: Student Strategies in Lower-Secondary Norwegian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalland, Cecilie P.; Klette, Kirsti

    2014-01-01

    This article explores how individualized teaching methods, such as the use of work plans, create new student strategies in Norwegian lower secondary classrooms. Work plans, which are frequently set up as instructional tools in Norwegian classrooms, outline different types of tasks and requirements that the students are supposed to do during a…

  14. Relational Mentoring of Doctoral Social Work Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Sheriff, Fariyal; Berry Edwards, Janice; Orme, Julie

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the distinctive mentoring experiences of social work doctoral students at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). With a philosophical emphasis on social justice, self-determination, racial identity and pride, and social integration, social work faculty at HBCUs mentor African American and other students in PhD…

  15. Don't Erase that Whiteboard! Archiving Student Work on a Photo-Sharing Website

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Edward; Tsui, Stephen; Hart, Alicia; Saucedo, Lydia

    2011-01-01

    Students in physics courses often use whiteboards to brainstorm, solve problems, and present results to the rest of the class, particularly in courses involving collaborative small group work and whole class discussions. The whiteboards contain a valuable record of students' collaborative work. Once a whiteboard is erased, however, its contents…

  16. Differences in Work, Levels of Involvement, and Academic Performance between Residential and Commuter Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, Halley J.; Eduljee, Nina B.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between work, levels of involvement and academic performance between residential and commuter students. One hundred and eight undergraduate students at a private college in the Northeast were surveyed. Surveys aimed at examining work and levels of involvement were administered to the…

  17. The Meaning of Work among Chinese University Students: Findings from Prototype Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sili; Leung, S. Alvin; Li, Xu

    2012-01-01

    This study examined Chinese university students' conceptualization of the meaning of work. One hundred and ninety students (93 male, 97 female) from Beijing, China, participated in the study. Prototype research methodology (J. Li, 2001) was used to explore the meaning of work and the associations among the identified meanings. Cluster analysis was…

  18. Desired Characteristics for MSW Students and Social Work Employees: Cognitive versus Personal Attributes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seipel, Michael M. O.; Johnson, Jennifer D.; Walton, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Selecting the best students and hiring the best social workers are important professional responsibilities. Findings from this exploratory study identify personal attributes that are significant in enabling MSW students and social work employees to succeed. Social work educators and agency administrators generally agree that personal attributes…

  19. Keep It Positive: Using Student Goals and Appraisals to Inform Small Group Work in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-McConney, Amanda; Wosnitza, Marold; Donetta, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    In teaching science, small group work is often recommended and frequently used. In this study, we asked 130 students about their personal goals and views (appraisals) of small group work in science. We found significant relationships between students' personal goals and their views of doing science in small groups. We discuss the practical…

  20. Promising Homework Practices: Teachers' Perspectives on Making Homework Work for Newcomer Immigrant Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Hee Jin

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the homework practices of eight teachers working in a high school designed to serve newcomer immigrant students. Individual structured interviews were conducted in which teachers working in an innovative setting explained their purposes of assigning homework, their beliefs about factors affecting their students' homework…

  1. Student- Directed Projects: An International Case Study for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowa, Gina A.; Ansong, David

    2010-01-01

    Student-directed projects are increasingly becoming a common phenomenon in schools of social work across the United States. Students acquire a great learning experience from these projects, which sharpen their skills in leadership, innovation, and practice. Social work practitioners who go through such a process emerge having acquired knowledge…

  2. Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

  3. Collaboration among Social Work and Journalism Students and Faculty: An Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Susan; Ekman, Eve; English, Dierdre; Fujimori, Sachi

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe an instructional model designed to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among students pursuing master's degrees in social work and journalism. This unique model involved active collaboration among social work and journalism graduate students and faculty to create a single-issue magazine focused on a diverse range of social…

  4. Exploring Baccalaureate Social Work Students' Self-Efficacy: Did It Change over Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Bonnie; Boykin, Lolita; Hebert, Corie; Kulkin, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    This study explored baccalaureate social work students' self-efficacy at a rural southern university. Bandura's concept of self-efficacy is used as a theoretical base for the study. Students (N = 43) in introductory social work courses and in the field practicum course completed the Foundation Practice Self Efficacy Scale. Following The Council on…

  5. Instructions, Independence and Uncertainty: Student Framing in Self-Regulated Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklof, Anders; Nilsson, Lars-Erik; Ottosson, Torgny

    2014-01-01

    This study presents an approach to student interaction in self-regulated project work. By combining frame analysis and socio-cultural risk theory, the authors explore the importance of students' framing activities as a basis for their understanding of tasks. The increase in self-regulated work in Swedish schools can be seen as being in line with…

  6. Bosnian and American students' attitudes toward electronic monitoring: is it about what we know or where we come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muftić, Lisa R; Payne, Brian K; Maljević, Almir

    2015-06-01

    The use of community corrections continues to grow across the globe as alternatives to incarceration are sought. Little research attention, however, has been directed at correctional alternatives from a global orientation. The purpose of this research study is to compare the way that a sample of criminal justice students from the United States (n = 118) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (n = 133) perceive electronic monitoring. Because electronic monitoring is a newer sentencing alternative and it is used differently in Bosnia and Herzegovina than it is in the United States, it is predicted that Bosnian students will view electronic monitoring differently than will students from the United States. This study finds that while students are largely supportive of electronic monitoring sentences, support is affected by offender type and student nationality. For example, Bosnian students are more supportive of electronic monitoring sentences for drug offenders while American students are more supportive of electronic monitoring sentences for juvenile offenders. Differences were also found across student groups when attitudes toward electronic monitoring and the costs and pains associated with electronic monitoring were assessed. Specifically, American students were less likely to view electronic monitoring as meeting the goals of rehabilitation and more likely to view the conditions and restrictions associated with electronic monitoring as being punitive than Bosnian students were. Implications from these findings, as well as limitations and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  7. Neural Networks: Making Connections about the Brain and about College while Monitoring Student Engagement in Second Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Kristina S

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a neuroscience outreach program developed by college undergraduates and aimed at second graders. Over a period of four weeks, twenty-five Denison students enrolled in a non-majors course on gender and the brain visited twenty-four second grade classrooms to engage a total of 464 students. We had a mission to both promote college awareness and to specifically bring some brain science into the classroom. The desire to engage students with the brain was in part a wish to celebrate brain awareness week and in part a wish to follow a feminist tenet of bridging theory and practice via activism. The college students chose six activities: a brain puzzle, a sock content guessing game, a jelly bean olfaction and taste test, mystery noises, a message transmission game, and a version of tag. During our outreach with the second graders, my students monitored student engagement and compared engagement between male and female second graders. Engagement was high for nearly all activities but girls were more engaged than boys during the brain puzzle and jelly bean activities. Effect sizes measured as Cohen's "d" statistics were small to large (0.2 to 0.93). The other four activities (mystery socks, mystery noises, message transmission and neuron chain tag) showed no difference in engagement between male and female second graders. Our program benefited the Denison students as well, introducing many to community involvement and awakening in them an interest in teaching or working with kids.

  8. ASPIRE: Teachers and researchers working together to enhance student learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lollie Garay

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM disciplines have become key focus areas in the education community of the United States. Newly adopted across the nation, Next Generation Science Standards require that educators embrace innovative approaches to teaching. Transforming classrooms to actively engage students through a combination of knowledge and practice develops conceptual understanding and application skills. The partnerships between researchers and educators during the Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE offer an example of how academic research can enhance K-12 student learning. In this commentary, we illustrate how ASPIRE teacher–scientist partnerships helped engage students with actual and virtual authentic scientific investigations. Crosscutting concepts of research in polar marine science can serve as intellectual tools to connect important ideas about ocean and climate science for the public good.

  9. Making Mobile Learning Work: Student Perceptions and Implementation Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon W. Tabor

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices are the constant companions of technology users of all ages. Studies show, however, that making calls is a minimal part of our engagement with today’s smart phones and that even texting has fallen off, leaving web browsing, gaming, and social media as top uses. A cross-disciplinary group of faculty at our university came together in the mLearning Scholars group to study the potential for using mobile devices for student learning. The group met bi-weekly throughout a semester and shared thoughts, ideas, resources, and examples, while experimenting with mobile learning activities in individual classes. This paper summarizes student perceptions and adoption intent for using mobile devices for learning, and discusses implementation issues for faculty in adding mobile learning to a college course. Outcomes reflect that mobile learning adoption is not a given, and students need help in using and understanding the value in using personal devices for learning activities.

  10. College student employment and drinking: a daily study of work stressors, alcohol expectancies, and alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Adam B; Dodge, Kama D; Faurote, Eric J

    2010-07-01

    We examined the within-person relationships between daily work stressors and alcohol consumption over 14 consecutive days in a sample of 106 employed college students. Using a tension reduction theoretical framework, we predicted that exposure to work stressors would increase alcohol consumption by employed college students, particularly for men and those with stronger daily expectancies about the tension reducing properties of alcohol. After controlling for day of the week, we found that hours worked were positively related to number of drinks consumed. Workload was unrelated to alcohol consumption, and work-school conflict was negatively related to consumption, particularly when students expressed strong beliefs in the tension reducing properties of alcohol. There was no evidence that the effects of work stressors were moderated by sex. The results illustrate that employment during the academic year plays a significant role in college student drinking and suggest that the employment context may be an appropriate intervention site to address the problem of student drinking.

  11. The interplay between uncertainty monitoring and working memory: Can metacognition become automatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Mariana V C; Redford, Joshua S; Church, Barbara A; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Couchman, Justin J; Smith, J David

    2015-10-01

    The uncertainty response has grounded the study of metacognition in nonhuman animals. Recent research has explored the processes supporting uncertainty monitoring in monkeys. It has revealed that uncertainty responding, in contrast to perceptual responding, depends on significant working memory resources. The aim of the present study was to expand this research by examining whether uncertainty monitoring is also working memory demanding in humans. To explore this issue, human participants were tested with or without a cognitive load on a psychophysical discrimination task that included either an uncertainty response (allowing the participant to decline difficult trials) or a middle-perceptual response (labeling the same intermediate trial levels). The results demonstrated that cognitive load reduced uncertainty responding, but increased middle responding. However, this dissociation between uncertainty and middle responding was only observed when participants either lacked training or had very little training with the uncertainty response. If more training was provided, the effect of load was small. These results suggest that uncertainty responding is resource demanding, but with sufficient training, human participants can respond to uncertainty either by using minimal working memory resources or by effectively sharing resources. These results are discussed in relation to the literature on animal and human metacognition.

  12. Identifying and Working with Elementary Asperger's Students in Rural America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Barton; Loiacono, Vito; Vacca, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, somewhere in a rural American school sits an elementary-aged student who has been labeled by a teacher and his/her peers as the "Little Professor" according to the Asperger's Syndrome Coalition of the United States. The onset of Asperger's Syndrome is recognized and occurs later than what is typical of autism. A significant…

  13. The LD Student and Social Integration: Getting It to Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosensweig, Jill; Vacca, Dorothy

    1983-01-01

    A five session program that involved empathy, sensitivity exercises, and a visit to a resource room reduced the ostracizing by fifth graders of their learning disabled peers. The program was designed to deal with the students' values to excel and their typical preadolescent fear of being different from peers. (CL)

  14. Working through Whiteness: White, Male College Students Challenging Racism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Nolan L.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study relies on Freire's conception of liberatory praxis to examine White male college students' becoming aware of racism and translating awareness into action. The participants developed racial cognizance via cross-racial contact and course content. They also tended to be open to interrogating racism and racial privilege due to…

  15. Strategic Teaching: Student Learning through Working the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanbroek, Nancy

    2010-01-01

    The designers of our future built environment must possess intellectual tools which will allow them to be disciplined, flexible and analytical thinkers, able to address and resolve new and complex problems. In response, an experimental and collaborative design studio was designed to inspire and build on students' knowledge and their creative…

  16. Group Project Support Agents for Helping Students Work Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Janice; Staniford, Geof; Beer, Martin; Scown, Phil

    1999-01-01

    Discusses group projects in distance learning, describes factors affecting the successful completion of group projects, and considers whether agent technology (self-contained, concurrently executing software processes that encapsulate the current state in terms of knowledge) is able to support students doing group projects. (LRW)

  17. An Agent System to Support Student Teams Working Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatley, Janice

    2004-01-01

    Online learning is now a reality, with distributed learning and blended learning becoming more widely used in Higher Education. Novel ways in which undergraduate and postgraduate learning material can be presented are being developed, and methods for helping students to learn online are needed, especially if we require them to collaborate with…

  18. Creating a Climate for Change: Students, Teachers, Administrators Working Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Susan; Gard, Jane

    1993-01-01

    Staff and students at an Illinois high school recently decided to challenge all previously held assumptions about all school operations. For this group, school was best viewed as culture (not bureaucracy) dependent on collaboration, shared leadership, and flat organizational structure. Group identified communication styles matching their approach,…

  19. Student Loan Guarantee Agencies and Their Financing. A Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Janet S.; Wolfe, Mark L.

    Guarantee agencies and their financing are discussed in order to increase awareness of their role and to provide information for policy decisions. Information is provided on: the history of the Guaranteed Student Loan (GSL) program, sources and uses of funds by state guarantee agencies for fiscal years (FY) 1982 and 1984, federal advances repaid…

  20. Guide to Working with Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    PEPNet, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This handbook was created for professors, high school teachers and vocational teachers new to interacting with Deaf and Hard of Hearing students. Topics include a general understanding of deafness, classroom accommodations, and communication tips. Appendices include: (1) A Professor Shares His Experience; (2) A Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor…

  1. An Inquiry into Workplace Incivility: Perceptions of Working Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ashley E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential mixed methods study was to examine and determine the level of incivility in the workplace as a growing problem from the perceptional views of graduate students enrolled in accelerated degree programs for graduate studies in Business Administration, Criminal Justice Administration, Gerontology, Health Management, and…

  2. "Going Paperless": The Case for Electronic Submission of Student Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    This article advances the discussion about "Going paperless," how it will save ink and paper, perhaps even a tree over the course of a semester. The author mentions that the sustainability task force on campus may present an award, while eco-conscious students may applaud the willingness of faculty to "go green." Still other…

  3. ASPIRE: Teachers and researchers working together to enhance student learning

    OpenAIRE

    Lollie Garay; Anna Marie Wotkyns; Kate E. Lowry; Janet Warburton; Anne-Carlijn Alderkamp; Yager, Patricia L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) disciplines have become key focus areas in the education community of the United States. Newly adopted across the nation, Next Generation Science Standards require that educators embrace innovative approaches to teaching. Transforming classrooms to actively engage students through a combination of knowledge and practice develops conceptual understanding and application skills. The partnerships between researchers and educators during ...

  4. Identifying Maths Anxiety in Student Nurses and Focusing Remedial Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Maths anxiety interferes with maths cognition and thereby increases the risk of maths errors. To initiate strategies for preventing anxiety-related errors progressing into nursing practice, this study explored the hypothesis that student nurses experience high maths anxiety in association with poor maths performance, and that high maths anxiety is…

  5. An Inquiry into Workplace Incivility: Perceptions of Working Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Ashley E.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this sequential mixed methods study was to examine and determine the level of incivility in the workplace as a growing problem from the perceptional views of graduate students enrolled in accelerated degree programs for graduate studies in Business Administration, Criminal Justice Administration, Gerontology, Health Management, and…

  6. Teachers Know Best: Making Data Work for Teachers and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2015

    2015-01-01

    As part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's broader efforts to improve educational opportunities for all students, the "Teachers Know Best" research project seeks to encourage innovation in K-12 education by helping product developers and those who procure resources for teachers better understand teachers' views. The original…

  7. "Who Leaves?" Teacher Attrition and Student Achievement. Working Paper 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Donald; Grossman, Pamela; Lankford, Hamilton; Loeb, Susanna; Wyckoff, James

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes attrition patterns among teachers in New York City public elementary and middle schools and explores whether teachers who transfer among schools, or leave teaching entirely, are more or less effective than those who remain. We find that the first-year teachers who are less effective in improving student math scores have higher…

  8. Preaching Our Practice: On Sharing Professional Work with Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelbaum, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Describes one teacher-author's classroom use of interview samples, editors' comments, and other materials from his own article-then-in-progress for the "New York Times Magazine." Describes how students, who were creating their own in-depth magazine articles, could see principles and techniques discussed in class applied on a professional level.…

  9. Tablets in English Class: Students' Activities Surrounding Online Dictionary Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunting, Leona

    2015-01-01

    Tablets have become increasingly popular among young people in Sweden and this rapid increase also resonates in school, especially in classrooms for younger children. The aim of the present study is to analyze and describe how the students deal with the open instructions for a task of using online dictionaries on tablets. Specific focus is on how…

  10. Business Education Students' Evaluation of the Benefits and Challenges Confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme in Edo and Delta States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olumese, H. A.; Ediagbonya, Kennedy

    2016-01-01

    This research paper specifically investigated Business Education students' evaluation of the benefits and challenges confronting Student Industrial Works Experience Scheme (SIWES) in Edo and Delta States. Two research questions were raised to guide the study and were answered descriptively. The descriptive survey research design was adopted for…

  11. The Impact of Perceived College Students and Psychosocial Factors on Missed Class and Work in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jenifer J.; Borrayo, Evelinn A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of how missed class and work are influenced by psychosocial factors is important. The authors collected data from 303 college students through self-report questionnaires. Moderation analysis indicated that with higher perceived stress, students were more likely to miss class if they were less satisfied with social support and less…

  12. The Impact of Perceived College Students and Psychosocial Factors on Missed Class and Work in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jenifer J.; Borrayo, Evelinn A.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of how missed class and work are influenced by psychosocial factors is important. The authors collected data from 303 college students through self-report questionnaires. Moderation analysis indicated that with higher perceived stress, students were more likely to miss class if they were less satisfied with social support and less…

  13. Bicultural Work Motivation Scale for Asian American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Lung; Fouad, Nadya A.

    2016-01-01

    The bicultural work motivations of Asian Americans have not yet been comprehensively captured by contemporary vocational constructs and scales. For this study, we conducted two studies on the initial reliability and validity of the Bicultural Work Motivation Scale (BWMS) by combining qualitative and quantitative methods. First, a pilot study was…

  14. Teachers' Leadership and Students' Experience of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva; Granstrom, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Group work is used as a means of learning at all levels of most educational systems. However, teachers often use group work without considering its "pros and cons." Such a mode of non-reflected application may sometimes end up in positive experiences and learning, but the likelihood is that the outcome will be the opposite. The aim of this…

  15. Teachers' Leadership and Students' Experience of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammar Chiriac, Eva; Granstrom, Kjell

    2012-01-01

    Group work is used as a means of learning at all levels of most educational systems. However, teachers often use group work without considering its "pros and cons." Such a mode of non-reflected application may sometimes end up in positive experiences and learning, but the likelihood is that the outcome will be the opposite. The aim of…

  16. Students' Progression in Monitoring Anomalous Results Obtained in Inquiry-Based Laboratory Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crujeiras-Pérez, Beatriz; Jiménez-Aleixandre, Maria Pilar

    2017-07-01

    This paper examines students' engagement in monitoring anomalous results across a 2-year longitudinal study with 9th and 10th graders (14-15 and 15-16 years of age). The context is a set of five inquiry-based laboratory tasks, requiring students to plan and carry out investigations. The study seeks to examine students' interpretation of data, in particular anomalous results generated by them during the process of solving the tasks, and their ability to monitor them. Data collected include video and audio recordings as well as students' written products. For the analysis, two rubrics were developed drawing on Chinn and Brewer (Cognition and Instruction, 19, 323-393, 2001) and Hmelo-Silver et al. (Science Education, 86, 219-243, 2002). The findings point to a pattern of progress in students' responses across the 2 years: (a) responses revealing a low capacity of monitoring due to not recognizing the data as anomalous or recognizing it as anomalous but being unable to explain their causes are more frequent in the first tasks and (b) responses revealing an improved capacity of monitoring are more frequent in the last tasks. The factors influencing students' regulation of their performances, as the requirement of planning, and specific scaffolding based on activity theory are discussed.

  17. Effluent-Monitoring Procedures: Basic Laboratory Skills. Student Reference Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, William T.; And Others

    This is one of several short-term courses developed to assist in the training of waste water treatment plant operational personnel in the tests, measurements, and report preparation required for compliance with their NPDES Permits. This Student Reference Manual provides a review of basic mathematics as it applies to the chemical laboratory. The…

  18. Laboratory Works Designed for Developing Student Motivation in Computer Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petre Ogrutan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In light of the current difficulties related to maintaining the students’ interest and to stimulate their motivation for learning, the authors have developed a range of new laboratory exercises intended for first-year students in Computer Science as well as for engineering students after completion of at least one course in computers. The educational goal of the herein proposed laboratory exercises is to enhance the students’ motivation and creative thinking by organizing a relaxed yet competitive learning environment. The authors have developed a device including LEDs and switches, which is connected to a computer. By using assembly language, commands can be issued to flash several LEDs and read the states of the switches. The effectiveness of this idea was confirmed by a statistical study.

  19. Stres and burnout related to work with special education needs students in elementary school teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Katja Košir; Marta Licardo; Sara Tement; Katarina Habe

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the predictive value of elementary school teachers' workplace characteristics on work stress and burnout. Workplace characteristics were defined as job demands and resources, which were further divided into general and specific, related to work with special education needs students. We examined whether variables related to work with special education needs students explained incremental variance in stress and burnout above and beyond general workpla...

  20. Schoolcraft vs. Becoming Somebody: Competing Visions of Higher Education among Working-Class College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Allison Hurst

    2010-01-01

    By exploring the meanings working-class students attribute to college and academic success, this article uncovers important and surprising disjunctures between the official view of college as a pathway to social mobility and students’ own needs and aspirations. While some working-class college students do use college as a “ticket out of the working class,” others reject this view, arguing that the twin functions of college as educative and credentialing should be delinked. It is important for...

  1. Personality and professional commitment of students in nursing, social work, and teaching: A comparative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesje, Kjersti

    2016-01-01

    Nurses are often portrayed as possessing specific traits and dispositions associated with care and empathy. The assumption has been that possessing these traits makes nurses competent, engaged, and well suited to their job. This proposition has been mostly normative, and few studies have investigated how this plays out empirically. The aims of this study were to investigate (a) whether possessing a personality trait related to empathy and care was more common among nursing students than students in teaching and social work programs and (b) whether nursing students possessing an affirming personality trait judged themselves to be more suited to their future work - understood as commitment to the profession - than students in teaching and social work. A cross-sectional survey design was used. All first-year students attending seven Norwegian universities and university colleges were invited to participate in the study. Of the 1675 students who participated in the survey, 527 were nursing students, 668 were students in teaching, and 480 were social work students. A response rate of 65 percent was achieved. The survey was conducted by Oslo and Akershus University College in the autumn of 2012. Data collection methods included both a paper-and-pencil questionnaire and an online survey. Instruments used included Blau's Career Commitment Scale and Orlinsky and Rønnestad's Interpersonal Adjective Scale. Analysis of variance and regression analysis were performed on the data. Nursing students did not differ from students in teaching and social work programs in terms of the degree of affirming personality trait. Furthermore, the regression analysis revealed an equally strong association between having an affirming personality trait and being committed to the profession among all these student groups. The results of this study indicate that the narrative of nursing students as individuals who possess a special personality characteristic does not entirely reflect reality

  2. Monitoring Pharmacy Student Adherence to World Health Organization Hand Hygiene Indications Using Radio Frequency Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Andrew S; Cipriano, Gabriela C; Tsouri, Gill; Lavigne, Jill E

    2016-04-25

    Objective. To assess and improve student adherence to hand hygiene indications using radio frequency identification (RFID) enabled hand hygiene stations and performance report cards. Design. Students volunteered to wear RFID-enabled hospital employee nametags to monitor their adherence to hand-hygiene indications. After training in World Health Organization (WHO) hand hygiene methods and indications, student were instructed to treat the classroom as a patient care area. Report cards illustrating individual performance were distributed via e-mail to students at the middle and end of each 5-day observation period. Students were eligible for individual and team prizes consisting of Starbucks gift cards in $5 increments. Assessment. A hand hygiene station with an RFID reader and dispensing sensor recorded the nametag nearest to the station at the time of use. Mean frequency of use per student was 5.41 (range: 2-10). Distance between the student's seat and the dispenser was the only variable significantly associated with adherence. Student satisfaction with the system was assessed by a self-administered survey at the end of the study. Most students reported that the system increased their motivation to perform hand hygiene as indicated. Conclusion. The RFID-enabled hand hygiene system and benchmarking reports with performance incentives was feasible, reliable, and affordable. Future studies should record video to monitor adherence to the WHO 8-step technique.

  3. Space Weather Monitoring for the IHY: Involving Students Worldwide in the Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, D.; Burress, B.; Ross, K.

    2008-06-01

    Our project explores how new methods of space weather data collection and networks of instruments can lead to innovative and exciting ways of involving audiences in the research process. We describe our space weather monitors, being distributed to high school students and universities worldwide for the International Heliophysical Year. The project includes a centralized data collection site, accessible to anyone with or without a monitor. Classroom materials, developed in conjunction with the Chabot Space & Science Center in California, are designed to introduce teachers and students to the Sun, space weather, the Earth's ionosphere, and how to use monitor data to encourage students to undertake "hands-on" research and gain experience with real scientific data. For more information, see \\url{http://sid-stanford.edu}.

  4. Social work knowledge of community-based services for older adults: an educational model for social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Noell L; Faul, Anna C; Birkenmaier, Julie; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn

    2011-02-01

    Social workers are often the key link between older adults, their families and community-based services. Thus, knowledge about older adults and community-based care is imperative for social work practice. Evaluation data are provided on a national multisite effort (N = 353) from 35 schools to assure graduate social work student's competency related to community services for older adults. Results suggest that the educational model as described in this article sets forth positive outcomes in the education of aging savvy social workers. Ongoing social work education is needed to meet the burgeoning needs of the geriatric population.

  5. Providence-St. Mel School: How a School That Works for African American Students Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Michael; Raphael, Lisa; Gallagher, J. David; DiBella, Jeanette

    2004-01-01

    A portrait, using grounded theory qualitative methodologies, was constructed of a K-12 school serving urban, African American students, one producing high achievement. The primary data were observations complemented by questionnaire responses and document analyses. Consistent with conclusions in the effective schooling literature, this school has…

  6. Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, A.; Soave, K.; Costolo, R.; Kudler, J.; Emunah, M.; Hatfield, J.; Kiyasu, J.

    2015-12-01

    Alina Rainsford, Kathy Soave, Julia Kudler, Jane Hatfield, Melea Emunah, Rose Costelo, Jenna Kiyasu, Amy Dean and Sustainable Seas Monitoring Project, Branson School, Ross, CA, United States, Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association, San Francisco, CA, United StatesAbstract:The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima, Cladophora sp. and Fucus sp.. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high

  7. Dimensional comparability of psychosocial working conditions as covered in European monitoring questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formazin, Maren; Burr, Hermann; Aagestad, Cecilie; Tynes, Tore; Thorsen, Sannie Vester; Perkio-Makela, Merja; Díaz Aramburu, Clara Isabel; Pinilla García, Francisco Javier; Galiana Blanco, Luz; Vermeylen, Greet; Parent-Thirion, Agnes; Hooftman, Wendela; Houtman, Irene

    2014-12-09

    In most countries in the EU, national surveys are used to monitor working conditions and health. Since the development processes behind the various surveys are not necessarily theoretical, but certainly practical and political, the extent of similarity among the dimensions covered in these surveys has been unclear. Another interesting question is whether prominent models from scientific research on work and health are present in the surveys--bearing in mind that the primary focus of these surveys is on monitoring status and trends, not on mapping scientific models. Moreover, it is relevant to know which other scales and concepts not stemming from these models have been included in the surveys. The purpose of this paper is to determine (1) the similarity of dimensions covered in the surveys included and (2) the congruence of dimensions of scientific research and of dimensions present in the monitoring systems. Items from surveys representing six European countries and one European wide survey were classified into the dimensions they cover, using a taxonomy agreed upon among all involved partners from the six countries. The classification reveals that there is a large overlap of dimensions, albeit not in the formulation of items, covered in the seven surveys. Among the available items, the two prominent work-stress-models--job-demand-control-support-model (DCS) and effort-reward-imbalance-model (ERI)--are covered in most surveys even though this has not been the primary aim in the compilation of these surveys. In addition, a large variety of items included in the surveillance systems are not part of these models and are--at least partly--used in nearly all surveys. These additional items reflect concepts such as "restructuring", "meaning of work", "emotional demands" and "offensive behaviour/violence & harassment". The overlap of the dimensions being covered in the various questionnaires indicates that the interests of the parties deciding on the questionnaires in

  8. Using Working Agreements in Participatory Action Research: Working through Moral Problems with Malaysian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Vishalache; Cornforth, Sue

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose that taking time before the work begins to develop agreements about how to work together in participatory action research enables researchers to directly address several ethical issues that can be problematic in this type of research: gaining fully informed consent; in-group confidentiality; cultural misconceptions; and…

  9. Enhancing the accuracy of the Fowler method for monitoring non-constant work functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, R.

    2016-04-01

    The Fowler method is a prominent non-invasive technique to determine the absolute work function of a surface based on the photoelectric effect. The evaluation procedure relies on the correlation of the photocurrent with the incident photon energy hν which is mainly dependent on the surface work function χ. Applying Fowler's theory of the photocurrent, the measurements can be fitted by the theoretical curve near the threshold hν⪆χ yielding the work function χ and a parameter A. The straightforward experimental implementation of the Fowler method is to use several particular photon energies, e.g. via interference filters. However, with a realization like that the restriction hν ≈ χ can easily be violated, especially when the work function of the material is decreasing during the measurements as, for instance, with coating or adsorption processes. This can lead to an overestimation of the evaluated work function value of typically some 0.1 eV, reaching up to more than 0.5 eV in an unfavorable case. A detailed analysis of the Fowler theory now reveals the background of that effect and shows that the fit-parameter A can be used to assess the accuracy of the determined value of χ conveniently during the measurements. Moreover, a scheme is introduced to quantify a potential overestimation and to perform a correction to χ to a certain extent. The issues are demonstrated exemplarily at the monitoring of the work function reduction of a stainless steel sample surface due to caesiation.

  10. Students' Views About Secondary School Science Lessons: The Role of Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplis, Rob

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports an interpretive study that sought students' views about the role that practical work plays in their school science lessons. Twenty-nine students aged between 13 and 16 years were selected from three secondary schools in England. Data were collected from initial lesson observations and in-depth interviews in order to explore students' views about practical work. The findings suggest that students have three main reasons why practical work is important in their school science lessons: for interest and activity, including social and personal features such as participation and autonomy; as an alternative to other forms of science teaching involving a pedagogy of transmission, and as a way of learning, including memorizing and recall. The findings are discussed in the context of a critical view of previous work on the role of practical work, work on attitudes to science and on the student voice. The paper concludes that practical work is seen to provide opportunities for students to engage with and influence their own learning but that learning with practical work remains a complex issue that needs further research and evaluation about its use, effectiveness and of the role of scientific inquiry as a component of practical activity.

  11. Strengthening Attainment of Student Learning Outcomes during Work-Integrated Learning: A Collaborative Governance Framework across Academia, Industry and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Amanda; Trede, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Graduate capability and employability are regarded as critical success factors for degree programs by universities, industry, and the students. Furthering work-based experiences for academic credit within degree programs is being increasingly explored to assist employability. Effective work-based experiences are reliant on good partnerships…

  12. Views of Japanese medical students on the work-life balance of female physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Keiko; Nin, Tomoni; Akano, Megumi; Hasuike, Yukiko; Iijima, Hiroko; Suzuki, Keiichirou

    2017-05-11

    To survey medical students on their ideas of future work-life balance and discuss topics for next-generation medical education. First-year (n=372, 34.9% female) and sixth-year medical students (n=311, 44.1% female) responded to a questionnaire on future self, marriage and childcare, and gender differences at the workplace. Responses were compared between academic years and gender. Responses were evaluated by gender and academic year using the Mann-Whitney U test.  Significance was set at pwork part-time. Also among first-year students, greater percentages of female students expected to work part-time or leave their jobs temporarily while raising their children. Compared with first-year male students, first-year female students expected to undertake larger portions of the childcare and housework burden than their partners. However, gender differences in work-life balance and childcare leave vanished in the sixth-year students. Female medical students accepted childcare and housework burdens as inevitable; the work environment they choose might affect their career development. While support from male partners and institutions must be increased, voluntary actions and change in mentality of female students need to be promoted through medical education to prevent them from waiting passively for the situation to change.

  13. Teachers' and Students' Negotiation Moves When Teachers Scaffold Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Gloriana; DeJarnette, Anna F.

    2015-01-01

    Group work has been a main activity recommended by mathematics education reform. We aim at describing the patterns of interaction between teachers and students during group work. We ask: How do teachers scaffold group work during a problem-based lesson? We use data from a problem-based lesson taught in six geometry class periods by two teachers…

  14. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students' Experiences in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students' experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by…

  15. Examining Problems in Project Work Executed in High Schools According to Student and Teacher Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Guner; Yigit, Nevzat; Alev, Nedim

    2009-01-01

    Project work is the primary method which enables practicing the activities that contemporary learning theories suggest. The aim of this study is to determine the issues encountered during project work in accordance with students' and teachers' views in secondary schools physics courses in the city of Trabzon, Turkey where project work has been…

  16. Understanding the Working College Student: New Research and Its Implications for Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perna, Laura W., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that work is a fundamental part of life for nearly half of all undergraduate students--with a substantial number of "traditional" dependent undergraduates in employment, and working independent undergraduates averaging 34.5 hours per week--little attention has been given to how working influences the integration and engagement…

  17. Student Responses to the Women's Reclamation Work in the Philosophy of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcik, Teresa Genevieve; Titone, Connie

    2013-01-01

    Reclamation work denotes the process of uncovering the lost contributions of women to the philosophy of education, analyzing their works, making them accessible to a larger audience, and (re)introducing them to the historical record and canon. Since the 1970s, scholars have been engaged in the reclamation work, thus making available to students,…

  18. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education: Students' Experiences in Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) constitutes a promising way of integrating academia and social work practice because PBL fosters engagement with real-life problems and enhances important skills needed in social work practice. However, little attention has been given to social work students' experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by…

  19. With 1,670 Students--Student Self-Scheduling Works Well for Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, F. Edward

    1976-01-01

    Chesterton High School, which has used both computer scheduling and student self-scheduling, finds the latter method produces the most satisfactory results. In response to Richard Tilwick's article in the November 1975 Bulletin (Student Self-Scheduling: An Unintentional Deception), F. Edward Wall explains why his students and teachers favor…

  20. Student Journey Work: A Review of Academic Library Contributions to Student Transition and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to capture projects, services, and approaches that are being used to ensure student success and sustainability across the stages (or transitions) of the student experience of higher education, where these extend the traditional role of the library, in the UK and internationally. The article examines why the student journey (and…

  1. Action Research: An Approach to Student Work Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    Explains the application of action research to work-based learning, describing the action research cycle and meta learning. Outlines key processes for action research projects: keeping journals, managing dual roles of employee and researcher, managing politics and ethics. Offers suggestions for writing an action research dissertation. (SK)

  2. The Role of Work Placement in Engineering Students' Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blicblau, Aaron Simon; Nelson, Tracey Louise; Dini, Kurosh

    2016-01-01

    Engineering graduates without industrial experience may find that employment is difficult to obtain immediately after completing their studies. This study investigates the impact of two arrangements of work experiences; short term (over 12 weeks, STP) and long-term (over 52 weeks, IBL) on academic grades. This study involved 240 undergraduate…

  3. Teams That Work: Preparing Student Teams for the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Diane D.; Webb, Fred L.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations today often require collaboration in the form of work teams. Many tasks completed within organizations, whether in the workplace or in academia, however, can be beyond the capabilities of individuals alone. Productive teamwork and cooperative activities in business are expected and can begin very early in a person's career. The…

  4. Political Practica: Educating Social Work Students for Policymaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolk, James L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A survey of 131 bachelor's level and 30 master's level programs in social work found that less than 20% of undergraduate and 50% of graduate programs offered practica in government relations, electoral politics, and policy advocacy and development, and that existing practica were almost exclusively in government relations. Recommendations for…

  5. PROJECT WORK BY STUDENTS FOR FIRST DEGREE: AN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    an academic, a solicitor/advocate or judge or write legal opinion(s) for an executive. In writing ... structure as well as the proper footnoting rather than end notes. ..... subsequent references to articles, or to component parts of a larger work, or.

  6. Effect of Frequent Peer-Monitored Testing and Personal Goal Setting on Fitnessgram Scores of Hispanic Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Grant; Downing, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of frequent peer-monitored Fitnessgram testing, with student goal setting, on the PACER and push-up performance of middle school students. Subjects were 176 females and 189 males in 10 physical education classes at a middle school with an 83.7% Hispanic student population. Students were…

  7. PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON STUDENT WORK IN DISTANCE EDUCATION IN TURKEY: Practices and Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Sibel HISMANOGLU; Murat HISMANOGLU

    2009-01-01

    In distance education, providing feedback on student work has a key role in facilitating learning and teacher- student dialogue. This article examines the distance learning context and providing feedback in this great but challenging system. It draws on the experiences of 200 distance learners enrolled in different programs in the Open Education Faculty at Anadolu University in Turkey. Its purpose is to find out whether distance students are provided any feedback by their faculty, whether...

  8. Sustainable Seas Student Intertidal Monitoring Project at Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, A.; Soave, K.; Gerraty, F.; Jung, G.; Quirke-Shattuck, M.; Kudler, J.; Hatfield, J.; Emunah, M.; Dean, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The Sustainable Seas Student Monitoring Project at the Branson School in Ross, CA has monitored Duxbury Reef in Bolinas, CA since 1999, in cooperation with the Farallones Marine Sanctuary Association and the Gulf of Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Goals of this student-run project include: 1) To monitor the rocky intertidal habitat and develop a baseline database of invertebrates and algal density and abundance; 2) To contribute to the conservation of the rocky intertidal habitat through education of students and visitors about intertidal species; 3) To increase stewardship in the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary; and 4) To contribute abundance and population data on key algae and invertebrate species to the national database, LiMPETS (Long Term Monitoring Program & Experiential Training for Students). Each fall student volunteers complete an intensive training course on the natural history of intertidal invertebrates and algae, identification of key species, rocky intertidal monitoring techniques, and history of the sanctuary. Students identify and count key invertebrate and algae species along two permanent transects and, using randomly determined points, within two permanent 200 m2 areas, in fall, winter, and late spring. Using data from the previous years, we will compare population densities, seasonal abundance and long-term population trends of key algal and invertebrate species, including Tegula funebralis, Anthopluera elegantissima, Cladophora sp. and Fucus sp.. Future analyses and investigations will include intertidal abiotic factors (including water temperature, pH and human foot-traffic) to enhance insights into the Duxbury Reef ecosystem, in particular, the high and mid-intertidal zones experiencing the greatest amount of human impacts.

  9. What Predicts Health Students' Self-Reported Preparedness to Work in Indigenous Health Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Jonathan; Roberts, Lynne; Hoffman, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Australian undergraduate programs are implementing curriculum aimed at better preparing graduates to work in culturally diverse settings, but there remains uncertainty over the role of extant student attitudes towards Indigenous Australians. To begin to address this, we obtained baseline data on student attitudes upon entry to tertiary education.…

  10. Attitudes of Jordanian Students towards Using Group Work in EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Sana'

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses itself to the outcomes of a field study which was carried out to identify Jordanian EFL students' attitudes towards using group work in EFL classrooms. The study sample consisted of 179 students enrolled in English 101, an elementary language skills course taught at Al- Huson University College, Al -Balqa' Applied University,…

  11. Working with Textbooks: Reconceptualising Student and Teacher Roles in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Luke; Barrs, Keith

    2013-01-01

    Student reactions to different methods of in-class textbook use have received little attention in the literature on English language teaching. This article explores the responses of 57 Japanese university students to the replacement of teacher-led textbook lessons with small group, role-based textbook work in regular English reading classes.…

  12. What Can Student Work Show? From Playing a Game to Exploring Probability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Merilyn; Hawera, Ngarewa

    2016-01-01

    Rich learning tasks embedded within a familiar context allow students to work like mathematicians while making sense of the mathematics. This article demonstrates how 11-12 year-old students were able to employ all of the proficiency strands while demonstrating a deep understanding of some of the "big ideas" of probabilistic thinking.

  13. What Can Student Work Show? From Playing a Game to Exploring Probability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Merilyn; Hawera, Ngarewa

    2016-01-01

    Rich learning tasks embedded within a familiar context allow students to work like mathematicians while making sense of the mathematics. This article demonstrates how 11-12 year-old students were able to employ all of the proficiency strands while demonstrating a deep understanding of some of the "big ideas" of probabilistic thinking.

  14. A WIDER ROLE FOR TECHNICIANS IN SCIENCE PRACTICAL WORK WITH SCHOOL STUDENTS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G. Harrison

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a study made on the impact of improved deployment of science technicians in the classroom could directly benefit students in practical science investigations. Science technicians are skilled individuals whose understanding of practical work is a valuable resource not being used of in support of students understanding of science. Aspects of practical work and technician support were scrutinised, through information attained from a post-16 student survey to improve understanding about this teaching tool, to establish if it was being used to its full potential within science lessons. Analysis was also made of students’ perceptions of school science. The main outcomes were that the majority of students enjoyed science practical work and felt that science could not be taught without it. Students studying science at pre-university level attained a greater understanding, through participating in relevant practical work, than students who had studied it at earlier, compulsory levels. Students reported that science technicians provide impact on student learning when contact time was the greatest.

  15. Impact of Teacher Perceptions of Their Working Conditions on Elementary School Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, Bonnie W.

    2012-01-01

    Reading and math proficiency is important for all students because education is a leading indicator of personal health and success and national prosperity. Improved student performance has also been linked to teacher satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of teacher perceptions of their working conditions on student…

  16. School Supported Work Placements for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: Why Inclusive Principles/Principals Matter!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Tiffany L.; Bennett, Sheila M.

    2013-01-01

    This article offers considerations for principals and other educators as they seek to provide students with intellectual disabilities (ID) with authentic work placement experiences. Survey and interview data gathered from 20 employers, 7 paraprofessionals (job coaches), a principal, and 21 students with intellectual disabilities provide a…

  17. Language Identities in Students' Writings about Group Work in Their Mathematics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planas, Nuria

    2011-01-01

    In this article, I explore language identities and processes of negotiation concerning parts of these identities as seen by a group of students from a bilingual mathematics classroom. A collection of 10 students' individual writings on the questions "What language do you use during group work in your mathematics class and why?" is…

  18. Taking a Trait Approach to Understanding College Students' Perceptions of Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.; Bogdan, Leah M.; Eidsness, Mary A.; Johnson, Angela N.; Schoo, Meghan E.; Smith, Nicole A.; Thompson, Michelle R.; Zackery, Brooke A.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined whether college students' perceptions of the positive and negative attributes of group work are associated with their tolerance for ambiguity, tolerance for disagreement, conversational sensitivity, and cognitive flexibility. Participants were 192 undergraduate students who completed a series of quantitative measures…

  19. The Development and Initial Validation of the Work Volition Scale-Student Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Diemer, Matthew A.; Jadidian, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The present study sought to develop and validate an instrument to measure work volition, defined as the perceived capacity to make occupational choices despite constraints, among college students. In Study 1, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted with a large and diverse sample of college students, finding a reliable scale with two factors,…

  20. Possible Link between Medical Students' Motivation for Academic Work and Time Engaged in Physical Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Myo Nyein; Somboonwong, Juraiporn; Jaroonvanichkul, Vorapol; Wannakrairot, Pongsak

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise results in an active well-being. It is likely that students' engagement in physical exercise keeps them motivated to perform academic endeavors. This study aimed to assess the relation of time engaged in physical exercise with medical students' motivation for academic work. Prospectively, 296 second-year medical students…

  1. Electronic Learning Courses as a Means to Activate Students' Independent Work in Studying Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurygin, Viktor Yurjevich; Krasnova, Lyubov Alekseevna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are special requirements to the system of higher education, focused not only on imparting knowledge to students, but also on the formation of the continuous need for independent self-education, self-creative approach to getting knowledge throughout their active life. In this regard, the role of students' independent work with its…

  2. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  3. Recognition, Resources, Responsibilities: Using Students' Stories of Family to Renew the South African Social Work Curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozalek, V.G.

    2004-01-01

    This PhD project aims to demonstrate the importance of giving space to local student voices as forms of subjugated knowledges to inform the curriculum on Family and Child Care. It does so by reflecting upon the process and product of critical autobiographical assignments which social work students a

  4. International Students' Experience of Studying and Working at a Northeastern Public University in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwadzo, Moses

    2014-01-01

    This study explores international students' experiences with studying and working at a North Eastern public university. Through phenomenological research approach that utilized face-to-face interview and photo-elicitation techniques, the personal experiences of twenty international students were captured. The findings of this study indicated that…

  5. Group Work Oral Participation: Examining Korean Students' Adjustment Process in a US University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Yin

    2016-01-01

    This study examines, from a sociocultural perspective, the factors that explain why a group of seven Korean students attending an undergraduate business program in a US university are initially labelled as silent participants when first engaging in group work, and how these factors impacted the students' overall adjustment process. Data came from…

  6. "What's in It for Me?" A Study on Students' Accommodation or Resistance during Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslund Frykedal, Karin; Samuelsson, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    This article explores students' accommodation and resistance while participating in group work. The data collected are from fieldwork observations in several classrooms over the course of four terms in different secondary school classes in Sweden, and also from interviews with the students. Through this data analysis, we report that the students…

  7. How Undergraduate Students Use Social Media Technologies to Support Group Project Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAliney, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Technology continues to evolve and become accessible to students in higher education. Concurrently, teamwork has become an important skill in academia and the workplace and students have adopted established technologies to support their learning in both individual and team project work. Given the emergence of social media technologies, I examined…

  8. Introducing Problem-Based Learning to Undergraduate IT Service Management Course: Student Satisfaction and Work Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anicic, Katarina Pažur; Mekovec, Renata

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of problem-based learning (PBL) principles in an undergraduate IT service management course, followed by the results about student satisfaction and work performance. The results indicate the students' general satisfaction with the course implementation, as well as some challenges regarding the…

  9. Linking Classes: Learning Communities, "High" Culture, and the Working Class Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ginger G.; Buczinsky, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    How do you teach the humanities to working class students living in the shadow of a BP oil refinery? Calumet College uses freshman learning communities that link humanities, social justice, and English composition classes to provide a foundation for college success to predominantly first-generation students who are often underprepared for…

  10. Gender Differences in Self-Reported Symptomatology and Working Memory in College Students with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kercood, Suneeta; Lineweaver, Tara T.; Kugler, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in self-reported symptomatology and working memory (visuospatial and auditory) in college students with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Forty-seven college students with ADHD and 44 non-affected control participants completed two self-report questionnaires and six tests…

  11. The Experiences of Working-Class College Students Who Became University Presidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Working-class students enter college lacking necessary capital to predict their academic and personal success making college success less likely than for middle class students (Bufton, 2003; Mack, 2006; Paulsen & St. John, 2002; Rose, 1997; Wegner, 1973). This same social class origin helps to define experiences, provides context for…

  12. Which Type of Work-Study Experience Is More Beneficial?: Perceptions of Taiwanese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng Cheng; Ho, Hsuan-Fu; Chen, Shan-Hua

    2013-01-01

    The rapid increase of tuition and the reduced financial support from government and families have forced many more students to take part-time jobs, however, different jobs might bear different benefits. The main purposes of this study were to identify the major benefits of part-time jobs or work-study experiences performed by college students, and…

  13. What Predicts Health Students' Self-Reported Preparedness to Work in Indigenous Health Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullen, Jonathan; Roberts, Lynne; Hoffman, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Australian undergraduate programs are implementing curriculum aimed at better preparing graduates to work in culturally diverse settings, but there remains uncertainty over the role of extant student attitudes towards Indigenous Australians. To begin to address this, we obtained baseline data on student attitudes upon entry to tertiary education.…

  14. Learning through Experience: The Transition from Doctoral Student to Social Work Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktay, Julianne S.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Fisher, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The researchers conducted an exploratory study using grounded theory qualitative research methods to examine experiences of social work doctoral students as they learned to teach ("N"?=?14). A core category, "learning through experience," representing a basic social process, was identified. The doctoral students experienced…

  15. Intelligent Design: Student Perceptions of Teaching and Learning in Large Social Work Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulding, Nicole Therese

    2010-01-01

    Research into the effects of large classes demonstrates that students are disadvantaged in terms of higher order learning because interactions between teachers and students occur at lower cognitive levels. This has significance for social work education, with its emphasis on the development of critical thinking and problem solving, both higher…

  16. What Do Primary Students Say about School-Based Social Work Programmes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testa, Doris

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on primary school children's experiences of school-based social work programmes. These students, aged between 6 and 11, and drawn from a student population comprising 28 different cultural backgrounds and from low socio-economic backgrounds, participated in a case study that researched a school-based social work…

  17. "All Work and No Play..." Overcommitment and Personality among University and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Hilde; Saksvik, Ingvild B.; Albertsen, Hanne; Berntsen, Linn Synnove; Henriksen, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Students' traits, attitudes and behaviors can be a key factor in how they prepare for entering a career and later adapt to working life. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore associations between personality traits and overcommitment among university and college students. Overcommitment (OC) is a pattern of attitudes, behaviours and…

  18. Secondary School Students' Perceptions of Working Life Skills in Science-Related Careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Anssi; Hartikainen-Ahia, Anu; Hense, Jonathan; Scheersoi, Annette; Keinonen, Tuula

    2017-01-01

    School students demonstrate a lack of interest in choosing science studies and science-related careers. To better understand the underlying reasons, this study aims to examine secondary school students' perceptions of working life skills and how these perceptions relate to the skills of the twenty-first century. The participants in this study were…

  19. "All Work and No Play..." Overcommitment and Personality among University and College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetland, Hilde; Saksvik, Ingvild B.; Albertsen, Hanne; Berntsen, Linn Synnove; Henriksen, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Students' traits, attitudes and behaviors can be a key factor in how they prepare for entering a career and later adapt to working life. Based on this, the aim of this study was to explore associations between personality traits and overcommitment among university and college students. Overcommitment (OC) is a pattern of attitudes, behaviours and…

  20. Integrated Contextual Learning and Food Science Students' Perception of Work Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coorey, Ranil; Firth, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The expectation that universities will produce graduates with high levels of work readiness is now a commonplace in government policies and statements from industry representatives. Meeting the demand requires that students gain industry related experience before graduation. Traditionally students have done so by undertaking extended work…

  1. Increasing International and Domestic Student Interaction through Group Work: A Case Study from the Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruickshank, Ken; Chen, Honglin; Warren, Stan

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the use of group work strategies to increase student interaction and learning. Despite the growing linguistic and cultural diversity in tertiary institutions, there is strong evidence of minimal interaction between "domestic" and "international" students in classrooms and in wider university contexts. This study investigates…

  2. Ethics in the Work Environment: Applied Bioethics in the Hospital for Delta's Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackowski, Linda C.

    In 1979, Delta College, in Michigan, established a bioethics requirement for all nursing students. This paper describes a project to teach one of the required ethics course to local hospitals to observe students while they work and discuss ethical dilemmas as they arose. Introductory sections discuss project rationale and procedures, indicating…

  3. Explaining Comfort with Homosexuality among Social Work Students: The Impact of Demographic, Contextual, and Attitudinal Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Eric; Raiz, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    While recent research explores the determinants of homophobia among college students, only a few studies look at the perceptions of homosexuals among social work students. Unfortunately these rare studies generally present a modest list of predictor variables or small sample sizes. To address this gap, this research explores the ways in which…

  4. Standing Firm on Slippery Slopes: Understanding Ethical Boundaries in Student Affairs Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddell, Debora; Hornak, Anne M.; Ignelzi, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding ethical boundaries in student affairs work can be challenging and difficult to navigate for student affairs professionals. The purpose of this article is to examine the complexities of dual relationships and the ethical issues that may arise. As a result, the authors offer tools to (a) identify various perspectives in resolving…

  5. Student Identity Development in Higher Education: Implications for Graduate Attributes and Work-Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jeannie; Brooker, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background: As universities in many countries engage more directly with industry, the learning emphasis has moved from the student experience to the work-readiness of the graduate. This focus on the student as potential worker is expressed through graduate attributes: particular sets of employability skills developed by institutions and embedded…

  6. A Different Kind of Animal: Liminal Experiences of Social Work Doctoral Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, Gail; Cronley, Courtney; Smith, Kenneth Scott

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that social and academic integration is a vital factor in doctoral student retention. This paper describes findings from a qualitative study which explored the experiences of a cohort of social work doctoral students during the first year in their programme of study. We used the anthropological concept of liminality which…

  7. Listening to Student Views on the Transition from Work Placement to the Final Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Pamela; Novakovic, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses a gap in the literature on student work placements, specifically the challenges of returning to final-year study after a year out. We focus on students in an Accountancy and Finance Department at one UK University who alerted us to the ways in which they struggled during the transition back to full-time study. Their accounts…

  8. Use of global navigation satellite systems for monitoring deformations of water-development works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftan, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, A. V. [JSC Institut Gidropreoekt (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The feasibility of using global radio-navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to improve functional safety of high-liability water-development works - dams at hydroelectric power plants, and, consequently, the safety of the population in the surrounding areas is examined on the basis of analysis of modern publications. Characteristics for determination of displacements and deformations with use of GNSS, and also in a complex with other types of measurements, are compared. It is demonstrated that combined monitoring of deformations of the ground surface of the region, and engineering and technical structures is required to ensure the functional safety of HPP, and reliable metrologic assurance of measurements is also required to obtain actual characteristics of the accuracy and effectiveness of GNSS observations.

  9. LINGUOCULTURAL MONITORING OF THE CROSS-BORDER REGION: ALTAI VIEWED BY CHINESE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrieva, L.M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article studies the peculiarities of linguocultural monitoring of the cross-border region. The studied group consists of Chinese students who receive education in the institutions of higher education in Barnaul. The reactions of the students to the stimulus-words related to the Altai realia are studied in the investigation. The results of the investigation show that most associations are those with positive connotation which can be explained by the desire of the students to appeal to the interlocutor and establish contacts. The results of the associative experiment once again prove the necessity of such investigations for intercultural communication.

  10. College Student Employment and Drinking: A Daily Study of Work Stressors, Alcohol Expectancies, and Alcohol Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Butler, Adam B.; Dodge, Kama D.; Faurote, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the within-person relationships between daily work stressors and alcohol consumption over 14 consecutive days in a sample of 106 employed college students. Using a tension reduction theoretical framework, we predicted that exposure to work stressors would increase alcohol consumption by employed college students, particularly for men and those with stronger daily expectancies about the tension reducing properties of alcohol. After controlling for day of the week, we found that hou...

  11. Foreign students and foreign-born scientists and engineers in the US work force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finn, M.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes some earlier findings regarding the stay rate of foreign students and then addresses two questions about which we have scant information at present. One question is concerning the geographic origin of foreign nationals working in the United States. The second is related to the stay rate of foreign students: What is the emigration rate of foreign-born scientists and engineers once they have become a part of the US work force.

  12. Learning Difficulties and Working Memory Deficits among Primary School Students in Jakarta, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Wiguna, Tjhin; Setyawati WR, Noorhana; Kaligis, Fransiska; Belfer, Myron Lowell

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There are multiple possible etiologies for learning difficulties in children. There is growing evidence that many students identified as having learning difficulties have significant working memory deficits. To determine, in a sample of primary school students in Jakarta, Indonesia, the prevalence of learning difficulties and learning difficulties co-morbid with working memory deficits. Methods: Subjects (N=423) were recruited via proportional random sampling from 27 primary school...

  13. When environments collide : the role of social identity and drinking among working students

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    The normative environment, often represented by college peer and friend interactions, is a strong and consistent predictor of problem drinking in college. However, many students work in addition to attending college and the influence of this other peer group is not well studied. This study sought to address this gap using two objectives : 1) to test social identity as a moderator between descriptive drinking norms and problem drinking among students that work, and 2) to test the relationship ...

  14. How Often Do Students Working in Two-Person Teams Report that Work Was Shared Equitably?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaslassy, Edmond

    2011-01-01

    There are many reasons to assign group projects but determining the grade for each individual working in a group can be problematic. Self and peer assessments of contributions to a group project can be used to adjust individual grades. Most studies of such assessments have considered teams with three to seven members. This study documents the…

  15. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  16. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

  17. Suicide Prevention in Social Work Education: How Prepared Are Social Work Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osteen, Philip J.; Jacobson, Jodi M.; Sharpe, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of suicide suggests social workers will encounter clients at risk for suicide, but research shows social workers receive little to no training on suicide and suicide prevention and feel unprepared to work effectively with clients at risk. Baseline results from a randomized intervention study of the Question, Persuade, and Refer…

  18. Team Teaching in Social Work: Sharing Power with Bachelor of Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Michael Kim; Jerome, Les; Williams, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Team teaching in social work education usually involves sequential lectures delivered by different instructors--relay or tag-team teaching. Truly collaborative or collegial team teaching involves a committed group of diverse instructors interacting together as equals in the classroom. Having more than one teacher in the classroom confounds…

  19. Monitoring the Effectiveness of the Wilson Reading System for Students with Disabilities: One District's Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, Molly S.; Stormont, Melissa; Lembke, Erica S.; Wilson, David J.; Clippard, Dana

    2012-01-01

    The current study detailed the manner in which one school district monitored the effectiveness of the Wilson Reading System for students with disabilities who were experiencing difficulty with reading. Effectiveness was measured by growth in the reading skills that have been documented to be critical for successful readers. Twenty fourth- and…

  20. The Influence of Monitoring Interval on Data Measurement: An Analysis of Step Counts of University Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Sigmundová

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The pedometer is a widely used research tool for measuring the level and extent of physical activity (PA within population subgroups. The sample used in this study was drawn from a population of university students to examine the influence of the monitoring interval and alternate starting days on step-count activity patterns. The study was part of a national project during 2008–2010. Eligible subjects (641 were selected from a sample of 906 university students. The students wore pedometers continuously for 7 days excluding time for sleep and personal hygiene. Steps per day were logged on record sheets by each student. Data gathering spanned an entire week, and the results were sorted by alternate starting days, by activity for an entire week, by activity for only the weekdays of the one-week monitoring interval and for the two-day weekend. The statistical analysis included ANOVA, intra-class correlation (ICC analysis, and regression analysis. The ICC analysis suggested that monitoring starting on Monday (ICC = 0.71; 95%CI (0.61–0.79, Tuesday (ICC = 0.67; 95%CI (0.59–0.75 or Thursday (ICC = 0.68; 95%CI (0.55–0.79 improved reliability. The results of regression analysis also indicated that any starting day except Sunday is satisfactory as long as a minimum of four days of monitoring are used.

  1. Entry to Exit. Identification, Monitoring and Tracking of Handicapped and Disadvantaged Students. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primavera, Joanne M.

    In view of new federal guidelines, a project sought to write a procedure for identifying disadvantaged, handicapped, and/or nontraditional students and set up a monitoring system in the Renton Vocational Technical Institute. A literature review showed no practical tracking system had been published. The identification procedure developed included…

  2. Auto-Graph: Considering the Utility of Student Behaviour Self-Monitoring for Inclusive Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jull, Stephen K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the outcomes of a small-scale exploratory study that examined the utility of a novel computer-supported student behaviour self-monitoring procedure called Auto-Graph. The Auto-Graph procedure is a universal classroom behaviour management strategy for responding to disruptive antisocial behaviours. It was designed to provide…

  3. SkyGlowNet: Multi-Disciplinary Independent Student Research in Environmental Light at Night Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; DeBenedetti, J. C.; Flurchick, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    SkyGlowNet uses Internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) to monitor sky brightness over school sites. The data are used professionally and in STEM outreach to study natural and artificial sources of sky brightness, light pollution, energy efficiency, and environmental and health impacts of artificial night lighting. The iSBM units are owned by participating institutions and managed by faculty or students via proprietary Internet links. Student data are embargoed for two semesters to allow students to analyze data and publish results, then they are moved to a common area where students from different institutions can collaborate. The iSBM units can be set to operate automatically each night. Their data include time, sky brightness, weather conditions, and other related parameters. The data stream can be viewed and processed online or downloaded for study. SkyGlowNet is a unique, multi-disciplinary, real science program aiding research for science and non-science students.

  4. Stigmatizing Clients with Mental Health Conditions: An Assessment of Social Work Student Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Ahmedani, Brian K; Rios-Bedoya, Carlos F; Anthony, James C

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that stigma plays a major role in discouraging clients from participating in mental health treatment. Because social workers provide a significant amount of such services, this study investigates social work student stigma as a function of their willingness to treat clients with alcohol dependence, nicotine dependence, depression, and Alzheimer's disease. Students' held higher levels of stigma toward nicotine dependent clients and less toward those with depression. Personal histories of depression and student age - but not smoking or alcohol use - were predictive of higher stigma levels towards nicotine dependent clients. Implications for social work are discussed.

  5. Identification of the students' critical thinking skills through biochemistry laboratory work report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Yunita Arian Sani; Senam, Laksono, Endang W.

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to (1) identify the critical thinking skills of student based on their ability to set up laboratory work reports, and (2) analyze the implementation of biochemistry laboratory work. The method of quantitative content analysis was employed. Quantitative data were in the form of critical thinking skills through the assessment of students' laboratory work reports and questionnaire data. Hoyo rubric was used to measure critical thinking skills with 10 indicators, namely clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, evidence, reason, depth, breadth, and fairness. The research sample consisted of 105 students (35 male, 70 female) of Mataram University who took a Biochemistry course and 2 lecturers of Biochemistry course. The results showed students' critical thinking skills through laboratory work reports were still weak. Analysis of the questionnaire showed that three indicators become the biggest problems during the laboratory work implementation, namely, lecturers' involved in laboratory work implementation, the integration of laboratory work implementation of learning in the classroom has not been done optimally and laboratory work implementation as an effort to train critical thinking skills is not optimal yet.

  6. Dissecting the journey: nursing student experiences with collaboration during the group work process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Lissa L; Roberge, Ginette D

    2012-11-01

    Since the outset of nursing care, group work processes have evolved into essential components of a nurse's role and responsibilities within the health care system. To reflect this trend, group work is often utilized as a medium to promote professional socialization in undergraduate nursing curricula. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the ways undergraduate nursing students experience collaboration during group work activities. Braun and Clarke's (2006) theoretical thematic analysis combined with Pollio et al.'s (2006) interpretive framework was utilized to capture the students' lived experiences regarding group work. The participants of this study consisted of 96 undergraduate students enrolled in a nursing program in Canada. Written descriptions of their perceptions of their group work practices were analyzed to determine the extent to which these adhere to the collaborative practice essential elements (Jones and Way, 2006). Analysis of the results revealed an unexpected element of collaboration that of the psychosocial element in group work. The results from this study expose advantages and disadvantages of group work processes during group work in nursing education. This type of insight is valuable for educators to prepare nursing students for the complex demands of working with interdisciplinary teams.

  7. A study of the learning styles of undergraduate social work students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Margaret G; Kim, Suk-Hee; Mitchell, Courtney

    2011-05-01

    This study examines the learning styles of students in social work classes at Norfolk State University. Knowledge of learning styles can enhance the ability of faculty to build on student experiences and construct new learning opportunities. Kolb's Learning Style Inventory was administered to identify each student's dominate learning style. The theoretical underpinning is experiential learning, which supports the concept that learning styles are developed through experiences. The results indicated that diverging and accommodating learning styles occurred most often. Students with these styles learn best in classes where activities include lectures, role playing exercises, discussions, opportunities to practice skills, and reflection.

  8. Real-Time Personalized Monitoring to Estimate Occupational Heat Stress in Ambient Assisted Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Pancardo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ambient Assisted Working (AAW is a discipline aiming to provide comfort and safety in the workplace through customization and technology. Workers’ comfort may be compromised in many labor situations, including those depending on environmental conditions, like extremely hot weather conduces to heat stress. Occupational heat stress (OHS happens when a worker is in an uninterrupted physical activity and in a hot environment. OHS can produce strain on the body, which leads to discomfort and eventually to heat illness and even death. Related ISO standards contain methods to estimate OHS and to ensure the safety and health of workers, but they are subjective, impersonal, performed a posteriori and even invasive. This paper focuses on the design and development of real-time personalized monitoring for a more effective and objective estimation of OHS, taking into account the individual user profile, fusing data from environmental and unobtrusive body sensors. Formulas employed in this work were taken from different domains and joined in the method that we propose. It is based on calculations that enable continuous surveillance of physical activity performance in a comfortable and healthy manner. In this proposal, we found that OHS can be estimated by satisfying the following criteria: objective, personalized, in situ, in real time, just in time and in an unobtrusive way. This enables timely notice for workers to make decisions based on objective information to control OHS.

  9. Real-Time Personalized Monitoring to Estimate Occupational Heat Stress in Ambient Assisted Working.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancardo, Pablo; Acosta, Francisco D; Hernández-Nolasco, José Adán; Wister, Miguel A; López-de-Ipiña, Diego

    2015-07-13

    Ambient Assisted Working (AAW) is a discipline aiming to provide comfort and safety in the workplace through customization and technology. Workers' comfort may be compromised in many labor situations, including those depending on environmental conditions, like extremely hot weather conduces to heat stress. Occupational heat stress (OHS) happens when a worker is in an uninterrupted physical activity and in a hot environment. OHS can produce strain on the body, which leads to discomfort and eventually to heat illness and even death. Related ISO standards contain methods to estimate OHS and to ensure the safety and health of workers, but they are subjective, impersonal, performed a posteriori and even invasive. This paper focuses on the design and development of real-time personalized monitoring for a more effective and objective estimation of OHS, taking into account the individual user profile, fusing data from environmental and unobtrusive body sensors. Formulas employed in this work were taken from different domains and joined in the method that we propose. It is based on calculations that enable continuous surveillance of physical activity performance in a comfortable and healthy manner. In this proposal, we found that OHS can be estimated by satisfying the following criteria: objective, personalized, in situ, in real time, just in time and in an unobtrusive way. This enables timely notice for workers to make decisions based on objective information to control OHS.

  10. Automatic scoring of medical students' clinical notes to monitor learning in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spickard, Anderson; Ridinger, Heather; Wrenn, Jesse; O'brien, Nathan; Shpigel, Adam; Wolf, Michael; Stein, Glenn; Denny, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Educators need efficient and effective means to track students' clinical experiences to monitor their progress toward competency goals. To validate an electronic scoring system that rates medical students' clinical notes for relevance to priority topics of the medical school curriculum. The Vanderbilt School of Medicine Core Clinical Curriculum enumerates 25 core clinical problems (CCP) that graduating medical students must understand. Medical students upload clinical notes pertinent to each CCP to a web-based dashboard, but criteria for determining relevance of a note and consistent uploading practices by students are lacking. The Vanderbilt Learning Portfolio (VLP) system automates both tasks by rating relevance for each CCP and uploading the note to the student's electronic dashboard. We validated this electronic scoring system by comparing the relevance of 265 clinical notes written by third year medical students to each of the 25 core patient problems as scored by VLP verses an expert panel of raters. We established the threshold score which yielded 75% positive prediction of relevance for 16 of the 25 clinical problems to expert opinion. Automated scoring of student's clinical notes provides a novel, efficient and standardized means of tracking student's progress toward institutional competency goals.

  11. Staff-Student Collaboration: Student Learning from Working Together to Enhance Educational Practice in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerson, Claire; Jarvis, Joy; Stockwell, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The association of research and teaching, and the roles and responsibilities of students and academic staff and the nature of their interrelationship are important issues in higher education. This article presents six undergraduate student researchers' reports of their learning from collaborating with academic staff to design, undertake and…

  12. Studying and Working: A National Study of Student Finances and Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin, Marcia; James, Richard; Grigg, Gabrielle

    2008-01-01

    A key determinant of the new relationship between students and universities in Australia is the changing nature of higher education funding arrangements and the shift towards "user-pays". In 2007, the Centre for the Study of Higher Education (CSHE) completed a commissioned national study, "Australian University Student Finances…

  13. Sleep patterns, work, and strain among young students in hospitality and tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Serge; Hermann, Bernadette; Muheim, Flavio; Beck, Johannes; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2008-07-01

    Good and sufficient sleep is crucial for a good quality of life. We investigated the associations between sleep patterns, work, and strain among students of hospitality and tourism. 92 students completed psychological and sleep-related questionnaires, and a sleep/work log for one week. Sleeping hours were inversely correlated with working hours. Decreased sleep quality was associated with increased scores of strain, depression and anxiety. Participants with increased working hours were 3.2 times more likely to report heightened insomnia scores than those with lower weekly working hours. Working on weekends was associated with increased strain with family life and peers. In hospitality and tourism, the employees' 'personal costs' for a 24/7 service may be underestimated; unfavourable work schedules are linked with decreased sleep quality, symptoms of depression, anxiety, and with social problems.

  14. A model of psychosocial work environment, stress, and satisfaction among dental students in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schéle, Ingrid A; Hedman, Leif R; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-09-01

    Dental students are often described as stressed. The stress has, among other things, been connected to stressors in their psychosocial environment and inconsistent feedback. The hypothesis of this study was that the psychosocial work environment in dental schools leads to stress and affects the satisfaction of dental students and that tolerance for ambiguity shields students from stress. A web-based survey was sent to the entire Swedish dental student population in clinical training (N=805); the response rate was 40 percent. Structural equation modeling used in the analyses contains four main constructs: psychosocial work environment, tolerance for ambiguity, perceived stress, and student satisfaction (χ(2)=267.437, d.f.=174, pstress and satisfaction: it accounted for almost all of the explained variance in perceived stress for women, while about half of the variance for the men was explained by tolerance for ambiguity. This study concluded that about 40 percent of the total perceived stress of these female dental students was related to their psychosocial work environment. Tolerance for ambiguity shielded men but not women from stress. An improved psychosocial work environment in dental schools would decrease the stress of both male and female dental students.

  15. Induction as an empirical problem: how students generalize during practical work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickman, Per-Olof

    2002-05-01

    We examined how university students made generalizations when making morphological observations of insects. Five groups of two or three students working together were audio recorded. The results were analysed by an approach based on the work of Wittgenstein and on a pragmatic and sociocultural perspective. Results showed that students rarely made generalizations in terms of universal statements and they did not use induction or produced hypotheses for testing in an analytic philosophical sense. The few generalizations they made of this kind were taken from zoological authorities like textbooks or lectures. However, students used induction when in more familiar contexts. Moreover, when generalizations were analysed in the sense of Dewey, it became evident that students are fully capable of making generalizations by transferring meaning from one experience to another. The implications of these results for using induction and hypotheses testing in instruction are discussed.

  16. Work profile and associated health hazards among nursing students at Mansoura University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elwafa, Hala S; Khashaba, Eman O; El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Abd El-Raouf, Samar

    2017-03-30

    Nursing students are increasingly undertaking paid term-time employment to finance their living expenses and studies. The objectives of this study are to estimate its prevalence, factors associated, and possible health hazards. A cross-sectional study was conducted of nursing students using a questionnaire that included sociodemographic and employment data, reasons for working, possible health hazards in the workplace, and perceived effects on academic performance. The prevalence of student paid employment was found to be 23.3%. Being male and belonging to a low social class were independently associated with the likelihood of working while studying. Financial support was the main reason for student employment. Workplace hazards included noise, temperature extremes and psychosocial stressors. Sleep disorders were the most frequent health effects followed by musculoskeletal complaints. Nursing students are at risk from many deleterious health effects which are not covered by occupational health and safety programmes.

  17. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  18. The Impact of Instructor's Group Management Strategies on Students' Attitudes to Group Work and Generic Skill Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Jackling, Beverley; Seelanatha, Lalith

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the influence of two distinct group work management strategies on finance students' attitudes towards group work and their perceptions of generic skill development. Using quantitative and qualitative data, comparisons are made between students who experienced a supportive group work environment and students who experienced an…

  19. The New Approaches to Organization of Students' Individual Work in Foreign Language Learning in Ukraine and Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Halyna; Martynyuk, Olena

    2017-01-01

    Different approaches to organization of students' individual work using information technologies in Ukraine and abroad have been presented in the paper. The authors have analyzed the concept and role of students' individual work in the language learning process. It has been revealed that students' individual work is a rather flexible process and…

  20. Developing a Model using High School Students for Restoring, Monitoring and Conducting Research in Fresh Water Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blueford, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon in eastern San Francisco Bay is one of the largest sag ponds created by the Hayward Fault that has not been destroyed by urbanization. In the 1990’s Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District designed a constructed wetland to naturally filter stormwater before it entered Tyson Lagoon on its way to the San Francisco Bay. The Math Science Nucleus, a non profit organization, manages the facility that incorporates high school students through community service, service learning, and research. Students do a variety of tasks from landscaping to scientific monitoring. Through contracts and grants, we create different levels of competency that the students can participate. Engineers and scientists from the two agencies involved, create tasks that are needed to be complete for successful restoration. Every year the students work on different components of restoration. A group of select student interns (usually juniors and seniors) collects and records the data during the year. Some of these students are part of a paid internship to insure their regular attendance. Every year the students compile and discuss with scientists from the Math Science Nucleus what the data set might mean and how problems can be improved. The data collected helps determine other longer term projects. This presentation will go over the journey of the last 10 years to this very successful program and will outline the steps necessary to maintain a restoration project. It will also outline the different groups that do larger projects (scouts) and liaisons with schools that allow teachers to assign projects at our facility. The validity of the data obtained by students and how we standardize our data collection from soil analysis, water chemistry, monitoring faults, and biological observations will be discussed. This joint agency model of cooperation to provide high school students with a real research opportunity has benefits that allow the program to

  1. Electronic Repositories of Marked Student Work and their Contributions to Formative Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Heinrich

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The educational literature shows that formative assessment is highly conducive to learning. The tasks given to students in formative assessment generally require open-ended responses that can be given, for example, in essay-type format and that are assessed by a human marker. An essential component is the formative feedback provided by the marker that needs to assist the student in recognising knowledge gaps and in formulating steps to close these gaps. The concepts of ‘electronic repositories of marked student work’ introduced in this article suggests an approach to support learning from formative assessment. At the core of this concept lies the realisation that the artefacts submitted by students and assessed by markers are a valuable resource. This resource should not just be used by the submitting students but should be made accessible to future students studying the same concepts. These students can learn from the artefacts and the formative feedback attached to these artefacts. Self- and peer-assessment, important concepts closely linked to formative assessment, can be integrated with the repositories to develop the students’ subject knowledge, to enhance their critical thinking skills and to familiarise them with assessment procedures. This article develops the concepts of electronic repositories of marked student work. Special emphasis is put on reviewing the educational literature on formative assessment and on binding the concepts introduced into the literature findings.

  2. ONBOARD MONITORING OF ENGINE OIL RESOURCE WORKING-OUT RATE IN WHEELED AND CATERPILLAR MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. D. Karpievich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An engine oil is capable reliably and longtime to perform specified functions only in the case when its properties correspond to those thermal, mechanical and chemical impacts to which the oil is subjected in the engine. Compatibility of the engine design, its uprate and oil properties is one of the main conditions for provision of high operational reliability. Type and properties of fuel, quality of an engine oil, engine type, its design, its health, its operational regime and conditions and a number of other factors influence on intensity of oil contamination in the operated engine. Oil quality is deteriorated due to accumulation of incomplete combustion products in it and this process is associated with the engine's health. This leads to reduction of viscosity, deterioration of lubrication ability, troubles in fluid friction mode. Combustion products have rather high amount of aggressive corrosive oxides.Service-life of engine oil prior to its change is determined not only by automobile mileage or tractor operating time but also by the period of time within which this work has been carried out. Corrosion processes are speeding up, protective processes are worsening, oil ageing is accelerating when vehicles have short daily and small mileages. So it is necessary to change oil at least annually.A new method for onboard monitoring of engine oil resource working-out rate in wheeled and caterpillar machines has been developed in the paper. Usage of fuel expended volume by engine while determining engine oil resource working-out rate makes it possible timely to assess a residual resource of the engine oil and also predict the date of its change at any operational period of wheeled and caterpillar machines.

  3. Effect of Group Work on EFL Students' Attitudes and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taqi, Hanan A.; Al-Nouh, Nowreyah A.

    2014-01-01

    The use of group work in classroom activities is a method used for motivating learning and increasing the idea of pleasure through learning. The current study investigates the advantages of group work in exams in the English department, in the College of Basic Education. 40 students in two classes of "The Introduction of Phonetics and…

  4. The Preparation of Pre-Service Student Teachers' Competence to Work in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Sylvia Y. F.; Cheng, May M. H.; Wong, Angel K. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Competence to work in schools is an important dimension of professional competence, although it is often a neglected dimension of teacher development. This article reports a qualitative study that examined student teachers' learning experiences in initial teacher education (ITE) in relation to competence to work in schools. In-depth interviews…

  5. Understanding Accounting as a Career: An Immersion Work Experience for Students Making Career Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Dianne; Murphy, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a project which is designed to increase the participation of high school students in accounting work experience placements. The focus of the paper is on an Australian-based project which overcomes the identified barriers to offering high school accounting work experience placements with a resultant increase in the number and…

  6. A Demands-Resources Model of Work Pressure in IT Student Task Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, E. Vance; Sheetz, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an initial test of the group task demands-resources (GTD-R) model of group task performance among IT students. We theorize that demands and resources in group work influence formation of perceived group work pressure (GWP) and that heightened levels of GWP inhibit group task performance. A prior study identified 11 factors…

  7. Happiness, Work Engagement, and Perception of Organizational Support of Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempfling, Michele Sheets

    2015-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the work engagement, subjective happiness, or perceived organizational support of student affairs professionals. In this study, 299 professionals in the American College Personnel Association were surveyed utilizing the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Subjective Happiness Scale, and the Survey of Perceived…

  8. Adapting Objective Structured Clinical Examinations to Assess Social Work Students' Performance and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogo, Marion; Regehr, Cheryl; Logie, Carmen; Katz, Ellen; Mylopoulos, Maria; Regehr, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    The development of standardized, valid, and reliable methods for assessment of students' practice competence continues to be a challenge for social work educators. In this study, the Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), originally used in medicine to assess performance through simulated interviews, was adapted for social work to…

  9. Academic Performance of College Students: Influence of Time Spent Studying and Working

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonis, Sarath A.; Hudson, Gail I.

    2006-01-01

    Today's college students are less prepared for college-level work than their predecessors. Once they get to college, they tend to spend fewer hours studying while spending more hours working, some even full time (D. T. Smart, C. A. Kelley, & J. S. Conant, 1999). In this study, the authors examined the effect of both time spent studying and time…

  10. Implementing Work Systems across the School Day: Increasing Engagement in Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Kara; Reynolds, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Work systems provide visual information and organization for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and assist in increasing on-task behavior and productivity while simultaneously decreasing adult prompting. Work systems are a core component of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication-Handicapped Children…

  11. Crossing Borders: Evaluating a Work Integrated Learning Project Involving Australian and Vietnamese Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Bernadette; Vo-Tran, Huan; Pittayachawan, Siddhi; Reynolds, Sue

    2012-01-01

    The value of work integrated learning (WIL) is well-established in the education of information management (IM) professionals. Adding value to WIL through cross-cultural or cross-disciplinary experiences is considered in this article. Using online communication, simulation activities, and onsite work, students from RMIT Melbourne and RMIT Ho Chi…

  12. Poverty and Knowing: Exploring Epistemological Development in Welfare-to-Work Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Olson, Avery B.

    2016-01-01

    Through a one year-long, qualitative study of welfare-to-work students, this study investigates the developing epistemologies of women enrolled in a community college CalWORKs program. We investigate how poverty as a macro-environment and the community college as a micro-environment influence participants' epistemological development. Findings…

  13. The Study of Relations between Life Satisfaction, Burnout, Work Engagement and Hopelessness of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çapri, Burhan; Gündüz, Bülent; Akbay, Sinem Evin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to determine the relations between high school students' life satisfaction, burnout, work engagement and hopelessness scores and examine the contribution of their burnout, work engagement and hopelessness scores in the prediction of their life satisfaction scores. The Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Maslach…

  14. Organization of Individual Work of Students under Competence-Oriented Approach to Education in Higher School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ualiyeva, Nazym T.; Murzalinova, Alma Z.

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to identify the essence, content and specifics of organization of individual work of higher school students under competence-oriented approach. The research methodology is related to the choice of competence-oriented approach to ensure transformation of individual work into individual activity in…

  15. Poverty and Knowing: Exploring Epistemological Development in Welfare-to-Work Community College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Jane Elizabeth; Olson, Avery B.

    2016-01-01

    Through a one year-long, qualitative study of welfare-to-work students, this study investigates the developing epistemologies of women enrolled in a community college CalWORKs program. We investigate how poverty as a macro-environment and the community college as a micro-environment influence participants' epistemological development. Findings…

  16. An Examination of the Role of Values in Working-Class Students' Career Decision-Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbank, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The literature suggests that members of the working class value informal ("hot") information rather than formal ("cold") information. They are also said to lack a future orientation; have a fatalistic (and pessimistic) attitude to life; and have low aspirations. These values should influence the way students from working-class backgrounds approach…

  17. Personal History of Psychosocial Trauma in the Early Life of Social Work and Business Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Phyllis N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study found the incidence of psychological trauma in the families of 116 social work master's degree students to be significantly higher than in 46 counterparts in a nonhelping profession (master's-level business administration). Implications are seen for effective social work practice, education, and professional responsibility. (Author/MSE)

  18. Social Work Students' Experiences and Training Needs after the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Berlin, Scott; Harold, Rena D.; Heyman, Janna

    2007-01-01

    The terrorist attacks of 9/11/01 created a major life disruption for citizens near and far from New York. This study describes field work experiences of social work students in two different geographic locations inside and outside of New York in the six months after 9/11 in terms of their: (1) reports of client problems, (2) receipt of special…

  19. Teaching Note--Using TED Talks in the Social Work Classroom: Encouraging Student Engagement and Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Melody Aye; Klemm, Terri

    2016-01-01

    Focusing on TED Talks (online videos) as a resource for social work educators, this teaching note shares our ideas regarding the use of the online videos as an avenue for reaching students and encouraging discussions in the social work classroom. The article first explores the TED platform and then discusses using TED as a teaching tool. Finally,…

  20. Happiness, Work Engagement, and Perception of Organizational Support of Student Affairs Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempfling, Michele Sheets

    2015-01-01

    Little research has been conducted on the work engagement, subjective happiness, or perceived organizational support of student affairs professionals. In this study, 299 professionals in the American College Personnel Association were surveyed utilizing the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, the Subjective Happiness Scale, and the Survey of Perceived…